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Sample records for neutron-gamma fluence influence

  1. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. PMID:21550259

  2. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  3. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  4. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence may be attributed to less "free" H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  5. Influence of fluence rate on radiation-induced mechanical property changes in reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L. )

    1990-03-01

    This report describes a set of experiments undertaken using a 2 MW test reactor, the UBR, to qualify the significance of fluence rate to the extent of embrittlement produced in reactor pressure vessel steels at their service temperature. The test materials included two reference plates (A 302-B, A 533-B steel) and two submerged arc weld deposits (Linde 80, Linde 0091 welding fluxes). Charpy-V (C{sub v}), tension and 0.5T-CT compact specimens were employed for notch ductility, strength and fracture toughness (J-R curve) determinations, respectively. Target fluence rates were 8 {times} 10{sup 10}, 6 {times} 10{sup 11} and 9 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} {minus}s{sup {minus}1}. Specimen fluences ranged from 0.5 to 3.8 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The data describe a fluence-rate effect which may extend to power reactor surveillance as well as test reactor facilities now in use. The dependence of embrittlement sensitivity on fluence rate appears to differ for plate and weld deposit materials. Relatively good agreement in fluence-rate effects definition was observed among the three test methods. 52 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. MAPLE-deposited PFO films: influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on the film emission and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Anni, M.; Cesaria, M.; Lattante, S.; Leggieri, G.; Leo, C.; Martino, M.; Perulli, A.; Resta, V.

    2015-06-01

    The Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique is emerging as an alternative route to the conventional methods for depositing organic materials, although the MAPLE-deposited films very often present high surface roughness and characteristic morphological features. Films of the blue-emitting polymer, poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)—PFO, have been deposited by MAPLE to investigate the influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on both their topography and emission properties. The laser fluence has been changed from 150 up to 450 mJ/cm2, while laser repetition rates of 2 and 10 Hz have been considered. The interplay/relationship between the topography and the emission properties of the MAPLE-deposited films has been studied by confocal microscopy, photoluminescence spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. It has been found that under high irradiation (fluence of 450 mJ/cm2) conditions, the sample surface is characterized by bubbles presenting the intrinsic PFO blue emission. Instead, while improvements in the film morphology can be observed for lowered fluence and laser repetition rate, green emission becomes predominant in such conditions. Such result is very interesting to better understand the MAPLE ablation mechanism, which is discussed in this study.

  7. The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: Gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Axell, Kåre; Avdic, Senada; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders; Allard, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with the inclusion of general reactions and corresponding intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-alpha formulas.

  8. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-09-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  9. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, A. J.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCR's are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCR's were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 exp 13 pn/sq. cm, and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time.

  10. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, A. J.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCR's are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCR's were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 exp 13 n/sq. cm, and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time.

  11. The influence of laser wavelength and fluence on palladium nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinil; Amaranatha Reddy, D.; Ma, Rory; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Homogeneous spherical palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in deionized water, without the addition of any external chemical surfactant. The influence of laser wavelength (355, 532, and 1064 nm) and fluence (8.92, 12.74, and 19.90 J/cm2) on nucleation, growth, and aggregation of Pd nanoparticles were systematically studied. Microstructural and optical properties of the obtained nanoparticles were studied by field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy. FETEM micrographs indicate that the average nanocrystallite sizes are relatively low (3-6 nm) and homogeneous for the particles synthesized at the laser wavelengths of 355 and 532 nm. However, at a laser wavelength of 1064 nm, the average nanocrystallite size is relatively large and inhomogeneous in nature. Moreover, we observe that the mean diameter and production rate of particles increases with an increase in laser fluence. The selected area electron diffraction patterns obtained from isolated Pd nanoparticles show the characteristic diffused electron diffraction rings of polycrystalline materials with a face-centered cubic structure. Absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanoparticle solution shows a broad absorption band, which corresponds to a typical inter-band transition of a metallic system, indicating the production of pure palladium nanoparticles. The present work provides new insights into the effect of laser wavelength and fluence on the control of size and aggregation of palladium nanoparticles in the liquid medium.

  12. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  13. Numerical study of the influence of picosecond laser spot size on ablated depth and threshold fluence of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming; Lauer, Benjamin; Neuenschwander, Beat; Romano, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond laser systems have been widely used in industrial microprocessing applications since they are a cost-effective tool to achieve high throughput. To better understand the ablation process, firstly the dependence of the ablation depth and the threshold fluence on the laser spot size were determined experimentally by performing ablation with a 10ps pulsed laser system. Further, a 2D axisymmetric model was established to demonstrate the possible mechanism of the phenomena. Three sets of spot radii, namely 15.5μm, 31.5μm and 49.6μm, respectively with equal laser peak fluences ranging from 0.6J/cm2 to 4.5J/cm2 were applied on copper. It was found that the laser ablation depth increases while the threshold fluence decreases with decreasing spot size at identical peak fluence. A 2D axisymmetric thermomechanical model was developed to qualitatively illustrate the mechanism behind these phenomena. The numerical results of the position where the tensile stress exceed to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of copper show the same trend as the experimental ones. The longitudinal tensile stress was seen to play a more crucial role than the radial tensile/compressive stress on laser ablation process. The impact of the thermal stress on the ablation depth and threshold fluence is derived from the lattice temperature gradient along the surface of the material, leading to spallation and possible modifications of the mechanical properties already at lower laser peak fluences. This is elucidated numerically and analytically. The deviation of the experimental results from the simulation might be attributed to the fact that this simulation model is static. Nevertheless, at low laser fluences, this static approach can provide good explanations of the cold ablation with ultrashort pulsed laser. The limitation of this model is also illustrated.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  15. Interactions between endothelial cells and T cells modulate responses to mixed neutron/gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Cary, Lynnette H; Noutai, Daniel; Salber, Rudolph E; Williams, Margaret S; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Whitnall, Mark H

    2014-06-01

    Detonation of an improvised nuclear device near a population center would cause significant casualties from the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) due to exposure to mixed neutron/gamma fields (MF). The pathophysiology of ARS involves inflammation, microvascular damage and alterations in immune function. Interactions between endothelial cells (EC) and hematopoietic cells are important not only for regulating immune cell traffic and function, but also for providing the microenvironment that controls survival, differentiation and migration of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in blood-forming tissues. Endothelial cells/leukocyte interactions also influence tumor progression and the results of anticancer therapies. In this study, we hypothesized that irradiation of endothelial cells would modulate their effects on hematopoietic cells and vice versa. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and immortalized T lymphocytes (Jurkat cells) were cultured individually and in co-culture after exposure to mixed fields. Effects of nonirradiated cells were compared to effects of irradiated cells and alterations in signaling pathways were determined. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and p44/42 (ERK1/2) in HUVEC exhibited higher levels of phosphorylated protein after exposure to mixed field radiation. IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and angiopoietin 2 (ANG2) protein expression were upregulated in HUVEC by exposure to mixed field radiation. PCR arrays using HUVEC mRNA revealed alterations in gene expression after exposure to mixed fields and/or co-culture with Jurkat cells. The presence of HUVEC also influenced the function of Jurkat cells. Nonirradiated Jurkat cells showed an increase in proliferation when co-cultured with nonirradiated HUVEC, and a decrease in proliferation when co-cultured with irradiated HUVEC. Additionally, nonirradiated Jurkat cells incubated in media from irradiated HUVEC exhibited upregulation of activated

  16. MCNP capabilities at the dawn of the 21st century: Neutron-gamma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; McKinney, G.W.

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear well-logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000.This paper described the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss the future directions for MCNP code development, including rewriting the code in Fortran 90.

  17. MCNP Capabilities at the Dawn of the 21st Century: Neutron-Gamma Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcow, E. C.; McKinney, G. W.; Booth, T. E.; Briesmeister, J. F.; Cox, L. J.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J. S.; Mosteller, R. D.; Prael, R. E.; Sood, A.; White, S. W.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear oil-well logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C [1], was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss some of the future directions for MCNP code development.

  18. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  19. Determination of the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Nievaart, Sander; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge of gamma-ray spectrum highly affects the accuracy of the correspondingly derived gamma-ray dose and the correctness of calculated neutron dose in the neutron/gamma-ray mixed field dosimetry when using the paired ionization chambers technique. It is of our interest to develop a method to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field. The current type detector, Mg(Ar) ionization chamber with 6 different thick caps incorporated with the unfolding technique, was used to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in the THOR epithermal neutron beam, which contains intense neutrons and gamma rays. The applied caps had nominal thicknesses from 1 to 6 mm. Detector response functions of the applied Mg(Ar) chamber with different caps were calculated using MCNP5 with a validated chamber model. The spectrum unfolding process was performed using the well-known SAND-II algorithm. The unfolded result was found much softer than the originally calculated spectrum at the design stage. A large portion of low energy continuum was shown in the adjusted spectrum. This work gave us a much deeper insight into the THOR epithermal neutron beam and also showed a way to determine the gamma-ray spectrum.

  20. Investigation about decoupling capacitors of PMT voltage divider effects on neutron-gamma discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Divani, Nazila Firoozabadi, Mohammad M.; Bayat, Esmail

    2014-11-24

    Scintillators are almost used in any nuclear laboratory. These detectors combine of scintillation materials, PMT and a voltage divider. Voltage dividers are different in resistive ladder design. But the effect of decoupling capacitors and damping resistors haven’t discussed yet. In this paper at first a good equilibrium circuit designed for PMT, and it was used for investigating about capacitors and resistors in much manner. Results show that decoupling capacitors have great effect on PMT output pulses. In this research, it was tried to investigate the effect of Capacitor’s value and places on PMT voltage divider in Neutron-Gamma discrimination capability. Therefore, the voltage divider circuit for R329-02 Hamamatsu PMT was made and Zero Cross method used for neutron-gamma discrimination. The neutron source was a 20Ci Am-Be. Anode and Dynode pulses and discrimination spectrum were saved. The results showed that the pulse height and discrimination quality change with the value and setting of capacitors.

  1. Influence of the per pulse laser fluence on the optical properties of carbon nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of solids in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Contreras, Delfino; Camacho-López, Marco; Camacho-López, Miguel A.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Rodríguez-Beltrán, René I.; Mayorga-Rojas, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present experimental results on the optical characterization of carbon-nanoparticles (CNPs) synthesized by the laser ablation of solids in liquids technique (LASL). A pulsed Nd-YAG laser, a graphite disk and acetone were used in the laser ablation experiments. The per pulse laser fluence was varied, while all the other irradiation parameters (irradiation time, repetition rate, etc.) were kept constant. Both the graphite target and the obtained CNPs were characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy. The colloidal solutions were characterized by UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. Additionally, the CNPs were also characterized by TEM and HRTEM. Our results show that spherical nanoparticles in the range of 4-20 nm in diameter were obtained. UV-vis and PL results for the obtained CNPs colloidal solutions showed that the optical absorption and PL intensity are dependent on the per pulse laser fluence. We also found that the PL spectral emission of the CNPs can be tuned from blue to yellow by varying the excitation wavelength.

  2. Fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, J.; Liu, Y.; Rainey, S.; Roach, G.; Sowerby, B.; Stevens, R.; Tickner, J.

    2006-05-01

    There is a worldwide need for efficient inspection of cargo containers at airports, seaports and road border crossings. The main objectives are the detection of contraband such as illicit drugs, explosives and weapons. Due to the large volume of cargo passing through Australia's airports every day, it is critical that any scanning system should be capable of working on unpacked or consolidated cargo, taking at most 1-2 minutes per container. CSIRO has developed a fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography (FNGR) method for the rapid screening of air freight. By combining radiographs obtained using 14 MeV neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays, high resolution images showing both density and material composition are obtained. A near full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory. With the support of the Australian Customs Service, a full-scale scanner has recently been installed and commissioned at Brisbane International Airport.

  3. Neutron-gamma discrimination based on the support vector machine method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xunzhen; Zhu, Jingjun; Lin, ShinTed; Wang, Li; Xing, Haoyang; Zhang, Caixun; Xia, Yuxi; Liu, Shukui; Yue, Qian; Wei, Weiwei; Du, Qiang; Tang, Changjian

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the combination of the support vector machine (SVM) method with the moment analysis method (MAM) is proposed and utilized to perform neutron/gamma (n/γ) discrimination of the pulses from an organic liquid scintillator (OLS). Neutron and gamma events, which can be firmly separated on the scatter plot drawn by the charge comparison method (CCM), are detected to form the training data set and the test data set for the SVM, and the MAM is used to create the feature vectors for individual events in the data sets. Compared to the traditional methods, such as CCM, the proposed method can not only discriminate the neutron and gamma signals, even at lower energy levels, but also provide the corresponding classification accuracy for each event, which is useful in validating the discrimination. Meanwhile, the proposed method can also offer a predication of the classification for the under-energy-limit events.

  4. Fast neutron-gamma discrimination on neutron emission profile measurement on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Shinohara, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Baba, M.; Isobe, M.

    2010-10-15

    A digital signal processing (DSP) system is applied to stilbene scintillation detectors of the multichannel neutron emission profile monitor in JT-60U. Automatic analysis of the neutron-{gamma} pulse shape discrimination is a key issue to diminish the processing time in the DSP system, and it has been applied using the two-dimensional (2D) map. Linear discriminant function is used to determine the dividing line between neutron events and {gamma}-ray events on a 2D map. In order to verify the validity of the dividing line determination, the pulse shape discrimination quality is evaluated. As a result, the {gamma}-ray contamination in most of the beam heating phase was negligible compared with the statistical error with 10 ms time resolution.

  5. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  6. Novel deployment of elpasolites as a dual neutron / gamma- ray directional detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckes, Amber

    (FOM) of 2.3. An array of three CLYC detectors was assembled for the purpose of directional neutron / gamma-ray detection. The intrinsic peak efficiency of CLYC detectors was evaluated. The three-CLYC detector array was deployed for directional measurements with a single gamma-ray 137Cs source, two gamma-ray sources of 137Cs and 60Co isotopes and a thermal neutron source designed using a 239PuBe neutron source supplied with a polyethylene moderator. Measurements were carried out using sources located in the longitude and latitude planes over the angles from 0° to 360°. The measured data were processed through a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm providing a possible direction for which the radioactive source in each case was positioned. The estimated directions were close if not exact matches for the actual directions to the radioactive source. The largest discrepancy in direction produced by the algorithm was approximately 11%. However, it was hypothesized that this percent error can be decreased by homogenizing the directional detection system to consist of scintillators of the same size and quality, identical photomultiplier tubes and identical aluminum housings. The feasibility of this hypothesis to decrease the percent error was confirmed by the zero percent error achieved in the directional measurements produced in the computational study utilizing a homogenous directional detection system. The results of computational and experimental studies completed within this research project provide means to propose the array of three CLYC scintillators as an efficient dual neutron / gamma-ray directional detector.

  7. Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  8. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 6Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Cai -Lin; Riedel, Richard A.

    2016-01-14

    A 6Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at SNS. Traditional pulse-height analysis (PHA) for neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 104. The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, five digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms from PMTs were proposed using: i). pulse-amplitude histogram; ii). power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse amplitude; iii). two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from Wiener filter; iv). an effective amplitude (m)more » obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square (LMS) filter; and v). a cross-correlation (CC) coefficient between an individual waveform and a reference. The NGD ratios can be 1-102 times those from traditional PHA method. A brighter scintillator GS2 has better NGD ratio than GS20, but lower neutron detection efficiency. The ultimate NGD ratio is related to the ambient, high-energy background events. Moreover, our results indicate the NGD capability of neutron Anger cameras can be improved using digital signal analysis methods and brighter neutron scintillators.« less

  9. ESR response of CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeters to a mixed neutron-gamma field: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hoseininaveh, M; Ranjbar, A H

    2015-11-01

    Clear fused quartz (CFQ) may be considered a suitable material for electron and gamma dose measurements using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Research has been ongoing to optimize the neutron capture therapy (NCT) mechanism and its effects in cancer treatment. Neutron sources of the mixed neutron-gamma field are a challenge for this treatment method. A reliable dosimetric measurement and treatment should be able to determine various components of this mixed field. In this study, the ESR response of cylindrical and spherical shells of CFQ dosimeters, filled with Gd2O3, when exposed to a thermal neutron beam, has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. In order to maximize the ESR response, the dimensions of the outer and inner parts of the samples have been chosen as variables, and the amount of energy deposited in the samples has been determined. The optimum size of the samples has been determined, and the capability of discriminating gamma and neutron dose in a mixed neutron-gamma field regarding the CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeter has also been widely studied. PMID:26342935

  10. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 6Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. L.; Riedel, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    A 6Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at Spallation Neutron Source. Traditional Pulse-Height Analysis (PHA) for Neutron-Gamma Discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 104. The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, six digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms acquired from photomultiplier tubes were proposed using (i) charge integration, (ii) pulse-amplitude histograms, (iii) power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse-amplitude, (iv) two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from a Wiener filter, (v) an effective amplitude (m) obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square filter, and (vi) a cross-correlation coefficient between individual and reference waveforms. The NGD ratios are about 70 times those from the traditional PHA method. Our results indicate the NGD capabilities of neutron Anger cameras based on GS20 scintillators can be significantly improved with digital signal analysis methods.

  11. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a (6)Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Riedel, R A

    2016-01-01

    A (6)Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at Spallation Neutron Source. Traditional Pulse-Height Analysis (PHA) for Neutron-Gamma Discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 10(4). The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, six digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms acquired from photomultiplier tubes were proposed using (i) charge integration, (ii) pulse-amplitude histograms, (iii) power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse-amplitude, (iv) two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from a Wiener filter, (v) an effective amplitude (m) obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square filter, and (vi) a cross-correlation coefficient between individual and reference waveforms. The NGD ratios are about 70 times those from the traditional PHA method. Our results indicate the NGD capabilities of neutron Anger cameras based on GS20 scintillators can be significantly improved with digital signal analysis methods. PMID:26827314

  12. Development of neutron/gamma generators and a polymer semiconductor detector for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael Joseph

    Instrumentation development is essential to the advancement and success of homeland security systems. Active interrogation techniques that scan luggage and cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials or explosives hold great potential in halting further terrorist attacks. The development of more economical, compact and efficient source and radiation detection devices will facilitate scanning of all containers and luggage while maintaining high-throughput and low-false alarms Innovative ion sources were developed for two novel, specialized neutron generating devices and initial generator tests were performed. In addition, a low-energy acceleration gamma generator was developed and its performance characterized. Finally, an organic semiconductor was investigated for direct fast neutron detection. A main part of the thesis work was the development of ion sources, crucial components of the neutron/gamma generator development. The use of an externally-driven radio-frequency antenna allows the ion source to generate high beam currents with high, mono-atomic species fractions while maintaining low operating pressures, advantageous parameters for neutron generators. A dual "S" shaped induction antenna was developed to satisfy the high current and large extraction area requirements of the high-intensity neutron generator. The dual antenna arrangement generated a suitable current density of 28 mA/cm2 at practical RF power levels. The stringent requirements of the Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy neutron generator necessitated the development of a specialized ten window ion source of toroidal shape with a narrow neutron production target at its center. An innovative ten antenna arrangement with parallel capacitors was developed for driving the multi-antenna arrangement and uniform coupling of RF power to all ten antennas was achieved. To address the desire for low-impact, low-radiation dose active interrogation systems, research was performed on mono

  13. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10(exp 13) n/sq cm and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are presented. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  14. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10{sup 13} n/cm {sup 2} and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are given in this paper. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  15. The effect of local fluence on the micropatterning of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils through proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Papaléo, R. M.; Dias, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of ion fluence on the development of microstructures produced by 2.2 MeV H+ impinging on 12-μm-thick poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET, Mylar®) foils. Several lines of 1 × 100 pixels corresponding to approximately 2.5 × 101.5 µm2 were patterned on PET foils using different ion fluences (from 1012 to 1017 H+/cm2) and etching times (from 1 to 60 min). We observe the presence of three different behaviors according to the ion fluence. Long etching times are necessary to open the structure in the low fluence regime, while moderate fluences require shorter etching times. In the high fluence regime, a more complex scenario emerges where short etching times lead to structures either fully or partially developed.

  16. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  17. Mobile neutron/gamma waste assay system for characterization of waste containing transuranics, uranium, and fission/activation products

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.R.; Haggard, D.; Lemons, C.

    1994-12-31

    A new integrated neutron/gamma assay system has been built for measuring 55-gallon drums at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The system is unique because it allows simultaneous measurement of neutrons and gamma-rays. This technique also allows measurement of transuranics (TRU), uranium, and fission/activation products, screening for shielded Special Nuclear Material prior to disposal, and critically determinations prior to transportation. The new system is positioned on a platform with rollers and installed inside a trailer or large van to allow transportation of the system to the waste site instead of movement of the drums to the scanner. The ability to move the system to the waste drums is particularly useful for drum retrieval programs common to all DOE sites and minimizes transportation problems on the site. For longer campaigns, the system can be moved into a facility. The mobile system consists of two separate subsystems: a passive Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and a {open_quotes}clam-shell{close_quotes} passive neutron counter. The SGS with high purity germanium detector and {sup 75}Se transmission source simultaneously scan the height of the drum allowing identification of unshieled {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} in the drum or segments where the matrix is too dense for the transmission source to penetrate. Dense segments can flag shielding material that could be used to hide plutonium or uranium during the gamma analysis. The passive nuetron counter with JSR-12N Neutron Coincidence Analyzer measures the coincident neutrons from the spontaneous fission of even isotopes of plutonium. Because high-density shielding produces minimal absorption of neutrons, compared to gamma rays, the passive neutron portion of the system can detect shielded SNM. Measurements to evaluate the performance of the system are still underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  18. Pulsed-Neutron-Gamma (PNG) saturation monitoring at the Ketzin pilot site considering displacement and evaporation/precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Gunther; Henninges, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in saline aquifers is a promising option to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and to mitigate global climate change. During the proposed CO2 injection process, application of suitable techniques for monitoring of the induced changes in the subsurface is required. Existing models for the spreading of the CO2, as well as mixing of the different fluids associated with saturation changes or resulting issues from mutual solubility between brine and CO2, need to be checked. For well logging in cased boreholes, which would be the standard situation encountered under the given conditions, only a limited number of techniques like pulsed neutron-gamma (PNG) logging are applicable. The PNG technique uses controlled neutron bursts, which interact with the nuclei of the surrounding borehole and formation. Due to the collision with these neutrons, atoms from the surrounding environment emit gamma rays. The main PNG derived parameter is the capture cross section (Σ) which is derived from the decline of gamma rays with time from neutron capture processes. The high Σ contrast between brine and CO2 results in a high sensitivity to evaluate saturation changes. This makes PNG monitoring favourable for saturation profiling especially in time-lapse mode. Previously, the conventional PNG saturation model based on a displacement process has been used for PNG interpretation in different CO2 storage projects in saline aquifers. But in addition to the displacement process, the mutual solubility between brine and CO2 adds further complex processes like evaporation and salt precipitation, which are not considered in PNG saturation models. These evaporation and precipitation processes are relevant in the vicinity of an injection well, where dry CO2 enters the reservoir. The Σ brine value depends strongly on the brine salinity e.g. its chlorine content which makes PNG measurements suitable for evaporation and salt precipitation

  19. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  20. LOWTHRM: a thermal fluence code. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.R.

    1980-03-01

    A Fortran computer program LOWTERM is described for calculating nuclear thermal fluence incident upon a target area. Atmospheric transmissivity factors in the spectral region 0.25 to 28.5 microns are determined through use of the LOWTRAN5 computer code. The program provides a choice of six model atmospheres covering seasonal and latitudinal variations from sea level to 100 km, eight haze models, and accounts for molecular absorption, molecular scattering, and aerosol extinction. Atmospheric refraction, earth curvature effects, thermal scattering, and thermal ground reflection contributions are included.

  1. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  2. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  3. Basis for equivalent fluence concept in space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The equivalent fluence concept is defined, and its use and potential problems are noted. Silicon and GaAs solar cells are compared in a radiation environment. The analysis indicates that valid equivalent fluence values may be easier to obtain in GaAs than in silicon.

  4. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  5. Reactor vessel fluence evaluation and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The methodology currently in use for the estimation of the fast neutron fluence to the pressure vessel (inside surface and reactor cavity) is based on discrete ordinates two-dimensional codes such as DOT or its updated version DORT. This methodology assumes a P[sub 3] scattering, an S[sub 8] quadrature approximation, and cross sections based on the ENDF/B-IV file. Associated one-dimensional codes are often used for the cross-section collapsing portion of the calculation. The neutron spectrum at the pressure vessel location of interest is estimated assuming a [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, or [sup 241]Pu source spectrum or an appropriate combination thereof. The two-dimensional codes and associated methodologies were benchmarked in the early eighties using the results of the PCA and PSF Oak Ridge National Laboratory reactor experiments. The benchmarking experiments were estimated to provide an uncertainty of [approx]10%. The results of the calculations applied to a reactor were estimated to have an uncertainty of [approx]20%. This level of uncertainty was assumed in the estimation of the margin term defined in 10CFR50.61

  6. NOTE: Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph K.; Clews, Luke; Gordon, J. James; Wang, Song; Greer, Peter B.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm × 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source.

  7. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  8. HIGH FLUENCE NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to research the basic plasma physics necessary to develop a high fluence neutron source based on the inertial electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma. An intense neutron source directly addresses the capability to characterize nuclear materials under difficult measurem...

  9. System and Method for Determining Fluence of a Substance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for measuring a fluence of gas are disclosed. The system has a first light detector capable of outputting an electrical signal based on an amount of light received. A barrier is positionable adjacent the first light detector and is susceptible to a change in dimension from the fluence of the gas. The barrier permits a portion of light from being received by the first light detector. The change in the dimension of the barrier changes the electrical signal output from the first light detector. A second light detector is positionable to receive light representative of the first light detector without the barrier. The system and method have broad application to detect fluence of gas that may cause erosion chemical reaction causing erosive deterioration. One application is in low orbit Earth for detecting the fluence of atomic oxygen.

  10. Anisotropy of the neutron fluence from a plasma focus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Shomo, L. P.; Kim, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fluence of neutrons from a plasma focus was measured by gamma spectrometry of an activated silver target. This method results in a significant increase in accuracy over the beta-counting method. Multiple detectors were used in order to measure the anisotropy of the fluence of neutrons. The fluence was found to be concentrated in a cone with a half-angle of 30 deg about the axis, and to drop off rapidly outside of this cone; the anisotropy was found to depend upon the total yield of neutrons. This dependence was strongest on the axis. Neither the axial concentration of the fluence of neutrons nor its dependence on the total yield of neutrons is explained by any of the currently proposed models. Some other explanations, including the possibility of an axially distributed source, are considered.

  11. Effects of fluence rate on cytoxicity during photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Theresa M.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    1997-05-01

    Production of 1O2 during PDT may be limited as a consequence of tissue oxygen depletion by the photodynamic process. This may in turn limit cytotoxicity during PDT. One possible way of controlling oxygen consumption during treatment is through modification of fluence rate. We have studied the impact of fluence rate on tumor oxygenation and direct PDT cytotoxicity using the RIF murine tumor and the photosensitizer Photofrin. Both fluence rates caused an acute decrease in tumor pO2 to severely hypoxic levels. With 150 mW/cm2 light median pO2 remained low during prolonged exposure, while with 30 mW/cm2 light median pO2 values recovered to above control levels. When tumors treated with 135 J/cm2 at each fluence rate were tested for cell survival in a clonogenic assay, 30 mW/cm2 significantly decreased both cell clonogenicity and plating efficiency compared to light-only controls. Slight but insignificant decreases were found with 150 mW/cm2. During in vitro PDT the fluence rate of light delivery had no effect on cell survival. In summary, we have found that low fluence rate improves tumor oxygenation and direct cell effects during PDT.

  12. Possible evidence of Coulomb explosion in the femtosecond laser ablation of metal at low laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuchang; Li, Suyu; Zhang, Fangjian; Tian, Dan; Li, He; Liu, Dunli; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-11-01

    We use a computational model to study the ablation mechanism of metal target irradiated by femtosecond pulse laser. It is confirmed that the Coulomb explosion can occur during femtosecond laser ablation of metal. The influence of thermal ablation and Coulomb explosion on the ablation depth is respectively investigated. Comparing the calculated results with the experimental ones, we find that the theoretical results which consider the thermal ablation only agree well with the experimental ones at high laser fluence, and those which take the Coulomb explosion into account fit well with the experimental ones at lower laser fluence, which exactly explains the ablation mechanism. In contrast with the previous theoretical results which only consider the thermal ablation, our theoretical simulation describes the ablation mechanism straightforward by making comparison of ablation depth, and provides a more reasonable explanation that fits with the actual ablation process.

  13. Development and testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 coupled neutron-gamma multigroup cross-section libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, J.M.; Wiarda, D.; Miller, T.M.; Peplow, D.E.; Patton, B.W.; Dunn, M.E.; Parks, B.T.

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI.3 data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII.0. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries were accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, 'unit tests' for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in RPV fluence calculations and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190. (authors)

  14. Impact of proton fluence on DC and trapping characteristics in InAlN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, I.; Rampazzo, F.; Gerardin, S.; Meneghini, M.; Bagatin, M.; Zanandrea, A.; Dua, C.; di Forte-Poisson, M.-A.; Aubry, R.; Oualli, M.; Delage, S. L.; Paccagnella, A.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2015-11-01

    Robustness of InAlN/GaN devices under proton radiation is investigated. Several proton fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 4 × 1014 have been considered on two typologies of devices. Displacement damage is found to be the major responsible of device DC degradation leading to threshold voltage positive shift, ON resistance increase and drain current decrease, in all cases well correlated with proton fluence. Negligible difference is noticed in displacement damage effects measured on different device typologies. Furthermore, device geometry does not influence the impact of proton radiation on main DC parameters, either if gate width or length are considered. Radiation significantly affects trapping properties. A good correlation between the so-called current collapse increase and proton fluence is demonstrated when a high gate drain voltage value is imposed as trapping condition. Moreover radiation enhances the contribution of dynamic ON resistance and transconductance peak variation on current collapse increase.

  15. Optimization of 3D conformal electron beam therapy in inhomogeneous media by concomitant fluence and energy modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsell, Mats; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Gustafsson, Anders; Brahme, Anders

    1997-11-01

    The possibilities of using simultaneous fluence and energy modulation techniques in electron beam therapy to shape the dose distribution and almost eliminate the influences of tissue inhomogeneities have been investigated. By using a radiobiologically based optimization algorithm the radiobiological properties of the tissues can be taken into account when trying to find the best possible dose delivery. First water phantoms with differently shaped surfaces were used to study the effect of surface irregularities. We also studied water phantoms with internal inhomogeneities consisting of air or cortical bone. It was possible to improve substantially the dose distribution by fluence modulation in these cases. In addition to the fluence modulation the most suitable single electron energy in each case was also determined. Finally, the simultaneous use of several preselected electron beam energies was also tested, each with an individually optimized fluence profile. One to six electron energies were used, resulting in a slow improvement in complication-free cure with increasing number of beam energies. To apply these techniques to a more clinically relevant situation a post-operative breast cancer patient was studied. For simplicity this patient was treated with only one anterior beam portal to clearly illustrate the effect of inhomogeneities like bone and lung on the dose distribution. It is shown that by using fluence modulation the influence of dose inhomogeneities can be significantly reduced. When two or more electron beam energies with individually optimized fluence profiles are used the dose conformality to the internal target volume is further increased, particularly for targets with complex shapes.

  16. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  17. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-21

    Proton dose calculation algorithms--as well as photon and electron algorithms--are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and-to a lesser extent-design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques. PMID:18367787

  18. Fluence dependence of deuterium retention in oxidized SS-316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Masao; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Asakura, Yamato; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    The ion fluence dependence of deuterium retention in SS-316 during oxidation at a temperature of 673 K was studied to evaluate the dynamics of deuterium retention in the oxide layer of SS-316. The correlation between the chemical state of stainless steel and deuterium retention was evaluated using XPS and TDS. It was found that the major deuterium desorption temperatures were located at around 660 K and 935 K, which correspond to the desorption of deuterium trapped as hydroxide. The deuterium retention increased with increasing deuterium ion fluence, since the deuterium retention as hydroxide increased significantly. However, retention saturated at an ion fluence of ˜2.5 × 10 21 D + m -2. The XPS result showed that FeOOD was formed on the surface, although pure Fe also remained in the oxide layer. These facts indicate the nature of the oxide layer have a key role in deuterium trapping behavior.

  19. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    Proton dose calculation algorithms—as well as photon and electron algorithms—are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and—to a lesser extent—design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques.

  20. Fluence field optimization for noise and dose objectives in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Graham, Sean; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Jaffray, David

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Selecting the appropriate imaging technique in computed tomography (CT) inherently involves balancing the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose. Modulation of the x-ray fluence field, laterally across the beam, and independently for each projection, may potentially meet user-prescribed, regional image quality objectives, while reducing radiation to the patient. The proposed approach, called fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT), parallels the approach commonly used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), except ''image quality plans'' replace the ''dose plans'' of IMRT. This work studies the potential noise and dose benefits of FFMCT via objective driven optimization of fluence fields. Methods: Experiments were carried out in simulation. Image quality plans were defined by specifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criteria for regions of interest (ROIs) in simulated cylindrical and oblong water phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom with bone, air, and water equivalent regions. X-ray fluence field patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization method that attempts to achieve the spatially-dependent prescribed SNR criteria in the phantoms while limiting dose (to the volume or subvolumes). The resulting SNR and dose distributions were analyzed and compared to results using a bowtie filtered fluence field. Results: Compared to using a fixed bowtie filtered fluence, FFMCT achieved superior agreement with the target image quality objectives, and resulted in integral dose reductions ranging from 39 to 52%. Prioritizing dose constraints for specific regions of interest resulted in a preferential reduction of dose to those regions with some tradeoff in SNR, particularly where the target low dose regions overlapped with regions where high SNR was prescribed. The method appeared fairly robust under increased complexity and heterogeneity of the object structure. Conclusions: These results support that FFMCT has the potential to meet

  1. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  2. Development and Testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 Coupled Neutron-Gamma Multigroup Cross-Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, Joel M; Wiarda, Dorothea; Miller, Thomas Martin; Peplow, Douglas E.; Patton, Bruce W; Dunn, Michael E; Parks, Benjamin T

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries was accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, unit tests for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in LWR shielding applications, and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190.

  3. Low-fluence carbon dioxide laser irradiation of lentigines

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, J.S.; Smoller, B.R.; Stern, R.S.; Rosen, S.; Arndt, K.A.

    1988-08-01

    Low-fluence carbon dioxide (CO2) laser irradiation of skin has previously been shown to induce damage limited primarily to the epidermis. To evaluate whether this technique was therapeutically effective for pigmented epidermal lesions, ten lentigines caused by methoxsalen and ultraviolet light therapy were treated in one patient using the CO2 laser at fluences ranging from 3.0 to 7.7 J/cm2 for 0.1-s exposures with 4.5-mm spot size. Based on substantial clearing in seven of ten lesions treated, 146 solar lentigines were treated in five patients at fluences of 3.0, 3.7, or 4.4 J/cm2. Biopsies were performed on a total of 30 lesions immediately and 24 hours, seven days, and six weeks after irradiation. Of 125 lesions followed up clinically for six weeks, 12 cleared completely, 81 lightened substantially, and 28 remained unchanged. Only two demonstrated atrophic change. Hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation did not occur. All lesions that improved had been treated at 3.7 or 4.4 J/cm2. Immediate histologic injury consisted of vacuolar and spindly change and subsequent vesiculation limited to the basilar epidermis. Twenty-four hours later there was epidermal necrosis with regeneration, 0.1 mm of dermal basophilia and stromal condensation, and a mild inflammatory infiltrate. These alterations were dose-dependent, with near complete epidermal necrosis and superficial dermal involvement at the highest fluence, and only focal epidermal necrosis at the lowest. At seven days, epidermal regeneration was complete with traces of melanin remaining in keratinocytes. Melanophages first appeared at seven days and persisted at six weeks, by which time the inflammatory infiltrate had cleared. No lentiginous proliferation was evident and epidermal pigmentation had become normal. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation is an effective means of damaging the epidermis with only minimal dermal change.

  4. Rethinking the Concepts of Fluence (UV Dose) and Fluence Rate: The Importance of Photon-based Units - A Systemic Review.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James R; Mayor-Smith, Ian; Linden, Karl G

    2015-11-01

    After a critical review of the fundamental equations describing photobiological and photochemical processes occurring in a medium exposed to a quasi-collimated monochromatic UV light beam, the analysis in this review is extended to analogous processes driven by polychromatic UV light, such as that emitted by medium pressure mercury-vapor arc lamps. The analysis is based on the Second Law of Photochemistry, namely that all photochemical events must be independent, and the rate of such events must be proportional to the rate of photon absorption. A consistent application of the Second Law of Photochemistry leads to a concept change; hence it is proposed herein to use photon fluence and photon fluence rate, rather than fluence (UV dose) and fluence rate, respectively, in the analysis and interpretation of photobiological and photochemical processes. As a consequence, many equations that have been used in the past must be revised, and some experimental information (e.g. action spectra) needs to be re-analyzed. PMID:26277478

  5. Compensator models for fluence field modulated computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Jaffray, David

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated computed tomography (FFMCT) presents a novel approach for acquiring CT images, whereby a patient model guides dynamically changing fluence patterns in an attempt to achieve task-based, user-prescribed, regional variations in image quality, while also controlling dose to the patient. This work aims to compare the relative effectiveness of FFMCT applied to different thoracic imaging tasks (routine diagnostic CT, lung cancer screening, and cardiac CT) when the modulator is subject to limiting constraints, such as might be present in realistic implementations.Methods: An image quality plan was defined for a simulated anthropomorphic chest slice, including regions of high and low image quality, for each of the thoracic imaging tasks. Modulated fluence patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization script, which attempts to achieve the image quality plan under a global dosimetric constraint. Optimization was repeated under different types of modulation constraints (e.g., fixed or gantry angle dependent patterns, continuous or comprised of discrete apertures) with the most limiting case being a fixed conventional bowtie filter. For each thoracic imaging task, an image quality map (IQM{sub sd}) representing the regionally varying standard deviation is predicted for each modulation method and compared to the prescribed image quality plan as well as against results from uniform fluence fields. Relative integral dose measures were also compared.Results: Each IQM{sub sd} resulting from FFMCT showed improved agreement with planned objectives compared to those from uniform fluence fields for all cases. Dynamically changing modulation patterns yielded better uniformity, improved image quality, and lower dose compared to fixed filter patterns with optimized tube current. For the latter fixed filter cases, the optimal choice of tube current modulation was found to depend heavily on the task. Average integral dose reduction compared

  6. Comparative analysis of SN1987A antineutrino fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the electron antineutrino fluence derived from the events detected by Kamiokande-II, IMB and Baksan on 23 February 1987. The data are analysed adopting a new simple and accurate formula for the signal, improving on the previous modeling of the detectors response, considering the possibility of background events. We perform several alternative analyses to quantify the relevance of various descriptions, approximations and biases. In particular, we study the effect of: omitting Baksan data or neglecting the background, using simplified formulae for the signal, modifying the fluence to account for oscillations and pinching, including the measured times and angles of the events, using other descriptions of detector response, etc. We show that most of these effects are small or negligible and argue, by comparing the allowed regions for astrophysical parameters, that the results are stable. We comment on the accordance with theoretical results and on open questions.

  7. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Ronald P.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

  9. Fluence estimation by deconvolution via l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Hernández, J. C.; Lazaro-Ponthus, D.; Gmar, M.; Barthe, J.

    2011-03-01

    Advances in radiotherapy irradiation techniques have led to very complex treatments requiring for a more stringent control. The dosimetric properties of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) encouraged their use for treatment verification. Two main approaches have been proposed: the forward approach, where measured portal dose images are compared to predicted dose images and the backward approach, where EPID images are used to estimate the dose delivered to the patient. Both approaches need EPID images to be converted into a fluence distribution by deconvolution. However, deconvolution is an ill-posed problem which is very sensitive to small variations on input data. This study presents the application of a deconvolution method based on l1-norm minimization; this is a method known for being very stable while working with noisy data. The algorithm was first evaluated on synthetic images with different noise levels, the results were satisfactory. Deconvolution algorithm was then applied to experimental portal images; the required EPID response kernel and energy fluence images were computed by Monte-Carlo calculation, accelerator treatment head and EPID models had already been commissioned in a previous work. The obtained fluence images were in good agreement with simulated fluence images. This deconvolution algorithm may be generalized to an inverse problem with a general operator, where image formation is not longer modeled by a convolution but by a linear operation that might be seen as a position-dependent convolution. Moreover, this procedure would be detector independent and could be used for any detector type provided its response function is known.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis and Neutron Fluence Adjustment for VVER-1000 Rpv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, Kr.; Kirilova, D.

    2003-06-01

    Adjustment of the neutron fluence at the VVER-1000 RPV inner wall has been carried out. For the purpose of this adjustment the neutron flux response sensitivity to the main parameters of calculation uncertainty has been calculated. The obtained sensitivities, the parameters uncertainty and activity measurement data of iron, copper and niobium detectors positioned behind the RPV of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 have been used in this adjustment.

  11. Dopant distribution in high fluence Fe implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Jensen, J.; Hallen, A.; Aggerstam, T.

    2008-09-01

    Undoped wurtzite GaN epilayers implanted at room temperature with 50-325 keV Fe{sup +} ions in the fluence range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} are studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis. The results show an enhanced Fe concentration close to the surface for high ion fluences (>1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), which increases with the ion fluence. Annealing at 800 deg. C for 30 min has a negligible effect on the Fe distribution in the material bulk, but further increases the Fe concentration near the surface. Our findings can be understood by radiation enhanced diffusion during ion implantation and an increased Fe diffusivity in the near surface region with distorted stoichiometry, or formation of secondary phases and precipitates for the highest doses. The simulation shows that, if enhanced diffusion is the reason for Fe buildup at the surface, both radiation enhanced diffusion and the thermal diffusion of Fe atoms near the surface, need to be at least five times larger than ordinary bulk diffusion to explain the increased Fe surface concentration.

  12. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  13. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  14. Dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenari, T.; Matsuo, H.; Ito, A.; Miyoshi, S.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We investigated experimentally dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo. In this particular photosensitization reaction scheme, the photosensitizer accumulation characteristics for target region are not available. Meanwhile, the photosensitizer dose and hospitalization period under restricted light circumstance might be reduced. Since both photosensitizer and oxygen supply are governed by blood flow, this photosensitization reaction is influenced significantly by blood flow variation in particular blood vessel occlusion. We employed the myocardial tissue to keep tissue blood flow during the photosensitization reaction because vessel blood flow speed in myocardial tissue is fast to resist vascular occlusion. Surgically exposed rabbits myocardial tissues were irradiated with the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2 by a 663 nm diode laser 30 min after the injection of 2 mg/kg water soluble chlorin photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium. Two weeks after the irradiation, the rabbits were sacrificed and the histological specimens of the irradiated area were made to measure scar layer thickness. The scar layer tissue thickness of 0.2-3.0 mm was observed microscopically by the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2. The scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was estimated to 15-25 J/cm3 based on the above mentioned relation assuming constant and uniform myocardial effective attenuation coefficient of 0.72 mm-1. The estimated scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was lower than the threshold of conventional PDT. Large variation of the estimated threshold value might be attributed to unconsidered PDT parameter such as flow rate inhomogeneity in the myocardial tissue. These results suggested that the photosensitization reaction investigated in this study would be available to apply arrhythmia therapy such as atrial fibrillation.

  15. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konheiser, Joerg; Grahn, Alexander; Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady

    2016-02-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS) programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p)54Mn and 58Ni(n,p)58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  16. Atomic oxygen flux and fluence calculation for Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Roger J.; Gillis, James R.

    1991-01-01

    The LDEF mission was to study the effects of the space environment on various materials over an extended period of time. One of the important factors for materials degradation in low earth orbit is the atomic oxygen fluxes and fluences experienced by the materials. These fluxes and fluences are a function of orbital parameters, solar and geomagnetic activity, and material surface orientation. Calculations of atomic oxygen fluences and fluxes for the LDEF mission are summarized. Included are descriptions of LDEF orbital parameters, solar and geomagnetic data, computer code FLUXAV, which was used to perform calculations of fluxes and fluences, along with a discussion of the calculated fluxes and fluences.

  17. Quantitative Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Fluence Dependent Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B.T.; Laufer, J.G.; Beard, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In biomedical photoacoustic imaging the images are proportional to the absorbed optical energy density, and not the optical absorption, which makes it difficult to obtain a quantitatively accurate image showing the concentration of a particular absorbing chromophore from photoacoustic measurements alone. Here it is shown that the spatially varying concentration of a chromophore whose absorption becomes zero above a threshold light fluence can be estimated from photoacoustic images obtained at increasing illumination strengths. This technique provides an alternative to model-based multiwavelength approaches to quantitative photoacoustic imaging, and a new approach to photoacoustic molecular and functional imaging. PMID:21258458

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  19. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  20. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose. PMID:17643260

  1. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  2. Surface Treatment of Polymers by Ion Beam Irradiation to Control the Human Osteoblast Adhesion: Fluence and Current Density Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, G.; Rossel, T.; Weder, G.; Betschart, B.; Meunier, C.; Mikhailov, S.

    2009-03-01

    In the biomaterial field, the modification of surfaces are used to create polymers with high performances, preserving their bulk properties and creating specific interactions between the designed surfaces and the cells or tissues. The polymers were irradiated with a 900 keV Helium beam to modify their surface properties. Cell cultivation on the samples was done using human osteoblasts cells (hFOB 1.19). For PTFE, PS and PEEK polymers, the cell adhesion occurs after reached some threshold values of fluences. For PET or PMMA polymers, the cells adhere on the non irradiated samples, however the fluence value modifies the cell density. For PMMA and PTFE both, the fluence and the current density influence the cell adhesion. By modifying the appropriate parameters on each material, the control of the cell adhesion is possible. Indeed the surface treatment must be selected and adapted according to the further application: for biosensors, tissue engineering, tissue regeneration, neural probes, drug delivery, bio-actuators etc.

  3. Surface Treatment of Polymers by Ion Beam Irradiation to Control the Human Osteoblast Adhesion: Fluence and Current Density Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, G.; Mikhailov, S.; Rossel, T.; Weder, G.; Betschart, B.; Meunier, C.

    2009-03-10

    In the biomaterial field, the modification of surfaces are used to create polymers with high performances, preserving their bulk properties and creating specific interactions between the designed surfaces and the cells or tissues. The polymers were irradiated with a 900 keV Helium beam to modify their surface properties. Cell cultivation on the samples was done using human osteoblasts cells (hFOB 1.19). For PTFE, PS and PEEK polymers, the cell adhesion occurs after reached some threshold values of fluences. For PET or PMMA polymers, the cells adhere on the non irradiated samples, however the fluence value modifies the cell density. For PMMA and PTFE both, the fluence and the current density influence the cell adhesion. By modifying the appropriate parameters on each material, the control of the cell adhesion is possible. Indeed the surface treatment must be selected and adapted according to the further application: for biosensors, tissue engineering, tissue regeneration, neural probes, drug delivery, bio-actuators etc.

  4. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  5. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  6. Increase of bulk optical damage threshold fluences of KDP crystals by laser irradiation and heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Swain, J.E.; Stokowski, S.E.; Milam, D.; Kennedy, G.C.; Rainer, F.

    1982-07-07

    The bulk optical damage threshold fluence of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals is increased by irradiating the crystals with laser pulses of duration 1 to 20 nanoseconds of increasing fluence, below the optical damage threshold fluence for untreated crystals, or by baking the crystals for times of the order of 24 hours at temperatures of 110 to 165/sup 0/C, or by a combination of laser irradiation and baking.

  7. A Common Fluence Threshold for First Positive and Second Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi, Abdul; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−3 micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rateresponse curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system. PMID:11537470

  8. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  9. Electrical activation of low-fluence boron implantation in silicon studied by PCV in combination with SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J.

    1988-01-01

    The thermally induced electrical activation of boron implanted in silicon at fluences ≦1013 cm-2 was studied by the combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and pulsed capacitance voltage (PCV). After annealing at 900°C for 30 min boron is completely ionized and the contribution of electrically active defects to the electrical profile is negligible. For partly annealed samples ( T<900°C) the degree of electrical activation of boron decreases with increasing boron concentration due to the presence of residual defects. The experimental data can be described qualitatively by the first-order kinetics if the influence of residual crystal defects on the electrical activation is considered.

  10. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  11. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  12. The radial and longitudinal dependence of SEP intensities and fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zank, G.; Verkhoglyadova, O.; Ruzmaikin, A.; Feynman, J.; Jun, I.

    Solar Energetic Particles SEPs are an important hazard in the context of space weather These particles bombard spacecraft and can cause instruments onboard to malfunction At sufficiently high energies and dosages they can also be extremely harmful to biological materials human bodies and are therefore one of the major safety concerns for the future manned spacecraft program We now know that these particles are associated with Coronal Mass Ejection CMEs driven shocks As a CME-driven shock propagates outward particles are injected and accelerated at the shock front via a first order Fermi mechanism aka diffusive shock acceleration After being accelerated the particles convect with the shock diffuse both upstream and downstream of the shock and many eventually escape the shock complex after reaching far upstream downstream In this work we present a model calculation of the SEP time intensity profile The model is based on a 2D-ZEUS MHD code which is used to simulate the solar wind The shock is modeled using a shell model where particle convection and diffusion are followed numerically When particles reach some distance ahead of the shock they are can escape from the shock Their subsequent motion is followed using a Monte-Carlo approach This sophisticated model allows us to obtain a time intensity profile and instantaneous particle spectra at various locations We will discuss the radial and longitudinal dependence of both the intensities and fluences

  13. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli

    2010-12-01

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N(3)) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization. PMID:21081826

  14. Space Environment Effects: Model for Emission of Solar Protons (ESP): Cumulative and Worst Case Event Fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Barth, J. L.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Burke, E. A.; Gee, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary and polar orbits and for interplanetary missions. Designers of spacecraft and mission planners are required to assess the performance of microelectronic systems under a variety of conditions. A number of useful approaches exist for predicting information about solar proton event fluences and, to a lesser extent, peak fluxes. This includes the cumulative fluence over the course of a mission, the fluence of a worst-case event during a mission, the frequency distribution of event fluences, and the frequency distribution of large peak fluxes. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the sponsorship of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program, have developed a new model for predicting cumulative solar proton fluences and worst-case solar proton events as functions of mission duration and user confidence level. This model is called the Emission of Solar Protons (ESP) model.

  15. Effect of fluence on carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaie, Nushin; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-05-01

    Effects of laser fluence on the properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation method in liquid nitrogen have been studied experimentally. The beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength at 7 ns pulse width and different fluences is employed to irradiate the graphite target in liquid nitrogen. Properties of carbon nanostructures were studied using their UV-Vis-NIR spectrum, TEM images, and Raman scattering spectrum. Two categories of graphene nanosheets and carbon nanoparticles were observed due to variation of laser fluence. Results show that in our experimental condition there is a threshold fluence for producing carbon nanoparticles. With increasing the laser fluence from the threshold, the amount of carbon nanoparticles in suspensions was increased, while the amount of graphene nanosheets was decreased.

  16. High-fluence Ga-implanted silicon—The effect of annealing and cover layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, J. Heera, V.; Hübner, R.; Voelskow, M.; Germer, S.; Schmidt, B.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-14

    The influence of SiO{sub 2} and SiN{sub x} cover layers on the dopant distribution as well as microstructure of high fluence Ga implanted Si after thermal processing is investigated. The annealing temperature determines the layer microstructure and the cover layers influence the obtained Ga profile. Rapid thermal annealing at temperatures up to 750 °C leads to a polycrystalline layer structure containing amorphous Ga-rich precipitates. Already after a short 20 ms flash lamp annealing, a Ga-rich interface layer is observed for implantation through the cover layers. This effect can partly be suppressed by annealing temperatures of at least 900 °C. However, in this case, Ga accumulates in larger, cone-like precipitates without disturbing the surrounding Si lattice parameters. Such a Ga-rich crystalline Si phase does not exist in the equilibrium phase diagram according to which the Ga solubility in Si is less than 0.1 at. %. The Ga-rich areas are capped with SiO{sub x} grown during annealing which only can be avoided by the usage of SiN{sub x} cover layers.

  17. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  18. Dependence of the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana on fluence rate and wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Konjević, Radomir; Steinitz, Benjamin; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    In the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, the shape of the fluence-response relation depends on fluence rate and wavelength. At low fluence rates, the response to 450-nm light is characterized by a single maximum at about 0.3 μmol·m-2. At higher fluence rates, the response shows two distinct maxima, I and II, at 0.3 and 3.5 μmol·m-2, respectively. The response to 500-nm light shows a single maximum at 2 μmol·m-2, and the response to 510-nm light shows a single maximum at 4.5 μmol·m-2, independent of fluence rate. The response to 490-nm light shows a maximal at 4.5 μmol·m-2 and a shoulder at about 0.6 μmol·m-2. Preirradiation with high-fluence 510-nm light from above, immediately followed by unilateral 450-nm light, eliminates maximum II but not maximum I. Preirradiation with high-fluence 450-nm light from above eliminates the response to subsequent unilateral irradiation with either 450-nm or 510-nm light. The recovery of the response following high-fluence 450-nm light is considerably slower than the recovery following high-fluence 510-nm light. Unilateral irradiation with low-fluence 510-nm light followed by 450-nm light results in curvature that is approximately the sum of those produced by either irradiation alone. Based on these results, it is proposed that phototropism in A. thaliana seedlings is mediated by at least two blue-light photoreceptor pigments. PMID:16594094

  19. Thermal and structural properties of low-fluence irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Dauke, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The release of Wigner energy from graphite irradiated by fast neutrons at a TRIGA Mark II research reactor has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry / synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction between 25 and 725 °C at a heating rate of 10 °C min -1. The graphite, having been subject to a fast-neutron fluence from 5.67 × 10 20 to 1.13 × 10 22 n m -2 at a fast-neutron flux ( E > 0.1 MeV) of 7.88 × 10 16 n m -2 s -1 and at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C, exhibits Wigner energies ranging from 1.2 to 21.8 J g -1 and a Wigner energy accumulation rate of 1.9 × 10 -21 J g -1 n -1 m 2. The differential-scanning-calorimeter curves exhibit, in addition to the well known peak at ˜200 °C, a pronounced fine structure consisting of additional peaks at ˜150, ˜230, and ˜280 °C. These peaks correspond to activation energies of 1.31, 1.47, 1.57, and 1.72 eV, respectively. Crystal structure of the samples is intact. The dependence of the c lattice parameter on temperature between 25 and 725 °C as determined by Rietveld refinement leads to the expected microscopic thermal expansion coefficient along the c axis of ˜26 × 10 -6 °C -1. At 200 °C, coinciding with the maximum in the differential-scanning-calorimeter curves, no measurable changes in the rate of thermal expansion have been detected - unlike its decrease previously seen in more highly irradiated graphite.

  20. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  1. Neutron fluence vessel assessment in the 1300 MWe NPP French fleet: the FLUOLE program in EOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Thiollay, N.; Fougeras, P.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D.; Pont, T.; Garnier, D.

    2006-07-01

    The Vessel Neutron fluence assessment is a key parameter for vessel embrittlement determination and plant lifetime estimation To validate this parameters, the CEA and its Industrial Partner EdF have decided to launch a devoted experimental program in the EOLE facility of the Cadarache Research Centre The aim of this proposed FLUOLE experimental program (acronym of Fluence in EOLE) is to provide the most accurate neutron propagation measurements in representative PWR neutron spectrum material and geometry in order to enable a reduction of uncertainties on calculated vessel fluence with Monte-Carlo codes such as MCNP or TRIPOLI. (authors)

  2. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  3. Neutron fluence and energy reproducibility of a 2-dollar TRIGA reactor Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rosara F.; Drader, Jessica A.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hines, Corey C.; Metz, Lori A.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; King, Matthew D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Smith, Jeremy D.; Wall, Donald E.

    2009-10-01

    Washington State University’s 1 MW TRIGA reactor has a long history of utilization for neutron activation analysis (NAA). TRIGA reactors have the ability to pulse, reach supercritical (k>1) for short bursts of time. At this high power and fast time the energy spectrum and neutron fluence are largely uncharacterized. The pulse neutron energy spectrum and fluence were determined by the activation of Cu, Au, Co, Fe, and Ti. These analyses were completed with and without Cd shielding to determine reproducibility between pulses. The applications and implications of the neutron energy and fluence reproducibility to the use of pulsed NAA will be discussed.

  4. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  5. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148; Physics Department, University of Malaya ; Saw, S. H.; Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148

    2013-06-15

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  6. Light fluence normalization in turbid tissues via temporally unmixed multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Stiel, Andre C; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    Discerning the accurate distribution of chromophores and biomarkers by means of optoacoustic imaging is commonly challenged by the highly heterogeneous excitation light patterns resulting from strong spatial variations of tissue scattering and absorption. Here we used the light-fluence dependent switching kinetics of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs), in combination with real-time acquisition of volumetric multi-spectral optoacoustic data to correct for the light fluence distribution deep in scattering media. The new approach allows for dynamic fluence correction in time-resolved imaging, e.g., of moving organs, and can be extended to work with a large palette of available synthetic and genetically encoded photochromic substances for multiplexed wavelength-specific fluence normalization. PMID:26469596

  7. Effects of Laser Wavelength and Fluence in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ge Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren; Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong; Ladam, Cecile

    2011-03-30

    Nanosecond lasers with ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths: KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) were used to ablate polycrystalline Ge target and deposit Ge films in vacuum (<10-6 Torr). Time-integrated optical emission spectra were obtained for laser fluence from 0.5-10 J/cm{sup 2}. Neutrals and ionized Ge species in the plasma plume were detected by optical emission spectroscopy. Ge neutrals dominated the plasma plume at low laser fluence while Ge{sup +} ions above some threshold fluence. The deposited amorphous thin-film samples consisted of particulates of size from nano to micron. The relation of the film properties and plume species at different laser fluence and wavelengths were discussed.

  8. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  9. Pressure-vessel-damage fluence reduction by low-leakage fuel management. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.; Aronson, A.L.; Carew, J.F.; Kohut, P.; Todosow, M.; Lois, L.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of neutron-induced radiation damage to the pressure vessel and of an increased concern that in a PWR transient the pressure vessel may be subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS), detailed analyses have been undertaken to determine the levels of neutron fluence accumulation at the pressure vessels of selected PWR's. In addition, various methods intended to limit vessel damage by reducing the vessel fluence have been investigated. This paper presents results of the fluence analysis and the evaluation of the low-leakage fuel management fluence reduction method. The calculations were performed with DOT-3.5 in an octant of the core/shield/vessel configuration using a 120 x 43 (r, theta) mesh structure.

  10. SWIMRT: a graphical user interface using sliding window algorithm to construct a fluence map machine file.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Grigorov, Grigor N; Yazdani, Nuri

    2006-01-01

    A custom-made computer program, SWIMRT, to construct "multileaf collimator (MLC) machine" file for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fluence maps was developed using MATLAB and the sliding window algorithm. The user can either import a fluence map with a graphical file format created by an external treatment-planning system such as Pinnacle3 or create his or her own fluence map using the matrix editor in the program. Through comprehensive calibrations of the dose and the dimension of the imported fluence field, the user can use associated image-processing tools such as field resizing and edge trimming to modify the imported map. When the processed fluence map is suitable, a "MLC machine" file is generated for our Varian 21 EX linear accelerator with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC. This machine file is transferred to the MLC console of the LINAC to control the continuous motions of the leaves during beam irradiation. An IMRT field is then irradiated with the 2D intensity profiles, and the irradiated profiles are compared to the imported or modified fluence map. This program was verified and tested using film dosimetry to address the following uncertainties: (1) the mechanical limitation due to the leaf width and maximum traveling speed, and (2) the dosimetric limitation due to the leaf leakage/transmission and penumbra effect. Because the fluence map can be edited, resized, and processed according to the requirement of a study, SWIMRT is essential in studying and investigating the IMRT technique using the sliding window algorithm. Using this program, future work on the algorithm may include redistributing the time space between segmental fields to enhance the fluence resolution, and readjusting the timing of each leaf during delivery to avoid small fields. Possible clinical utilities and examples for SWIMRT are given in this paper. PMID:17533330

  11. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  12. Determination of mixed proton/neutron fluences in the LANSCE irradiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.; Fowler, M.M.; Corzine, K.

    1998-12-31

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, several materials were exposed to a high-energy proton and spallation neutron environments. Large differences in mechanical property changes in this environment are expected compared to the typical fusion or fission systems. To make proper dose correlations, it is important to accurately quantify the fluences. Activation foils consisting of a stack of disks of Co, Ni, Fe, Al, Nb and Cu were irradiated concurrent with mechanical testing samples in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The irradiation consisted of an 800 MeV, 1 mA proton beam and a W target in the beam provided a source of spallation neutrons. The maximum proton fluence was around 3 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} and the maximum neutron fluence approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. After irradiation, the foils were withdrawn and the radioactive isotopes analyzed using gamma spectroscopy. From initial estimates for the fluences and spectra derived from the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport (LAHET) Code System (LCS), comparisons to the measured levels of activation products were made. The Na-22 activation products in the Al foils were measured from different regions of the target in order to profile the spatial levels of the fluences. These tests gave empirical confirmation of the proton and neutron fluences of the irradiated samples throughout the target region.

  13. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M J; Séguin, F H; Waugh, C J; Rinderknecht, H G; Orozco, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Sio, H; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Stoeckl, C; Hohenberger, M; Sangster, T C; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Landen, O L; Zacharias, R A; Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5-8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7-4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10(6) cm(-2). A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount. PMID:24784597

  14. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  15. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  16. The dependence of rate coefficients and product yields upon fluence, intensity, and time in unimolecular reactions induced by monochromatic infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, M.; Humbert, P.; van den Bergh, H.

    1980-07-01

    The influence of the three parameters (with two degrees of freedom) fluence, intensity, and time on rate coefficients and product yields in collisionless Unimolecular Reactions Induced by Monochromatic Infrared Radiation (URIMIR) is discussed in some detail in terms of the recently proposed logarithmic reactant fluence plots. Model calculations for several archetypes of such plots are presented, based on solutions of the Pauli master equation and solutions of the quantum mechanical equations of motion for spectra involving many states at each level of excitation. Linear diagrams, turnups, and turnovers are found and are discussed systematically. Experimental examples re-evaluated from the literature and new measurements on the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl are reported which nicely illustrate the various theoretical possibilities. Steady state rate coefficients for six molecules are evaluated and summarized. In some situations the intrinsic nonlinear intensity dependence of the steady state rate coefficients and deviations from simple fluence dependence of the product yields both before and at steady state are shown to be important theoretically and experimentally. The role of the reducibility of the rate coefficient matrix is discussed in connection with turnovers and with the strong influence of initial temperature that is found in the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl.

  17. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles' mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  18. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K. Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Polek, M. P.; Harilal, S. S.

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  19. Neutrons, gamma rays, and beta particles interactions with IIaO films flown on Astro I and Astro II and comparison with IIaO flown on the get-away-special STS-7

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, E.C. Jr.; Peters, K.; Boone, K.

    1995-09-01

    The current requirements for the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, sends rocket satellites and in the near future will involve flights in the shuttle to the upper reaches of the Earth`s atmosphere where they will be subjected to the atomic particles and electromagnetic radiation produced by the Sun and other cosmic radiation. It is therefore appropriate to examine the effect of neutrons, gamma rays, beta particles, and X-rays on the film currently being used by the Laboratory for current and future research requirements. It is also hoped by examining these particles in their effect that the authors will have simulated the space environment of the rockets, satellites, and shuttles. Several samples of the IIaO film were exposed to a neutron howitzer with a source energy of approximately 106 neutrons/steradians. They exposed several samples of the film to a 10 second blast of neutrons in both metal and plastic containers which exhibited higher density readings which indicated the possibility of some secondary nuclear interactions between neutrons and the aluminum container. The plastic container showed some variations at the higher densities. Exposure of the samples of IIaO film to a neutron beam of approximately 10 neutrons per steradians for eight minutes produces approximately a 13% difference in the density readings of the dark density grids. It is not noticeable that at the lighter density grid the neutrons have minimal effects, but on a whole the trend of the eight minute exposed IIaO film density grids at the darker end had a 7.1% difference than the control. Further analysis is anticipated by increasing the exposure time. Two sets of film were exposed to a beta source in a plastic container. The beta source was placed at the bottom so that the cone of rays striking the film would be conical for a period of seven days. It was observed in the films, designated 4a and 4b, a dramatic increase in the grid densities had occurred.

  20. PDT in the thoracic cavity: Spectroscopic methods and fluence modeling for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia Lauren

    PDT for the thoracic cavity provides a promising cancer treatment modality, but improvements in treatment planning, particularly in PDT dosimetry, can be made to improve uniformity of light delivery. When a cavity of arbitrary geometry is illuminated, the fluence increases due to multiple-scattered photons, referred to as the Integrating Sphere Effect (ISE). Current pleural PDT treatment protocol at the University of Pennsylvania monitors light fluence (hereafter simply fluence, measured in W/cm2) via seven isotropic detectors sutured at different locations in thoracic cavity of a patient. This protocol monitors light at discrete locations, but does not provide a measurement of fluence for the thoracic cavity as a whole. Current calculation of light fluence includes direct light only and thus does not account for the unique optical properties of each tissue type present, which in turn affects the accuracy of the calculated light distribution in the surrounding tissue and, in turn, the overall cell death and treatment efficacy. Treatment planning for pleural PDT can be improved, in part, by considering the contribution of scattered light, which is affected by the two factors of geometry and in vivo optical properties. We expanded the work by Willem Star in regards to the ISE in a spherical cavity. A series of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were run for semi-infinite planar, spherical, and ellipsoidal geometries for a range of optical properties. The results of these simulations are compared to theory and numerical solutions for fluence in the cavity and at the cavity-medium boundary. The development via MC simulations offers a general method of calculating the required light fluence specialized to each patient, based on the treatment surface area. The scattered fluence calculation is dependent on in vivo optical properties (μa and μs') of the tissues treated. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy methods are used to determine the optical properties and

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  2. Mechanical Behaviour of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Blends after Reactor Irradiation to High Neutron Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  3. Equivalent electron fluence for solar proton damage in GaAs shallow junction cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stock, L. V.

    The short-circuit current reduction in GaAs shallow junction heteroface solar cells was calculated according to a simplified solar cell damage model in which the nonuniformity of the damage as a function of penetration depth is treated explicitly. Although the equivalent electron fluence was not uniquely defined for low-energy monoenergetic proton exposure, an equivalent electron fluence is found for proton spectra characteristic of the space environment. The equivalent electron fluence ratio was calculated for a typical large solar flare event for which the proton spectrum is PHI(sub p)(E) = A/E(p/sq. cm) where E is in MeV. The equivalent fluence ratio is a function of the cover glass shield thickness or the corresponding cutoff energy E(sub c). In terms of the cutoff energy, the equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence ratio is r(sub p)(E sub c) = 10(9)/E(sub c)(1.8) where E(sub c) is in units of KeV.

  4. Equivalent electron fluence for solar proton damage in GaAs shallow junction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stock, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    The short-circuit current reduction in GaAs shallow junction heteroface solar cells was calculated according to a simplified solar cell damage model in which the nonuniformity of the damage as a function of penetration depth is treated explicitly. Although the equivalent electron fluence was not uniquely defined for low-energy monoenergetic proton exposure, an equivalent electron fluence is found for proton spectra characteristic of the space environment. The equivalent electron fluence ratio was calculated for a typical large solar flare event for which the proton spectrum is PHI(sub p)(E) = A/E(p/sq. cm) where E is in MeV. The equivalent fluence ratio is a function of the cover glass shield thickness or the corresponding cutoff energy E(sub c). In terms of the cutoff energy, the equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence ratio is r(sub p)(E sub c) = 10(9)/E(sub c)(1.8) where E(sub c) is in units of KeV.

  5. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Simpson, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3.

  6. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-04-17

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760/sup 0/C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500/sup 0/C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650/sup 0/C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material.

  7. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY BLENDS AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION TO HIGH NEUTRON FLUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-03

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  8. Combination neutron-gamma ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Stuart, Travis P.; Tipton, Wilbur J.

    1976-10-26

    A radiation detection system capable of detecting neutron and gamma events and distinguishing therebetween. The system includes a detector for a photomultiplier which utilizes a combination of two phosphor materials, the first of which is in the form of small glass beads which scintillate primarily in response to neutrons and the second of which is a plastic matrix which scintillates in response to gammas. A combination of pulse shape and pulse height discrimination techniques is utilized to provide an essentially complete separation of the neutron and gamma events.

  9. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  10. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  11. A new proton fluence model for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers describe a new engineering model for the fluence of protons with energies greater than 10 MeV. The data set used is a combination of observations made primarily from the Earth's surface between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of Earth between 1963 and 1985. With this data set we find that the distinction between ordinary proton events and anomalously large proton events made in earlier work disappears. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. In contrast to earlier models, results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event.

  12. Fluence ablation threshold dependence on tin impurities in commercial soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we study the reduction in the fluence ablation threshold induced by tin impurities incorporated in float soda-lime glass during the fabrication process. The laser system used in the experiments was a Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse duration of 20 ns. The fluence ablation thresholds found were 112  J/cm2 for the tin side and 920  J/cm2 for the tin-free side, which means a reduction of nearly 1 order of magnitude. The fluence ablation threshold reduction permits the manufacturing of narrower grooves with small level of roughness, obtaining quality elements in low-cost soda-lime substrates. PMID:25321113

  13. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  14. Accelerator-based Neutron Fluence Standard of the National Metrology Institute of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Jun; Uritani, Akira; Kudo, Katsuhisa

    2009-03-01

    We report the present status of the national standard on accelerator-based fast neutron fluences in Japan. Monoenergetic neutron fluence standards have been established at 144 keV, 565 keV, 5.0 MeV and 8.0 MeV by using a Van de Graaff accelerator and at 2.5 MeV and 14.8 MeV by using a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. These standards are prepared to measure the detection efficiency and the energy response of neutron sensitive devices, such as personal dosimeters and survey meters. Neutron production and absolute fluence measurement for these energies are described. We are developing a new standard in the energy region of a few tens of keV, which is also introduced here as well as our future plans.

  15. Fluence Evaluations For Applications of In Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in Non-Flat Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin M.

    1999-02-28

    Evaluations of gamma-ray fluence are made for source geometries that depart from the flat ground geometry that is used in standard applications of in situ spectrometry. Geometries considered include uniform source distributions for soil mounds on top of flat terrain, cylindrical wells, and rectangular trenches. The results indicate that scaling the standard fluence values for flat terrain by the ratio of solid angle subtended by the soil to 2π leads to fluence estimates that are accurate to within a few percent. Practical applications of in situ spectrometry in non-flat terrain also appears to be simplified by the fact that the angular correction factor for a typical coaxial detector in these geometries may typically be about the same as that computed for flat ground.

  16. Fast Rise Exponential Decay (FRED) Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Fluence Duration Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. C.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2003-05-01

    The fluences and durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be systematically underestimated for low signal-to-noise ratios. This is the result of a human operator selecting a time interval shorter than the burst interval, effectively ignoring burst flux in the fluence calculation. The gradual rise and decay of the FRED-type GRBs are especially susceptible to this bias. Because of the large number of FREDs in the BATSE catalogue, a series of Monte Carlo simulations of hypothetical FREDs have been analyzed. By varying the parameters of the Norris et al. pulse model, the properties of those FREDs most susceptible to the fluence duration bias have been identified. This work is funded by NASA grant NRA-98-OSS-03 and NSF grant AST00-98499.

  17. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  18. The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron-56 in polyethylene. I. Fragment fluence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Gong, W.; Schimmerling, W.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron ions in several thicknesses of polyethylene has been measured. Non-interacting primary beam particles and fragments have been identified and their LETs calculated by measuring ionization energy loss in a stack of silicon detectors. Fluences, normalized to the incident beam intensity and corrected for detector effects, are presented for each fragment charge and target. Histograms of fluence as a function of LET are also presented. Some implications of these data for measurements of the biological effects of heavy ions are discussed.

  19. SOLPRO: A computer code to calculate probabilistic energetic solar proton fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A code was developed for the calculation of interplanetary solar proton fluences at 1 AU for the active years 1977 to 1983. The fluences are presented as functions of mission duration tau, energy threshold E, and confidence level Q. For a given combination of tau and Q, the routine determines whether ordinary or anomalously large events are to be considered, and in the latter case, the number of anomalously large events that are predicted by probabilistic theory for the specified mission duration. The code is described in detail. A listing and sample calculations are included.

  20. An On-line Monitor for Fluence Distributions and Imaging of Scanning Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautard, C.; Balanzat, E.; Ban, G.; Batin, E.; Carniol, B.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Etasse, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Labalme, M.; Laborie, P.

    2007-11-01

    Clinical applications of hadron beams have generated a wide development of radiobiology experiments, especially at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds), an ion accelerator in Caen. Biological samples are irradiated with ions in order to observe the induced biological effects. As these observations have to be related to the fluence distribution, an on-line beam monitor has been developed in order to measure and image fluence maps of each biological sample irradiation with a 1% uncertainty. This beam monitor has been tested with different types of ions at several energies and for intensities from 104 to 109 ions per second.

  1. Fluence inhomogeneities due to a ripple filter induced Moiré effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Brons, Stephan; Naumann, Jakob; Ackermann, Benjamin; Horn, Julian; Latzel, Harald; Scheloske, Stefan; Galonska, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Zink, Klemens; Weber, Uli

    2015-02-01

    At particle therapy facilities with pencil beam scanning, the implementation of a ripple filter (RiFi) broadens the Bragg peak, so fewer energy steps from the accelerator are required for a homogeneous dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV). However, sharply focusing the scanned pencil beams at the RiFi plane by ion optical settings can lead to a Moiré effect, causing fluence inhomogeneities at the isocenter. This has been experimentally proven at the Heidelberg Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany. 150 MeV u-1 carbon-12 ions are used for irradiation with a 3 mm thick RiFi. The beam is focused in front of and as close to the RiFi plane as possible. The pencil beam width is estimated to be 0.78 mm at a 93 mm distance from the RiFi. Radiographic films are used to obtain the fluence profile 30 mm in front of the isocenter, 930 mm from the RiFi. The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT12A is used to determine the RiFi-induced inhomogeneities in the fluence distribution at the isocenter for a similar setup, pencil beam widths at the RiFi plane ranging from σ x\\text{RiFi}=0.56 to 1.2 mm and for scanning step sizes ranging from 1.5 to 3.7 mm. The beam application and monitoring system (BAMS) used at HIT is modelled and simulated. When the width of the pencil beams at the RiFi plane is much smaller than the scanning step size, the resulting inhomogeneous fluence distribution at the RiFi plane interfers with the inhomogeneous RiFi mass distribution and fluence inhomogeneity can be observed at the isocenter as large as an 8% deviation from the mean fluence. The inverse of the fluence ripple period at the isocenter is found to be the difference between the inverse of the RiFi period and the inverse of the scanning step size. We have been able to use MC simulations to reproduce the spacing of the ripple stripes seen in films irradiated at HIT. Our findings clearly indicate that pencil beams sharply focused near the RiFi plane

  2. Generation of multiple stress waves in silica glass in high fluence femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Haofeng; Wang Xiaolei; Zhai Hongchen; Zhang Nan; Wang Pan

    2010-08-09

    Shadowgraphs of dynamic processes outside and inside transparent target during the intense femtosecond laser ablation of silica glass are recorded. Two material ejections outside the target and two corresponding stress waves inside the target are observed at different energy fluences. In particular, a third stress wave can be observed at energy fluence as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The first wave is a thermoelastic wave, while the second and the third may be generated subsequently by the mechanical expansions. In addition, the magnitudes of the three stress waves decrease sequentially based on our analysis.

  3. The 2002 dosimetry system (DS02) and available fluences for organ dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D

    2012-03-01

    The A bomb dosimetry system (DS) calculates each survivor's organ doses. It does this by calculating the angular fluences incident on each survivor. These are used with humanoid phantom shielding calculations to estimate organ doses in 15 organs, 3-sized phantoms, 2 sexes and 2 postures at any orientation or distance to the bomb. The DS has been re-used and updated several times. Currently, efforts are being considered to include shielding for additional organs by adding additional phantoms. The DS has gone through a series of upgrades referred to as: DS84, DS86, DS86R, DS93, DS02. DS86 and DS02 were approved and installed at Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The system uses free-field energy-angular fluence from a discrete ordinate calculation coupled with Monte Carlo adjoint-shielding histories. This paper briefly discusses the adjoint Monte Carlo; combinatorial shield geometry for the phantom, house, factory, and terrain; modifications to use fictitious scattering in voxel phantoms; the adjoint source energy, angle and location distribution; 'leakage histories' and their optimisation for dose or fluence; doubly differential (energy-angle) coupling for single-, double-, or triple-shielding coupling; output of various components of dose and energy-angular fluences; survivor-specific inputs; organ dose uncertainty; and testing, benchmarking and extended applications. Also, approaches to add additional organ-shielding calculations to DS02 are discussed. PMID:21778157

  4. Accelerated (48)Ti Ions Induce Autosomal Mutations in Mouse Kidney Epithelium at Low Dose and Fluence.

    PubMed

    Hryciw, Gwen; Grygoryev, Dmytro; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Dan, Cristian; Madhira, Ravi; Eckelmann, Bradley; Gauny, Stacey; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to high-energy charged particles (HZE ions) at low fluence could significantly affect astronaut health after prolonged missions in deep space by inducing mutations and related cancers. We tested the hypothesis that the mutagenic effects of HZE ions could be detected at low fluence in a mouse model that detects autosomal mutations in vivo. Aprt heterozygous mice were exposed to 0.2, 0.4 and 1.4 Gy of densely ionizing (48)Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm). We observed a dose-dependent increase in the Aprt mutant fraction in kidney epithelium at the two lowest doses (an average of 1 or 2 particles/cell nucleus) that plateaued at the highest dose (7 particles/cell nucleus). Mutant cells were expanded to determine mutation spectra and translocations affecting chromosome 8, which encodes Aprt. A PCR-based analysis for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events on chromosome 8 demonstrated a significant shift in the mutational spectrum from Ti ion exposure, even at low fluence, by revealing "radiation signature" mutations in mutant cells from exposed mice. Likewise, a cytogenetic assay for nonreciprocal chromosome 8 translocations showed an effect of exposure. A genome-wide LOH assay for events affecting nonselected chromosomes also showed an effect of exposure even for the lowest dose tested. Considered in their entirety, these results show that accelerated (48)Ti ions induce large mutations affecting one or more chromosomes at low dose and fluence. PMID:26397174

  5. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  6. Optimizing photon fluence measurements for the accurate determination of detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Molly; Zhang, Da; Rong, John; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2009-10-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the error contributed by photon fluence measurements to the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of an x-ray imaging system. The investigation consisted of separate error analyses for the exposure and spectrum measurements that determine the photon fluence. Methods were developed for each to determine the number of measurements required to achieve an acceptable error. A new method for calculating the magnification factor in the exposure measurements was presented and compared to the existing method. The new method not only produces much lower error at small source-to-image distances (SIDs) such as clinical systems, but is also independent of SID. The exposure and spectra results were combined to determine the photon fluence error contribution to the DQE of 4%. The error in this study is small because the measurements resulted from precisely controlled experimental procedures designed to minimize the error. However, these procedures are difficult to follow in clinical environments, and application of this method on clinical systems could therefore provide important insight into error reduction. This investigation was focused on the error in the photon fluence contribution to the DQE, but the error analysis method can easily be extended to a wide range of applications.

  7. New method for estimation of fluence complexity in IMRT fields and correlation with gamma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanušová, T.; Vondráček, V.; Badraoui-Čuprová, K.; Horáková, I.; Koniarová, I.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimation of fluence complexity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields is proposed. Unlike other previously published works, it is based on portal images calculated by the Portal Dose Calculation algorithm in Eclipse (version 8.6, Varian Medical Systems) in the plane of the EPID aS500 detector (Varian Medical Systems). Fluence complexity is given by the number and the amplitudes of dose gradients in these matrices. Our method is validated using a set of clinical plans where fluence has been smoothed manually so that each plan has a different level of complexity. Fluence complexity calculated with our tool is in accordance with the different levels of smoothing as well as results of gamma analysis, when calculated and measured dose matrices are compared. Thus, it is possible to estimate plan complexity before carrying out the measurement. If appropriate thresholds are determined which would distinguish between acceptably and overly modulated plans, this might save time in the re-planning and re-measuring process.

  8. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  9. Corrosion behaviors of Mo coating on stainless steel 316 substrates implanted by different nitrogen ion fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Madjid; Bafandeh, Nastaran

    2014-03-01

    The molybdenum nitride coating was produced by nitrogen ion implantation of the molybdenum layer deposited on the stainless steel 316 (SS) substrates. At first, molybdenum layers were deposited on the substrates by ion beam sputtering method, then nitrogen ions with an energy of 30 keV and a fluence between 1×1017 and 12×1017 N+ cm-2 were implanted in Mo/SS system. Crystal structure and topography of the surface are investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image respectively. XRD patterns showed the formation of molybdenum nitride phases in all implanted samples. Corrosion tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the nitrogen applied fluences. A considerable improvement of corrosion performance by increasing ions fluences was observed. The lowest corrosion current density with amount of 0.1 μA/cm2 was obtained at 12×1017 ions/cm2 fluence in our case.

  10. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  11. Absolute Neutron Fluence Measurements at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Anderson, E.; Snow, M.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.

    2015-10-01

    Precise, absolute fluence measurements of cold and thermal neutron beams are of primary importance to beam-type determinations of the neutron lifetime, measurements of standard neutron cross sections, and the development of standards for neutron dosimetry. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a totally absorbing neutron detector based on absolute counting of the 10B(n,α1)7Li reaction 478 keV gamma ray has been used to perform fluence measurements with a precision of 0.06%. This detector has been used to improve the neutron fluence determination in the 2000 NIST beam neutron lifetime by a factor of five, significantly reducing the uncertainty in the lifetime result. Ongoing and possible future uses of the Alpha-Gamma device include 1) Calibration of the neutron fluence monitors that will be used in the upcoming NIST beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2; 2) The first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy; 3) Measurements of the 10B(n, γ)11B and 235U(n,f) neutron cross sections; 4) A re-calibration of the national neutron standard NBS-1. The apparatus, measurement technique, and applications will be discussed.

  12. Ultra low fluence rate photodynamic therapy: simulation of light emitted by the Cerenkov effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Jonathan; Wang, Fred; Zamora, Genesis; Trinidad, Anthony; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    PDT has been shown to be most effective at low fluence rates. Many radionuclides used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes produce measurable amounts of visible radiation when they decay via the Cerenkov effect which occurs when a charged particle travels faster in a dielectric medium than the speed of light in that medium. Cerenkov radiation from radiopharmaceuticals could serve as a source of extended duration, low level "internal" light, to mediate PDT, with the ultimate goals of overcoming some its current limitations. Using laser light, we are exploring the effects of fluence rates that could be generated by Cerenkov radiation on PDT efficacy. ALA or TPPS2a mediated PDT of rat gliomas monolayers or multicell spheroids ( F98, C6) was performed with 410 nm laser light exposure over an extended period of 24-96hrs. Photosensitizers were delivered either as a bolus or continuously with light exposure. At fluence rate of 20μW/cm2 effective PDT was obtained as measured by decrease in cell viability or inhibition of spheroid growth. PDT is effective at ultra low fluence rates if given over long time periods. No lower threshold has been ascertained. Since the half-life of 90Y, a radionuclide with a high Cherenkov yield is 64 hrs it is a good candidate to supply sufficient light activation for PDT. The combination of radionuclide and photodynamic therapies could improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment by exploiting synergies between these two modalities.

  13. Absolute neutron fluence measurements between 0.5 and 3MeV and their intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. W.; Guung, T. C.; Pei, C. C.; Yang, T. N.; Hwang, W. S.; Thomas, D. J.

    1999-02-01

    Primary standards of monoenergetic neutron fluences for 0.565, 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction have been developed for the calibration of neutron dosimeters and spectrometers. The fluences for 0.565MeV neutrons were measured using both H2 and CH4 proton recoil proportional counters with the measured spectra fitted to the modified SPEC-4 Monte Carlo simulations for the subtraction of gamma and recoil carbons. The fluences for 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons were determined with vacuum-type proton recoil telescopes. Various uncertainties for each detector are analyzed and its overall uncertainty is 3.1% for gas counter and less than 3% for the telescope. These neutron fluence standards have been intercompared with those of the National Physical Laboratory of the United Kingdom by the use of two transfer instruments: a long counter and a 3He detector. The comparison results will be presented and discussed.

  14. Calculated values of atomic oxygen fluences and solar exposure on selected surfaces of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. R.; Pippin, H. G.; Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) fluences and solar exposure have been modeled for selected hardware from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The atomic oxygen exposure was modeled using the microenvironment modeling code SHADOWV2. The solar exposure was modeled using the microenvironment modeling code SOLSHAD version 1.0.

  15. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.L.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  16. Monte Carlo fluence simulation for prospective evaluation of interstitial photodynamic therapy treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) delivers a localized cytotoxic dose that is a function of tissue oxygen availability, photosensitive drug concentration, and light fluence. Providing safe and effective PDT requires an understanding of all three elements and the physiological response to the radicals generated. Interstitial PDT (IPDT) for solid tumours poses particular challenges due to complex organ geometries and the associated limitations for diffusion theory based fluence rate prediction, in addition to restricted access for light delivery and dose monitoring. As a first step towards enabling a complete prospective IPDT treatment-planning platform, we demonstrate use of our previously developed FullMonte tetrahedral Monte Carlo simulation engine for modeling of the interstitial fluence field due to intravesicular insertion of brief light sources. The goal is to enable a complete treatment planning and monitoring work flow analogous to that used in ionizing radiation therapy, including plan evaluation through dose-volume histograms and algorithmic treatment plan optimization. FullMonte is to our knowledge the fastest open-source tetrahedral MC light propagation software. Using custom hardware acceleration, we achieve 4x faster computing with 67x better power efficiency for limited-size meshes compared to the software. Ongoing work will improve the performance advantage to 16x with unlimited mesh size, enabling algorithmic plan optimization in reasonable time. Using FullMonte, we demonstrate significant new plan-evaluation capabilities including fluence field visualization, generation of organ dose-volume histograms, and rendering of isofluence surfaces for a representative bladder cancer mesh from a real patient. We also discuss the advantages of MC simulations for dose-volume histogram generation and the need for online personalized fluence-rate monitoring.

  17. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. PMID:15353732

  18. SU-E-J-69: Iterative Deconvolution of the Initial Photon Fluence for EPID Dosimetry: A Monte Carlo Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, D; Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Shishechian, D Uchimura; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Developing a fast and accurate calculation model to reconstruct the applied photon fluence from an external photon radiation therapy treatment based on an image recorded by an electronic portal image device (EPID). Methods: To reconstruct the initial photon fluence the 2D EPID image was corrected for scatter from the patient/phantom and EPID to generate the transmitted primary photon fluence. This was done by an iterative deconvolution using precalculated point spread functions (PSF). The transmitted primary photon fluence was then backprojected through the patient/phantom geometry considering linear attenuation to receive the initial photon fluence applied for the treatment.The calculation model was verified using Monte Carlo simulations performed with the EGSnrc code system. EPID images were produced by calculating the dose deposition in the EPID from a 6 MV photon beam irradiating a water phantom with air and bone inhomogeneities and the ICRP anthropomorphic voxel phantom. Results: The initial photon fluence was reconstructed using a single PSF and position dependent PSFs which depend on the radiological thickness of the irradiated object. Appling position dependent point spread functions the mean uncertainty of the reconstructed initial photon fluence could be reduced from 1.13 % to 0.13 %. Conclusion: This study presents a calculation model for fluence reconstruction from EPID images. The{sup Result} show a clear advantage when position dependent PSF are used for the iterative reconstruction. The basic work of a reconstruction method was established and further evaluations must be made in an experimental study.

  19. Space Environment Effects: Model for Emission of Solar Protons (ESP)--Cumulative and Worst-Case Event Fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Barth, J. L.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Burke, Edward A.; Gee, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary and polar orbits and for interplanetary missions. Designers of spacecraft and mission planners are required to assess the performance of microelectronic systems under a variety of conditions. A number of useful approaches exist for predicting information about solar proton event fluences and, to a lesser extent, peak fluxes. This includes the cumulative fluence over the course of a mission, the fluence of a worst-case event during a mission, the frequency distribution of event fluences, and the frequency distribution of large peak fluxes. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the sponsorship of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program, have developed a new model for predicting cumulative solar proton fluences and worst-case solar proton events as functions of mission duration and user confidence level. This model is called the Emission of Solar Protons (ESP) model.

  20. High fluence ion beam modification of polymer surfaces: EPR and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popok, V. N.; Azarko, I. I.; Odzhaev, V. B.; Tóth, A.; Khaibullin, R. I.

    2001-05-01

    Polyethylene, polyamide-6 and polyimide foils implanted with 100 keV B+, P+ and Sb + ions to a fluence range of 10 15-10 17 cm-2 have been studied using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods. The experimental data allow the comparison of the implantation-induced changes both in a given polymer foil under different ion beam regimes and in different polymers under similar ion-bombardment conditions. The high fluence implantation of boron ions, depositing energy mainly via electronic stopping, was found to be accompanied with the effective formation of π-bonded carbon-rich clusters. By contrast, heavier (phosphorus and antimony) ions, which deposit energy predominantly in nuclear collisions, produced a lower concentration of π-radicals and a less carbonised top surface layer. The peculiarities and main trends of the alterations of the polymer structure and composition induced via electronic and nuclear stopping have also been discussed.

  1. Effect of temperature and photon fluence rate on gametophytes and young sporophytes of Laminaria ochroleuca Pylaie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, José Luis; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel; Gallardo, Tomás

    2002-02-01

    We analysed the effects of temperature and photon fluence rate on meiospore germination, growth and fertility of gametophytes, and growth of young sporophytes of Laminaria ochroleuca. Maximum percentages of germination (91-98%) were obtained at 15°C and 18°C, independent of photon fluence rate. Optimal development of female gametophyte and maximum fecundity and reproductive success of gametophytes occurred at 15°C and 18°C and at 20 and 40 µmol m-2 s-1. Maximum relative growth rate of young sporophytes after 2 weeks of culture was achieved under the same conditions. L. ochroleuca gametophytes cannot reproduce and growth of its sporophytes is not competitive at temperatures close to 10°C.

  2. (129)I dispersion in Argentina: concentrations in fresh and marine water and deposition fluences in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Negri, Agustín E; Fernández Niello, Jorge O; Wallner, Anton; Arazi, Andrés; Fifield, Leslie K; Tims, Stephen G

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of total iodine (I) and iodine-129 ((129)I) concentrations in rivers and lakes of Argentina are presented. Their latitudinal distribution can be explained by taking into account their main sources (oceanic emissions and biomass burning for I, and atmospheric nuclear tests for (129)I), transport mechanisms, and fallout patterns. From the measured (129)I concentrations in the studied lakes, deposition fluences for their catchment areas were estimated. These results agree with a model of the global deposition pattern due to the (129)I released by atmospheric nuclear weapon tests and with other fluences reported for the southern hemisphere. In addition, the first measurements of (129)I in shallow seawater from the South Atlantic Ocean are presented and discussed. PMID:23931086

  3. An altitude and distance correction to the initial fluence distribution of TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrøder Nisi, Ragnhild; Østgaard, Nikolai; Gjesteland, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The initial fluence distribution of Terrestrial Gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but very few have considered how the distribution of TGF production altitudes and horizontal distances from the satellite affects the initial distribution. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with altitude and distance these might be important factors. We have assessed the issue by using the tropopause pressure as an approximation to the TGF production altitude and WWLLN spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of RHESSI TGFs found in the new search of the RHESSI data. The results indicate that the altitude distribution and distance should be considered when investigating the initial fluence distribution of TGFs.

  4. Effect of extreme radiation fluences on parameters of SiC nuclear particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. M. Lebedev, A. A.; Strokan, N. B.

    2006-10-15

    Detectors based on modern CVD-grown films were irradiated with 8 MeV protons at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. The concentration of primary radiation defects was {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of the initially present uncompensated donors. The resulting deep compensation of SiC enabled measurements of detector parameters in two modes: under reverse and forward bias. The basic parameters of the detectors degraded by no more than a factor of 1.7, compared with the fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. However, there appeared a polarization voltage, which indicates that a space charge is accumulated by radiation defects.

  5. A Method to Estimate the Fast-Neutron Fluence for the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tokushi; Imamura, Mineo; Shibata, Seiichi; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Ohkubo, Tohru; Satoh, Shinngo; Nogawa, Norio; Hasai, Hiromi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hoshi, Masaharu; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A new method to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb is proposed. 63Ni produced by the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction provides a unique measure by which to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombs, because the half-life of 63Ni is 100 years and 70% of the 63Ni produced in a copper piece presently exists after 50 years. Using the neutron spectrum given in DS86 and the estimated cross section, we found that a piece of copper of about 10 g which was exposed at a point around 100 m from the hypocenter gives a measurable amount of 63Ni using a low-background liquid scintillation counter. For the measurement of 63Ni, accelerator mass spectrometry also seems to be applicable.

  6. Generation of nanoparticles at a fluence less than the ablation threshold using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odachi, Go; Sakamoto, Ryosuke; Hara, Kento; Yagi, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond laser machining of crystalline Si in vacuum resulted in the formation of pillars and particles of ∼100 nm in size at the wall surfaces and the periphery of the ablated hole. These structures were created at a laser fluence below the ablation threshold. The nanopillars and nanoparticles appear to grow from the target surface. The target surface near the particles showed molten features with descending height, indicating significant mass transport from the surface layer to the particles. The nanopillars and nanoparticles likely formed as a result of successive crystal growth processes including amorphization of the laser-irradiated target surface, followed by crystalline nucleation, melting of the amorphous Si surrounding the crystalline particles, and liquid Si creeping over particle surfaces leading to an increase in particle size. By repeating these processes, the particles grow in cumulative laser shots. These particles are the major debris components distributed near micron-sized holes formed at the ablation threshold fluence in vacuum.

  7. Simulation of the dependence of spatial fluence profiles on tissue optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Medical laser applications are promoted as safe, effective treatments for a multiplicity of concerns, ranging from hyperthermal skin rejuvenation to subcutaneous tumor ablation. Chromophore and structural protein concentration and distribution within a patient's tissue vary from patient to patient and dictate the interaction of incident radiative energy of a specific wavelength with the target tissue. Laser parameters must be matched to tissue optical and thermal properties in order to achieve the desired therapeutic results without inducing unnecessary tissue damage, although accurate tissue optical properties are not always measured prior to and during laser therapies. A weighted variable step size Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation of skin tissue was used to determine the effects of variations in absorption (μa) and scattering coefficients (μs) and the degree of anisotropy (g) on the radiant energy transport per mm2 in response to steady-state photon propagation. The three parameters were varied in a factorial experimental design for the ranges of 0.25/mm <= μa <= 2.0/mm, 30.0/mm <= μs <= 140.0/mm, and 0.65 <= g <= 0.99 in order to isolate their impacts on the overall fluence distribution. Box plots of the resulting fluence profiles were created and compared to identify ranges in which optical property variance could be considered to significantly impact the spatial variance of fluence within the simulation volume. Results indicated that accurate prediction of the fluence profiles that will be achieved by any given medical laser treatment is unlikely without pre-treatment assessment of the tissue optical properties of individual patients.

  8. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept.

  9. Fractal hydrodynamic model of high-fluence laser ablation plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Focsa, C.

    2010-10-08

    Optical/electrical characterization of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence (up to 1 kJ/cm{sup 2}) laser ablation of various targets revealed as a general feature the splitting of the plume in two structures. In order to account for this behavior, a new fractal hydrodynamic model has been developed in a non-differentiable space-time. The model successfully retrieves the kinetics of the two structures.

  10. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  11. On the use of quality factors and fluence to dose rate conversion in human radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondhaus, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that various combinations of numbers and factors arrive at estimates of dose and dose effectiveness from values of fluence; but as yet it has not been possible to use biological data with the same degree of precision to estimate the physical data. It would seem that the most reasonable way to use the human data that exist is to apply them as far as possible to the human animal as a whole.

  12. Fluence field modulated CT on a clinical TomoTherapy radiation therapy machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) assembly present on TomoTherapy (Accuray, Madison WI) radiation therapy (RT) and mega voltage CT machines is well suited to perform fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT). In addition, there is a demand in the RT environment for FFMCT imaging techniques, specifically volume of interest (VOI) imaging. Methods: A clinical TomoTherapy machine was programmed to deliver 30% imaging dose outside predefined VOIs. Four different size ROIs were placed at varying distances from isocenter. Projections intersecting the VOI received "full dose" while those not intersecting the VOI received 30% of the dose (i.e. the incident fluence for non VOI projections was 30% of the incident fluence for projections intersecting the VOI). Additional scans without fluence field modulation were acquired at "full" and 30% dose. The noise (pixel standard deviation) was measured inside the VOI region and compared between the three scans. Results: The VOI-FFMCT technique produced an image noise 1.09, 1.05, 1.05, and 1.21 times higher than the "full dose" scan for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region. Conclusions: Noise levels can be almost unchanged within clinically relevant VOIs sizes for RT applications while the integral imaging dose to the patient can be decreased, and/or the image quality in RT can be dramatically increased with no change in dose relative to non-FFMCT RT imaging. The ability to shift dose away from regions unimportant for clinical evaluation in order to improve image quality or reduce imaging dose has been demonstrated. This paper demonstrates that FFMCT can be performed using the MLC on a clinical TomoTherapy machine for the first time.

  13. Changes in relative light fluence measured during laser heating: implications for optical monitoring and modelling of interstitial laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, L. C. L.; Whelan, W. M.; Sherar, M. D.; Vitkin, I. A.

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic changes in internal light fluence were measured during interstitial laser heating of tissue phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver. In albumen phantoms, the results demonstrate an unexpected rise in optical power transmitted ≈1 cm away from the source during laser exposure at low power (0.5-1 W), and a decrease at higher powers (1.5-2.5 W) due to coagulation and possibly charring. Similar trends were observed in liver tissue, with a rise in interstitial fluence observed during 0.5 W exposure and a drop in interstitial fluence seen at higher powers (1-1.5 W) due to tissue coagulation. At 1.5 W irradiation an additional, later decrease was also seen which was most likely due to tissue charring. Independent spectrophotometric studies in Naphthol Green dye indicate the rise in fluence observed in the heated albumen phantoms may have been primarily due to light exposure causing photobleaching of the absorbing chromophore, and not due to heat effects. Experiments in liver tissue demonstrated that the observed rise in fluence is dependent on the starting temperature of the tissue. Correlating changes in light fluence with key clinical endpoints/events such as the onset of tissue coagulation or charring may be useful for on-line monitoring and control of laser thermal therapy via interstitial fluence sensors.

  14. Fluence-Field Modulated X-ray CT using Multiple Aperture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Stayman, J. Webster; Mathews, Aswin; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Gang, Grace; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Kawamoto, Satomi; Blevis, Ira; Levinson, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel strategy for fluence field modulation (FFM) in x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices (MADs). MAD filters permit FFM by blocking or transmitting the x-ray beam on a fine (0.1–1 mm) scale. The filters have a number of potential advantages over other beam modulation strategies including the potential for a highly compact design, modest actuation speed and acceleration requirements, and spectrally neutral filtration due to their essentially binary action. In this work, we present the underlying MAD filtration concept including a design process to achieve a specific class of FFM patterns. A set of MAD filters is fabricated using a tungsten laser sintering process and integrated into an x-ray CT test bench. A characterization of the MAD filters is conducted and compared to traditional attenuating bowtie filters and the ability to flatten the fluence profile for a 32 cm acrylic phantom is demonstrated. MAD-filtered tomographic data was acquired on the CT test bench and reconstructed without artifacts associated with the MAD filter. These initial studies suggest that MAD-based FFM is appropriate for integration in clinical CT system to create patient-specific fluence field profile and reduce radiation exposures. PMID:27110052

  15. Fluence-field modulated x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stayman, J. Webster; Mathews, Aswin; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Gang, Grace; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Kawamoto, Satomi; Blevis, Ira; Levinson, Reuven

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel strategy for fluence field modulation (FFM) in x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices (MADs). MAD filters permit FFM by blocking or transmitting the x-ray beam on a fine (0.1-1 mm) scale. The filters have a number of potential advantages over other beam modulation strategies including the potential for a highly compact design, modest actuation speed and acceleration requirements, and spectrally neutral filtration due to their essentially binary action. In this work, we present the underlying MAD filtration concept including a design process to achieve a specific class of FFM patterns. A set of MAD filters is fabricated using a tungsten laser sintering process and integrated into an x-ray CT test bench. A characterization of the MAD filters is conducted and compared to traditional attenuating bowtie filters and the ability to flatten the fluence profile for a 32 cm acrylic phantom is demonstrated. MAD-filtered tomographic data was acquired on the CT test bench and reconstructed without artifacts associated with the MAD filter. These initial studies suggest that MAD-based FFM is appropriate for integration in clinical CT system to create patient-specific fluence field profile and reduce radiation exposures.

  16. Use of glazes on porcelain from near ground zero to measure Hiroshima neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, J; Fleischer, R L; Fujita, S; Hoshi, M

    2003-10-01

    Several porcelain samples from almost directly beneath the atomic explosion at Hiroshima on 6 August 1945, have been scanned for induced fission tracks, produced mostly by the thermal neutrons from the bomb due to interactions with trace uranium in their glass coatings. The ability to use porcelain opens a new and abundant material for retrospective dosimetry. Four different samples had thermal neutron fluences in 1945 of 1.0, 3.8, 4.1, and 8.9 x 10(12) cm(-2). The different values are not caused by track fading, but are likely to result from differing shielding at different nearby positions. Assuming that the three highest fluences, which have overlapping uncertainties, are at locations of minimum shielding, the statistically weighted thermal fluence in the air at ground level and ground zero was 4.8 x 10(12) cm(-2) with a statistical uncertainty of 15%. This value lies between the calculated value of 6.5 x 10(12) given in DS86 and the 3.7 x 10(12) inferred from induced radionuclides by Hoshi et al. (1998). PMID:13678283

  17. An altitude and distance correction to the source fluence distribution of TGFs

    PubMed Central

    Nisi, R S; Østgaard, N; Gjesteland, T; Collier, A B

    2014-01-01

    The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the Dobson-Brewer circulation. The main result is an indication that the altitude distribution and distance should be considered when investigating the source fluence distribution of TGFs, as this leads to a softening of the inferred distribution of source brightness. PMID:26167434

  18. Transient behaviour of quantum-dot saturable absorber mirrors at varying excitation fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, Niels; Marcinkevicius, Saulius; Pasiskevicius, Valdas

    2014-09-01

    We present results from studying the carrier dynamics in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum-dot saturable absorbers intended for mode-locking of solid-state lasers. Four samples are examined, featuring controlled variations in the resonance condition of the electric field inside the absorber, the number of quantum-dot (QD) layers and the thickness of the GaAs barriers between these QD layers. Pump-probe experiments are conducted at a wide range of excitation fluences and reveal a fast relaxation component of the initial bleaching at low excitation fluences, while a slowly relaxing induced transparency becomes dominant at higher excitation fluences. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements reveal a large and slowly relaxing induced transparency due to a capture of excess carriers from the barrier bands into the QDs and a slow radiative recombination there. The resonance condition as well as the thickness of the barriers between the QD layers can be used to control the relaxation behaviour. The fastest response is obtained in a structure with an increased number of QD layers at each individual anti-node of the electric field, which is attributed to the appearance of efficient non-radiative recombination channels and capture centres. These centres are probably related to dislocations and other defects appearing in thick QD stacks.

  19. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpki, G.; Mescher, H.; Akselrod, M. S.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u-1 carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference.

  20. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors.

    PubMed

    Klimpki, G; Mescher, H; Akselrod, M S; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u(-1) carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference. PMID:26757791

  1. Fluence-related risk coefficients using the Harderian gland data as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Fry, R. J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept is introduced for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer to space travelers: a fluence-related risk coefficient F (called the risk cross section), which is the risk of a cancer per unit particle fluence for a given particle type. Fs are functions of the LET of the particles in the radiation field and, when integrated over fluence-LET spectra and summed, yield the risk of the endpoint of interest. As an example, tumor prevalence data in mice are used to estimate the probability of the induction of mouse Harderian-gland tumor per year on an extramagnetospheric mission inside an idealized shielding configuration of a spherical 1 g/sq cm hick aluminum shell. Results indicate a yearly tumor prevalence of 0.06 at solar minimum conditions, with 60 percent of this arising from charge components with Z between 10 and 28, and two-thirds of the contribution arising from LET components between 10 and 200 keV/micron.

  2. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-04-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT.

  3. Recrystallization in polyvinylidene fluoride upon low fluence swift heavy ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A.; Gupta, R.; Kumar, N.; Avasthi, D. K.; Singh, J. P.; Lotha, S.; Fink, D.; Paul, S. N.; Bose, S. K.

    2001-06-25

    Thin films (9 {mu}m) of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are irradiated by swift heavy ions (180 MeV Ag{sup 14+}) in the fluence range 1{times}10{sup 10}{endash}1{times}10{sup 12}ions/cm{sup 2} with an electronic linear energy transfer LET{similar_to}11 keV/nm. In sharp contrast to the previous results, the most characteristic crystalline asymmetric and symmetric {open_quotes}CH{sub 2}{close_quotes} doublets (located at 3025 and 2985 cm{sup {minus}1}), have shown remarkable increase in their respective Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorbance intensities upon low fluence ion impact (10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2}). This increase in absorbance is in consonance with the simultaneous decrease of the transmission intensities of other crystalline bending vibration bands located at 532 (CF{sub 2} bending), 614, 796, and 975 cm{sup {minus}1} (all due to CH{sub 2} bending) at the similar ion fluence. It appears most probable from the results that, being a polar polymer, the molecular dipoles in PVDF forming a hydrogen bond network get realigned upon irradiation into a highly ordered state of chain molecules in the crystalline regions and create volume elements as crystallites. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm{sup 2}, 495 mJ/cm{sup 2}, and 637 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications.

  5. An altitude and distance correction to the source fluence distribution of TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisi, R. S.; Østgaard, N.; Gjesteland, T.; Collier, A. B.

    2014-10-01

    The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the Dobson-Brewer circulation. The main result is an indication that the altitude distribution and distance should be considered when investigating the source fluence distribution of TGFs, as this leads to a softening of the inferred distribution of source brightness.

  6. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. PMID:25222335

  7. In vivo light fluence correction for determination of tissue absorption coefficient using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic Tomography is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound detection with the high contrast available from optical absorption in tissue. The spectral profile of near infrared excitation light used in optoacoustic tomography instruments is modified by absorption and scattering as it propagates deep into biological tissue. The resulting images therefore provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. Knowledge of the spectral profile of excitation light across the mouse is needed for accurate determination of the absorption coefficient in vivo. Under the conditions of constant Grueneisen parameter and accurate knowledge of the light fluence, a linear relationship should exist between the initial optoacoustic pressure amplitude and the tissue absorption coefficient. Using data from a commercial optoacoustic tomography system, we implemented an iterative optimization based on the σ-Eddington approximation to the Radiative Transfer Equation to derive a light fluence map within a given object. We segmented the images based on the positions of phantom inclusions, or mouse organs, and used known scattering coefficients for initialization. Performing the fluence correction in simple phantoms allowed the expected linear relationship between recorded and independently measured absorption coefficients to be retrieved and spectral coloring to be compensated. For in vivo data, the correction resulted in an enhancement of signal intensities in deep tissues. This improved our ability to visualize organs at depth (> 5mm). Future work will aim to perform the optimization without data normalization and explore the need for methodology that enables routine implementation for in vivo imaging.

  8. The meteoroid fluence at Mars due to Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Wiegert, Paul A.; Cooke, William J.

    2014-03-01

    Long-period Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will experience a close encounter with Mars on 2014 October 19. As of 2013 October 21, the distance of closest approach between the two is projected to be between 89,000 km and 173,000 km, with a nominal value of 131,000 km. Thus, a collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comet’s coma may very well envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present a simple analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. We find that this model successfully reproduces, to within an order of magnitude, particle fluxes measured by spacecraft Giotto in the coma of 1P/Halley and by spacecraft Stardust in the coma of 81P/Wild 2. We apply our analytic model to C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and compute the expected total fluence of potentially damaging particles at Mars at the time of closest approach between the two bodies; we obtain a nominal fluence of 0.15 particles per square meter. We conduct numerical simulations of particle ejection from the comet’s nucleus and compare the resulting spatial distribution with that of our analytic model, and conclude that our spherically symmetric analytic model is adequate for order-of-magnitude fluence estimates.

  9. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Gladstone, David; Pogue, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Cherenkov radiation has emerged as a novel source of light with a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. It's unique properties, including its broadband emission spectrum, spectral weighting in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue have made it an attractive source of light for techniques ranging from widefield imaging to oximetry and phototherapy. To help guide the future development of this field in the context of molecular imaging, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rates of Cherenkov radiation from a number of radionuclide and external radiotherapy beams in tissue was explored for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.1 - 1 nW/cm2 per MBq/g for radionuclides and 1 - 10 μW/cm2 per Gy/sec for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband and optical properties. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ/cm2 for radionuclides, and mJ/cm2 for radiotherapy beams. To validate these findings, experimental validation was completed with an MV x-ray photon beam incident onto a tissue phantom, confirming the magnitudes of the simulation values. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at these relatively low fluence values.

  10. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Szczykutowicz, TP; Mistretta, CA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. Methods: X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of 10 iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or “flat field” scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. Results The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to “flat field” CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. Conclusions

  11. Analysis of the longitudinal dependence of the downstream fluence of large solar energetic proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Daniel; Sanahuja, Blai; Aran, Angels; Agueda, Neus; Jiggens, Piers

    2016-07-01

    Simulations of the solar energetic particle (SEP) intensity-time profiles are needed to estimate the radiation environment for interplanetary missions. At present, the physics-based models applied for such a purpose, and including a moving source of particles, are not able to model the portion of the SEP intensity enhancement occurring after the coronal/interplanetary shock crossing by the observer (a.k.a. the downstream region). This is the case, for example, of the shock-and-particle model used to build the SOLPENCO2 code. SOLPENCO2 provides the statistical modelling tool developed in the ESA/SEPEM project for interplanetary missions with synthetic SEP event simulations for virtual spacecraft located at heliocentric distances between 0.2 AU and 1.6 AU (http://dev.sepem.oma.be/). In this work we present an analysis of 168 individual SEP events observed at 1 AU from 1988 to 2013. We identify the solar eruptive phenomena associated with these SEP events, as well as the in-situ passage of interplanetary shocks. For each event, we quantify the amount of fluence accounted in the downstream region, i.e. after the passage of the shock, at the 11 SEPEM reference energy channels (i.e., from 5 to 300 MeV protons). First, from the subset of SEP events simultaneously detected by near Earth spacecraft (using SEPEM reference data) and by one of the STEREO spacecraft, we select those events for which the downstream region can be clearly determined. From the 8 selected multi-spacecraft events, we find that the western observations of each event have a minor downstream contribution than their eastern counterpart, and that the downstream-to-total fluence ratio of these events decreases as a function of the energy. Hence, there is a variation of the downstream fluence with the heliolongitude in SEP events. Based on this result, we study the variation of the downstream-to-total fluence ratios of the total set of individual events. We confirm the eastern-to-western decrease of the

  12. Analytic IMRT dose calculations utilizing Monte Carlo to predict MLC fluence modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Lerma, F. A.; Wu, Y.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid dose-computation method is designed which accurately accounts for multileaf collimator (MLC)-induced intensity modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculations. The method employs Monte Carlo (MC) modeling to determine the fluence modulation caused by the delivery of dynamic or multisegmental (step-and-shoot) MLC fields, and a conventional dose-computation algorithm to estimate the delivered dose to a phantom or a patient. Thus, it determines the IMRT fluence prediction accuracy achievable by analytic methods in the limit that the analytic method includes all details of the MLC leaf transport and scatter. The hybrid method is validated and benchmarked by comparison with in-phantom film dose measurements, as well as dose calculations from two in-house, and two commercial treatment planning system analytic fluence estimation methods. All computation methods utilize the same dose algorithm to calculate dose to a phantom, varying only in the estimation of the MLC modulation of the incident photon energy fluence. Gamma analysis, with respect to measured two-dimensional (2D) dose planes, is used to benchmark each algorithm’s performance. The analyzed fields include static and dynamic test patterns, as well as fields from ten DMLC IMRT treatment plans (79 fields) and five SMLC treatment plans (29 fields). The test fields (fully closed MLC, picket fence, sliding windows of different size, and leaf-tip profiles) cover the extremes of MLC usage during IMRT, while the patient fields represent realistic clinical conditions. Of the methods tested, the hybrid method most accurately reproduces measurements. For the hybrid method, 79 of 79 DMLC field calculations have γ ≤1 (3% /3 mm) for more than 95% of the points (per field) while for SMLC fields, 27 of 29 pass the same criteria. The analytic energy fluence estimation methods show inferior pass rates, with 76 of 79 DMLC and 24 of 29 SMLC fields having more than 95% of the test points

  13. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, A.; Wiegert, P.; Blaauw, R.; McCarty, C.; Kingery, A.; Cooke, W.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will experience a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comet's coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. By the time of the close encounter, five operational spacecraft will be present near Mars. Characterizing the coma is crucial for assessing the risk posed to these satellites by meteoroid impacts. We present an analytic model of cometary comae that describes the spatial and size distributions of cometary dust and meteoroids. This model correctly reproduces, to within an order of magnitude, the number of impacts recorded by Giotto near 1P/Halley [1] and by Stardust near comet 81P/Wild 2 [2]. Applied to Siding Spring, our model predicts a total particle fluence near Mars of 0.02 particles per square meter. In order to determine the degree to which Siding Spring's coma deviates from a sphere, we perform numerical simulations which take into account both gravitational effects and radiative forces. We take the entire dust component of the coma and tail continuum into account by simulating the ejection and evolution of dust particles from comet Siding Spring. The total number of particles simulated is essentially a free parameter and does not provide a check on the total fluence. Instead, these simulations illustrate the degree to which the coma of Siding Spring deviates from the perfect sphere described by our analytic model (see Figure). We conclude that our analytic model sacrifices less than an order of magnitude in accuracy by neglecting particle dynamics and radiation pressure and is thus adequate for order-of-magnitude fluence estimates. Comet properties may change unpredictably and therefore an analytic coma model that enables quick recalculation of the meteoroid fluence is highly desirable. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office is monitoring comet Siding Spring and taking measurements of cometary brightness and dust production. We

  14. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Mahmood, Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10-3 Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm-2 to 6 J cm-2. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas Csbnd H stretching vibration band is formed for two moderate fluences (5 J cm-2 and 5.5 J cm-2) in case of ablation in hydrogen. Raman spectroscopy shows that no new bands are formed in case of ablation in both environments; however a slight Raman shift is observed which is attributed to laser-induced stresses. The electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge increases with increasing fluence and is also dependent upon the environment as well as grown structures.

  15. Estimation of Covariances on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Impact of the PFNS Model on the Vessel Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Léonie; Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Archier, Pascal; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Pénéliau, Yannick; Regnier, David

    2016-02-01

    As the need for precise handling of nuclear data covariances grows ever stronger, no information about covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are available in the evaluated library JEFF-3.2, although present in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries for the main fissile isotopes. The aim of this work is to provide an estimation of covariance matrices related to PFNS, in the frame of some commonly used models for the evaluated files, such as the Maxwellian spectrum, the Watt spectrum, or the Madland-Nix spectrum. The evaluation of PFNS through these models involves an adjustment of model parameters to available experimental data, and the calculation of the spectrum variance-covariance matrix arising from experimental uncertainties. We present the results for thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. The systematic experimental uncertainties are propagated via the marginalization technique available in the CONRAD code. They are of great influence on the final covariance matrix, and therefore, on the spectrum uncertainty band width. In addition to this covariance estimation work, we have also investigated the importance on a reactor calculation of the fission spectrum model choice. A study of the vessel fluence depending on the PFNS model is presented. This is done through the propagation of neutrons emitted from a fission source in a simplified PWR using the TRIPOLI-4® code. This last study includes thermal fission spectra from the FIFRELIN Monte-Carlo code dedicated to the simulation of prompt particles emission during fission.

  16. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Böcklin, Christoph Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-02-14

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

  17. Epoxy-paint stripping using TEA CO2 laser: Determination of threshold fluence and the process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhargava, P.; Biswas, A. K.; Sahu, Shasikiran; Mandloi, V.; Ittoop, M. O.; Khattak, B. Q.; Tiwari, M. K.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that the threshold fluence for laser paint stripping can be accurately estimated from the heat of gasification and the absorption coefficient of the epoxy-paint. The threshold fluence determined experimentally by stripping of the epoxy-paint on a substrate using a TEA CO2 laser matches closely with the calculated value. The calculated threshold fluence and the measured absorption coefficient of the paint allowed us to determine the epoxy paint thickness that would be removed per pulse at a given laser fluence even without experimental trials. This was used to predict the optimum scan speed required to strip the epoxy-paint of a given thickness using a high average power TEA CO2 laser. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) studies were also carried out on laser paint-stripped concrete substrate to show high efficacy of this modality.

  18. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ∼1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ∼100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  19. Solar proton fluences as observed during 1966-1972 and as predicted for 1977-1983 space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The probability with which any given proton fluence level will be exceeded during a space mission is computed for missions to be flown during the active phase of the next solar cycle (1977-1983). This probability is a function of fluence level, proton energy threshold, and mission duration. Data on the major solar proton events of 1966-1972 are given; it is argued that only this data set (and not that of the previous solar cycle) is appropriate for estimating next-cycle fluences. Probable numbers of each of the two types of events are estimated from Burrell's extension of Poisson statistics. Fluences of all future anomalously large events are assumed to have a common spectrum, that given by the August 1972 event. Fluences of the ordinary events are assumed to obey a log normal distribution. It is shown that for much of the confidence-level mission-duration regime of interest, at least one anomalously large event will occur; and given such an occurrence, the ordinary-event contribution to mission fluence is negligible.

  20. Physics of the Isotopic Dependence of Galactic Cosmic Ray Fluence Behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Saganti, Premkumar B.; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2003-01-01

    For over 25 years, NASA has supported the development of space radiation transport models for shielding applications. The NASA space radiation transport model now predicts dose and dose equivalent in Earth and Mars orbit to an accuracy of plus or minus 20%. However, because larger errors may occur in particle fluence predictions, there is interest in further assessments and improvements in NASA's space radiation transport model. In this paper, we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. Using NASA's quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, we study the effect of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and secondary nuclei on shielding calculations. The QMSFRG is shown to accurately describe the iso-spin dependence of nuclear fragmentation. The principal finding of this study is that large errors (plus or minus 100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotope grid (approximately 170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotope grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (less than 20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotope grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  1. In situ auger analysis of surface composition during high fluence ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, D. A.; Sartwell, B. D.; Singer, I. L.

    1985-03-01

    A multi-technique ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) target chamber has been used to perform in situ Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) analysis during ion implantation and AES sputter depth profiling of the substrate within 1-2 min after implantation. Iron was implanted with 150 keV Ti + at a 45° angle of incidence in a target chamber with pressures ranging from 8 × 10 -9 Torr of residual gases up to 1 × 10 -5 Torr of intentionally admitted CO gas. A fluence of ∼1.0 × 10 16cm -2 was needed to sputter away the C-covered air-formed oxide. The implanted Ti reached the surface at the 1 at.% level by ∼1.5 × 10 16cm -2. With increasing fluence, the Ti surface concentration increased to ∼15 at.% at steady-state with a curve shape that was concave downward at all fluences. The surface C concentration was found to be proportional to that of Ti for implants in CO, supporting a vacuum carburization model. Substantial O surface concentration (15-20 at.%) was detected for these runs but depth profiles showed only carburization, not oxidation, of the implanted layer. Even in the best vacuum available (8 × 10 -9Torr), some carburization was observed and was attributed to residual gas absorption. An increase in Ti retained dose with increasing CO pressure has been observed but not yet independently confirmed. The Ti/Fe surface concentration ratio is higher for implants done in CO, and this is discussed in terms of modification of the sputter yield for Ti.

  2. Controlling Fluences of Reactive Species Produced by Multipulse DBDs onto Wet Tissue: Frequency and Liquid Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Tissue covered by a thin liquid layer treated by atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications ultimately requires a reproducible protocol for human healthcare. The outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) depend on the plasma dose which determines the integral fluences of radicals and ions onto the tissue. These fluences are controlled in part by frequency and liquid thickness. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of multipulse DBDs interacting with wet tissue. The DBDs were simulated for 100 stationary or random streamers at different repetition rates and liquid thicknesses followed by 10 s to 2 min of afterglow. At 100 Hz, NOaq and OHaq are mixed by randomly striking streamers, although they have different rates of solvation. NOaq is nearly completely consumed by reactions with OHaq at the liquid surface. Only H2O2aq, produced through OHaq mutual reactions, survives to reach the tissue. After 100 pulses, the liquid becomes ozone-rich, in which the nitrous ion, NO2-aq, is converted to the nitric ion, NO3-aq. Reducing the pulse frequency to 10 Hz results in significant fluence of NOaq to the tissue as NOaq can escape during the interpulse period from the liquid surface where OHaq is formed. For the same reason, NO2-aq can also reach deeper into the liquid at lower frequency. Frequency and thickness of the liquid are methods to control the plasma produced aqueous species to the underlying tissue. Work supported by DOE (DE-SC0001319) and NSF (CHE-1124724).

  3. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-09-01

    Cherenkov radiation has recently emerged as an interesting phenomenon for a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. Its unique properties, including broadband emission spectrum, spectral weight in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue, have made it an attractive new source of light within tissue for molecular imaging and phototherapy applications. While several studies have investigated the total Cherenkov light yield from radionuclides in units of [photons/decay], further consideration of the light propagation in tissue is necessary to fully consider the utility of this signal in vivo. Therefore, to help further guide the development of this novel field, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rate of Cherenkov radiation from both radionuclides and radiotherapy beams in a biological tissue are presented for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.01-1 nW cm(-2) per MBq g(-1) for radionuclides, and 1-100 μW cm(-2) per Gy s(-1) for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband, optical properties, and radiation source. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ cm(-2) for radionuclides, and mJ cm(-2) for radiotherapy beams. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at such exceedingly low fluence values. The results of this study are publicly available for distribution online at www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/. PMID:26270125

  4. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum progressively converges toward typical TGF spectrum as the potential drop increases. Additionally, we show that the number of streamers produced in a negative corona flash, the source electron energy distribution function, the corresponding number of photons, and the photon energy distribution and transport through the atmosphere up to low-orbit satellite altitudes exhibit a very strong dependence on this potential drop. This leads to a threshold effect causing X-rays produced by leaders with potentials lower than those producing typical TGFs extremely unlikely to be detected by low-orbit satellites. Moreover, from the number of photons in X-ray bursts produced by -CGs estimated from ground observations, we show that the proportionality between the number of thermal runaway electrons and the square of the potential drop in the leader tip region during negative corona flash proposed earlier leads to typical photon fluences on the order of 1 ph/cm2 at an altitude of 500 km and a radial distance of 200 km for intracloud lightning discharges producing 300 MV potential drops, which is consistent with observations of TGF fluences and spectra from satellites.

  5. A review of solar-proton fluence models for ISO specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goka, T.

    Statistical models of high-energy typically above 10MeV solar proton fluence in a given period and solar activity are commonly used to assess the cumulative effects of space radiation on spacecraft with respect to degradation displacement damage of solar cell generating power and total dose effects ionization damage of EEE parts of spacecraft Several models have been proposed from statistical studies of solar flare proton events over a few solar cycles these include models by Feynman et al JPL91 model Xapsos et al ESP Model and Nymmik et al MSU model in the framework of ISO technical standardization TC20 SC14 WG4 Space environment A brief review of these three models and the merits and demerits of each are reported New engineering needs have arisen Current geosynchronous GEO commercial satellites have a longer design life about 15 years exceeding the 11-year solar cycle than these 2 former models have supposed about 7 solar active years We evaluated the JPL 91 model using GOES-5-11 total 14 years and IMP-8 total 28 years fluence data Over two mission years including a solar maximum total fluence does not steadily increase The JPL 91 model overestimates cumulative damage for longer mission years That is why the European Cooperation for Space Standardization ECSS-E-10-04A Space engineering Space environment Table 31 compensates the JPL 91 model by changing the Confidence Level 97 for one year 95 for two to three years and 90 for four to seven years Also the JPL and ESP models

  6. Exit fluence analysis using portal dosimetry in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Prabakar; Padmanaban, Sriram; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Kannan, Muniyappan; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan

    2012-01-01

    Aim In measuring exit fluences, there are several sources of deviations which include the changes in the entrance fluence, changes in the detector response and patient orientation or geometry. The purpose of this work is to quantify these sources of errors. Background The use of the volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment with the help of image guidance in radiotherapy results in high accuracy of delivering complex dose distributions while sparing critical organs. The transit dosimetry has the potential of Verifying dose delivery by the linac, Multileaf collimator positional accuracy and the calculation of dose to a patient or phantom. Materials and methods The quantification of errors caused by a machine delivery is done by comparing static and arc picket fence test for 30 days. A RapidArc plan, created for the pelvis site was delivered without and with Rando phantom and exit portal images were acquired. The day to day dose variation were analysed by comparing the daily exit dose images during the course of treatment. The gamma criterion used for analysis is 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement with a threshold of 10% of maximum dose. Results The maximum standard deviation for the static and arc picket fence test fields were 0.19 CU and 1.3 CU, respectively. The delivery of the RapidArc plans without a phantom shows the maximum standard deviation of 1.85 CU and the maximum gamma value of 0.59. The maximum gamma value for the RapidArc plan delivered with the phantom was found to be 1.2. The largest observed fluence deviation during the delivery to patient was 5.7% and the maximum standard deviation was 4.1 CU. Conclusion It is found from this study that the variation due to patient anatomy and interfraction organ motion is significant. PMID:24377034

  7. Fluence-related risk coefficients using the Harderian gland data as an example.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W; Powers-Risius, P; Alpen, E L; Fry, R J

    1992-01-01

    The risk of radiation-induced cancer to space travelers outside the earth's magnetosphere will be of concern on missions to the Moon and beyond to Mars. High energy galactic cosmic rays with high charge (HZE particles) will penetrate the spacecraft and the bodies of the astronauts, sometimes fragmenting into nuclear secondary species of lower charge but always ionizing densely, thus causing cellular damage which may lead to malignant transformation. To quantitate this risk, the concept of dose equivalent (in which a quality factor Q as a function of LET is assumed) may not be adequate, since different particles of the same LET may have different efficiencies for tumor induction. Also, RBE values on which quality factors are based depend on response to low-LET radiation at low doses, a very difficult region for which to obtain reliable experimental data. Thus, we introduce a new concept, a fluence-related risk coefficient (F), which is the risk of a cancer per unit particle fluence and which we call the risk cross section. The total risk is the sum of the risk from each particle type: sigma i integral Fi(Li) phi i(Li) dLi, where Li is the LET and phi i(Li) is the fluence-LET spectrum of the ith particle type. As an example, tumor prevalence data in mice are used to estimate the probability of mouse Harderian gland tumor induction per year on an extra-magnetospheric mission inside an idealized shielding configuration of a spherical aluminum shell 1 g/cm2 thick. The combined shielding code BRYNTRN/GCR is used to generate the LET spectra at the center of the sphere. Results indicate a yearly prevalence at solar minimum conditions of 0.06, with 60% of this arising from charge components with Z between 10 and 28, and two-thirds of the contribution arising from LET components between 10 and 200 keV/micrometers. PMID:11537038

  8. A new model for the calculation and prediction of solar proton fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the energy greater than 10 MeV and greater than 30 MeV solar proton environment at earth is reviewed. The data used are from observations made from 1956 through 1985. In this data set, the distinction between 'ordinary events' and 'anomalously large events' that was required in earlier models disappeared. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for ordinary events on the entire data set. The greater than 10-MeV fluences with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of earlier models. At energies greater than 30 MeV, the old and new models agree.

  9. Investigating the Causes of Solar-Cycle Variations in Solar Energetic Particle Fluences and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewaldt, Richard; Cohen, Christina; Mason, Glenn M.; von Rosenvinge, Tycho; Li, Gang; Smith, Charles; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-04-01

    Measurements with ACE, STEREO, and GOES show that the number of large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in solar cycle 24 is reduced by a factor of ~2 compared to this point of cycle 23, while the fluences of >10 MeV/nuc ions from H to Fe are reduced by factors ranging from ~4 to ~10. We investigate the origin of these cycle-to-cycle differences by evaluating possible factors that include properties of the associated CMEs, seed particle densities, and the interplanetary magnetic field strength and turbulence levels. These properties will be evaluated in the context of existing SEP acceleration models.

  10. Exceeding the leading spike intensity and fluence limits in backward Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, V. M.; Toroker, Z.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The leading amplified spike in backward Raman amplifiers can reach nearly relativistic intensities before the saturation by the relativistic electron nonlinearity. The saturation sets an upper limit to the largest achievable leading spike intensity. It is shown here that this limit can be substantially exceeded by the initially subdominant spikes, which surprisingly outgrow the leading spike after its nonlinear saturation. Furthermore, an initially negligible group velocity dispersion of the amplified pulse in strongly undercritical plasma appears to be capable of delaying the longitudinal filamentation instability in the nonlinear saturation regime. This enables further amplification of the pulse to even larger output fluences.

  11. Exceeding the leading spike intensity and fluence limits in backward Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malkin, V M; Toroker, Z; Fisch, N J

    2014-12-01

    The leading amplified spike in backward Raman amplifiers can reach nearly relativistic intensities before the saturation by the relativistic electron nonlinearity. The saturation sets an upper limit to the largest achievable leading spike intensity. It is shown here that this limit can be substantially exceeded by the initially subdominant spikes, which surprisingly outgrow the leading spike after its nonlinear saturation. Furthermore, an initially negligible group velocity dispersion of the amplified pulse in strongly undercritical plasma appears to be capable of delaying the longitudinal filamentation instability in the nonlinear saturation regime. This enables further amplification of the pulse to even larger output fluences. PMID:25615208

  12. Measurements on HV-CMOS active sensors after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, B.

    2015-04-01

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to 2·1016 neq cm-2 are presented.

  13. Temperature coefficients for concentrator cells at various electron and proton fluence levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry B.; Hart, Russell E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented on the Isc, Voc and Pmax temperature coefficients for several small concentrator solar cells. The cells are AlGaAs (1.72 eV), GaAs, silicon and InGaAs (1.1 eV) concentrator cells operating at 6.25 and 100 times AM0. The temperature range covered was 25 to 100 C. Cells were irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 37-MeV protons, and data are presented at different fluence levels.

  14. Magnesium aluminate planar waveguides fabricated by C-ion implantation with different energies and fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Lian; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Lian; Wang, Tie-Jun; Qiao, Mei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2015-11-01

    We report on MgAl2O4 planar waveguides produced using different energies and fluences of C-ion implantation at room temperature. Based on the prism coupling method and end-face coupling measurements, light could propagate in the C-ion-implanted samples. The Raman spectra results indicate that the MgAl2O4 crystal lattice was damaged during the multi-energy C implantation process, whereas the absorption spectra were hardly affected by the C-ion implantation in the visible and infrared bands.

  15. Direct UV written planar Bragg gratings that feature zero fluence induced birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Christopher; Cooper, Peter A.; Fernando, Harendra N. J.; Stroll, Andreas; Gates, James C.; Krishnan, Chirenjeevi; Haynes, Roger; Mennea, Paolo L.; Carpenter, Lewis G.; Gawith, Corin B. E.; Roth, Martin M.; Charlton, Martin D.; Smith, Peter G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Direct UV writing is a planar fabrication process capable of simultaneously defining waveguides and Bragg gratings. The technique is fully computer controlled and uniquely uses a small focused spot ~7 μm in diameter for direct writing exposure. This work investigates its use to achieve phase trimming and Bragg grating definition in silica-on-silicon lithographic waveguides. It is observed that birefringence control using direct UV writing can be made independent of exposure fluence with this technique through tailoring substrate stress. The result is demonstrated experimentally and supported theoretically using finite element analysis.

  16. Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

    2010-08-23

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

  17. Lowering photosensitizer doses and increasing fluences induce apoptosis in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Haedicke, Katja; Graefe, Susanna; Teichgraeber, Ulf; Hilger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine an optimal dose of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for inducing apoptotic tumor cells in vivo. In this context, mice bearing human tongue-squamous epithelium carcinomas were treated with various photosensitizer concentrations and fluences. Tumor apoptosis was imaged after 2 days via a self-designed DY-734-annexin V probe using near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging. Apoptosis was verified ex vivo via TUNEL staining. Apoptotic tumor cells were detected in vivo at a dose of 40 µg photosensitizer and a fluency of 100 J/cm2. This is the lowest photosensitizer dose reported so far. PMID:27446695

  18. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  19. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  20. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  1. Stability of SiC and its Composites at High Neutron Fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Snead, Lance Lewis; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, H.

    2011-01-01

    High purity chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) and near-stoichiometric SiC fiber, chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composite were evaluated following neutron irradiation to {approx}28 dpa at 300 and 650 C and to {approx}41 dpa at 800 C, respectively. The irradiated swelling, thermal conductivity, and elastic modulus indicated no additional changes in these properties at high fluences after saturation at low fluences. With a statistically meaningful sample population, no change in flexural strength of CVD SiC was observed after 300 C irradiation. A slight decrease in strength was observed after 650 C irradiation but was attributed to an experimental artifact; specifically, a reaction between samples and the capsule components. The Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, CVI SiC composite retained the pre-irradiation strength and the non-linear fracture mode. The electrical resistivity measurement revealed a relatively minor effect of irradiation. Overall, irradiation-insensitivity of the high purity SiC ceramics and composite to neutron irradiation to doses 30-40 dpa at temperatures 300-800 C was demonstrated.

  2. Neutron fluence rate measurements in a PGNAA 208-liter drum assay system using silicon carbide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulloo, A. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Seidel, J. G.; Lee, S.; Petrović, B.; McIlwain, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is being implemented for the nondestructive assay (NDA) of mercury, cadmium and lead in containers of radioactive waste. A PGNAA prototype system capable of assaying 208-liter (55-gallon) drums has already been built and demonstrated. As part of the evaluation of this system, the thermal neutron fluence rate distribution in a drum containing a combustible waste surrogate was measured during PGNAA runs using a silicon carbide neutron detector. The fast charge-collection time of this detector type enabled the investigation of the neutron kinetics at various locations within the matrix during and between pulses of the system's 14-MeV neutron source. As expected, the response of a SiC detector equipped with a lithium-6 fluoride layer is dominated by thermal neutron-induced events between pulses. The measurement results showed that the thermal neutron fluence rate is relatively uniform over a radial depth of several centimeters in the matrix region that contributes a significant fraction of the prompt gamma radiation incident on the system's photon detector.

  3. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  4. Hiroshima neutron fluence on a glass button from near ground zero.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L; Fujita, S; Hoshi, M

    2001-12-01

    A decorative glass button that was uncovered at a location that is 190 +/- 15 m from directly beneath the atomic explosion at Hiroshima on 6 August 1945 has been scanned for induced fission tracks produced mostly by the thermal neutrons from the bomb due to interactions with the trace uranium that is normally present in silicate glasses. In surveying 4.14 cm2 at 500x magnification, 28 tracks were seen. From a calibration irradiation in a nuclear reactor we infer that the neutron fluence in 1945 was 5.7(+/-1.1) x 10(11) cm(-2); and, allowing for shielding by the structure in which the button was probably located, the free-air (i.e., outside) value is estimated as 1.5(+/-0.5) x 10(12) cm(-2). A limit has been placed on possible fading of the radiation-damage tracks that could increase the fluence by at most a factor of 1.27. The values bracket the calculated value of 9 x 10(11) given in DS86 but are higher than the 3.6 x 10(11) inferred from induced radionuclides for the distance given. The difference is, however, within the observed variability of the two types of results. PMID:11725892

  5. Properties of polyimide, polyetheretherketone and polyethyleneterephthalate implanted by Ni ions to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A.; Hnatowicz, V.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Slepicka, P.; Svorcik, V.; Slouf, M.; Perina, V.

    2012-02-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) were implanted with 40 keV Ni + ions at RT to the fluences (0.25-1.5) × 10 17 cm -2 at ion current density of 4 μA cm -2. Then some of the samples were annealed at the temperatures close to the polymer glassy transition temperature. Depth profiles of the Ni atoms in the as implanted and annealed samples were determined by RBS method. The profiles in the as implanted samples agree reasonably with those simulated using TRYDIN code. The implanted Ni atoms tend to aggregate into nano-particles, the size and distribution of which was determined from TEM images. The nano-particle size increases with increasing ion fluence. Subsequent annealing leads to a reduction in the nanoparticle size. The surface morphology of the implanted and annealed samples was studied using AFM. The changes in the polymer sheet resistance of the implanted and annealed samples were measured by standard two-point technique. The sheet resistance decreases with increasing temperature of annealing.

  6. Fast modelling of spectra and stopping-power ratios using differentiated fluence pencil kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2008-08-01

    Modern radiotherapy steadily utilizes more of the available degrees of freedom provided by radiotherapy equipment, raising the need for the dosimetric methods to deliver reliable measurements for situations where the spectral properties of the radiation field may also vary. A kernel-based superposition method is presented for which the spectra from any field modulation can be instantly calculated, thus facilitating the determination of dosimetric quantities at arbitrary locations. A database of fluence pencil kernels describing the fluence resulting from point monodirectional monoenergetic beams incident onto a water phantom has been calculated with the PENELOPE-2005 Monte Carlo package. Spectra calculated by means of the kernels are presented for various 6 MV fields. The spectra have been used to investigate depth and lateral variations of water-to-air stopping-power ratios. Results show that the stopping-power ratio decreases with depth, and that this effect is more pronounced for small fields. These variations are clearly connected to spectral variations. For a 10 × 10 cm2 field, the difference between the stopping-power ratio at 2.5 cm depth and 30 cm depth is less than 0.3% while for a 0.3 × 0.3 cm2 field this difference is 0.7%. Ratios outside the field were found to be sensitive to the collimator leakage spectral variations.

  7. Photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients calculated from a Saudi population-based phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, A. K.; Altaher, K.; Hussein, M. A.; Amer, M.; Farid, K. Y.; Alghamdi, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we will present a new set of photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients using the Saudi population-based voxel phantom developed recently by our group. The phantom corresponds to an average Saudi male of 173 cm tall weighing 77 kg. There are over 125 million voxels in the phantom each of which is 1.37×1.37×1.00 mm3. Of the 27 organs and tissues of radiological interest specified in the recommendations of ICRP Publication 103, all but the oral mucosa, extrathoracic tissue and the lymph nodes were identified in the current version of the phantom. The bone surface (endosteum) is too thin to be identifiable; it is about 10 μm thick. The dose to the endosteum was therefore approximated by the dose to the bones. Irradiation geometries included anterior-posterior (AP), left (LLAT) and rotational (ROT). The simulations were carried out with the MCNPX code version 2.5.0. The fluence in free air and the energy depositions in each organ were calculated for monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV to obtain the conversion coefficients. The radiation and tissue weighting factors were taken from ICRP Publication 60 and 103. The results from this study will also be compared with the conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 116.

  8. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  9. A Technique for Determining Neutron Beam Fluence to 0.01% Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, A. T.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    The achievable uncertainty in neutron lifetime measurements using the beam technique has been limited by the uncertainty in the determination of the neutron density in the decay volume. In the Sussex-ILL-NIST series of beam lifetime experiments, the density was determined with a neutron fluence mon itor that detected the charged particle products from neutron absorption in a thin layer of 6Li or lOB. In each of the experiments, the absolute detection efficiency of the neutron monitor was determined from the measured density of the neutron absorber, the thermal neutron cross section for the absorbing ma terial, and the solid angle of the charged particle detectors. The efficiency of the neutron monitor used in the most recent beam lifetime experiment has since been measured directly by operating it on a monochromatic neutron beam in which the total neutron rate is determined with a totally absorbing neutron detector. The absolute nature of this technique does not rely on any knowl edge of neutron absorption cross sections or a measurement of the density of the neutron absorbing deposit. This technique has been used to measure the neutron monitor efficiency to 0.06% uncertainty. VVe show that a new monitor and absolute neutron detector employing the same technique would be capable of achieving determining neutron fluence to an uncertainty of 0.01%.

  10. Novel Low Fluence Combination Laser Treatment of Solar Lentigines in Type III Asian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Brian Wei Cheng Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate a novel low fluence combination laser technique [Erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Erb:YAG) and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG)] to effectively treat solar lentigines in type III Asian skin in a single session. Design: A prospective study. Setting: A Singapore-based clinic. Participants: Five patients (all females) were enrolled into the study. The ages ranged 35-60 years; all patients had Fitzpatrick skin type III. Measurements: Photographs were taken at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. These were reviewed by two independent physicians who were blinded to the study. Changes in pigment severity were assessed by a 5-point scale (1: Aggravation of pigment, 2: No change, 3: 25-50% improvement, 4: 51-75% improvement, and 5: 76-100% improvement). Results: All patients received a single treatment session. At 1-month follow-up, a reduction in pigment was observed in all patients. Both physicians’ reports were independently agreeable. All patients scored 5, having >90% improvement in pigment severity. No hypopigmentation, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), or recurrence was seen. Conclusion: Low fluence combination laser is effective and safe for clearance of solar lentigines in type III Asian skin. PMID:26865789

  11. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-12-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate {approx}.05 V/rad responsivity with {ge}1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ``peaks`` binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} range indicate smearing over {approx}1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  12. Comparison of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for deuterons, tritons and helions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Friedberg, Wallace; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Secondary radiation in aircraft and spacecraft includes deuterons, tritons and helions. Two sets of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for isotropic exposure to these particles were compared: one used the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) radiation transport code coupled with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms (PHITS-ICRP) and the other the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport code coupled with modified BodyBuilder™ phantoms (MCNPX-BB). Also, two sets of fluence-to-effective dose equivalent conversion coefficients calculated using the PHITS-ICRP combination were compared: one used quality factors based on linear energy transfer; the other used quality factors based on lineal energy (y). Finally, PHITS-ICRP effective dose coefficients were compared with PHITS-ICRP effective dose equivalent coefficients. The PHITS-ICRP and MCNPX-BB effective dose coefficients were similar, except at high energies, where MCNPX-BB coefficients were higher. For helions, at most energies effective dose coefficients were much greater than effective dose equivalent coefficients. For deuterons and tritons, coefficients were similar when their radiation weighting factor was set to 2. PMID:21474471

  13. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Roudén, Jenny; Green, Eva-Lena

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ˜ 25 effective full power years) of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV) fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M) and calculated (C) results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE)/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV) flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  14. Active waveguides by low-fluence carbon implantation in Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Luo, Zhe-Yuan; Li, Yu-Wen; Chen, Meng; Xu, Jun; Fu, Li-Li; Yu, Ke-Han; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Guo, Hai-Tao; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A planar waveguide in the Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass is fabricated by a 6.0 MeV C3+ ion implantation at a low-fluence of 1.0 × 1014 ions/cm2. The fluence is close to that in semiconductor industry. The dark mode spectra are recorded by a model 2010 prism coupler. The energy losses during the implantation process and the refractive index profile of the waveguide are simulated by the SRIM 2010 code and the reflectivity calculation method (RCM), respectively. The near-field light intensity profile and the propagation loss of the waveguide are measured by an end-face coupling system. The two-dimensional (2D) modal profile of transverse electric (TE) mode for the fabricated waveguide is calculated by the finite difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM). The results of microluminescence and optical absorption reveal that the spectroscopic characteristics of the Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass are nearly unaffected by the carbon ion implantation process. This work suggests that the carbon-implanted Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass waveguide is a promising candidate for integrated active devices.

  15. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux--Scaling with stored energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E0. The ion number fluence (ions m-2) and energy fluence (J m-2) computed as 2.4-7.8 × 1020 and 2.2-33 × 106, respectively, are found to be independent of E0 from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E0 at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E0 for the high inductance INTI PF.

  16. IR multiphoton absorption of SF6 in flow with Ar at moderate energy fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Ronander, E.; van Heerden, S. P.; Gouws, M.; van der Merwe, K.

    1997-10-01

    IR multiple photon absorption (MPA) of SF6 in flow with Ar (SF6: Ar=1:100) in conditions of a large vibrational/rotational temperature difference (TV𪒮 K, TR䏐 K) was studied at moderate energy fluences from ۂ.1 to 𪐬 mJ/cm2, which are of interest for isotope selective two-step dissociation of molecules. A 50 cm Laval-type slit nozzle for the flow cooling, and a TEA CO2-laser for excitation of molecules were used in the experiments. The laser energy fluence dependences of the SF6 MPA were studied for several CO2-laser lines which are in a good resonance with the linear absorption spectrum of the Ƚ vibration of SF6 at low temperature. The effect of the laser pulse duration (intensity) on MPA of flow cooled SF6 with Ar was also studied. The results are compared with those obtained in earlier studies.

  17. UV photolysis kinetics of sulfonamides in aqueous solution based on optimized fluence quantification.

    PubMed

    Lian, Junfeng; Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Mengkai; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-05-15

    The ultraviolet (UV) photolysis kinetics of eight sulfonamide (SA) antibiotics was investigated in a quasi-collimated beam apparatus. By using a micro fluorescent silica detector to monitor online the dynamic irradiance fluctuation, the accuracy in fluence quantification could be increased by up to 15%. Solution pH governed the speciation of selected SAs, thus impacting significantly their molar absorption coefficients (ε), fluence-based photolysis rate constants (k'), and quantum yields. An increasing pH induced a hyperchromic effect and a blue shift of the UV-Vis absorption spectra of selected SAs, thus causing the anionic species to show a relatively higher specific ε value than the neutral species at 254 nm. On UV exposure, the photodegradation of selected SAs all followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The SAs with a penta-heterocycle, because of their higher electron densities, exhibited an obviously higher photodegradation rate than those with a hexa-heterocycle. The specific k' values of the neutral and anionic species were in the ranges of (0.30-14.49) × 10(-3) and (0.61-20.90) × 10(-3) cm(2) mJ(-1), respectively. With the specific k' values obtained, it is estimated that only part of SAs can be photodegraded during UV disinfection of water and wastewater, so an advanced oxidation process is necessary if a higher removal of selected SAs is to be achieved. PMID:25746961

  18. Effect of wavelength and fluence on morphology, cellular and genetic integrity of diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, H.; Hawkins, D.; Houreld, N.

    2006-02-01

    An alternative treatment modality for diabetic wound healing includes low level laser therapy (LLLT). Biostimulation of such wounds may be of benefit to patients by reducing healing time. Structural, cellular and genetic events in diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts (WS1) were evaluated after exposing cells in culture to a Helium-Neon (632.8nm), a Diode laser (830nm) and a Nd:YAG (Neodynium:Yttrium-Allumina-Gallium) laser (1064nm) at either 5J/cm2 or 16J/cm2. Cells were exposed twice a week and left 24 hours post-irradiation prior to measuring effects. Structural changes were evaluated by assessing colony formation, haptotaxis and chemotaxis. Cellular changes were evaluated using cell viability, (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP production), and proliferation, (alkaline phosphatase, ALP and basic fibroblast growth factor, bFGF expression), while the Comet assay evaluated DNA damage and cytotoxicity was determined assessing membrane permeability for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Caspase 3/7 activity was used as an estimate of apoptosis as a result of irradiation. The irradiated diabetic wounded cells showed structural, cellular as well as molecular resilience comparable to that of unwounded normal skin fibroblast cells. With regards to fluence, 5J/cm2 elicit positive cellular and structural responses while 16J/cm2 increases cellular and genetic damage and cellular morphology is altered. Different wavelengths of LLLT influences the beneficial outcomes of diabetic wounded cells and although all three wavelengths elicit cellular effects, the penetration depth of 830nm plays a significant role in the healing of diabetic wounded human fibroblast cells. Results from this study validate the contribution of LLLT to wound healing and elucidate the biochemical effects at a cellular level while highlighting the role of different dosages and wavelengths in LLLT.

  19. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy. PMID:24243312

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  1. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    SciTech Connect

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced size reduction of carbon nanodots in solution: Effect of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Vanthan; Yan, Lihe Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-28

    Photoluminescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) with size tunability and uniformity were fabricated in polyethylene glycol (PEG{sub 200N}) solution using femtosecond laser ablation method. The size distributions and photoluminescence (PL) properties of C-dots are well controlled by adjusting the combined parameters of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time. The size reduction efficiency of the C-dots progressively increases with decreasing laser fluence and spot size. The optimal PL spectra are red-shifted and the quantum yields decrease with the increase in C-dots size, which could be attributed to the more complex surface functional groups attached on C-dots induced at higher laser fluence and larger spot size. Moreover, an increase in irradiation time leads to a decrease in size of C-dots, but long-time irradiation will result in the generation of complex functional groups on C-dots, subsequently the PL spectra are red-shifted.

  3. Naphthalene degradation in seawater by UV irradiation: the effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration.

    PubMed

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu; Zheng, Jisi; Liu, Bo

    2014-04-15

    A large amount of oil pollution at sea is produced by the operational discharge of oily wastewater. The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from such sources using UV irradiation has become attractive, yet the photolysis mechanism in seawater has remained unclear. This study examines the photodegradation kinetics of naphthalene in natural seawater through a full factorial design of experiments (DOE). The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration are investigated. Results show that fluence rate, temperature and the interaction between temperature and initial concentration are the most influential factors. An increase in fluence rate can linearly promote the photodegradation process. Salinity increasingly impedes the removal of naphthalene because of the existence of free-radical scavengers and photon competitors. The results will help understand the photolysis mechanism of PAHs and develop more effective methods for treating oily seawater generated from offshore industries. PMID:24576392

  4. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  5. A Multigroup Method for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence with a Source Term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Clowdsley, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Current research on the Grant involves the development of a multigroup method for the calculation of low energy evaporation neutron fluences associated with the Boltzmann equation. This research will enable one to predict radiation exposure under a variety of circumstances. Knowledge of radiation exposure in a free-space environment is a necessity for space travel, high altitude space planes and satellite design. This is because certain radiation environments can cause damage to biological and electronic systems involving both short term and long term effects. By having apriori knowledge of the environment one can use prediction techniques to estimate radiation damage to such systems. Appropriate shielding can be designed to protect both humans and electronic systems that are exposed to a known radiation environment. This is the goal of the current research efforts involving the multi-group method and the Green's function approach.

  6. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  7. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Kenta; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki; Sekimura, Naoto

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  8. Modulation of photodynamic activity with Photofrin: effect of dose, time interval, fluence, and delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbo, Greta M.; Ballard, Jonathan R.; Harrison, Linda T.; Kik, Peter K.; Wieman, T. J.; Fingar, Victor H.

    2005-04-01

    A goal of our laboratory is to accurately define the parameters of light dose and drug dose that contribute to tissue destruction after Photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using Photofrin as sensitizer, we examined a range of drug doses, various intervals between injection and light treatment, and various fluence rates. The effect of Photofrin photosensitizer encapsulated in liposomal delivery vehicle was also studied. Three liposome delivery vehicles were chosen to deliver the photosensitizer in vivo: DPPC/cholesterol, DMPC/HPC and stealth liposomes. Tumor response and microvessel behaviour were examined in tumor and surrounding skin in a mouse model. Under these conditions, better selectivity of tissue damage was seen using some of the treatment. These data might be used to design better clinical protocols for patient care. In memory of Dr. Victor Fingar (Supported by R01 CA51771).

  9. Retention behavior in tungsten and molybdenum exposed to high fluences of deuterium ions in TPE

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Sharpe; R.D. Kolasinski; M. Shimada; P. Calderoni; R.A. Causey

    2009-06-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) has been used to investigate deuterium fuel retention behavior in tungsten and molybdenum– materials utilized for plasma-facing surfaces in some existing tokamak plasma devices and under consideration for future devices. Although several studies have been performed over the past several years on these metals, many issues remain unresolved, including for example blister formation mechanisms and correlation to surface conditions. In this study we expose several metal samples to deuterium ion fluences up to 1026 ions/m2 and measure retention behavior with thermal desportion spectroscopy. Fractional retention of up to 2.0×10-5 is found for W at 600 K, and Mo similarly retains deuterium at a fraction of 1.5×10-5 at 600 K. Blistering was found for W samples exposed at temperatures above 453 K, whereas blistering was not observed for Mo samples at any experiment temperature.

  10. Instability of characteristics of SiC detectors subjected to extreme fluence of nuclear particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. M. Strokan, N. B.; Bogdanova, E. V.; Lebedev, A. A.

    2007-01-15

    The operation of detectors irradiated with 8-MeV protons at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} has been studied. The detectors were based on modern CVD-grown n-4H-SiC films with a concentration of uncompensated donors equal to {approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and a thickness of 55 {mu}m. The high concentration of primary radiation defects ({approx}2 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) determined the deep compensation of the films. The basic characteristics of the detectors-pulse amplitude and resolution-exhibited temporal instability. This effect is due to prolonged capture of nonequilibrium carriers by radiation centers and the resulting appearance of a polarization voltage in the bulk of the detector. The kinetics of attainment of steady values by the quantities specified above was analyzed.

  11. Retention of nanocrystalline WNx layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Angella, G.; Dellasega, D.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pedroni, M.; Ricci, D.; Rigato, V.; Passoni, M.

    2015-11-01

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N2 gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WNx compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WNx compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼1024 m-2). It is shown that WNx compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER.

  12. Effect of Source Bandwidth, Focusing and Fluence on the Depth Of Cure in Polymer Dental Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Ranjit; Melikechi, Noureddine; Eichmiller, Frederick

    2000-03-01

    Photo-curable polymer dental composites are widely used in restorative dental applications. These composites are typically cured using a conventional curing lamp with broad band visible irradiation between 400-500 nm. Argon ion laser-based sources are now available in dentistry for curing applications. This work reports on the dependence of depth of cure on the wavelength bandwidth, the focusing geometry and the irradiation fluence of the curing light source. The depth of cure resulting from a narrow band irradiation source such as the 488 line of the Argon ion laser is observed to be higher than that resulting from broadband irradiation sources such as the curing lamp or the multiline Argon ion laser with lines between 450-500 nm. For the same total irradiation energy deposited into the polymer a focused beam yields higher depth of cure than a non-focused beam.

  13. Neutron fluences and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron fluences were measured on LDEF in the low energy (< 1 MeV) and high energy (> 1 MeV) ranges. The low energy detectors used the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction with Gd foil absorbers to separate thermal (< 0.2 eV) and resonance (0.2 eV-1 MeV) neutron response. High energy detectors contained sets of fission foils (181Ta, 209Bi, 232Th, 238U) with different neutron energy thresholds. The measured neutron fluences together with predicted spectral shapes were used to estimate neutron dose equivalents. The detectors were located in the A0015 and P0006 experiments at the west and Earth sides of LDEF under shielding varying from 1 to 19 g/cm2. Dose equivalent rates varied from 0.8 to 3.3 microSv/d for the low energy neutrons and from 160 to 390 microSv/d for the high energy neutrons. This compares with TLD measured absorbed dose rates in the range of 1000-3000 microGy/d near these locations and demonstrates that high energy neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total dose equivalent in LEO. Comparisons between measurements and calculations were made for high energy neutrons based on fission fragment tracks generated by fission foils at different shielding depths. A simple 1-D slab geometry was used in the calculations. Agreement between measurements and calculations depended on both shielding depth and threshold energy of the fission foils. Differences increased as both shielding and threshold energy increased. The modeled proton/neutron spectra appeared deficient at high energies. A 3-D model of the experiments is needed to help resolve the differences.

  14. Development and applications of energy-specific fluence monitor for field monitoring.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, D N; Somayaji, K M; Venkatesan, R; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2011-07-01

    A portable energy-specific fluence monitor is developed for field monitoring as well as to serve as stand-alone data acquisition system to measure dose rate due to routine releases at various locations in and around Nuclear Power Reactors. The data from an array of such monitors deployed over a region of interest would help in evolving a methodology to arrive at the source term evaluation in the event of a postulated nuclear incident. The other method that exists for this purpose is by conducting tracer experiments using known release of a gas like SF(6) into the atmosphere and monitoring their concentrations downwind. The above instrument enables one to use the routine release of (41)Ar as a tracer gas. The Argon fluence monitor houses a CsI(Tl) detector and associated miniature electronics modules for conditioning the signal from the detector. Data logging and in-situ archival of the data are controlled by a powerful web enabled communication controller preloaded with Microsoft Windows Compact Edition (WIN CE). The application software is developed in Visual Basic.NET under Compact Framework and deployed in the module. The paper gives an outline of the design aspects of the instrument, associated electronics and calibration of the instrument, including the preliminary results obtained using the instrument. The utility of the system is established by carrying out field survey around Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), consisting of two Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR), by mapping the (41)Ar plume. Additional features such as enhancing the monitor capability with embedded GPS along with real-time linking using wireless networking techniques are also being incorporated. PMID:21367610

  15. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-04

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125{mu}m in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  16. Effect of fluence smoothing on the quality of intensity-modulated radiation treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Niyas, Puzhakkal; Abdullah, Kallikuzhiyil Kochunny; Noufal, Manthala Padannayil; Sankaran Nair, Thekkedath

    2016-07-01

    A fluence-smoothing function applied for reducing the complexity of a treatment plan is an optional requirement in the inverse planning optimization algorithm of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this study, we investigated the consequences of fluence smoothing on the quality of highly complex and inhomogeneous plans in a treatment-planning system, Eclipse™. The smoothing function was applied both in the direction of leaf travel (X) and perpendicular to leaf travel (Y). Twenty IMRT plans from patients with cancer of the nasopharynx and lung were selected and re-optimized with use of various smoothing combinations from X = 0, Y = 0 to X = 100, Y = 100. Total monitor units (MUs), dose-volume histograms, and radiobiological estimates were computed for all plans. The study yielded a significant reduction in the average total MUs from 2079 ± 265.4 to 1107 ± 137.4 (nasopharynx) and from 1556 ± 490.3 to 791 ± 176.8 (lung) while increasing smoothing from X, Y = 0 to X, Y = 100. Both the tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities were found to vary, but not significantly so. No appreciable differences in doses to the target and most of the organs at risk (OARs) were noticed. The doses measured with the I'MRT MatriXX 2-D system indicated improvements in deliverability of the plans with higher smoothing values. Hence, it can be concluded that increased smoothing reduced the total MUs exceptionally well without any considerable changes in OAR doses. The observed progress in plan deliverability in terms of the gamma index strongly supports the recommendation of smoothing levels up to X = 70 and Y = 60, at least for the nasopharynx and lung. PMID:26951466

  17. Nodal weighting factor method for ex-core fast neutron fluence evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R. T.

    2012-07-01

    The nodal weighting factor method is developed for evaluating ex-core fast neutron flux in a nuclear reactor by utilizing adjoint neutron flux, a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV, the unit fission source, and relative assembly nodal powers. The method determines each nodal weighting factor for ex-core neutron fast flux evaluation by solving the steady-state adjoint neutron transport equation with a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV as the adjoint source, by integrating the unit fission source with a typical fission spectrum to the solved adjoint flux over all energies, all angles and given nodal volume, and by dividing it with the sum of all nodal weighting factors, which is a normalization factor. Then, the fast neutron flux can be obtained by summing the various relative nodal powers times the corresponding nodal weighting factors of the adjacent significantly contributed peripheral assembly nodes and times a proper fast neutron attenuation coefficient over an operating period. A generic set of nodal weighting factors can be used to evaluate neutron fluence at the same location for similar core design and fuel cycles, but the set of nodal weighting factors needs to be re-calibrated for a transition-fuel-cycle. This newly developed nodal weighting factor method should be a useful and simplified tool for evaluating fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in ex-core components of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  18. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Gauny, Stacey; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2016-06-01

    High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing (48)Ti ions (1GeV/amu, LET=107 keV/μm), (56)Fe ions (1GeV/amu, LET=151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1GeV, LET=0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for (48)Ti and (56)Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3-5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the (48)Ti and (56)Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest. PMID:27055360

  19. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5×1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2×103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  20. Critical Fluences And Modeling Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene From Vaporization To The Plasma Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Umehara, Noritsugu; Gregory, Don A.

    2010-05-06

    A CO{sub 2} laser was operated at pulse energies up to 10 J to ablate polyoxymethylene targets in air and vacuum conditions. Critical effects predicted by ablation models are discussed in relation to the experimental data, including specifically the threshold fluences for vaporization and critical plasma formation, and the fluence at which the optimal momentum coupling coefficient is found. Finally, we discuss a new approach for modeling polymers at long wavelengths, including a connection formula that links the vaporization and plasma regimes for laser ablation propulsion.

  1. Analysis and comparison of monoenergetic fast neutron fluence determination using 238U samples at different positions with respect to the neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Liu, Xiang; Gao, Zhiqi; Wu, Hao; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-05-01

    Using two (238)U samples placed in a gridded ionization chamber and a parallel-plate fission chamber, fluence of monoenergetic fast neutrons was determined. Four runs of measurements were performed. Analysis showed that although the neutron fluences for the two (238)U samples differ by 20-33 times in the present work, the fluences at the position of the sample in the gridded ionization chamber determined by the two ways are in agreement within experimental uncertainties. PMID:22398325

  2. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Koo, Eugene; Isseroff, R. Rivkah; Murphy, William; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL) is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease. Objective The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS) free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed. Methods High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR). For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2. Results High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158

  3. Intense Pulsed Light and Low-Fluence Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser Treatment in Melasma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Na, Se Young; Cho, Soyun

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, low fluence collimated Q-switched (QS) Nd:YAG laser has drawn attention for the treatment of melasma. However, it needs a lot of treatment sessions for the substantial results and repetitive laser exposures may end up with unwanted depigmentation. Objective We evaluated the clinical effects and safety of the combinational treatment, using intense pulsed light (IPL) and low fluence QS Nd:YAG laser. Methods Retrospective case series of 20 female patients, with mixed type melasma, were analyzed using medical records. They were treated with IPL one time, and 4 times of weekly successive low fluence Nd:YAG laser treatments. At each visit, digital photographs were taken under the same condition. Melanin index (MI) and erythema index (EI) were measured on the highest point on the cheekbones. Modified melasma area and severity index (MASI) scores were calculated by two investigators using digital photographs. Results The mean values of MI and EI decreased significantly after treatments. The modified MASI score has decreased by 59.35%, on average. Sixty percents of the participants did not require any more treatments, and no clinical aggravations were observed during the follow-up period (mean 5.9 months). Conclusion IPL and low fluence laser may elicit a clinical resolution in the mixed type melasma with long term benefits. PMID:22879709

  4. Determination of atomic oxygen fluence using spectrophotometric analysis of infrared transparent witness coupons for long duration exposure tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podojil, Gregg M.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    Atomic oxygen degradation is one of several major threats to the durability of spaceborne systems in low Earth orbit. Ground-based simulations are conducted to learn how to minimize the adverse effects of atomic oxygen exposure. Assessing the fluence of atomic oxygen in test chambers such as a plasma asher over long periods of time is necessary for accurate determination of atomic oxygen exposure. Currently, an atomic oxygen susceptible organic material such as Kapton is placed next to samples as a witness coupon and its mass loss is monitored and used to determine the effective atomic oxygen fluence. However, degradation of the Kapton witness coupons occurs so rapidly in plasma ashers that for any long term test many witness coupons must be used sequentially in order to keep track of the fluence. This necessitates opening vacuum to substitute fresh coupons. A passive dosimetry technique was sought to monitor atomic oxygen exposure over longer periods without the need to open the plasma asher to the atmosphere. This paper investigates the use of spectrophotometric analysis of durable IR transparent witness coupons to measure atomic oxygen exposure for longer duration testing. The method considered would be conductive to making in situ measurements of atomic oxygen fluence.

  5. Pulse-fluence-specified optimal control simulation with applications to molecular orientation and spin-isomer-selective molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Masataka; Nakashima, Kaoru; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi

    2015-12-31

    We propose an optimal control simulation with specified pulse fluence and amplitude. The simulation is applied to the orientation control of CO molecules to examine the optimal combination of THz and laser pulses, and to discriminate nuclear-spin isomers of {sup 14}N{sub 2} as spatially anisotropic distributions.

  6. Impact of the differential fluence distribution of brachytherapy sources on the spectroscopic dose-rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Martha J.; Bartol, Laura J.; DeWerd, Larry A. E-mail: ladewerd@wisc.edu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate why dose-rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds computed using the spectroscopic technique, Λ{sub spec}, differ from those computed with standard Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. A potential cause of these discrepancies is the spectroscopic technique’s use of approximations of the true fluence distribution leaving the source, φ{sub full}. In particular, the fluence distribution used in the spectroscopic technique, φ{sub spec}, approximates the spatial, angular, and energy distributions of φ{sub full}. This work quantified the extent to which each of these approximations affects the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Additionally, this study investigated how the simplified water-only model used in the spectroscopic technique impacts the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Methods: Dose-rate constants as described in the AAPM TG-43U1 report, Λ{sub full}, were computed with MC simulations using the full source geometry for each of 14 different {sup 125}I and 6 different {sup 103}Pd source models. In addition, the spectrum emitted along the perpendicular bisector of each source was simulated in vacuum using the full source model and used to compute Λ{sub spec}. Λ{sub spec} was compared to Λ{sub full} to verify the discrepancy reported by Rodriguez and Rogers. Using MC simulations, a phase space of the fluence leaving the encapsulation of each full source model was created. The spatial and angular distributions of φ{sub full} were extracted from the phase spaces and were qualitatively compared to those used by φ{sub spec}. Additionally, each phase space was modified to reflect one of the approximated distributions (spatial, angular, or energy) used by φ{sub spec}. The dose-rate constant resulting from using approximated distribution i, Λ{sub approx,i}, was computed using the modified phase space and compared to Λ{sub full}. For each source, this process was repeated for each approximation in order to determine which approximations used in

  7. Determination of Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Effective Atomic Oxygen Fluence for DC 93?500 Silicone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Ma, David

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research was to calibrate the ground-to-space effective atomic oxygen fluence for DC 93-500 silicone in a thermal energy electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen plasma facility. Silicones, commonly used spacecraft materials, do not chemically erode with atomic oxygen attack like other organic materials but form an oxidized hardened silicate surface layer. Therefore, the effective atomic oxygen fluence in a ground test facility should not be determined based on mass loss measurements, as they are with organic polymers. A technique has been developed at the Glenn Research Center to determine the equivalent amount of atomic oxygen exposure in an ECR ground test facility to produce the same degree of atomic oxygen damage as in space. The approach used was to compare changes in the surface hardness of ground test (ECR) exposed DC 93-500 silicone with DC 93-500 exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen as part of a shuttle flight experiment. The ground to in-space effective atomic oxygen fluence correlation was determined based on the fluence in the ECR source that produced the same hardness for the fluence in-space. Nanomechanical hardness versus contact depth measurements were obtained for five ECR exposed DC 93-500 samples (ECR exposed for 18 to 40 hrs, corresponding to Kapton effective fluences of 4.2 x 10(exp 20) to 9.4 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm, respectively) and for space exposed DC 93-500 from the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials III (EOIM III) shuttle flight experiment, exposed to LEO atomic oxygen for 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. Pristine controls were also evaluated. A ground-to-space correlation value was determined based on correlation values for four contact depths (150, 200, 250, and 300 nm), which represent the near surface depth data. The results indicate that the Kapton effective atomic oxygen fluence in the ECR facility needs to be 2.64 times higher than in LEO to replicate equivalent exposure damage in the

  8. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Effective Atomic-Oxygen Fluence Determined for DC 93-500 Silicone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Ma, David

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces on the leading edge of spacecraft in low Earth orbit (e.g., surface facing the velocity direction), such as on the International Space Station, are subject to atomic oxygen attack, and certain materials are susceptible to erosion. Therefore, ground-based laboratory testing of the atomic oxygen durability of spacecraft materials is necessary for durability assessment when flight data are not available. For accurate space simulation, the facility is commonly calibrated on the basis of the mass loss of Kapton (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) as a control sample for effective fluence determination. This is because Kapton has a well-characterized atomic oxygen erosion yield (E(sub y), in cubic centimeters per atom) in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Silicones, a family of commonly used spacecraft materials, do not chemically erode away with atomic oxygen attack like other organic materials that have volatile oxidation products. Instead, silicones react with atomic oxygen and form an oxidized hardened silicate surface layer. Often the loss of methyl groups causes shrinkage of the surface skin and "mud-tile" crazing degradation. But silicones often do not lose mass, and some silicones actually gain mass during atomic oxygen exposure. Therefore, the effective atomic oxygen fluence for silicones in a ground-test facility should not be determined on the basis of traditional mass-loss measurements, as it is with polymers that erode. Another method for determining effective fluence needs to be employed for silicones. A new technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for determining the effective atomic oxygen fluence for silicones in ground-test facilities. This technique determines the equivalent amount of atomic oxygen oxidation on the basis of changes in the surface-oxide hardness. The specific approach developed was to compare changes in the surface hardness of ground-laboratory-exposed DC93-500 silicone with DC93-500 exposed to LEO atomic oxygen

  9. Using high-energy proton fluence to improve risk prediction for consequences of solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is a major concern during interplanetary transfer and extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. Previously, we have used data from the last 5 solar cycles to estimate percentiles of dose to a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) for a hypothetical astronaut in a nominally shielded spacecraft during a 120-d lunar mission. As part of this process, we made use of complete energy spectra for 34 large historical SPEs to calculate what the BFO mGy-Eq dose would have been in the above lunar scenario for each SPE. From these calculated doses, we then developed a prediction model for BFO dose based solely on an assumed value of integrated fluence above 30 MeV ( Φ30) for an otherwise unspecified future SPE. In this study, we reasoned that since BFO dose is determined more by protons with higher energies than by those with lower energies, more accurate BFO dose prediction models could be developed using integrated fluence above 60 ( Φ60) and above 100 MeV ( Φ100) as predictors instead of Φ30. However to calculate the unconditional probability of a BFO dose exceeding a pre-specified limit ("BFO dose risk"), one must also take into account the distribution of the predictor ( Φ30,Φ60, or Φ100), as estimated from historical SPEs. But Φ60 and Φ100 have more variability, and less available historical information on which to estimate their distributions over many SPE occurrences, than does Φ30. Therefore, when estimating BFO dose risk there is a tradeoff between increased BFO dose prediction at a given energy threshold and decreased accuracy of models for describing the distribution of that threshold over future SPEs as the threshold increases. Even when taking the second of these two factors into account, we still arrived at the conclusion that overall prediction improves as the energy level threshold increases from 30 to 60 to 100 MeV. These results can be applied

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of high-energy and high fluence rate photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartol, Laura J.

    High-energy, high fluence rate photon sources are used in radiation oncology for the treatment of a variety of disease sites. Common dosimetry methods for characterizing these sources use energy-integrating devices; however, the most descriptive characterization of these sources are performed with devices that preserve the energy-specific information in the source output. This work used Monte-Carlo- (MC-) and measurement-based spectroscopic methods to characterize two therapeutic-level megavoltage photon sources. MC simulations were performed using the MCNP5 transport code and measurements were performed with a Compton-scattering (CS) technique. Because MC was used extensively in this work, some general MCNP5 investigations were performed to benchmark the techniques used. Limitations in the advanced variance reduction techniques, Doppler-broadening model, and use of phase space files were investigated. Based on the results of these investigations, recommendations were made for using each technique. The validity of the CS technique for use with megavoltage systems was demonstrated using MC simulations of a 6 MV linear accelerator field and measurements of a high dose rate 192Ir source. Following these initial demonstrations, the spectrum of a 60Co teletherapy unit was characterized. Simulations were performed to determine the spectrum's sensitivity to the source model. Multiple measurements were completed using a reverse-electrode germanium (REGe) detector with the CS spectrometry technique. The CS spectra were corrected for detector response and the CS geometry using a novel detector response function that was calculated using MCNP5. The detector response was unfolded using the Gold deconvolution method. Comparisons of the simulated and measured spectra showed agreement in terms of the peak positions, mean spectrum energy, and relative fluences under specific portions of the spectra. The spectrum of a 6 MV photon field from a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator was

  11. Evaluation of fluence-based dose delivery incorporating the spatial variation of dosimetric leaf gap (DLG).

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Lalith K; Xu, Zhengzheng; Bailey, Daniel W; Schmitt, Jonathan D; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    The Eclipse treatment planning system uses a single dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value to retract all multileaf collimator leaf positions during dose calculation to model the rounded leaf ends. This study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the 2D variation of DLG on clinical treatment plans based on their degree of fluence modulation. In-house software was developed to retrospectively apply the 2D variation of DLG to 61 clinically treated VMAT plans, as well as to several test plans. The level of modulation of the VMAT cases were determined by calculating their modulation complexity score (MCS). Dose measurements were done using the MapCHECK device at a depth of 5.0 cm for plans with and without the 2D DLG correction. Measurements were compared against predicted dose planes from the TPS using absolute 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm gamma criteria for test plans and for VMAT cases, respectively. The gamma pass rate for the 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm sweep test plans increased by 23.2%, 28.7%, and 26.0%, respectively, when the measurements were corrected with 2D variation of DLG. The clinical anal VMAT cases, which had very high MLC modulation, showed the most improvement. The majority of the improvement occurred for doses created by the 1.0 cm width leaves for both the test plans and the VMAT cases. The gamma pass rates for the highly modulated head and neck (H&N) cases, moderately modulated prostate and esophageal cases, and minimally modulated brain cases improved only slightly when corrected with 2D variation of DLG. This is because these cases did not employ the 1.0 cm width leaves for dose calculation and delivery. These data suggest that, at the very least, the TPS plans with highly modulated fluences created by the 1.0 cm fields require 2D DLG correction. Incorporating the 2D variation of DLG for the highly modulated clinical treatment plans improves their planar dose gamma pass rates, especially for fields employing the outer 1.0 cm width MLC leaves. This is because there are

  12. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  13. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m(2) higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27206508

  14. Zn nanoparticles irradiated with swift heavy ions at low fluences: Optically-detected shape elongation induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishimoto, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Okubo, N.; Ridgway, M. C.; Giulian, R.; Buchal, Ch.; Mantl, S.

    2011-05-15

    Elongation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica (SiO{sub 2}) induced by swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation, from spheres to spheroids, has been evaluated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high fluences, where tens to thousands of ion tracks were overlapped each other. It is important to clarify whether the high fluences, i.e., track overlaps, are essential for the elongation. In this study the elongation of metal NPs was evaluated at low fluences by linearly polarized optical absorption spectroscopy. Zn NPs embedded in silica were irradiated with 200-MeV Xe{sup 14+} ions with an incident angle of 45 deg. The fluence ranged from 1.0x10{sup 11} to 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the track coverage ratio (CR) of 0.050 to 25 by ion tracks. A small but certain dichroism was observed down to 5.0x10{sup 11} Xe/cm{sup 2} (CR = 0.25). The comparison with numerical simulation suggested that the elongation of Zn NPs was induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks. After further irradiation each NP experienced multiple SHI impacts, which resulted in further elongation. TEM observation showed the elongated NPs whose aspect ratio (AR) ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 at 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}. Under almost the same irradiation conditions, Co NPs with the same initial mean radius showed more prominent elongation with AR of {approx}4 at the same fluence, while the melting point (m.p.) of Co is much higher than that of Zn. Less efficient elongation of Zn NPs while lower m.p. is discussed.

  15. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-05-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about −1.63 in the lateral region and −1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example. PMID:19887713

  17. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, Sandra C. . E-mail: s.vieira@erasmusmc.nl; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery.

  18. Inferences from the Distributions of Fast Radio Burst Pulse Widths, Dispersion Measures, and Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    The widths, dispersion measures (DMs), dispersion indices, and fluences of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) impose coupled constraints that all models must satisfy. The non-monotonic dependence of burst widths (after deconvolution of instrumental effects) on DMs excludes the intergalactic medium as the location of scattering that broadens the FRBs in time. Temporal broadening far greater than that of pulsars at similar high Galactic latitudes implies that scattering occurs close to the sources where high densities and strong turbulence or heterogeneity are plausible. FRB energetics are consistent with supergiant pulses from young, fast, high-field pulsars at cosmological distances. The distribution of FRB DMs is: (1) inconsistent with that of expanding clouds (such as SNRs); (2) inconsistent with space-limited source populations (such as the local Supercluster); and (3) consistent with intergalactic dispersion of a homogeneous source population at cosmological distances. Finally, the FRB {log}\\N-{log} S relation also indicates a cosmological distribution aside from the anomalously bright Lorimer burst.

  19. Fission foil measurements of neutron and proton fluences in the A0015 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Results are given from sets of fission foil detectors (FFD's) (Ta-181, Bi-209, Th-232, U-238) which were included in the A0015 experiment to measure combined proton/neutron fluences. Use has been made of recent FFD high energy proton calibrations for improved accuracy of response. Comparisons of track density measurements have been made with the predictions of environmental modeling based on simple 1-D (slab) geometry. At 1 g/cm(exp 2) (trailing edge) the calculations were approximately 25 percent lower than measurements; at 13 g/cm(exp 2) (Earthside) calculations were more than a factor of 2 lower. A future 3-D modeling of the experiment is needed for a more meaningful comparison. Approximate mission proton doses and neutron dose equivalents were found. At Earthside (13 g/cm(exp 2) the dose was 171 rad and dose equivalent was 82 rem. At the trailing edge (1 g/cm(exp 2) dose was 315 rad and dose equivalent was 33 rem. The proton doses are less than expected from TLD doses by 16 percent and 37 percent, respectively. These differences can be explained by uncertainties in the proton and neutron spectra and in the method used to separate proton and neutron contributions to the measurements.

  20. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Rocca, Jorge J.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm-2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique.

  1. Energetic Fe particle fluence measured in 2002-2004 on the ISS orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Baranov, Dmitrii; Dergachev, Valentin; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Gagarin, Yurii

    PLATAN-M chamber consisting of solid state track detectors was exposed at the outer surface of the ISS during 2002-2004. Fluence of Fe particles (SEPs and GCRs) was measured in the 30-150 MeV/nucleon energy range. Results of the PLATAN-M experiment were compared with the data obtained by the SIS and CRIS instruments (ACE spacecraft). Energy resolution of the PLATAN-M experiment was 3 times better with statistical errors being 2 times lower as compared with the SIS instrument. Spectra measured outside the magnetosphere of the Earth were transformed to the ISS orbit using the model of charged particle penetration to the near-Earth orbit. General coincidence of the results obtained at the two space stations can be seen. Yet some of the SIS energy channels display outliers distant for 6 standard errors from the PLATAN-M spectrum. Comparison of data obtained at the orbital station with measurements carried out in the interplanetary space evidences the reliability of the model describing the transformation of spectra during charged particle penetration inside the magnetosphere. Thus, a broad range of possibilities arises for the study of energetic particles combining the data measured by different instruments both outside and inside the magnetosphere of the Earth.

  2. Effect of neutron energy and fluence on deuterium retention behaviour in neutron irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroe; Yuyama, Kenta; Li, Xiaochun; Hatano, Yuji; Toyama, Takeshi; Ohta, Masayuki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Naoaki; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium (D) retention behaviours for 14 MeV neutron irradiated tungsten (W) and fission neutron irradiated W were evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to elucidate the correlation between D retention and defect formation by different energy distributions of neutrons in W at the initial stage of fusion reactor operation. These results were compared with that for Fe2+ irradiated W with various damage concentrations. Although dense vacancies and voids within the shallow region near the surface were introduced by Fe2+ irradiation, single vacancies with low concentration were distributed throughout the sample for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W. Only the dislocation loops were introduced by fission neutron irradiation at low neutron fluence. The desorption peak of D for fission neutron irradiated W was concentrated at low temperature region less than 550 K, but that for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W was extended toward the higher temperature side due to D trapping by vacancies. It can be said that the neutron energy distribution could have a large impact on irradiation defect formation and the D retention behaviour.

  3. Effects of faceted surface topography on high-fluence sputtering of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Effects of ion-induced faceted surface relief on high-fluence sputtering of graphite under 30-keV Ar and 15-keV N ion bombardment have been studied by means of binary-collision computer simulation. Taking into account experimental observations of surface topography, the relief was modeled by an α-dependent ridge-like periodic function (α = the ion incidence angle measured from the normal to macroscopic surface plane). It was shown that for normal incidence the sputter yield S represents a non-monotonic function of the relief aspect ratio and is saturated at x ∼ 100-200 nm (x = the half-period of the relief). The simulations stressed the importance of the relationship between the dimensions of surface roughness and atomic collision cascades and allowed to explain the S(α)-dependences found experimentally. It was shown that a strong (about 2 times) decrease of S at α = 60-80° is due to a shadowing mechanism which is also clearly revealed in the angular distribution of sputtered atoms.

  4. Multi-Billion Shot, High-Fluence Exposure of Cr(4+): YAG Passive Q-Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Dallas, Joseph L.; Afzal, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) employing a diode pumped, Q-Switched, ND:YAG laser operating at 40 Hz repetition rate. To meet the five-year mission lifetime goal, a single transmitter would accumulate over 6.3 billion shots. Cr(4+):YAG is a promising candidate material for passively Q-switching the laser. Historically, the performance of saturable absorbers has degraded over long-duration usage. To measure the multi-billion shot performance of Cr(4+):YAG, a passively Q-switched GLAS-like oscillator was tested at an accelerated repetition rate of 500 Hz. The intracavity fluence was calculated to be approximately 2.5 J/cm(exp 2). The laser was monitored autonomously for 165 days. There was no evidence of change in the material optical properties during the 7.2 billion shot test.. All observed changes in laser operation could be attributed to pump laser diode aging. This is the first demonstration of multi-billion shot exposure testing of Cr(4+):YAG in this pulse energy regime

  5. Solar flare particle fluences during solar cycles 19, 20 and 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, R. E.; Goswami, J. N.; Jha, R.; Lal, D.; Reedy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite data for solar flare particle events during solar cycle 21 (up to July 1982) have been analyzed to obtain event-integrated fluxes of energetic protons and alpha particles. Thirty nine events with proton fluences (E greater than 10 MeV) greater than 10-million/sq cm occurred during 1976-1982. The average flux of protons with kinetic energy greater than 10 MeV is 65 per sq cm/s for this period. The event averaged alpha to proton ratio, in the energy interval 1-22 MeV/n, varies between 0.006 to 0.04, with an average value of about 0.02 for the whole cycle. The flux of protons (with energies greater than 10 MeV) averaged over cycle 21 is lower than those for solar-cycle 20 per sq cm/s based on satellite data, and for solar-cycle 19 378 per sq cm/s based on lunar sample data. There is no definitive correlation between solar-cycle averaged proton fluxes and sunspot numbers.

  6. Photon fluence perturbation correction factors for solid state detectors irradiated in kilovoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobit, Paul N.; Sandison, George A.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2000-02-01

    Dose perturbation correction factors, gamma (p ), for LiF, CaF2 and Li2 B4 O7 solid state detectors have been determined using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Each detector was simulated in the form of a disc of diameter 3.61 mm and thickness 1 mm irradiated in a clinical kilovoltage photon beam at a depth of 1 cm in a water phantom. The perturbation correction factor gamma (p ) is defined as the deviation of the absorbed dose ratio from the average mass energy absorption coefficient ratio of water to the detector material, (mubar en /rho )med,det , which is evaluated assuming that the photon fluence spectrum in the medium and in the detector material are identical. We define another mass energy absorption coefficient ratio, (kappabar en /rho )med,det , which is evaluated using the actual photon fluence spectrum in the medium and detector for LiF and CaF2 rather than assuming they are identical. (kappabar en /rho )med,det predicts the average absorbed dose ratio of the medium to the detector material within 0.3%. When the difference in atomic number between the cavity and the phantom material is large then their photon fluence spectra will differ substantially resulting in a difference between (kappabar en /rho )med,det and (

  7. Fluence-based relative biological effectiveness for charged particle carcinogenesis in mouse Harderian gland.

    PubMed

    Alpen, E L; Powers-Risius, P; Curtis, S B; DeGuzman, R; Fry, R J

    1994-10-01

    Neoplasia in the rodent Harderian gland has been used to determine the carcinogenic potential of irradiation by HZE particles. Ions from protons to lanthanum at energies up to 670 MeV/a have been used to irradiate mice, and prevalence of Harderian gland tumors has been measured 16 months after irradiation. The RBE for tumor induction has been expressed as the RBEmax, which is the ratio of the initial slopes of the dose vs prevalence curve. The RBEmax has been found to be approximately 30 for ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer. Analysis on the basis of fluence as a substitute for dose has shown that on a per particle basis all of the ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer have equal effectiveness. An analysis of the probabilities of ion traversals of the nucleus has shown that for these high stopping powers that a single hit is effective in producing neoplastic transformation. PMID:11539994

  8. The circadian oscillator is regulated by a very low fluence response of phytochrome in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, F; Fejes, E; Wehmeyer, B; Dallman, G; Schafer, E

    1993-01-01

    Expression of genes encoding the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding proteins of photosystem II (Cab) in etiolated wheat seedlings is controlled by phytochrome and a circadian clock. Even photoconversion of <1% of phytochrome to its active form, which can be achieved by moonlight, induces the expression of the Cab genes, particularly that of the Cab-1 gene, in circadian fashion. Thus, this reaction shows the characteristics of a low and a very low fluence response. A single far-red light pulse given to an etiolated seedling is sufficient for a persistence of the circadian oscillation of the Cab-1 mRNA level for at least 100 h. Subsequent red (R) or long-wavelength far-red (RG9) light irradiations alter the free running rhythm. These observations indicate a change in sensitivity to phytochrome and/or a control by stable phytochrome. The latter hypothesis is supported by the observation that the level of Cab-1 mRNA is increased or decreased by a second R or RG9 light pulse, respectively. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:11607411

  9. Experimental derivation of the fluence non-uniformity correction for air kerma near brachytherapy linear sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vianello, E. A.; Almeida, C. E. de

    2008-07-15

    In brachytherapy, one of the elements to take into account for measurements free in air is the non-uniformity of the photon fluence due to the beam divergence that causes a steep dose gradient near the source. The correction factors for this phenomenon have been usually evaluated by two available theories by Kondo and Randolph [Radiat. Res. 13, 37-60 (1960)] and Bielajew [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 517-538 (1990)], both conceived for point sources. This work presents the experimental validation of the Monte Carlo calculations made by Rodriguez and deAlmeida [Phys. Med. Biol. 49, 1705-1709 (2004)] for the non-uniformity correction specifically for a Cs-137 linear source measured using a Farmer type ionization chamber. The experimental values agree very well with the Monte Carlo calculations and differ from the results predicted by both theoretical models widely used. This result confirms that for linear sources there are some important differences at short distances from the source and emphasizes that those theories should not be used for linear sources. The data provided in this study confirm the limitations of the mentioned theories when linear sources are used. Considering the difficulties and uncertainties associated with the experimental measurements, it is recommended to use the Monte Carlo data to assess the non-uniformity factors for linear sources in situations that require this knowledge.

  10. Fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods for radiation protection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.; Meinhold, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recently published a report (Report #137) that discusses various aspects of the concepts used in radiation protection and the difficulties in measuring the radiation environment in spacecraft for the estimation of radiation risk to space travelers. Two novel dosimetric methodologies, fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods, are discussed and evaluated, along with the more conventional quality factor/LET method. It was concluded that for the present, any reason to switch to a new methodology is not compelling. It is suggested that because of certain drawbacks in the presently-used conventional method, these alternative methodologies should be kept in mind. As new data become available and dosimetric techniques become more refined, the question should be revisited and that in the future, significant improvement might be realized. In addition, such concepts as equivalent dose and organ dose equivalent are discussed and various problems regarding the measurement/estimation of these quantities are presented.

  11. Assessment of neutron fluence to organ dose conversion coefficients in the ORNL analytical adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Miri Hakimabad, H; Rafat Motavalli, L; Karimi Shahri, K

    2009-03-01

    Neutron fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients have been evaluated for the analytical ORNL modified adult phantom in 21 body organs using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The calculation used 20 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9)-20 MeV, under four irradiation conditions: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), left-lateral (LLAT) and right-lateral (RLAT). Then the conversion coefficients are compared with the data reported in ICRP publication 74 for mathematical MIRD type phantoms and by Bozkurt et al for the VIPMAN voxel model. Although the ORNL results show fewer differences with the ICRP results than the Bozkurt et al data, one can deduce neither complete agreement nor disparity between this study and other data sets. This comparison shows that in some cases any differences in applied Monte Carlo codes or simulated body models could significantly change the organ dose conversion factors. This sensitivity should be considered for radiological protection programmes. For certain organs, the results of two models with major differences can be in a satisfactory agreement because of the similarity in those organ models. PMID:19225185

  12. Fluence-based relative biological effectiveness for charged particle carcinogenesis in mouse Harderian gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpen, E. L.; Power-Risius, P.; Curtis, S. B.; Deguzman, R.; Fry, R. J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Neoplasia in the rodent Harderian gland has been used to determine the carcinogenic potential of irradiation by HZE particles. Ions from protons to lanthanum at energies up to 670 MeV/a have been used to irradiate mice, and prevalence of Harderian gland tumors has been measured 16 months after irradiation. The Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for tumor induction has been expressed as the RBE(sub max), which is the ratio of the initial slopes of the dose vs prevalence curve. The RBE(sub max) has been found to be approximately 30 for ions with Linear Energy Transfer (LET) values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer. Analysis on the basis of fluence as a substitute for dose has shown that on a per particle basis all of the ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer have equal effectiveness. An analysis of the probabilities of ion traversals of the nucleus has shown that for these high stopping powers that a single hit is effective in producing neoplastic transformation.

  13. On the growth of segregated C layers on top of Fe films on pyrolytic graphite samples during high-fluence D + irradiation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, A.; Möller, W.; Roth, J.

    1989-05-01

    On Fe films evaporated on pyrolytic graphite, thick C layers segregate during high-temperature (above about 800 K) light ion irradiation if the penetrating ions are energetic enough to reach the Fe-graphite interface. The thickness of the C segregated layer and the C depth distribution in the Fe film have been determined with 2-MeV 4He+ Rutherford backscattering. A steady-state carbon overlayer is reached at high fluences (above about 1019 particles/cm2), the thickness of which depends on the energy of the irradiating beam for a given thickness of the Fe evaporated film. The anisotropic structure of the pyrolytic graphite substrate influences the thickness of the steady-state C overlayer, thicker C layers being measured for edge-oriented C substrates. Using the Monte Carlo code trim, the production of defects in the graphite substrate has been calculated for different thicknesses of the C overlayer. The total amount of defects produced in the graphite substrate has been identified as the parameter regulating the growth and the steady-state value of the C overlayer. With the depth distributions of defect production generated by trim as source functions, the diffusion of C interstitials in graphite under the influence of recombination with vacancies has been modeled. The segregating C fluxes are identified with the fluxes of interstitials arriving at the Fe/graphite substrate interface for a suitable choice of the parameters in the diffusion equation.

  14. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  15. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut's ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. PMID:25800120

  16. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; Ojha, R.; Müller, C.; Schulz, R.; Anton, G.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Eberl, T.; Edwards, P. G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; James, C. W.; Kappes, A.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Longo, F.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McEnery, J.; Natusch, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Ros, E.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.; Wilms, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. The outburst of PKS B1424-418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Low Fluence Li-Ag Laser Driven Plasma Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, M. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Filuk, A.; Clark, B.; Lake, P.; Abdallah, J.

    2002-10-01

    Low fluence laser produced plasmas are used in many applications: from ion sources to material synthesis. Our work focuses on developing a quantitative description of these ablation plasmas through the interpretation and analysis of time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements with detailed spectral modeling. To this end, in a series of experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratories, laser generated Li-Ag plasma plumes were produced by irradiation of solid targets using a Nd pulsed laser. Time- and spatially-resolved optical spectra were recorded with a framing spectrograph. In order to limit the gradients along a direction perpendicular to the target's normal, targets with strips of Li-Ag coated on top of Pt were used. The Pt plume collisionally confines the Li-Ag, thus reducing the Li-Ag lateral expansion. The spectra display line transitions in Li and Ag atoms. A spectroscopic model based on time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, detailed line shapes, and radiation transport was used to describe plasma parameters both spatially and temporally. In particular, this analysis has revealed that level populations in laser-ablated plumes may behave in a time-dependent manner, i.e. not in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). The time-scales associated with these phenomena and the interpretation of spectral data critically depends on the details of the atomic kinetic model and the quality of the rate coefficients. In order to generate accurate atomic data for atoms present in the plasma, a semi-empirical technique has been implemented in the Los Alamos suite of atomic structure and electron scattering codes. Details of the spectral model and analysis results will be discussed.

  18. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Craver, Brianna M.; Tran, Katherine K.; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut’s ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. PMID:25800120

  19. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  20. Modeling of radiation damage effects in silicon detectors at high fluences HL-LHC with Sentaurus TCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, D.; Moscatelli, F.; Morozzi, A.; Bilei, G. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we propose the application of an enhanced radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of silicon detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 2.0 ×1016 1 MeV equivalent neutrons/cm2). We present the comparison between simulation results and experimental data for p-type substrate structures in different operating conditions (temperature and biasing voltages) for fluences up to 2.2 ×1016 neutrons/cm2. The good agreement between simulation findings and experimental measurements fosters the application of this modeling scheme to the optimization of the next silicon detectors to be used at HL-LHC.

  1. Three-dimensional shielding effects on charged particle fluences measured in the P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csige, I.; Benton, E. V.; Frigo, L.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional shielding effects on cosmic ray charged particle fluences were measured with plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The azimuthal and polar angle distributions of the galactic cosmic ray particles (mostly relativistic iron) were measured in the main stack and in four side stacks of the P0006 experiment, located on the west end of the LDEF satellite. A shadowing effect of the shielding of the LDEF satellite is found. Total fluence of stopping protons was measured as a function of the position in the main and side stacks of the P0006 experiment. Location dependence of total track density is explained by the three-dimensional shielding model of the P0006 stack. These results can be used to validate 3D mass model and transport code calculations and also for predictions of the outer radiation environment for the Space Station Freedom.

  2. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  3. Effects of solar wind dynamic pressure on the ionospheric O+ fluence during the 31 August 2005 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, P. A.; Brambles, O. J.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J.

    2010-11-01

    The Multifluid-Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (MFLFM) global simulation model incorporating an ionospheric cusp O+ outflow model based on an empirical relation between downward DC Poynting flux and O+ outflow flux regulated by the precipitating electron number flux (Fen) is used to simulate the 31 August 2005 storm. A baseline run incorporating the original solar wind data is contrasted against a case where the solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdyn) is artificially adjusted to see what effects this variable has on the O+ fluence generated in the model. Consistent with data, it is found that both the fluence and O+ outflow flux have a positive correlation with the solar wind dynamic pressure. Additionally, changes in Pdyn affect the downward Poynting flux only marginally and regulates both outflow flux and cusp outflow area via Fen. Increases in Pdyn lead to increased cusp electron precipitation, which has the physical effect of enhancing the upwelling O+ population available for outflow.

  4. How simulated fluence of photons from terrestrial gamma ray flashes at aircraft and balloon altitudes depends on initial parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. S.; ØStgaard, N.; Gjesteland, T.; Carlson, B.

    2013-05-01

    Up to a few years ago, terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) were only observed by spaceborne instruments. The aircraft campaign ADELE was able to observe one TGF, and more attempts on aircraft observations are planned. There is also a planned campaign with stratospheric balloons, COBRAT. In this context an important question that arises is what count rates we can expect and how these estimates are affected by the initial properties of the TGFs. Based on simulations of photon propagation in air we find the photon fluence at different observation points at aircraft and balloon altitudes. The observed fluence is highly affected by the initial parameters of the simulated TGFs. One of the most important parameters is the number of initial photons in a TGF. In this paper, we give a semi-analytical approach to find the initial number of photons with an order of magnitude accuracy. The resulting number varies over several orders of magnitude, depending mostly on the production altitude of the TGF. The initial production altitude is also one of the main parameters in the simulations. Given the same number of initial photons, the fluence at aircraft and balloon altitude from a TGF produced at 10 km altitude is 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller then a TGF originating from 20 km altitude. Other important parameters are altitude distribution, angular distribution and amount of feedback. The differences in altitude, altitude distribution and amount of feedback are especially important for the fluence of photons observed at altitudes less than 20 km, and for instruments with a low-energy threshold larger than 100 keV. We find that the maximum radius of observation in 14 km for a TGF with the intensity of an average RHESSI TGF is smaller than the results reported by Smith et al. (2011), and our results support the conclusion in Gjesteland et al. (2012) and Østgaard et al. (2012) that TGFs probably are a more common phenomenon than previously reported.

  5. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  6. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or < 5 microsec at = or < 3 nA/sq mm or = or < 10(exp 5) e/sq mm per pulse) with low energy electron and UV flooding to neutralize the charging between pulses. Quantifiable changes in yield curves are observed due to < 100 fC/sq mm fluences for several excellent dielectric thin film materials. We find good agreement with a phenomenological argument based on insulator charging predicted by the yield curve; this includes an approximately linear decrease in the magnitude of the yield as incident energies approach the crossover energies and an exponential decrease in yield as accumulated internal charge reduces the landing energy to asymptotically approach a steady state surface charge and unity yield. We also find that the exponential decay of yield curves with fluence exhibit an energy dependent decay constant, alpha(E), over a broad range of incident energies below, between and above the crossover energies. Finally, we present some preliminary physics-based models for this energy dependence and attempt to relate our charging measurements to knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and transport, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators.

  7. Fluence-dependent dynamics of the 5d6s exchange splitting in Gd metal after femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietsch, Björn; Carley, Robert; Gleich, Markus; Teichmann, Martin; Bowlan, John; Weinelt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the fluence-dependent dynamics of the exchange-split 5d6s valence bands of Gd metal after femtosecond, near-infrared (IR) laser excitation. Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulses is used to simultaneously map the transient binding energies of the minority and majority spin valence bands. The decay constant of the exchange splitting increases with fluence. This reflects the slower response of the occupied majority-spin component, which we attribute to Elliot–Yafet spin-flip scattering in accordance with the microscopic three-temperature model (M3TM). In contrast, the time constant of the partly unoccupied minority-spin band stays unaffected by a change in pump fluence. Here, we introduce as an alternative to superdiffusive spin transport exchange scattering, which is an ultrafast electronic mechanism explaining the observed dynamics. Exchange scattering can reduce the spin polarization in the partially unoccupied minority-spin band and thus its energetic position without effective demagnetization.

  8. Fluence Rate-Dependent Photobleaching of Intratumorally-Administered Pc 4 Does Not Predict Tumor Growth Delay

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    We examined effects of fluence rate on the photobleaching of the photosensitizer Pc 4 during photodynamic therapy (PDT) and the relationship between photobleaching and tumor response to PDT. BALB/c mice with intradermal EMT6 tumors were given 0.03 mg/kg Pc 4 by intratumor injection and irradiated at 667 nm with an irradiance of 50 or 150 mW/cm2 to a fluence of 100 J/cm2. While no cures were attained, significant tumor growth delay was demonstrated at both irradiances compared to drug-only controls. There was no significant difference in tumor responses to these two irradiances (p = 0.857). Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor the bleaching of Pc 4 during irradiation, with more rapid bleaching with respect to fluence shown at the higher irradiance. No significant correlation was found between fluorescence photobleaching and tumor regrowth for the data interpreted as a whole. Within each treatment group, weak associations between photobleaching and outcome were observed. In the 50 mW/cm2 group, enhanced photobleaching was associated with prolonged growth delay (p = 0.188), while at 150 mW/cm2 this trend was reversed (p = 0.308). Thus, it appears that Pc 4 photobleaching is not a strong predictor of individual tumor response to Pc4-PDT under these treatment conditions. PMID:22582826

  9. Role of laser fluence in protein synthesis of cultured DRG neurons following low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Qiu, Caimin; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Yixiu; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-11-01

    Low-level lasers have been used to relieve pain in clinical for many years. But the mechanism is not fully clear. In animal models, nitric oxide (NO) has been reported involving in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive signals. So the objective of this study was to establish whether low-level laser with different fluence could stimulate the production of nitric oxide synthese (NOS), which produces NO in cultured primary dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG neurons). The primary DRG neurons were isolated from healthy Sprague Dawley rats (8-12 weeks of age) and spread on 35 mm culture dishes specially used for confocal microscopy. 24 hours after spreading, cells were irradiated with 658 nm laser for two consecutive days at the energy density of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mJ·cm-2 respectively. Control groups were not exposed to the laser, but were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The synthesis of NOS after laser irradiation was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the changes of NOS were evaluated using confocal microscopy and Image J software. The results showed that all the laser fluence could promote the production of NOS in DRG neurons, especially the 60 mJ·cm-2 . These results demonstrated that low-level laser irradiation could modify protein synthesis in a dose- or fluence- dependent manner, and indicated that low-level laser irradiation might achieve the analgesic effect through modulation of NO production.

  10. An improved analytic function for predicting light fluence rate in circular fields on a semi-infinite geometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Amy; Ong, Yi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate determination of in-vivo light fluence rate is critical for preclinical and clinical studies involving photodynamic therapy (PDT). This study compares the longitudinal light fluence distribution inside biological tissue in the central axis of a 1 cm diameter circular uniform light field for a range of in-vivo tissue optical properties (absorption coefficients (μa) between 0.01 and 1 cm−1 and reduced scattering coefficients (μs’) between 2 and 40 cm−1). This was done using Monte-Carlo simulations for a semi-infinite turbid medium in an air-tissue interface. The end goal is to develop an analytical expression that would fit the results from the Monte Carlo simulation for both the 1 cm diameter circular beam and the broad beam. Each of these parameters is expressed as a function of tissue optical properties. These results can then be compared against the existing expressions in the literature for broad beam for analysis in both accuracy and applicable range. Using the 6-parameter model, the range and accuracy for light transport through biological tissue is improved and may be used in the future as a guide in PDT for light fluence distribution for known tissue optical properties. PMID:27053827

  11. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  12. Developing a new model for gradual SEP events: Peak intensities and fluences within 1.6 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aran, A.; Jiggens, P.; Sanahuja, B.; Jacobs, C.; Heynderickx, D.; Lario, D.

    2011-12-01

    In order to correctly asses the particle radiation environment that missions like Solar Orbiter or Solar Probe Plus may encounter it is necessary to model the contribution of interplanetary collisionless shocks to particle intensities and fluences of SEP events. Within the Solar Energetic Particle Environment Modeling (SEPEM) Project we developed a method to couple a statistical model of SEP events at 1 AU with the outputs of a physics-based model for the description of gradual SEP events from 0.2 AU to 1.6 AU in the ecliptic plane. This latter model combines 2D MHD simulations of propagation of shocks (from 4 solar radii up to 1.6 AU) with a particle transport model to obtain the intensity-time profiles of 5-200 MeV protons, as seen by different observers. We consider an armada of 98 spacecraft located at 14 longitudes (from W85 to E65 at 1 AU) and at seven radial distances. The observers placed out of 1 AU are sitting along the same interplanetary magnetic field lines passing through the 1 AU-observers. We calibrate the resulting profiles with 1 AU data and we estimate the event fluences and the upstream time-intensity profiles at the other radial distances. We apply this method to a few SEP events and derive the radial variations of the peak intensity and fluence. We discuss the results and propose a way to extend the statistical model to other radial distances.

  13. Investigation Into the Optimum Beam Shape and Fluence for Selective Ablation of Dental Calculus at lambda = 400 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.E.; Seka. W.; Rechmann, P.

    2010-02-25

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a morehomogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (<=50-mm diameter) without fiber propagation and cooled by a water spray are heavily distorted and may lead to variable ablation. Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (>= 2 J/cm^2); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm^2. Supplying laser light to a tooth using an optical fiber with coaxial water-cooling is determined to be the most appropriate method when selectively removing calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm^2 are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus

  14. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and. gamma. -ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and ..gamma..-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties.

  15. Influence of focal point properties on energy transfer and plasma evolution during laser ignition process with a passively q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Bärwinkel, Mark; Lorenz, Sebastian; Stäglich, Robert; Brüggemann, Dieter

    2016-07-11

    Miniaturized passively q-switched laser ignition systems are a promising alternative to conventional ignition sources to ensure a reliable ignition under difficult conditions. In this study the influences of focal point properties on energy transfer from laser to plasma as well as plasma formation and propagation are investigated as the first steps of the laser induced ignition process. Maximum fluence and fluence volume are introduced to characterize focal point properties for varying laser pulse energies and focusing configurations. The results show that the transferred laser energy increases with increasing maximum fluence. During laser emission plasma propagates along the beam path of the focused laser beam. Rising maximum fluence results in increased plasma volume, but expansion saturates when fluence volume reaches its maximum. PMID:27410797

  16. Effects of low fluence neutron bombardment on material properties of aluminum 2024 t-3 and aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jesse Lee

    The purpose of this work was to explore the impact of neutron irradiation (1018 n/m2 to 1021 n/m 2) on the aluminum alloy 2024 T-3, and several corrosion resistant treatments commonly used. The irradiation was conducted in the Utah Nuclear Engineering Programs Reactor facility using the Fast Neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF) with a 1 MeV equivalent beam and the Center Irradiator (CI) with average neutron energy of 0.58 MeV. Historically, materials tests have focused on mechanical failures occurring at very high fluence. These same tests have generally been conducted for pure materials: the limited research existing for alloyed materials focuses on power plant materials such as zircaloy and steel. This body of information is mainly used to avoid catastrophic performance failures. Small research and test reactors operating at low power will subject core materials to fluence from 1014 n/m2 to 1024 n/m2. Aluminum alloys are very common in these systems. Materials used in research reactors, such as aluminum, have been deemed adequate due to high radiation tolerance and low mechanical failure rates. While aluminum and its alloys are a well-defined set of materials in nonradiation environments, there are very little published data for them for low fluence neutron radiation. This work measured Al 2024's (T-3) thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, oxide layer thickness, oxide/metal interface and corrosion resistance (using passive current density) for Alodine, Anodize type II, Anodize type III and native oxide. These measurements were taken before and after irradiation and results were examined. Over the course of 30 to 50 years, property changes will likely impact thermal diffusion, corrosion properties and electrical properties. Defining these changes may give future engineers the tools needed to safely justify life extensions and build inspection methods to identify pre-failure conditions.

  17. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  18. Neutron/gamma dose characterization for use with TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, J.C.; Magee, L.; Hefley, T.

    1991-01-01

    The work described in this paper was performed in preparation for establishing a thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system for workers exposed to spontaneous fission neutrons from mixed plutonium isotopes, {sup 232}Th, and depleted uranium at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex facility. The method proposed uses a neutron-insensitive thermoluminescent dosimeter to measure the gamma dose and apply a neutron dose/gamma dose ratio to calculate the neutron dose equivalent. This approach, while requiring multibadge dosimetry for each individual, provides a more accurate neutron dose calculation than was previously in use and reduces the maximum missed dose and falsely reported dose.

  19. Mu2e Neutron/Gamma Background Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, Morgan; Ahmed, Mohamed; Alexander, Damien; Daniel, Aji; Hungerford, Ed; Sikora, Mark; Alcap Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    In Mu2e, a muon-to-electron conversion experiment that will search for neutrinoless lepton conversion with a single event sensitivity of 10-16, a large flux of neutrons with energies less than 10 MeV are emitted after muon capture in the stopping target. These neutrons, and gamma radiation resulting from their absorption, comprise a major component of experimental backgrounds. However, they are not currently sufficiently understood to reliably mitigate single-event-upsets in the readout electronics and time-to-failure of the detector components. At the Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, a program was undertaken to measure neutron and charged particle emission after muon capture in targets of interest. Two BC501A neutron counters, a Ge, and a LaBr3 detector were used to measure the rates and spectra of emitted neutrons, X-rays, and gammas. The ongoing analysis of this data will provide characterization of the neutron and gamma spectra at low energies. Because the lifetime of a captured muon is nearly a microsecond, the neutron energy spectrum must be determined by unfolding methods. This presentation will discuss the experiment, neutron detector calibrations, and the progress of the analysis.

  20. Hypopigmentation Induced by Frequent Low-Fluence, Large-Spot-Size QS Nd:YAG Laser Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siong See Joyce; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    The Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG) laser is increasingly used for nonablative skin rejuvenation or "laser toning" for melasma. Multiple and frequent low-fluence, large-spot-size treatments are used to achieve laser toning, and these treatments are associated with the development of macular hypopigmentation as a complication. We present a case series of three patients who developed guttate hypomelanotic macules on the face after receiving laser toning treatment with QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG. PMID:26719647

  1. Hypopigmentation Induced by Frequent Low-Fluence, Large-Spot-Size QS Nd:YAG Laser Treatments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yisheng; Lee, Siong See Joyce; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-12-01

    The Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG) laser is increasingly used for nonablative skin rejuvenation or "laser toning" for melasma. Multiple and frequent low-fluence, large-spot-size treatments are used to achieve laser toning, and these treatments are associated with the development of macular hypopigmentation as a complication. We present a case series of three patients who developed guttate hypomelanotic macules on the face after receiving laser toning treatment with QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG. PMID:26719647

  2. Comparison of anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based treatment planning approaches for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Rao, Min; Cao, Daliang; Chen, Fan; Ye, Jinsong; Mehta, Vivek; Wong, Tony; Shepard, David

    2010-11-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to reduce treatment times while producing comparable or improved dose distributions relative to fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In order to take full advantage of the VMAT delivery technique, one must select a robust inverse planning tool. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of VMAT planning techniques of three categories: anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based inverse planning. We have compared these techniques in terms of the plan quality, planning efficiency and delivery efficiency. Fourteen patients were selected for this study including six head-and-neck (HN) cases, and two cases each of prostate, pancreas, lung and partial brain. For each case, three VMAT plans were created. The first VMAT plan was generated based on the anatomical geometry. In the Elekta ERGO++ treatment planning system (TPS), segments were generated based on the beam's eye view (BEV) of the target and the organs at risk. The segment shapes were then exported to Pinnacle TPS followed by segment weight optimization and final dose calculation. The second VMAT plan was generated by converting optimized fluence maps (calculated by the Pinnacle TPS) into deliverable arcs using an in-house arc sequencer. The third VMAT plan was generated using the Pinnacle SmartArc IMRT module which is an aperture-based optimization method. All VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the plan comparisons were made in terms of plan quality and delivery efficiency. The results show that for cases of little or modest complexity such as prostate, pancreas, lung and brain, the anatomy-based approach provides similar target coverage and critical structure sparing, but less conformal dose distributions as compared to the other two approaches. For more complex HN cases, the anatomy-based approach is not able to provide clinically acceptable VMAT plans while highly

  3. Characterization of active waveguides fabricated by ultralow-fluence swift heavy ion irradiation in lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ningning; Chen, Feng; Jaque, Daniel; Benayas, Antonio; Qiu, Feng; Narusawa, Tadashi

    2011-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of neodymium-doped lithium niobate active planar waveguides based on the generation of non-overlapping nano-tracks by ultralow-fluence swift heavy ions. A combination of confocal luminescence, Raman and surface second harmonic investigations have evidenced the simultaneous presence of partial amorphization, damage and local compression of the lithium niobate network along the ion path, with these effects being at the basis of the refractive index modification. The potential application of the obtained waveguides in multi-functional laser devices has been discussed.

  4. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  5. Comparison of anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based treatment planning approaches for VMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Min; Cao, Daliang; Chen, Fan; Ye, Jinsong; Mehta, Vivek; Wong, Tony; Shepard, David

    2010-11-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to reduce treatment times while producing comparable or improved dose distributions relative to fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In order to take full advantage of the VMAT delivery technique, one must select a robust inverse planning tool. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of VMAT planning techniques of three categories: anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based inverse planning. We have compared these techniques in terms of the plan quality, planning efficiency and delivery efficiency. Fourteen patients were selected for this study including six head-and-neck (HN) cases, and two cases each of prostate, pancreas, lung and partial brain. For each case, three VMAT plans were created. The first VMAT plan was generated based on the anatomical geometry. In the Elekta ERGO++ treatment planning system (TPS), segments were generated based on the beam's eye view (BEV) of the target and the organs at risk. The segment shapes were then exported to Pinnacle3 TPS followed by segment weight optimization and final dose calculation. The second VMAT plan was generated by converting optimized fluence maps (calculated by the Pinnacle3 TPS) into deliverable arcs using an in-house arc sequencer. The third VMAT plan was generated using the Pinnacle3 SmartArc IMRT module which is an aperture-based optimization method. All VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the plan comparisons were made in terms of plan quality and delivery efficiency. The results show that for cases of little or modest complexity such as prostate, pancreas, lung and brain, the anatomy-based approach provides similar target coverage and critical structure sparing, but less conformal dose distributions as compared to the other two approaches. For more complex HN cases, the anatomy-based approach is not able to provide clinically acceptable VMAT plans while highly

  6. Morphology And Microstructure in Fused Silica Induced By High Fluence Ultraviolet 3omega (355 Nm) Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Ferriera, J.L.; Lindsey, E.F.; Haupt, D.L.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Kinney, J.H.

    2007-08-08

    The morphology and microstructure induced in high quality fused silica by UV (355 nm) laser pulses at high fluence (10-45 J/cm{sup 2}) have been investigated using a suite of microscopic and spectroscopic tools. The laser beam has a near-Gaussian profile with a 1/e{sup 2} diameter of 0.98 mm at the sample plane and a pulse length FWHM (full width at half maximum) of 7.5 ns. The damage craters consist of a molten core region (thermal explosion), surrounded by a near concentric region of fractured material. The latter arises from propagation of lateral cracks induced by the laser-generated shock waves, which also compact the crater wall, {approx} 10 {micro}m thick and {approx} 20% higher in density. The size of the damage crater varies with laser fluence, number of pulses, and laser irradiation history. In the compaction layer, there is no detectable change in the Si/O stoichiometry to within {+-} 1.6% and no crystalline nano-particles of Si were observed. Micro- (1-10 {micro}m) and nano- (20-200 nm) cracks are found, however. A lower valence Si{sup 3+} species on the top 2-3 nm of the compaction layer is evident from the Si 2p XPS. The results are used to construct a physical model of the damage crater and to gain critical insight into laser damage process.

  7. Trapping in proton irradiated p+-n-n+ silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, Th.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, Th.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.; Van Parijs, I.; Strom, D. A.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Callatay, B.; Delaere, C.; Du Pree, T.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Michotte, D.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pagano, D.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.-R.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Tuuva, T.; Beaulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sabes, D.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Zoccarato, Y.; Agram, J.-L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-Ch.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.; Charles, L.; Goetzmann, Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Mathieu, C.; Richer, M.; Skovpen, K.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Geisler, M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Autermann, C.; Edelhoff, M.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schwering, G.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Burgmeier, A.; Calligaris, L.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Fluke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Gizhko, A.; Hansen, K.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Schroeder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Blobel, V.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Draeger, A.-R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Lapsien, T.; Mättig, S.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Sola, V.; Steinbrück, G.; Wellhausen, J.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Eber, R.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, Th.; Heindl, S.; Hoffmann, K.-H.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Mallows, S.; Muller, Th.; Nuernberg, A.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H. J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Bhardwaj, A.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Ranjan, K.; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Di Mattia, A.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuvè, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Civinini, C.; Gallo, E.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Ciulli, V.; D'Alessandro, R.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Scarlini, E.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Dinardo, M.; Fiorendi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Giubilato, P.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; Zucchetta, A.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Bissi, L.; Checcucci, B.; Magalotti, D.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Biasini, M.; Conti, E.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Salvatore, M.; Santocchia, A.; Solestizi, L. A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Minuti, M.; Moggi, A.; Moon, C. S.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Rizzi, A.; Tonelli, G.; Calzolari, F.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Ligabue, F.; Vernieri, C.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Bellan, R.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.

    2016-04-01

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200 μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 · 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming two effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. The effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggest an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.

  8. Investigation of light propagation models to determine the optical properties of tissue from interstitial frequency domain fluence measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heping; Farrell, Thomas J; Patterson, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Four models, standard diffusion approximation (SDA), single Monte Carlo (SMC), delta-P1, and isotropic similarity (ISM), are developed and evaluated as forward calculation tools in the estimation of tissue optical properties. The inverse calculation uses the ratio of the fluences and phase difference at two locations close to an intensity modulated isotropic source to recover the reduced scattering coefficient mus' and the absorption coefficient mua. Diffusion theory allows recovery of optical properties (OPs) within 5% for media with mus'mua>10. The performance of the delta-P1 model is similar to SDA, with limited enhanced accuracy. The collimation approximation may limit the use of the delta-P1 model for spherical geometry, and/or the fluence may not be accurately calculated by this model. The SMC model is the best, recovering OPs within 10% regardless of the albedo. However, the necessary restriction of the searched OPs space is inconvenient. The performance of ISM is similar to that of diffusion theory for media with mus'mua>10, and better for 15. PMID:16965132

  9. A method to detect low-level 63Ni activity for estimating fast neutron fluence from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Shibata, T; Imamura, M; Shibata, S; Nogawa, N; Uwamino, Y; Shizuma, K

    1999-06-01

    The Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs resulted in the worst reported exposure of radiation to the human body. The data of survivors have provided the basis for the risk estimation for ionizing radiation, and thus are widely used as the basis of radiation safety. In this report we have studied a new method to detect the low-level 63Ni activity in copper samples in order to estimate the fast neutron fluence from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Only 0.8 x 10(-3) Bq g(-1) of 63Ni is expected to be produced by the atomic bomb in a copper sample with the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction at a distance of 500 m from the hypocenter. Our method has the required level of sensitivity for determination of the fast neutron fluence out to distances of at least 500 m, and perhaps as far as 1,000 m. We have already investigated and collected some bomb-irradiated copper samples for further study. PMID:10334579

  10. Effect of fluence and ambient environment on the surface and structural modification of femtosecond laser irradiated Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umm-i-Kalsoom; Shazia, Bashir; Nisar, Ali; M Shahid, Rafique; Wolfgang, Husinsky; Chandra, S. R. Nathala; Sergey, V. Makarov; Narjis, Begum

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions, ultrafast pulsed laser interaction with matter leads to the formation of self-organized conical as well as periodic surface structures (commonly reffered to as, laser induced periodic surface structures, LIPSS). The purpose of the present investigations is to explore the effect of fsec laser fluence and ambient environments (Vacuum & O2) on the formation of LIPSS and conical structures on the Ti surface. The surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ablation threshold with single and multiple (N = 100) shots and the existence of an incubation effect was demonstrated by SEM investigations for both the vacuum and the O2 environment. The phase analysis and chemical composition of the exposed targets were performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. SEM investigations reveal the formation of LIPSS (nano & micro). FFT d-spacing calculations illustrate the dependence of periodicity on the fluence and ambient environment. The periodicity of nano-scale LIPSS is higher in the case of irradiation under vacuum conditions as compared to O2. Furthermore, the O2 environment reduces the ablation threshold. XRD data reveal that for the O2 environment, new phases (oxides of Ti) are formed. EDS analysis exhibits that after irradiation under vacuum conditions, the percentage of impurity element (Al) is reduced. The irradiation in the O2 environment results in 15% atomic diffusion of oxygen. Project supported by Österreichische Forschungsfödergesellschaft (FFG) (Grant No. 834325).

  11. Trapping in irradiated p+-n-n- silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adam, W.

    2016-04-22

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 x 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming twomore » effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. Furthermore, the effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggests an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.« less

  12. Trapping in irradiated p-on-n silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.

    2015-05-08

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 • 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming two effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. Furthermore, the effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggests an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.

  13. Real-time verification of multileaf collimator-driven radiotherapy using a novel optical attenuation-based fluence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Multileaf collimator (MLC)-driven conformal radiotherapy modalities [e.g., such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy] are more subject to delivery errors and dose calculation inaccuracies than standard modalities. Fluence monitoring during treatment delivery could reduce such errors by allowing an independent interface to quantify and assess measured difference between the delivered and planned treatment administration. We developed an optical attenuation-based detector to monitor fluence for the on-line quality control of radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of the current study was to develop the theoretical background of the invention and to evaluate the detector's performance both statistically and in clinical situations. Methods: We aligned 60 27-cm scintillating fibers coupled to a photodetector via clear optical fibers in the direction of motion of each of the 60 leaf pairs of a 120 leaves Millenium MLC on a Varian Clinac iX. We developed a theoretical model to predict the intensity of light collected on each side of the scintillating fibers when placed under radiation fields of varying sizes, intensities, and positions. The model showed that both the central position of the radiation field on the fiber (x{sub c}) and the integral fluence passing through the fiber ({Phi}{sub int}) could be assessed independently in a single measurement. We evaluated the performance of the prototype by (1) measuring the intrinsic variation of the measured values of x{sub c} and {Phi}{sub int}, (2) measuring the impact on the measured values of x{sub c} and {Phi}{sub int} of random leaf positioning errors introduced into IMRT fields, and (3) comparing the predicted values of x{sub c} and {Phi}{sub int} calculated with the treatment planning software to the measured values of x{sub c} and {Phi}{sub int} in order to assess the predictive effectiveness of the developed theoretical model. Results: We

  14. Extracting the distribution of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces for 351 nm, 3 ns laser pulses at high fluences (20-150 J/cm2).

    PubMed

    Laurence, Ted A; Bude, Jeff D; Ly, Sonny; Shen, Nan; Feit, Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Surface laser damage limits the lifetime of optics for systems guiding high fluence pulses, particularly damage in silica optics used for inertial confinement fusion-class lasers (nanosecond-scale high energy pulses at 355 nm/3.5 eV). The density of damage precursors at low fluence has been measured using large beams (1-3 cm); higher fluences cannot be measured easily since the high density of resulting damage initiation sites results in clustering. We developed automated experiments and analysis that allow us to damage test thousands of sites with small beams (10-30 µm), and automatically image the test sites to determine if laser damage occurred. We developed an analysis method that provides a rigorous connection between these small beam damage test results of damage probability versus laser pulse energy and the large beam damage results of damage precursor densities versus fluence. We find that for uncoated and coated fused silica samples, the distribution of precursors nearly flattens at very high fluences, up to 150 J/cm2, providing important constraints on the physical distribution and nature of these precursors. PMID:22565775

  15. In vivo fluence rate measurements during Foscan-mediated photodynamic therapy of persistent and recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinomas using a dedicated light applicator.

    PubMed

    van Veen, R L P; Nyst, H; Rai Indrasari, S; Adham Yudharto, M; Robinson, D J; Tan, I B; Meewis, C; Peters, R; Spaniol, S; Stewart, F A; Levendag, P C; Sterenborg, H J C M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a dedicated light applicator for light delivery and fluence rate monitoring during Foscan-mediated photodynamic therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a clinical phase I/II study. We have developed a flexible silicone applicator that can be inserted through the mouth and fixed in the nasopharyngeal cavity. Three isotropic fibers, for measuring of the fluence (rate) during therapy, were located within the nasopharyngeal tumor target area and one was manually positioned to monitor structures at risk in the shielded area. A flexible black silicon patch tailored to the patient's anatomy is attached to the applicator to shield the soft palate and oral cavity from the 652-nm laser light. Fourteen patients were included in the study, resulting in 26 fluence rate measurements in the risk volume (two failures). We observed a systematic reduction in fluence rate during therapy in 20 out of 26 illuminations, which may be related to photodynamic therapy-induced increased blood content, decreased oxygenation, or reduced scattering. Our findings demonstrate that the applicator was easily inserted into the nasopharynx. The average light distribution in the target area was reasonably uniform over the length of the applicator, thus giving an acceptably homogeneous illumination throughout the cavity. Shielding of the risk area was adequate. Large interpatient variations in fluence rate stress the need for in vivo dosimetry. This enables corrections to be made for differences in optical properties and geometry resulting in comparable amounts of light available for Foscan absorption. PMID:16965135

  16. SU-E-T-261: Plan Quality Assurance of VMAT Using Fluence Images Reconstituted From Log-Files

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Y; Shimizu, E; Matsunaga, K; Majima, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A successful VMAT plan delivery includes precise modulations of dose rate, gantry rotational and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shapes. One of the main problem in the plan quality assurance is dosimetric errors associated with leaf-positional errors are difficult to analyze because they vary with MU delivered and leaf number. In this study, we calculated integrated fluence error image (IFEI) from log-files and evaluated plan quality in the area of all and individual MLC leaves scanned. Methods: The log-file reported the expected and actual position for inner 20 MLC leaves and the dose fraction every 0.25 seconds during prostate VMAT on Elekta Synergy. These data were imported to in-house software that developed to calculate expected and actual fluence images from the difference of opposing leaf trajectories and dose fraction at each time. The IFEI was obtained by adding all of the absolute value of the difference between expected and actual fluence images corresponding. Results: In the area all MLC leaves scanned in the IFEI, the average and root mean square (rms) were 2.5 and 3.6 MU, the area of errors below 10, 5 and 3 MU were 98.5, 86.7 and 68.1 %, the 95 % of area was covered with less than error of 7.1 MU. In the area individual MLC leaves scanned in the IFEI, the average and rms value were 2.1 – 3.0 and 3.1 – 4.0 MU, the area of errors below 10, 5 and 3 MU were 97.6 – 99.5, 81.7 – 89.5 and 51.2 – 72.8 %, the 95 % of area was covered with less than error of 6.6 – 8.2 MU. Conclusion: The analysis of the IFEI reconstituted from log-file was provided detailed information about the delivery in the area of all and individual MLC leaves scanned.

  17. A novel algorithm for the reconstruction of an entrance beam fluence from treatment exit patient portal dosimetry images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Nicholas Niven

    The problem of determining the in vivo dosimetry for patients undergoing radiation treatment has been an area of interest since the development of the field. Most methods which have found clinical acceptance work by use of a proxy dosimeter, e.g.: glass rods, using radiophotoluminescence; thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), typically CaF or LiF; Metal Oxide Silicon Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters, using threshold voltage shift; Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLD), composed of Carbon doped Aluminum Dioxide crystals; RadioChromic film, using leuko-dye polymers; Silicon Diode dosimeters, typically p-type; and ion chambers. More recent methods employ Electronic Portal Image Devices (EPID), or dosimeter arrays, for entrance or exit beam fluence determination. The difficulty with the proxy in vivo dosimetery methods is the requirement that they be placed at the particular location where the dose is to be determined. This precludes measurements across the entire patient volume. These methods are best suited where the dose at a particular location is required. The more recent methods of in vivo dosimetry make use of detector arrays and reconstruction techniques to determine dose throughout the patient volume. One method uses an array of ion chambers located upstream of the patient. This requires a special hardware device and places an additional attenuator in the beam path, which may not be desirable. A final approach is to use the existing EPID, which is part of most modern linear accelerators, to image the patient using the treatment beam. Methods exist to deconvolve the detector function of the EPID using a series of weighted exponentials. Additionally, this method has been extended to determine in vivo dosimetry. The method developed here employs the use of EPID images and an iterative deconvolution algorithm to reconstruct the impinging primary beam fluence on the patient. This primary fluence may then be employed to determine dose through

  18. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-01

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  19. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  20. Conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose for heavy ions with energies up to 3 GeV/A.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Tsuda, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Niita, K

    2003-01-01

    Radiological protection against high-energy heavy ions has been an essential issue in the planning of long-term space missions. The fluence to effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for heavy ions using the particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS coupled with an anthropomorphic phantom of the MIRD5 type. The calculations were performed for incidences of protons and typical space heavy ions--deuterons, tritons, 3He, alpha particles, 12C, 20Ne, 40Ar, 40Ca and 56Fe--with energies up to 3 GeV/A in the isotropic and anterior-posterior irradiation geometries. A simple fitting formula that can predict the effective dose from almost all kinds of space heavy ions below 3 GeV/A within an accuracy of 30% is deduced from the results. PMID:14653334

  1. Characterization of n-GaN dilute magnetic semiconductors by cobalt ions implantation at high-fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husnain, G.; Shu-De, Yao; Ahmad, Ishaq; Rafique, H. M.; Mahmood, Arshad

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we present the structural and magnetic characteristics of cobalt ions implantation at a high-fluence (5×1016 cm-2) into n-GaN epilayer of thickness about 1.6 μm. The n-GaN was grown on sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Rutherford backscattering channeling was used for the structural study. After implantation, samples were annealed at 700, 800 and 900 °C by rapid thermal annealing in ambient N2. XRD measurements did not show any secondary phase or metal related-peaks. High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was performed as well to characterize structures. Well-defined hysteresis loops were observed at 5 K and room temperature using alternating gradient magnetometer AGM and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Temperature-dependent magnetization indicated magnetic moment at the lowest temperatures and retained magnetization up to 380 K for cobalt-ion-implanted samples.

  2. Practical considerations for TLD-400/700-based gamma ray dosimetry for BNCT applications in a high thermal neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, S W; Johnson, J E; Vostmyer, C E; Albertson, B D; Binney, S E

    1995-12-01

    Operating experience with thermoluminescent dosimeters used in a boron neutron capture therapy research project is reported. In particular, certain facets of the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters for gamma ray dose measurements in the presence of a high thermal neutron fluence are discussed, including a comparison of TLD-400 and TLD-700 for gamma ray dosimetry, annealing procedures, and the effects of neutrons (56Mn activation) on TLD-400. The TLD-400 were observed to have a thermal neutron sensitivity (due to 56Mn beta decay) of 1.5 x 10(-13) Gy per n cm-2. An algorithm was developed to correct for the 56Mn beta decay thermal neutron-induced effects on TLD-400 by using a two-stage thermoluminescent readout for the thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. PMID:7493815

  3. High fluence 1.05 {mu}m performance tests using 20 ns shaped pulses on the Beamlet prototype laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.E.; Burkhart, S.C.; Penko, F.; Henesian, M.A.; Auerbach, J.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Caird, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Beamlet is a single beamline, nearly full scale physics prototype of the 192 beam Nd:Glass laser driver of the National Ignition Facility. It is used to demonstrate laser performance of the NIF multipass amplifier architecture. Initial system characterization tests have all been performed at pulse durations less than 10 ns. Pinhole closure and modulation at the end of long pulses are a significant concern for the operation of NIF. We recently demonstrated the generation, amplification and propagation of high energy pulses temporally shaped to mimic 20 ns long ignition pulse shapes at fluence levels exceeding the nominal NIF design requirements for Inertial Confinement Fusion by Indirect Drive. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of a new conical pinhole design used in the transport spatial filter to mitigate plasma closure effects and increase closure time to exceed the duration of the 20 ns long pulse.

  4. Mechanism study on mitochondrial fragmentation under oxidative stress caused by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo continual fusion and fission to maintain their morphology and functions, but the mechanism involved is still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) on mitochondrial dynamics in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Upon HF-LPLI-triggered oxidative stress, mitochondria displayed a fragmented structure, which was abolished by exposure to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a reactive oxygen species scavenger, indicating that oxidative stress can induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial translocation of the profission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was observed following HF-LPLI, demonstrating apoptosis-related activation of Drp1. Notably, DHA pre-treatment prevented HF-LPLI-induced Drp1 activation. We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress through activation of Drp1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation.

  5. Fluence Thresholds for Laser-Induced Damage of Optical Components in the Injector Laser of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boton, P

    2005-01-31

    Damage threshold fluences for several optical components were measured at three wavelengths using the injector laser at SSRL's Gun Test Facility. Measurements were conducted using the fundamental ir wavelength at 1053 nanometers and harmonics at 526 nm and 263 nm with 3.4ps pulses (1/e{sup 2} full width intensity); ir measurements were also conducted with 850 ps pulses. Practical surfaces relevant to the laser system performance are emphasized. Damage onset was evidenced by an alteration of the specular reflection of a cw probe laser (650 nm) from the irradiated region of the target surface. For the case of stretched ir pulses, damage to a Nd:glass rod was observed to begin at a site within the bulk material and to progress back toward the incident surface.

  6. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  7. Structural properties of gold-silicon nanohybrids formed by femtosecond laser ablation in water at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, Y. V.; Popov, A. A.; Sentis, M.; Timoshenko, V. Y.; Kabashin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    A gold target was ablated by femtosecond laser radiation in aqueous solutions of preliminarily prepared Si nanoparticles. The ablation process led to the formation of Au-based spherical colloids with the mean size around 5-10 nm and a weak abundance of larger species. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed the presence of Au and Si in colloid composition, while the stoichiometry of colloids did not depend on laser fluence during the fabrication experiments. The formation of Au-Si nanohybrid structure was explained by an effect of the interaction of laser-ablated Au nanoclusters with water-dispersed Si nanoparticles. The fabricated structures can be of importance for biomedical, catalysis, and photovoltaics applications.

  8. Low-Fluence Red Light Increases the Transport and Biosynthesis of Auxin1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Cohen, Jerry D.; Gardner, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In plants, light is an important environmental signal that induces photomorphogenesis and interacts with endogenous signals, including hormones. We found that light increased polar auxin transport in dark-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) hypocotyls. In tomato, this increase was induced by low-fluence red or blue light followed by 1 d of darkness. It was reduced in phyA, phyB1, and phyB2 tomato mutants and was reversed by far-red light applied immediately after the red or blue light exposure, suggesting that phytochrome is involved in this response. We further found that the free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) level in hypocotyl regions below the hook was increased by red light, while the level of conjugated IAA was unchanged. Analysis of IAA synthesized from [13C]indole or [13C]tryptophan (Trp) revealed that both Trp-dependent and Trp-independent IAA biosynthesis were increased by low-fluence red light in the top section (meristem, cotyledons, and hook), and the Trp-independent pathway appears to become the primary route for IAA biosynthesis after red light exposure. IAA biosynthesis in tissues below the top section was not affected by red light, suggesting that the increase of free IAA in this region was due to increased transport of IAA from above. Our study provides a comprehensive view of light effects on the transport and biosynthesis of IAA, showing that red light increases both IAA biosynthesis in the top section and polar auxin transport in hypocotyls, leading to unchanged free IAA levels in the top section and increased free IAA levels in the lower hypocotyl regions. PMID:21807888

  9. Implementation and validation of a fluence pencil kernels model for GaN-based dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruoxi; Pittet, Patrick; Ribouton, Julien; Lu, Guo-Neng; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-10-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), a direct-gap semiconductor that is radioluminescent, can be used as a transducer yielding a high signal from a small detecting volume and thus potentially suitable for use in small fields and for high dose gradients. A common drawback of semiconductor dosimeters with effective atomic numbers higher than soft tissues is that their responses depend on the presence of low energy photons for which the photoelectric cross section varies strongly with atomic number, which may affect the accuracy of dosimetric measurements. To tackle this ‘over-response’ issue, we propose a model for GaN-based dosimetry with readout correction. The local photon spectrum is calculated by convolving fluence pencil kernel spectra with the beam aperture fluence distribution. The response of a GaN detector is modelled by combining large cavity theory and small cavity theory for the low and high energy components of the local spectrum. Monte Carlo simulations are employed for determination of specific correction factors for different GaN transducer sizes and irradiation conditions. Some model parameters such as the cut-off energy and partitioning energy are discussed. The accuracy of the GaN dosimetric response model has been evaluated for tissue phantom ratio experiments along the central axis. These experiments have shown that calculated and measured GaN responses stay within ±3% at all depths beyond the build-up depth. The calculated GaN response factor is also in good agreement with measured data (±2.5%). The validated model with response compensation improves significantly the accuracy of dosimetric measurements: below 2.5% deviation as compared to 13% without compensation, for a 10 × 10 cm2 field, at depth from 1.5 to 22 cm.

  10. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of {>=}5% in {approx}1 mm{sup 2} areas and {>=}2% in {approx}20 mm{sup 2} areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences ({<=}2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  11. Design and Construction of a Faraday Cup for Electron Fluence Measurements in the Energy Range from 1 to 5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korwin, D. M.; Vargas-Aburto, C.; Uribe, R. M.; Hudson, K. J.

    2003-03-01

    Electron beams are used in research and industry in order to develop new materials or change the physical properties of materials of technological interest (e.g. polymeric materials or semiconductors). Usually the physical or chemical effect produced by the electron beam is a function of the dose absorbed by the material and ultimately of the fluence of the incoming radiation. In many of these applications, such as the study of radiation damage in solar cells, the electron fluence is one of the parameters used to characterize the effect of the radiation on the semiconductor material. In this paper a description is presented of the design and construction of a Faraday Cup to measure electron beam fluence values in a 1 to 5 MeV, 150 kW electron accelerator used for radiation processing. At such high powers, the electron beam is continuously scanned back and forth in one direction in order to prevent the burning of the sample, so the design of the Faraday Cup took into consideration the fact that the electron beam is absorbed both in the fluence sensing element as well as in the outer jacket. A virtual instrument was developed using National Instruments development software to control the data acquisition process with the Faraday Cup and associated NIM electronics. Fluence measurements have been carried out in the energy range from 1 to 5 MeV. Examples of fluence measurements on semiconductor devices will be presented. Work partially supported through NASA grant NCC3-721 and KSU's Research Council.

  12. Color Matters—Material Ejection and Ion Yields in UV-MALDI Mass Spectrometry as a Function of Laser Wavelength and Laser Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W.; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  13. Enhanced Transfection Efficiency in Laser-Induced Stress Wave-Assisted Gene Transfer at Low Laser Fluence by Increasing Pressure Impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Shinta; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Asida, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Obara, Minoru

    2008-03-01

    To improve transfection efficiency in gene delivery based on nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves, we examined different types of transparent materials, a poly(ethylene terephthalate) sheet, poly(vinyl alcohol) gel, and water, which were placed on a laser target for plasma confinement. We found that the use of water was most effective for maintaining a large pressure impulse during multipulse laser irradiation and, as a result, high transfection efficiency was demonstrated in rat skin in vivo at a relatively low laser fluence of 0.7 J/cm2. At this fluence, steady laser transmission through quartz fibers was confirmed, allowing endoscopic application of our gene delivery technique.

  14. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 Degree-Sign -60 Degree-Sign . Differential Compton and Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained from xraylib, an ANSI C library for x-ray-matter interactions, were applied to derive the incident fluence. MCNP5 simulations of the irradiation geometry provided the dose deposition per photon fluence as a function of depth in the phantom. Results: At 25 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose overestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 7.2 {+-} 3.0%-2.1 {+-} 3.0% for PMMA depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm, respectively. At 35 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose underestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 1.0 {+-} 3.4%-2.5 {+-} 3.4%, respectively. Conclusions: These results showed that TG-61 ion chamber dosimetry, used to calibrate dose output for cell irradiations, agreed with fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations to within approximately 7

  15. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Gennady; Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay; Ryabinin, Yuriy; Adeev, Valeriy

    2016-02-01

    The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO) which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  16. Comparison of photobleaching and fluence rate effects in PpIX and BPD-MA photosensitization of rat bladder tumor in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Seiichi; Wagnieres, Georges A.; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Bamberg, Mike; Hasan, Tayyaba

    1995-05-01

    Photobleaching of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) -induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and benzoporphyrin derivative-monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) was investigated using an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. For both photosensitizers used, the photobleaching rate constant was not fluence- rate-dependent under conditions that photodynamic response was fluence rate-dependent. These data suggest that photobleaching pathways may be independent of the photochemical paths involved in tissue destruction. The fluorescence spectrum was followed during irradiation by using laser-induced fluorescence method and a build-up of photoproducts of PpIX was observed whereas no fluorescence of photoproducts was obtained in the case of BPD-MA.

  17. Fluence to local skin absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic positrons using Monte-Carlo code MCNP6.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, L; Antoni, R

    2016-01-01

    Conversion coefficients fluence to local skin equivalent dose, as introduced in ICRP Publication 116, 2010, are calculated for positrons of energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV using the code MCNP6. Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients H'(0.07,0°)/Φ are calculated for positrons of energy ranging between 20 keV and 10 MeV. A comparison between operational dose quantity H'(0.07,0°) and the Local-Skin equivalent Dose shows an overall good agreement between these two quantities, except between 60 keV and 100 keV. PMID:26623930

  18. Convoluted effect of laser fluence and pulse duration on the property of a nanosecond laser-induced plasma into an argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xueshi; Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu Jin; Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain

    2013-01-07

    We studied the behavior of the plasma induced by a nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse on a metallic target (Al) during its propagation into argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure and especially over the delay interval ranging from several hundred nanoseconds to several microseconds. In such interval, the plasma is particularly interesting as a spectroscopic emission source for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIBS). We show a convoluted effect between laser fluence and pulse duration on the structure and the emission property of the plasma. With a relatively high fluence of about 160 J/cm{sup 2} where a strong plasma shielding effect is observed, a short pulse of about 4 ns duration is shown to be significantly more efficient to excite the optical emission from the ablation vapor than a long pulse of about 25 ns duration. While with a lower fluence of about 65 J/cm{sup 2}, a significantly more efficient excitation is observed with the long pulse. We interpret our observations by considering the post-ablation interaction between the generated plume and the tailing part of the laser pulse. We demonstrate that the ionization of the layer of ambient gas surrounding the ablation vapor plays an important role in plasma shielding. Such ionization is the consequence of laser-supported absorption wave and directly dependent on the laser fluence and the pulse duration. Further observations of the structure of the generated plume in its early stage of expansion support our explanations.

  19. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    2000-01-01

    For the Monahans chondrite and halite, we determined Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of silicate = 4.53 Ga, halite > 4.3 Ga; a space exposure age of approx. 5 Ma; a regolith pre-irradiation; solar gas concentrations in the dark phase; and a regolith thermal neutron fluence.

  20. Ion fluence dependence of the total sputtering yield and differential angular sputtering yield of bismuth due to 50 keV argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh T.; Phinney, Lucas C.; Weathers, Duncan L.

    2014-08-01

    The dependences of the total sputtering yield of Bi and the differential angular distribution of these sputtered Bi atoms on the fluence of 50 keV Ar+ ions at normal incidence have been experimentally measured. Polycrystalline Bi targets were used for these purposes. The collector technique and accurate current integration methods were adopted for the determination of angular distributions of sputtered Bi atoms. The ion fluence was varied from 1.9 × 1019 to 3.1 × 1020 ions/cm2. The sputtered atoms were collected on high purity aluminum foils under ultra-high vacuum (∼5 × 10-9 Torr). The collector foils were subsequently analyzed using heavy ion Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The shape of the angular distribution of sputtered atoms was found not to change significantly with the fluence, but the sputtering yield increased significantly from 2.2 ± 0.2 to 9.6 ± 0.6 atoms/ion over the fluence range studied.

  1. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon; Carlson, Joel; and others

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MI{sub SPORT}) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The r

  2. Fluence Uniformity Measurements in an Electron Accelerator Used for Irradiation of Extended Area Solar Cells and Electronic Circuits for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, Roberto M.; Filppi, Ed; Zhang, Shubo

    2007-01-01

    It is common to have liquid crystal displays and electronic circuit boards with area sizes of the order of 20x20 sq cm on board of satellites and space vehicles. Usually irradiating them at different fluence values assesses the radiation damage in these types of devices. As a result, there is a need for a radiation source with large spatial fluence uniformity for the study of the damage by radiation from space in those devices. Kent State University s Program on Electron Beam Technology has access to an electron accelerator used for both research and industrial applications. The electron accelerator produces electrons with energies in the interval from 1 to 5 MeV and a maximum beam power of 150 kW. At such high power levels, the electron beam is continuously scanned back and forth in one dimension in order to provide uniform irradiation and to prevent damage to the sample. This allows for the uniform irradiation of samples with an area of up to 1.32 sq m. This accelerator has been used in the past for the study of radiation damage in solar cells (1). However in order to irradiate extended area solar cells there was a need to measure the uniformity of the irradiation zone in terms of fluence. In this paper the methodology to measure the fluence uniformity on a sample handling system (linear motion system), used for the irradiation of research samples, along the irradiation zone of the above-mentioned facility is described and the results presented. We also illustrate the use of the electron accelerator for the irradiation of large area solar cells (of the order of 156 sq cm) and include in this paper the electrical characterization of these types of solar cells irradiated with 5 MeV electrons to a total fluence of 2.6 x 10(exp 15) e/sq cm.

  3. In vivo fluence rate measurements during Foscan®-mediated photodynamic therapy of persistent and recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinomas using a dedicated light applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veen, R. L. P.; Nyst, H.; Indrasari, S. R.; Yudharto, M. A.; Robinson, D. J.; Tan, I. B.; Meewis, C.; Peters, R.; Spaniol, Stefan B.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Levendag, P. C.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a dedicated light applicator for light delivery and fluence rate monitoring during Foscan®-mediated photodynamic therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a clinical phase I/II study. We have developed a flexible silicone applicator that can be inserted through the mouth and fixed in the nasopharyngeal cavity. Three isotropic fibers, for measuring of the fluence (rate) during therapy, were located within the nasopharyngeal tumor target area and one was manually positioned to monitor structures at risk in the shielded area. A flexible black silicon patch tailored to the patient's anatomy is attached to the applicator to shield the soft palate and oral cavity from the 652-nm laser light. Fourteen patients were included in the study, resulting in 26 fluence rate measurements in the risk volume (two failures). We observed a systematic reduction in fluence rate during therapy in 20 out of 26 illuminations, which may be related to photodynamic therapy-induced increased blood content, decreased oxygenation, or reduced scattering. Our findings demonstrate that the applicator was easily inserted into the nasopharynx. The average light distribution in the target area was reasonably uniform over the length of the applicator, thus giving an acceptably homogeneous illumination throughout the cavity. Shielding of the risk area was adequate. Large interpatient variations in fluence rate stress the need for in vivo dosimetry. This enables corrections to be made for differences in optical properties and geometry resulting in comparable amounts of light available for Foscan® absorption.

  4. Effects of anisotropic fluences and angular depended spectra of beta-particles in the use of large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Kawada, Yasushi; Ishizu, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Shinich; Yunoki, Akira; Sato, Yasushi; Unno, Yasuhiro; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Calibrations of instrument efficiency of surface contamination meters are usually made with extended reference sources which are standardized in terms of 2π surface β-particle emission rates from the source surface including backscattered particles. Extended sources supplied from various metrology institutes or calibration laboratories, but the source-types such as structure, preparation method, backing and covering materials vary between manufacturers. In this work first we show how the calibration results are dependent on the source type. Second, in order to clarify the possible reason of such discrepancy, we examined the isotropy of β-particle fluences by the use of a proportional counter and also observed the angular dependence of β-particle spectra by the use of small plastic scintillation spectrometer, where the source mount can rotate relative to the detector window at various obliquities. The discrepancy in the instrument-calibration of surface contamination meters, which are mainly used under the conditions of large source-to-detector geometry, can be explained. PMID:22424745

  5. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Thomas D; Justus, Alan L; Gadd, S Milan; Olsher, Richard H; Devine, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  6. Final report on LDRD project 105967 : exploring the increase in GaAs photodiode responsivity with increased neutron fluence.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Cich, Michael Joseph; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Fleming, Robert M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Wrobel, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    A previous LDRD studying radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications led to the result that increased neutron irradiation from a fast-burst reactor caused increased responsivity in GaAs photodiodes up to a total fluence of 4.4 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (1 MeV Eq., Si). The silicon photodiodes experienced significant degradation. Scientific literature shows that neutrons can both cause defects as well as potentially remove defects in an annealing-like process in GaAs. Though there has been some modeling that suggests how fabrication and radiation-induced defects can migrate to surfaces and interfaces in GaAs and lead to an ordering effect, it is important to consider how these processes affect the performance of devices, such as the basic GaAs p-i-n photodiode. In this LDRD, we manufactured GaAs photodiodes at the MESA facility, irradiated them with electrons and neutrons at the White Sands Missile Range Linac and Fast Burst Reactor, and performed measurements to show the effect of irradiation on dark current, responsivity and high-speed bandwidth.

  7. Implantation and post-annealing characteristics when impinging small B n clusters into silicon at low fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. H.; Han, H. M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the similarities and differences between B1 monomer and Bn cluster ion implantation into silicon. Small polyatomic boron ions ( Bn- , n = 1-4) with the same atomic boron kinetic energy (20 keV/atom) and atomic fluence (5 × 1013 atoms/cm2) were used. In the simulation, the widely-used SRIM computer code was employed to calculate the as-implanted boron and damage depth profiles of B1 monomer ion implantation in order to make comparisons with experimental results. In the experimental one, the B1 monomer and Bn cluster ions extracted from a tandem accelerator were used to perform ion implantation. Post-annealing methods included one-step (RTA) and two-step (FA + RTA) treatments, where RTA denoted high-temperature rapid thermal annealing at 1050 °C for 10 s and FA represented low-temperature furnace annealing at 550 °C for 1 h. The results revealed that all four as-implanted range parameters (average range, longitudinal range straggling, skewness, kurtosis) increase and tend to saturate as the cluster size increases when compared to those of SRIM-calculated results for the B1 implant. Furthermore, the peculiar damage structures produced by different Bn cluster ions lead to various behaviors in both diffusing and activating boron atoms.

  8. Validation of fluence-based 3D IMRT dose reconstruction on a heterogeneous anthropomorphic phantom using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Ono, Takeshi; Maruyama, Masato; Nagasue, Nozomu; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of a three-dimensional (3D) dose verification system, COMPASS version 3, which has a dedicated beam models and dose calculation engine. It was possible to reconstruct the 3D dose distributions in patient anatomy based on the measured fluence using the MatriXX 2D array. The COMPASS system was compared with Monte Carlo simulation (MC), glass rod dosimeter (GRD), and 3DVH, using an anthropomorphic phantom for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose verification in clinical neck cases. The GRD measurements agreed with the MC within 5% at most measurement points. In addition, most points for COMPASS and 3DVH also agreed with the MC within 5%. The COMPASS system showed better results than 3DVH for dose profiles due to individual adjustments, such as beam modeling for each linac. Regarding the dose-volume histograms, there were no large differences between MC, analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS), 3DVH, and the COMPASS system. However, AAA underestimated the dose to the clinical target volume and Rt-Parotid slightly. This is because AAA has some problems with dose calculation accuracy. Our results indicated that the COMPASS system offers highly accurate 3D dose calculation for clinical IMRT quality assurance. Also, the COMPASS system will be useful as a commissioning tool in routine clinical practice for TPS. PMID:25679177

  9. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  10. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  11. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom. PMID:19887515

  12. Low-Fluence Photodynamic Therapy versus Subthreshold Micropulse Yellow Wavelength Laser in the Treatment of Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, Sibel; Batıoğlu, Figen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy and safety of subthreshold micropulse yellow wavelength laser (SMYL) and low-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Methods. Thirty-three eyes of 30 patients with chronic CSC received either PDT (18 eyes) or SMYL (15 eyes) therapy. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), subretinal fluid (SRF) height, and central macular thickness (CMT) were evaluated at the baseline visit and one, three, six, nine, and 12 months after the therapy. Results. After 12 months, mean BCVA improved from 67.3 ± 14.2 to 71.5 ± 21.4 ETDRS letters in SMYL group and from 60.7 ± 16.3 to 64.4 ± 24.9 ETDRS letters in PDT group (p = 0.285 and p = 0.440, resp.). Mean CMT decreased from 242.8 ± 80 μm to 156.9 ± 60 μm in the PDT group and from 287.3 ± 126 μm to 138.0 ± 40 μm in the SMYL group (p = 0.098 and p = 0.003, resp.). SRF resolved completely in 72.2% and 80.0% of the eyes in the PDT and SMYL groups, respectively. Mean SRF height decreased from 117.2 ± 58 μm to 31.3 ± 56 μm in the PDT group and from 130.0 ± 104 μm to 12.5 ± 21 μm in the SMYL group (p = 0.031 and p = 0.014, resp.). Conclusions. Subthreshold micropulse yellow wavelength laser seems to be effective in the treatment of chronic CSC without any side effect and results in the resorption of SRF without causing visible retinal scarring. PMID:27597894

  13. Nano-Crystal Formation and Growth from High-Fluence Ion Implantation of Au, Ag or Cu in Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ila, D.; Baglin, J. E. E.; Zimmerman, R. L.

    The linear and non-linear optical properties of silica may be tailored by the introduction of a random distribution of nanocrystallites of an immiscible metal within a near-surface region. The size, size distribution, and spatial distribution of these crystallites must be controllable in order to optimize the functional properties for device applications. In this paper, we present a novel fabrication technique that offers such control. Energetic metal ions are implanted in silica at room temperature. Subsequent heat treatment leads to diffusion of the implanted atoms, nucleation and growth of metal crystallites, and Ostwald ripening of the resulting clusters. We have observed the kinetics and effective activation energies describing the multiple processes involved, for the cases of Au, Ag or Cu implanted at MeV energies, at various fluences, and then annealed at fixed temperatures in the range 500 °C-1000 °C. Effective activation energies found for nanocrystal nucleation and growth at temperatures below 800 °C (e.g. 64 meV for Ag) are replaced above this temperature range by much higher activation energies (e.g. 400 meV for Ag). We may attribute this to the depletion of un-attached mobile metal atoms (so that ripening of clusters will be limited by energy barriers for escape of such mobile atoms from small crystallites), and/or the annealing of implant-caused stress in the silica structure at high temperatures, that creates new channels for thermal diffusion of metal atoms within the silica host.

  14. Low-Fluence Photodynamic Therapy versus Subthreshold Micropulse Yellow Wavelength Laser in the Treatment of Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel; Yanık, Özge; Batıoğlu, Figen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy and safety of subthreshold micropulse yellow wavelength laser (SMYL) and low-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Methods. Thirty-three eyes of 30 patients with chronic CSC received either PDT (18 eyes) or SMYL (15 eyes) therapy. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), subretinal fluid (SRF) height, and central macular thickness (CMT) were evaluated at the baseline visit and one, three, six, nine, and 12 months after the therapy. Results. After 12 months, mean BCVA improved from 67.3 ± 14.2 to 71.5 ± 21.4 ETDRS letters in SMYL group and from 60.7 ± 16.3 to 64.4 ± 24.9 ETDRS letters in PDT group (p = 0.285 and p = 0.440, resp.). Mean CMT decreased from 242.8 ± 80 μm to 156.9 ± 60 μm in the PDT group and from 287.3 ± 126 μm to 138.0 ± 40 μm in the SMYL group (p = 0.098 and p = 0.003, resp.). SRF resolved completely in 72.2% and 80.0% of the eyes in the PDT and SMYL groups, respectively. Mean SRF height decreased from 117.2 ± 58 μm to 31.3 ± 56 μm in the PDT group and from 130.0 ± 104 μm to 12.5 ± 21 μm in the SMYL group (p = 0.031 and p = 0.014, resp.). Conclusions. Subthreshold micropulse yellow wavelength laser seems to be effective in the treatment of chronic CSC without any side effect and results in the resorption of SRF without causing visible retinal scarring. PMID:27597894

  15. Tuning the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition in FeRh thin films by means of low-energy/low fluence ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarian, A.; Bali, R.; Grenzer, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Yildirim, O.; Lindner, J.; Potzger, K.

    2015-09-01

    Ion irradiation induced modifications of the thermomagnetic properties of equiatomic FeRh thin films have been investigated. The application of 20 keV Ne+ ions at different fluencies leads to broadening of the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition as well as a shift of the transition temperature towards lower temperatures with increasing ion fluence. Moreover, the ferromagnetic background at low temperatures generated by the ion irradiation leads to pronounced saturation magnetisation at 5 K. Complete erasure of the transition, i.e. ferromagnetic ordering through the whole temperature regime was achieved at a Ne+ fluence of 3 × 1014 ions/cm2. It does not coincide with the complete randomization of the chemical ordering of the crystal lattice.

  16. Quantitative comparison of terahertz emission from (100) InAs surfaces and a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch at high fluences.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2005-01-01

    InAs has previously been reported to be an efficient emitter of terahertz radiation at low excitation fluences by use of femtosecond laser pulses. The scaling and saturation of terahertz emission from a (100) InAs surface as a function of excitation fluence is measured and quantitatively compared with the emission from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. We find that, although the instantaneous peak radiated terahertz field from (100) InAs exceeds the peak radiated signals from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch biased at 1.6 kV/cm, the pulse duration is shorter. For the InAs source the total energy radiated is less than can be obtained from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. PMID:15662896

  17. Paradoxical darkening of unperceived tattoo ink after relatively low fluence from a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064-nm) laser in the course of treatment for melasma.

    PubMed

    Chung, W K; Yang, J H; Lee, D W; Chang, S E; Lee, M W; Choi, J H; Moon, K C

    2009-12-01

    Although Q-switched (QS) lasers are the mainstay of modern tattoo removal, paradoxical darkening of tattoo ink may occur. This darkening of tattoo ink is dependent on laser wavelength, pulse duration and fluence, with high-energy, nanosecond-pulsed lasers more prone to induce tattoo-ink darkening. Laser toning, consisting of multiple-passed QS neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG), 1064-nm laser treatment with low fluence, short pulse duration (< 10 ns), and a repetition rate of 10 Hz has been successful in the treatment of melasma. A mistake commonly made during laser toning is to scorch scalp hair, eyebrows or eyelashes, but this phenomenon is reversible. A more problematic error is caused by treatment of eyeliner or eyebrow tattoos. We report a patient who experienced changes in unperceived, skin-coloured tattoos, turning them blue after QS Nd:YAG laser treatment of melasma. PMID:19486060

  18. Fractographic examination of ferritic alloy Charpy specimens at a fluence of 6 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    The fracture surfaces of thirteen Charpy specimens have been examined by scanning electron microscopy and several of these have been measured for hardness. The specimen series irradiated in the AD-2 test, second discharge includes HT-9 base metal in two product forms, and Modified 9Cr-1Mo base metal and weld metal, fluences include 13 and 26 dpa and irradiation temperatures cover the range 390/sup 0/C to 550/sup 0/C. Fracture appearance is found to be insensitive to irradiation fluence, whereas significant differences could be found in product form. It is concluded that irradiation does not encourage a new fracture mechanism such as temper embrittlement. Failure is controlled by the microstructure generated prior to irradiation.

  19. Signal enhancement in electrospray laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry by using a black oxide-coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence.

    PubMed

    Kononikhin, Alexey; Huang, Min-Zong; Popov, Igor; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kukaev, Evgeny; Boldyrev, Alexey; Spasskiy, Alexander; Leypunskiy, Ilya; Shiea, Jentaie; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The electrospray Laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) method is actively used for direct sample analysis and ambient mass spectrometry imaging. The optimizing of Laser desorption conditions is essential for this technology. In this work, we propose using a metal target with a black oxide (Fe3O4) coating to increase the signal in ELDI-MS for peptides and small proteins. The experiments were performed on an LTQ-FT mass spectrometer equipped with a home-made ELDI ion source. A cutter blade with black oxide coating was used as a target. A nitrogen laser was used with the following parameters: 337 nm, pulse duration 4ns, repetition rate 10 Hz, fluence to approximately 700 Jm(-2). More than a five times signal increase was observed for a substance P peptide when a coated and a non-coated metal target were compared. No ion signal was observed for proteins if the same fluence and the standard stainless steel target were used. With the assistance of the Fe3O4 coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence < or =700 Jm(-2)), proteins such as insulin, ubiquitin and myoglobin were successfully ionized. It was demonstrated that the Fe3O4-coated metal target can be used efficiently to assist laser desorption and thus significantly increase the analyte signal in ELDI-MS. A relatively low laser fluence (< or = 700 Jm(-2)) was enough to desorb peptides and proteins (up to 17 kDal with the assistance of the Fe3O4-coated metal target under ambient conditions. PMID:24575623

  20. Importance of fluence rate in photodynamic therapy with ALA-induced PpIX and BPD-MA in a rat bladder tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Seiichi; Wagnieres, Georges A.; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Bamberg, Mike; Hasan, Tayyaba

    1995-05-01

    Oxygen dependent phototoxicity was investigated in vivo in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Two photosensitizers, benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A and 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX were studied. For a given cumulative light dose of 30 J/cm2, enhanced tumor destruction was obtained for both photosensitizers by either using a low fluence rate or fractionated light delivery mode. These observations may be attributed to rapid local oxygen consumption during photochemical reactions.

  1. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm2-1 mJ/cm2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm2 and 1 mJ/cm2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed range of laser fluences.

  2. Energy spectra, angular spread, fluence profiles and dose distributions of 6 and 18 MV photon beams: results of Monte Carlo simulations for a Varian 2100EX accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, George X.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide detailed characteristics of incident photon beams for different field sizes and beam energies. This information is critical to the future development of accurate treatment planning systems. It also enhances our knowledge of radiotherapy photon beams. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code, BEAM, has been used to simulate 6 and 18 MV photon beams from a Varian Clinac-2100EX accelerator. A simulated realistic beam is stored in a phase space data file, which contains details of each particle's complete history including where it has been and where it has interacted. The phase space files are analysed to obtain energy spectra, angular distribution, fluence profile and mean energy profiles at the phantom surface for particles separated according to their charge and history. The accuracy of a simulated beam is validated by the excellent agreement between the Monte Carlo calculated and measured dose distributions. Measured depth-dose curves are obtained from depth-ionization curves by accounting for newly introduced chamber fluence corrections and the stopping-power ratios for realistic beams. The study presents calculated depth-dose components from different particles as well as calculated surface dose and contribution from different particles to surface dose across the field. It is shown that the increase of surface dose with the increase of the field size is mainly due to the increase of incident contaminant charged particles. At 6 MV, the incident charged particles contribute 7% to 21% of maximum dose at the surface when the field size increases from 10 × 10 to 40 × 40 cm2. At 18 MV, their contributions are up to 11% and 29% of maximum dose at the surface for 10 × 10 cm2 and 40 × 40 cm2 fields respectively. However, the fluence of these incident charged particles is less than 1% of incident photon fluence in all cases.

  3. Treatment of Melasma with the Photoacoustic Twin Pulse Mode of Low-Fluence 1,064 nm Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee Young; Choi, Misoo; Nam, Chan Hee; Kim, Ji Seok; Kim, Myung Hwa; Park, Byung Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-fluence 1,064 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been widely used for the treatment of melasma. Although new Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers with photoacoustic twin pulse (PTP) mode have been recently developed for high-efficiency, there is limited information available for the new technique. Objective This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and adverse effects after few sessions of repeated low fluence 1,064 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment with PTP mode in Asian women with melasma. Methods Twenty-two Korean women were treated with a total of five sessions of low-fluence PTP mode Nd:YAG laser treatment (Pastelle®) at 2 weeks interval. Responses to treatments were evaluated by using Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) scoring, colorimeter measurement, and the investigators' and patients' overall assessments. Adverse events were recorded at each visit. Results Investigators' and patients' overall assessment showed that 'significantly improved' was assessed by 13 (59.1%) and 19 of 22 patients (86.4%), respectively. MASI scores were significantly reduced by 20.4%. The lightness, measured by using a colorimeter, was significantly increased by 1.3 point. Notable adverse events were not observed. Conclusion After 5 sessions of laser therapy alone, about 60% of the subjects showed significant improvement. Few sessions of repeated laser toning treatment using the PTP mode is a safe and effective way to treat facial melasma. PMID:27274626

  4. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  5. Quantum dot imaging in the second near-infrared optical window: studies on reflectance fluorescence imaging depths by effective fluence rate and multiple image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yebin; Jeong, Sanghwa; Nayoun, Won; Ahn, Boeun; Kwag, Jungheon; Geol Kim, Sang; Kim, Sungjee

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dot (QD) imaging capability was investigated by the imaging depth at a near-infrared second optical window (SOW; 1000 to 1400 nm) using time-modulated pulsed laser excitations to control the effective fluence rate. Various media, such as liquid phantoms, tissues, and in vivo small animals, were used and the imaging depths were compared with our predicted values. The QD imaging depth under excitation of continuous 20 mW/cm2 laser was determined to be 10.3 mm for 2 wt% hemoglobin phantom medium and 5.85 mm for 1 wt% intralipid phantom, which were extended by more than two times on increasing the effective fluence rate to 2000 mW/cm2. Bovine liver and porcine skin tissues also showed similar enhancement in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values. A QD sample was inserted into the abdomen of a mouse. With a higher effective fluence rate, the CNR increased more than twofold and the QD sample became clearly visualized, which was completely undetectable under continuous excitation. Multiple acquisitions of QD images and averaging process pixel by pixel were performed to overcome the thermal noise issue of the detector in SOW, which yielded significant enhancement in the imaging capability, showing up to a 1.5 times increase in the CNR.

  6. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility. PMID:19291975

  7. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  8. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility. PMID:19291975

  9. DRC2: A code with specialized applications for coupling localized Monte Carlo adjoint calculations with fluences from two-dimensional R-Z discrete ordinates air-over-ground calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1992-01-01

    The DRC2 code, which couples MASH or MASHX adjoint leakages with DORT 2-D discrete ordinates forward directional fluences, is described. The forward fluences are allowed to vary both axially and radially over the coupling surface, as opposed to the strictly axial variation allowed by the predecessor DRC code. Input instructions are presented along with descriptions and results from several sample problems. Results from the sample problems are used to compare DRC2 with DRC, DRC2 with DORT, and DRC2 with itself for the case of x-y dependence versus no x-y dependence of the forward fluence. The test problems demonstrate that for small systems DRC and DRC2 give essentially the same results. Some significant differences are noted for larger systems. Additionally, DRC2 results with no x-y dependence of the forward directional fluences are practically the same as those calculated by DRC.

  10. Intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor combined with half-fluence photodynamic therapy for choroidal neovascularization in chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Smretschnig, E; Hagen, S; Glittenberg, C; Ristl, R; Krebs, I; Binder, S; Ansari-Shahrezaei, S

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the results of indocyanine green angiography (ICGA)-guided verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) with half-fluence rate combined with intravitreal application of anti-VEGF in treating choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR).Patients and methodsIn this retrospective cohort study 17 consecutive patients with secondary CNV due to chronic CSCR had their diagnosis verified with fluorescein angiography (FA) and ICGA at baseline. All eyes received either intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR) or bevacizumab (IVB). On the consecutive day following the initial IVR/IVB treatment, ICGA-guided verteporfin (6 mg/m(2)) PDT with half-fluence rate (25 J/cm(2)) was performed on every patient. IVR or IVB was rescheduled on a pro re nata regimen. Main outcome measures were changes in visual acuity (VA) according to the ETDRS letter score and changes in the central foveal thickness (CFT).ResultsBest-corrected VA at baseline was 65.6 letters (±6.7; n=17) according to the ETDRS letter score. At 12 months, mean ETDRS letter score improved to 71.2 letters (P=0.34). CFT was 309 μm and decreased to 216 μm at month 12 control (P=0.0004). Nine eyes (52.9%) received additional treatment with IVR/IVB due to recurrence of subretinal fluid, with an overall mean number of IVR/IVB treatment of 1.8±3.6 per patient with no systemic side effects during 12 months' follow-up.ConclusionsIVR or IVB combined with ICGA-guided half-fluence PDT with verteporfin is effective in treating CNV in chronic CSCR, with choroidal hyperpermeability in ICGA, resulting in stable vision and significant reduction of CFT. PMID:26965012

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent for a passively scattered proton therapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Stray neutron exposures pose a potential risk for the development of secondary cancer in patients receiving proton therapy. However, the behavior of the ambient dose equivalent is not fully understood, including dependences on neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and proton treatment beam characteristics. The objective of this work, therefore, was to estimate neutron exposures resulting from the use of a passively scattered proton treatment unit. In particular, we studied the characteristics of the neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent with Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron spectral fluence contained two pronounced peaks, one a low-energy peak with a mode around 1 MeV and one a high-energy peak that ranged from about 10 MeV up to the proton energy. The mean radiation weighting factors varied only slightly, from 8.8 to 10.3, with proton energy and location for a closed-aperture configuration. For unmodulated proton beams stopped in a closed aperture, the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons per therapeutic absorbed dose (H*(10)/D) calculated free-in-air ranged from about 0.3 mSv/Gy for a small scattered field of 100 MeV proton energy to 19 mSv/Gy for a large scattered field of 250 MeV proton energy, revealing strong dependences on proton energy and field size. Comparisons of in-air calculations with in-phantom calculations indicated that the in-air method yielded a conservative estimation of stray neutron radiation exposure for a prostate cancer patient.

  12. Integrating sphere effect in whole-bladder wall photodynamic therapy: III. Fluence multiplication, optical penetration and light distribution with an eccentric source for human bladder optical properties.

    PubMed

    van Staveren, H J; Keijzer, M; Keesmaat, T; Jansen, H; Kirkel, W J; Beek, J F; Star, W M

    1996-04-01

    Whole-bladder-wall (WBW) photodynamic therapy (PDT) is performed using approximately 630 nm light emitted by an isotropic light source centered in the bladder cavity. The phenomenon of an increased fluence rate in this spherical geometry, due to light scattering, is denoted as the integrating sphere effect. The fluence rate and the optical penetration depth depend on a single tissue optical parameter, namely the reduced albedo. The optical properties of (diseased) human bladder tissue, i.e. absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, anisotropy factor and refractive index, were determined in vitro in the wavelength range of 450-880 nm. The integrating sphere effect and optical penetration depth were calculated with diffusion theory and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations using approximately 630 nm optical properties. With increasing albedo, the integrating sphere effect calculated with diffusion approximation is increasingly larger than that found with MC simulations. Calculated and simulated optical penetration depths are in reasonable agreement. The smaller the integrating sphere effect for a given tissue absorption, the larger the optical penetration depth into the bladder wall, as the effective attenuation coefficient decreases. Optical penetration depths up to approximately 7.5 mm (definition dependent) can be responsible for unintended tissue damage beyond the bladder tissue. MC simulations were also performed with an eccentric light source and the uniformity of the light distribution at the bladder wall was assessed. The simulations show that even for a small eccentricity, the extremes in deviation from the mean fluence rate are large. All these results indicate that WBW PDT should be performed with some kind of in situ light dosimetry. PMID:8730658

  13. Atmospheric ionization by high-fluence, hard-spectrum solar proton events and their probable appearance in the ice core archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.; Laird, Claude M.; Neuenswander, Ben; Atri, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    Solar energetic particles ionize the atmosphere, leading to production of nitrogen oxides. It has been suggested that some such events are visible as layers of nitrate in ice cores, yielding archives of energetic, high-fluence solar proton events (SPEs). This has been controversial, due to slowness of transport for these species down from the upper stratosphere; past numerical simulations based on an analytic calculation have shown very little ionization below the midstratosphere. These simulations suffer from deficiencies: they consider only soft SPEs and narrow energy ranges; spectral fits are poorly chosen; and with few exceptions secondary particles in air showers are ignored. Using improved simulations that follow development of the proton-induced air shower, we find consistency with recent experiments showing substantial excess ionization down to 5 km. We compute nitrate available from the 23 February 1956 SPE, which had a high-fluence, hard-spectrum, and well-resolved associated nitrate peak in a Greenland ice core. For the first time, we find that this event can account for ice core data with timely (~2 months) transport downward between 46 km and the surface, thus indicating an archive of high-fluence, hard-spectrum SPEs covering the last several millennia. We discuss interpretations of this result, as well as the lack of a clearly defined nitrate spike associated with the soft-spectrum 3-4 August 1972 SPE. We suggest that hard-spectrum SPEs, especially in the 6 months of polar winter, are detectable in ice cores and that more work needs to be done to investigate this.

  14. SU-E-T-459: Dosimetric Consequences of Rotated Elliptical Proton Spots in Modeling In-Air Proton Fluence for Calculating Doses in Water of Proton Pencil Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Matysiak, W; Yeung, D; Hsi, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a study of dosimetric consequences on doses in water in modeling in-air proton fluence independently along principle axes for rotated elliptical spots. Methods: Phase-space parameters for modeling in-air fluence are the position sigma for the spatial distribution, the angle sigma for the angular distribution, and the correlation between position and angle distributions. Proton spots of the McLaren proton therapy system were measured at five locations near the isocenter for the energies of 180 MeV and 250 MeV. An elongated elliptical spot rotated with respect to the principle axes was observed for the 180 MeV, while a circular-like spot was observed for the 250 MeV. In the first approach, the phase-space parameters were derived in the principle axes without rotation. In the second approach, the phase space parameters were derived in the reference frame with axes rotated to coincide with the major axes of the elliptical spot. Monte-Carlo simulations with derived phase-space parameters using both approaches to tally doses in water were performed and analyzed. Results: For the rotated elliptical 180 MeV spots, the position sigmas were 3.6 mm and 3.2 mm in principle axes, but were 4.3 mm and 2.0 mm when the reference frame was rotated. Measured spots fitted poorly the uncorrelated 2D Gaussian, but the quality of fit was significantly improved after the reference frame was rotated. As a Result, phase space parameters in the rotated frame were more appropriate for modeling in-air proton fluence of 180 MeV protons. Considerable differences were observed in Monte Carlo simulated dose distributions in water with phase-space parameters obtained with the two approaches. Conclusion: For rotated elliptical proton spots, phase-space parameters obtained in the rotated reference frame are better for modeling in-air proton fluence, and can be introduced into treatment planning systems.

  15. Hypervelocity sub 10-micron impacts into aluminium foil: new experimental data and implications for comet 81P/Wild-2's dust fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Mark C.; Kearsley, Anton T.; Burchell, Mark J.; Horz, Friedrich; Cole, Mike J.

    2009-06-01

    Recent experimental work (Price, M. C. et. al., LPSC XXXX, #1564, 2009) has shown that the lip-to-lip diameter of hypervelocity impact craters at micron-scales (Dp< 10 microns) is a non-linear function of the impactor's diameter (Dp). We present data for monodisperse silica projectiles impacting aluminium-1100 and elemental aluminium at 6.1 kmsec and discuss the implications of this effect for the Stardust fluence calibration for micron-scale particles (which make up the majority of the impactor flux). Hydrocodes have been used to investigate the potential causes of the phenomena and the results are presented.

  16. The role of lithium thin-film coatings on W surface morphology evolution under high-fluence and high temperature He irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten is the candidate plasma-facing component material for the ITER divertor due to its high sputter threshold, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity. However, when exposed to He ions with E = 0.01-1.0 keV and high fluences >1026 m-2, as those expected in a burning plasma fusion tokamak divertor, the damage to the surface can include the creation of bubbles, holes and tendril-like fuzz morphology. Recent studies show that adding low-Z impurities (C and Be) to a He plasma can inhibit the growth of fuzz. In other applications, lithium (Li) as a PFC coating in multiple tokamaks has improved plasma performance, yet its interaction with high-Z materials (i.e. W) and its role inhibiting fuzz formation is not well understood. We investigated the effect of a thin ~1000 nm Li coating on formation of W surface defect morphology under high fluence and temperature conditions. Samples were exposed with fluxes of ~1024 m-2s-1 and Tsurf ~ 1100 °C. After irradiation, the surfaces of the samples were characterized with SEM. These results are presented along with XPS and SIMS results elucidating the persistence of Li coatings under these conditions. Work supported by US DOE Contract Nos. DC-SC0010717 and DC-SC0010719.

  17. BURST FLUENCE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS 1806-20 AND 1900+14 IN THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER PCA ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Kaaret, Philip

    2012-08-10

    We study the fluence distributions of over 3040 bursts from SGR 1806-20 and over 1963 bursts from SGR 1900+14 using the complete set of observations available from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array through 2011 March. Cumulative event distributions are presented for both sources and are fitted with single and broken power laws as well as an exponential cutoff. The distributions are best fitted by a broken power law with exponential cutoff; however the statistical significance of the cutoff is not high and the upper portion of the broken power law can be explained as the expected number of false bursts due to random noise fluctuations. Event distributions are also examined in high and low burst rate regimes and power-law indices are found to be consistent, independent of the burst rate. The contribution function of the event fluence is calculated. This distribution shows that the energy released in the soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts is dominated by the most powerful events for both sources. The power-law nature of these distributions combined with the dominant energy dissipation of the system occurring in the large, less frequent bursts is indicative of a self-organized critical system, as suggested by Gogus et al. in 1999.

  18. Desorption/Ionization Fluence Thresholds and Improved Mass Spectral Consistency Measured Using a Flattop Laser Profile in the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Bacillus Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Tobias, H J; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-11-30

    Bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) is being developed to analyze and identify biological aerosols in real-time. Mass spectra of individual Bacillus endospores were measured here with a bipolar aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer in which molecular desorption and ionization were produced using a single laser pulse from a Q-switched, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser that was modified to have an approximately flattop profile. The flattened laser profile allowed the minimum fluence required to desorb and ionize significant numbers of ions from single aerosol particles to be determined. For Bacillus spores this threshold had a mean value of approximately 1 nJ/{micro}m{sup 2} (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}). Thresholds for individual spores, however, could apparently deviate by 20% or more from the mean. Threshold distributions for clumps of MS2 bacteriophage and bovine serum albumin were subsequently determined. Finally, the flattened profile was observed to increase the reproducibility of single spore mass spectra. This is consistent with the general conclusions of our earlier paper on the fluence dependence of single spore mass spectra and is particularly significant because it is expected to enable more robust differentiation and identification of single bioaerosol particles.

  19. Role of ambient gas and laser fluence in governing the dynamics of the plasma plumes produced by laser blow off of LiF-C thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai; Patel, B. G.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    The time- and space-resolved emission profiles of Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II emission lines from the laser-blow-off plumes of a multilayered LiF-C thin film have been studied using spectroscopic technique. The evolution features were analyzed in different ambient environments ranging from high vacuum to 3mbars of argon pressures and at various fluences of the ablating laser. During the evolution of the plume, a transition region was found to exist between 4 and 6mm. Here, the plume dynamics changed from free expansion to collisional regime, where the plume experienced viscous force of the medium. The enhancement observed in neutral lines, in comparison with ionic lines, is explained in terms of the yield difference in electron impact excitation and ionization processes. Substantial difference in the arrival time distribution of the plume species was observed for Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II lines at high ambient pressures. Three expansion models are invoked to explain the evolution of the plume in different ambient conditions. The laser fluence was found to control the ratio of ions and neutrals.

  20. Highest-speed dicing of thin silicon wafers with nanosecond-pulse 355nm q-switched laser source using line-focus fluence optimization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovatsek, James M.; Patel, Rajesh S.

    2010-02-01

    Due to current and future anticipated widespread use of thin silicon wafers in the microelectronics industry, there is a large and growing interest in laser-based wafer dicing solutions. As the wafers become thinner, the laser advantage over saw dicing increases in terms of both the speed and yield of the process. Furthermore, managing the laser heat input during the dicing process becomes more important with increasingly thin wafers and with increasingly narrow saw streets. In this work, shaped-beam laser-cutting of thin (100 μm and below) silicon is explored with Newport / Spectra- Physics Pulseo 20-W nanosecond-pulse 355-nm DPSS q-switched laser system. Optimal process conditions for cutting various depths in silicon are determined, with particular emphasis on fluence optimization for a narrow-kerf cutting process. By shaping the laser beam into a line focus, the optimal fluence for machining the silicon can be achieved while at the same time utilizing the full output power of the laser source. In addition, by adjusting the length of the laser line focus, the absolute fastest speed for various cutting depths is realized. Compared to a circular beam, a dramatic improvement in process efficiency is observed.

  1. Comparison of ablation mechanisms at low fluence for ultrashort and short-pulse laser exposure of very thin molybdenum films on glass.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pinaki Das; O'Connor, Gerard M

    2016-03-20

    Complete removal of a loosely adhered very thin molybdenum film from a glass substrate is investigated for both femtosecond and nanosecond lasers at different wavelengths. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirm that ablation of the molybdenum film by femtosecond pulses occurs close to the damage threshold fluence, creating minimal damage to the substrate. This is in contrast to nanosecond laser processing where significant substrate damage at the equivalent damage threshold fluence is observed. Simulations predict a two-stage mechanical buckling mechanism in the femtosecond case. Out-of-plane thermal expansion first results in a tensile expansion of molybdenum film from the glass substrate; this locally delaminated film is then buckled by a subsequent compressive stress, leading to thin film spallation. Ablation by nanosecond laser pulses behaves differently. The appreciable heat diffusion length (∼700  nm) in molybdenum, observed for the nanosecond case, results in an increased thermal expansion of the glass. The thermally induced stress generated by the molten glass creates a delaminated area, which "pushes" the compressed film away from the substrate. These findings are relevant to future selective laser patterning of very thin molybdenum layers. PMID:27140542

  2. KEY COMPARISON: International key comparison of 24 keV neutron fluence measurements (1993-2009): CCRI(III)-K1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. J.; Lewis, V. E.; Klein, H.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 24.5 keV neutron fluence standards was organized by Section III (Neutron Measurements) of the Comité Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants, (CCRI). The exercise involved the circulation of a set of three different-diameter Bonner spheres for calibration in fields with energies around 24.5 keV. The fields were produced using four different methods of neutron production. The responses (counts per unit neutron fluence) of the individual spheres were initially determined for the neutron energy of the production method, or methods, employed. To derive the 24.5 keV responses, it was necessary to make corrections for spectral effects, and these were achieved by using response functions for the spheres calculated using the code MCNP. The results demonstrate good consistency within the estimated uncertainties (ranging from about 5% to 10% at the 95% confidence level) between the results reported by all the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section III, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  4. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-Man anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.; Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project®. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1×10-9 MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  5. Examination of the suitability of an implementation of the Jette localized heterogeneities fluence term L(1)(x,y,z) in an electron beam treatment planning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodebaugh, Raymond Francis, Jr.

    2000-11-01

    In this project we applied modifications of the Fermi- Eyges multiple scattering theory to attempt to achieve the goals of a fast, accurate electron dose calculation algorithm. The dose was first calculated for an ``average configuration'' based on the patient's anatomy using a modification of the Hogstrom algorithm. It was split into a measured central axis depth dose component based on the material between the source and the dose calculation point, and an off-axis component based on the physics of multiple coulomb scattering for the average configuration. The former provided the general depth dose characteristics along the beam fan lines, while the latter provided the effects of collimation. The Gaussian localized heterogeneities theory of Jette provided the lateral redistribution of the electron fluence by heterogeneities. Here we terminated Jette's infinite series of fluence redistribution terms after the second term. Experimental comparison data were collected for 1 cm thick x 1 cm diameter air and aluminum pillboxes using the Varian 2100C linear accelerator at Rush-Presbyterian- St. Luke's Medical Center. For an air pillbox, the algorithm results were in reasonable agreement with measured data at both 9 and 20 MeV. For the Aluminum pill box, there were significant discrepancies between the results of this algorithm and experiment. This was particularly apparent for the 9 MeV beam. Of course a one cm thick Aluminum heterogeneity is unlikely to be encountered in a clinical situation; the thickness, linear stopping power, and linear scattering power of Aluminum are all well above what would normally be encountered. We found that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the choice of the average configuration. This is an indication that the series of fluence redistribution terms does not converge fast enough to terminate after the second term. It also makes it difficult to apply the algorithm to cases where there are no a priori means of choosing the best average

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 63Ni at the Munich Tandem Laboratory for estimating fast neutron fluences from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Knie, K; Rugel, G; Marchetti, A A; Faestermann, T; Wallner, C; McAninch, J E; Straume, T; Korschinek, G

    2000-10-01

    After the release of the present dosimetry system DS86 in 1987, measurements have shown that DS86 may substantially underestimate thermal neutron fluences at large distances (>1,000 m) from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. This discrepancy casts doubts on the DS86 neutron source term and, consequently, the survivors' estimated neutron doses. However, the doses were caused mainly by fast neutrons. To determine retrospectively fast neutron fluences in Hiroshima, the reaction 63Cu(n, p)63Ni can be used, if adequate copper samples can be found. Measuring 63Ni (half life 100 y) in Hiroshima samples requires a very sensitive technique, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), because of the relatively small amounts of 63Ni expected (approximately 10(5)-10(6) atoms per gram of copper). Experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated in 1996 that AMS can be used to measure 63Ni in Hiroshima copper samples. Subsequently, a collaboration was established with the Technical University of Munich in view of its potential to perform more sensitive measurements of 63Ni than the Livermore facility and in the interest of interlaboratory validation. This paper presents the progress made at the Munich facility in the measurement of 63Ni by AMS. The Munich accelerator mass spectrometry facility is a combination of a high energy tandem accelerator and a detection system featuring a gas-filled magnet. It is designed for high sensitivity measurements of long-lived radioisotopes. Optimization of the ion source setup has further improved the sensitivity for 63Ni by reducing the background level of the 63Cu isobar interference by about two orders of magnitude. Current background levels correspond to a ratio of 63Ni/Ni<2x10(-14) and suggest that, with adequate copper samples, the assessment of fast neutron fluences in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is possible for ground distances of up to 1500 m, and--under favorable conditions--even beyond. To demonstrate this

  7. The influence of microstructure on blistering and bubble formation by He ion irradiation in Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, S. R.; Tolley, A.; Sánchez, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of microstructure and composition on the effects of ion irradiation in Al alloys was studied combining Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For this purpose, irradiation experiments with 20 keV He+ ions at room temperature were carried out in Al, an Al-4Cu (wt%) supersaturated solid solution, and an Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge (wt.%) alloy with a very high density of precipitates, and the results were compared. In Al and Al-4Cu, He bubbles were found with an average size in between 1 nm and 2 nm that was independent of fluence. The critical fluence for bubble formation was higher in Al-4Cu than in Al. He bubbles were also observed below the critical fluence after post irradiation annealing in Al-4Cu. The incoherent interfaces between the equilibrium θ phase and the Al matrix were found to be favorable sites for the formation of He bubbles. Instead, no bubbles were observed in the precipitate rich Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy. In all alloys, blistering was observed, leading to surface erosion by exfoliation. The blistering effects were more severe in the Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy, and they were enhanced by increasing the fluence rate.

  8. Savior of post-blepharoepicanthoplasty scarring: Novel use of a low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei Cheng Brian Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Blepharoplasty with medial epicanthoplasty is popular in Asia. However, known complications include scarring, which can take the form of hypertrophic scars or keloids. Treatments for scars include pressure dressing, silicone gels, retinoic acids, radiotherapy, cryotherapy, triamcinolone injections, and surgical revision. These methods, however, have variable outcomes. Recently, there is an interest in post-surgical scar remodeling with lasers. Although the 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG is primarily a pigment laser, it has recently been shown to be effective for treating scars. In the management of post-blepharoepicanthoplasty scarring, this is certainly unheard of. In this paper, we present a novel technique of treating a patient with post-blepharoepicanthoplasty hypertrophic scarring with a low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. PMID:26820981

  9. Geomagnetic transmission disturbances and heavy-ion fluences observed in low Earth orbit during the solar energetic particle events of October 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boberg, P. R.; Tylka, A. J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Beahm, L. P.; Fluckiger, E. O.; Kleis, T.; Kobel, E.

    1996-01-01

    The large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and simultaneous large geomagnetic disturbances observed during October 1989 posed a significant, rapidly evolving space radiation hazard. Using data from the GOES-7, NOAA-10, IMP-8 and LDEF satellites, we determined the geomagnetic transmission, heavy ion fluences, mean Fe ionic charge state, and effective radiation hazard observed in low Earth orbit (LEO) for these SEPs. We modeled the geomagneitc transmission by tracing particles through the combination to the internal International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and the Tsyganenko (1989) magnetospheric field models, extending the modeling to large geomagnetic disturbances. We used our results to assess the radiation hazard such very large SEP events would pose in the anticipated 52 deg inclination space station orbit.

  10. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Monahans H5 chondrite, Zolensky et al. report the first occurrence of grains of halite (NaCl), which contain minor sylvite (KCl) and tiny inclusions of liquid water. Here we report Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of Monahans light (4.53 Ga) and dark phases and of the halite (>4.33 Ga). We report the presence of trapped solar gases in the dark phase, demonstrating that it represents a prior regolith on the Monahans parent body, We also report the cosmic-ray exposure age of Monahans and the neutron fluence experienced by the regolith component. Because the halite grains are apparently located only in the regolith phase, they may have formed by early hydrous activity within the Monahans parent body regolith, or they may have been introduced from outside.

  11. Bindi Tattoo on Forehead: Success with Modified R-20 Technique Using Low Fluence Q-Switched Nd Yag Laser: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zawar, Vijay; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Bindi tattoo on the forehead, is one of the cultural practice in Indian women from rural areas. Many patients are not pleased with the appearance of their tattoo and thus seek removal. The development of quality-switched lasers has revolutionized the removal of unwanted tattoos. However, despite multiple treatment sessions, the efficacy is often found to be limited. We herein report a case of green-blue bindi tattoo which failed to clear after 8 sessions of Q-switched Nd YAG laser. The tattoo significantly cleared with R-20 method using low fluence Q-switched Nd YAG Laser. R-20 technique seems to be an effective method of tattoo removal and might be a boon for patients who are reluctant to pursue laser treatment because of fear of expenditure, side effects and uncertainty of result. We report efficacy of R-20 technique for a bindi tattoo on forehead. PMID:24761103

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 17: In-phantom and Fluence-based Measurements for Quality Assurance of Volumetric-driven Adaptation of Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaly, B; Hoover, D; Mitchell, S; Wong, E

    2014-08-15

    During volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of head and neck cancer, some patients lose weight which may result in anatomical deviations from the initial plan. If these deviations are substantial a new treatment plan can be designed for the remainder of treatment (i.e., adaptive planning). Since the adaptive treatment process is resource intensive, one possible approach to streamlining the quality assurance (QA) process is to use the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to measure the integrated fluence for the adapted plans instead of the currently-used ArcCHECK device (Sun Nuclear). Although ArcCHECK is recognized as the clinical standard for patient-specific VMAT plan QA, it has limited length (20 cm) for most head and neck field apertures and has coarser detector spacing than the EPID (10 mm vs. 0.39 mm). In this work we compared measurement of the integrated fluence using the EPID with corresponding measurements from the ArcCHECK device. In the past year nine patients required an adapted plan. Each of the plans (the original and adapted) is composed of two arcs. Routine clinical QA was performed using the ArcCHECK device, and the same plans were delivered to the EPID (individual arcs) in integrated mode. The dose difference between the initial plan and adapted plan was compared for ArcCHECK and EPID. In most cases, it was found that the EPID is more sensitive in detecting plan differences. Therefore, we conclude that EPID provides a viable alternative for QA of the adapted head and neck plans and should be further explored.

  13. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Efe, Mert; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; Allain, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 1023-2.0 × 1024 ions m-2 s-1, the sample bias ranged from a negative (20-65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600-1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma.

  14. Poster — Thur Eve — 48: Dosimetric dependence on bone backscatter in orthovoltage radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo photon fluence spectral study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Grigor, G

    2014-08-15

    This study investigated dosimetric impact due to the bone backscatter in orthovoltage radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate depth doses and photon fluence spectra using the EGSnrc-based code. Inhomogeneous bone phantom containing a thin water layer (1–3 mm) on top of a bone (1 cm) to mimic the treatment sites of forehead, chest wall and kneecap was irradiated by the 220 kVp photon beam produced by the Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine. Percentage depth doses and photon energy spectra were determined using Monte Carlo simulations. Results of percentage depth doses showed that the maximum bone dose was about 210–230% larger than the surface dose in the phantoms with different water thicknesses. Surface dose was found to be increased from 2.3 to 3.5%, when the distance between the phantom surface and bone was increased from 1 to 3 mm. This increase of surface dose on top of a bone was due to the increase of photon fluence intensity, resulting from the bone backscatter in the energy range of 30 – 120 keV, when the water thickness was increased. This was also supported by the increase of the intensity of the photon energy spectral curves at the phantom and bone surface as the water thickness was increased. It is concluded that if the bone inhomogeneity during the dose prescription in the sites of forehead, chest wall and kneecap with soft tissue thickness = 1–3 mm is not considered, there would be an uncertainty in the dose delivery.

  15. Microbiological stability and quality of pulsed light treated cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. reticulatus cv. Glamour) based on cut type and light fluence.

    PubMed

    Koh, Pei Chen; Noranizan, Mohd Adzahan; Karim, Roselina; Nur Hanani, Zainal Abedin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cut type and pulsed light (PL) fluence on microbiological stability and quality of fresh-cut cantaloupes. Fresh-cut cantaloupes with various cut types (cuboid, triangular prism and sphere) were treated with PL technology at 6 J/cm(2). Samples were exposed to PL treatment at fluences of 2.7, 7.8, 11.7 and 15.6 J/cm(2) followed by storage at 4 ± 1 °C for 28 days. Microbiological quality, headspace composition, firmness, colour, pH, titratable acidity, total soluble solids, total phenolic content and ascorbic acid content of fresh-cut cantaloupes were determined. Spherical shape was found to be the most suitable shape for PL treatment of fresh-cut cantaloupes due to its significantly lowest (p ≤ 0.05) microbial counts before and after the PL treatment. No significant (p > 0.05) effect was observed for firmness, colour, total soluble solids and total phenolic content of fresh-cut cantaloupes throughout the storage study. Pulsed light treatment using 7.8 J/cm(2) was the best for extending shelf life of fresh-cut cantaloupes with extension of 8 days longer at 4 ± 1 °C compared to the control while maintaining the ascorbic acid content. In conclusion, PL treatment is a potential technique for extending the shelf life of fresh-cut cantaloupes by inactivating microorganisms without compromising the nutritional value. PMID:27413207

  16. The effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on the properties of a fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Burchell, T. D.; Strizak, J. P.; Eto, M.

    1996-05-01

    A fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite (IG-110), manufactured from a petroleum coke, was irradiated to a total neutron dose of 3.8 × 10 26 n/m 2 or 25 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600°C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge: National Laboratory (ORNL). The effect of irradiation and the influence of post-irradiation thermal annealing on the properties of the graphite were evaluated. Volume change turnaround was clearly observed at 15—20 dpa and the return to original volume ( {ΔV}/{V 0} = 0 ) can be estimated to occur at ˜ 30 dpa. Strength and elastic moduli of the irradiated graphite increased by a factor of 2-3, and maximums in the {δ}/{δ 0}, and {E}/{E o} curves were at ˜20 dpa at 600°C. Recovery of volume, fracture strength and thermal conductivity by thermal annealing were found., and thermal conductivity returned to better than about 30% of the unirradiated value after 1200°C thermal annealing.

  17. Low Fluence Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser Toning and Q-Switched Ruby Laser in the Treatment of Melasma:A Comparative Split-Face Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Rie; Kawana, Seiji; Sato, Shigeru; Naito, Zenya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Melasma still presents as a difficult entity to treat, especially in the Asian skin phe-notype. Recently laser toning with the Q-switched Nd:YAG has attracted attention. The present study investigated the efficacy of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser toning for melasma, with a histopathological comparison with the Q-switched ruby laser. Subjects and Methods: Eight Japanese females (41–57 yr, mean 52.5 yr) with Fitzpatrick skin type III and bilateral melasma participated in the study. One half of each subject's face (randomly chosen) was treated with Q-switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser toning (pulse width 5–20 ns; spot size, 6 mm diameter; fluence, 3.0 J/cm2, 5–7 passes, once/week, 4 weeks: QS:YAG group), and the contralateral half with a single treatment using a Q-switched ruby laser (694.5 nm, pulse width 20 ns, spot size 4 mm diameter; fluence 4.0 J/cm2, 1 pass with approximately 20% overlap: QS:Ruby group). Skin biopsies were taken immediately after the 4th Nd:YAG session and the single ruby session, and histopathological comparison was performed with light- and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: Improvement in melasma pigmentation was seen in both the QS:YAG- and QS:Ruby-treat-ed sides, and this was well-maintained in the QS:YAG group. Ultrastructurally, melanin granules were destroyed in both groups, but there was considerably more morphological epidermal and dermal damage in the QS:Ruby specimens compared with minimal epidermal disruption and cellular damage in the QS:YAG specimens. Conclusions: Q-switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser toning offered superior results in the treatment of melasma in the Japanese skin type compared with the Q-switched ruby laser, both ultrastructurally with less immediately post-treatment cellular damage and macroscopically, and a longer recurrence-free interval. PMID:24610976

  18. Comparison of Epidermal/Dermal Damage Between the Long-Pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite Lasers Under Relatively High Fluence Conditions: Quantitative and Histological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Park, So Ra; Jo, Jeong Ho; Park, Sung Yun; Seo, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare degrees of epidermal/dermal tissue damage quantitatively and histologically after laser irradiation, to find ideal treatment conditions with relatively high fluence for skin rejuvenation. Background data: A number of recent studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of therapeutic lasers under relatively low fluence conditions. Methods: We transmitted the long-pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite lasers into pig skin according to different fluences and spot diameters, and estimated epidermal/dermal temperatures. Pig skin specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological assessments. The fluence conditions comprised 26, 30, and 36 J/cm2, and the spot diameter conditions were 5, 8, and 10 mm. Pulse duration was 30 ms for all experiments. Results: Both lasers produced reliable thermal damage on the dermis without any serious epidermal injuries, under relatively high fluence conditions. The 1064 nm laser provided more active fibrous formations than the 755 nm laser, while higher risks for tissue damages simultaneously occurred. Conclusions: The ideal treatment conditions for skin rejuvenation were 8 mm diameter with 30 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 1064 nm laser, and 8 mm diameter with 36 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 755 nm laser. PMID:24992273

  19. A historical fluence analysis of the radiation environment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and implications for continued radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePasquale, J. M.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Schwartz, D. A.

    2006-06-01

    Now in operation for over 6 years, the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has sampled a variety of space environments. Its highly elliptical orbit, with a 63.5 hr period, regularly takes the spacecraft through the Earth's radiation belts, the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath and into the solar wind. Additionally, the CXO has weathered several severe solar storms during its time in orbit. Given the vulnerability of Chandra's Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) to radiation damage from low energy protons, proper radiation management has been a prime concern of the Chandra team. A comprehensive approach utilizing scheduled radiation safing, in addition to both on-board autonomous radiation monitoring and manual intervention, has proved successful at managing further radiation damage. However, the future of autonomous radiation monitoring on-board the CXO faces a new challenge as the multi-layer insulation (MLI) on its radiation monitor, the Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument (EPHIN), continues to degrade, leading to elevated temperatures. Operating at higher temperatures, the data from some EPHIN channels can become noisy and unreliable for radiation monitoring. This paper explores the full implication of the loss of EPHIN to CXO radiation monitoring by evaluating the fluences the CXO experienced during 40 autonomous radiation safing events from 2000 through 2005 in various hypothetical scenarios which include the use of EPHIN in limited to no capacity as a radiation monitor. We also consider the possibility of replacing EPHIN with Chandra's High Resolution Camera (HRC) for radiation monitoring.

  20. Experimental study on the effect of wavelength and fluence in the laser cleaning of silvering in late Roman coins (Mid 3rd/4th century AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou-Mogire, C.; Drakaki, E.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Zergioti, I.; Boukos, N.

    2007-03-01

    The political problems in Late Roman Empire caused significant changes in the coin technology. The silver content dropped severely and a new technology, in all the mints operating around the Empire, was introduced. For the production of these coins, copper based quaternary alloys were used and their surface was covered by a silver amalgam plating layer. Hoards of these coins have been recovered in thousands from across the Empire, however, their treatment has been problematic. Both mechanical and chemical cleaning results in the damage or the complete destruction of the thin silver layer. The use of laser technology in the cleaning of works of art has a wide range of applications which includes metallic objects. The main aim of this work was to investigate the use of lasers in the cleaning of the thin silver plating layers found in late Roman coins. The optimisation of laser parameters was achieved through comparative cleaning tests by employing Nd:YAG (532 nm and 266 nm) laser systems. The cleaning results on the plated areas were characterised by optical microscopy, and SEM-EDX analysis. Following a systematic investigation and many cleaning trials on two different wavelengths and fluence values, optimum irradiation parameters were thoroughly demonstrated. Microscopic observations of the cleaned areas evidenced complete removal of the encrustation and high selectivity of the laser cleaning. Neither thermal or mechanical injuries, nor cuprite blackening were observed on the cleaned surfaces at the optimum laser cleaning technique, using 532 nm of the Nd: YAG laser.

  1. Study of the integrated fluence threshold condition for the formation of β-Bi2O3 on Bi thin films by using ns laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venegas-Castro, A.; Reyes-Contreras, A.; Camacho-López, M.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Camacho-López, S.; Esparza-García, A.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of β-Bi2O3 through laser irradiation of a bismuth (Bi) thin film is reported. The bismuth thin films were irradiated in atmospheric air using Nd:YAG laser pulses of 7 ns duration and 1064 nm wavelength. A set of irradiations was done on the samples varying the total irradiation time (i. e. the number of pulses) for a fix per pulse laser fluence of 25 mJ/cm2. The laser processed regions were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microRaman spectroscopy (mRS). OM results show that the laser modified cross section on the film is smaller than the laser beam cross section, which means a thermally confined interaction; SEM micrographs reveled the formation of submicron sized particles as a result of the multi-pulse laser irradiation; using microRaman spectroscopy characterization we were able to determine the formation of the β-Bi2O3 crystalline phase within the laser irradiated spot on the sample.

  2. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2). PMID:19762061

  3. Long Duration Exposure Facility post-flight data as it influences the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon A.

    1995-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is an earth observing satellite that will be in a low earth orbit (350 kilometers) during the next period of maximum solar activity. The TRMM observatory is expected to experience an atomic oxygen fluence of 8.9 x 10(exp 22) atoms per square centimeter. This fluence is ten times higher than the atomic oxygen impingement incident to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Other environmental concerns on TRMM include: spacecraft glow, silicon oxide contaminant build-up, severe spacecraft material degradation, and contamination deposition resulting from molecular interactions with the dense ambient atmosphere. Because of TRMM's predicted harsh environment, TRMM faces many unique material concerns and subsystem design issues. The LDEF data has influenced the design of TRMM and the TRMM material selection process.

  4. The influence of wavelength in extinction measurements and beam steering in laser-induced incandescence measurements in sooting flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbs, J.; Geigle, K. P.; Lammel, O.; Hader, J.; Stirn, R.; Hadef, R.; Meier, W.

    2009-09-01

    The accuracy of laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements is significantly influenced by the calibration process and the laser profile degradation due to beam steering. Additionally, the wavelength used for extinction measurements, needed for LII calibration, is critical and should be kept as high as possible in order to avoid light absorption by molecular species in the flame. The influence of beam steering on the LII measurement was studied in turbulent sooting C2H4/air flames at different pressures. While inhomogeneities in the laser profile become smoothed out in time-averaged measurements, especially at higher pressure, the corresponding single-shot beam profiles reveal an increasing effect of beam steering. In the current configuration it was observed that the resulting local laser fluence remains within certain limits (30% to 200%) of the original value. A sufficiently high incident laser fluence can thus prevent the local fluence from dropping below the LII threshold value of approximately 0.3 J/cm2 at the cost of increased soot surface vaporization. A spatial resolution in the dimension of the sheet thickness of below 1 mm cannot be guaranteed at increased pressure of 9 bars due to beam steering. A feasibility study in a combustor at technical conditions demonstrates the influence of both effects beam steering and choice of calibration wavelength and led to the conclusion that, however, a shot-to-shot calibration of LII with simultaneously measured extinction can be realized.

  5. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  6. Projection correlation based view interpolation for cone beam CT: primary fluence restoration in scatter measurement with a moving beam stop array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Xu, Qiong; Zankl, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Scatter correction is an open problem in x-ray cone beam (CB) CT. The measurement of scatter intensity with a moving beam stop array (BSA) is a promising technique that offers a low patient dose and accurate scatter measurement. However, when restoring the blocked primary fluence behind the BSA, spatial interpolation cannot well restore the high-frequency part, causing streaks in the reconstructed image. To address this problem, we deduce a projection correlation (PC) to utilize the redundancy (over-determined information) in neighbouring CB views. PC indicates that the main high-frequency information is contained in neighbouring angular projections, instead of the current projection itself, which provides a guiding principle that applies to high-frequency information restoration. On this basis, we present the projection correlation based view interpolation (PC-VI) algorithm; that it outperforms the use of only spatial interpolation is validated. The PC-VI based moving BSA method is developed. In this method, PC-VI is employed instead of spatial interpolation, and new moving modes are designed, which greatly improve the performance of the moving BSA method in terms of reliability and practicability. Evaluation is made on a high-resolution voxel-based human phantom realistically including the entire procedure of scatter measurement with a moving BSA, which is simulated by analytical ray-tracing plus Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc. With the proposed method, we get visually artefact-free images approaching the ideal correction. Compared with the spatial interpolation based method, the relative mean square error is reduced by a factor of 6.05-15.94 for different slices. PC-VI does well in CB redundancy mining; therefore, it has further potential in CBCT studies.

  7. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/..gamma.. dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/..gamma.. three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references.

  8. Radiation effect on silicon transistors in mixed neutrons-gamma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.; Shweikani, R.; Ghazi, N.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gamma and neutron irradiations on two different types of transistors, Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) and Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT), were investigated. Irradiation was performed using a Syrian research reactor (RR) (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR)) and a gamma source (Co-60 cell). For RR irradiation, MCNP code was used to calculate the absorbed dose received by the transistors. The experimental results showed an overall decrease in the gain factors of the transistors after irradiation, and the JFETs were more resistant to the effects of radiation than BJTs. The effect of RR irradiation was also greater than that of gamma source for the same dose, which could be because neutrons could cause more damage than gamma irradiation.

  9. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  10. Monitoring Neutron Generator Output in a Mixed Neutron-Gamma Field Using a Plastic Scintillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra,S.; Wielopolski, L.

    2007-10-28

    Quantitative neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy employing neutron generators (NGs) entails monitoring them for possible fluctuations in their neutron output. We accomplished this using a plastic scintillator and recording a spectrum from which we selected a neutron region-of-interest (nROI) to discriminate between neutrons and the accompanying high-energy gamma-rays. We show that the selected nROI is insensitive to changes in the gamma-ray background, thus allowing satisfactory normalization of the gamma-ray spectra of an in-situ system for analyzing soil carbon.

  11. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  12. Improved pulse shape discriminator for fast neutron-gamma ray detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; St. Onge, R.

    1969-01-01

    Discriminator in nuclear particle detection system distinguishes nuclear particle type and energy among many different nuclear particles. Discriminator incorporates passive, linear circuit elements so that it will operate over a wide dynamic range.

  13. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  14. [sup 3]He neutron detector performance in mixed neutron gamma environments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N. H.; Beddingfield, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    A test program of the performance of 3He neutron proportional detectors with varying gas pressures, and their response to lligh level gamma-ray exposure in a mixed neutrodgamma environment, ha$ been performed Our intent was to identie the optimal gas pressure to reduce the gamma-ray sensitivity of these detectors. These detectors were manufxtured using materials to minimize their gamma response. Earlier work focused on 3He fill pressures of four atmospheres and above, whereas the present work focuses on a wider range of pressures. Tests have shown that reducing the .filling pressure will M e r increase the gamma-ray dose range in which the detectors can be operated.

  15. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  16. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), and static induction transistors (SITs) are given. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Postirradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  17. MA-NRBC: First successful attempt for neutron gamma discrimination in plastic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, S.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Bourbotte, J. M.; Ferragut, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a new electronic hardware and algorithms enabling discrimination between neutron and gamma in plastic scintillators together with the first associated experimental results, are presented. This electronic platform is mainly based onto a quad 200 MHz ADCs. Using phase rotating, it is possible to sample the signal up to 800 MHz equivalent, with 8 bits precision. This sampling frequency allows a real time signal processing. Despite all previous work, we have shown during this study that it is possible to discriminate neutron from gamma in plastic scintillators even for low energy neutrons (less than 10 MeV). Two patents have been accepted and registered; the first deals with the intrinsic signal processing and the second with thermal stabilization methods of photomultiplier tubes. The system could be used up to 100 000 events per second (both gamma and neutron). This system is currently dedicated to homeland security devices; this is due to its response time (in the order of 1 up to 3 seconds). The next step is to implement the thermal stabilization algorithm in the FPGA and micro-controller to obtain a global system free from any trouble caused by the environment thermal variations. This aspect of the research is crucial for measurements in the field. The time response should also be improved to make it a reliable alternative to Helium-3 shortage for neutron detection at borders checkpoint. (authors)

  18. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-05-05

    Our paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, 137Cs gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. Moreover, the neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth ofmore » that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. Our set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.« less

  19. Anisn-Dort Neutron-Gamma Flux Intercomparison Exercise for a Simple Testing Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Borodkin, G.; Brodkin, E.; Egorov, A.; Kozhevnikov, A.; Zaritsky, S.; Manturov, G.; Voloschenko, A.

    2003-06-01

    The ability of transport codes ANISN, DORT, ROZ-6, MCNP and TRAMO, as well as nuclear data libraries BUGLE-96, ABBN-93, VITAMIN-B6 and ENDF/B-6 to deliver consistent gamma and neutron flux results was tested in the calculation of a one-dimensional cylindrical model consisting of a homogeneous core and an outer zone with a single material. Model variants with H2O, Fe, Cr and Ni in the outer zones were investigated. The results are compared with MCNP-ENDF/B-6 results. Discrepancies are discussed. The specified test model is proposed as a computational benchmark for testing calculation codes and data libraries.

  20. Water detection at the moon, Mars and comets with a combined neutron gamma ray instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Albert E.; Haines, Eldon L.

    1991-01-01

    Measuring the fluxes of thermal and epithermal neutrons at a planetary object in conjunction with gamma-ray spectroscopic observations will provide information about the chemical composition of the surface which is less model dependent than the gamma ray measurements by themselves. Researchers devised a passive neutron detector for this purpose. An experimental model was designed and built. Three variables provided the basis for a set of experiments: thickness of the Sm and B layers, the presence or absence of the ACS, and the position of the source relative to the PND's cylindrical axis. Experimental results are given.

  1. Simulation study of the neutron-gamma discrimination capability of a liquid scintillator neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haoyang; Yu, Xunzhen; Zhu, Jingjun; Wang, Li; Ma, Jinglu; Liu, Shukui; Li, Linwei; Chen, Liejian; Tang, Changjian; Yue, Qian

    2014-12-01

    The capability to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays (n/γ) by means of their pulse shapes is important for many users of liquid scintillator (LS) neutron detectors. To simulate the n/γ discrimination capability of a neutron detector, we have developed a method to simulate the pulse signal generated by an incident n or γ in the LS. Light pulses caused by ionization and excitation from incident n or γ radiation are simulated by the Geant4 simulation package based on the geometry and materials of a prototype LS detector. The response to the incident light of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) and data acquisition (DAQ) circuit was obtained from a single photoelectron experiment. The final output signal from a detector was produced by convolving its light pulse with the response function of the PMT and DAQ. Two methods, the charge comparison method (CCM) and the pulse gradient method (PGM), were applied to discriminate the simulated signals. The simulation was validated by comparing its result to an experimental result from the prototype LS detector. Our method can be applied in the design of an LS detector, which has subsequently been optimized n/γ discrimination. The method can also be helpful to analyze experimental data and evaluate the performance of n/γ discrimination techniques.

  2. Investigating the Anisotropic Scintillation Response in Anthracene through Neutron, Gamma-Ray, and Muon Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Our paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, 137Cs gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. Moreover, the neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. Our set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.

  3. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in plastic scintillators with digital PSD electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Simonson, Duane L.; Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a common method to distinguish between pulses produced by gamma rays and neutrons in scintillator detectors. This technique takes advantage of the property of many scintillators that excitations by recoil protons and electrons produce pulses with different characteristic shapes. Unfortunately, many scintillating materials with good PSD properties have other, undesirable properties such as flammability, toxicity, low availability, high cost, and/or limited size. In contrast, plastic scintillator detectors are relatively low-cost, and easily handled and mass-produced. Recent studies have demonstrated efficient PSD in plastic scintillators using a high concentration of fluorescent dyes. To further investigate the PSD properties of such systems, mixed plastic scintillator samples were produced and tested. The addition of up to 30 wt. % diphenyloxazole (DPO) and other chromophores in polyvinyltoluene (PVT) results in efficient detection with commercial detectors. These plastic scintillators are produced in large diameters up to 4 inches by melt blending directly in a container suitable for in-line detector use. This allows recycling and reuse of materials while varying the compositions. This strategy also avoids additional sample handling and polishing steps required when using removable molds. In this presentation, results will be presented for different mixed-plastic compositions and compared with known scintillating materials

  4. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGE detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  5. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGe detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  6. Time-resolved neutron/gamma-ray data acquisition for in situ subsurface planetary geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarik, J. G.; Burger, D. M.; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr, R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-04-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  7. Analysis of wavelength influence on a-Si crystallization processes with nanosecond laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Munoz-Martin, David; Núñez-Sánchez, S.; Morales, M.; Carabe, J.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J. J.; Molpeceres, C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present a detailed study of the wavelength influence in pulsed laser annealing of amorphous silicon thin films, comparing the results for material modification at different fluence regimes in the three fundamental harmonics of standard DPSS (diode pumped solid state) nanosecond laser sources, UV (355 nm), visible (532 nm) and IR (1064 nm). The crystalline fraction (% crystalline silicon) profiles resulted from irradiation of amorphous silicon thin film samples are characterized with MicroRaman techniques. A finite element numerical model (FEM) is developed in COMSOL to simulate the process. The crystalline fraction results and the local temperature evolution in the irradiated area are presented and analyzed in order to establish relevant correlation between theoretical and experimental results. For UV (355 nm) and visible (532 nm) wavelengths, the results of the numerical model are presented together with the experimental results, proving that the process can be easily predicted with an essentially physical model based on heat transport at different wavelengths and fluence regimes. The numerical model helps to establish the optimal operation fluence regime for the annealing process.

  8. SU-C-BRD-04: Comparison of Shallow Fluence to Deep Point Dose Measurements for Spine VMAT SBRT Patient-Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J; Held, M; Morin, O; Weethee, B; Chuang, C; Perez-Andujar, A; Sudhyadhom, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of traditional gamma-index-based fluence measurements for patient-specific measurements in VMAT delivered spine SBRT. Methods: The ten most recent cases for spine SBRT were selected. All cases were planned with Eclipse RapidArc for a TrueBeam STx. The delivery was verified using a point dose measurement with a Pinpoint 3D micro-ion chamber in a Standard Imaging Stereotactic Dose Verification Phantom. Two points were selected for each case, one within the target in a low dose-gradient region and one in the spinal cord. Measurements were localized using on-board CBCT. Cumulative and separate arc measurements were acquired with the ArcCheck and assessed using the SNC patient software with a 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm gamma analysis with global normalization and a 10% dose threshold. Correlations between data were determined using the Pearson Product-Moment Correlation. Results: For our cohort of patients, the measured doses were higher than calculated ranging from 2.2%–9.7% for the target and 1.0%–8.2% for the spinal cord. There was strong correlation between 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm passing rates (r=0.91). Moderate correlation was found between target and cord dose with a weak fit (r=0.67, R-Square=0.45). The cumulative ArcCheck measurements showed poor correlation with the measured point doses for both the target and cord (r=0.20, r=0.35). If the arcs are assessed separately with an acceptance criteria applied to the minimum passing rate between all arcs, a moderate negative correlation was found for the target and cord (r=−0.48, r= −0.71). The case with the highest dose difference (9.7%) received a passing rate of 97.2% for the cumulative arcs and 87.8% for the minimum with separate arcs. Conclusion: Our data suggest that traditional passing criteria using ArcCheck with cumulative measurements do not correlate well with dose errors. Separate arc analysis shows better correlation but may still miss large dose errors. Point dose

  9. Nontargeted Stressful Effects in Normal Human Fibroblast Cultures Exposed to Low Fluences of High Charge, High Energy (HZE) Particles: Kinetics of Biologic Responses and Significance of Secondary Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ~151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ~50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1–3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ~109 keV/μm) that targets ~1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ~13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ~13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise <1% of the absorbed dose. Further, the radial spread of dose due to secondary heavy ion fragments is confined to approximately 10–20 μm. Thus, the latter are unlikely to significantly contribute to stressful effects in cells not targeted by primary HZE particles. PMID:23465079

  10. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing

    2008-08-01

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  11. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  12. Novel treatment of Hori's nevus: A combination of fractional nonablative 2,940-nm Er:YAG and low-fluence 1,064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Brian Wei Cheng Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate a combination laser therapy to treat Hori's nevus. Design: A prospective study. Setting: A Singapore-based clinic. Participants: Five female patients, aged 30-46 years, with bilateral malar Hori's nevus. Measurements: Photographs were taken before treatment and 1 month after laser treatment was completed. These were graded by three independent physicians. The patients were also asked to grade their treatment response subjectively. They were followed up for a total of 3 months after laser treatment to monitor recurrence. Materials and Methods: The fractional nonablative 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser with a fluence of 0.7 J/cm2, spot size 12 mm, and frequency 15 Hz was used to perform a full-face single-pass treatment. Subsequently, a second pass and third pass over Hori's nevi were done bilaterally till the clinical endpoint of skin whitening. The 1,064-nm Q-switched (QS) Nd:YAG at a fluence of 2.0 J/cm2, frequency 2 Hz, and 4-mm spot size was used to deliver multiple passes over Hori's nevus till erythema with mild petechiae appeared. We repeated the treatment once a week for 3 more consecutive weeks. Results: All five patients had above 80% improvement in their pigmentation and two (skin type III) achieved complete 100% clearance. Based on the patients’ subjective assessments, all five of them expressed satisfaction and felt that their pigmentation had improved. There were no complications noted. Conclusion: The fractional nonablative 2940 nm Er:YAG laser and Q-switched 1064nm laser Nd:YAG combination is an effective and safe treatment for Hori's nevus. PMID:26865788

  13. Application of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry combined with in-core measurements for correction of neutron source used for RPV fluence calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with calculated and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Neutron activation measurements analyzed in the paper were carried out in an ex-vessel air cavity at different nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 during different fuel cycles. The time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared via two different approaches based on (a) calculated fuel burnup (standard routine procedure) and (b) in-core measurements by means of self-powered detectors (SPDs) and thermocouples (TCs) (new approach). Considering that fuel burnup distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by the use of analytical methods (calculations) only, it is necessary to develop new approaches for the testing and correction of calculated evaluations of a neutron source. The results presented in this paper allow one to consider the reverse task of the alternative estimation of fuel burnup distributions. The proposed approach is based on the adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and thus fuel burnup patterns, in some part of the reactor core, taking into account neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations, and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  14. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nikolov, A. S.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (λ = 1064 nm), second (λSHG = 532) and third (λTHG = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by λirrad = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  15. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  16. The Impact of Adaptive and Non-targeted Effects in the Biological Responses to Low Dose/Low Fluence Ionizing-Radiation: The Modulating Effect of Linear Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    de Toledo, Sonia M.; Buonanno, Manuela; Li, Min; Asaad, Nesrin; Qin, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2011-01-01

    A large volume of laboratory and human epidemiological studies have shown that high doses of ionizing radiation engender significant health risks. In contrast, the health risks of low level radiation remain ambiguous and have been the subject of intense debate. To reduce the uncertainty in evaluating these risks, research advances in cellular and molecular biology are being used to characterize the biological effects of low dose radiation exposures and their underlying mechanisms. Radiation type, dose rate, genetic susceptibility, cellular redox environment, stage of cell growth, level of biological organization and environmental parameters are among the factors that modulate interactions among signaling processes that determine short- and long-term outcomes of low dose exposures. Whereas, recommended radiation protection guidelines assume a linear dose-response relationship in estimating radiation cancer risk, in vitro and in vivo investigations of phenomena such as adaptive responses and non-targeted effects, namely bystander effects and genomic instability, suggest that low dose/low fluence-induced signaling events act to alter linearity of the dose-response relation as supported by the biophysical argument. The latter predicts that increases in dose simply increase the probability that a given cell in a tissue will be intersected by an electron track, and by corollary, each unit of radiation, no matter how small would increases risk. These predictions assume that similar molecular events mediate both low and high dose radiobiological effects, and the cumulative risk from two sequential radiation exposures can never be less than one alone. PMID:21512606

  17. Depth profile investigation of β-FeSi2 formed in Si(1 0 0) by high fluence implantation of 50 keV Fe ion and post-thermal vacuum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Reinert, Tilo; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2014-08-01

    A single phase polycrystalline β-FeSi2 layer has been synthesized at the near surface region by implantation in Si(1 0 0) of a high fluence (∼1017 atoms/cm2) of 50 keV Fe ions and subsequent thermal annealing in vacuum at 800 °C. The depth profile of the implanted Fe atoms in Si(1 0 0) were simulated by the widely used transportation of ions in matter (TRIM) computer code as well as by the dynamic transportation of ions in matter code (T-DYN). The simulated depth profile predictions for this heavy ion implantation process were experimentally verified using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in combination with Ar-ion etching. The formation of the β-FeSi2 phase was monitored by X-ray diffraction measurements. The T-DYN simulations show better agreement with the experimental Fe depth profile results than the static TRIM simulations. The experimental and T-DYN simulated results show an asymmetric distribution of Fe concentrated more toward the surface region of the Si substrate.

  18. The influence of silver-ion doping using ion implantation on the luminescence properties of Er-Yb silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, S.; Nekvindova, P.; Svecova, B.; Vytykacova, S.; Mika, M.; Oswald, J.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Spirkova, J.

    2016-03-01

    A set of zinc-silicate glasses with different ratios of erbium and ytterbium was fabricated. To achieve Ag-rich thin films in a sub-surface layer, ion-implantation technique at an energy of 1.2 MeV and 1.7 MeV with a fluence of 1 × 1016 cm-2 was used. Post-implantation annealing was also applied. Changes in the spectroscopic and lasing properties of erbium ions as a function of implantation fluence of silver were studied with the aim to assess the positive effect of silver as a sensitiser of erbium luminescence. Therefore, absorption spectra in the visible range as well as luminescence spectra in the near-infrared range were measured and partially also the 4I11/2-4I15/2 transition of the erbium ion was studied. The results showed that silver positively influenced luminescence intensity at 1530 nm by increasing it almost three times. The biggest increase was achieved in glass with the highest concentration of erbium. Luminescence lifetime was not significantly influenced by the presence of silver and still remained around 10 ms.

  19. Conceptual design of stacked-layer detectors to increase the sensitivity of Fast Neutron Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jea Hyung; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chung, Young Hyun

    2012-04-01

    This study is focused on the structure and other possible factors related to scintillators used in the Fast Neutron and Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR) system to increase its sensitivity. The CsI(Tl) crystal scintillator (Co-60 gamma-ray detection) and the BC430 plastic scintillator (14 MeV fast neutron detection) were analyzed with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX and DETEC97 codes). Each scintillator was investigated with regard to the optimum thickness (1 cm × 1 cm), reconfiguration of detector modules (a stacked-layer structure), the optimum surface treatment, and the spectral matching with customized PIN-type photodiodes. As a result, the optimum thickness of the CsI(Tl) was found to be 4.5 cm; the optimum value was 5.5 cm for the BC430. When the detector modules were stacked in a sandwich structure rather than the existing single detector structure, the light photon transmission to the surface of the photodiode was enhanced by 40% and 58% for CsI(Tl) and BC430, respectively. In the matter of scintillator surface treatment, both scintillators were simulated with unpolished and polished condition before coating. The polished condition of the scintillator surfaces showed a higher performance, more than doubling that of the unpolished condition surfaces. Then, the performance improvement of the scintillator with the paint coating was compared to the scintillator with the metal coating conditions. For CsI(Tl), the metal coating showed a 10 % higher performance than that of the paint coating, and the metal coating of BC430 showed a 6% higher performance than that of the paint coating. As a result of spectral matching between the scintillators and the customized PIN-photodiodes, PS100-6b of Silicon AG, SD445-14-21-305 of API, and FSD1010-CAL of THOLABS were compared. The spectral matching factor of PS100-6b was 0.39 with CsI(Tl) and was 0.42 with BC430; the spectral matching factors of the other samples were relatively lower (SD445-14-21-305 with CsI(Tl): 0.29; SD445-14-21-305 with BC430: 0.33; FSD1010-CAL with CsI(Tl): 0.26; FSD1010-CAL with BC430: 0.29).

  20. Effect of fast neutron, gamma-ray and combined radiations on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herley, P. J.; Wang, C. S.; Varsi, G.; Levy, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal decomposition kinetics have been determined for ammonium perchlorate crystals subjected to a fast neutron irradiation or to a fast neutron irradiation followed by a gamma-ray irradiation. Qualitatively, the radiation induced changes are similar to those obtained in this and in previous studies, with samples exposed only to gamma rays. The induction period is shortened and the rate constants, obtained from an Avrami-Erofeyev kinetic analysis, are modified. The acceleratory period constant increases and the decay period constant decreases. When compared on an equal deposited energy basis, the fast neutron induced changes are appreciably larger than the gamma-ray induced changes. Some, or all, of the fast neutron induced effects might be attributable to the introduction of localized regions of concentrated radiation damage ('spikes') by lattice atom recoils which become thermal decomposition sites when the crystals are heated.

  1. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  2. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  3. Phytochrome-like responses in Euglena: A low fluence response that reorganizes the spectral dependence of the high irradiance response in long-day photoperiodic induction of cell division.

    PubMed

    Bolige, Aoen; Goto, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Irradiance spectra change spatiotemporally, and angiosperms adapt accordingly, mainly through phytochromes. This study challenges the long-held belief that the flagellated alga Euglena gracilis lacks phytochromes and is therefore unaffected by spectral changes. We photoautotrophically cultured the alga under continuous light (LL), then transferred it to darkness. After about 26h in darkness, different irradiations for 3h enabled cell division in dark-arrested G2 cells evoking a high-irradiance response (HIR). The spectral characteristics of the irradiation during the LL period (pre-irradiation) defined the spectral sensitivity in the subsequent dark period. LL with light rich in the red spectrum led to a HIR to the red spectrum (R-HIR), whereas light rich in the far-red spectrum (FR) led to a FR-HIR. Finishing the period of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) by a FR pulse enhanced the characteristics of the FR-HIR 26h later. By contrast, a R pulse given at the end of the pre-irradiation rich in FR potentiated the R-HIR. The effects were completely photoreversible between R and FR with critical fluences of about 2mmolm(-2), satisfying the classic diagnostic feature of phytochromes. The action spectrum of the FR effect at the end of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) had a main peak at 740nm and a minor peak at 380nm, whereas antagonization of the FR effect had a main peak at 640nm and a minor peak at 480nm. Wavelengths of 610 and 670nm appeared in both spectra. We also demonstrated the photoreversibility of 380/640, 480/740, and (610 and 670)/(640 and 740) nm. We conclude that Euglena displays phytochrome-like responses similar to the 'shade avoidance' and 'end-of-day FR' effects reported in angiosperms. PMID:17029970

  4. Buffer-gas influence on multiphoton absorption and dissociation in different gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, J. D.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Jovanović-Kurepa, J.

    2008-03-01

    Buffer-gas influence on the multiphoton absorption and dissociation in different mixtures was investigated using the simple method based on the empirical and theoretical vibrational energy distribution, generalized coupled two-level model and photoacoustic cell especially designed for low pressures studies. Energy transfer efficiency was analyzed by means of pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy technique. Collisional effects of buffer-gas (Ar) pressure are introduced to enhance the absorption and relaxation characteristics of irradiated absorbing molecules (SF 6). Functional behavior of mean number of absorbed photons per molecule < n> total and a dependence on buffer-gas pressure ( pbuff) which enables us to confirm or predict some physical and chemical processes are presented. Limitation of proposed model was analyzed depending on both gas pressure and laser fluence. Results are compared with other previously obtained by the same experimental technique but for different absorber and different molecular buffer-gas.

  5. XeCl laser ablation of polyimide: Influence of ambient atmosphere on particulate and gaseous products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Donald L.; Paraskevopoulos, George; Irwin, Robert S.

    1989-10-01

    The gaseous and particulate products of the XeCl (308 nm) laser ablation of polyimide (Kapton H) are quantitatively determined and compared with the mass loss of the polymer in atmospheres of He, N2, air, or O2. In air and in pure O2, the observed mass balance is about 90%, but is lower for inert atmospheres. With increasing oxygen content in the atmosphere, the yield of CO2 increases at the expense of particulates and acetylene. The influence of laser fluence and nature of the ambient atmosphere on the product distribution is interpreted in terms of ejection of small reactive species which are involved in the competitive reactions of particulate formation and oxidation to CO2.

  6. Influence of incidence angle and polarization state on the damage site characteristics of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Yanyun; Ma, Hongping; Jiao, Hongfei; Cheng, Xinbin; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-02-01

    The influence of the incidence angle and polarization state on the damage site characteristics of fused silica under 355 nm laser irradiation was investigated. The initial damage morphologies and growth behaviors of the damage sites on the exit surface at incidence angles of 0° and 45° as well as in P and S states were compared to investigate the effects of various angles and polarization states. The relationships between the size of the initial damage sites and the laser fluence, as well as the growth threshold, were discussed. The damage morphologies of the craters and cracks at different incidence angles and polarization states were then investigated. Finally, the growth characteristics of the lateral size, crater depth, and crack depth were compared and analyzed. PMID:24514256

  7. Peer Influence and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Crystal; Simpson, Shelly; Najera, John; Weiner, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that peer influence can be negative, by increasing the likelihood that a youth will engage in high-risk behaviors and make risky decisions. However, peer influence can also be positive and protect a youth from these same high-risk activities. This article examines the extent of peer influence and then describes the Alternative…

  8. Influence of the interplanetary shock on the radial dependence of solar energetic particle intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aran, A.; Jacobs, C.; Sanahuja, B.; Lario, D.; Poedts, S.; Jiggens, P.

    2012-12-01

    The inclusion of a travelling shock as a source of energetic particles during gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events is a key element to assess the radiation encountered by a mission in the inner heliosphere. We have developed, in the frame of the Solar Energetic Particle Environment Model (SEPEM) project, a two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model to describe the shock propagation from 4 solar radii up to 1.6 AU. The outputs of this model are used to simulate the transport of SEPs from the shock front up to a given observer. The combination of the shock and particle transport models allows us to study the influence of both the shock properties and the observer's magnetic connection on the radial and longitudinal variation of proton peak intensities and fluences in gradual SEP events. We have simulated the propagation of four shocks characterized by two different transit times to 1 AU and two angular widths (narrow and wide). Two sets of seven spacecraft are placed along two nominal interplanetary magnetic field lines at radial distances ranging from 0.2 AU to 1.6 AU. The observers at 1 AU are located at central meridian and western positions with respect to the launch direction of the shocks. We calculate the resulting synthetic proton time-intensity profiles at several energies (5.0 < E < 200 MeV) measured by each virtual spacecraft. By tracking the shock from close to the Sun, we obtain the peak intensity of high-energy particles at the prompt component of the SEP events, without assuming ad-hoc conditions for particle injection at the corona. We discuss how the resulting power-law dependences of the peak intensities (and fluences) on the observer's radial distance vary with the particle energy, the characteristics of the shock, and the different evolving conditions for particle injection at the point of the shock front that magnetically connects to the observers. This information may contribute to improve the understanding of the peak intensities and

  9. Motivational Influences on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Bergin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Both transfer and motivation are important constructs accompanied by extensive bodies of literature. However, there is a lack of integration of the 2 constructs. This article analyzes the potential indirect influence of motivational factors on transfer by reviewing studies that examine the influence of motivation on cognitive processes related to…

  10. Influencing Your Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    1993-01-01

    This fifteenth article in a series on the principles of the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics focuses on members using coercive means to influence decisions of colleagues, using an example of a professor trying to influence a colleague to include his name on a research proposal. (LRW)

  11. Can Television Influence People?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simultaneous airing by three commercial networks and influence on viewers' attitudes of The Great American Values Test, a 30-minute informational program designed to affect viewers' values about environmental issues, racial equality, and sexual equality. The program's effectiveness at influencing behavior was proven by a field…

  12. Influence of microstructure on laser damage threshold of IBS coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C.J.; Genin, F.Y.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Long, D.; Lalazari, R.; Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.

    1996-01-05

    Ion-beam sputtering (IBS) coatings were developed for the laser gyro industry to meet significantly different requirements than those of fusion lasers. Laser gyro mirrors are small (< 25 mm) and require low losses (< 30 ppm typical) and high stability with long exposures to low power laser energy. In contrast, fusion laser optics are large (< 1 meter), have significantly reduced loss requirements (< 5,000 ppm) and high damage thresholds (> 26 J/cm{sup 2} at 1,064 nm with 3-ns pulses). As part of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) coating development effort, IBS coatings are being studied to explore the possible benefits of this technology to NIF optics. As an initial step to achieving the NIF size and damage threshold requirements, the coating process is being scaled to uniformly coat a 20 x 40 cm{sup 2} area with reduced spectral, reflected wavefront, and laser damage threshold requirements. Here, multilayer coatings deposited by ion-beam sputtering with amorphous layers were found to have lower damage thresholds at 1,064 nm than similar coatings with crystalline layers. Interestingly, at higher fluences the damage was less severe for the amorphous coatings. The magnitude of the difference in damage thresholds between the two different microstructures was strongly influenced by the size of the tested area. To better understand the microstructure effects, single layers of HfO{sub 2} with different microstructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy, ellipsometry, and a photothermal deflection technique. Since the laser damage initiated at defects, the influence of thermal diffusivity on thermal gradients in nodular defects is also presented.

  13. Influence of the interplanetary shock on the heliocentric radial variations of gradual SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aran, Angels; Jacobs, Carla; Sanahuja, Blai; Poedts, Stefaan; Lario, David; Rodriguez-Gasen, Rosa

    The inclusion of a travelling shock as a source of energetic particles during gradual solar ener-getic particle (SEP) events is a key element to assess the radiation encountered by a mission in the inner heliosphere. We have developed, in the frame of the Solar Energetic Particle Envi-ronment Model (SEPEM) project, a new two dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to describe the shock propagation from 4 solar radii up to 1.6 AU. The outputs of this model are used to simulate the transport of SEPs from the shock front up to a given observer. The combination of the shock and particle transport models allows us to study the influence of both the shock properties and the observer's magnetic connection on the radial and longitudinal variation of proton peak intensities and fluences in gradual SEP events. We have simulated the propagation of six shocks characterized by three different transit times to 1 AU and two different angular widths (narrow and wide). Two sets of spacecraft are placed along two nominal interplanetary magnetic field lines in the undisturbed solar wind but at different radial distances from the Sun. The two observers at 1 AU are located at central meridian and western positions with respect to the nose of each shock. For each spacecraft, synthetic proton time-intensity profiles at several energies (1.0 < E < 128 MeV) are produced. By tracking the shock from close to the Sun, we obtain the peak intensity of high energy particles at the prompt component of the SEP events, without assuming ad-hoc conditions for particle injection at the corona. We discuss how the resulting power-law dependences of the peak intensities (and fluences) on the observer's radial distance vary with the particle energy, the characteristics of the shock, and the different evolving conditions for particle injection at the cobpoint.

  14. Radiation hardness of Efratom M-100 rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T. C.; Vorwerk, H.; Rudie, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on rubidium gas cell frequency standards and components are presented, including the results of recent tests where a continuously operating rubidium frequency standard (Effratom, Model M-100) was subjected to simultaneous neutron/gamma radiation. At the highest neutron fluence 7.5 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm and total dose 11 krad(Si) tested, the unit operated satisfactorily; the total frequency change over the 2 1/2 hour test period due to all causes, including repeated retraction from and insertion into the reactor, was less than 1 x 10 to the -10th power. The effects of combined neutron/gamma radiation on rubidium frequency standard physics package components were also studied, and the results are presented.

  15. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; Reinhart, M.; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m-2) and incident ion energy (40 eV) to two different ion fluxes (low flux: 1022 m-2 s-1, high flux: 1024 m-2 s-1). The maximum of deuterium retention was observed at ∼630 K for low flux density and at ∼870 K for high flux density, as indicated from the thermal desorption spectroscopy data (TDS). Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of blisters with a diameter of up to 1 μm which were formed at high flux density and high temperature (1170 K) contrasting with previously reported surface modification results at such exposure conditions.

  16. Influence of plasma impurities on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed in the linear plasma generator PSI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, M.; Kreter, A.; Buzi, L.; Rasinski, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Unterberg, B.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2015-08-01

    The hydrogen retention in fusion reactors can be significantly influenced by the presence of plasma impurities. Earlier studies showed that helium can reduce the retention in tungsten wall materials. This paper gives the results of experiments on this topic in the linear plasma generator PSI-2. Exposures of polycrystalline tungsten samples to a deuterium plasma were performed at low temperatures (380 K) under the variation of the impurity species (He, Ar) and concentration (0-5%). For the experiments with He, the total deuterium fluence was varied between 2 ṡ 1024 m-2 and 2 ṡ 1026 m-2. Subsequently, the surface morphology and deuterium retention were investigated. The results show a reduction of the deuterium retention by a factor of 3 for helium, and an increase by up to 30% for argon. A diffusion model for the helium case was developed, in which a shallow layer of porous helium nanobubble structures reduces the total deuterium content.

  17. Influence of Reinforcement Anisotropy on the Stress Distribution in Tension and Shear of a Fusion Magnet Insulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Raff, S.; Prokopec, R.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic laminate, which consists of half-overlapped wrapped Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcing tapes vacuum-pressure impregnated in a cyanate ester/epoxy blend, is proposed as the insulation system for the ITER Toroidal Field coils. In order to assess its mechanical performance under the actual operating conditions, cryogenic (77 K) tensile and interlaminar shear tests were done after irradiation to the ITER design fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). The data were then used for a Finite Element Method (FEM) stress analysis. We find that the mechanical strength and the fracture behavior as well as the stress distribution and the failure criteria are strongly influenced by the winding direction and the wrapping technique of the reinforcing tapes.

  18. INFLUENCE OF REINFORCEMENT ANISOTROPY ON THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN TENSION AND SHEAR OF A FUSION MAGNET INSULATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Prokopec, R.; Weber, H. W.; Raff, S.

    2008-03-03

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic laminate, which consists of half-overlapped wrapped Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcing tapes vacuum-pressure impregnated in a cyanate ester/epoxy blend, is proposed as the insulation system for the ITER Toroidal Field coils. In order to assess its mechanical performance under the actual operating conditions, cryogenic (77 K) tensile and interlaminar shear tests were done after irradiation to the ITER design fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). The data were then used for a Finite Element Method (FEM) stress analysis. We find that the mechanical strength and the fracture behavior as well as the stress distribution and the failure criteria are strongly influenced by the winding direction and the wrapping technique of the reinforcing tapes.

  19. Influencing choice without awareness.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jay A; Amlani, Alym A; Raz, Amir; Rensink, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Forcing occurs when a magician influences the audience's decisions without their awareness. To investigate the mechanisms behind this effect, we examined several stimulus and personality predictors. In Study 1, a magician flipped through a deck of playing cards while participants were asked to choose one. Although the magician could influence the choice almost every time (98%), relatively few (9%) noticed this influence. In Study 2, participants observed rapid series of cards on a computer, with one target card shown longer than the rest. We expected people would tend to choose this card without noticing that it was shown longest. Both stimulus and personality factors predicted the choice of card, depending on whether the influence was noticed. These results show that combining real-world and laboratory research can be a powerful way to study magic and can provide new methods to study the feeling of free will. PMID:25666736

  20. Influence of electronic energy deposition on the structural modification of swift heavy-ion-irradiated amorphous germanium layers

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, T.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wesch, W.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Sprouster, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-02-01

    Swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers leads to a strong volume expansion accompanied by a nonsaturating irreversible plastic deformation (ion hammering), which are consequences of the high local electronic energy deposition within the region of the a-Ge layer. We present a detailed study of the influence of SHI irradiation parameters on the effect of plastic deformation and structural modification. Specially prepared a-Ge layers were irradiated using two SHI energies and different angles of incidence, thus resulting in a variation of the electronic energy deposition per depth {epsilon}{sub e} between 14.0 and 38.6 keV nm{sup -1}. For all irradiation parameters used a strong swelling of the irradiated material was observed, which is caused by the formation and growth of randomly distributed voids, leading to a gradual transformation of the amorphous layer into a sponge-like porous structure as established by cross-section scanning electron microscopy investigations. The swelling depends linearly on the ion fluence and on the value of {epsilon}{sub e}, thus clearly demonstrating that the structural changes are determined solely by the electronic energy deposited within the amorphous layer. Plastic deformation shows a superlinear dependence on the ion fluence due to the simultaneous volume expansion. This influence of structural modification on plastic deformation is described by a simple approach, thus allowing estimation of the deformation yield. With these results the threshold values of the electronic energy deposition for the onset of both structural modification and plastic deformation due to SHI irradiation are determined. Furthermore, based on these results, the longstanding question concerning the reason for the structural modification observed in SHI-irradiated crystalline Ge is answered.

  1. Influences in Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Glenys G., Ed.; Leeper, Robert R., Ed.

    This report contains conference addresses that (1) deal with social and psychological forces influencing curriculum change and (2) discuss actual changes now taking place in a number of subject fields. Insights into the forces acting on the curriculum are presented by the authors of Part I. Arthur W. Foshay challenges educators to recognize the…

  2. Status, Numbers and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, David; Savage, Scott V.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model of social influence in n-person groups. We argue that disagreement between group members introduces uncertainty into the social situation, and this uncertainty motivates people to use status characteristics to evaluate the merits of a particular opinion. Our model takes the numerical distribution of opinions and the…

  3. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  4. Sewage bacteriophage inactivation by cationic porphyrins: influence of light parameters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Carvalho, Carla M B; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, João P C; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2010-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of targeted photosensitizers. Although the photoinactivation of microorganisms has already been studied under different conditions, a systematic evaluation of irradiation characteristics is still limited. The goal of this study was to test how the light dose, fluence rate and irradiation source affect the viral photoinactivation of a T4-like sewage bacteriophage. The experiments were carried out using white PAR light delivered by fluorescent PAR lamps (40 W m(-2)), sun light (600 W m(-2)) and an halogen lamp (40-1690 W m(-2)). Phage suspensions and two cationic photosensitizers (Tetra-Py(+)-Me, Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF) at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 microM were used. The results showed that the efficacy of the bacteriophage photoinactivation is correlated not only with the sensitizer and its concentration but also with the light source, energy dose and fluence rate applied. Both photosensitizers at 5.0 microM were able to inactivate the T4-like phage to the limit of detection for each light source and fluence rate. However, depending of the light parameters, different irradiation times are required. The efficiency of photoinactivation is dependent on the spectral emission distribution of the light sources used. Considering the same light source and a fixed light dose applied at different fluence rates, phage inactivation was significantly higher when low fluence rates were used. In this way, the light source, fluence rate and total light dose play an important role in the effectiveness of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and should always be considered when establishing an optimal antimicrobial protocol. PMID:20563346

  5. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  6. Family Influences and Unconscious Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fanita

    2001-01-01

    Drives for survival, expression, and quiescence influence early human development and continue to influence career development throughout life. Turmoil may arise when a drive conflicts with others or is suppressed by other drives. (SK)

  7. Nutritional influences on folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Medrano, J H; Campbell, B K; Webb, R

    2012-08-01

    Folliculogenesis is an intricate process that involves the proliferation and differentiation of both somatic and germ cells. This process depends on complex interactions between systemic factors such as both pituitary gonadotrophins and metabolic hormones and/or local factors produced by the ovarian somatic and germ cells, such as the IGF system and TGF-β superfamily members. In domestic ruminants, follicular development begins during foetal life with formation of primordial follicles from the association of germ cells and pre-granulosa cells. After follicular formation, folliculogenesis begins with a primordial follicle progressing into more developed stages (i.e. primary, secondary, pre-antral and antral) in a continuous, progressive process to either ovulation or, as in most cases, to atresia. Even early stages of follicular formation and subsequent development are influenced by both internal (e.g. genotype) and/or external environmental (e.g. nutrition and season) factors. Among these external factors, nutrition is one of the most important affecting reproductive function, and this is the focus of this review, because other reviews in this issue discuss other environmental factors. A number of studies have now shown that nutrition can have both positive and negative effects on follicular growth, oestrous activity, oocyte quality, blastocyst development and pregnancy outcome. Therefore, understanding the intricate processes involved during folliculogenesis and the ways in which factors, such as nutrition, affect them is leading to new opportunities to improve pregnancy rates by influencing follicle development and oocyte quality. This review will focus on follicular development from foetal to adult stages and the influences that nutrition has during some of these developmental stages. PMID:22827381

  8. Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Little, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  9. Superintendents: The Key Influence Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Randy

    1990-01-01

    By the nature of their positions in schools, administrators are either influence agents or targets. Based on personal interviews with 140 Oregon administrators and a survey of 319 administrators around the state, this article highlights administrators' comments about their administrative influence and about constraints on their influence.…

  10. Influencing the legislative process

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.

    1994-12-31

    This basic premise--that environmental policy results from a multitude of responses to a variety of problems--explains to some extent the general lack of coordination between major environmental protection programs. It also suggests why there has been so much new legislation and regulation in the last decade and a half. Solutions have been proposed and adopted to address a myriad of problems, from leaking underground storage tanks to catastrophic releases of toxic materials. In the absence of broader environmental goals or policy, these individual solutions often gain a life of their own and their passage becomes a high priority for their sponsors. Given this situation, the best way an individual can influence environmental policy is to become involved in solving a problem--in making one`s voice heard in the decision-making process. But influencing the outcome of a decision-making process can be difficult at best, and is impossible without an understanding of the process itself.In addition to knowing the process, it is also important to understand the role played by the professionals involved in the process, the way in which decision makers view the world, and the ways in which a position or opinion on a particular issue can be best brought to the attention of decision makers.

  11. The levers of influence.

    PubMed

    Martin, W

    1999-01-01

    Physicians often determine the demand for health care services, as well as control the clinical processes aimed at improving health outcomes at the individual and population level. Given their important role in enhancing health status and improving the health care delivery system, it is critical that physician executives master the tools necessary to positively influence physician behavior. But changing behavior is far more complex than "doing it or not doing it." The Nike slogan "just do it" is motivating, but over-simplified. The roots of human change include: consciousness-raising, emotional arousal, commitment, helping relationships, self-reevaluation, reward, and environmental control. A model to effectively influence behavior is presented and includes setting clear expectations, measuring and monitoring performance, providing feedback, and rewarding and recognizing improvement. If all else fails, try discipline. This five-step approach is based on the science of human behavior and working with physicians in diverse settings, ranging from academic medical centers to small practices. PMID:10788108

  12. Orientation on understanding interpersonal influence.

    PubMed

    Strickland, B; Arnn, J

    1977-09-01

    Everyone influences and is influenced by others. Are you satisfied with the impact your influence has on others? If not, it can be changed by examining and working on the dimensions of your "style of influence," such as activity, visibility, involvement, and productivity. The author analyzes some of the opposites on a spectrum or "wheel of influence," showing how they may be melded by moderation to achieve the kind of impact you may wish. For instance, there is the analyzer vs. the performer, the leader vs. the follower, the experimenter vs. the organizer, and the asserter vs. the listener. As modes of influence, extremes in any dimension are self-defeating, but by balancing aspects of both sides, desirable "compromises" can be developed. Should you wish to change your style of influence, helfpful procedures to follow are suggested, which, hopefully, will result in satisfying interpersonal relationships and understanding. PMID:886127

  13. Influence of pulse width on the laser ablation of zinc in nitrogen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smijesh, N.; Rao, Kavya H.; Philip, Reji

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of expanding plasma plumes generated by irradiating a solid zinc target with laser pulses of 7 ns and 100 fs durations are carried out in the ambient pressure range of 0.05-200 Torr of nitrogen. At the relatively high input fluence of ~16 J/cm2, fast and slow atomic species are found to appear at different times in the optical time-of-flight (OTOF) spectra, the dynamics of which is primarily determined by the pulse duration of the excitation laser. In fs LPP, the average speed of fast species is unaffected by an increase in ambient pressure, while in ns LPP, the speed is found to reduce with pressure. The slow species shows a sharp peak in the OTOF spectra with a narrow velocity distribution for fs LPP, indicating a large number density and low electron temperature, which is consistent with optical emission spectroscopic (OES) studies. On the other hand, for ns LPP, the OTOF of slow species shows a more broadened profile which can be attributed to strong plume-laser interaction. The dynamics of slow species is heavily influenced by the presence of shock waves, which leads to the occurrence of much slower species at larger pressures.

  14. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  15. Planar laser-induced incandescence of turbulent sooting flames: the influence of beam steering and signal trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. W.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Gu, D. H.; Mahmoud, S. M.; Nathan, G. J.; Dally, B. B.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of beam steering and signal trapping on the accuracy of soot volume fractions measured using planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) has been investigated in turbulent non-premixed sooting flames at atmospheric pressure. In turbulent non-premixed C2H4/air flames, the influence of local de-focusing/focusing of the laser sheet from beam steering can result in the underestimate of the averaged LII signal by 30 %, even when operating within the so-called plateau regime of laser fluence. Beam steering was also found to be significant in both the upstream region of C2H4/air flames and non-reacting C2H4 flows, because the fuel has a relatively high refractive index compared with ambient air. The extent of beam steering at different heights of reacting and isothermal flows as well as its dependence on exit Reynolds number (Re) has been measured. The measurements reveal that even at low turbulence levels (2000 < Re < 3000), beam steering effects can be significant. Also found is that the LII signal at a 450 nm wavelength can be attenuated by a few per cent at high soot loading regions in turbulent flames due to signal trapping. Finally, the feasibility of directly evaluating the signal attenuation via planar LII results was assessed by comparing the virtual soot attenuation calculated based on the planar LII result with that measured using light-of-sight extinction.

  16. How experts gain influence.

    PubMed

    Mikes, Anette; Hall, Matthew; Millo, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    In theory, the risk management groups of two British banks--Saxon and Anglo--had the same influence in their organizations. But in practice, they did not: Saxon's was engaged in critical work throughout the bank, while Anglo's had little visibility outside its areas of expertise. In their study of these two financial institutions, the authors identified four competencies--trailblazing, toolmaking, teamwork, and translation--that help functional leaders or groups compete for top management's limited attention and increase their impact. Anglo's risk managers were strong in only some of the competencies, but Saxon's were strong in all four. They consistently scanned the internal and external environment for important issues to which they could apply a risk management perspective (trailblazing) and then developed tools--such as quarterly risk reports--that spread their expertise (toolmaking). While controlling the tools' design and implementation, the risk managers incorporated business managers' insights (teamwork) and made sure everyone could understand the findings (translation). Ultimately, experts' roles must fit the organization's strategy and structural needs. In some situations, functional experts can raise their profile by cultivating just two of the competencies. But those who are strong in all four are likely to be the most influential. PMID:24730171

  17. Corporate influences on epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Neil

    2008-02-01

    Corporate influences on epidemiology have become stronger and more pervasive in the last few decades, particularly in the contentious fields of pharmacoepidemiology and occupational epidemiology. For every independent epidemiologist studying the side effects of medicines and the hazardous effects of industrial chemicals, there are several other epidemiologists hired by industry to attack the research and to debunk it as 'junk science'. In some instances these activities have gone as far as efforts to block publication. In many instances, academics have accepted industry funding which has not been acknowledged, and only the academic affiliations of the company-funded consultants have been listed. These activities are major threats to the integrity of the field, and its survival as a scientific discipline. There is no simple solution to these problems. However, for the last two decades there has been substantial discussion on ethics in epidemiology, partly in response to the unethical conduct of many industry-funded consultants. Professional organizations, such as the International Epidemiological Association, can play a major role in encouraging and supporting epidemiologists to assert positive principles of how science should work, and how it should be applied to public policy decisions, rather than simply having a list of what not to do. PMID:18245050

  18. Power, Influence Tactics, and Influence Processes in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughton, Marla

    2011-01-01

    Current studies of power, influence tactics, and influence processes in virtual teams assume that these constructs operate in a similar manner as they do in the face-to-face (FtF) environment. However, the virtual context differs from the FtF environment on a variety of dimensions, such as the availability of status cues. The differences between…

  19. Family Structure and Social Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Dawn R.

    Regardless of family form, there is a universal belief that one's family is the most powerful agent of socialization. A sample of 38 junior high school students from single parent and nuclear families completed a questionnaire in order to examine the relative effects of peer influence and family influence in single parent and nuclear families.…

  20. Student Influence and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juola, Arvo E.

    Since 1965, student views and feelings have influenced great changes in higher education, sometimes to the detriment of long-term interests in academic institutions and colleges. One conspicuous recent trend is the desire of college students for more influence, impact, or power. Other prevalent attitudes may be characterized as a desire to be…