Science.gov

Sample records for newborn screening linkage

  1. Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, James J

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of many disorders, mainly inherited, is feasible with population-wide analysis of newborn dried blood spot samples. Phenylketonuria was the prototype disorder for newborn screening (NBS) and early dietary treatment has resulted in vastly improved outcomes for this disorder. Testing for primary hypothyroidism and cystic fibrosis (CF) was later added to NBS programs following the development of robust immunoassays and molecular testing. Current CF testing usually relies on a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation detection strategy. Multiplex testing for approximately 25 inborn errors of metabolism using tandem mass spectrometry is a relatively recent addition to NBS. The simultaneous introduction of many disorders has caused some re-evaluation of the traditional guidelines for NBS, because very rare disorders or disorders without good treatments can be included with minimal effort. NBS tests for many other disorders have been developed, but these are less uniformly applied or are currently considered developmental. This review focuses on Australasian NBS practices. PMID:20498829

  2. Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Screening Newborns Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... of newborns in the U.S. are screened for hearing loss before they leave the hospital. Research improves the ...

  3. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources For Lab Professionals Data and Reports Laboratory Reports National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) Resources ...

  4. Newborn screening in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rustama, Diet S; Fadil, M Ryadi; Harahap, Elly R; Primadi, Aris

    2003-01-01

    In Indonesia, newborn screening is not yet a policy, and the incidence of preventable causes of mental retardation detected by newborn screening is not known. Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is not infrequent. Without a screening program, unrecognized CH patients were neglected for years. Since May 1999, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has assisted in starting a CH Newborn Screening Project to estimate the local incidence of CH and to evaluate the problems associated with the screening. In June 2000, a pilot study was conducted using primary TSH measurement, supplemented by T4 in infants with elevated TSH. The target was to screen 12,000 newborn infants, using cord blood serum taken at birth, or a heel prick between 2 to 6 days of age. Between June 2000 and February 2001, 3,534 neonates born in 4 hospitals were screened using cord blood serum taken at birth (recall rate 3.3%). From March 2001 onwards, the heel prick method was used and participating hospitals increased from 4 to 7. Using this approach, until August 2001, 3,309 samples were analysed and the recall rate was much lower (0.64%). The number of unsatisfactory samples was relatively high due to an unstable process of blood collection. Parental refusal and low acceptance of screening among policy makers resulted from lack of awareness of the dangers of CH, and the screening program was not considered a health priority. Recall of patients after screening was a major barrier, with problems in tracking patients arising from urbanization and a high rate of relocation. To advance the CH screening program nationwide, infrastructure must be improved along with the recall system, and education as well as information campaigns for parents and medical professionals must be intensified. The Department of Health must be persuaded to give a national mandate. PMID:15906701

  5. What's New with Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Newborn screening is the process of testing and screening newborns shortly after birth for certain, potentially dangerous, conditions and/or impairments--conditions that include everything from inborn errors of metabolism and other genetic disorders to hearing impairment. Early detection through newborn screening is paramount, often allowing the…

  6. Screening Newborns' Hearing Now Standard

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance Screening Newborns' Hearing Now ... emailing NIDCDinfo@nidcd.nih.gov . Read More "Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance" Articles At Last: A ...

  7. How Are Newborn Screening Tests Done?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are newborn screening tests done? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Newborn screening typically consists of a blood test and a ...

  8. Pilot Programs in Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pass, Kenneth; Green, Nancy S.; Lorey, Fred; Sherwin, John; Comeau, Anne Marie

    2006-01-01

    The term "pilot study" has been used over the years to describe the evaluation of the many elements involved in deciding whether a proposed condition should be added to a newborn screening (NBS) panel, and until recently, was unilaterally used to describe the evaluation of the assay to be used before the condition was officially adopted by a state…

  9. MedlinePlus: Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phenylketonuria National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Newborn Screening is the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Languages Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) ...

  10. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... at least 26 disorders on an expanded and standardized uniform panel. The most thorough screening panel checks ... diagnose illnesses. They show which babies need more testing to confirm or rule out illnesses. If follow- ...

  11. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  12. Newborn Screening: Characteristics of State Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toiv, Helene F.; Austin, Janina; Gardiner, Emily Gamble; Tynan, Ann; Hill, Ariel; Milne, Kevin; Moon, Cindy; Lawes, Susan

    Each year, state newborn screening programs test 4 million newborns for disorders that require early detection and treatment to prevent serious illness or death. The U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to provide Congress with information on variations among state newborn screening programs. Based on surveys of such programs in all 50…

  13. Newborn Hearing Screening in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Daniel; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review The objectives of this review are to provide the reader with a current and concise review of the data and trends in universal newborn hearing screening(UNHS). Within a relatively short period of time, the concept of screening all infants for hearing loss at the time of birth has evolved from a nascent process to a truly universal system in most developed countries. As a result, the focus and challenges of UNHS have shifted to topics of developing ever more efficient and cost-effective approaches and potentially melding physiologic hearing screenings with ancillary screening techniques. Recent Findings Enhancement of the UNHS process is likely to be accomplished by implementation of novel tools such as wideband reflectance technologies and intelligent incorporation of screening for common genetic and viral causes of congenital hearing loss. Summary With such a rapidly evolving process, it will be critical for clinicians to understand the benefits and limitations of various newborn hearing screening methodologies in order to determine the most appropriate management of children referred from their UNHS. This will entail a working knowledge of emerging audiologic tools as well as infectious and genetic etiologies of pediatric hearing loss. PMID:20808221

  14. Newborn Screening for Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Newborn screening for fragile X syndrome (FXS) is technically possible, and in the relatively near future accurate and inexpensive screening technologies are likely to be available. When that happens, will America's public health system adopt newborn screening for fragile X syndrome? This article addresses this issue by first placing screening for…

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  16. National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... GENERAL INFORMATION Conditions Screened by US Programs General Resources Genetics Birth Defects Hearing Screening FOR PROFESSIONALS ACT Sheets(ACMG) General Resources Newborn Screening Genetics Birth Defects FOR FAMILIES FAQs ...

  17. Update: newborn screening for endocrinopathies.

    PubMed

    Pass, Kenneth A; Neto, Eurico Carmago

    2009-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are included in many newborn screening (NBS) panels worldwide and in all state-sponsored programs in the United States. Both conditions meet the fundamental prerequisites for NBS: high incidence in the population; biomarkers in the dried blood specimen that are easily detected; and, effective therapies to lessen, if not prevent, the sequelae of late or no treatment. In this review, the history of NBS is discussed for these 2 conditions. The technologies and protocols used in their detection, and related subjects such as genetics, and treatment and outcomes, are also discussed. PMID:19944295

  18. Newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2006-11-01

    Most neonates born with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) have normal appearance and no detectable physical signs. Hypothyroidism in the newborn period is almost always overlooked and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Blood spot T4 or TSH or both can be used in neonatal screening for CH. The latter, which is more sensitive, is not cost effective, so the first two are used in different programs in the world. TSH screening was shown to be more specific in the diagnosis of CH; T4 screening is more sensitive in detecting newborns especially with rare hypothalamic-pituitary hypothyroidism, but less specific with a high frequency of false positives mainly in low birth weight and premature infants. The time at which the sample is taken may vary between centers, with the majority taking blood from a heel prick after 24 hours of age to minimize the false positive high TSH due to the physiological neonatal TSH surge that elevates TSH levels and causes dynamic T4 and T3 changes in the first 1 or 2 days after birth. Early discharge of mothers postpartum has increased the ratio of false positive TSH elevations. Although transient hypothyroidism may occur frequently, all suspected infants should be treated as having CH for the first 3 years of life, taking into account the risks of mental retardation. A reevaluation after 3 years is needed in such patients. The goal of initial therapy in CH is to minimize neonatal central nervous system exposure to hypothyroidism by normalizing thyroid function, as reflected by T4 and TSH levels, as rapidly as possible. Iodine deficiency is the most important cause of CH worldwide. Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis and is present in soil, water and air. Prevention of iodine deficiency can be by iodized salt, iodized oil, iodized bread or iodine tablets. PMID:17220056

  19. Newborn Screening (NBS): Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... FREE ADDITONAL NEWBORN SCREENING PACKETS What is Newborn Screening (NBS)? NBS is a system that helps tell ... the condition. What are the benefits of Newborn Screening? Early detection of disorders and conditions detectable through ...

  20. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Matern, Dietrich; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Oglesbee, Devin; Raymond, Kimiyo; Rinaldo, Piero; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Every newborn in the U.S. is screened for at least 29 disorders, where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion in newborn screening programs. Among those are several lysosomal storage disorders that have been evaluated in limited pilot studies or that are already included in a few national or international newborn screening programs. These conditions include Pompe disease, Niemann-Pick type A/B disease, Fabry disease, Krabbe disease, Mucopolysaccharidoses types I and II, and Gaucher disease. Here, we review the current state of newborn screening for these lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:25891428

  1. The Clinical Aspects of Newborn Screening: Importance of Newborn Screening Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Philip M.; Levy, Harvey L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of newborn screening is to identify presymptomatic healthy infants that will develop significant metabolic or endocrine derangements if left undiagnosed and untreated. The goal of ultimately reducing or eliminating irreversible sequelae is reached by maximizing test sensitivity of the primary newborn screening that measures specific…

  2. NICHD research initiative in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Duane; Hanson, James W

    2006-01-01

    Recent changes in genetics research have created new opportunities to improve the scope and quality of newborn screening services. Changes in newborn screening should be supported and directed by an organized program of research. The NICHD Research Initiative in Newborn Screening includes the development of systematic methods to identify additional conditions appropriate for newborn screening; development and testing innovative interventions and treatments to improve outcomes; education of the provider workforce; development and implementation of appropriate information and communication systems for parents and providers; and, sponsoring an ongoing program of research and research training. Future needs will include the development of a national translational research infrastructure, prevention research and research into behavioral and social sciences issues. The NICHD Research Initiative in Newborn Screening is expected to be an ongoing and vital initiative that adapts itself to new scientific findings, technological developments, changes in the public and personal health care system, and our evolving understanding of the needs of affected individuals, families and the community. PMID:17183575

  3. Newborn screening education on the internet: a content analysis of North American newborn screening program websites.

    PubMed

    Araia, Makda H; Potter, Beth K

    2011-09-01

    The Internet is a potentially important medium for communication about public health programs including newborn screening. This study explores whether the information available on official newborn screening program websites is consistent with existing guidelines regarding educational content for parents. We conducted a systematic search of the public websites of newborn screening programs in the US and Canada, identifying web pages and downloadable brochures that contained educational information. Two researchers independently reviewed all documents to determine the extent to which they included 14 key recommended educational messages. We identified 85 documents containing educational information on 46 US and 6 Canadian newborn screening program websites. The documents contained from 1 to 14 of the recommended messages. The majority of identified materials emphasized the importance and benefits of screening. The differences between US and Canadian materials were related to the importance of parental involvement in follow-up and issues of consent and storage of blood spots. Our findings are consistent with studies of non-web-based newborn screening education materials. The results emphasize the need for further evaluation of newborn screening education, including internet-based resources, particularly in terms of the impact of particular messages on parental attitudes and behaviors. PMID:22109819

  4. National Evaluation of US Newborn Screening System Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrell, Bradford L.; Hannon, W. Harry

    2006-01-01

    Newborn screening has existed as a state-based public health service since the early 1960s. Every state and most territorial jurisdictions have comprehensive newborn screening programs in place, but in the United States a national newborn screening policy does not exist. This results in different administrative infrastructures, screening…

  5. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Hattori, Kiyoko; Endo, Fumio

    2011-02-15

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles containing acid hydrolases that degrade biological macromolecules. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are caused by absent activity of one or more of these enzymes due to mutations of genes encoding lysosomal hydrolases or enzymes that process, target, and transport these enzymes. The specific signs and symptoms of each LSD derive from the type of material accumulated within the lysosome, the site (organ) of accumulation and the response of the body (sometimes in the form of an inflammatory or immune response) to the accumulated material. Interest for inclusion of these disorders in newborn screening programs derives from the availability of effective therapy in the form of enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy and bone marrow transplant that may improve long-term outcome especially if started prior to irreversible organ damage. Based on the availability of therapy and suitable screening methods, Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease, mucopolysaccharidosis I and II, Niemann-Pick disease, and Krabbe disease are candidates for newborn screening. Pilot newborn screening projects have been performed for some of these conditions that indicate the feasibility of this approach. This review will provide insight into these screening strategies and discuss their advantages and limitations. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21312327

  6. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Other Neuronopathic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or…

  7. Newborn Screening To Prevent Mental Retardation. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This information fact sheet on screening newborns to prevent mental retardation defines newborn screening and outlines how screening is performed. It discusses the six most common disorders resulting in mental retardation for which states most commonly screen. These include phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, galactosemia, maple syrup…

  8. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Peter J; Grasby, Dallas J; Dean, Caroline J; Lang, Debbie L; Bockmann, Michelle; Whittle, Alison M; Fietz, Michael J; Simonsen, Henrik; Fuller, Maria; Brooks, Douglas A; Hopwood, John J

    2006-08-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are chronic progressive diseases that have a devastating impact on the patient and family. Most patients are clinically normal at birth but develop symptoms early in childhood. Despite no curative treatment, a number of therapeutic options are available to improve quality of life. To achieve this, there is a pressing need for newborn screening to identify affected individuals early, before the onset of severe irreversible pathology. We have developed a multiplexed immune-quantification assay of 11 different lysosomal proteins for the identification of individuals with an LSD and evaluated this assay in a retrospective study using blood-spots from; newborns subsequently diagnosed with an LSD (n=19, six different LSD), individuals sampled after diagnosis of an LSD (n=92, 11 different LSD), newborn controls (n=433), and adult controls (n=200). All patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), MPS II, MPS IIIA, MPS VI, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann-Pick disease type A/B, and multiple sulfatase deficiency could be identified by reduced enzyme levels compared to controls. All mucolipidosis type II/III patients were identified by the elevation of several lysosomal enzymes, above the control range. Most Fabry, Pompe, and Gaucher disease patients were identified from either single protein differences or profiles of multiple protein markers. Newborn screening for multiple LSD is achievable using multiplexed immune-quantification of a panel of lysosomal proteins. With further validation, this method could be readily incorporated into existing screening laboratories and will have a substantial impact on patient management and counseling of families. PMID:16600651

  9. Newborn screening for neuropathic lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Lee, Ni-Chung

    2010-08-01

    Interest in newborn screening (NBS) for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) has increased significantly due to newly developed enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the need for early diagnosis, and advances in technical developments. Since the central nervous system cannot be treated by ERT, neuronopathic LSDs are generally not the primary target of NBS. An exception is Krabbe disease, in which hematopoietic stem cell transplantation before the onset of symptoms has benefits. However, NBS for LSD relies on measuring enzyme activities, so the most severely affected individuals (usually patients with neuronopathic subtypes) will be detected together with patients with less severe disease. In the near future, NBS is likely to be developed for diseases such as Gaucher, Niemann-Pick A/B, and certain mucopolysaccharidoses. The ability to predict phenotypes (neuronopathic or not) by enzyme activity and genotyping will therefore be critical for adequate patient management. This article reviews the status of LSD screening and issues concerning detection of neuronopathic LSDs by screening. PMID:20532820

  10. Cystic fibrosis: newborn screening in America.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Daniel T; McCudden, Christopher R; Willis, Monte S

    2008-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, manifesting as progressive lung dysfunction, pancreatic insufficiency, and intestinal disease. CF was traditionally diagnosed clinically, either because of a family history or occurrence of meconium ileus, or as a result of intestinal malabsorption and chronic pulmonary disease. In 1979, it was discovered that immunoreactive trypsinogen was increased in neonatal dried-blood specimens on Guthrie cards, making it possible to screen neonates. During the past decades, survival rates of patients with CF have improved significantly (see Figure 5). To continue this progress, universal newborn screening has been implemented in many states as an addition to the arsenal of therapies and strategies to improve survival. National newborn-screening programs to identify CF patients after birth have been adopted for a number of years in Europe, Australia, and Canada. As expected, many benefits have been seen due to the early identification of CF patients, including improved survival, better lung function and growth with less intensive therapy, and reduced cost of therapy. To date, 37 states in the United States have adopted similar programs, in the hopes of improving CF outcomes. This welcome trend should help improve the lives of CF patients living in America. PMID:18717498

  11. Emergency preparedness for newborn screening and genetic services.

    PubMed

    Pass, Kenneth A; Thoene, Jess; Watson, Michael S

    2009-06-01

    Patients identified in newborn screening programs can be among the most vulnerable during a disaster due to their need to have prompt diagnosis and medical management. Recent disasters have challenged the ability of newborn screening programs to maintain the needed continuity during emergency situations. This has significant implications for the newborn screening laboratories, the diagnostic confirmation providers, and the patients who either require diagnosis or maintenance of their therapeutic interventions. In 2007, the National Coordinating Center (NCC) for the Regional Genetics and Newborn Screening Collaboratives (RCs) sponsored a meeting involving representatives of the Regional Genetics and Newborn Screening Collaborative Groups, state newborn screening programs, providers of diagnosis and confirmation services, manufacturers of equipment, medical foods, and other treatments used in patients identified in newborn screening programs, and individuals from agencies involved in disaster response including the National Disaster Medical Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and others. In addition to developing contingency plans for newborn screening, we have considered other uses of genetics as it is used in DNA-based kinship identification of mass casualties. The meeting resulted in the description of a wide range of issues facing newborn screening programs, provider groups, and patients for which emergency preparedness development is needed in order that appropriate response is enabled. PMID:19444127

  12. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is worldwide interest in newborn screening for lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that give better results when carried out early in life. Screens with high differentiation between affected and nonaffected individuals are critical because of the large number of potential false positives. CONTENT This review summarizes 3 screening methods: (a) direct assay of enzymatic activities using tandem mass spectrometry or fluorometry, (b) immunocapture-based measurement of lysosomal enzyme abundance, and (c) measurement of biomarkers. Assay performance is compared on the basis of small-scale studies as well as on large-scale pilot studies of mass spectrometric and fluorometric screens. SUMMARY Tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry techniques for direct assay of lysosomal enzymatic activity in dried blood spots have emerged as the most studied approaches. Comparative mass spectrometry vs fluorometry studies show that the former better differentiates between nonaffected vs affected individuals. This in turn leads to a manageable number of screen positives that can be further evaluated with second-tier methods. PMID:25477536

  13. Screening Newborns | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant hearing screening programs. In December 2010, President Obama expanded the funding to include diagnostic services. Now, ... 98% of newborns are screened annually. 2010 President Obama signs the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act ...

  14. What Disorders Are Newborns Screened for in the United States?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most appropriate application of universal newborn screening tests, technologies, policies, guidelines, and standards. A complete list of the conditions screened for in each state can be found at Baby's First Test . What are some examples of the benefits of ...

  15. Universal Newborn Screening and Adverse Medical Outcomes: A Historical Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Seider, Michael I.; Dunn, Angela C.

    2006-01-01

    Universal newborn screening programs for metabolic disorders are typically described as a triumph of medicine and public policy in the US over the last 50 years. Advances in science and technology, including the Human Genome Project, offer the opportunity to expand universal newborn screening programs to include many additional metabolic and…

  16. Newborn screening progress in developing countries--overcoming internal barriers.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Carmencita D; Krotoski, Danuta; Therrell, Bradford L

    2010-04-01

    Newborn screening is an important public health measure aimed at early identification and management of affected newborns thereby lowering infant morbidity and mortality. It is a comprehensive system of education, screening, follow-up, diagnosis, treatment/management, and evaluation that must be institutionalized and sustained within public health systems often challenged by economic, political, and cultural considerations. As a result, developing countries face unique challenges in implementing and expanding newborn screening that can be grouped into the following categories: (1) planning, (2) leadership, (3) medical support, (4) technical support, (5) logistical support, (6) education, (7) protocol and policy development, (8) administration, (9) evaluation, and (10) sustainability. We review some of the experiences in overcoming implementation challenges in developing newborn screening programs, and discuss recent efforts to encourage increased newborn screening through support networking and information exchange activities in 2 regions-the Asia Pacific and the Middle East/North Africa. PMID:20207264

  17. [Newborn screening : the point of view of the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    De Laet, C; Laeremans, H; Ferster, A; Gulbis, B; Mansbach, A-L; Jonniaux, E; Regal, L; Goyens, P

    2015-09-01

    Newborn screening is a public health effort that has changed the prognosis of some congenital diseases. Newborn screening programmes differ between countries in which it is organized. Demographic, epidemiological or economic factors play a role in the choice of the screening panel. In the French Community of Belgium, the programme focuses on 13 metabolic and endocrine diseases, hearing loss and hemoglobinopathies (Brussels and Liege). Newborn screening is a complex process that requires the involvement of all stakeholders : parent information, blood sampling or testing, lab analysis, follow-up of the results, initiate adequate care in case of positive test and genetic counselling. Newborn screening programmes will evolve in the next years. New therapeutic and diagnostic methods will make other genetic diseases candidates for screening. Whole genome sequencing may be the next expansion; it will create new opportunities but will pose new ethical dilemmas. We must all prepare now for future challenges. PMID:26591303

  18. Newborn Screening: What Does the Emergency Physician Need to Know?

    PubMed

    Lavin, Lindsay Roofe; Higby, Nicholas; Abramo, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Newborn screening programs were established in the United States in the early 1960s. Newborn screening programs were then developed by states and have continued to be the responsibility of the state. All states require a newborn screening, but what is required of these programs and screening panels has differed greatly by state. Historically, the most commonly screened disorders are the following: congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, sickle cell disease and associated hemoglobinopathies, biotinidase deficiency, galactosemia, cystic fibrosis and phenylketonuria, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. However, under new guidelines in 2006 and with new advances in technology, the scope of newborn screening programs has expanded to include at a minimum 9 organic acidurias, 5 fatty acid oxidation disorders, 3 hemoglobinopathies, and 6 other conditions. This CME article reviews the logistics of newborn screening and explores the effect of new technology and recent policy on state screens and what that means for providers. This article also highlights several of the disorders most relevant to emergency room physicians and discusses future considerations of newborn screening. PMID:26335232

  19. National evaluation of US newborn screening system components.

    PubMed

    Therrell, Bradford L; Hannon, W Harry

    2006-01-01

    Newborn screening has existed as a state-based public health service since the early 1960s. Every state and most territorial jurisdictions have comprehensive newborn screening programs in place, but in the United States a national newborn screening policy does not exist. This results in different administrative infrastructures, screening requirements, laboratory and follow-up services, medical management approaches, and related activities across the country. Federal initiatives and support have contributed to limited evaluations of various aspects of individual newborn screening programs at the national level, but funding is an issue. The national evaluation strategies have taken various forms, all with the intent of improving the screening system through review of actions taken and suggestions for future improvements. While participation in the national evaluation effort for newborn screening laboratory practices includes all US programs, and this has aided in improving quality and harmonizing protocols, other national evaluation activities have been only moderately successful. National data reporting of quality indicators for various program elements must be comprehensive and timely, and the elements must be universally accepted in order to meet the evaluation and improvement needs of the national newborn screening system. A comprehensive real time national evaluation activity will likely require additional resources and enforcement incentives. Limited federal actions through grant incentives and selected reporting requirements provide a possible means of stimulating programs to participate in national harmonization efforts. PMID:17183567

  20. Conference on Newborn Hearing Screening; Proceedings Summary and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Presented in the conference proceedings are schedule and list of participants, seven major papers, and the newborn hearing screening recommendations of the interdisciplinary conference on newborn hearing and early identification of hearing impairment. Neonatal auditory testing is reviewed by Sanford E. Gerber, and Sheldon B. Korones gives a…

  1. Newborn screening cards: a legal quagmire.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Diana M; Studdert, David M

    2011-03-21

    Newborn screening (NBS) programs are a well established and cost-effective method for early identification of genetic disorders. However, a raft of legal questions surrounds the collection, storage, ownership and secondary use of NBS cards. The absence of clear legal rules governing NBS programs in Australia means that there are few straightforward answers to these questions. A series of controversial incidents have exposed this uncertainty in Australia, and remarkably similar controversies have occurred in the United States and European Union. We review the situation, using Victoria as a case study. We also make the case for a dedicated regulatory regime for NBS programs, arguing that the lack of such a regime threatens public trust and the robust operation of NBS programs in Australia. New rules would likely introduce stricter requirements for informed consent at the point of blood collection than has been the norm to date. However, the scope for use of cards in research could expand rather than contract, and it may be possible to reduce the risk that vast card archives will need to be destroyed in response to future public outcries. PMID:21426290

  2. Cystic fibrosis newborn screening: a model for neuromuscular disease screening?

    PubMed

    Scully, Michele A; Farrell, Philip M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Griggs, Robert C; Kwon, Jennifer M

    2015-02-01

    Congenital neuromuscular disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), and Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency [AMD]), are candidates for universal newborn screening (NBS). In this article, we discuss the future path of NBS for these disorders with particular emphasis on DMD NBS, because of the likely approval of new gene-modifying treatments, the possible benefits of earlier treatment with corticosteroids, and the recently demonstrated feasibility of a 2-tiered approach to NBS with screening by creatine kinase (CK) levels in dried blood spots followed by mutation detection in those with elevated CK. The cystic fibrosis (CF) NBS program is a successful model for NBS. CF outcomes have consistently improved into adulthood following introduction of CF NBS because considerable resources have been devoted to practices that include: attention to improving laboratory screening, consistent confirmatory testing and immediate referral of all newly diagnosed infants to designated CF care centers that follow established practice guidelines, and ongoing evaluation of CF care centers via a centralized clinical database. Like CF, DMD, SMA, and infantile AMD are inexorably debilitating and require lifetime multidisciplinary clinical management. NBS would address the delays in diagnosis that prevent patients from receiving timely treatments. Standardized care following early diagnosis would reduce disparities in clinical care and outcomes. NBS in these neuromuscular disorders should be implemented, utilizing lessons learned from the past 20 years of CF NBS: standardized protocols for all patients identified by DMD NBS, longitudinal follow-up in multidisciplinary clinics, and coordinated oversight of these clinics. PMID:25425541

  3. Whole-Genome Screening of Newborns? The Constitutional Boundaries of State Newborn Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    King, Jaime S.; Smith, Monica E.

    2016-01-01

    State newborn screening (NBS) programs routinely screen nearly all of the 4 million newborns in the United States each year for ~30 primary conditions and a number of secondary conditions. NBS could be on the cusp of an unprecedented expansion as a result of advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS). As WGS becomes cheaper and easier and as our knowledge and understanding of human genetics expand, the question of whether WGS has a role to play in state NBS programs becomes increasingly relevant and complex. As geneticists and state public health officials begin to contemplate the technical and procedural details of whether WGS could benefit existing NBS programs, this is an opportune time to revisit the legal framework of state NBS programs. In this article, we examine the constitutional underpinnings of state-mandated NBS and explore the range of current state statutes and regulations that govern the programs. We consider the legal refinements that will be needed to keep state NBS programs within constitutional bounds, focusing on 2 areas of concern: consent procedures and the criteria used to select new conditions for NBS panels. We conclude by providing options for states to consider when contemplating the use of WGS for NBS. PMID:26729704

  4. Lessons Learned From Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Aucott, Susan W; Glidewell, Jill; Hackell, Jesse; Kochilas, Lazaros; Martin, Gerard R; Phillippi, Julia; Pinto, Nelangi M; Saarinen, Annamarie; Sontag, Marci; Kemper, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Newborn screening for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Within 4 years, 46 states and the District of Columbia had adopted it into their newborn screening program, leading to CCHD screening being nearly universal in the United States. This rapid adoption occurred while there were still questions about the effectiveness of the recommended screening protocol and barriers to follow-up for infants with a positive screen. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with the American Academy of Pediatrics to convene an expert panel between January and September 2015 representing a broad array of primary care, neonatology, pediatric cardiology, nursing, midwifery, public health, and advocacy communities. The panel's goal was to review current practices in newborn screening for CCHD and to identify opportunities for improvement. In this article, we describe the experience of CCHD screening in the United States with regard to: (1) identifying the target lesions for CCHD screening; (2) optimizing the algorithm for screening; (3) determining state-level challenges to implementation and surveillance of CCHD; (4) educating all stakeholders; (5) performing screening using the proper equipment and in a cost-effective manner; and (6) implementing screening in special settings such as the NICU, out-of-hospital settings, and areas of high altitude. PMID:27244826

  5. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Other Neuronopathic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion into NBS programs. Among those are several conditions with a strong neuronopathic component. Some of these conditions have already been added to a few national and international screening programs, whereas others are undergoing pilot studies to determine the test performance metrics. Here, we review the current state of NBS for 13 lysosomal storage disorders, X-adrenoleukodystrophy, Wilson disease, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:23798012

  6. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders and other neuronopathic conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Dietrich; Oglesbee, Devin; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion into NBS programs. Among those are several conditions with a strong neuronopathic component. Some of these conditions have already been added to a few national and international screening programs, whereas others are undergoing pilot studies to determine the test performance metrics. Here, we review the current state of NBS for 13 lysosomal storage disorders, X-adrenoleukodystrophy, Wilson disease, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:23798012

  7. Digital Microfluidics: A Future Technology in the Newborn Screening Laboratory?

    PubMed Central

    Millington, David S.; Sista, Ramakrishna; Eckhardt, Allen; Rouse, Jeremy; Bali, Deeksha; Goldberg, Ronald; Cotten, Michael; Buckley, Rebecca; Pamula, Vamsee

    2010-01-01

    Expansion of newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders using tandem mass spectrometry has generated interest in screening for other treatable conditions, including lysosomal storage diseases. Limitations to expansion include labor and equipment costs. We describe a cost-effective new platform that reduces the time to result reporting and can perform multiplexing assays requiring different platforms. Immunoassays and enzyme activity assays currently used in newborn screening have been translated to a disposable microchip programmed to dispense, transport, mix, wash, and incubate individual microdroplets from specimens, including dried blood spot extracts, and reagents all under software control. The specimen and reagents consumed are approximately 1% of those required by equivalent bench assays. In addition to immunologic and enzymatic assays, DNA amplification, amplicon detection, and sequencing have been demonstrated using the same microchips and control equipment. Recently, the multiplexing of 4 different enzyme activities has also been demonstrated with negligible cross-contamination. We review assays relevant to newborn screening. PMID:20207266

  8. Newborn Sickle Cell Screening: Benefits and Burdens Realized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Peter T.; Huntzinger, Donna J.

    1983-01-01

    Follow-up data on a program that screened 17 newborns for sickle cell anemia suggests that in order to derive maximum benefit from such screening physicians need to better understand the differential diagnosis, treatment, and inheritance of sickle cell disease, and individual guidance must be provided to families. (GC)

  9. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels in newborn screening blood samples.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A F; Holton, J B; Burman, D; Colley, J R

    1983-01-01

    A previously described difference in newborn blood phenylalanine concentrations between those living in urban and non-urban areas in the south west of England has been confirmed and shown to be independent of the type of feed. Several factors including the place of abode, type of feed, birthweight, and the accuracy of the test have been found to affect the measured, phenylalanine concentration in the newborn screening blood spot, and the importance of these results to screening practice is considered. Blood tyrosine also varied with the above factors, but severe, neonatal tyrosinaemia was shown to be a rare problem. PMID:6847230

  10. Cost Analysis of TEOAE-Based Universal Newborn Hearing Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weirather, Yusnita; Korth, Nancy; White, Karl R.; Woods-Kershner, Nancy; Downs, Diane

    1997-01-01

    After reviewing the extant literature, this article describes a cost analysis of the transient evoked otoaoustic emissions (TEOAE)-based universal newborn hearing screening program. Reasons why the cost per baby ($7.42) is lower than in previous reports are explained and the benefits of having accurate cost analysis data are summarized. (Author/CR)

  11. Newborn Hearing Screening: An Analysis of Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, K. Todd; Bradham, Tamala S.; Munoz, Karen F.; Guignard, Gayla Hutsell

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that consisted of 12 evaluative areas of EHDI programs. For the newborn hearing screening area, a total of 293 items were listed by 49 EHDI coordinators, and themes were identified within…

  12. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  13. Expanding Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Disorders: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Darrel J.; Tan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and…

  14. Appropriateness of Newborn Screening for α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Teckman, Jeffrey; Pardee, Erin; Howell, R. Rodney; Mannino, David; Sharp, Richard R.; Brantly, Mark; Wanner, Adam; Lamson, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The Alpha-1 Foundation convened a workshop to consider the appropriateness of newborn screening for α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. Methods: A review of natural history and technical data was conducted. Results: Homozygous ZZ AAT deficiency is a common genetic disease occurring in 1 in 2000 to 3500 births; however, it is underrecognized and most patients are undiagnosed. AAT deficiency can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver failure in children and adults, and lung disease in adults. The clinical course is highly variable. Some neonates present with cholestatic hepatitis and some children require liver transplantation, but many patients remain well into adulthood. Some adults develop emphysema. There is no treatment for AAT liver disease, other than supportive care and liver transplant. There are no data on the effect of early diagnosis on liver disease. Avoidance of smoking is of proven benefit to reduce future lung disease, as is protein replacement therapy. Justifying newborn screening with the aim of reducing smoking and reducing adult lung disease-years in the future would be a significant paradigm shift for the screening field. Recent passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and the Affordable Care Act may have a major effect on reducing the psychosocial and financial risks of newborn screening because many asymptomatic children would be identified. Data on the risk–benefit ratio of screening in the new legal climate are lacking. Conclusions: Workshop participants recommended a series of pilot studies focused on generating new data on the risks and benefits of newborn screening. PMID:24121147

  15. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Taraka R.; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Atwal, Paldeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis. PMID:27114915

  16. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis. PMID:27114915

  17. Governing population screening in an age of expansion: The case of newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Cressman, Céline; Hayeems, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Newborn bloodspot screening is one of the most enduring and successful population screening initiatives. Yet technological innovation to permit simultaneous measurement of multiple biomarkers - and potentially, entire genomes - has spurred expansion and debate. Through a cross-jurisdictional comparison, we describe the varied roles and reach of screening-related governance structures in the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Canada, and highlight the distinct values and resources brought to bear by the genetics, public health and maternal-child health communities in adjudicating the benefits and burdens of expanded newborn screening. We call for the expansion of formal governance structures that are balanced in resources and perspective and mandated to ensure that the organization and delivery of newborn screening achieves optimal quality. PMID:26285197

  18. Newborn screening and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Fujii, Tadashi; Fukushi, Masaru; Oguma, Toshihiro; Shimada, Tsutomu; Maeda, Miho; Kida, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Yuniko; Futatsumori, Hideyuki; Montaño, Adriana M.; Mason, Robert W.; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme activities needed to degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are long unbranched polysaccharides consisting of repeating disaccharides. GAGs include: chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate (DS), heparan sulfate (HS), keratan sulfate (KS), and hyaluronan. Their catabolism may be blocked singly or in combination depending on the specific enzyme deficiency. There are 11 known enzyme deficiencies, resulting in seven distinct forms of MPS with a collective incidence of higher than 1 in 25,000 live births. Accumulation of undegraded metabolites in lysosomes gives rise to distinct clinical syndromes. Generally, the clinical conditions progress if untreated, leading to developmental delay, systemic skeletal deformities, and early death. MPS disorders are potentially treatable with enzyme replacement therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For maximum benefit of available therapies, early detection and intervention are critical. We recently developed a novel high-throughput multiplex method to assay DS, HS, and KS simultaneously in blood samples by using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for MPS. The overall performance metrics of HS and DS values on MPS I, II, and VII patients vs. healthy controls at newborns were as follows using a given set of cut-off values: sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 98.5–99.4%; positive predictive value, 54.5–75%; false positive rate, 0.62–1.54%; and false negative rate, 0%. These findings show that the combined measurements of these three GAGs are sensitive and specific for detecting all types of MPS with acceptable false negative/positive rates. In addition, this method will also be used for monitoring therapeutic efficacy. We review the history of GAG assay and application to diagnosis for MPS. PMID:23860310

  19. Newborn screening and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Fujii, Tadashi; Fukushi, Masaru; Oguma, Toshihiro; Shimada, Tsutomu; Maeda, Miho; Kida, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Yuniko; Futatsumori, Hideyuki; Montaño, Adriana M; Mason, Robert W; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme activities needed to degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are long unbranched polysaccharides consisting of repeating disaccharides. GAGs include: chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate (DS), heparan sulfate (HS), keratan sulfate (KS), and hyaluronan. Their catabolism may be blocked singly or in combination depending on the specific enzyme deficiency. There are 11 known enzyme deficiencies, resulting in seven distinct forms of MPS with a collective incidence of higher than 1 in 25,000 live births. Accumulation of undegraded metabolites in lysosomes gives rise to distinct clinical syndromes. Generally, the clinical conditions progress if untreated, leading to developmental delay, systemic skeletal deformities, and early death. MPS disorders are potentially treatable with enzyme replacement therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For maximum benefit of available therapies, early detection and intervention are critical. We recently developed a novel high-throughput multiplex method to assay DS, HS, and KS simultaneously in blood samples by using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for MPS. The overall performance metrics of HS and DS values on MPS I, II, and VII patients vs. healthy controls at newborns were as follows using a given set of cut-off values: sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 98.5-99.4%; positive predictive value, 54.5-75%; false positive rate, 0.62-1.54%; and false negative rate, 0%. These findings show that the combined measurements of these three GAGs are sensitive and specific for detecting all types of MPS with acceptable false negative/positive rates. In addition, this method will also be used for monitoring therapeutic efficacy. We review the history of GAG assay and application to diagnosis for MPS. PMID:23860310

  20. Newborn screening for spinal muscular atrophy: Anticipating an imminent need.

    PubMed

    Phan, Han C; Taylor, Jennifer L; Hannon, Harry; Howell, Rodney

    2015-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. Children with type I SMA typically die by the age of 2 years. Recent progress in gene modification and other innovative therapies suggest that improved outcomes may soon be forthcoming. In animal models, therapeutic intervention initiated before the loss of motor neurons alters SMA phenotype and increases lifespan. Presently, supportive care including respiratory, nutritional, physiatry, and orthopedic management can ameliorate clinical symptoms and improve survival rates if SMA is diagnosed early in life. Newborn screening could help optimize these potential benefits. A recent report demonstrated that SMA detection can be multiplexed at minimal additional cost with the assay for severe combined immunodeficiency, already implemented by many newborn screening programs. The public health community should remain alert to the rapidly changing developments in early detection and treatment of SMA. PMID:25979781

  1. Current Status of Newborn Screening: Decision-Making about the Conditions to Include in Screening Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Newborn screening is considered a highly successful public health program that has resulted in the reduction of mortality, mental retardation, and other serious disabilities in thousands of children since the introduction of screening for phenylketonuria (PKU) in the 1960s. Programs are based in state public health departments such that each state…

  2. Expanding newborn screening for lysosomal disorders: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Darrel J; Tan, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and suitable screening methods, the LSDs that are considered for NBS generally include Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, MPSI, MPSII, MPSV, Metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann-Pick, and Pompe. Utilizing traditional and expanded criteria for consideration of NBS leads to a set of fundamental questions that need to be explored when considering the opportunities and challenges of adding LSDs to NBS panels. PMID:22447749

  3. Newborn screening of metabolic disorders: recent progress and future developments.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Piero; Lim, James S; Tortorelli, Silvia; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Matern, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry has been the main driver behind a significant expansion in newborn screening programs. The ability to detect more than 40 conditions by a single test underscores the need to better understand the clinical and laboratory characteristics of the conditions being tested, and the complexity of pattern recognition and differential diagnoses of one or more elevated markers. The panel of conditions recommended by the American College of Medical Genetics, including 20 primary conditions and 22 secondary targets that are detectable by tandem mass spectrometry has been adopted as the standard of care in the vast majority of US states. The evolution of newborn screening is far from being idle as a large number of infectious, genetic, and metabolic conditions are currently under investigation at variable stages of test development and clinical validation. In the US, a formal process with oversight by the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders and Genetic Diseases in Newborns and Children has been established for nomination and evidence-based review of new candidate conditions. If approved, these conditions could be added to the uniform panel and consequently pave the way to large scale implementation. PMID:18626194

  4. Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in 11 Screening Programs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Antonia; Abraham, Roshini S.; Currier, Robert; Brower, Amy; Andruszewski, Karen; Abbott, Jordan K.; Baker, Mei; Ballow, Mark; Bartoshesky, Louis E.; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Brokopp, Charles; Brooks, Edward; Caggana, Michele; Celestin, Jocelyn; Church, Joseph A.; Comeau, Anne Marie; Connelly, James A.; Cowan, Morton J.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dasu, Trivikram; Dave, Nina; De La Morena, Maria T.; Duffner, Ulrich; Fong, Chin-To; Forbes, Lisa; Freedenberg, Debra; Gelfand, Erwin W.; Hale, Jaime E.; Celine Hanson, I.; Hay, Beverly N.; Hu, Diana; Infante, Anthony; Johnson, Daisy; Kapoor, Neena; Kay, Denise M.; Kohn, Donald B.; Lee, Rachel; Lehman, Heather; Lin, Zhili; Lorey, Fred; Abdel-Mageed, Aly; Manning, Adrienne; McGhee, Sean; Moore, Theodore B.; Naides, Stanley J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Orange, Jordan S.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Porteus, Matthew; Rodriguez, Ray; Romberg, Neil; Routes, John; Ruehle, Mary; Rubenstein, Arye; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A.; Scott, Ginger; Scott, Patricia M.; Secord, Elizabeth; Seroogy, Christine; Shearer, William T.; Siegel, Subhadra; Silvers, Stacy K.; Stiehm, E. Richard; Sugerman, Robert W.; Sullivan, John L.; Tanksley, Susan; Tierce, Millard L.; Verbsky, James; Vogel, Beth; Walker, Rosalyn; Walkovich, Kelly; Walter, Jolan E.; Wasserman, Richard L.; Watson, Michael S.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Weiner, Leonard B.; Wood, Heather; Yates, Anne B.; Puck, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) using assays to detect T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) began in Wisconsin in 2008, and SCID was added to the national recommended uniform panel for newborn screened disorders in 2010. Currently 23 states, the District of Columbia, and the Navajo Nation conduct population-wide newborn screening for SCID. The incidence of SCID is estimated at 1 in 100 000 births. OBJECTIVES To present data from a spectrum of SCID newborn screening programs, establish population-based incidence for SCID and other conditions with T-cell lymphopenia, and document early institution of effective treatments. DESIGN Epidemiological and retrospective observational study. SETTING Representatives in states conducting SCID newborn screening were invited to submit their SCID screening algorithms, test performance data, and deidentified clinical and laboratory information regarding infants screened and cases with nonnormal results. Infants born from the start of each participating program from January 2008 through the most recent evaluable date prior to July 2013 were included. Representatives from 10 states plus the Navajo Area Indian Health Service contributed data from 3 030 083 newborns screened with a TREC test. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Infants with SCID and other diagnoses of T-cell lymphopenia were classified. Incidence and, where possible, etiologies were determined. Interventions and survival were tracked. RESULTS Screening detected 52 cases of typical SCID, leaky SCID, and Omenn syndrome, affecting 1 in 58 000 infants (95%CI, 1/46 000-1/80 000). Survival of SCID-affected infants through their diagnosis and immune reconstitution was 87%(45/52), 92%(45/49) for infants who received transplantation, enzyme replacement, and/or gene therapy. Additional interventions for SCID and non-SCID T-cell lymphopenia included immunoglobulin infusions, preventive antibiotics, and avoidance of live vaccines. Variations in

  5. Maintaining Acceptably Low Referral Rates in TEOAE-Based Newborn Hearing Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxon, Antonia Brancia; White, Karl R.; Culpepper, Brandt; Vohr, Betty R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes factors that can affect the referral rate for otoacoustic emission-based newborn hearing screening and discusses the screening results of 1,328 newborns screened with transient evoked otoaoustic emissions prior to hospital discharge. The youngest infants were as likely to pass as infants who were 24-27 hours old. (Author/CR)

  6. Neonatal screening for haemoglobinopathy. Results in 7691 Manchester newborns.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D I; Blair, V M

    1976-01-01

    Over a period of one year the blood samples collected for phenylketonuria testing from 7691 Manchester newborns were screened by haemoglobin electrophoresis. An abnormality was detected in 47 (0-61%) of the babies. No cases of homozygous haemoglobinopathy were found. The overall incidence of sickle-cell trait was 0-38%, but for the Black population it was 10%. Four Black babies and one White baby had alpha-thalassaemia. No other haemoglobinopathies were found in the White babies and no Asian baby had alpha-thalassaemia. Haemoglobin A2 was precociously developed in three babies, two of whom were coloured--probably a further example of the earlier maturity of coloured babies. The screening programme was stopped when it became cleaasily be combined with screening for metabolic disease in places where the incidence of haemoglobinopathies is higher. PMID:1259457

  7. Newborn screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia in New York State.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Melissa; DeMartino, Lenore; McMahon, Rebecca; Hamel, Rhonda; Maloney, Breanne; Stansfield, Daniele-Marisa; McGrath, Emily C; Occhionero, Amanda; Gearhart, Adam; Caggana, Michele; Tavakoli, Norma P

    2016-06-01

    From 2007 to 2014 the New York State (NYS) Newborn Screening (NBS) program screened 2 million newborns for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The data was analyzed to determine factors that affect 17α-hydroxyprogesterone levels and assist in developing algorithm changes that would improve the positive predictive value of the methodology being used. The concentration of 17-OHP in dried blood spots was measured using the AutoDELFIA Neonatal 17-OHP kit (Perkin Elmer, Turku, Finland). During the 8 year period of this study 2476 babies were referred, 105 babies were diagnosed with CAH (90 with the salt-wasting (SW), 8 with simple virilizing (SV), 5 with non-classical CAH, and 2 with another enzyme deficiency) and, 14 with possible CAH. Three false negative cases with SV-CAH were reported to the program. Of the total 108 known cases, 74 (69%) infants were detected by newborn screening in the absence of clinical information, or, known family history. The incidence of CAH in NYS is 1 in 18,170 with a ratio of SW to SV of 8.2:1. The incidence of CAH is lower in Black infants than in White, Hispanic and Asian infants. Despite a lower mean birth weight, female infants have a lower mean 17-OHP value than male infants and are under-represented in the referred category. As per other NBS programs the false positive rate is exacerbated by prematurity/low birth weight and by over-early specimen collection. PMID:27331001

  8. "Collodion baby": A unique challenge for newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Kayla M; Gaudreau, Philip; Cartee, Todd V; Reilly, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with collodion membrane who had an obstructed external auditory canal, causing the infant to fail her newborn hearing screen (otoacoustic emissions) bilaterally. An auditory brainstem response (ABR) test was deferred due to the reported increased risk of infections in these babies. Meticulous but gentle debridement of the membranes on the external auditory canal, using a combination of otic drops (ofloxacin), emollients (baby oil/mineral oil), and suctioning, permitted the infant to ultimately pass otoacoustic emissions bilaterally and subsequent serial audiograms. PMID:27178521

  9. Appropriateness of newborn screening for classic galactosaemia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Varela-Lema, L; Paz-Valinas, L; Atienza-Merino, G; Zubizarreta-Alberdi, R; Villares, R Vizoso; López-García, M

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there is no universal agreement on galactosaemia screening, fundamentally because of the risk-benefit uncertainties. We conducted two exhaustive systematic searches in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, etc.) to recover relevant information about the disease and screening test/s in order to support decision making in Spain. All of the 45 studies identified that covered disease issues were retrospective case series or cross-sectional analysis (level-4 evidence). Studies consistently found that the majority of patients presented characteristic symptomatology before diagnosis. Long term disabilities were not significantly correlated with age of diagnosis, onset of dietary restriction or strict diet compliance. The five studies that provided accuracy data used different cut-off points and verification tests, and thus differed in their definitions of a positive case (level-3b evidence). The estimated sensitivity was 100 % and the specificity 99.9 %. The false-positive rate ranged from 0.0005 % to 0.25 %, and the PPV from 0 % to 64.3 %. The comparative clinical effectiveness in relation to not screening or implementation of other programs is unknown. In summary, existing evidence remains insufficient to establish the appropriateness of newborn screening for galactosaemia screening, although health benefits could be expected if early diagnosis and treatment is achieved. If screening is implemented in Spain, it would be important that a pilot programme be implemented to assess false positive rate and ensure that early diagnosis is not delayed. PMID:27116003

  10. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders in hungary.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Judit; Karg, Eszter; Turi, Sàndor; Legnini, Elisa; Wittmann, Gyula; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Lukas, Jan; Gölnitz, Uta; Klingenhäger, Michael; Bodamer, Olaf; Mühl, Adolf; Rolfs, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    Even though lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are considered to be orphan diseases, they pose a highly relevant cause for morbidity and mortality as their cumulative prevalence is estimated to be 1:4,000. This is especially important as treatment in form of enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy or stem cell transplantation is amenable for some LSDs. It is plausible that an early start of treatment might improve the overall prognosis and, even more important, prevent irreversible damage of key organs. To get a more precise insight into the real frequency of some LSDs in the general population, we screened 40,024 samples from the Hungarian newborn screening (NBS) program in Szeged for Fabry disease (FD), Gaucher disease (GD), Pompe disease (PD), and Niemann-Pick A/B (NPB) disease using tandem mass spectrometry. Altogether, 663 samples (1.66%) were submitted for retesting. Genetic confirmation was carried out for 120 samples with abnormal screening results after retesting, which identified three cases of GD, three cases of FD, nine cases of PD, and two cases with NPB. In some cases, we detected up to now unknown mutations - one in NPB and seven in PD - which raise questions about the clinical consequences of a NBS in the sense of late-onset manifestations. Overall, we conclude that screening for LSDs by tandem MS/MS followed by a genetic workup in identified patients is a robust, easy, valid, and feasible technology in newborn screening programs. Furthermore, early diagnosis of LSDs gives a chance to early treatment, but needs more clinical long-term data especially regarding the consequence of private mutations. PMID:23430949

  11. Combination of hearing screening and genetic screening for deafness-susceptibility genes in newborns

    PubMed Central

    YAO, GEN-DONG; LI, SHOU-XIA; CHEN, DING-LI; FENG, HAI-QIN; ZHAO, SU-BIN; LIU, YONG-JIE; GUO, LI-LI; YANG, ZHI-MING; ZHANG, XIAO-FANG; SUN, CAI-XIA; WANG, ZE-HUI; ZHANG, WEI-YONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the results of screening of newborn hearing and the incidence of deafness-susceptibility genes. One thousand newborn babies in the Handan Center Hospital (Handan, China) underwent screening of hearing and deafness-susceptibility genes. The first screening test was carried out using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Babies with hearing loss who failed to pass the initial screening were scheduled for rescreening at 42 days after birth. Cord blood was used for the screening of deafness-susceptibility genes, namely the GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MTRNR1) genes. Among the 1,000 neonates that underwent the first hearing screening, 25 exhibited left-sided hearing loss, 21 exhibited right-sided hearing loss and 15 cases had binaural hearing loss. After rescreening 42 days later, only one of the initial 61 cases exhibited hearing loss under OAE testing. The neonatal deafness gene tests showed two cases with 1555A>G mutation and two cases with 1494C>T mutation of the MTRNR1 gene. In the SLC26A4 gene screening, four cases exhibited the heterozygous IVS7-2A>G mutation and one case exhibited heterozygous 1226G>A mutation. In the GJB2 gene screening, two cases exhibited the homozygous 427C>T mutation and 10 exhibited the heterozygous 235delC mutation. The genetic screening revealed 21 newborns with mutations in the three deafness-susceptibility genes. The overall carrier rate was 2.1% (21/1,000). The association of hearing and gene screening may be the promising screening strategy for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:24348793

  12. AB017. The extended newborn screening by tandem mass in Taiwan—results from two national newborn screening centers: Taipei Institute of Pathology & Chinese Foundation of Health

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dau-Ming; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Ho, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Since 2001, tandem mass spectrometry was introduced for newborn screening by two Taiwan national newborn screening centers: Taipei Institute of Pathology and Chinese Foundation of Health, in Taiwan, respectively. A total of 24 metabolic disorders, including 6 amino acidopathies, 8 organic acid disorders and 9 fatty acid disorders, etc., were screened and the newborns with positive screening result were referred to Taipei Veterans General Hospital for confirmatory diagnosis. Until Dec 2014, a total of 1,391,583 newborns have been screened by these two newborn screening centers. The overall incidence of inborn errors of metabolism identified by tandem mass was approximately 1/6,000. The most common inborn errors were defects of phenylalanine metabolism (phenylketonuria: 1/60,000; 6-pyruvoyltertrahydropterin synthase (PTPS): 1/110,000). Maple syrup urine disease was the second most common amino acidopathy (1/100,000) and, significantly, most MSUD patients (75%) belonged to the Austronesian aboriginal tribes of southern Taiwan. The most frequently detected organic acid disorder was 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (1/35,000). Glutaric aciduria type 1 and methylmalonic academia were the second most common organic acid disorders (1/100,000 for each disease). The incidence of fatty acid disorder is relatively less than most western countries. Out of them, carnitine transport defect was the most common fatty acid disease (1/100,000). In this report we will present this large population study of tandem mass newborn screening in Chinese population.

  13. Improving regional universal newborn hearing screening programmes in Italy.

    PubMed

    Molini, E; Cristi, M C; Lapenna, R; Calzolaro, L; Muzzi, E; Ciciriello, E; Della Volpe, A; Orzan, E; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    The Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) programme aims at achieving early detection of hearing impairment. Subsequent diagnosis and intervention should follow promptly. Within the framework of the Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the limitations and strengths of current UNHS programs in Italy have been analysed by a group of professionals working in tertiary centres involved in regional UNHS programmes, using SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix. Coverage and lost-to-follow up rates are issues related to UNHS programmes. Recommendations to improve the effectiveness of the UNHS programme have been identified. The need for homogeneous policies, high-quality information and dissemination of knowledge for operators and families of hearing-impaired children emerged from the discussion. PMID:27054385

  14. Retention and Research Use of Residual Newborn Screening Bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby

    2013-01-01

    The storage and use of residual newborn screening dried blood specimens has generated significant controversy in the past 5 years, primarily because of public concerns over the lack of parental knowledge and consent for these activities. State policies addressing the management of these specimens vary widely, and there is currently little guidance to aid new state policy development to address the concerns of program professionals, investigators, and the general public. This article offers guidance for state policy based on multiple sources of data, including public attitudes, professional statements, state experience, and an analysis of the ethical, social, legal, and biomedical issues from a multidisciplinary group of scholars. This guidance will be useful for state programs that seek to develop policies that are informed by a contemporary analysis of the key ethical, legal, and social aspects of this practice. This article represents the work of the authors and does not represent American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:23209103

  15. Retention and research use of residual newborn screening bloodspots.

    PubMed

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Goldenberg, Aaron J; Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby

    2013-01-01

    The storage and use of residual newborn screening dried blood specimens has generated significant controversy in the past 5 years, primarily because of public concerns over the lack of parental knowledge and consent for these activities. State policies addressing the management of these specimens vary widely, and there is currently little guidance to aid new state policy development to address the concerns of program professionals, investigators, and the general public. This article offers guidance for state policy based on multiple sources of data, including public attitudes, professional statements, state experience, and an analysis of the ethical, social, legal, and biomedical issues from a multidisciplinary group of scholars. This guidance will be useful for state programs that seek to develop policies that are informed by a contemporary analysis of the key ethical, legal, and social aspects of this practice. This article represents the work of the authors and does not represent American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:23209103

  16. Newborn screening strategies for congenital hypothyroidism: an update.

    PubMed

    LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-10-01

    It is the purpose of this article to briefly review the initial development and subsequent evolution of newborn screening programs to detect infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and then to provide an update of the advantages and disadvantages of the main test strategies. Pilot programs began screening newborn populations in North America in the mid-1970s using either primary thyroxine (T4)-follow-up thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or primary TSH testing. Many programs in the United States and around the world continue to prefer a primary T4-follow-up TSH test strategy. This approach has the advantage of detecting infants with primary CH, as well as cases of hypopituitary hypothyroidism, by follow-up of infants with a T4 below an absolute cutoff or with a persistently low T4 level, necessitating a higher recall rate. With increasing assay sensitivity and specificity, several programs in the United States and worldwide have elected to switch to a primary TSH test strategy. This test strategy has the advantage of detecting primary CH and subclinical hypothyroidism and at a lower recall rate. Programs considering switching to a primary TSH test strategy need to develop age-related TSH cutoffs to maintain an acceptable recall rate. Both test strategies have the potential to detect infants with CH characterized by "delayed TSH rise," but only if they collect a routine or discretionary second specimen, now recommended in low-birth-weight and acutely ill infants. Lastly, a lower TSH cutoff appears to be one of the explanations for the recently described increased incidence of CH. PMID:20195902

  17. Expanded newborn screening in New South Wales: missed cases.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jane; Wilcken, Bridget; Carpenter, Kevin; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Tchan, Michel; Wiley, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    There have been few reports of cases missed by expanded newborn screening. Tandem mass spectrometry was introduced in New South Wales, Australia in 1998 to screen for selected disorders of amino acid, organic acid and fatty acid metabolism. Of 1,500,000 babies screened by 2012, 1:2700 were diagnosed with a target disorder. Fifteen affected babies were missed by testing, and presented clinically or in family studies. In three cases (cobalamin C defect, very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and glutaric aciduria type 1), this led to modification of analyte cut-off values or protocols during the first 3 years. Two patients with intermittent MSUD, two with β-ketothiolase deficiency, two with citrin deficiency, two siblings with arginosuccinic aciduria, two siblings with homocystinuria, and one with cobalamin C defect had analyte values and ratios below the action limits which could not have been detected without unacceptable false-positive rates. A laboratory interpretation error led to missing one case of cobalamin C defect. Reference ranges, regularly reviewed, were not altered. For citrin deficiency, while relevant metabolites are detectable by tandem mass spectrometry, our cut-off values do not specifically screen for that disorder. Most of the missed cases are doing well and with no acute presentations although eight of 15 are likely to have been somewhat adversely affected by a late diagnosis. Analyte ratio and cut-off value optimisations are important, but for some disorders occasional missed cases may have to be tolerated to maintain an acceptable specificity, and avoid harm from screening. PMID:24970580

  18. Genome Screen to Detect Linkage to Intracranial Aneurysm Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Foroud, Tatiana; Sauerbeck, Laura; Brown, Robert; Anderson, Craig; Woo, Daniel; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Deka, Ranjan; Hornung, Richard; Meissner, Irene; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Rouleau, Guy; Sander Connolly, E.; Lai, Dongbing; Koller, Daniel L.; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evidence supports a substantial genetic contribution to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA). The purpose of this study was to identify chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes that contribute to the risk of IA. Methods Multiplex families having at least 2 individuals with “definite” or “probable” IA were ascertained through an international consortium. First-degree relatives of individuals with IA who were at increased risk of an IA because of a history of hypertension or present smoking were offered cerebral magnetic resonance angiography. A genome screen was completed using the Illumina 6K SNP system, and the resulting data from 192 families, containing 1155 genotyped individuals, were analyzed. Narrow and broad disease definitions were used when testing for linkage using multipoint model-independent methods. Ordered subset analysis was performed to test for a gene×smoking (pack-years) interaction. Results The greatest evidence of linkage was found on chromosomes 4 (LOD=2.5; 156 cM), 7 (LOD=1.7; 183 cM), 8 (LOD=1.9; 70 cM), and 12 (LOD=1.6; 102 cM) using the broad disease definition. Using the average pack-years for the affected individuals in each family, the genes on chromosomes 4 (LOD=3.5; P=0.03), 7 (LOD=4.1; P=0.01) and 12 (LOD=3.6; P=0.02) all appear to be modulated by the degree of smoking in the affected members of the family. On chromosome 8, inclusion of smoking as a covariate did not significantly strengthen the linkage evidence, suggesting no interaction between the loci in this region and smoking. Conclusions We have detected possible evidence of linkage to 4 chromosomal regions. There is potential evidence for a gene×smoking interaction with 3 of the loci. PMID:18323491

  19. Whole-genome sequencing in newborn screening? A statement on the continued importance of targeted approaches in newborn screening programmes

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Heidi Carmen; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Cornel, Martina C; Wright Clayton, Ellen; Sénécal, Karine; Borry, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The advent and refinement of sequencing technologies has resulted in a decrease in both the cost and time needed to generate data on the entire sequence of the human genome. This has increased the accessibility of using whole-genome sequencing and whole-exome sequencing approaches for analysis in both the research and clinical contexts. The expectation is that more services based on these and other high-throughput technologies will become available to patients and the wider population. Some authors predict that sequencing will be performed once in a lifetime, namely, shortly after birth. The Public and Professional Policy Committee of the European Society of Human Genetics, the Human Genome Organisation Committee on Ethics, Law and Society, the PHG Foundation and the P3G International Paediatric Platform address herein the important issues and challenges surrounding the potential use of sequencing technologies in publicly funded newborn screening (NBS) programmes. This statement presents the relevant issues and culminates in a set of recommendations to help inform and guide scientists and clinicians, as well as policy makers regarding the necessary considerations for the use of genome sequencing technologies and approaches in NBS programmes. The primary objective of NBS should be the targeted analysis and identification of gene variants conferring a high risk of preventable or treatable conditions, for which treatment has to start in the newborn period or in early childhood. PMID:25626707

  20. The Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Thirty-five Year Experience Assuring Newborn Screening Laboratory Quality

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús, Víctor R.; Mei, Joanne V.; Cordovado, Suzanne K.; Cuthbert, Carla D.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn screening is the largest genetic testing effort in the United States and is considered one of the ten great public health achievements during the first 10 years of the 21st century. For over 35 years, the Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has helped NBS laboratories ensure that their testing does not delay diagnosis, minimizes false-positive reports, and sustains high-quality testing performance. It is a multi-component program that provides comprehensive quality assurance services for dried blood spot testing. The NSQAP, the Biochemical Mass Spectrometry Laboratory (BMSL), the Molecular Quality Improvement Program (MQIP) and the Newborn Screening Translation Research Initiative (NSTRI), aid screening laboratories achieve technical proficiency and maintain confidence in their performance while processing large volumes of specimens daily. The accuracy of screening tests could be the difference between life and death for many babies; in other instances, identifying newborns with a disorder means that they can be treated and thus avoid life-long disability or severe cognitive impairment. Thousands of newborns and their families have benefited from reliable and accurate testing that has been accomplished by a network of screening laboratories and the NSQAP, BMSL, MQIP and NSTRI. PMID:26309908

  1. Review of Current International Decision-Making Processes for Newborn Screening: Lessons for Australia

    PubMed Central

    Metternick-Jones, Selina Carolyne; Lister, Karla Jane; Dawkins, Hugh J. S.; White, Craig Anthony; Weeramanthri, Tarun Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Newborn bloodspot screening has been operating successfully in Australia for almost 50 years. Recently, the development of new technologies and treatments has led to calls for the addition of new conditions to the screening programs. Internationally, it is recognized by governments that national policies for newborn screening should support transparent and evidence-based decision making, and promote consistency between states within a country. Australia is lagging behind the international community, and currently has no national policies or decision-making processes, agreed by government, to support its newborn screening programs. In contrast, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States of America (US) have robust and transparent processes to assess conditions for screening, which have been developed by, and have pathways to, government. This review provides detail on the current policy environment for newborn screening in Australia, highlighting that there are a number of risks to the programs resulting from the lack of a decision-making process. It also describes the processes used to assess conditions for newborn screening in the US, UK, and NZ. These examples highlight the benefits of developing a national decision-making process, including ensuring that screening is evidence based and effective. These examples also provide models that might be considered for Australia, as well as other countries currently seeking to introduce or expand newborn bloodspot screening. PMID:26442241

  2. Successful newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Antonia; Hu, Diana; Song, Miran; Gomes, Heidi; Brown, Denise R; Bourque, Trudy; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Diana; Lin, Zhili; Cowan, Morton J; Puck, Jennifer M

    2015-05-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) identifies affected infants before the onset of life-threatening infections, permitting optimal treatment. Navajo Native Americans have a founder mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Artemis, resulting in frequent Artemis SCID (SCID-A). A pilot study at 2 Navajo hospitals assessed the feasibility of SCID NBS in this population. Dried blood spots from 1800 infants were assayed by PCR for T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), a biomarker for naïve T cells. Starting in February 2012, TREC testing transitioned to standard care throughout the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, and a total of 7900 infants were screened through July 2014. One infant had low TRECs and was diagnosed with non-SCID T lymphopenia, while 4 had undetectable TRECs due to SCID-A, all of whom were referred for hematopoietic cell transplantation. This report establishes the incidence of SCID-A and demonstrates effectiveness of TREC NBS in the Navajo. PMID:25762520

  3. Newborn Hearing Screening in Neonates Exposed to Psychoactive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruna Salazar Castro da; Machado, Márcia Salgado; Zanini, Cláudia Fernandes Costa; Paniz, Tatiana de Carvalho; Menegotto, Isabela Hoffmeister

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In pregnancy, the mother and fetus share body structures based on the maternal organism. Exposure to psychoactive drugs in this period may have repercussions on the baby's hearing. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate this association. Aim Analyze the results of newborn hearing screening (NHS), the occurrence of associated risk factors, and the incidence of hearing loss in newborn exposed to psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. Methods This is an observational retrospective study done from a database analysis. From this database, records were selected about the use of psychoactive drugs by mothers during pregnancy, then the neonates were divide into two groups: the study group (146 babies exposed to drugs) and the control group (500 babies not exposed to drugs). The NHS failure rate, the presence of risk factors for hearing loss, and need for audiological diagnosis were analyzed in both groups. From these variables, absolute frequency and prevalence rates were calculated and the results compared between groups. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the comparison of NHS failure rates between the groups (p = 0.267). The occurrence of risk factors for hearing loss was greater in babies exposed to drugs (p < 0.0001). There was only one diagnosis of hearing loss, which occurred in the control group (p = 0.667). Conclusion The use of psychoactive drugs by mothers during pregnancy did not affect the NHS failure rate of this sample. However, the occurrence of significant risk factors in the study group showed a possible sensitivity of babies exposed to psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. PMID:25992062

  4. Ethical and policy issues in newborn screening of children for neurologic and developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-06-01

    Genetic testing for neurologic and developmental disorders spans the spectrum from universal newborn screening for conditions like phenylketonuria to diagnostic testing for suspected genetic conditions, to predictive genetic testing for childhood-onset conditions. Given that virtually all children in the United States undergo genetic screening in the newborn period, this article focuses on 3 actual case studies of neurologic and developmental disorders that have been included or proposed for inclusion in newborn screening programs: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (a neuromuscular disorder), Krabbe disease (a neurodegenerative disorder), and fragile X syndrome (a neurodevelopmental disorder). PMID:26022175

  5. A newborn screening system based on service-oriented architecture embedded support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Weng, Yung-Ching; Wu, Jang-Hung; Lai, Feipei

    2010-10-01

    The clinical symptoms of metabolic disorders are rarely apparent during the neonatal period, and if they are not treated earlier, irreversible damages, such as mental retardation or even death, may occur. Therefore, the practice of newborn screening is essential to prevent permanent disabilities in newborns. In the paper, we design, implement a newborn screening system using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifications. By evaluating metabolic substances data collected from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), we can interpret and determine whether a newborn has a metabolic disorder. In addition, National Taiwan University Hospital Information System (NTUHIS) has been developed and implemented to integrate heterogeneous platforms, protocols, databases as well as applications. To expedite adapting the diversities, we deploy Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) concepts to the newborn screening system based on web services. The system can be embedded seamlessly into NTUHIS. PMID:20703618

  6. The Dried Bloodspot: Newborn Screening Research Saving the Lives of Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Fisch, Jill; Gartzke, Micki; Leight, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Newborn screening is a test done on every child born in the US shortly after birth to detect diseases where, if not diagnosed and treated in the newborn period, the child will suffer significant trauma, disability or die. A few drops of blood from each baby's heel is put on a card and sent to the state's public health lab for testing. Most states…

  7. Newborn screening of phenylketonuria using direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Hongbin; Cai, Zongwei; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2013-04-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is commonly included in the newborn screening panel of most countries, with various techniques being used for quantification of L-phenylalanine (Phe). To diagnose PKU as early as possible in newborn screening, a rapid and simple method of analysis was developed. Using direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled with triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (TQ-MS/MS) and with use of a 12 DIP-it tip scanner autosampler in positive ion mode, we analyzed dried blood spot (DBS) samples from PKU newborns. The concentration of Phe was determined using multiple reaction monitoring mode with the nondeuterated internal standard N,N-dimethylphenylalanine. The results of the analysis of DBS samples from newborns indicated that the DART-TQ-MS/MS method is fast, accurate, and reproducible. The results prove that this assay as a newborn screen for PKU can be performed in 18 s per sample for the quantification of Phe in DBS samples. DART-TQ-MS/MS analysis of the Phe concentration in DBS samples allowed us to screen newborns for PKU. This innovative protocol is rapid and can be effectively applied on a routine basis to analyze a large number of samples in PKU newborn screening and PKU patient monitoring. PMID:23397086

  8. History and Current Status of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Antonia; Puck, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay utilizing dried blood spots in universal newborn screening has allowed the early detection of T cell lymphopenia in newborns. Diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in affected infants in the neonatal period while asymptomatic permits early treatment and restoration of a functional immune system. SCID was the first immunodeficiency disease to be added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel of Core Conditions in the United States in 2010, and is now implemented in 26 states in the U.S. This review covers the development of newborn screening for SCID, the biology of the TREC test, its current implementation in the U.S., new findings for SCID in the newborn screening era, and future directions. PMID:25937517

  9. Screening Newborns' Hearing Now Standard | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hospital. Combined with similar recommendations by the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing, and further research and workshops supported by the NIDCD, universal newborn hearing screening began in 1999, when President ...

  10. Opportunities for Quality Improvement in Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Groose, Molly K.; Reynolds, Richard; Li, Zhanhai; M.Farrell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background With the rapid implementation of cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening (NBS), quality improvement (QI) has become essential to identify and prevent errors. Using Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (PFMEA), we adapted this method to determine if it could be applied to discover and rank high priority QI opportunities. Methods Site visits to three programmes were conducted, and PFMEA exercises were accomplished in Colorado, Massachusetts and Wisconsin with 23 experienced professionals. During each of these comprehensive sessions, participants identified and ranked potential failures based on severity, occurrence and detection to calculate risk priority number (RPN) values. Results A total of 96 failure modes were generated and ranked in a list of the 20 riskiest problems that show no significant discordances by site, although there were differences by profession of the rater, particularly nurses. Conclusions Our results illustrate that the PFMEA method applies well to CF NBS and that steps requiring communication and information transfer are perceived to be the highest risks. The number of identified failure makes and their potential impact demonstrate considerable overall risk and a need for ongoing QI. PMID:20471332

  11. Informing parents about positive newborn screen results: parents' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Salm, Natalie; Yetter, Elena; Tluczek, Audrey

    2012-12-01

    This descriptive study examined parents' reactions to newborn screening (NBS) results and their recommendations for improving communication. Dimensional and content analyses were conducted on interviews with 203 parents of 106 infants having positive NBS results. Diagnostic results confirmed infants as having congenital hypothyroidism (n = 37), cystic fibrosis (n = 26), or being cystic fibrosis (CF)-carriers (n = 43). Parents' reactions ranged from 'very scary' to 'not too concerned'. Most reported feeling shock, panic, and worry; some reported guilt. Parents in the CF and CF-carrier groups preferred face-to-face disclosure as the communication channel; whereas congenital hypothyroidism group parents supported telephone contacts. Parents recommended providers be well informed, honest, and calm; personalize disclosure, avoid jargon, listen carefully, encourage questions, recognize parental distress, offer realistic reassurance, pace amount and rate of information, assess parents' understanding, and refer to specialists. We conclude that provider-patient communication approach and channel can exacerbate or alleviate parents' negative reactions to positive NBS results. PMID:22984167

  12. Public views on participating in newborn screening using genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Miller, Fiona A; Hayeems, Robin Z; Barg, Carolyn; Cressman, Celine; Carroll, June C; Wilson, Brenda J; Little, Julian; Avard, Denise; Painter-Main, Michael; Allanson, Judith; Giguere, Yves; Chakraborty, Pranesh

    2014-11-01

    Growing discussion on the use of whole-genome or exome sequencing (WG/ES) in newborn screening (NBS) has raised concerns regarding the generation of incidental information on millions of infants annually. It is unknown whether integrating WG/ES would alter public expectations regarding participation in universal NBS. We assessed public willingness to participate in NBS using WG/ES compared with current NBS. Our secondary objective was to assess the public's beliefs regarding a parental responsibility to participate in WG/ES-based NBS compared with current NBS. We examined self-reported attitudes regarding willingness to participate in NBS using a cross-sectional national survey of Canadian residents recruited through an internet panel, reflective of the Canadian population by age, gender and region. Our results showed that fewer respondents would be willing to participate in NBS using WG/ES compared with NBS using current technologies (80 vs 94%, P<0.001), or perceived a parental responsibility to participate in WG/ES-based NBS vs current NBS (30 vs 48%, P<0.001). Our findings suggest that integrating WG/ES into NBS might reduce participation, and challenge the moral authority that NBS programmes rely upon to ensure population benefits. These findings point to the need for caution in the untargeted use of WG/ES in public health contexts. PMID:24549052

  13. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry: the case of newborn screening.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo

    2014-12-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) program is a complex and organized system consisting of family and personnel education, biochemical tests, confirmatory biochemical and genetic tests, diagnosis, therapy, and patient follow up. The program identifies treatable metabolic disorders possibly when asymptomatic by using dried blood spot (DBS). During the last 20 years tandem mass spectrometry (TMS) has become the leading technology in NBS programs demonstrating to be versatile, sensitive and specific. There is consistent evidence of benefits from NBS for many disorders detected by TMS as well as for congenital hypothyroidism, cystic fibrosis, congenital adrenal hyperplasia by immune-enzymatic methods. Real time PCR tests have more recently been proposed for the detection of some severe combined immunodeficiences (SCID) along with the use of TMS for ADA and PNP SCID; a first evaluation of their cost-benefit ratio is still ongoing. Avoiding false negative results by using specific biomarkers and reducing the false positive rate by using second tier tests, is fundamental for a successful NBS program. The fully integration of NBS and diagnostic laboratories with clinical service is crucial to have the best effectiveness in a comprehensive NBS system. PMID:24844843

  14. Financing newborn screening: sources, issues, and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Therrell, Bradford L; Williams, Donna; Johnson, Kay; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Mann, Marie Y; Ramos, Lauren Raskin

    2007-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) programs are population-based public health programs and are uniquely financed footline compared with many other public health programs. Since they began more than 45 years ago, the financing issues have become more complex for NBS programs. Today, almost all programs have a portion of their costs paid by fees. The fee amounts vary from program to program, with little standardization in the way they are formulated, collected, or used. We previously surveyed 37 of the 51 dried blood spot screening programs throughout the United States, and confirmed an increasing dependence on NBS fees. In this study, we have collected responses from all 51 programs (100%), including updated responses from the original 37, and updated our fee listings. Comments from those surveyed indicated that the lack of a national standardized procedural coding system for NBS contributes to billing complexities. We suggest one coding possibility for discussion and debate for such a system. Differences in Medicaid interpretations may also contribute to financing inequities across NBS programs and there may be benefit from certain clarifications at the national level. Completed survey responses accounted for few changes in the conclusions of our original survey. We confirmed that 90 percent of all NBS programs have a fee paid by parents or a third party payer. Sixty-one percent reported receiving some funds from the Maternal and Child Health Services Title V block grant, 33 percent reported some funding from state general revenue/general public health appropriations; and 24 percent reported obtaining direct reimbursement from Medicaid (without passing through a third party). A majority of programs (63%) reported budget increases between 2002 and 2005, with increases primarily from fees (72%) and to a lesser extent from Medicaid, the Title V block grant, and state general revenues. PMID:17299328

  15. Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis. The Cystic Fibrosis Neonatal Screening Study Group.

    PubMed

    Farrell, P M; Mischler, E H

    1992-01-01

    Many questions remain regarding the efficacy, risks, and costs of CF neonatal screening. The major gap in knowledge that must be closed before CF neonatal screening can be recommended generally in the United States concerns the potential long-term medical benefits of initiating treatment in early infancy. It would be premature, in our opinion, to implement mass population screening of newborns for CF until the benefits and risks have been fully defined, and an adequate and logistically feasible testing system developed and/or highly effective therapy for CF lung disease becomes available. It is for this reason we designed a randomized, controlled investigation of CF neonatal screening and implemented this project in Wisconsin during 1985. The fact that 5 years of randomized screening and systematic evaluation of outcome measures have not yet revealed any pulmonary benefits underscores the importance of rigorous investigation to resolve the efficacy issue. In addition to the medical uncertainties, we believe that the ethical issues described herein need to be resolved; this concern pertains not only to the CF patient but also the heterozygote carrier. On the other hand, financial factors and uncertainty about the cost effectiveness of CF neonatal screening do not appear to be dominant issues according to our assessment of current data. Despite the reservations related to the benefit/risk relationship, we expect that the discovery of the CF gene should have a favorable impact on neonatal screening for the disease, as well as for management. PMID:1442316

  16. Development of a Newborn Screening Program for Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) in Taipei

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Szu-Hui; Ho, Hui-Chen; Liu, Yu-Ling; Chung, Yuan-Fang; Lin, Li-Ju; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chang, Jia-Kan; Soong, Wen-Jue; Lin, Hsiu-Lian; Hwang, Betau; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection of critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality among newborns. We investigate the feasibility of implementing a community-based newborn CCHD screening program in Taipei. Methods Twelve birthing facilities in Taipei participated in a trial screening program between October 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Newborns underwent pulse oximetry at 24–36 h old, with probes attached to the right hand and one lower limb. Any screening saturation ≥95% in either extremity, with an absolute difference of ≤3% between the right hand and foot, was accepted as a screening pass. A screening result was considered as a fail if the oxygen saturation was <95% at either probe site, on 3 separate occasions, each separated by 30 min or the first result was <95% at either probe site, and any subsequent oxygen saturation measurement was <90%. Public health nurses would follow up all missed or refused cases. Results Of the 6,387 live births, 6,296 newborns (coverage rate: 6,296/6,387 = 98.6%) underwent appropriate pulse oximetry screening. Sixteen newborns (0.25%) were reported to have a failed screening result. Five of these screen positive newborns were confirmed with CCHD; two of them were diagnosed solely attributed to the failed screening results. The false-positive rate was 0.18%. Implementing a 6-month screening program for CCHD produced good case detection rate, while using efficient screening and referral systems. Conclusion This program was successful in integrating screening, referral and public health tracking systems. The protocol outlined in this report could provide a community-based model for worldwide implementation. PMID:27073996

  17. Detection of critical congenital heart defects: Review of contributions from prenatal and newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Olney, Richard S.; Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Sontag, Marci K.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, statewide newborn screening programs for critical congenital heart defects began in the United States, and subsequently screening has been implemented widely. In this review, we focus on data reports and collection efforts related to both prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening. Defect-specific, maternal, and geographic factors are associated with variations in prenatal detection, so newborn screening provides a population-wide safety net for early diagnosis. A new web-based repository is collecting information on newborn screening program policies, quality indicators related to screening programs, and specific case-level data on infants with these defects. Birth defects surveillance programs also collect data about critical congenital heart defects, particularly related to diagnostic timing, mortality, and services. Individuals from state programs, federal agencies, and national organizations will be interested in these data to further refine algorithms for screening in normal newborn nurseries, neonatal intensive care settings, and other special populations; and ultimately to evaluate the impact of screening on outcomes. PMID:25979782

  18. Detection of critical congenital heart defects: Review of contributions from prenatal and newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Olney, Richard S; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Sontag, Marci K

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, statewide newborn screening programs for critical congenital heart defects began in the United States, and subsequently screening has been implemented widely. In this review, we focus on data reports and collection efforts related to both prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening. Defect-specific, maternal, and geographic factors are associated with variations in prenatal detection, so newborn screening provides a population-wide safety net for early diagnosis. A new web-based repository is collecting information on newborn screening program policies, quality indicators related to screening programs, and specific case-level data on infants with these defects. Birth defects surveillance programs also collect data about critical congenital heart defects, particularly related to diagnostic timing, mortality, and services. Individuals from state programs, federal agencies, and national organizations will be interested in these data to further refine algorithms for screening in normal newborn nurseries, neonatal intensive care settings, and other special populations; and ultimately to evaluate the impact of screening on outcomes. PMID:25979782

  19. Specific guidelines for assessing and improving the methodological quality of economic evaluations of newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Economic evaluation of newborn screening poses specific methodological challenges. Amongst others, these challenges refer to the use of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in newborns, and which costs and outcomes need to be considered in a full evaluation of newborn screening programmes. Because of the increasing scale and scope of such programmes, a better understanding of the methods of high-quality economic evaluations may be crucial for both producers/authors and consumers/reviewers of newborn screening-related economic evaluations. The aim of this study was therefore to develop specific guidelines designed to assess and improve the methodological quality of economic evaluations in newborn screening. Methods To develop the guidelines, existing guidelines for assessing the quality of economic evaluations were identified through a literature search, and were reviewed and consolidated using a deductive iterative approach. In a subsequent test phase, these guidelines were applied to various economic evaluations which acted as case studies. Results The guidelines for assessing and improving the methodological quality of economic evaluations in newborn screening are organized into 11 categories: “bibliographic details”, “study question and design”, “modelling”, “health outcomes”, “costs”, “discounting”, “presentation of results”, “sensitivity analyses”, “discussion”, “conclusions”, and “commentary”. Conclusions The application of the guidelines highlights important issues regarding newborn screening-related economic evaluations, and underscores the need for such issues to be afforded greater consideration in future economic evaluations. The variety in methodological quality detected by this study reveals the need for specific guidelines on the appropriate methods for conducting sound economic evaluations in newborn screening. PMID:22947299

  20. Screening of Newborns for Disorders with High Benefit-Risk Ratios Should Be Mandatory.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Nicole; Makarem, Dalia Chehayeb; Wasserstein, Melissa P

    2016-06-01

    Newborn screening has evolved to include an increasingly complex spectrum of diseases, raising concerns that screening should be optional and require parental consent. Early detection of disorders like PKU and MCAD is essential to prevent serious disability and death in affected children. These are examples of high benefit-risk ratio disorders because of the irrefutable health benefits of early detection, coupled with the low risks of treatment. The dire consequences of not diagnosing an infant with a treatable disorder because of parental refusal to screen are wholly unacceptable. Thus, we believe that newborn screening for disorders with high benefit-risk ratios should continue to be mandatory. PMID:27338599

  1. Supporting Parental Decisions About Genomic Sequencing for Newborn Screening: The NC NEXUS Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Megan A; Paquin, Ryan S; Roche, Myra I; Furberg, Robert D; Rini, Christine; Berg, Jonathan S; Powell, Cynthia M; Bailey, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genomic sequencing technology have raised fundamental challenges to the traditional ways genomic information is communicated. These challenges will become increasingly complex and will affect a much larger population in the future if genomics is incorporated into standard newborn screening practice. Clinicians, public health officials, and other stakeholders will need to agree on the types of information that they should seek and communicate to parents. Currently, few evidence-based and validated tools are available to support parental informed decision-making. These tools will be necessary as genomics is integrated into clinical practice and public health systems. In this article we describe how the North Carolina Newborn Exome Sequencing for Universal Screening study is addressing the need to support parents in making informed decisions about the use of genomic testing in newborn screening. We outline the context for newborn screening and justify the need for parental decision support. We also describe the process of decision aid development and the data sources, processes, and best practices being used in development. By the end of the study, we will have an evidenced-based process and validated tools to support parental informed decision-making about the use of genomic sequencing in newborn screening. Data from the study will help answer important questions about which genomic information ought to be sought and communicated when testing newborns. PMID:26729698

  2. Supporting Parental Decisions About Genomic Sequencing for Newborn Screening: The NC NEXUS Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Megan A.; Paquin, Ryan S.; Roche, Myra I.; Furberg, Robert D.; Rini, Christine; Berg, Jonathan S.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genomic sequencing technology have raised fundamental challenges to the traditional ways genomic information is communicated. These challenges will become increasingly complex and will affect a much larger population in the future if genomics is incorporated into standard newborn screening practice. Clinicians, public health officials, and other stakeholders will need to agree on the types of information that they should seek and communicate to parents. Currently, few evidence-based and validated tools are available to support parental informed decision-making. These tools will be necessary as genomics is integrated into clinical practice and public health systems. In this article we describe how the North Carolina Newborn Exome Sequencing for Universal Screening study is addressing the need to support parents in making informed decisions about the use of genomic testing in newborn screening. We outline the context for newborn screening and justify the need for parental decision support. We also describe the process of decision aid development and the data sources, processes, and best practices being used in development. By the end of the study, we will have an evidenced-based process and validated tools to support parental informed decision-making about the use of genomic sequencing in newborn screening. Data from the study will help answer important questions about which genomic information ought to be sought and communicated when testing newborns. PMID:26729698

  3. Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Downs, Stephen M; van Dyck, Peter C; Rinaldo, Piero; McDonald, Clement; Howell, R Rodrey; Zuckerman, Alan; Downing, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange (HIE) in this convergence of individual patient care and population health activities. For this reason, the American Health Information Community undertook three tasks described in this paper. First, a newborn screening use case was established to facilitate standards harmonization for common terminology and interoperability specifications guiding HIE. Second, newborn screening coding and terminology were developed for integration into electronic HIE activities. Finally, clarification of privacy, security, and clinical laboratory regulatory requirements governing information exchange was provided, serving as a framework to establish pathways for improving screening program timeliness, effectiveness, and efficiency of quality patient care services. PMID:20064796

  4. Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    van Dyck, Peter C; Rinaldo, Piero; McDonald, Clement; Howell, R Rodrey; Zuckerman, Alan; Downing, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange (HIE) in this convergence of individual patient care and population health activities. For this reason, the American Health Information Community undertook three tasks described in this paper. First, a newborn screening use case was established to facilitate standards harmonization for common terminology and interoperability specifications guiding HIE. Second, newborn screening coding and terminology were developed for integration into electronic HIE activities. Finally, clarification of privacy, security, and clinical laboratory regulatory requirements governing information exchange was provided, serving as a framework to establish pathways for improving screening program timeliness, effectiveness, and efficiency of quality patient care services. PMID:20064796

  5. Evaluating Harms in the Assessment of Net Benefit: A Framework for Newborn Screening Condition Review.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Aaron J; Comeau, Anne Marie; Grosse, Scott D; Tanksley, Susan; Prosser, Lisa A; Ojodu, Jelili; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Kemper, Alex R; Green, Nancy S

    2016-03-01

    Background The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children ("Advisory Committee") makes recommendations to the HHS Secretary regarding addition of new conditions to the national Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns. The Advisory Committee's decision-making process includes assessing the net benefit of screening for nominated conditions, informed by systematic evidence reviews generated by an independent Condition Review Workgroup. The evidence base regarding harms associated with screening for specific conditions is often more limited than that for benefits. Procedures The process for defining potential harms from newborn screening reviewed the frameworks from other public health evidence-based review processes, adapted to newborn screening by experts in systematic review, newborn screening programs and bioethics, with input from and approval by the Advisory Committee. Main findings To support the Advisory Committee's review of nominated conditions, the Workgroup has developed a standardized approach to evaluation of harms and relevant gaps in the evidence. Types of harms include the physical burden to infants; psychosocial and logistic burdens to families from screening or diagnostic evaluation; increased risk of medical treatment for infants diagnosed earlier than children with clinical presentation; delayed diagnosis from false negative results; psychosocial harm from false positive results; uncertainty of clinical diagnosis, age of onset or clinical spectrum; and disparities in access to diagnosis or therapy. Conclusions Estimating the numbers of children at risk, the magnitude, timing and likelihood of harms will be integrated into Workgroup reports to the Advisory Committee. PMID:26833040

  6. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  10. Newborn Screening for Genetic-Metabolic Diseases: Progress, Principles and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Neil A.

    This monograph, designed for persons involved in the organization and regulation of screening of newborns infants for Phenylketonuria (PKU) and other genetic-metabolic diseases reviews new developments in the field, makes recommendations, and provides information about specific conditions other than PKU that are detectable by screening. Discussed…

  11. Current Sickle Cell Screening Program for Newborns in New York City, 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Ranjeet; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Screening tests indicated that 141 out of 106,565 infants examined in New York City during 1979-80, had various forms of sickle cell anemia. Follow-up of 131 patients confirmed the original diagnoses, suggesting that the New York City Follow-up Program for Sickle Cell Screening of newborns was successful. (Author/MJL)

  12. Parents' Decisions to Screen Their Newborn for Fragile X Syndrome. FPG Snapshot #63

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2011

    2011-01-01

    State newborn screening (NBS) programs have expanded in recent years, and more tests may be added in the future. The expansion of neonatal screening raises ethical, legal, and social questions. The questions surrounding NBS for fragile X syndrome (FXS) typify these concerns. FXS is an X-linked genetic condition that is the most common inherited…

  13. Newborn screening healthcare information system based on service-oriented architecture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Weng, Yung-Ching; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chi-Huang; Tu, Chien-Ming; Wang, Zhenyu; Lai, Feipei

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we established a newborn screening system under the HL7/Web Services frameworks. We rebuilt the NTUH Newborn Screening Laboratory's original standalone architecture, having various heterogeneous systems operating individually, and restructured it into a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), distributed platform for further integrity and enhancements of sample collections, testing, diagnoses, evaluations, treatments or follow-up services, screening database management, as well as collaboration, communication among hospitals; decision supports and improving screening accuracy over the Taiwan neonatal systems are also addressed. In addition, the new system not only integrates the newborn screening procedures among phlebotomy clinics, referral hospitals, as well as the newborn screening center in Taiwan, but also introduces new models of screening procedures for the associated, medical practitioners. Furthermore, it reduces the burden of manual operations, especially the reporting services, those were heavily dependent upon previously. The new system can accelerate the whole procedures effectively and efficiently. It improves the accuracy and the reliability of the screening by ensuring the quality control during the processing as well. PMID:20703906

  14. Newborn screening for metabolic diseases: saving children's lives and improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Newborn screening for metabolic diseases was initially introduced in the 1960s with a program for the early diagnosis of phenylketonuria. Guidelines for the introduction of additional conditions to the screen required that the condition was sufficiently common to merit screening, that it was treatable and that the cost of diagnosis was not prohibitive. Additional conditions added to the screen included congenital hypothyroidism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The recognition of medium-chain acyl0CoA dehydrogenase deficiency coupled to the advent of tandem mass spectrometry as a diagnostic tool allowed for the inclusion of many more conditions into screening programs, some of which do not fit the original criteria for inclusion. This presentation will discuss the current state of newborn screening for metabolic diseases and report on clinical outcome measures of patients identified by screening. PMID:24886768

  15. State Laws Regarding the Retention and Use of Residual Newborn Screening Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Aaron; Anderson, Rebecca; Rothwell, Erin; Botkin, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After newborn screening has been completed, many states retain residual newborn screening dried blood samples for various purposes, including program evaluation, quality assurance, and biomedical research. The extent to which states possess legal authority to retain residual dried blood samples (DBS) and use them for purposes unrelated to newborn screening is unclear. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate state laws regarding the retention and use of DBS. METHODS: State statutes and regulations related to newborn screening of all 50 states plus the District of Columbia were accessed online between November 2008 and December 2009 and reviewed by 2 independent reviewers to determine the extent to which the retention and use of DBS were addressed. RESULTS: The retention or use of DBS has not been addressed in 18 states. In 4 states, DBS becomes state property. Eight states require that parents be provided information regarding the retention of DBS. Parents in 5 states may request the destruction of their child's residual sample. Parental consent is required under certain circumstances to release DBS for research in 6 states. One state prohibits DBS from being used for research purposes. CONCLUSIONS: States have wide variability in their policies regarding the retention and use of DBS. Many states have not addressed key issues, and some states that retain DBS may be acting outside the scope of their legal authority. The lack of transparency on the part of states in retaining DBS may undermine public trust in state newborn screening programs and the research enterprise. PMID:21444595

  16. The knowledge gap in expanded newborn screening: survey results from paediatricians in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Gennaccaro, M; Waisbren, S E; Marsden, D

    2005-01-01

    Massachusetts currently offers an optional expanded newborn screening programme that tests for 20 biochemical genetic disorders in addition to the mandated newborn screening tests, including phenylketonuria (PKU) and nine other biochemical genetic disorders. We conducted a mail survey of 550 paediatricians listed in the 2000 Massachusetts Healthcare Directory to determine paediatricians' preparedness in discussing expanded newborn screening and its results with families, and to determine in what specific format physicians in Massachusetts would prefer to receive educational materials and updates. Of surveys mailed, 35% (190/550) were returned within the allotted 3 weeks: 25 paediatricians (14%) were unaware of expanded newborn screening; 78 respondents (42%) indicated feeling less than prepared talking about test results with families; 100 paediatricians (54%) indicated a lack of information about metabolic disorders; 134 (73%) preferred information sent in postal mailings, 62 (34%) preferred grand rounds, 60 (33%) preferred educational seminars, and 58 (32%) preferred websites. Other formats receiving preferences of less than 30% included e-mail (27%), phone calls (8%), video (6%), and distance learning (1%). Paediatricians are ill-prepared for expanded newborn screening for biochemical genetic disorders. To address this problem, paediatricians in Massachusetts indicated a preference for unsolicited periodic mailings including short reviews and brochures. PMID:16435173

  17. Effects of newborn screening of cystic fibrosis on reported maternal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Boland, C; Thompson, N L

    1990-11-01

    Screening for cystic fibrosis is highly controversial. Concerns have been expressed that newborn screening may cause mothers, who had considered their child to be healthy before diagnosis, to overprotect their child. Some critics of screening also suggest that a period of delay from onset of symptoms to diagnosis may help a mother adjust to the reality of the child's lethal condition. This study compared the strength of overprotective child rearing attitudes of 29 mothers whose children were screened (13 had symptomatic children and 16 asymptomatic children) with the attitudes of 29 mothers whose children were diagnosed after the onset of symptoms. Results indicate that newborn screening had not increased a mother's tendency to overprotect her child with cystic fibrosis and in some cases the tendency had decreased. Further, delay in diagnosis when screening was not conducted usually caused mothers considerable personal distress. PMID:2248536

  18. Newborn screening for citrin deficiency and carnitine uptake defect using second-tier molecular tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis is a powerful tool for newborn screening, and many rare inborn errors of metabolism are currently screened using MS/MS. However, the sensitivity of MS/MS screening for several inborn errors, including citrin deficiency (screened by citrulline level) and carnitine uptake defect (CUD, screened by free carnitine level), is not satisfactory. This study was conducted to determine whether a second-tier molecular test could improve the sensitivity of citrin deficiency and CUD detection without increasing the false-positive rate. Methods Three mutations in the SLC25A13 gene (for citrin deficiency) and one mutation in the SLC22A5 gene (for CUD) were analyzed in newborns who demonstrated an inconclusive primary screening result (with levels between the screening and diagnostic cutoffs). Results The results revealed that 314 of 46 699 newborns received a second-tier test for citrin deficiency, and two patients were identified; 206 of 30 237 newborns received a second-tier testing for CUD, and one patient was identified. No patients were identified using the diagnostic cutoffs. Although the incidences for citrin deficiency (1:23 350) and CUD (1:30 000) detected by screening are still lower than the incidences calculated from the mutation carrier rates, the second-tier molecular test increases the sensitivity of newborn screening for citrin deficiency and CUD without increasing the false-positive rate. Conclusions Utilizing a molecular second-tier test for citrin deficiency and carnitine transporter deficiency is feasible. PMID:23394329

  19. Cobalamin C Disease Missed by Newborn Screening in a Patient with Low Carnitine Level.

    PubMed

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C; Serdaroglu, Esra; Muraresku, Colleen; Ficicioglu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin C (CblC) disease is the most common inherited disorder of intracellular cobalamin metabolism. It is a multisystemic disorder mainly affecting the eye and brain and characterized biochemically by methylmalonic aciduria, low methionine level, and homocystinuria. We report a patient found to have CblC disease who initially presented with low carnitine and normal propionylcarnitine (C3) levels on newborn screen. Newborn screening likely failed to detect CblC in this patient because of both his low carnitine level and the presence of a mild phenotype. PMID:25772322

  20. High 17-hydroxyprogesterone level in newborn screening test for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a female infant with an elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone level detected in the newborn screening for 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The physical examination was unremarkable including no dysmorphism and no signs of virilisation. In the absence of clinical evidence of androgen excess, as would be expected in a female infant with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, further evaluation was performed and led to the diagnosis of the extremely rare disorder, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency. This case highlights the differential diagnosis of elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels in newborn screening and the importance of correct diagnosis for improving patient care. PMID:26912766

  1. Enhancing the quality and efficiency of newborn screening programs through the use of health information technology.

    PubMed

    Downing, Gregory J; Zuckerman, Alan E; Coon, Constanze; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A

    2010-04-01

    A variety of efforts are underway at national, state, regional, and local levels to enhance the performance of programs for early detection of inherited diseases and conditions of newborn infants. Newborn screening programs serve a vital purpose in identifying nonsymptomatic clinical conditions and enabling early intervention strategies that lessen morbidity and mortality. Currently, the programs of most intense focus are early hearing detection and intervention, using physiological techniques for audiology screening and use of newborn dried blood spots for detection of metabolites or proteins representing inherited disorders. One of the primary challenges to effective newborn screening programs to date has been the inability to provide information in a timely and easily accessible way to a variety of users. Other challenging communication issues being faced include the complexity introduced by the diversity of conditions for which testing is conducted and laboratory methods being used by each state's screening programs, lack of an electronic information infrastructure to facilitate information exchange, and variation in policies that enable access to information while protecting patient privacy and confidentiality. In this study, we address steps being taken to understand these challenges, outline progress made to date to overcome them, and provide examples of how electronic health information exchange will enhance the utility of newborn screening. It is likely that future advances in science and technology will bring many more opportunities to prevent and preempt disabilities among children through early detection programs. To take their advantage, effective communication strategies are needed among the public health, primary care practice, referral/specialty service, and consumer advocacy communities to provide continuity of information required for medical decision-making throughout prenatal, newborn, and early childhood periods of patient care. PMID:20207265

  2. [Justification for the study screening newborn hearing screening in terms of regionalization of perinatal care in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Shcherbyna, A V; Bychkov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Conducting research screening newborn hearing screening in terms of regional perinatal centers in Ukraine and further rehabilitation of children with hearing impairment is a key step in their integration into society. Universal newborn hearing screening should be mandatory, especially in perinatal centers, because it has significant medical, social and economic effects. It is also necessary to reorganize the existing regional offices surdologichesky and create on their bases and methodological Regional Medical Center hearing and speech problems, which will provide high-quality diagnosis, epidemiological data form, will hold the register of children diagnosed with hearing defects, organize them continuously active surveillance, hearing aids and effective rehabilitation, to ensure the quality of screening. Creating a distributed database for these patients, by far. Will achieve success in the integration of children with special needs in society. PMID:25286608

  3. Web-Based Newborn Screening System for Metabolic Diseases: Machine Learning Versus Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Chen, Han-Ping; Su, Xing-Yu; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Background A hospital information system (HIS) that integrates screening data and interpretation of the data is routinely requested by hospitals and parents. However, the accuracy of disease classification may be low because of the disease characteristics and the analytes used for classification. Objective The objective of this study is to describe a system that enhanced the neonatal screening system of the Newborn Screening Center at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The system was designed and deployed according to a service-oriented architecture (SOA) framework under the Web services .NET environment. The system consists of sample collection, testing, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up services among collaborating hospitals. To improve the accuracy of newborn screening, machine learning and optimal feature selection mechanisms were investigated for screening newborns for inborn errors of metabolism. Methods The framework of the Newborn Screening Hospital Information System (NSHIS) used the embedded Health Level Seven (HL7) standards for data exchanges among heterogeneous platforms integrated by Web services in the C# language. In this study, machine learning classification was used to predict phenylketonuria (PKU), hypermethioninemia, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency. The classification methods used 347,312 newborn dried blood samples collected at the Center between 2006 and 2011. Of these, 220 newborns had values over the diagnostic cutoffs (positive cases) and 1557 had values that were over the screening cutoffs but did not meet the diagnostic cutoffs (suspected cases). The original 35 analytes and the manifested features were ranked based on F score, then combinations of the top 20 ranked features were selected as input features to support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to obtain optimal feature sets. These feature sets were tested using 5-fold cross-validation and optimal models were generated. The datasets

  4. Newborn screening for autism: in search of candidate biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Mizejewski, Gerald J; Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Pass, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represents a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in social interaction, language, communication and range of interests. Autism is usually diagnosed in children 3–5 years of age using behavioral characteristics; thus, diagnosis shortly after birth would be beneficial for early initiation of treatment. Aim This retrospective study sought to identify newborns at risk for ASD utilizing bloodspot specimens in an immunoassay. Materials & methods The present study utilized stored frozen specimens from ASD children already diagnosed at 15–36 months of age. The newborn specimens and controls were analyzed by immunoassay in a multiplex system that included 90 serum biomarkers and subjected to statisical analysis. Results Three sets of five biomarkers associated with ASD were found that differed from control groups. The 15 candidate biomarkers were then discussed regarding their association with ASD. Conclusion This study determined that a statistically selected panel of 15 biomarkers successfully discriminated presumptive newborns at risk for ASD from those of nonaffected controls. PMID:23547820

  5. Succinylacetone as Primary Marker to Detect Tyrosinemia Type I in Newborns and its Measurement by Newborn Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús, Víctor R.; Adam, Barbara W.; Mandel, Daniel; Cuthbert, Carla D.; Matern, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type I (TYR I) is caused by autosomal recessive fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and is characterized by development of severe liver disease in infancy and neurologic crises. If left untreated, most patients die of liver failure in the first years of life. Intervention with medication is effective when initiated during the first month of life. This improvement in the treatment of TYR I patients influenced the decision to include TYR I in the US Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Recommended Uniform Screening Panel. However, while tyrosine is routinely measured in newborn screening (NBS) by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), elevated tyrosine levels are not specific to TYR I. To improve the specificity of NBS for TYR I, several assays were developed to measure succinylacetone (SUAC) in dried blood spots (DBS). SUAC is a pathognomonic marker of TYR I, and its detection by NBS MS/MS is possible. This review of the current status of NBS for TYR I in the US is the result of discussions at the HHS Secretary’s (Discretionary) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children about the inconsistent implementation of effective NBS for TYR I in the US. We sought to understand the different TYR I screening practices in US NBS programs. Results indicate that 50 out of 51 NBS programs in the US screen for TYR I, and a successful SUAC performance evaluation scheme is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Programmatic and methodological barriers were identified that prevent widespread adoption of SUAC measurements in NBS laboratories. However, since SUAC detection is currently the best approach to NBS for TYR I, a further delay of the addition of SUAC measurement into NBS procedures is discouraged. SUAC measurement should improve both the false positive and false negative rate in NBS for TYR I thereby yielding the desired benefits for affected patients at no expense to the overall

  6. The Regional Genetic and Newborn Screening Service Collaboratives: The First Two Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puryear, Michele; Weissman, Gloria; Watson, Michael; Mann, Marie; Strickland, Bonnie; van Dyck, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Newborn screening and genetic technologies are expanding and changing rapidly, increasing the demand for genetic specialty services. Because of the scarcity and geographic maldistribution of genetic specialty services, access to these services is a critical issue. This article discusses some of the efforts initiated by the Maternal and Child…

  7. Making the Case for Objective Performance Metrics in Newborn Screening by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldo, Piero; Zafari, Saba; Tortorelli, Silvia; Matern, Dietrich

    2006-01-01

    The expansion of newborn screening programs to include multiplex testing by tandem mass spectrometry requires understanding and close monitoring of performance metrics. This is not done consistently because of lack of defined targets, and interlaboratory comparison is almost nonexistent. Between July 2004 and April 2006 (N = 176,185 cases), the…

  8. The Impact of the National Newborn Hearing Screening Programme on Educational Services in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Wendy; Young, Alys; Tattersall, Helen; Uus, Kai; Bamford, John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents results related to the impact on educational support services of the introduction of the first phase of the national Newborn Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP) in England. This study was funded by the Department of Health and undertaken as one element of a national evaluation of NHSP across a range of domains. It presents…

  9. The Role of National Library of Medicine[R] Web Sites in Newborn Screening Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomous, Cathy; Miller, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening programs and subsequent detection of rare genetic disorders challenge parents and their medical providers to learn about the treatment and management of these disorders. Many people seek medical information on the Internet but may encounter requests for registration or fees, or find that resources are out of date,…

  10. Levels of Evidence: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) and Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Systems (EHDI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Levels of evidence differ according to the audience addressed. Implementation of universal newborn hearing screening requires responses to a complex myriad of diverse groups: the general public, families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing, the deaf and hard of hearing communities, hospital administrators, physicians (pediatricians,…

  11. Critical Role of the March of Dimes in the Expansion of Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howse, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Marina; Green, Nancy S.

    2006-01-01

    Expansion of newborn screening (NBS) has been driven primarily by a combination of advances in technology and medical treatment, and the sustained advocacy efforts of consumers and voluntary health organizations. The longstanding leadership of the March of Dimes has been credited by many as a critical factor in the expansion and improvement of…

  12. A conceptual framework for rationalized and standardized Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) programs.

    PubMed

    Leo, Carlo Giacomo; Mincarone, Pierpaolo; Sabina, Saverio; Latini, Giuseppe; Wong, John B

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss is the most frequent birth defect. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing established quality of care process indicators for Universal Newborn Hearing Screening starting from 1999. In a previous systematic review of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening studies we highlighted substantial variability in program design and in reported performance data. In order to overcome these heterogeneous findings we think it is necessary to optimize the implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening programs with an appropriate application of the planning, executing, and monitoring, verifications and reporting phases. For this reason we propose a conceptual framework that logically integrates these three phases and, consequently, a tool (a check-list) for their rationalization and standardization.Our paper intends to stimulate debate on how to ameliorate the routine application of high quality Universal Newborn Hearing Screening programs. The conceptual framework is proposed to optimize, rationalise and standardise their implementation. The checklist is intended to allow an inter-program comparison by removing heterogeneity in processes description and assessment. PMID:26872853

  13. Ultrasonography in screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip in newborns: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Woolacott, Nerys F; Puhan, Milo A; Steurer, Johann; Kleijnen, Jos

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy and effectiveness of the screening of all newborn infants for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) using ultrasound imaging, as is standard practice in some European countries but not in the United Kingdom, the United States, or Scandinavia. Design Systematic review. Data sources Twenty three medical, economic, and grey literature databases (to March 2004), with no limitations of design or language; some references were provided by experts. Selection of studies Only diagnostic accuracy studies and comparative studies conducted in an unselected newborn population were eligible for the review. Two reviewers independently selected the studies and performed the quality assessment. Results The review identified one diagnostic accuracy study, and this was of limited quality. In this study the reference standard was treatment up to age of 8 months or an abnormal ultrasound finding at age 8 months. Ultrasound screening had a sensitivity of 88.5% (95% confidence interval 84.1% to 92.1%), specificity of 96.7% (96.4% to 97.4%), a positive predictive value of 61.6% and a negative predictive value of 99.4%. Ten studies evaluated the impact of ultrasound in screening, but these too had various methodological weaknesses, limiting the reliability of their findings. Compared with clinical screening, general ultrasound screening in newborns may increase overall treatment rates, but ultrasound screening seems to be associated with shorter and less intrusive treatment. Conclusions Clear evidence is lacking either for or against general ultrasound screening of newborn infants for DDH. Studies that investigate the natural course of the disorder, the optimal treatment for DDH, and the best strategy for ultrasound screening are needed. PMID:15930025

  14. The otolaryngologist's role in newborn hearing screening and early intervention.

    PubMed

    Bower, Charles M; St John, Rachel

    2014-10-01

    Infant hearing loss is common. Screening is performed in more than 98% of US infants. Otolaryngologists play an important role in identification and management of infants and children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Otolaryngologists should routinely assess for hearing screening results and intervene for screens not passed. Long-term follow-up and reassessment of patients with hearing loss is an ongoing component of otolaryngology practice. This article reviews the otolaryngologist's role in the management of infants and children who are deaf or hard of hearing from screening to intervention and management. PMID:25213275

  15. Newborn screening in Japan: restructuring for the new era.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2008-12-01

    Nationwide neonatal mass screening for inherited metabolic diseases has started in Japan since 1977. At least 8000 children have probably been spared from handicaps resulting from such diseases over the past 30 years. Recently remarkable changes have been made to the evolving neonatal screening system. Declining birth rate and economic problems in Japan have demanded a more effective neonatal screening system. Development of new innovative screening methods and treatment tools, e.g. tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) technology and enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), have facilitated expansion of target diseases in neonatal screening. We have carried out pilot screening using MS/MS in 6 laboratories in Japan. The incidence of inherited metabolic diseases was found to be 1 in 9330 (65 cases out of 606,380 babies screened) during the period between 1997 and 2007. The incidence was lower than those of Europe or USA (about 1 in 4000 to 5000). The disease frequency between unscreened symptomatic cases and asymptomatic cases detected through MS/MS screening were also found to be different. In MS/MS screening, the most common organic acidemia was propionic acidemia, whereas in symptomatic cases, methylmalonic acidemia was the most common. Further study of ethnic diversity in severity of propionic academia is required. The outcomes of patients detected in the MS/MS screening were significantly favourable. The results showed the benefits of MS/ MS screening. The diagnostic support network for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/ MS) analysis and enzyme determination has also been developed. We have developed an automated system of GC/MS data processing and auto-diagnosis which allowed the GC/MS data processing to be extremely fast and simple. Enzyme evaluation for diagnostic support for screening, including a method using peripheral blood and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and another method of in-vitro probe assay using cultured

  16. Evaluation of a novel, commercially available mass spectrometry kit for newborn screening including succinylacetone without hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Metz, Thomas F; Mechtler, Thomas P; Merk, Michael; Gottschalk, Anne; Lukačin, Richard; Herkner, Kurt R; Kasper, David C

    2012-08-16

    Newborn screening for tyrosinemia type I (Tyr-I) is mandatory to identify infants at risk before life-threatening symptoms occur. The analysis of tyrosine alone is limited, and might lead to false-negative results. Consequently, the analysis of succinylacetone (SUAC) is needed. Current protocols are time-consuming, and above all, include hazardous reagents such hydrazine. We evaluated a novel, commercial kit to analyze amino acids, acylcarnitines and SUAC with a significantly less harmful hydrazine derivative in a newborn screening laboratory. Dried blood spot specimens from 4683 newborns and samples from known patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) were analyzed by a novel protocol and compared to an in-house screening assay. All samples were derivatized with butanol-HCl after extraction from 1/8-inch DBS punches. For the novel protocol, the residual blood spots were extracted separately for SUAC, converted into hydrazone, combined with amino acids and acylcarnitines, and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry using internal isotope-labeled standards. All newborns were successfully tested, and 74 patients with IEMs including three with Tyr-I (SUAC 1.50, 4.80 and 6.49; tyrosine levels 93.10, 172.40 and 317.73, respectively) were detected accurately. The mean SUAC level in non-affected newborns was 0.68 μmol/l (cut-off 1.29 μmol/l). The novel assay was demonstrated to be accurate in the detection of newborns with IEM, robust, and above all, without the risk of the exposure to highly toxic reagents and requirement of additional equipment for toxic fume evacuation. PMID:22521492

  17. Performance and characteristics of the Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in England: The first seven years

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Sally A; Sutton, Graham J; Davis, Adrian C

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the performance of the universal newborn hearing screen in England. Design: Retrospective analysis of population screening records. Study sample: A total of 4 645 823 children born 1 April 2004 to 31 March 2013. Results: 97.5% of the eligible population complete screening by 4/5 weeks of age and 98.9% complete screening by three months of age. The refer rate for the 12/13 birth cohort is 2.6%. The percentage of screen positive (i.e. referred) babies commencing follow up by four weeks of age and six months of age is 82.5% and 95.8% respectively. The yield of bilateral PCHL from the screen is around 1/1000. For bilateral PCHL in the 12/13 birth cohort the median age is nine days at screen completion, 30 days at entry into follow up, 49 days at confirmation, 50 days at referral to early intervention, and 82 days at hearing-aid fitting. Conclusion: The performance of the newborn hearing screening programme has improved continuously. The yield of bilateral PCHL from the screen is about 1/1000 as expected. The age of identification and management is well within the first six months of life, although there remains scope for further improvement with respect to timely entry into follow up. PMID:25766652

  18. Maternal Glutaric Acidemia, Type I Identified by Newborn Screening*

    PubMed Central

    Crombez, Eric A.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Spector, Elaine; Chan, Erica; Salazar, Denise; Neidich, Julie; Goodman, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    We report two women with glutaric acidemia type I in whom the diagnosis was unsuspected until a low carnitine level was found in their newborn children. Both mothers had low carnitine in plasma. In the first, organic acid analysis was only done after fibroblast studies revealed normal carnitine uptake. Having learned from the first family, organic acid analysis was done immediately in the mother of family 2. In both, the plasma acylcarnitine profile was normal but both excreted the metabolites typical of their disorder. One of the women was a compound heterozygote for distinct mutations in the glutaric acid dehydrogenase gene, whereas the second was either homozygous or hemizygous for a mutation in Exon 6 of the gene. PMID:18304851

  19. Parental permission for pilot newborn screening research: guidelines from the NBSTRN.

    PubMed

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Watson, Michael S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Anderson, Rebecca; Berry, Susan A; Bonhomme, Natasha; Brosco, Jeffrey P; Comeau, Anne M; Goldenberg, Aaron; Goldman, Edward; Therrell, Bradford; Levy-Fisch, Jill; Tarini, Beth; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    There is broad recognition of the need for population-based research to assess the safety and efficacy of newborn screening (NBS) for conditions that are not on current panels. However, prospective population-based research poses significant ethical, regulatory, and logistical challenges. In the context of NBS, there have been a variety of approaches that address parental decision-making in pilot studies of new screening tests or conditions. This article presents an ethical and legal analysis of the role of parental permission by the Bioethics and Legal Work Group of the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network created under a contract from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Circumstances are outlined in which a waiver of documentation of permission or a waiver of permission may be ethically and legally appropriate in the NBS context. These guidelines do not constitute American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:24394680

  20. Parental Permission for Pilot Newborn Screening Research: Guidelines From the NBSTRN

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Watson, Michael S.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Anderson, Rebecca; Berry, Susan A.; Bonhomme, Natasha; Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Comeau, Anne M.; Goldenberg, Aaron; Goldman, Edward; Therrell, Bradford; Levy-Fisch, Jill; Tarini, Beth; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    There is broad recognition of the need for population-based research to assess the safety and efficacy of newborn screening (NBS) for conditions that are not on current panels. However, prospective population-based research poses significant ethical, regulatory, and logistical challenges. In the context of NBS, there have been a variety of approaches that address parental decision-making in pilot studies of new screening tests or conditions. This article presents an ethical and legal analysis of the role of parental permission by the Bioethics and Legal Work Group of the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network created under a contract from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Circumstances are outlined in which a waiver of documentation of permission or a waiver of permission may be ethically and legally appropriate in the NBS context. These guidelines do not constitute American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:24394680

  1. Identifying the Optimal Age to Perform Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, M; Redshaw, E; Crossley, E; Phillips, C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Permanent congenital hearing loss affects up to 6/1000 births in developing countries. Currently, in Uganda there is no newborn screening for hearing loss (NSHL) program and no published work on this topic. Within the existing healthcare system there are two opportunities to deliver screening, at birth or 6 weeks of age when infants receive their immunizations. Aim: This study explored the outcomes of otoacoustic emission (OAE) testing in infants at birth and 6 weeks of age, to identify the optimal age for screening. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional pilot study recruited 60 consecutive infants from two health centres in Kampala, Uganda. Thirty infants were newborns recruited from the postnatal ward and 30 were aged 4–8 weeks from the immunization clinic, we performed OAE testing on all infants. Results: The results showed 56.7% (17/30) of newborn infants passed OAE testing compared with 90.0% (27/30) of the immunization infants, P < 0.01. Furthermore, of the 11 newborn infants aged ≥24 h of age 90.9% (10/11) passed, compared with the 19 infants <24 h of age where 37% (7/19) passed, P < 0.01. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a higher pass rate for OAE testing for infants ≥24 h of age compared to those <24 h of age. The overall lower pass rate of the newborn infants could be due to external ear debris and middle ear fluid compromising the OAE testing. These findings would support a NSHL programme in Uganda that offers screening to infants ≥24 h of age, to maximize the cost-effectiveness of the program. PMID:27057378

  2. FMR1 CGG allele size and prevalence ascertained through newborn screening in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Population screening for FMR1 mutations has been a topic of considerable discussion since the FMR1 gene was identified in 1991. Advances in understanding the molecular basis of fragile X syndrome (FXS) and in genetic testing methods have led to new, less expensive methodology to use for large screening endeavors. A core criterion for newborn screening is an accurate understanding of the public health burden of a disease, considering both disease severity and prevalence rate. This article addresses this need by reporting prevalence rates observed in a pilot newborn screening study for FXS in the US. Methods Blood spot screening of 14,207 newborns (7,312 males and 6,895 females) was conducted in three birthing hospitals across the United States beginning in November 2008, using a PCR-based approach. Results The prevalence of gray zone alleles was 1:66 females and 1:112 males, while the prevalence of a premutation was 1:209 females and 1:430 males. Differences in prevalence rates were observed among the various ethnic groups; specifically higher frequency for gray zone alleles in males was observed in the White group compared to the Hispanic and African-American groups. One full mutation male was identified (>200 CGG repeats). Conclusions The presented pilot study shows that newborn screening in fragile X is technically feasible and provides overall prevalence of the premutation and gray zone alleles in the USA, suggesting that the prevalence of the premutation, particularly in males, is higher than has been previously reported. PMID:23259642

  3. Impact of Co-Occurring Birth Defects on the Timing of Newborn Hearing Screening and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Derek A.; Stampfel, Caroline C.; Bodurtha, Joann N.; Dodson, Kelley M.; Pandya, Arti; Lynch, Kathleen B.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Early detection of hearing loss in all newborns and timely intervention are critical to children's cognitive, verbal, behavioral, and social development. The initiation of appropriate early intervention services before 6 months of age can prevent or reduce negative developmental consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess, using large, population-based registries, the effect of co-occurring birth defects (CBDs) on the timing and overall rate of hearing screening and diagnosis. Method The authors linked statewide data from newborn hearing screenings, a birth defects registry, and birth certificates to assess the timeliness of newborn hearing screening and diagnosis of hearing loss (HL) for infants with and without CBDs in 485 children with confirmed HL. Results Nearly one third (31.5%) of children with HL had 1 or more CBDs. The presence of CBDs prolonged the time of the initial infant hearing screening, which contributed to further delays in the subsequent diagnosis of HL. Conclusions Better coordination of HL assessment into treatment plans for children with CBDs may enable earlier diagnosis of HL and provide opportunities for intervention that will affect long-term developmental outcomes for these children. PMID:21940980

  4. Maternal Consequences of the Detection of Fragile X Carriers in Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Anne; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora; Powell, Cynthia M.; Roche, Myra; Gane, Louise W.; Sideris, John

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The possibility of newborn screening for fragile X syndrome is complicated by the potential for identifying premutation carriers. Although knowing the child’s carrier status has potential benefits, the possibility of late-onset disorders in carrier children and their parents raises concerns about whether such information would be distressing to parents and potentially more harmful than helpful. This study sought to answer this question by offering voluntary fragile X screening to new parents and returning results for both the full mutation and premutation FMR1 gene expansions. We tested the assumption that such information could lead to adverse mental health outcomes or decision regret. We also wanted to know if child age and spousal support were associated with the outcomes of interest. METHODS: Eighteen mothers of screen-positive infants with the premutation and 15 comparison mothers completed a battery of assessments of maternal anxiety, postpartum depression, stress, family quality of life, decision regret, and spousal support. The study was longitudinal, with an average of 3 assessments per mother. RESULTS: The premutation group was not statistically different from the comparison group on measures of anxiety, depression, stress, or quality of life. A subset of mothers experienced clinically significant anxiety and decision regret, but factors associated with these outcomes could not be identified. Greater spousal support was generally associated with more positive outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Although we did not find evidence of significant adverse events, disclosure of newborn carrier status remains an important consideration in newborn screening policy. PMID:26169437

  5. Newborn screening for galactosemia in the United States: looking back, looking around, and looking ahead.

    PubMed

    Pyhtila, Brook M; Shaw, Kelly A; Neumann, Samantha E; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    It has been 50 years since the first newborn screening (NBS) test for galactosemia was conducted in Oregon, and almost 10 years since the last US state added galactosemia to their NBS panel. During that time an estimated >2,500 babies with classic galactosemia have been identified by NBS. Most of these infants were spared the trauma of acute disease by early diagnosis and intervention, and many are alive today because of NBS. Newborn screening for galactosemia is a success story, but not yet a story with a completely happy ending. NBS, follow-up testing, and intervention for galactosemia continue to present challenges that highlight gaps in our knowledge. Here we compare galactosemia screening and follow-up data from 39 NBS programs gathered from the states directly or from public sources. On some matters the programs agreed: for example, those providing relevant data all identify classic galactosemia in close to 1/50,000 newborns and recommend immediate and lifelong dietary restriction of galactose for those infants. On other matters the programs disagree. For example, Duarte galactosemia (DG) detection rates vary dramatically among states, largely reflecting differences in screening approach. For infants diagnosed with DG, >80% of the programs surveyed recommend complete or partial dietary galactose restriction for the first year of life, or give mixed recommendations; <20% recommend no intervention. This disparity presents an ongoing dilemma for families and healthcare providers that could and should be resolved. PMID:24718839

  6. First Colombian Multicentric Newborn Screening for Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marin, Jorge Enrique; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Angel-Muller, Edith; Rubio, Jorge; Arenas, Jaime; Osorio, Elkin; Nuñez, Lilian; Pinzon, Lyda; Mendez-Cordoba, Luis Carlos; Bustos, Agustin; de-la-Hoz, Isabel; Silva, Pedro; Beltran, Monica; Chacon, Leonor; Marrugo, Martha; Manjarres, Cristina; Baquero, Hernando; Lora, Fabiana; Torres, Elizabeth; Zuluaga, Oscar Elias; Estrada, Monica; Moscote, Lacides; Silva, Myriam Teresa; Rivera, Raul; Molina, Angie; Najera, Shirley; Sanabria, Antonio; Ramirez, Maria Luisa; Alarcon, Claudia; Restrepo, Natalia; Falla, Alejandra; Rodriguez, Tailandia; Castaño, Giovanny

    2011-01-01

    Aims To determine the incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis in Colombian newborns from 19 hospital or maternal child health services from seven different cities of five natural geographic regions (Caribbean, Central, Andean, Amazonia and Eastern). Materials and Methods We collected 15,333 samples from umbilical cord blood between the period of March 2009 to May 2010 in 19 different hospitals and maternal-child health services from seven different cities. We applied an IgM ELISA assay (Vircell, Spain) to determine the frequency of IgM anti Toxoplasma. The results in blood cord samples were confirmed either by western blot and repeated ELISA IgM assay. In a sub-sample of 1,613 children that were negative by the anti-Toxoplasma IgM assay, the frequency of specific anti-Toxoplasma IgA by the ISAGA assay was determined. All children with positive samples by IgM, IgA, clinical diagnosis or treatment during pregnancy were recalled for confirmatory tests after day 10 of life. Results 61 positive samples for specific IgM (0.39%) and 9 positives for IgA (0.5%) were found. 143 questionnaires were positive for a clinical diagnosis or treatment for toxoplasmosis during pregnancy. 109 out of the 218 children that had some of the criteria for postnatal confirmatory tests were followed. Congenital toxoplasmosis infection was confirmed in 15 children: 7 were symptomatic, and three of them died before the first month of life (20% of lethality). A significant correlation was found between a high incidence of markers for congenital toxoplasmosis and higher mean annual rainfall for the city. Conclusions Incidence for congenital toxoplasmosis is significantly different between hospitals or maternal child health services from different cities in Colombia. Mean annual rainfall was correlated with incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:21655304

  7. Infrastructure and Educational Needs of Newborn Screening Short-Term Follow-Up Programs within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative: A Pilot Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bellcross, Cecelia A.; Harmond, Lokie; Floyd-Browning, Phaidra; Singh, Rani

    2015-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) follow-up protocols vary significantly by state, and there is a need to better understand the infrastructure and communication flow of NBS programs. In addition, assessment of the educational needs of families and providers with regard to the implications of NBS results is required to inform the development of appropriate informational resources and training opportunities. To begin to address these issues, we administered a web-based survey to state NBS coordinators within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative (SERC). Fourteen coordinators responded to the survey, including at least one from each of the 10 SERC states/territories. Over one-third of respondents had never received formal training regarding the metabolic conditions identified on NBS. Most communicated results via telephone or fax, though two centers indicated use of a web-based platform. Only two programs were involved in directly reporting results to the family. Four programs reported a long-term follow-up protocol. Deficits were noted for primary care provider (PCP) knowledge of metabolic disorders identified on NBS, and how to inform parents of abnormal results. Close to half indicated that the adequacy of the number of genetic counselors, dietitians, and medical/biochemical geneticists was minimal to insufficient. Respondents uniformly recognized the importance of providing additional educational and informational resources in multiple categories to NBS staff, PCPs, and families. PMID:27417806

  8. Questioning the consensus: managing carrier status results generated by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Robert, Jason Scott; Hayeems, Robin Z

    2009-02-01

    An apparent consensus governs the management of carrier status information generated incidentally through newborn screening: results cannot be withheld from parents. This normative stance encodes the focus on autonomy and distaste for paternalism that characterize the principles of clinical bioethics. However, newborn screening is a classic public health intervention in which paternalism may trump autonomy and through which parents are-in effect-required to receive carrier information. In truth, the disposition of carrier results generates competing moral infringements: to withhold information or require its possession. Resolving this dilemma demands consideration of a distinctive body of public health ethics to highlight the moral imperatives associated with the exercise of collective authority in the pursuit of public health benefits. PMID:19059852

  9. Questioning the Consensus: Managing Carrier Status Results Generated by Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jason Scott; Hayeems, Robin Z.

    2009-01-01

    An apparent consensus governs the management of carrier status information generated incidentally through newborn screening: results cannot be withheld from parents. This normative stance encodes the focus on autonomy and distaste for paternalism that characterize the principles of clinical bioethics. However, newborn screening is a classic public health intervention in which paternalism may trump autonomy and through which parents are—in effect—required to receive carrier information. In truth, the disposition of carrier results generates competing moral infringements: to withhold information or require its possession. Resolving this dilemma demands consideration of a distinctive body of public health ethics to highlight the moral imperatives associated with the exercise of collective authority in the pursuit of public health benefits. PMID:19059852

  10. Good laboratory practices for biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening are essential laboratory services for the screening, detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism or inherited metabolic disorders. Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized on the basis of the level of testing complexity as either waived (i.e., from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived testing (which includes tests of moderate and high complexity). Laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing are required by CLIA regulations to meet the general quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the personnel requirements for high-complexity testing. Laboratories that perform public health newborn screening are subject to the same CLIA regulations and applicable state requirements. As the number of inherited metabolic diseases that are included in state-based newborn screening programs continues to increase, ensuring the quality of performance and delivery of testing services remains a continuous challenge not only for public health laboratories and other newborn screening facilities but also for biochemical genetic testing laboratories. To help ensure the quality of laboratory testing, CDC collaborated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Institutes of Health to develop guidelines for laboratories to meet CLIA requirements and apply additional quality assurance measures for these areas of genetic testing. This report provides recommendations for good laboratory practices that were developed based on recommendations from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, with additional input from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society; the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; and representatives of newborn

  11. Defining the Newborn Blood Spot Screening Reference Interval for TSH: Impact of Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Ivan; Heales, Simon; Ifederu, Adeboye; Langham, Shirley; Hindmarsh, Peter; Cole, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is variability in the congenital hypothyroidism (CH) newborn screening TSH cutoff across the United Kingdom. Objective: To determine the influences of year, gender, and ethnicity on screening variability and examine whether there is an optimal operational TSH cutoff. Design and Setting: Single center, retrospective population study using blood spot TSH cards received by the Great Ormond Street Hospital Screening Laboratory between 2006 and 2012. Patients: A total of 824 588 newborn screening blood spot TSH cards. Intervention: Blood spot TSH results were recorded with demographic data including the Ethnic Category Code. Main Outcome Measures: The proportions of samples exceeding different TSH cutoffs, ranked by ethnicity. Results: The proportion of samples exceeding the TSH cutoff increased over time, with the cutoff at 4 mU/L, but not at 6 mU/L. There was a consistent trend with ethnicity, irrespective of cutoff, with the odds ratio of exceeding the TSH cutoff lowest (∼1.0) in White babies, higher in Pakistani and Bangladeshi (>2.0), and highest in Chinese (>3.5). Conclusions: The blood spot TSH screening data demonstrate a clear ranking according to ethnicity for differences in mean TSH. This suggests that there may be ethnic differences in thyroid physiology. Ethnic diversity within populations needs to be considered when establishing and interpreting screening TSH cutoffs. PMID:27399348

  12. Screening newborns for metabolic disorders based on targeted metabolomics using tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Ran

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of newborn screening is to diagnose genetic, metabolic, and other inherited disorders, at their earliest to start treatment before the clinical manifestations become evident. Understanding and tracing the biochemical data obtained from tandem mass spectrometry is vital for early diagnosis of metabolic diseases associated with such disorders. Accordingly, it is important to focus on the entire diagnostic process, including differential and confirmatory diagnostic options, and the major factors that influence the results of biochemical analysis. Compared to regular biochemical testing, this is a complex process carried out by a medical physician specialist. It is comprised of an integrated program requiring multidisciplinary approach such as, pediatric specialist, expert scientist, clinical laboratory technician, and nutritionist. Tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to improve screening of newborns for diverse metabolic diseases. It is likely to be used to analyze other treatable disorders or significantly improve existing newborn tests to allow broad scale and precise testing. This new era of various screening programs, new treatments, and the availability of detection technology will prove to be beneficial for the future generations. PMID:26512346

  13. Screening newborns for metabolic disorders based on targeted metabolomics using tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of newborn screening is to diagnose genetic, metabolic, and other inherited disorders, at their earliest to start treatment before the clinical manifestations become evident. Understanding and tracing the biochemical data obtained from tandem mass spectrometry is vital for early diagnosis of metabolic diseases associated with such disorders. Accordingly, it is important to focus on the entire diagnostic process, including differential and confirmatory diagnostic options, and the major factors that influence the results of biochemical analysis. Compared to regular biochemical testing, this is a complex process carried out by a medical physician specialist. It is comprised of an integrated program requiring multidisciplinary approach such as, pediatric specialist, expert scientist, clinical laboratory technician, and nutritionist. Tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to improve screening of newborns for diverse metabolic diseases. It is likely to be used to analyze other treatable disorders or significantly improve existing newborn tests to allow broad scale and precise testing. This new era of various screening programs, new treatments, and the availability of detection technology will prove to be beneficial for the future generations. PMID:26512346

  14. Improved Reagents for Newborn Screening of Mucopolysaccharidosis Types I, II, and VI by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry for the multiplex and quantitative analysis of enzyme activities in dried blood spots on newborn screening cards has emerged as a powerful technique for early assessment of lysosomal storage diseases. Here we report the design and process-scale synthesis of substrates for the enzymes α-l-iduronidase, iduronate-2-sulfatase, and N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase that are used for newborn screening of mucopolysaccharidosis types I, II, and VI. The products contain a bisamide unit that is hypothesized to readily protonate in the gas phase, which improves detection sensitivity by tandem mass spectrometry. The products contain a benzoyl group, which provides a useful site for inexpensive deuteration, thus facilitating the preparation of internal standards for the accurate quantification of enzymatic products. Finally, the reagents are designed with ease of synthesis in mind, thus permitting scale-up preparation to support worldwide newborn screening of lysosomal storage diseases. The new reagents provide the most sensitive assay for the three lysosomal enzymes reported to date as shown by their performance in reactions using dried blood spots as the enzyme source. Also, the ratio of assay signal to that measured in the absence of blood (background) is superior to all previously reported mucopolysaccharidosis types I, II, and VI assays. PMID:24694010

  15. Targeted metabolomics in the expanded newborn screening for inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scolamiero, Emanuela; Cozzolino, Carla; Albano, Lucia; Ansalone, Antonella; Caterino, Marianna; Corbo, Graziella; di Girolamo, Maria Grazia; Di Stefano, Cristina; Durante, Adriano; Franzese, Giovanni; Franzese, Ignazio; Gallo, Giovanna; Giliberti, Paolo; Ingenito, Laura; Ippolito, Giovanni; Malamisura, Basilio; Mazzeo, Pietro; Norma, Antonella; Ombrone, Daniela; Parenti, Giancarlo; Pellecchia, Silvana; Pecce, Rita; Pierucci, Ippolito; Romanelli, Roberta; Rossi, Anna; Siano, Massimo; Stoduto, Teodoro; Villani, Guglielmo R D; Andria, Generoso; Salvatore, Francesco; Frisso, Giulia; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2015-06-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are genetic disorders due to impaired activity of enzymes, transporters, or cofactors resulting in accumulation of abnormal metabolites proximal to the metabolic block, lack of essential products or accumulation of by-products. Many of these disorders have serious clinical consequences for affected neonates, and an early diagnosis allows presymptomatic treatment which can prevent severe permanent sequelae and in some cases death. Expanded newborn screening for these diseases is a promising field of targeted metabolomics. Here we report the application, between 2007 and 2014, of this approach to the identification of newborns in southern Italy at risk of developing a potentially fatal disease. The analysis of amino acids and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 24 affected newborns among 45,466 infants evaluated between 48 and 72 hours of life (overall incidence: 1 : 1894). Diagnoses of newborns with elevated metabolites were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, biochemical studies, and genetic analysis. Five infants were diagnosed with medium-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 1 with methylmalonic acidemia with homocystinuria type CblC, 2 with isolated methylmalonic acidemia, 1 with propionic acidemia, 1 with isovaleric academia, 1 with isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 1 with beta ketothiolase deficiency, 1 with short branched chain amino acid deficiency, 1 with 3-methlycrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency, 1 with formimino-transferase cyclodeaminase deficiency, and 1 with cystathionine-beta-synthase deficiency. Seven cases of maternal vitamin B12 deficiency and 1 case of maternal carnitine uptake deficiency were detected. This study supports the widespread application of metabolomic-based newborn screening for these genetic diseases. PMID:25689098

  16. Saliva Polymerase-Chain-Reaction Assay for Cytomegalovirus Screening in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Boppana, Suresh B.; Ross, Shannon A.; Shimamura, Masako; Palmer, April L.; Ahmed, Amina; Michaels, Marian G.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bernstein, David I.; Tolan, Robert W.; Novak, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Nazma; Britt, William J.; Fowler, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important cause of hearing loss, and most infants at risk for CMV-associated hearing loss are not identified early in life because of failure to test for the infection. The standard assay for newborn CMV screening is rapid culture performed on saliva specimens obtained at birth, but this assay cannot be automated. Two alternatives — real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)–based testing of a liquid-saliva or dried-saliva specimen obtained at birth — have been developed. METHODS In our prospective, multicenter screening study of newborns, we compared real-time PCR assays of liquid-saliva and dried-saliva specimens with rapid culture of saliva specimens obtained at birth. RESULTS A total of 177 of 34,989 infants (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4 to 0.6) were positive for CMV, according to at least one of the three methods. Of 17,662 newborns screened with the use of the liquid-saliva PCR assay, 17,569 were negative for CMV, and the remaining 85 infants (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.6) had positive results on both culture and PCR assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the liquid-saliva PCR assay were 100% (95% CI, 95.8 to 100) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 91.4% (95% CI, 83.8 to 96.2) and 100% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. Of 17,327 newborns screened by means of the dried-saliva PCR assay, 74 were positive for CMV, whereas 76 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.5) were found to be CMV-positive on rapid culture. Sensitivity and specificity of the dried-saliva PCR assay were 97.4% (95% CI, 90.8 to 99.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 90.2% (95% CI, 81.7 to 95.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Real-time PCR assays of both liquid- and dried-saliva specimens showed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting CMV infection and should be

  17. Ultrasound as a primary screening tool for detecting low birthweight newborns

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Eita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: As low birthweight (i.e., birthweight < 2500 g) is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity, the pre-delivery detection of low birthweight is clinically advantageous. This study was performed to determine whether ultrasound is suitable for use in primary screening to detect low birthweight newborns. Methods: The primary outcomes included sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of ultrasound detection of low birthweight newborns. Ten databases, including PubMed, were searched. All English language studies that provided true- and false-positive and true- and false-negative results regarding the pre-delivery ultrasound detection of low birthweight newborns were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies. Bivariate diagnostic meta-analysis was performed and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Results: Studies of relatively good quality were included in the analysis to evaluate crown–rump length (n = 12); femur length (n = 5); formulas of Campbell, Hadlock, and Shepard (n = 9); and uterine artery blood flow (n = 7). All showed low sensitivity (=0.24–0.58) regardless of specificity (=0.60–0.96). The formulas of Campbell, Hadlock, and Shepard were usable for a confirmation strategy only (positive and negative likelihood ratios = 14.8 and 0.44, respectively), but crown–rump or femur length, and uterine artery blood flow were not usable for an exclusion or confirmation strategy (positive and negative likelihood ratios = 1.4–2.8 and 0.71–0.85, respectively). Conclusions: Primary screening does not have to confirm low birthweight, but should almost always categorize low birthweight as a positive result and exclude normal birthweight. Therefore, ultrasound is not suitable as a primary screening tool to detect low birthweight newborns. PMID

  18. Parent perception of newborn hearing screening: results of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Pynnonen, Melissa A.; Handelsman, Jaynee A.; King, Ericka F.; Singer, Dianne C.; Davis, Matthew M.; Lesperance, Marci M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance An unacceptably high number of children who do not pass universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) are lost to follow-up. Objectives Our objective was to gain insight into parent recall of UNHS. We compared responses of parents whose children were born before versus after UNHS. Design Survey Setting Nationally representative cross-sectional survey Participants 1,539 parent households surveyed in May 2012 Main Outcome(s) and Measures Outcome measures included recall of hearing screen at birth, hearing screen results, and recommendations for follow-up. All outcome measures were based on parent recall and report. We used descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Only 62.9% of parents recall a newborn hearing screen, and among those children with risk indicators for hearing loss, only 68.6% recall a hearing screen. Higher parent education (p=0.034), younger age of the child (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.11 – 1.23, p<0.001), and the presence of any risk indicator for hearing loss (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.13 – 2.13, p=0.007) were associated with parent recall of hearing screen. Reported pass rates were higher than expected. Parents’ recall of follow-up recommendations was not always consistent with guidelines. Conclusions and Relevance While this study is inherently limited by recall bias, our findings demonstrate a lack of parent awareness of UNHS. We believe changes in the system of reporting UNHS results are necessary to improve parents’ recall of screen results and improve follow up for children who do not pass the screen. PMID:26967534

  19. Molecular newborn screening of four genetic diseases in Guizhou Province of South China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengwen; Xu, Yin; Liu, Xingmei; Zhou, Man; Wu, Xian; Jia, Yankai

    2016-10-10

    Genetic disorders have been a major concern for public health in China, especially in the rural regions. However, there is little information available about prevalence of many common single-gene disorders in Guizhou Province in the south western part of China. In the present study, we performed a molecular newborn screening for four genetic disorders, including beta-thalassemia (β-thal), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, phenylketonuria (PKU), and non-syndromic hearing loss and deafness (NSHL) in this region. A total of 515 newborns were genotyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) developed for screening the mutations causing these four disorders, and then confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The results showed that 48 out of 515 newborns were carriers of mutations related to these four diseases, with a frequency of 1 in 11 (9.32%). The carrier frequencies for each disease are: β-thal 2.72%; G6PD deficiency 1.94%; PKU 0.78% and NSHL 4.47%. The genotyping results by MALDI-TOF MS were concordant with Sanger sequencing results within 30 randomly selected samples. This is the first study that reveals carrier frequencies of these four diseases in Guizhou Province. These data provide valuable information for the genetic counseling and disease prevention in Guizhou and southwest China. PMID:27395428

  20. Supporting Family Adaptation to Presymptomatic and “Untreatable” Conditions in an Era of Expanded Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, F. Daniel; Kemper, Alex R.; Skinner, Debra; Warren, Steven F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective As technology advances, newborn screening will be possible for conditions not screened today. With an expansion of screening, strategies will be needed to support family adaptation to unexpected and possibly uncertain genetic information provided shortly after birth. Method Although candidate conditions for expanded newborn screening will typically be associated with increased morbidity or mortality, for most there is no proven medical treatment that must be implemented quickly. Many will have clinical features that gradually emerge and for which the severity of impact is not predictable. Parents will seek guidance on information, support, and treatment possibilities. This article summarizes issues evoked by expanded newborn screening and suggests strategies for supporting families of identified children. Results We propose four components necessary to support family adaptation to pre-symptomatic and “untreatable” conditions in an era of expanded newborn screening: (1) accurate and understandable information; (2) formal and informal support; (3) active surveillance; and (4) general and targeted interventions. We argue that no condition is “untreatable” and that a well-designed program of prevention and support has the potential to maximize benefit and minimize harm. Conclusions Pediatric psychologists can play important roles in an era of expanded newborn screening by helping families understand genetic information, make informed decisions about genetic testing, and cope with the potential psychosocial consequences of genetic information. PMID:18378512

  1. Newborn screening conditions: What we know, what we do not know, and how we will know it.

    PubMed

    Levy, Harvey L

    2010-12-01

    Expanding newborn screening beyond that for phenylketonuria was always the goal of Guthrie once phenylketonuria screening was on solid ground. He succeeded in this effort to an extent, adding screening for galactosemia, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. Screening for congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, biotinidase deficiency, and a few additional disorders was added by others over the years. However, a very large expansion of covered metabolic disorders eluded Guthrie despite his best efforts. This required a new screening technology, tandem mass spectrometry, which was not available until recently. Now, almost all developed newborn screening program use tandem mass spectrometry to cover the 29 metabolic disorders recommended for coverage by the American College of Medical Genetics and additional secondary disorders. The results have in some cases been spectacular in preventing or greatly reducing the burden of disease imposed by many of the screened disorders. However, expanded newborn screening has also brought problems that need to be addressed. These include lack of knowledge about the natural history of some of the disorders, absence of effective preventive therapy for others, identification of seemingly benign disorders or benign variants of severe disorders, and the resulting parental anxiety. To address these and other issues brought by expanded newborn screening, a national effort led by the American College of Medical Genetics has been developed. This effort known as the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network seeks to stimulate research, advocate pilot screening programs for proposed new additions to screening, and develop a protocol-based systematic long-term follow-up of infants identified in expanded screening programs. Upon the outcome, this critical effort will depend on the health and well-being of children throughout the United States. PMID:21150366

  2. Newborn screening strategy for cystic fibrosis: a field study in an area with high allelic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Castellani, C; Bonizzato, A; Cabrini, G; Mastella, G

    1997-05-01

    To verify to what extent mutation analysis on blood spot could improve cystic fibrosis neonatal screening in an area with high allelic heterogeneity, we designed a special protocol. Spot trypsin estimation at birth, trypsin re-testing after 1 month, meconium lactase testing and mutation analysis of delta F508, R1162X and N1303K, were retrospectively clustered according to different patterns (trypsin/lactase/mutation; trypsin/lactase/re-testing; trypsin/mutation) and compared. The programme, which lasted 2 years (1993-94) and covered most of North-eastern Italy, included 95,553 screened newborns. Thirty-four affected babies were detected by screening and one by meconium ileus (incidence 1/2730). The combined use of trypsin, lactase and mutation analysis in cystic fibrosis neonatal screening permits a better sensitivity compared to the two other combinations (34 diagnoses vs 32 in both cases). Moreover, the higher specificity of the former method (false positives 42 vs 148) allows a reduction of recalls, which cause considerable anxiety. We confirm in trypsin-positive newborns an increased frequency of cystic fibrosis heterozygotes (1/17). PMID:9183489

  3. Finding Motivation: Online Information Seeking Following Newborn Screening for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Yulia A

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease that has no manifestations for carriers but is terminal for those diagnosed with it. CF is identified through newborn screening (NBS) tests, and most families have no knowledge about CF before their contact with a NBS program. Acknowledging the Internet as a popular health information source, this study examined information exchange about CF in online community forums. This article, guided by self-determination theory, aimed at providing understanding of psychological needs and motivation for health information seeking and active communication about CF. Through online communication with other families who share similar experience, caregivers of newborns diagnosed with CF sought and received support for their competence, autonomy, and relatedness needs during the initial CF testing and diagnosis reconciliation process. Online communities play an important role in the information seeking related to CF diagnosis and could become active partners in strategic knowledge dissemination efforts. PMID:26612888

  4. Clinical Follow-Up for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Newborn Screening: A Proposal.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jennifer M; Abdel-Hamid, Hoda Z; Al-Zaidy, Samiah A; Mendell, Jerry R; Kennedy, Annie; Kinnett, Kathi; Cwik, Valerie A; Street, Natalie; Bolen, Julie; Day, John W; Connolly, Anne M

    2016-08-01

    New developments in the rapid diagnosis and treatment of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have led to growing enthusiasm for instituting DMD newborn screening (NBS) in the United States. Our group has been interested in developing clinical guidance to be implemented consistently in specialty care clinics charged with the care of presymptomatically identified newborns referred after DMD-NBS. We reviewed the existing literature covering patient-centered clinical follow-up after NBS, educational material from public health and advocacy sites, and federal recommendations on effective NBS follow-up. We discussed the review as a group and added our own experience to develop materials suitable for initial parent and primary care provider education. These materials and a series of templates for subspecialist encounters could be used to provide consistent care across centers and serve as the basis for ongoing quality improvement. Muscle Nerve 54: 186-191, 2016. PMID:27170260

  5. Newborn screening in Latin America at the beginning of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Borrajo, G J C

    2007-08-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) in Latin America took its first steps in the mid-1970s. Nevertheless, many years elapsed before it achieved its integration within the public health care system and its systematic and continuous implementation under a programme structure. Latin American countries can be characterized not only by their great geographic, demographic, ethnic, economic and health system diversity, but also by their heterogeneity in NBS activities, which gives rise to variation in degree of organization: countries with optimal fulfilment (Cuba, Costa Rica, Chile, Uruguay); others rapidly expanding their coverage (Brazil, Mexico, Argentina); some others in a recent implementation phase (Colombia, Paraguay, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Peru); others with minimal, isolated and non-organized activities (Guatemala, Dominican Republic, Bolivia, Panama, Ecuador); and finally others without any NBS activities at all (El Salvador, Honduras, Haiti). Despite this disparity, a sustained and significant growth in NBS activities has become evident during the last decade, highlighted by implementation of new programmes, increase in coverage, expansion of NBS panels, increasing involvement of governmental and public health authorities, and integration of NBS teams through scientific societies and External Quality Assurance Schemes. Currently, congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most widely screened disease, followed by phenylketonuria, with organized NBS programmes for CH in 14 countries. Other diseases usually included in NBS programmes are screened in a lower rate. Every year, around 11.2 million infants are born in Latin America. During 2005, 49.3% of newborns were screened for CH, indicating that around 5.7 million newborns still did not have access to the benefits of NBS. PMID:17701285

  6. Newborn Screening for Spinal Muscular Atrophy by Calibrated Short-Amplicon Melt Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Pham, Ha T.; Pouch-Downes, Frances; Prior, Thomas W.; Naylor, Edwin W.; Swoboda, Kathy J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management options for the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are evolving; however, their efficacy may require presymptom diagnosis and continuous treatment. To identify presymptomatic SMA patients, we created a DNA-based newborn-screening assay to identify the homozygous deletions of the SMN1 (survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric) gene observed in 95%–98% of affected patients. METHODS We developed primers that amplify a 52-bp PCR product from homologous regions in the SMN1 and SMN2 (survival of motor neuron 2, centromeric) genes that flank a divergent site at site c.840. Post-PCR high-resolution melt profiling assessed the amplification product, and we used a unique means of melt calibration to normalize profiles. Samples that we had previously characterized for the numbers of SMN1 and SMN2 copies established genotypes associated with particular profiles. The system was evaluated with approximately 1000 purified DNA samples, 100 self-created dried blood spots, and >1200 dried blood spots from newborn-screening tests. RESULTS Homozygous deletion of SMN1 exon 7 produced a distinctive melt profile that identified SMA patients. Samples with different numbers of SMN1 and SMN2 copies were resolved by their profiles. All samples with homozygous deletions were unambiguously recognized, and no normal sample was misidentified as a positive. CONCLUSIONS This assay has characteristics suitable for population-based screening. A reliable screening test will facilitate the identification of an SMA-affected cohort to receive early intervention to maximize the benefit from treatment. A prospective screening trial will allow the efficacy of treatment options to be assessed, which may justify the inclusion of SMA as a target for population screening. PMID:22490618

  7. Developing a public health-tracking system for follow-up of newborn screening metabolic conditions: a four-state pilot project structure and initial findings

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Cynthia F.; Mai, Cara T.; Nabukera, Sarah K.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Feuchtbaum, Lisa; Romitti, Paul A.; Wang, Ying; Piper, Kimberly Noble; Olney, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the methods, cases, and initial results of a pilot project using existing public health data collection programs (birth defect surveillance or newborn screening) to conduct long-term follow-up of children with metabolic disorders. Methods California, Iowa, New York, and Utah expanded birth defect surveillance or newborn screening programs to collect long-term follow-up data on 19 metabolic disorders. Data elements to monitor health status and services delivered were identified, and record abstraction and data linkages were conducted. Children were followed up through to the age of 3 years. Results A total of 261 metabolic cases were diagnosed in 1,343,696 live births (19.4 cases/100,000; 95% confidence interval = 17.1–21.8). Four deaths were identified. Children with fatty acid oxidation disorders had a higher percentage of health service encounters compared with children with other disorders of at least one health service encounter (hospitalization, emergency room, metabolic clinic, genetic service provider, or social worker) except for hospitalizations; children with organic acid disorders had a higher percentage of at least one hospitalization during their third year of life than children with other disorders. Conclusion Existing public health data programs can be leveraged to conduct population-based newborn screening long-term follow-up. This approach is flexible according to state needs and resources. These data will enable the states in assessing health burden, assuring access to services, and supporting policy development. PMID:24310309

  8. Newborn Screening: National Library of Medicine Literature Search, January 1980 through March 1987. No. 87-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrias, Karen

    This bibliography, prepared by the National Library of Medicine through a literature search of its online databases, covers all aspects of newborn screening. It includes references to screening for: inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia; hemoglobinopathies, particularly sickle cell disease; congenital hypothyroidism…

  9. The tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening experience in North Carolina: 1997-2005.

    PubMed

    Frazier, D M; Millington, D S; McCandless, S E; Koeberl, D D; Weavil, S D; Chaing, S H; Muenzer, J

    2006-02-01

    North Carolina (NC) was the first US state to initiate universal tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) newborn screening. This began as a statewide pilot project in 1997 to determine the incidence and feasibility of screening for fatty acid oxidation, organic acid and selected amino acid disorders. The MS/MS analyses were done by a commercial laboratory and all follow-up and confirmatory testing was performed through the NC Newborn Screening (NBS) Program. In April 1999, the NC NBS Laboratory began the MS/MS analyses in-house. Between 28 July 1997 and 28 July 2005, 944,078 infants were screened and 219 diagnoses were confirmed on newborns with elevated screening results, for an overall incidence of 1:4,300. Ninety-nine infants were identified with fatty acid oxidation disorders, 58 with organic acidaemias and 62 with aminoacidopathies. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency and disorders of phenylalanine metabolism were the most common disorders detected. Identification of affected infants has allowed retrospective testing of other family members, resulting in an additional 16 diagnoses. Seven neonates died from complications of their metabolic disorders/prematurity despite timely MS/MS screening. In addition, there were six infants who were not identified by elevated NBS results but who presented with symptoms later in infancy. The NC MS/MS NBS Program uses a two-tier system, categorizing results as either 'borderline' or 'diagnostic' elevated, for both the cutoffs and follow-up protocol. Infants with an initial borderline result had only a repeat screen. Infants with a diagnostic or two borderline results were referred for confirmatory testing. The positive predictive value of the NC MS/MS NBS for those infants requiring confirmatory testing was 53% for 2003 and 2004. The success of the NC MS/MS NBS Program in identifying infants with metabolic disorders was dependent on a comprehensive follow-up protocol

  10. The Prevalence of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Implication for Newborn Screening in Germany (Hamburg Metropolitan Area).

    PubMed

    Grosse, Regine; Lukacs, Zoltan; Cobos, Paulina Nieves; Oyen, Florian; Ehmen, Christa; Muntau, Birgit; Timmann, Christian; Noack, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is among hereditary diseases with evidence that early diagnoses and treatment improves the clinical outcome. So far sickle cell disease has not been included in the German newborn screening program despite immigration from countries with populations at risk. To determine the birth prevalence we tested 17,018 newborns. High pressure liquid chromatography and subsequent molecular-genetic testing were used for the detection and confirmation of hemoglobin variants. The frequency of sickle cell disease-consistent genotypes was one in 2,385 newborns. Duffy-blood group typing showed evidence that affected children were likely of Sub-Saharan ancestry. An inclusion of sickle cell disease into the German newborn screening seems reasonable. PMID:26275168

  11. Ethics, genetics and public policies in Uruguay: newborn and infant screening as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Larrandaburu, Mariela; Matte, Ursula; Noble, Ana; Olivera, Zully; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa V; Nacul, Luis; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2015-07-01

    Uruguay is a middle-income country and the smallest in South America. Its population is under 3.3 million. The demographic and epidemiological characteristics are similar to those of developed countries, with a high burden associated with congenital anomalies. Infant mortality rate (IMR) decreased from 37/1000 live births, in 1980, to 8.8/1000, in 2013. This is largely explained by medical and social policies. IMR related to congenital anomalies, however, remained unchanged for the last 30 years. Therefore, programmes for prevention of congenital disorders were developed, such as the National Newborn Screening Programme. Mandatory, universal, free infant screening was implemented two decades ago. The Ministry of Public Health created the Comprehensive Plan on Birth Defects and Rare Diseases (PIDCER), to develop a strategic public policy tool enabling comprehensive, universal, quality care during their entire lifetime. Recent national legislation created provisions for newborn and infant screening, including for congenital hypothyroidism, phenylketonuria, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, cystic fibrosis and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, via blood spot test, otoacoustic emissions, systematic physical examination and hip ultrasound. We discuss how this programme was implemented, the current situation of rare diseases, the institution managing disability in Uruguay and the development of new laws based on the MPH's PIDCER. It illustrates how Uruguay is developing public policies in the genomic era, based both on science and bioethics. PMID:26021874

  12. Multiplex Newborn Screening for Pompe, Fabry, Hunter, Gaucher, and Hurler Diseases Using a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Ramakrishna S.; Wang, Tong; Wu, Ning; Graham, Carrie; Eckhardt, Allen; Winger, Theodore; Srinivasan, Vijay; Bali, Deeksha; Millington, David S.; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose New therapies for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) have generated interest in screening newborns for these conditions. We present performance validation data on a digital microfluidic platform that performs multiplex enzymatic assays for Pompe, Fabry, Hunter, Gaucher, and Hurler diseases. Methods We developed an investigational disposable digital microfluidic cartridge that uses a single dried blood spot (DBS) punch for performing a 5-plex fluorometric enzymatic assay on up to 44 DBS samples. Precision and linearity of the assays were determined by analyzing quality control DBS samples; clinical performance was determined by analyzing 600 presumed normal and known affected samples (12 for Pompe, 7 for Fabry and 10 each for Hunter, Gaucher and Hurler). Results Overall coefficient of variation (CV) values between cartridges, days, instruments, and operators ranged from 2 to 21%; linearity correlation coefficients were ≥ 0.98 for all assays. The multiplex enzymatic assay performed from a single DBS punch was able to discriminate presumed normal from known affected samples for 5 LSDs. Conclusions Digital microfluidic technology shows potential for rapid, high-throughput screening for 5 LSDs in a newborn screening laboratory environment. Sample preparation to enzymatic activity on each cartridge is less than 3 hours. PMID:23660237

  13. Cochlear microphonics in sensorineural hearing loss: lesson from newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Ahmmed, Ansar; Brockbank, Christopher; Adshead, June

    2008-08-01

    The diagnostic dilemma surrounding the presence of cochlear microphonics (CM) coupled with significantly elevated auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds in babies failing the newborn hearing screening is highlighted. A case report is presented where initial electo-diagnostic assessment could not help in differentiating between Auditory Neuropathy/Auditory Dys-synchrony (AN/AD) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In line with the protocol and guidelines provided by the national Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in the UK (NHSP) AN/AD was suspected in a baby due to the presence of CM at 85 dBnHL along with click evoked ABR thresholds of 95 dBnHL in one ear and 100 dBnHL in the other ear. Significantly elevated thresholds for 0.5 and 1kHz tone pip ABR fulfilled the audiological diagnostic criteria for AN/AD. However, the possibility of a SNHL could not be ruled out as the 85 dBnHL stimuli presented through inserts for the CM would have been significantly enhanced in the ear canals of the young baby to exceed the threshold level of the ABR that was carried out using headphones. SNHL was eventually diagnosed through clinical and family history, physical examination and imaging that showed enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Presence of CM in the presence of very high click ABR thresholds only suggests a pattern of test results and in such cases measuring thresholds for 0.5 and 1 kHz tone pip ABR may not be adequate to differentiate between SNHL and other conditions associated with AN/AD. There is a need for reviewing the existing AN/AD protocol from NHSP in the UK and new research to establish parameters for CM to assist in the differential diagnosis. A holistic audiological and medical approach is essential to manage babies who fail the newborn hearing screening. PMID:18571245

  14. Sickle cell disease in childhood: from newborn screening through transition to adult medical care.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T

    2013-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the name for a group of related blood disorders caused by an abnormal hemoglobin molecule that polymerizes on deoxygenation. SCD affects the entire body, and the multisystem pathophysiology begins in infancy. Thanks to prognostic and therapeutic advancements, some forms of SCD-related morbidity are decreasing, such as overt stroke. Almost all children born with SCD in developed nations now live to adulthood, and lifelong multidisciplinary care is necessary. This article provides a broad overview of SCD in childhood, from newborn screening through transition to adult medical care. PMID:24237976

  15. Newborn bloodspot screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: 21 years experience in Wales (UK)

    PubMed Central

    Moat, Stuart J; Bradley, Donald M; Salmon, Rachel; Clarke, Angus; Hartley, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive X-linked neuromuscular disorder, has an estimated worldwide incidence of 1:3500 male births. Currently, there are no curative treatments and the mean age of diagnosis is 5 years. In addition, subsequent pregnancies frequently occur before a diagnosis is made in an index case. An ‘opt in' screening programme was introduced in Wales in 1990 with the aim to: reduce the diagnostic delay, permit reproductive choice and allow planning of the care of the affected boy. Newborn bloodspots were collected routinely as part of the Wales newborn screening programme. Specific consent was obtained for this test separately from the other tests. During the 21-year period, 369 780 bloodspot cards were received from male infants, of these 343 170 (92.8%) were screened using a bloodspot creatine kinase (CK) assay following parental consent. A total of 145 cases had a raised CK activity (≥250 U/l) and at follow-up, at 6–8 weeks of age, 79 cases had a normal serum CK (false-positive rate 0.023%) and 66 cases had an elevated serum CK. DMD was confirmed in 56 cases by genotyping/muscle biopsy studies, Becker muscular dystrophy in 5 cases and other rarer forms of muscular dystrophy in 5 cases. This long-term study has so far identified 13 false-negative cases. The incidence of DMD in Wales of 1:5136 during this period is lower than that of 1:4046 before commencement of screening in Wales. Screening has reduced the diagnostic delay enabling reproductive choice for parents of affected boys and earlier administration of current therapies. PMID:23340516

  16. Public participation in medical policy-making and the status of consumer autonomy: the example of newborn-screening programs in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, E H; Landenburger, G; Natowicz, M R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: State newborn-screening programs collectively administer the largest genetic-testing initiative in the United States. We sought to assess public involvement in formulating and implementing medical policy in this important area of genetic medicine. METHODS: We surveyed all state newborn-screening programs to ascertain the screening tests performed, the mechanisms and extent of public participation, parental access to information, and policies addressing parental consent or refusal of newborn screening. We also reviewed the laws and regulations of each state pertaining to newborn screening. RESULTS: Only 26 of the 51 state newborn-screening programs reported having advisory committees that include consumer representation. Fifteen states reported having used institutional review boards, another venue for public input. The rights and roles of parents vary markedly among newborn-screening programs in terms of the type and availability of screening information as well as consent-refusal and follow-up policies. CONCLUSIONS: There is clear potential for greater public participation in newborn-screening policy-making. Greater public participation would result in more representative policy-making and could enhance the quality of services provided by newborn-screening programs. PMID:9279262

  17. Useful second-tier tests in expanded newborn screening of isovaleric acidemia and methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Yosuke; Hata, Ikue; Tajima, Go

    2010-10-01

    Common use of pivalate-generating antibiotics in newborns in Japan and low cutoff value of C5-acylcarnitine (C5) to detect mild forms of isovaleric acidemia (IVA) led to 1,065 positive results from IVA screening among 146,000 newborns tested by tandem mass spectrometry over the last 3 years. Using our method to determine isovalerylglycine (IVG) levels in dried blood spots (DBS) as a second-tier test with IVG cutoff value of 0.5 nmol/ml in DBS, one patient with severe IVA was identified, and no recall of the second DBS was needed. Retrospective analysis revealed that most patients with moderate to severe forms of IVA have decreased free-carnitine levels shortly after birth and higher levels of IVG than those of C5, which suggests that this method is useful in evaluating the severity of IVA. Another second-tier test, to measure methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels in DBS by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), has been developed to overcome difficulties in screening methylmalonic aciduria (MMAU) and propionic acidemia. Methanol extract from DBS was dried and derivatized using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide. GC/MS was performed using splitless injection, electron-impact ionization, and selected ion monitoring for data recording. MMAU patients had much higher DBS concentrations of MMA (24.2-321.9 nmol/ml) than control newborns (0.34 ± 0.11 nmol/ml). MMA measurement in DBS was thought to provide useful information about the severity of MMAU, as MMAU patients with high levels of MMA had decreased levels of free carnitine and mildly increased levels of propionylcarnitine. PMID:20440648

  18. Incidence of Fragile X Syndrome by Newborn Screening for Methylated FMR1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Bradford; Keith, Krayton; Albizua, Igor; Malone, Tamika; Mowrey, Julie; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) results from a CGG-repeat expansion that triggers hypermethylation and silencing of the FMR1 gene. FXS is referred to as the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, yet its true incidence has never been measured directly by large population screening. Here, we developed an inexpensive and high-throughput assay to quantitatively assess FMR1 methylation in DNA isolated from the dried blood spots of 36,124 deidentified newborn males. This assay displays 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity for detecting FMR1 methylation, successfully distinguishing normal males from males with full-mutation FXS. Furthermore, the assay can detect excess FMR1 methylation in 82% of females with full mutations, although the methylation did not correlate with intellectual disability. With amelogenin PCR used for detecting the presence of a Y chromosome, this assay can also detect males with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47, XXY). We identified 64 males with FMR1 methylation and, after confirmatory testing, found seven to have full-mutation FXS and 57 to have KS. Because the precise incidence of KS is known, we used our observed KS incidence as a sentinel to assess ascertainment quality and showed that our KS incidence of 1 in 633 newborn males was not significantly different from the literature incidence of 1 in 576 (p = 0.79). The seven FXS males revealed an FXS incidence in males of 1 in 5161 (95% confidence interval of 1 in 10,653–1 in 2500), consistent with some earlier indirect estimates. Given the trials now underway for possible FXS treatments, this method could be used in newborn or infant screening as a way of ensuring early interventions for FXS. PMID:19804849

  19. Assessment of the Knowledge and Attitudes of Saudi Mothers towards Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Ayman; Kondkar, Altaf A.; Saeedi, Mohammad Y.; Saadallah, Amal; Al-Odaib, Ali; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the attitude and knowledge of the Saudi mothers toward newborn screening (NBS) program. Methods. A total of 425 Saudi women (only mothers who have at least one pregnancy) participated in the study from different regions in Saudi Arabia and completed the structured questionnaire which sought their views on the NBS services. Results. A majority of the participating women (91.1%) supported the NBS program and felt it was very important and useful. However, knowledge of NBS was found to be very limited and only 34.6% knew that NBS was a test to detect genetic disorders. A lack of communication and counseling to NBS clients by health authorities offering screening is implied. Conclusion. In general, there is a positive attitude towards the NBS program among Saudi women. However, they have several concerns to improve the availability of medication and formulas, genetic counseling, medical interventions, communication, education materials, and awareness. PMID:26543864

  20. m.8993T>G-Associated Leigh Syndrome with Hypocitrullinemia on Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mari; Mytinger, John R; Martin, Lisa C; Bartholomew, Dennis; Hickey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Citrulline is among the metabolites measured by expanded newborn screening (NBS). While hypocitrullinemia can be a marker for deficiency of proximal urea cycle enzymes such as ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), only a handful of state newborn screening programs in the United States officially report a low citrulline value for further work-up due to low positive predictive value. We report a case of a male infant who was found to have hypocitrullinemia on NBS. After excluding proximal urea cycle disorders by DNA sequencing, his NBS result was felt to be a false positive. At 4 months of age, he developed poor feeding, failure to thrive, apnea and infantile spasms with a progression to intractable seizures, as well as persistent hypocitrullinemia. He was diagnosed with Leigh syndrome due to a maternally inherited homoplasmic m.8993T>G mutation in the ATPase 6 gene. His mother, who had previously been diagnosed with cerebral palsy, was concurrently diagnosed with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) due to heteroplasmy of the same mutation. She had progressive muscle weakness, ataxia, and speech dyspraxia. The m.8993T>G mutation causes mitochondrial ATP synthase deficiency and it is hypothesized to undermine the synthesis of citrulline by CPS1. In addition to proximal urea cycle disorders, the evaluation of an infant with persistent hypocitrullinemia should include testing for the m.8993T>G mutation and other disorders that cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25240982

  1. VLCAD deficiency: Follow-up and outcome of patients diagnosed through newborn screening in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Evans, Maureen; Andresen, Brage S; Nation, Judy; Boneh, Avihu

    2016-08-01

    Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is an inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation. Treatment practices of the disorder have changed over the past 10-15years since this disorder was included in newborn screening programs and patients were diagnosed pre-symptomatically. A genotype-phenotype correlation has been suggested but the discovery of novel mutations make this knowledge limited. Herein, we describe our experience in treating patients (n=22) diagnosed through newborn screening and mutational confirmation and followed up over a median period of 104months. We report five novel mutations. In 2013 we formalised our treatment protocol, which essentially follows a European consensus paper from 2009 and our own experience. The prescribed low natural fat diet is relaxed for patients who are asymptomatic when reaching age 5years but medium-chain triglyceride oil is recommended before and after physical activity regardless of age. Metabolic stability, growth, development and cardiac function are satisfactory in all patients. There were no episodes of encephalopathy or hypoglycaemia but three patients had episodes of muscle pain with our without rhabdomyolysis. Body composition studies showed a negative association between dietary protein intake and percent body fat. Larger patient cohort and longer follow up time are required for further elucidation of genotype-phenotype correlations and for establishing the role of dietary protein in metabolic stability and long-term healthier body composition in patients with VLCAD deficiency. PMID:27246109

  2. The role of National Library of Medicine web sites in newborn screening education.

    PubMed

    Fomous, Cathy; Miller, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening programs and subsequent detection of rare genetic disorders challenge parents and their medical providers to learn about the treatment and management of these disorders. Many people seek medical information on the Internet but may encounter requests for registration or fees, or find that resources are out of date, difficult to understand, or buried in advertisements. The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), a component of the National Institutes of Health, provides web-based resources that address the challenges of newborn screening education. These resources include MedlinePlus, Genetics Home Reference, ClinicalTrials.gov, and PubMed. NLM websites are not commercial, do not require registration or fees, and provide varied levels of information for a continuum of audiences from low-literacy consumers to health professionals. Using phenylketonuria as an example, this study describes the information that parents and their medical providers can find through NLM resources. NLM has embraced the digital age and provides the public with reliable, accurate, and up-to-date educational materials. PMID:17183579

  3. Development of a bile acid-based newborn screen for Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Covey, Douglas F; Scherrer, David E; Earley, Brian; Gale, Sarah E; Farhat, Nicole Y; Porter, Forbes D; Dietzen, Dennis J; Orsini, Joseph J; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xiaokui; Reunert, Janice; Marquardt, Thorsten; Runz, Heiko; Giugliani, Roberto; Schaffer, Jean E; Ory, Daniel S

    2016-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, cholesterol storage disorder. With new therapeutics in clinical trials, it is imperative to improve diagnostics and facilitate early intervention. We used metabolomic profiling to identify potential markers and discovered three unknown bile acids that were increased in plasma from NPC but not control subjects. The bile acids most elevated in the NPC subjects were identified as 3β,5α,6β-trihydroxycholanic acid and its glycine conjugate, which were shown to be metabolites of cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol, an oxysterol elevated in NPC. A high-throughput mass spectrometry-based method was developed and validated to measure the glycine-conjugated bile acid in dried blood spots. Analysis of dried blood spots from 4992 controls, 134 NPC carriers, and 44 NPC subjects provided 100% sensitivity and specificity in the study samples. Quantification of the bile acid in dried blood spots, therefore, provides the basis for a newborn screen for NPC that is ready for piloting in newborn screening programs. PMID:27147587

  4. Using Formative Research to Develop a Counselor Training Program for Newborn Screening in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Anie, Kofi A.; Grant, Althea M.; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), sickle cell trait (SCT) and related conditions are highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the public health implications, there is limited understanding of the unique needs regarding establishing and implementing extensive screening for newborns and appropriate family counseling. We sought to gain understanding of community attitudes and beliefs about SCD/SCT from counselors and potential counselors in Ghana; obtain their input about goals for counseling following newborn screening; and obtain guidance about developing effective counselor education. Five focus groups with 32 health care providers and health educators from 9 of 10 regions in Ghana were conducted by trained facilitators according to a structured protocol. Qualitative data were coded and categorized to reflect common themes. Saturation was achieved in themes related to genetics/inheritance; common complications of SCD; potential for stigmatization; marital strain; and emotional stress. Misconceptions about SCT as a form of SCD were prevalent as were cultural and spiritual beliefs about the causes of SCD/SCT. Potential positive aspects included affected children's academic achievement as compensation for physical limitations, and family cohesion. This data informed recommendations for content and structure of a counselor training program that was provided to the Ministry of Health in Ghana. PMID:25193810

  5. Stakeholder attitudes towards the role and application of informed consent for newborn bloodspot screening: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, S G; Tessier, L; Etchegary, H; Brehaut, J C; Potter, B K; Hayeems, R Z; Chakraborty, P; Marcadier, J; Milburn, J; Pullman, D; Turner, L; Wilson, B J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction  Newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) involves testing a small sample of blood taken from the heel of the newborn for a number of serious and life-limiting conditions. In Canada, newborn screening programmes fall under provincial and territorial jurisdiction with no federal coordination. To date, we know very little about the underlying beliefs around different consent practices or how terminology is interpreted by different individuals. Differences in attitudes may have important healthcare consequences. This study will provide empirical data comparing stakeholder opinions on their understanding of consent-related terminology, the perceived applicability of different consent approaches to newborn screening, and the requirements of these different approaches. Methods and analysis Parents, healthcare professionals and policymakers will be recruited in the provinces of Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador. Parents will be identified through records held by each provincial screening programme. Healthcare professionals will be purposively sampled on the basis of engagement with newborn screening. Within each province we will identify policymakers who have policy analysis or advisory responsibilities relating to NBS. Data collection will be by qualitative interviews. We will conduct 20 interviews with parents of young children, 10 interviews with key healthcare professionals across the range of appropriate specialties and 10 with policymakers at each site (40 per site, total, N=80). The examination of the transcripts will follow a thematic analysis approach. Recruitment started in June 2014 and is expected to be complete by June 2015. Ethics and dissemination This study received ethics approval from the Ottawa Health Science Network Research Ethics Board, the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Ethics Board (both Ontario), and the Health Research Ethics Authority (Newfoundland and Labrador). Results These will be reported in peer

  6. A review of the psychosocial effects of false-positive results on parents and current communication practices in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, J; Waisbren, S E

    2006-10-01

    As more states adopt expanded newborn screening for metabolic disorders, the overall number of false positives increases. False-positive screening results have been associated with increased anxiety and stress in parents of infants who require follow-up testing, even after the infant's good health is confirmed. This article reviews the literature on the negative impact of false-positive newborn screening results on parents, along with a review of current communication practices for follow-up screening. The results of this review suggest that parental stress and anxiety can be reduced with improved education and communication to parents, specifically at the time of follow-up screening. Communication strategies with sample materials are proposed. PMID:16917730

  7. Ethical, legal, and social concerns about expanded newborn screening: fragile X syndrome as a prototype for emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Donald B; Skinner, Debra; Davis, Arlene M; Whitmarsh, Ian; Powell, Cynthia

    2008-03-01

    Technology will make it possible to screen for fragile X syndrome and other conditions that do not meet current guidelines for routine newborn screening. This possibility evokes at least 8 broad ethical, legal, and social concerns: (1) early identification of fragile X syndrome, an "untreatable" condition, could lead to heightened anxiety about parenting, oversensitivity to development, alterations in parenting, or disrupted bonding; (2) because fragile X syndrome screening should be voluntary, informed consent could overwhelm parents with information, significantly burden hospitals, and reduce participation in the core screening program; (3) screening will identify some children who are or appear to be phenotypically normal; (4) screening might identify children with other conditions not originally targeted for screening; (5) screening could overwhelm an already limited capacity for genetic counseling and comprehensive care; (6) screening for fragile X syndrome, especially if carrier status is disclosed, increases the likelihood of negative self-concept, societal stigmatization, and insurance or employment discrimination; (7) screening will suggest risk in extended family members, raising ethical and legal issues (because they never consented to screening) and creating a communication burden for parents or expanding the scope of physician responsibility; and (8) screening for fragile X syndrome could heighten discrepancies in how men and women experience genetic risk or decide about testing. To address these concerns we recommend a national newborn screening research network; the development of models for informed decision-making; materials and approaches for helping families understand genetic information and communicating it to others; a national forum to address carrier testing and the disclosure of secondary or incidental findings; and public engagement of scientists, policy makers, ethicists, practitioners, and other citizens to discuss the desired aims of

  8. Evaluation of universal newborn hearing screening in South African primary care

    PubMed Central

    Harbinson, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHC) is the gold standard toward early hearing detection and intervention, hence the importance of its deliberation within the South African context. Aim: To determine the feasibility of screening in low-risk neonates, using Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs), within the Midwife Obstetric Unit (MOU) three-day assessment clinic at a Community Health Centre (CHC), at various test times following birth. Method: Within a quantitative, prospective design, 272 neonates were included. Case history interviews, otoscopic examinations and Distortion Product OAEs (DPOAEs) screening were conducted at two sessions (within six hours and approximately three days after birth). Data were analysed via descriptive statistics. Results: Based on current staffing profile and practice, efficient and comprehensive screening is not successful within hours of birth, but is more so at the MOU three-day assessment clinic. Significantly higher numbers of infants were screened at session 2, with significantly less false-positive results. At session 1, only 38.1% of the neonates were screened, as opposed to more than 100% at session 2. Session 1 yielded an 82.1% rate of false positive findings, a rate that not only has important implications for the emotional well-being of the parents; but also for resource-stricken environments where expenditure has to be accounted for carefully. Conclusion: Current findings highlight the importance of studying methodologies to ensure effective reach for hearing screening within the South African context. These findings argue for UNHS initiatives to include the MOU three-day assessment to ensure that a higher number of neonates are reached and confounding variables such as vernix have been eliminated. PMID:26245605

  9. Establishment and Development of a National Newborn Screening Programme for Congenital Hypothyroidism in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Dilli, Dilek; Özbaş, Sema; Acıcan, Deniz; Yamak, Nergiz; Ertek, Mustafa; Dilmen, Uğur

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the Turkish National Newborn Screening Programme (NNSP) for congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Retrospective study based on the data from NNSP. Methods: Since December 2006, a nationwide screening programme for CH has been conducted in Turkey by the Turkish Directorate of Public Health (TDPH) in cooperation with several institutions. We evaluated the database between January 2008 and July 2010 of this programme. According to the methodology of the NNSP, between three and five days of age (or at discharge from the hospital, if this occurs earlier) blood specimens were routinely collected from neonates on filter paper, by puncturing the heel. The accepted thyroid-stimulating hormone cut-off level for recall was 20 mU/L initially and 15 mU/L subsequently. The incidence of possible CH by years was reported. Results: During the evaluation period, 3223765 newborns were tested. The mean annual incidence of possible CH showed a gradual increase over the years (1:888 in 2008, 1:592 in 2009, and 1:469 in 2010). Regional differences were noted. Although the mean age of blood sampling did not change by years, the mean age at notification for suspected CH decreased from 19.2 to 15.7 days from 2008 to 2010. Conclusions: We reported the first assessment of NNSP in Turkey. An improvement in performance measures for the CH screening programme has been noted. Knowledge on incidence of confirmed CH is not yet available in the database. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23748057

  10. Improving newborn screening for cystic fibrosis using next-generation sequencing technology: a technical feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mei W.; Atkins, Anne E.; Cordovado, Suzanne K.; Hendrix, Miyono; Earley, Marie C.; Farrell, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many regions have implemented newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) using a limited panel of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations after immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) analysis. We sought to assess the feasibility of further improving the screening using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Methods An NGS assay was used to detect 162 CFTR mutations/variants characterized by the CFTR2 project. We used 67 dried blood spots (DBSs) containing 48 distinct CFTR mutations to validate the assay. NGS assay was retrospectively performed on 165 CF screen–positive samples with one CFTR mutation. Results The NGS assay was successfully performed using DNA isolated from DBSs, and it correctly detected all CFTR mutations in the validation. Among 165 screen-positive infants with one CFTR mutation, no additional disease-causing mutation was identified in 151 samples consistent with normal sweat tests. Five infants had a CF-causing mutation that was not included in this panel, and nine with two CF-causing mutations were identified. Conclusion The NGS assay was 100% concordant with traditional methods. Retrospective analysis results indicate an IRT/NGS screening algorithm would enable high sensitivity, better specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). This study lays the foundation for prospective studies and for introducing NGS in NBS laboratories. PMID:25674778

  11. [Performance of record linkage for cancer registry data linked with mammography screening data].

    PubMed

    Giersiepen, K; Bachteler, T; Gramlich, T; Reiher, J; Schubert, B; Novopashenny, I; Schnell, R

    2010-07-01

    The evaluation of the German Mammography Screening Program requires record linkage with data from cancer registries in order to measure the number of false-negative mammograms and interval cancers. This study aims at evaluating the performance of the established linkage method based on identifiers encrypted by the standard procedure of the German cancer registries. In addition, the results are compared with an alternative method based on plain text identifiers. A total of 16,572 records from the Bremen Mammography Screening Pilot Study were linked with data from the Bremen Cancer Registry. Based on a gold standard set of matching record pairs, homonym and synonym errors were determined. Given the customary threshold value in cancer registries, the plain text method showed a lower rate of synonym errors (2.1-5.1%) and a lower rate of homonym errors (0.01-0.15%). As 10.4 million women are invited to take part biennially in screening, the corresponding figures would be 3,237 homonym errors for the standard procedure and 294 using the plain text method provided equivalent conditions. The 11-fold increase in the homonym error rate documents the trade-off for better data protection using encrypted data. PMID:20652484

  12. Applying public health screening criteria: how does universal newborn screening compare to universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome in adults with colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Cragun, Deborah; DeBate, Rita D; Pal, Tuya

    2015-06-01

    Institutions have increasingly begun to adopt universal tumor screening (UTS) programs whereby tumors from all newly diagnosed patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) are screened to identify who should be offered germline testing for Lynch syndrome (the most common cause of hereditary CRC). Given limited information about the impact of universal screening programs to detect hereditary disease in adults, we apply criteria used to evaluate public health screening programs and compare and contrast UTS with universal newborn screening (NBS) for the purpose of examining ethical implications and anticipating potential outcomes of UTS. Both UTS and a core set of NBS conditions clearly meet most of the Wilson and Jungner screening criteria. However, many state NBS panels include additional conditions that do not meet several of these criteria, and there is currently insufficient data to confirm that UTS meets some of these criteria. Comparing UTS and NBS with regard to newer screening criteria raises additional issues that require attention for both UTS and NBS. Comparisons also highlight the importance of evaluating the implementation of genomic tests to ensure or improve their effectiveness at reducing morbidity and mortality while minimizing potential harms. PMID:25323653

  13. Clinical and Environmental Influences on Metabolic Biomarkers Collected for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Cook, Daniel E; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identifying common clinical and environmental factors that influence newborn metabolic biomarkers will improve the utilization of metabolite panels for clinical diagnostic medicine. Design and Methods Environmental effects including gender, season of birth, gestational age, birth weight, feeding method and age at time of collection were evaluated for over 50 metabolites collected by the Iowa Neonatal Metabolic Screening Program on 221,788 newborns over a six year period. Results We replicated well known observations that low birth weight and preterm infants have higher essential amino acids and lower medium and long chain acylcarnitine levels than their term counterparts. Smaller, but still significant, differences were observed for gender and timing of sample collection, specifically the season in which the infant was born. Most intriguing were our findings of higher thyroid stimulating hormone in the winter months (P<1×10−40) which correlated with an increased false positive rate of congenital hypothyroidism in the winter (0.9%) compared to summer (0.6%). Previous studies, conducted globally, have identified an increased prevalence of suspected and confirmed cases of congenital hypothyroidism in the winter months. We found that the percentage of unresolved suspected cases were slightly higher in the winter (0.3% vs 0.2%). Conclusions We identified differences in metabolites by gestational age, birth weight, gender and season. Some are widely reported such as gestational age and birth weight, while others such as the effect of seasonality are not as well studied. PMID:23010448

  14. Informed Consent Should Be a Required Element for Newborn Screening, Even for Disorders with High Benefit-Risk Ratios.

    PubMed

    Fost, Norman

    2016-06-01

    Over-enthusiastic newborn screening has often caused substantial harm and has been imposed on the public without adequate information on benefits and risks and without parental consent. This problem will become worse when genomic screening is implemented. For the past 40 years, there has been broad agreement about the criteria for ethically responsible screening, but the criteria have been systematically ignored by policy makers and practitioners. Claims of high benefit and low risk are common, but they require precise definition and documentation, which has often not occurred, undermining claims that involuntary testing is justified. Even when the benefits and risks are well established, it does not automatically follow that involuntary testing is justified, a position supported by the widespread tolerance for parental refusal of immunizations and newborn screening. PMID:27338600

  15. Screening of Menkes Disease in Newborns that are likely to Benefit from Copper Treatment | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (NICHD) Molecular Medicine Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, or evaluate on a large-scale, population-based newborn screening for Menkes disease (also known as kinky hair disease).

  16. Present status and future concerns of expanded newborn screening in malaysia: sustainability, challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yin Hui; Gan, Chee Yuen; Tan, Mohd Adi Firdaus; Majid, Mohamed Isa Abdul

    2014-03-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) program is an important tool for the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of life-long impairments. NBS is one of the strategies recommended by the World Health Organization to promote the primary prevention of congenital anomalies and the health of children with these conditions. However, NBS initiation and implementation in developing countries, especially South-East Asian and North African regions, are slow and challenging. Expanded NBS is not mandatory and has not yet been incorporated into the public healthcare system in our country. Limited funding, manpower shortages, inadequate support services, low public awareness, and uncertain commitment from healthcare practitioners are the main challenges in establishing this program at the national level. Involvement and support from policy makers are very important to the success of the program and the benefit of the entire population. PMID:24876809

  17. Present Status and Future Concerns of Expanded Newborn Screening in Malaysia: Sustainability, Challenges and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LEONG, Yin Hui; GAN, Chee Yuen; TAN, Mohd Adi Firdaus; MAJID, Mohamed Isa Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) program is an important tool for the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of life-long impairments. NBS is one of the strategies recommended by the World Health Organization to promote the primary prevention of congenital anomalies and the health of children with these conditions. However, NBS initiation and implementation in developing countries, especially South-East Asian and North African regions, are slow and challenging. Expanded NBS is not mandatory and has not yet been incorporated into the public healthcare system in our country. Limited funding, manpower shortages, inadequate support services, low public awareness, and uncertain commitment from healthcare practitioners are the main challenges in establishing this program at the national level. Involvement and support from policy makers are very important to the success of the program and the benefit of the entire population. PMID:24876809

  18. Primary care providers' experiences notifying parents of cystic fibrosis newborn screening results.

    PubMed

    Finan, Caitlin; Nasr, Samya Z; Rothwell, Erin; Tarini, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines primary care provider (PCP) experiences with the initial parental disclosure of cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening (NBS) results in order to identify methods to improve parent-provider communication during the CF NBS process. PCPs of infants who received positive CF NBS results participated in semistructured phone interviews. Interviews were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. PCPs acknowledged the difficulty of "breaking bad news" to parents, and emphasized minimizing parental anxiety and maximizing parental understanding. PCPs used a variety of methods to notify parents, and shared varying information about the significance of the results. Variation in the method of parental notification, information discussed, and attention to parents' emotional needs may limit successful follow-up of children with positive CF NBS results. A multifaceted intervention to improve PCP knowledge, management, and communication could improve provider confidence, optimize information transfer, and minimize parental distress during the initial disclosure of CF NBS results. PMID:25104730

  19. Aetiologic diagnosis of hearing loss in children identified through newborn hearing screening testing.

    PubMed

    Forli, F; Giuntini, G; Bruschini, L; Berrettini, S

    2016-02-01

    With the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) programmes and early diagnosis and treatment of hearing problems, the need has clearly emerged to implement and carry out a systematic and coordinated protocol for the aetiological diagnosis of permanent hearing impairment (PHI). Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", it has been decided to consider the problems relative to aetiological diagnosis of child PHI within UNHS programmes. The specific objective was to apply a shared diagnostic protocol that can identify the cause in at least 70% of cases of PHI. For this part of the project, four main recommendations were identified that can be useful for an efficient aetiological diagnosis in children affected by PHI and that can offer valid suggestions to optimise resources and produce positive changes for third-level audiologic centres. PMID:27054388

  20. Cordblood-Based High-Throughput Screening for Deafness Gene of 646 Newborns in Jinan Area of China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shou-Xia; Chen, Ding-Li; Zhao, Su-Bin; Guo, Li-Li; Feng, Hai-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Ping, Li-Li; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Cai-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infants with slight/mild or late-onset hearing impairment might be missed in universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS). We identified the mutation hot spot of common deaf gene in the newborns in Jinan area population by screening the mutation spot with neonate cord blood, in order to make clear whether the neonate cord blood for screening is feasible. Methods Six hundred and forty-six newborns were subjected to both UNHS and genetic screening for deafness by using neonate cord blood. The newborn genetic screening targeted four deafness-associated genes, which were commonly found in the Chinese population including gap junction beta-2 protein (GJB2), gap junction beta-3 protein (GJB3), solute carrier family 26 member 4 (SLC26A4), and mtDNA 12S rRNA. The most common 20 spot mutations in 4 deaf genes were detected by MassARRAY iPLEX platform and mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G and C1494T mutations were sequenced using Sanger sequencing. Results Among the 646 newborns, 635 cases passed the UNHS and the other 11 cases (1.7%) did not. Of the 11 failures, two cases were found to carry homozygous GJB2 p.R143W pathogenic mutation, one case was found to have heterozygous GJB2 235delC mutation, and another one case carried heterozygous GJB3 p.R180X pathogenic mutation. Six hundred and thirty-five babies passed the newborn hearing screening, in which 25 babies were identified to carry pathogenic mutations, including 12 heterozygotes (1.9%) for GJB2 235delC, eight heterozygotes (1.3%) for SLC26A4 IVS7-2A>G, one heterozygote (0.2%) for p.R409H, two homozygotes (0.3%) for m.1494C>T, and two homozygotes (0.3%) for m.1555A>G. Conclusion Newborn genetic screening through the umbilical cord blood for common deafness-associated mutations may identify carriers sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotic, and can effectively prevent or delay hearing loss occurs. PMID:26330914

  1. Neonatal newborn hearing screening: four years’ experience at Ferrara University Hospital (CHEAP Project): Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, A; Hatzopoulos, S; Camurri, L; Negossi, L; Rossi, M; Cosso, D; Petruccelli, J; Martini, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary The Child Hearing Early Assessment Programme (CHEAP) regional project, was a combined departmental approach (Audiology, Neonatology) of the University Hospital of Ferrara, aimed at identifying neonatal hearing impairment and defining early intervention strategies. Aims of this project have been: i. construction of a neonatal screening programme using evoked otoacoustic emission and auditory brainstem responses; ii. the calculation of a precise estimate of cost-benefits for every child tested; iii. the development of an information flow instrument (database) for the storage of data and the statistical analysis of the results. The present report refers only to the results of the project related to the otoacoustic emission data from well-babies and intensive care unit residents. In the period January 2000-December 2004, 4269 full-term newborns and 654 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit babies were tested at the Neonatology Department. The cost of the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening was estimated at € 9,20 per child, considering the use of the ILO-292 apparatus, and € 8,28 per child in the case of an automatic screener. In this screening model, the initial hardware costs can be re-iterated into budget in a period of two years, if 1000 children per year are tested. PMID:17601205

  2. Committee report: Method for evaluating conditions nominated for population-based screening of newborns and children.

    PubMed

    Calonge, Ned; Green, Nancy S; Rinaldo, Piero; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele; Dougherty, Denise; Boyle, Coleen; Watson, Michael; Trotter, Tracy; Terry, Sharon F; Howell, R Rodney

    2010-03-01

    The Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children is charged with evaluating conditions nominated for addition to the uniform screening panel and consequently making recommendations to the secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services. This report describes the framework by which the committee approaches its task. Key decision nodes include initial review of every nomination to determine whether conditions are amenable for systematic evidence review, review of systematic evidence reviews conducted by the committee's external review group, and deliberation and formal recommendation for addition or exclusion to the uniform panel. Data analyzed include the accuracy and specificity of screening and diagnostic tests for nominated disorders, the extent of predicted health benefits, harms impact on disease course, and cost from early diagnosis and treatment. The committee process is guided by approaches used by similar entities, but more flexible criteria are sometimes needed to accommodate data limitations stemming from the rarity of many of these conditions. Possible outcomes of committee review range from recommendation to add a nominated condition to the uniform panel; provide feedback on specific gaps in evidence that must be addressed before making a decision; or rejection of a nomination (e.g., because of identified harms). The committee's structured evidence-based assessment of nominated conditions supports a consistently rigorous, iterative and transparent approach to its making recommendations regarding broad population-based screening programs for rare conditions in infants and children. PMID:20154628

  3. Current situation and prospects of newborn screening and treatment for Phenylketonuria in China — compared with the current situation in the United States, UK and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Song, Peipei; Kokudo, Norihiro; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Summary Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a treat-able and prevent-able inborn error of metabolism which leads to severe mental retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities. A screening program, especially for early detection, combined with a Phe-restricted therapeutic diet can help to control the process of PKU of most patients. The China government has put more emphasis on newborn screening and treatment against PKU, yet by comparing the situation of newborn screening and treatment against PKU in China and the relatively developed countries — United States, United Kingdom and Japan, the newborn screening and treatment against PKU in China is relatively weak and many deficiencies are found. More studies concerning multi-stage target blood Phe concentration criteria, a policy that requires newborn screening has to be taken, better financial support for newborn screening, publicity for newborn screening, and national guidelines for treatment of PKU may be prospects in China and may provide some support for better development of newborn screening and treatment against PKU in China. PMID:25343113

  4. Young adults' pre-existing knowledge of cystic fibrosis and sickle cell diseases: implications for newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Noke, Melissa; Ulph, Fiona

    2014-02-01

    Parental distress following newborn screening is thought to result from inadequate preparation for screening results which can result in maladjustment to screening results after birth. Although prior awareness of relevant genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell diseases, and preparedness for screening is suggested to enhance information uptake and reduce parental distress, little is known about how young adults' prior knowledge prepares them for screening or affects the assimilation and retention of screening information. Thirty-four young adults, without familial genetic disease or screening experience took part in one of seven focus groups which examined knowledge of cystic fibrosis and sickle cell diseases and ability to assimilate new disease information. Thematic analysis revealed that adults had limited understanding of how cystic fibrosis and sickle cell diseases were inherited or how symptoms manifest, leaving them inadequately prepared for screening results if they do not engage with information interventions. Further, they selectively assimilated new disease information and had difficulty understanding new information in the absence of prior disease knowledge. Young adults' prior disease knowledge should be considered within a newborn screening context and written materials should consider the inclusion of carrier statistics to improve information relevance. PMID:23813300

  5. Beyond Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Newborn Screening Using Pulse Oximetry for Neonatal Sepsis and Respiratory Diseases in a Middle-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Hak-Lee; Omar, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies on pulse oximetry screening for neonatal sepsis and respiratory disease in a middle-income country are lacking. Newborn screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) using pulse oximetry is an effective and life-saving strategy in developed countries. While most studies have reported false-positive results during CCHD screening, they have not elaborated on the detected disease types. We studied the effectiveness and outcomes of pulse oximetry newborn screening for non-cardiac hypoxemic diseases such as neonatal sepsis, respiratory diseases, and CCHD in a middle-income country. Methods and Findings In a pilot study performed at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia, all apparently healthy term newborns, delivered at UMMC were screened pre-discharge using pulse oximetry. Echocardiography was performed for newborns that had positive screening results on two separate occasions, 1-h apart. Newborns with normal echocardiograms were evaluated and treated for other non-cardiac diseases. Fifteen of 5247 term newborns had positive screening results. The median age at screening was 20 h. Thirteen newborns (0.24%) had significant non-cardiac diseases: sepsis (n = 2) and respiratory diseases (n = 11) that required hospitalization and treatment. The remaining two newborns with normal antenatal ultrasonograms had positive screening test and confirmed to have CCHD. Another 18 newborns with negative screening test were later admitted for treatment of sepsis (n = 16) and penumonia (n = 2). All newborns were treated and alive at the end of the study. The sensitivity and specificity of pulse oximetry screening for non-cardiac diseases were 42% and 99.9% respectively, and 100% and 99.7% for CCHD, respectively. Conclusions Routine pulse oximetry screening test was effective in identifying newborns with CCHD and other hypoxemia illnesses, which may led to potential life-threatening condition. This study showed that the expanded use of pulse

  6. Dataset and standard operating procedure for newborn screening of six lysosomal storage diseases: By tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Susan; Buroker, Norman; Cournoyer, Jason J; Potier, Anna M; Trometer, Joseph D; Elbin, Carole; Schermer, Mack J; Kantola, Jaana; Boyce, Aaron; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H; Scott, C Ronald

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we provide a detailed standard operating procedure for performing a tandem mass spectrometry, multiplex assay of 6 lysosomal enzymes for newborn screening of the lysosomal storage diseases Mucopolysaccharidosis-I, Pompe, Fabry, Niemann-Pick-A/B, Gaucher, and Krabbe, (Elliott, et al., 2016) [1]. We also provide the mass spectrometry peak areas for the product and internal standard ions typically observed with a dried blood spot punch from a random newborn, and we provide the daily variation of the daily mean activities for all 6 enzymes. PMID:27508243

  7. Newborn screening for severe T and B cell lymphopenia identifies a fraction of patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Fasth, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Winiarski, Jacek; Hammarström, Lennart

    2014-11-01

    The lack or marked reduction of recently formed T and B cells provides a basis for neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Newborns with other conditions are also identified if a severe T or B cell lymphopenia is present at birth. We retrospectively analyzed Guthrie card samples from 11 children with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a rare disease that requires early diagnosis and treatment, to determine whether combined T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) screening could identify these patients. 4 of 11 patients showed markedly reduced TREC or KREC copy numbers in their DBS as compared to storage-time matched controls and prospectively screened Swedish and German newborns. No correlation was observed between the WAS gene mutations, the clinical severity/course and the result of the screening assay. A diagnosis of WAS should thus be considered in newborns with positive TREC or KREC screening results. PMID:25217881

  8. Newborn screening for CF in a regional paediatric centre: the psychosocial effects of false-positive IRT results on parents.

    PubMed

    Moran, Janette; Quirk, Kirsten; Duff, Alistair J A; Brownlee, Keith G

    2007-05-01

    Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been established in Leeds since 1975. The current method is measuring IRT and genotyping. Newborn screening for CF results in a small but significant number of false positives. This study explored the psychosocial reactions to such results in a group of parents (N=21) using semi-structured interviews. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics and well-validated content analysis. Mothers described a range of emotions during the screening process including anxiety, distress and upset. Waiting for the repeat IRT test results was identified as the most emotionally difficult stage. Discussion focuses on good practice and implications for CF services. PMID:17056302

  9. Committee report: Considerations and recommendations for national guidance regarding the retention and use of residual dried blood spot specimens after newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Therrell, Bradford L; Hannon, W Harry; Bailey, Donald B; Goldman, Edward B; Monaco, Jana; Norgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Terry, Sharon F; Johnson, Alissa; Howell, R Rodney

    2011-07-01

    Newborn screening programs are state based with variable policies. Guidance regarding the retention, storage, and use of portions of newborn screening dried blood spots that remain after screening (residual specimens) was first published in 1996. Since then, newborn screening programs have paid increased attention to specimen storage and usage issues. Standard residual specimen uses include quality assurance and program evaluation, treatment efficacy, test refinement, and result verification. In all cases, privacy and security are primary concerns. In general, two distinct state practices regarding the storage and use of residual newborn screening specimens exist: (1) short-term storage (<3 years), primarily for standard program uses and (2) long-term storage (>18 years), for standard program uses and possible important public health research uses. Recently, there have been concerns in some consumer communities regarding both the potential uses of residual specimens and patient (newborn and family) privacy. To assist in policy improvements that can protect the individual's privacy and allow for important public health uses of residual newborn screening specimens, the Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children has developed recommendations (with requested action by the Secretary where applicable). This report presents the Committee's recommendations and reviews the pertinent associated issues. PMID:21602691

  10. Newborn screening for homocystinurias and methylation disorders: systematic review and proposed guidelines.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Martina; Kožich, Viktor; Rinaldo, Piero; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Merinero, Begoña; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Ribes, Antonia; Blom, Henk J

    2015-11-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is justified if early intervention is effective in a disorder generally not detected early in life on a clinical basis, and if sensitive and specific biochemical markers exist. Experience with NBS for homocystinurias and methylation disorders is limited. However, there is robust evidence for the success of early treatment with diet, betaine and/or pyridoxine for CBS deficiency and good evidence for the success of early betaine treatment in severe MTHFR deficiency. These conditions can be screened in dried blood spots by determining methionine (Met), methionine-to-phenylanine (Met/Phe) ratio, and total homocysteine (tHcy) as a second tier marker. Therefore, we recommend NBS for cystathionine beta-synthase and severe MTHFR deficiency. Weaker evidence is available for the disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism. Early treatment is clearly of advantage for patients with the late-onset cblC defect. In the early-onset type, survival and non-neurological symptoms improve but the effect on neurocognitive development is uncertain. The cblC defect can be screened by measuring propionylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine-to-acetylcarnitine ratio combined with the second tier markers methylmalonic acid and tHcy. For the cblE and cblG defects, evidence for the benefit of early treatment is weaker; and data on performance of Met, Met/Phe and tHcy even more limited. Individuals homozygous or compound heterozygous for MAT1A mutations may benefit from detection by NBS using Met, which on the other hand also detects asymptomatic heterozygotes. Clinical and laboratory data is insufficient to develop any recommendation on NBS for the cblD, cblF, cblJ defects, glycineN-methyltransferase-, S-adenosylhomocysteinehydrolase- and adenosine kinase deficiency. PMID:25762406

  11. Improving follow-up to newborn hearing screening: a learning-collaborative experience.

    PubMed

    Russ, Shirley A; Hanna, Doris; DesGeorges, Janet; Forsman, Irene

    2010-08-01

    Although approximately 95% of US newborns are now screened for hearing loss at birth, more than half of those who do not pass the screen lack a documented diagnosis. In an effort to improve the quality of the follow-up process, teams from 8 states participated in a breakthrough-series learning collaborative. Teams were trained in the Model for Improvement, a quality-improvement approach that entails setting clear aims, tracking results, identifying proven or promising change strategies, and the use of small-scale, rapid-cycle plan-do-study-act tests of these changes. Parents acted as equal partners with professionals in guiding system improvement. Teams identified promising change strategies including ensuring the correct identification of the primary care provider before discharge from the birthing hospital; obtaining a second contact number for each family before discharge; "scripting" the message given to families when an infant does not pass the initial screening test; and using a "roadmap for families" as a joint communication tool between parents and professionals to demonstrate each family's location on the "diagnostic journey." A learning-collaborative approach to quality improvement can be applied at a state-system level. Participants reported that the collaborative experience allowed them to move beyond a focus on improving their own service to improving connections between services and viewing themselves as part of a larger system of care. Ongoing quality-improvement efforts will require refinement of measures used to assess improvement, development of valid indicators of system performance, and an active role for families at all levels of system improvement. PMID:20679321

  12. Positive screening and carrier results for the England-wide universal newborn sickle cell screening programme by ethnicity and area for 2005–07

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Radoslav; Henthorn, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Aims The overall aim of the new national newborn programme is to identify infants at risk of sickle cell disease to allow early detection and to minimise deaths and complications. Methods Universal screening for sickle cell disease was introduced in England between September 2003 and July 2006. The 13 newborn laboratories each screen between 25 000 and 110 000 babies a year using the existing dried bloodspot cards. The specified conditions to be screened for include sickle cell anaemia (Hb SS), Hb SC disease, Hb S/β thalassaemia, Hb S/DPunjab and Hb S/OArab. Data are reported on screening results by ethnic group and geographical area. Results The prevalence of screen positive results across England is 1:2000. There is a 25-fold variation by geographical area. African babies make up 61% of all screen positive results despite representing only 4% of total births. Combined carrier rates vary widely by ethnicity, from 1.85 per 1000 (1:540) in ‘White British’ to 145 per 1000 (1:7) in ‘African’ babies. Refusal rates for screening show variation by ethnicity. Conclusions These results provide useful information both about the frequency of these conditions and the carrier state and their geographic and ethnic distribution across England. This can be used to refine counselling information and are also useful to target and plan services and public information. PMID:20591912

  13. Abnormal TREC-Based Newborn Screening Test in a Premature Neonate with Massive Perivillous Fibrin Deposition of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Stefan; Robbins, Karen A.; Hayward, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a primary immunodeficiency arising from variable defects in lymphocyte development and survival, is characterized by significant deficiency of thymus derived (T-) lymphocytes and variable defects in the B-lymphocyte population. Newborn screening for SCID is based on detection of low numbers of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) by real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). This screening allows for early identification of individuals with SCID and other disorders characterized by T-lymphopenia. Higher rates of abnormal screens are commonly seen in premature and critically ill neonates, often representing false positives. It is possible that many abnormal screens seen in these populations are result of conditions that are characterized by systemic inflammation or stress, possibly in the context of stress-induced thymic involution. We present a case of a male infant delivered at 27 weeks, 6 days of gestation, with severe intrauterine growth restriction who had an abnormal TREC screen and a massive perivillous fibrin deposition (MPFD) of the placenta. This association has not been reported previously. We are raising the awareness to the fact that conditions, such as MPFD, that can create adverse intrauterine environment are capable of causing severe stress-induced thymic involution of the fetus which can present with abnormal TREC results on newborn screening. PMID:27403355

  14. Abnormal TREC-Based Newborn Screening Test in a Premature Neonate with Massive Perivillous Fibrin Deposition of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Stefan; Robbins, Karen A; Hayward, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a primary immunodeficiency arising from variable defects in lymphocyte development and survival, is characterized by significant deficiency of thymus derived (T-) lymphocytes and variable defects in the B-lymphocyte population. Newborn screening for SCID is based on detection of low numbers of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) by real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). This screening allows for early identification of individuals with SCID and other disorders characterized by T-lymphopenia. Higher rates of abnormal screens are commonly seen in premature and critically ill neonates, often representing false positives. It is possible that many abnormal screens seen in these populations are result of conditions that are characterized by systemic inflammation or stress, possibly in the context of stress-induced thymic involution. We present a case of a male infant delivered at 27 weeks, 6 days of gestation, with severe intrauterine growth restriction who had an abnormal TREC screen and a massive perivillous fibrin deposition (MPFD) of the placenta. This association has not been reported previously. We are raising the awareness to the fact that conditions, such as MPFD, that can create adverse intrauterine environment are capable of causing severe stress-induced thymic involution of the fetus which can present with abnormal TREC results on newborn screening. PMID:27403355

  15. Uncertain diagnosis after newborn screening for cystic fibrosis: An ethics-based approach to a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Massie, John; Gillam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening (NBS) for some babies, either because of an intermediate sweat chloride test or inconclusive gene mutation analysis. There is considerable difficulty knowing how best to manage these babies, some of whom will develop cystic fibrosis, but many not. This article offers an ethics-based approach to this clinical dilemma that should be helpful to clinicians managing the baby with an uncertain diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after NBS. PMID:24166986

  16. Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Deficiency: Outlines from Newborn Screening, In Silico Predictions, and Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Catarzi, Serena; Caciotti, Anna; Thusberg, Janita; Tonin, Rodolfo; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Cavicchi, Catia; Ferri, Lorenzo; Donati, Maria A.; Baronio, Federico; Guerrini, Renzo; Mooney, Sean D.; Morrone, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation characterized by hypoglycemic crisis under fasting or during stress conditions, leading to lethargy, seizures, brain damage, or even death. Biochemical acylcarnitines data obtained through newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were confirmed by molecular analysis of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADM) gene. Out of 324.000 newborns screened, we identified 14 MCADD patients, in whom, by molecular analysis, we found a new nonsense c.823G>T (p.Gly275∗) and two new missense mutations: c.253G>C (p.Gly85Arg) and c.356T>A (p.Val119Asp). Bioinformatics predictions based on both phylogenetic conservation and functional/structural software were used to characterize the new identified variants. Our findings confirm the rising incidence of MCADD whose existence is increasingly recognized due to the efficacy of an expanded newborn screening panel by LC-MS/MS making possible early specific therapies that can prevent possible crises in at-risk infants. We noticed that the “common” p.Lys329Glu mutation only accounted for 32% of the defective alleles, while, in clinically diagnosed patients, this mutation accounted for 90% of defective alleles. Unclassified variants (UVs or VUSs) are especially critical when considering screening programs. The functional and pathogenic characterization of genetic variants presented here is required to predict their medical consequences in newborns. PMID:24294134

  17. Medium-chain acyl-CoA deficiency: outlines from newborn screening, in silico predictions, and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Catarzi, Serena; Caciotti, Anna; Thusberg, Janita; Tonin, Rodolfo; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Cavicchi, Catia; Ferri, Lorenzo; Donati, Maria A; Baronio, Federico; Guerrini, Renzo; Mooney, Sean D; Morrone, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation characterized by hypoglycemic crisis under fasting or during stress conditions, leading to lethargy, seizures, brain damage, or even death. Biochemical acylcarnitines data obtained through newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were confirmed by molecular analysis of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADM) gene. Out of 324.000 newborns screened, we identified 14 MCADD patients, in whom, by molecular analysis, we found a new nonsense c.823G>T (p.Gly275∗) and two new missense mutations: c.253G>C (p.Gly85Arg) and c.356T>A (p.Val119Asp). Bioinformatics predictions based on both phylogenetic conservation and functional/structural software were used to characterize the new identified variants. Our findings confirm the rising incidence of MCADD whose existence is increasingly recognized due to the efficacy of an expanded newborn screening panel by LC-MS/MS making possible early specific therapies that can prevent possible crises in at-risk infants. We noticed that the "common" p.Lys329Glu mutation only accounted for 32% of the defective alleles, while, in clinically diagnosed patients, this mutation accounted for 90% of defective alleles. Unclassified variants (UVs or VUSs) are especially critical when considering screening programs. The functional and pathogenic characterization of genetic variants presented here is required to predict their medical consequences in newborns. PMID:24294134

  18. [Ethics and clinical practice guidelines: newborn hearing screening and early deaf childcare].

    PubMed

    André-Vert, J; Laurence, M

    2014-08-01

    A national program for newborn hearing screening is gradually spreading throughout France, coming at a specific historical time: French sign language was recognized as a French language only in 2005, after almost a century of this language being banned in French educational institutions. Therefore, social views on deafness vary considerably depending on hearing status--deaf or hearing--and on the language used: spoken language, sign language, or bilingual. To help professionals take these different perspectives into account, the ethical questions raised during the French Authority for Health clinical practice guidelines development on deaf child care were retrospectively analyzed based on the Childress and Beauchamp principles: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. This analysis showed that the steps followed during the guideline development were very similar to those devised by J.M. Gomas's model for ethical decision making and were respectful of R. Ogien's minimal ethics principles: equal consideration for everyone, neutrality toward conceptions of what is good for oneself, and interventions limited to cases of obvious harm caused to others. PMID:25001434

  19. Public Health Action in Genomics Is Now Needed beyond Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, M.S.; Kolor, K.; Dotson, W.D.; Ned, R.M.; Khoury, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, newborn screening was the only public health program in the US focused on reducing morbidity, mortality and disability in people affected by genetic conditions. The landscape has changed, however, as evidence-based recommendations are now available for several other genomic applications that can save lives now in the US. Many more such applications are expected to emerge in the next decade. An action plan, based on evidence, provides the impetus for a new paradigm for public health practice in genomics across the lifespan using established multilevel processes as a guide. These include policy interventions, education, clinical interventions, and surveillance. Applying what we know today in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, Lynch syndrome and familial hypercholesterolemia has the potential to affect thousands of people in the US population every year. Enhanced partnerships between genetic and nongenetic providers of clinical medicine and public health are needed to overcome the challenges for implementing genomic medicine applications both now and in the future. PMID:22986915

  20. Postanalytical tools improve performance of newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Patricia L.; Marquardt, Gregg; McHugh, David M.S.; Currier, Robert J.; Tang, Hao; Stoway, Stephanie D.; Rinaldo, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare performance metrics of postanalytical interpretive tools of the Region 4 Stork collaborative project to the actual outcome based on cutoff values for amino acids and acylcarnitines selected by the California newborn screening program. Methods: This study was a retrospective review of the outcome of 176,186 subjects born in California between 1 January and 30 June 2012. Raw data were uploaded to the Region 4 Stork Web portal as .csv files to calculate tool scores for 48 conditions simultaneously using a previously unpublished functionality, the tool runner. Scores for individual target conditions were deemed informative when equal or greater to the value representing the first percentile rank of known true-positive cases (17,099 cases in total). Results: In the study period, the actual false-positive rate and positive predictive value were 0.26 and 10%, respectively. Utilization of the Region 4 Stork tools, simple interpretation rules, and second-tier tests could have achieved a false-positive rate as low as 0.02% and a positive predictive value >50% by replacing the cutoff system with Region 4 Stork tools as the primary method for postanalytical interpretation. Conclusion: Region 4 Stork interpretive tools, second-tier tests, and other evidence-based interpretation rules could have reduced false-positive cases by up to 90% in California. PMID:24875301

  1. An update on the use of health information technology in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Goodwin, Rebecca M; Sontag, Marci; Yusuf, Careema; Ojodu, Jelili; McDonald, Clement J

    2015-04-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) has high-stakes health implications and requires rapid and effective communication between many people and organizations. Multiple NBS stakeholders worked together to create national guidance for reporting NBS results with HL7 (Health Level 7) messages that contain LOINC (Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes) and SNOMED-CT (Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms) codes, report quantitative test results, and use standardized computer-readable UCUM units of measure. This guidance (a LOINC panel and an example annotated HL7 message) enables standard HL7 v2.5.1 laboratory messages to carry the information required for reporting NBS results. Other efforts include HL7 implementation guides for reporting point-of-care (POC) NBS results as well as standardizing follow-up of patients diagnosed with conditions identified through NBS. If the guidance is used nationally, regional and national registries can aggregate results from state programs to facilitate research and quality assurance and help ensure continuity of operations following a disaster situation. PMID:25935354

  2. Health Disparities in Hepatitis C Screening and Linkage to Care at an Integrated Health System in Southeast Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Indira; Baker-Genaw, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    With recommended screening for hepatitis C among the 1945–1965 birth cohort and advent of novel highly effective therapies, little is known about health disparities in the Hepatitis C care cascade. Our objective was to evaluate hepatitis C screening rates and linkage to care, among patients who test positive, at our large integrated health system. We used electronic medical records to retrospectively identify patients, in the birth cohort, who were seen in 21 Internal Medicine clinics from July 2014 to June 2015. Patients previously screened for hepatitis C and those with established disease were excluded. We studied patients’ sociodemographic and medical conditions along with provider-specific factors associated with likelihood of screening. Patients who tested positive for HCV antibody were reviewed to assess appropriate linkage to care and treatment. Of 40,561 patients who met inclusion criteria, 21.3% (8657) were screened, 1.3% (109) tested positive, and 30% (30/100) completed treatment. Multivariate logistic regression showed that African American race, male gender, electronic health engagement, residency teaching clinic visit, and having more than one clinic visit were associated with higher odds of screening. Patients had a significant decrease in the likelihood of screening with sequential interval increase in their Charlson comorbidity index. When evaluating hepatitis C treatment in patients who screened positive, electronic health engagement was associated with higher odds of treatment whereas Medicaid insurance was associated with significantly lower odds. This study shows that hepatitis C screening rates and linkage to care continue to be suboptimal with a significant impact of multiple sociodemographic and insurance factors. Electronic health engagement emerges as a tool in linking patients to the hepatitis C care cascade. PMID:27525983

  3. Screening of newborn infants for cholestatic hepatobiliary disease with tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Imran; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Michael; Johnson, Andrew W; Wade, Angie M; Kelly, Deirdre; Clayton, Peter T

    1999-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of screening for cholestatic hepatobiliary disease and extrahepatic biliary atresia by using tandem mass spectrometry to measure conjugated bile acids in dried blood spots obtained from newborn infants at 7-10 days of age for the Guthrie test. Setting Three tertiary referral clinics and regional neonatal screening laboratories. Design Unused blood spots from the Guthrie test were retrieved for infants presenting with cholestatic hepatobiliary disease and from the two cards stored on either side of each card from an index child. Concentrations of conjugated bile acids measured by tandem mass spectrometry in the two groups were compared. Main outcome measures Concentrations of glycodihydroxycholanoates, glycotrihydroxycholanoates, taurodihydroxycholanoates, and taurotrihydroxycholanoates. Receiver operator curves were plotted to determine which parameter (or combination of parameters) would best predict the cases of cholestatic hepatobiliary disease and extrahepatic biliary atresia. The sensitivity and specificity at a selection of cut off values for each bile acid species and for total bile acid concentrations for the detection of the two conditions were calculated. Results 218 children with cholestatic hepatobiliary disease were eligible for inclusion in the study. Two children without a final diagnosis and five who presented at <14 days of age were excluded. Usable blood spots were obtained from 177 index children and 708 comparison children. Mean concentrations of all four bile acid species were significantly raised in children with cholestatic hepatobiliary disease and extrahepatic biliary atresia compared with the unaffected children (P<0.0001). Of 177 children with cholestatic hepatobiliary disease, 104 (59%) had a total bile acid concentration >33 μmol/l (97.5th centile value for comparison group). Of the 61 with extrahepatic biliary atresia, 47 (77%) had total bile acid concentrations >33

  4. [The Russian and international experience with the implementation of the programs of universal audiological screening of the newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Tavartkiladze, G A; Markova, T G; Chibisova, S S; Al'shardzhabi, I; Tsygankova, E R

    2016-01-01

    The problem of diagnostics of congenital hearing impairment has acquired special importance in the light of new possibilities for the early rehabilitation of the patients presenting with this condition. The implementation of the programs of universal audiological screening into the clinical practice of Russia and many other countries made it possible to significantly reducethe time necessary to confirm congenital impairment of hearing and begin the rehabilitative treatment. The present paper was designed to analyze the international experience with the implementation of the programs of universal audiological screening of the newborn infants as exemplified by such countries as Great Britain, USA, Germany, and Poland. The main indicators of the quality and the efficiency of such programs are considered taking into account the results of the epidemiological studies on the prevalence of congenital hearing impairment. A total of 1.8 mln newborn infants were examined in Russia during 2013. The first stage of screening involved 96.7% of the children, and only 2.9% of them remained uncovered by the examination. As many as 5,659 children were found to present with the congenital loss of hearing,with the prevalence of this condition being 3 per 1.000 newborn infants and the prevalence of deafness 0.6 per 1.000. The principal problem to be resolved for the organization of the management of these patients, both in Russia and other countries, remains the enhancement of the availability of comprehensive diagnostic examination and the timelyreferral of the patients to such examination (if appropriate based on the results of the screening). The successful solution of this problem requires personalized recording of the screening data with the use of the commonly accepted medical information systems. PMID:27213647

  5. Rare disorders of metabolism with elevated butyryl- and isobutyryl-carnitine detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Gregersen, Niels S; Vockley, Jerry; Smith, Wendy E; Benjamin, Daniel Kelly; An, Yan; Weavil, Susan D; Chaing, Shu H; Bali, Deeksha; McDonald, Marie T; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Y-T; Millington, David S

    2003-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry was adopted for newborn screening by North Carolina in April 1999. Since then, three infants with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) and one with isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency were detected on the basis of elevated butyrylcarnitine/isobutyrylcarnitine (C4-carnitine) concentrations in newborn blood spots analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. For three SCAD-deficient infants, biochemical evaluation included a plasma acylcarnitine profile with markedly elevated C4-carnitine, urine organic acid analysis with markedly elevated ethylmalonic and 2-methylsuccinic acids, and markedly elevated [U-13C]butyrylcarnitine concentrations in medium from fibroblasts incubated with [U-13C]palmitic acid and excess l-carnitine, consistent with classic SCAD deficiency. Two of three infants diagnosed with classic SCAD deficiency remained asymptomatic; however, the third infant presented with seizures and a cerebral infarct at 10 wk of age. All three infants had putatively inactivating mutations in both alleles of the SCAD gene. The highly elevated plasma C4-carnitine levels in the three infants detected by newborn screening tandem mass spectrometry differentiated them from infants and children who were homozygous or compound heterozygous for one of two SCAD gene susceptibility variations; for the latter group the C4-carnitine levels were normal. Isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in a fourth infant was confirmed after isolated elevation of C4-carnitine in the acylcarnitine profile. PMID:12736383

  6. Evolution of maple syrup urine disease in patients diagnosed by newborn screening versus late diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Couce, M L; Ramos, F; Bueno, M A; Díaz, J; Meavilla, S; Bóveda, M D; Fernández-Marmiesse, A; García-Cazorla, A

    2015-11-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder for which the newborn screening (NBS) is possible but it has not been yet implemented for most Spanish regions. In the present study, we assess the clinical features and outcome of 14 MSUD Spanish patients with similar treatment protocol diagnosed either by NBS or by clinical symptoms. Eight patients were detected by NBS, four classic and four moderate MSUD. The average age at detection was 4.6 days, the mean plasmatic concentration of leucine at diagnosis was 1807 μM; the average number of days with leucine >1000 μM was 0.7 (0-4) and the mean number of total hospitalizations was 1.6 (0-5). Mean follow-up time was 70 months. They had good evolution: all remain asymptomatic, but 2 patients have attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Six patients with late diagnosis of classic MSUD were followed during 41 months. All presented with acute encephalopathy during the first month of life, mean leucine levels of 2355 μM, mean number of days with leucine >1000 μM of 6.6 (1-13) and mean number of total hospitalizations of 5.3 (4-7). Only two patients have a psychomotor development index in the lower limit (80 and 83). For all patients a good genotype-phenotype correlation was found and four novel mutations were identified: p.A311H, p.T84S, p.T397L, pL398P. Our study support that NBS improves prognosis of MSUD patients. But early diagnosis and an aggressive treatment together with a close monitoring of leucine levels improve neurological evolution in MSUD patients, even for those not detected by NBS. PMID:26232051

  7. Parental Views on Expanded Newborn Screening Using Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Galen; Chen, Flavia; Harris-Wai, Julie; Puck, Jennifer M.; Young, Charlotte; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE The potential application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to state-mandated standard newborn screening (NBS) challenges the traditional public health approach to NBS and raises ethical, policy, and clinical practice issues. This article examines the perspectives and values of diverse healthy pregnant women and parents of children diagnosed with a primary immunodeficiency disorder about traditional NBS and expanded NBS with the use of WGS. METHODS We conducted 4 focus groups (3 in English and 1 in Spanish) with socioeconomically and ethnically diverse pregnant women (n = 26), and a comparison group with parents of children diagnosed with a primary immunodeficiency disorder (n = 5). RESULTS Pediatric policy–relevant themes that emerged from our analysis of the focus group data are presented within 4 categories: (1) perspectives on traditional NBS, (2) informed consent, (3) return of results, and (4) storage and retrieval of results. Analyses indicate that study participants desired greater inclusion in the NBS process. Despite an optimistic orientation to the potential benefits and limited harms likely to result from genomic applications of NBS, parents voiced concerns about privacy and control over test results. Limited trust in the medical system and the state-run NBS program informed these concerns. CONCLUSIONS Expanded NBS with WGS for pediatricians may require management of more genetic conditions, including mutations that convey risk to both the child and parents for adult-onset disorders, and an informed-consent process to manage the genomic data and storage of blood spots. Attention to how these technologies are understood in diverse populations is needed for effective implementation. PMID:26729702

  8. AB093. A case of exogenous C5-acylcarnitine giving rise to a false positive result in newborn screening (NBS)

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Shu Jun; Tan, Ee Shien; Saumya, Jamuar; Poh, Sherry; Lim, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective NBS Screening by MS/MS is considered an effective screening test. However, the technique cannot distinguish between isobaric compounds, thus contributing to some false positive results. One such compound is C5-acylcarnitine in the in the identification of isovaleric acidemia (IVA) in the MS/MS profile. To report and contrast the findings of two newborns with C5-acylcarnitine elevations in newborn screening (NBS). Methods Blood collected on Guthrie card from newborns between 24-72 hours of life is analyzed by MS/MS. C5-acylcarnitine and its related ratios are measured in DBS sample to identify at risk newborn. Results Newborn A: DBS sample C5: 7.96 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.99 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 16.1 (normal <0.40); Plasma acylcarnitines profile: C5: 9.42 µmol/L (normal 0.06-0.29). Urine organic acid profiles showed marked elevations of isovalerylglycine (IVG), ketone bodies and lactate. This profile is consistent with a patient presenting with a diagnosis of IVA. Newborn B: DBS sample C5: 0.84 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.041 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 0.46 (normal <0.40); Despite the abnormal plasma acylcarnitines profile (C5: 4.38 µmol/L, normal 0.06-0.29), the urine acylglycine profile was normal [IVG: 1.02 mg/g Cr (normal 0.3-14.3 mg/g); 2-MBG: 0.16 mg/g Cr (normal: 0.3-7.5 mg/g)]. A 2nd plasma acylcarnitine showed a lower C5 level (1.49 µmol/L) and a repeat urine organic acid profile was normal; no IVG and 2-MBG detected. Mother’s (Newborn B) plasma acylcarnitines and urine organic acid profiles were normal, ruling out a possible maternal condition. Moreover, it was confirmed that mother and newborn were not on any antibiotics or steroids, which have been previously reported as the causal agents of falsely elevated C5-acylcarnitine. Further investigation revealed mom was using Mustela Nursing Comfort Balm which contained neopentanoate, a compound demonstrated by Boemer et al. [2014] as the causal agent for the false

  9. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  10. Using Benefit-Cost Ratio to Select Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Test Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Heather L.; Neely, Stephen T.; Gorga, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Current protocols presumably use criteria that are chosen on the basis of the sensitivity and specificity rates they produce. Such an approach emphasizes test performance, but does not include societal implications of the benefit of early identification. The purpose of the present analysis was to evaluate an approach to selecting criteria for use in UNHS programs that utilizes BCR to demonstrate an alternative method to audiologists, administrators, and others involved in UNHS protocol decisions. Design Existing data from over 1200 ears were used to analyze benefit-cost ratio (BCR) as a function of DPOAE level. These data were selected because both audiometric and DPOAE data were available on every ear. Although these data were not obtained in newborns, this compromise was necessary because audiometric outcomes (especially in infants with congenital hearing loss) in neonates are either lacking or limited in number. As such, it is important to note that the characteristics of responses from the group of subjects that formed the bases of the present analyses are different from those for neonates. This limits the extent to which actual criterion levels can be selected but should not affect the general approach of using BCR as a framework for considering UNHS criteria. Estimates of the prevalence of congenital hearing loss identified through UNHS in 37 states and U.S. territories in 2004 were used to calculate BCR. A range of estimates for the lifetime monetary benefits and yearly costs for UNHS were used, based on data available in the literature. Still, exact benefits and costs are difficult to know. Both one-step (DPOAE alone) and two-step (DPOAE followed by AABR) screening paradigms were considered in the calculation of BCR. The influence of middle-ear effusion was simulated by incorporating a range of expected DPOAE level reductions into an additional BCR analyses. Results Our calculations indicate that for a range of proposed benefit and cost estimates

  11. Inborn errors of metabolism and expanded newborn screening: review and update.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chloe Miu; Lee, Han-Chih Hencher; Chan, Albert Yan-Wo; Lam, Ching-Wan

    2013-11-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a defect in a metabolic pathway, leading to malfunctioning metabolism and/or the accumulation of toxic intermediate metabolites. To date, more than 1000 different IEM have been identified. While individually rare, the cumulative incidence has been shown to be upwards of 1 in 800. Clinical presentations are protean, complicating diagnostic pathways. IEM are present in all ethnic groups and across every age. Some IEM are amenable to treatment, with promising outcomes. However, high clinical suspicion alone is not sufficient to reduce morbidities and mortalities. In the last decade, due to the advent of tandem mass spectrometry, expanded newborn screening (NBS) has become a mandatory public health strategy in most developed and developing countries. The technology allows inexpensive simultaneous detection of more than 30 different metabolic disorders in one single blood spot specimen at a cost of about USD 10 per baby, with commendable analytical accuracy and precision. The sensitivity and specificity of this method can be up to 99% and 99.995%, respectively, for most amino acid disorders, organic acidemias, and fatty acid oxidation defects. Cost-effectiveness studies have confirmed that the savings achieved through the use of expanded NBS programs are significantly greater than the costs of implementation. The adverse effects of false positive results are negligible in view of the economic health benefits generated by expanded NBS and these could be minimized through increased education, better communication, and improved technologies. Local screening agencies should be given the autonomy to develop their screening programs in order to keep pace with international advancements. The development of biochemical genetics is closely linked with expanded NBS. With ongoing advancements in nanotechnology and molecular genomics, the field of biochemical genetics

  12. Preliminary investigation of the use of newborn dried blood spots for screening pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunhee; Tran, Nguyen-Thao B; Gospe, Sidney M; Hahn, Si Houn

    2013-11-01

    α-AASA and P6C were measured retrospectively in original newborn DBS of five patients with PDE using a LC-MS/MS method we developed previously. Both α-AASA and P6C were elevated markedly in the three newborn DBS stored at -20°C. At room temperature, α-AASA and P6C in DBS appeared stable for 3 days and then decreased by up to 70% after 14 days but remained much higher than control, indicating newborn screening for PDE is feasible. PMID:23953072

  13. First pilot newborn screening for four lysosomal storage diseases in an Italian region: identification and analysis of a putative causative mutation in the GBA gene.

    PubMed

    Paciotti, Silvia; Persichetti, Emanuele; Pagliardini, Severo; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Balducci, Chiara; Codini, Michela; Filocamo, Mirella; Menghini, Anna Rita; Pagliardini, Veronica; Pasqui, Silvio; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea; Beccari, Tommaso

    2012-11-20

    We report the first newborn screening pilot study in an Italian region for four lysosomal disorders including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type 1. The screening has been performed using enzymatic assay on Dry Blood Spot on filter paper. A total of 3403 newborns were screened. One newborn showed a reduction of β-glucosidase activity in leucocytes. Molecular analysis revealed a status of compound heterozygous for the panethnic mutation N370S and for the sequence variation E388K, not yet correlated to Gaucher disease onset. The functional consequences of the E388K replacement on β-glucosidase activity were evaluated by in vitro expression, showing that the mutant protein retained 48% of wild type activity. Structural modeling predicted that the E388K replacement, localized to a surface of the enzyme, would change the local charges distribution which, in the native protein, displays an overwhelming presence of negative charges. However, the newborn, and a 4 year old sister showing the same genomic alterations, are currently asymptomatic. This pilot newborn screening for lysosomal diseases appears to be feasible and affordable to be extended to large populations. Moreover other lysosomal diseases for which a therapy is available or will be available, could be included in the screening. PMID:22820396

  14. Genetic variants for long QT syndrome among infants and children from a statewide newborn hearing screening program cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ruey-Kang R.; Lan, Yueh-Tze; Silka, Michael J.; Morrow, Hallie; Kwong, Alan; Smith-Lang, Janna; Wallerstein, Robert; Lin, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Autosomal recessive long QT syndrome (LQTS), or Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), can be associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). We aimed to explore newborn hearing screening combined with ECGs for early JLNS detection. Study design We conducted California statewide, prospective ECG screening of children ≤6 years of age with unilateral or bilateral, severe or profound, sensorineural or mixed hearing loss. Families were identified through newborn hearing screening and interviewed about medical and family histories. Twelve-lead ECGs were obtained. Those with positive histories or QTc intervals ≥450 ms had repeat ECGs. DNA sequencing of 12 LQTS genes was performed for repeat QTc intervals ≥450 ms. Results We screened 707 subjects by ECGs (number screened/number of responses = 91%; number of responses/number of families who were mailed invitations = 54%). Of these, 73 had repeat ECGs, and 19 underwent gene testing. No subject had homozygous or compound heterozygous LQTS mutations, as in JLNS. However, 3 individuals (with QTc intervals of 472, 457, and 456 ms, respectively) were heterozygous for variants that cause truncation or missplicing: 2 in KCNQ1 (c.1343dupC or p.Glu449Argfs*14; c.1590+1G>A or p.Glu530sp) and 1 in SCN5A (c.5872C>T or p.Arg1958*). Conclusions In contrast to reports of JLNS in up to 4% of children with SNHL, we found no examples of JLNS. Because the 3 variants identified were unrelated to hearing, they likely represent the prevalence of potential LQTS mutations in the general population. Further studies are needed to define consequences of such mutations and assess the overall prevalence. PMID:24388587

  15. Variations in IBD (ACAD8) in children with elevated C4-carnitine detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christina B; Bischoff, Claus; Christensen, Ernst; Simonsen, Henrik; Lund, Allan M; Young, Sarah P; Koeberl, Dwight D; Millington, David S; Roe, Charles R; Roe, Diane S; Wanders, Ronald J A; Ruiter, Jos P N; Keppen, Laura D; Stein, Quinn; Knudsen, Inga; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage S

    2006-09-01

    The isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD) enzyme is involved in the degradation of valine. IBD deficiency was first reported in 1998 and subsequent genetic investigations identified acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) 8, now IBD, as the gene responsible for IBD deficiency. Only three individuals homozygous or compound heterozygous for variations in the IBD gene have been reported. We present IBD deficiency in an additional four newborns with elevated C(4)-carnitine identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) screening in Denmark and the United States. Three showed urinary excretions of isobutyryl-glycine, and in vitro probe analysis of fibroblasts from two newborns indicated enzymatic IBD defect. Molecular genetic analysis revealed seven new rare variations in the IBD gene (c.348C>A, c.400G>T, c.409G>A, c.455T>C, c.958G>A, c.1000C>T and c.1154G>A). Furthermore, sequence analysis of the short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) gene revealed heterozygosity for the prevalent c.625G>A susceptibility variation in all newborns and in the first reported IBD patient. Functional studies in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that the IBD variations present in the Danish newborn (c.409G>A and c.958G>A) together with a previously published IBD variation (c.905G>A) disturbed protein folding and reduced the levels of correctly folded IBD tetramers. Accordingly, low/no IBD residual enzyme activity was detectable when the variant IBD proteins were overexpressed in Chang cells. PMID:16857760

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of phenylketonuria for newborn screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmard, M.; Davis, R. W.

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria (PKU) in newborns is important because it can potentially help prevent mental retardation since it is treatable by dietary means. PKU results in phenylketonurics having phenylalanine levels as high as 2 mM whereas the normal upper limit in healthy newborns is 120 uM. To this end, we are developing a microfluidic platform integrated with a SERS substrate for detection of high levels of phenylalanine. We have successfully demonstrated SERS detection of phenylalanine using various SERS substrates fabricated using nanosphere lithography, which exhibit high levels of field enhancement. We show detection of SERS at clinically relevant levels.

  17. Frequency of high-quality communication behaviors used by primary care providers of heterozygous infants after newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Michael H.; Christopher, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the quality of communication likely to be experienced by parents when being first informed about how newborn screening identified heterozygous “carrier” status for cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease. Methods Primary care providers (PCPs) of infants found to have carrier status were telephoned over a 48-month period, and asked to rehearse with a standardized patient how they would inform the infants’ parent(s). 214 rehearsal transcripts were abstracted using explicit criteria methods to measure the frequency of five categories of high-quality communication behaviors. Results Overall, PCPs used large amounts of jargon and failed to use high quality communication behaviors. On average, PCPs used 18.6 total jargon words (8.7 unique words), but explained 2.4 jargon words. The most frequent assessment of understanding was the close-ended version, although it was only seen in 129 of 214 transcripts. The most common organizing behavior was importance emphasis (121/214). Precautionary empathy was rare; the most frequent behavior was “instruction about emotion” (33/214). Conclusions The limited use of high-quality communication behaviors in rehearsals raises concern about parental understanding, decision-making, and psychosocial outcomes after newborn screening. Practice Implications Measurement of specific behaviors may help PCPs to improve communication, and thereby improve the patient experience. PMID:23194821

  18. A Genomewide Screen for Autism: Strong Evidence for Linkage to Chromosomes 2q, 7q, and 16p

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Autism is characterized by impairments in reciprocal communication and social interaction and by repetitive and stereotyped patterns of activities and interests. Evidence for a strong underlying genetic predisposition comes from twin and family studies, although susceptibility genes have not yet been identified. A whole-genome screen for linkage, using 83 sib pairs with autism, has been completed, and 119 markers have been genotyped in 13 candidate regions in a further 69 sib pairs. The addition of new families and markers provides further support for previous reports of linkages on chromosomes 7q and 16p. Two new regions of linkage have also been identified on chromosomes 2q and 17q. The most significant finding was a multipoint maximum LOD score (MLS) of 3.74 at marker D2S2188 on chromosome 2; this MLS increased to 4.80 when only sib pairs fulfilling strict diagnostic criteria were included. The susceptibility region on chromosome 7 was the next most significant, generating a multipoint MLS of 3.20 at marker D7S477. Chromosome 16 generated a multipoint MLS of 2.93 at D16S3102, whereas chromosome 17 generated a multipoint MLS of 2.34 at HTTINT2. With the addition of new families, there was no increased allele sharing at a number of other loci originally showing some evidence of linkage. These results support the continuing collection of multiplex sib-pair families to identify autism-susceptibility genes. PMID:11481586

  19. AB107. Challenges in the management of patients with maple syrup urine disease diagnosed by newborn screening in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    De Castro-Hamoy, Leniza; Chiong, Mary Anne; Estrada, Sylvia; Cordero, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism resulting from a deficiency in the branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. MSUD has been reported to be the most common inborn error of metabolism in the Philippines. This study describes all patients with MSUD patients diagnosed through newborn screening during its first two years of implementation and the challenges encountered during their medical management. We reviewed the medical records of all patients diagnosed with MSUD by newborn screening in the Philippines from its initiation in July 2012 to June 2014. There were 24 patients diagnosed with MSUD by newborn screening for the two-year period. The mean age at newborn screening is 4 days. All patients needed hospital admission. The most common complication during hospital admission was infection, needing intravenous antibiotics which were given to 21 of the patients. Out of the 24 diagnosed, 16 (66.67%) of patients are alive, while 8 (33.33%) have died. Several neurologic and non-neurologic complications have been observed during the follow-up of the patients. The common challenges of MSUD diagnosis and management in a low-resource setting identified in this study were late diagnosis, lack of access to metabolic specialists and medical supplies, nosocomial septicaemia, and protein deficiency. Aside from early properly-timed collection, improvement in other logistical concerns such as an efficient system of sending and delivery of samples will also help in earlier diagnosis. Mechanisms of transfer of critically ill patients, albeit challenging in our setting due to geographical concerns, must be improved. Hospitals in difficult-to-reach areas must be equipped to handle critical metabolic cases when transfers are not possible. Newborn screening has been proven to improve outcome in patients diagnosed to have MSUD but the success of the newborn screening program in preventing disability is also dependent on improvements in other

  20. [Auditory neuropathy due to the Q829X mutation in the gene encoding otoferlin (OTOF) in an infant screened for newborn hearing impairment].

    PubMed

    Gallo-Terán, J; Morales-Angulo, C; Sánchez, N; Manrique, M; Rodríguez-Ballesteros, M; Moreno-Pelayo, M A; Moreno, E; del Castillo, I

    2006-01-01

    We report an infant with auditory neuropathy secondary to the Q829X mutation in the gene encoding otoferlin (OTOF). Included in a universal newborn hearing screening program, the subject passed the otoacoustic emission (OAEs) test. Given that the infant had a familial history of deafness auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing was performed, revealing a profound hearing impairment. The genetic study confirmed that the subject was homozygous for the Q829X mutation in OTOF. The patient underwent a cochlear implant, obtaining satisfactory results. The moderately high prevalence of this mutation in the Spanish population could produce a significant false negative rate in newborn hearing screening programs using OAEs. PMID:17036997

  1. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: An examination of the medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 cases identified through newborn screening or clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Waisbren, S.E.; Levy, H.L.; Noble, M.; Matern, D.; Gregersen, N.; Pasley, K.; Marsden, D.

    2014-01-01

    The medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 children with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) are described. Eight were detected as neonates by newborn screening. Three children diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms had normal newborn screening results while 3 were born in states that did not screen for SCADD. Treatment included frequent feedings and a low fat diet. All children identified by newborn screening demonstrated medical and neuropsychological development within the normative range on follow-up, although one child had a relative weakness in the motor area and another child exhibited mild speech delay. Of the 3 clinically identified children with newborn screening results below the cut-off value, 2 were healthy and performed within the normal range on cognitive and motor tests at follow-up. Four clinically identified children with SCADD experienced persistent symptoms and/or developmental delay. However, in each of these cases, there were supplementary or alternative explanations for medical and neuropsychological deficits. Results indicated no genotype-phenotype correlations. These findings suggest that SCADD might be benign and the clinical symptoms ascribed to SCADD reflective of ascertainment bias or that early identification and treatment prevented complications that may have occurred due to interaction between genetic susceptibility and other genetic factors or environmental stressors. PMID:18676165

  2. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD): validation of a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Walter C; Moser, Ann B; Liu, Anita C; Jones, Richard O; Steinberg, Steven J; Lorey, Fred; Panny, Susan R; Vogt, Robert F; Macaya, Daniela; Turgeon, Coleman T; Tortorelli, Silvia; Raymond, Gerald V

    2009-07-01

    Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) has until now been limited in implementation because of the lack of an accepted standard methodology. We have previously reported a technique using LC-MS/MS analysis that could provide the basis for screening of newborns for X-ALD. The target analyte diagnostic for X-ALD and other peroxisomal disorders of peroxisomal beta-oxidation is 1-hexacosanoyl-2-lyso-sn-3-glycero-phosphorylcholine (26:0-lyso-PC). We report here the validation of the analytical method using an authentic standard of the target compound. The method possesses sensitivity of <1.0fmole injected on column with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9987. A tetradeuterated analog of 26:0-lyso-PC served as the internal standard. The sensitivity of this clinical method was confirmed using 17 newborn samples of individuals with peroxisomal disorders retrieved from state newborn screening programs. These samples were run masked with over 1000 newborn samples. All affected individuals were identified with one exception. One sample which was retrieved as an affected did not have the biochemical or genetic abnormality of X-ALD and thus is considered an error in sample identity. These studies clearly show that the method is highly sensitive and accurate in identifying individuals with a defect in peroxisomal beta-oxidation such as X-ALD. PMID:19423374

  3. Parents' responses to receiving sickle cell or cystic fibrosis carrier results for their child following newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Ulph, Fiona; Cullinan, Tim; Qureshi, Nadeem; Kai, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Universal newborn screening for sickle cell disorders and cystic fibrosis aims to enable the early identification and treatment of affected babies. Screening can also identify infants who are healthy carriers, with carrier results being the commonest outcome for parents and professionals to discuss in practice. However it is unclear what the effect will be on parents on being informed of their baby's carrier result. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 67 family members (49 mothers, 16 fathers, 2 grandparents) of 51 infants identified by universal newborn screening as carriers of cystic fibrosis (n=27) and sickle cell (n=24), across all health regions in England. Data were analysed by thematic analysis with subsequent respondent validation. Untoward anxiety or distress among parents appeared influenced by how results were conveyed, rather than the carrier result per se. Parents who had more prior awareness of carrier status or the possibility of a carrier result assimilated the information more readily. Being left in an information vacuum while awaiting results, or before seeing a professional, led some parents to fear that their child had a serious health condition. Parental distress and anxiety appeared mostly transient, subsiding with understanding of carrier status and communication with a professional. Parents regarded carrier results as valuable information and sought to share this with their families and to inform their children in the future. However parents needed greater support after communication of results in considering and accessing cascade testing, and negotiating further communication within their families. PMID:25005733

  4. Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry: Nursing Aspects.

    PubMed

    Hom, Lisa A; Martin, Gerard R

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart disease (CCHD) is the most common birth defect. Screening for the most critical forms (CCHD) using pulse oximetry was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in the United States in 2011. Since then, CCHD screening has become nearly universal in the United States. Nurses are ideally situated to contribute to the development of best practices for implementation and provide education to families on CCHD screening. Much of the standardization, advocacy, and development of national recommendations occurred with key input from nurses. Nurses often have responsibility for educating parents, performing the screening, interpreting the screening algorithm, and the documentation of results. The nurse role often includes implementing follow-up quality improvement initiatives to ensure that systematic and accurate screening occurs. Smooth implementation can be achieved by identifying champions early, obtaining input from a multidisciplinary team including both physician and nursing leaders, and identifying ways to integrate screening into already existing workflow. By knowing the basics of why screening is important, how to screen, current recommendations on the follow-up for positive screens and the limitations of CCHD screening, nurses can advocate for their patients and positively impact outcomes for infants born with CCHD through early identification before discharge. PMID:27603538

  5. Incidence and Interrelated Factors in Patients With Congenital Hypothyroidism as Detected by Newborn Screening in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin; Qian, Jiale; Sooranna, Suren; Luo, Jingi; Li, Chuan; Tang, Qin; Lin, Caijuan

    2015-01-01

    Background. A newborn screening program (NSP) for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) was carried out in Guangxi in order to understand the incidence of CH and the factors interrelated to major types of CH in this region of China. Methods. During 2009 to 2013, data from 930 612 newborns attending NSP in Guangxi were collected. Patients were classified with either permanent CH (PCH) or transient CH (TCH) after 2 years of progressive study. Results. A total of 1210 patients were confirmed with CH with an incidence of 1/769, including 68 PCH and 126 TCH cases with incidences of 1/6673 and 1/3385, respectively. The frequency of thyroid stimulating hormone values greater than 5 mIU/L was 7.2%, which, based on WHO guidelines, suggests that the population was mildly iodine deficient. Conclusions. The incidence of CH was high in Guangxi. Approximately two thirds of CH patients were TCH, which may be due to a deficiency in iodine within the population. PMID:27335934

  6. Significant prevalence of sickle cell disease in Southwest Germany: results from a birth cohort study indicate the necessity for newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Awad, Saida; Happich, Margit; Muckenthaler, Lena; Lindner, Martin; Gramer, Gwendolyn; Okun, Jürgen G; Hoffmann, Georg F; Bruckner, Thomas; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-02-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) benefit from newborn screening, because life-threatening complications can be prevented by pre-symptomatic diagnosis. In Germany, the immigration of people from endemic countries is steadily growing. Comprehensive data about the epidemiology and prevalence of SCD in Germany are however lacking, and SCD is not included in the national newborn screening program. We provide data on the prevalence of SCD in a population from both urban and rural areas in Southwest Germany. Anonymized dried blood spots from 37,838 unselected newborns were analyzed by allele-specific PCR for the HbS mutation. Samples tested positive were subjected to Sanger sequencing of the entire β-globin coding sequence firstly to validate the screening and secondly to identify compound heterozygous SCD patients with other mutations of the β-globin gene. We identified 83 carriers of the sickle cell trait, three compound heterozygous SCD patients (two with sickle cell-β-thalassemia, one with sickle cell-Hb Tianshui) but no homozygous SCD patients. The novel molecular method and strategy for newborn screening for SCD presented here compares favorably in terms of sensitivity (1.0 for homozygous HbS, 0.996 for heterozygous HbS), specificity (0.996), practicability, and costs with conventional biochemical screening. Our results demonstrate a significant prevalence of SCD of approximately 1:12,000 in an unselected urban and rural population in Southwest Germany. Together with previously published even higher results from exclusively urban populations in Berlin and Hamburg, our data provide the basis for the decision on a newborn screening program for SCD in Germany. PMID:26658910

  7. Family, Community, and Health System Considerations for Reducing the Burden of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease in Uganda Through Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nancy S.; Mathur, Sanyukta; Kiguli, Sarah; Makani, Julie; Fashakin, Victoria; LaRussa, Philip; Lyimo, Magdalena; Abrams, Elaine J.; Mulumba, Lukia; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with high mortality for children under 5 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. Newborn sickle screening program and enhanced capacity for SCD treatment are under development to reduce disease burden in Uganda and elsewhere in the region. Based on an international stakeholder meeting and a family-directed conference on SCD in Kampala in 2015, and interviews with parents, multinational experts, and other key informants, we describe health care, community, and family perspectives in support of these initiatives. Key stakeholder meetings, discussions, and interviews were held to understand perspectives of public health and multinational leadership, patients and families, as well as national progress, resource needs, medical and social barriers to program success, and resources leveraged from HIV/AIDS. Partnering with program leadership, professionals, patients and families, multinational stakeholders, and leveraging resources from existing programs are needed for building successful programs in Uganda and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27336011

  8. A Common Mutation Is Associated with a Mild, Potentially Asymptomatic Phenotype in Patients with Isovaleric Acidemia Diagnosed by Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ensenauer, Regina; Vockley, Jerry; Willard, Jan-Marie; Huey, Joseph C.; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Edland, Steven D.; Burton, Barbara K.; Berry, Susan A.; Santer, René; Grünert, Sarah; Koch, Hans-Georg; Marquardt, Iris; Rinaldo, Piero; Hahn, Sihoun; Matern, Dietrich

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is an inborn error of leucine metabolism that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Since the implementation, in many states and countries, of newborn screening (NBS) by tandem mass spectrometry, IVA can now be diagnosed presymptomatically. Molecular genetic analysis of the IVD gene for 19 subjects whose condition was detected through NBS led to the identification of one recurring mutation, 932C→T (A282V), in 47% of mutant alleles. Surprisingly, family studies identified six healthy older siblings with identical genotype and biochemical evidence of IVA. Our findings indicate the frequent occurrence of a novel mild and potentially asymptomatic phenotype of IVA. This has significant consequences for patient management and counseling. PMID:15486829

  9. Second-tier test for quantification of underivatized amino acids in dry blood spot for metabolic diseases in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Hongbin; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    The quantitative analysis of amino acids (AAs) in single dry blood spot (DBS) samples is an important issue for metabolic diseases as a second-tier test in newborn screening. An analytical method for quantifying underivatized AAs in DBS was developed by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The sample preparation in this method is simple and ion-pairing agent is not used in the mobile phase that could avoid ion suppression, which happens in mass spectrometry and avoids damage to the column. Through chromatographic separation, some isomeric compounds could be identified and quantified, which cannot be solved through only appropriate multiple reactions monitoring transitions by MS/MS. The concentrations of the different AAs were determined using non-deuterated internal standard. All calibration curves showed excellent linearity within test ranges. For most of the amino acids the accuracy of extraction recovery was between 85.3 and 115 %, and the precision of relative standard deviation was <7.0 %. The 35 AAs could be identified in DBS specimens by the developed LC-MS/MS method in 17-19 min, and eventually 24 AAs in DBS were quantified. The results of the present study prove that this method as a second-tier test in newborn screening for metabolic diseases could be performed by the quantification of free AAs in DBS using the LC-MS/MS method. The assay has advantages of high sensitive, specific, and inexpensive merits because non-deuterated internal standard and acetic acid instead of ion-pairing agent in mobile phase are used in this protocol. PMID:22932943

  10. Observed and expected frequencies of structural hemoglobin variants in newborn screening surveys in Africa and the Middle East: Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Frédéric B.; Adamkiewicz, Thomas V.; Amendah, Djesika; Williams, Thomas N.; Gupta, Sunetra; Grosse, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to compare observed and expected genotype proportions from newborn screening surveys of structural hemoglobin variants. Methods We conducted a systematic review of newborn screening surveys of hemoglobins S and C in Africa and the Middle-East. We compared observed frequencies to those expected assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Significant deviations were identified by an exact test. The fixation index FIS was calculated to assess excess homozygosity. We compared newborn estimates corrected and uncorrected for HWE deviations using demographic data. Results Sixty samples reported genotype counts for hemoglobin variants in Africa and the Middle-East. Observed and expected counts matched in 27%. The observed number of sickle-cell anemia (SCA) individuals was higher than expected in 42 samples, reaching significance (p<0.05) in 24. High FIS were common across the study regions. The estimated total number of newborns with SCA, corrected based on FIS, were 33,261 annual births instead of 24,958 for the 38 samples across sub-Saharan Africa and 1,109 annual births instead of 578 for 12 samples from the Middle East. Conclusion Differences between observed and expected genotype frequencies are common in surveys of hemoglobin variants in the study regions. Further research is required to identify and quantify factors responsible for such deviations. Estimates based on HWE might substantially underestimate the annual number of SCA affected newborns (up to one third in sub-Saharan Africa and one half in the Middle East). PMID:26633548

  11. AB108. The appliance of Bio-Plex immunoassay using dried blood spots for mucopolysaccharidosis IVA newborn screening in Taiwan—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Tsai, Chia-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) resulting in excessive lysosomal storage of keratan sulfate. This excessive storage causes a systemic skeletal dysplasia, short stature, and joint abnormalities. Treatments for MPS IVA are available. Better outcomes are associated with early treatment, which highlights a need for newborn screening for MPS IVA. Methods We have conducted a newborn screening pilot program for MPS IVA since December 1, 2013. Screening involved measuring the quantity of GALNS in dried blood spots on filter paper (DBFP) from newborns using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. The amounts of fluorescence sorting detected by YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 (exciting) and 580 nm (emission) is proportional to the quantity of GALNS protein. Results More than 5,657 neonates have been analyzed, in those, 132 newborns had GALNS quantification less than the cut-off value (48.64 ρg/mL) at the first screening test. Most of them (n=124) were exclusive and only eight had been recalled for a second DBFP collection and GALNS quantity rechecked. The reference values were 48.64-552.4 ρg/mL. For the confirmed MPS IV patients without enzyme replacement therapy (n=11), the GALNS quantities were far less than 5% of the normal population, and ranged from 0.00 to 4.02 ρg/mL. The GALNS quantities of the carriers (n=2) were significantly reduced comparing with those of the normal values. Conclusions The Bio-Plex immunoassay has the potential to be adopted for newborn screening of MPS IVA. This method is reliable, sensitive, validated, simple, and cost-effective in measuring GALNS enzyme in DBFP.

  12. Temporal trends of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the blood of newborns from New York State during 1997 through 2011: analysis of dried blood spots from the newborn screening program.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Yun, Sehun; Bell, Erin M; Druschel, Charlotte M; Caggana, Michele; Aldous, Kenneth M; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-07-16

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, and on a global basis, North American populations are exposed to the highest doses of PBDEs. In response to the exponential increase in human exposure to PBDEs during the late 1990s, some PBDE formulations were phased out from production in the early 2000s. The effectiveness of the phase-out of commercial penta-BDE and octa-BDE mixtures in 2004 in the U.S. on human exposure levels is not known. Dried blood spots (DBSs), collected for the newborn screening program (NSP) in the U.S., are a valuable resource for the elucidation of trends in exposure to environmental pollutants in newborns. In this study, seven PBDE congeners were determined by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) in archived DBS samples (in total, 51 blood spot composites from 1224 newborns) collected from newborns in New York State (NYS) from 1997 to 2011. The most frequently detected PBDE congener was BDE-47, with a detection rate (DR) of 86%, followed by BDE-99 (DR: 45%) and BDE-100 (DR: 43%). The mean concentrations determined during 1997 through 2011 in the whole blood of newborns were 0.128, 0.040, and 0.012 ng/mL for BDE-47, -99, and -100, respectively. A significant correlation was found among the concentrations of three major congeners (p < 0.001). PBDE concentrations were similar during 1997 through 2002 and, thereafter, decreased significantly, which was similar to the trends observed for perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in DBS samples. Occurrence of PBDEs in the whole blood of newborns confirms that these compounds do cross the placental barrier. PMID:23755886

  13. False Negative Cell-Free DNA Screening Result in a Newborn with Trisomy 13

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Hoppman, Nicole L.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Sattler, Christopher A.; Borowski, Kristi S.; Wick, Myra J.; Highsmith, W. Edward; Aypar, Umut

    2016-01-01

    Background. Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) is revolutionizing prenatal screening as a result of its increased sensitivity, specificity. NIPS analyzes cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal plasma to detect fetal chromosome abnormalities. However, cffDNA originates from apoptotic placental trophoblast; therefore cffDNA is not always representative of the fetus. Although the published data for NIPS testing states that the current technique ensures high sensitivity and specificity for aneuploidy detection, false positives are possible due to isolated placental mosaicism, vanishing twin or cotwin demise, and maternal chromosome abnormalities or malignancy. Results. We report a case of false negative cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening due to fetoplacental mosaicism. An infant male with negative cfDNA screening result was born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal chromosome and FISH studies on a blood specimen revealed trisomy 13 in 20/20 metaphases and 100% interphase nuclei, respectively. FISH analysis on tissues collected after delivery revealed extraembryonic mosaicism. Conclusions. Extraembryonic tissue mosaicism is likely responsible for the false negative cfDNA screening result. This case illustrates that a negative result does not rule out the possibility of a fetus affected with a trisomy, as cffDNA is derived from the placenta and therefore may not accurately represent the fetal genetic information. PMID:26998368

  14. Comparison of Newborn Hearing Screening in Well-Baby Nursery and NICU: A Study Applied to Reduce Referral Rate in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Chun; Chen, Wei-I; Huang, Chih-Ming; Liu, Ching-Ju; Chang, Hsiu-wen; Lin, Hung-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether newborn hearing screening in a well-baby nursery (WBN) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nursery: 1) meet three targeted, screening, referral, and diagnostic follow-up rates; 2) compare the average age of diagnosis for infants admitted to the WIN and NICU; and 3) determine prevalence of hearing loss in neonatal population; and 4) try to find a practical newborn hearing screening time algorithm to reduce refer rate in NICU Materials and Methods It examined 15,624 newborns in the WBN (13,676) and NICU (1948) screened for congenital HL using AABR. The variables analyzed in it were the screening rate, referral rate, follow-up rate, diagnostic rate and diagnostic age, prevalence rate, degrees of congenital bilateral HL. The study was approved by the hospital’s institutional review board (13MMHISO23). Results The screening rates were 99.8% and 99.6% in the WBN and NICU groups, respectively, without significant difference. The referral rates were 0.7% and 2.8% in the WBN and NICU groups, with significant difference. Furthermore, the diagnostic follow-up rates were 76.7% and 89.1% in the WBN and NICU groups, without significant difference. The average initial diagnostic ages were 1.9 months and 3.8 months in the WBN and NICU groups, with significant difference. The prevalence of congenital bilateral hearing loss were 0.27% and 1.6% in the WBN and NICU groups, with significant difference. Conclusion The screening, referral and follow-up rate in the WBN and NICU groups were equivalent to the quality indicators. For NICU group, screening and diagnostic follow up were performed later than those in WBN group; however the lower referral rate in our NICU group was successfully achieved in this study and can be applied clinically. The prevalence of congenital bilateral hearing loss was higher in the NICU group than in the WBN group. PMID:27023324

  15. Newborn hearing screening outcomes during the first decade of the program in a reference hospital from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Gökdoğan, Çağıl; Gündüz, Bülent; Önal, Eray Esra; Türkyılmaz, Canan; Atalay, Yıldız

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the authors report the results of a three-stage newborn hearing screening (NHS) program for well babies at the Gazi University Hospital (GUH) in Ankara between 2003 and 2013. GUH-NHS was performed by automated transient evoked otoacoustic emission (a-TEOAE) at the first and second steps and by automated brainstem audiometry (a-ABR) at the third step. The data were analysed to assess not only rate of congenital permanent hearing loss (CPHL), but also the effectiveness of the program during the years. A total of 18,470 well babies were tested. The data showed that coverage ratio for the GUH-born babies was increased and more outside-born babies (OBB) were admitted by time (means 84.31 and 11.28 %, respectively). Mean CPHL was found to be 0.26 %. Mean referral rate was decreased to 0.81 % by a-ABR from 2.16 % by a-TEOAE. Mean of missed cases in any stage of GUH-NHS was 4.88 %. It was seen that neither CPHL nor referral rate, but only ratio of missed ones presented increase in parallel to increment in OBB. This paper first presents that clinically acceptable screening procedures developed in GUH by time, and secondly higher rate of CPHL in Turkey than in the Western countries, and benefits of third stage screening by a-ABR because it prevented referral of 251 children (1.29 %) to the clinical tests. We think that this number is reasonably important regarding not only economical point of view, but also waiting lists in the audiology departments in a developing country, in which audiological service is still limited. PMID:26036850

  16. Tandem mass spectrometry-based newborn screening strategy could be used to facilitate rapid and sensitive lung cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ting; Cao, Yunfeng; Zeng, Jia; Dong, Jun; Sun, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jianxing; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Newborn screening (NBS) helps in the early detection of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM). The most effective NBS strategy prevailing in clinics is tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis using dried blood spot (DBS) samples. Taking lung cancer (LC) as an example, this study tried to explore if this technique could be of any assistance for the discovery of tumor metabolite markers. Materials and methods Twenty-six acylcarnitines and 23 amino acids, which are commonly used in IEM screening, were quantified using DBS samples from 222 LC patients, 118 benign lung disease (LD) patients, and 96 healthy volunteers (CONT). Forty-four calculated ratios based on the abovementioned metabolites were also included using MS/MS quantification results. Results This pilot study led to the findings of 65 significantly changed amino acids, acylcarnitines, and some of their ratios for the LC, LD, and CONT groups. Among the differential parameters, 12 items showed reverse changing trends between the LC and LD groups compared to the CONT group. Regression analysis demonstrated that six of them – Arg, Pro, C10:1, Arg/Orn, Cit/Arg, and C5-OH/C0 – could be used to diagnose LC with a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 92.7%. Conclusion This study demonstrated the DBS-based MS/MS strategy was a promising tool for the discovery of tumor metabolite markers. Remarkably, this MS/MS analysis could be finished in several minutes, implying that it was a proper measure complementary to the traditional serum protein biomarker quantitation strategy for cancerous disease diagnosis and screening purposes. PMID:27217771

  17. Prevalence and mutation analysis of short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD) detected on newborn screening in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Baker, Mei W.; Williams, Phillip; Jones, Susan A.; Xiong, Blia; Thao, Mai Choua; Lee, Sheng; Yang, Mai Khou; Rice, Greg M.; Rhead, William; Vockley, Jerry; Hoffman, Gary; Durkin, Maureen S.

    2015-01-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD), also called 2-methylbutyryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (2-MBCDD), is a disorder of L-isoleucine metabolism of uncertain clinical significance. SBCADD is inadvertently detected on expanded newborn screening by elevated 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine (C5), which has the same mass to charge (m/s) on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as isovalerylcarnitine (C5), an analyte that is elevated in isovaleric acidemia (IVA), a disorder in leucine metabolism. SBCADD cases identified in the Hmong-American population have been found in association with the c.1165 A>G mutation in the ACADSB gene. The purposes of this study were to: (a) estimate the prevalence of SBCADD and carrier frequency of the c.1165 A>G mutation in the Hmong ethnic group; (b) determine whether the c.1 165 A>G mutation is common to all Hmong newborns screening positive for SBCADD; and (c) evaluate C5 acylcarnitine cut-off values to detect and distinguish between SBCADD and IVA diagnoses. During the first 10 years of expanded newborn screening using MS/MS in Wisconsin (2001–2011), 97 infants had elevated C5 values (≥0.44 μmol/L), of whom five were Caucasian infants confirmed to have IVA Of the remaining 92 confirmed SBCADD cases, 90 were of Hmong descent. Mutation analysis was completed on an anonymous, random sample of newborn screening cards (n = 1139) from Hmong infants. Fifteen infants, including nine who had screened positive for SBCADD based on a C5 acylcarnitine concentrations ≥0.44 μmol/L, were homozygous for the c.1165 A>G mutation. This corresponds to a prevalence in this ethnic group of being homozygous for the mutation of 1.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8–2.2%) and of being heterozygous for the mutation of 21.8% (95% confidence interval 19.4–24.3%), which is consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Detection of homozygous individuals who were not identified on newborn screening suggests that the C5 screening cut

  18. Pulse oximetry screening: a review of diagnosing critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Melissa S; Kochilas, Lazaros K

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects, with an incidence of nine out of every 1,000 live births. The mortality of infants with CHD has decreased over the past 3 decades, but significant morbidity and mortality continue to occur if not diagnosed shortly after birth. Pulse oximetry was recommended as a screening tool to detect critical CHD in 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. Pulse oximetry is a tool to measure oxygen saturation, and based on the presence of hypoxemia, many cardiac lesions are detected. Due to its ease of application to the patient, providing results in a timely manner and without the need for calibrating the sensor probe, pulse oximetry offers many advantages as a screening tool. However, pulse oximetry has also important limitations of which physicians should be aware to be able to assess the significance of the pulse oximetry measurement for a given patient. This review aims to highlight the benefits and shortcomings of pulse oximetry within the context of screening for critical CHD and suggests future avenues to cover existing gaps in current practices. PMID:27468253

  19. Direct multiplex assay of enzymes in dried blood spots by tandem mass spectrometry for the newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Michael H; Turecek, Frantisek; Scott, C Ron; Chamoles, Nestor A

    2006-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is currently used in newborn screening programmes to quantify the level of amino acids and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots for detection of metabolites associated with treatable diseases. We have developed assays for lysosomal enzymes in rehydrated dried blood spots in which a set of substrates is added and the set of corresponding enzymatic products are quantified using tandem mass spectrometry with the aid of mass-differentiated internal standards. We have developed a multiplex assay of the set of enzymes that, when deficient, cause the lysosomal storage disorders Fabry, Gaucher, Hurler, Krabbe, Niemann-Pick A/B and Pompe diseases. These diseases were selected because treatments are now available or expected to emerge shortly. The discovery that acarbose is a selective inhibitor of maltase glucoamylase allows the Pompe disease enzyme, acid alpha-glucosidase, to be selectively assayed in white blood cells and dried blood spots. When tested with dried blood spots from 40 unaffected individuals and 10-12 individuals with the lysosomal storage disorder, the tandem mass spectrometry assay led to the correct identification of the affected individuals with 100% sensitivity. Many of the reagents needed for the new assays are commercially available, and those that are not are being prepared under Good Manufacturing Procedures for approval by the FDA. Our newborn screening assay for Krabbe disease is currently being put in place at the Wadsworth Center in New York State for the analysis of approximately 1000 dried blood spots per day. Summary We have developed tandem mass spectrometry for the direct assay of lysosomal enzymes in rehydrated dried blood spots that can be implemented for newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders. Several enzymes can be analysed by a single method (multiplex analysis) and in a high-throughput manner appropriate for newborn screening laboratories. PMID:16763908

  20. The stability of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine in dried-blood spot quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy utilizes tandem mass spectrometry to analyze dried-blood spot specimens. Quality control materials (dried-blood spots enriched with hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine) were prepared and stored at different temperatures for up to 518 days to evaluate the stability of this biomarker for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Design and methods Dried-blood spot storage included desiccant (45, 171, and 518 days) or omitted desiccant (53 days at >90% relative humidity). Specimens were stored for 171 and 518 days at −20 °C, 4 °C, ambient temperature, and 37 °C. Each weekday for 45 days, a bag of specimens stored at 4 °C was warmed to ambient temperature and one specimen was removed for storage at −80 °C. Specimens were analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and data was plotted as concentration (micromoles per liter) vs. time. Linear regression provided slope and y-intercept values for each storage condition. Results Small slope values (0.01 or less) and y-intercept values close to the enrichment indicated less than 11% loss of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine under all storage conditions tested. Conclusions Quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy are stable for at least 1 year when stored with desiccant. PMID:25307302

  1. A false positive newborn screening result due to a complex allele carrying two frequent CF-causing variants.

    PubMed

    Bergougnoux, Anne; Boureau-Wirth, Amandine; Rouzier, Cécile; Altieri, Jean-Pierre; Verneau, Fanny; Larrieu, Lise; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Raynal, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    The detection of two frequent CFTR disease-causing variations in the context of a newborn screening program (NBS) usually leads to the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and a relevant genetic counseling in the family. In the present study, CF-causing variants p.Phe508del (F508del) and c.3140-26A>G (3272-26A>G) were identified on a neonate with positive ImmunoReactive Trypsinogen test by the Elucigene™ CF30 kit. The CF diagnosis initially suggested, despite three inconclusive Sweat Chloride Tests (SCT), was finally ruled out after the familial segregation study combined with a negative SCT. Haplotype studies, based on the comparison of 80 p.Phe508del haplotypes, suggested a probable de novo occurrence of c.3140-26A>G on the p.Phe508del ancestral allele in this family. This false positive case emphasizes the importance of SCT in the NBS strategy. Moreover, it raises the need for familial segregation studies in CF and in overall molecular diagnosis strategy of autosomal recessive diseases. PMID:27117206

  2. Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods from Small Samples of Newborn Screening Cards Suitable for Retrospective Perinatal Viral Research

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, Gai L.; Highet, Amanda R.; Gibson, Catherine S.; Goldwater, Paul N.; O'Callaghan, Michael E.; Alvino, Emily R.; MacLennan, Alastair H.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable detection of viral DNA in stored newborn screening cards (NSC) would give important insight into possible silent infection during pregnancy and around birth. We sought a DNA extraction method with sufficient sensitivity to detect low copy numbers of viral DNA from small punch samples of NSC. Blank NSC were spotted with seronegative EDTA-blood and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood. DNA was extracted with commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods and quantified on a spectrofluorometer using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification kit. Serial dilutions of purified viral DNA controls determined the sensitivity of the amplification protocol, and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood amplified by nested PCR (nPCR) validated the DNA extraction methods. There were considerable differences between the commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods (P=0.014; P=0.016). Commercial kits compared favorably, but the QIamp DNA micro kit with an added forensic filter step was marginally more sensitive. The mean DNA yield from this method was 3 ng/μl. The limit of detection was 10 viral genome copies in a 50-μl reaction. EBV nPCR detection in neat and 1:10 diluted DNA extracts could be replicated reliably. We conclude that the QIamp Micro DNA extraction method with the added forensic spin-filter step was suitable for retrospective DNA viral assays from NSC. PMID:21455476

  3. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcilene Rezende; Sendin, Shimene Mascarenhas; Araujo, Isabela Couto de Oliveira; Pimentel, Fernanda Silva; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. Methods βS allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI) were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. Results The following alpha chain variants were found: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5) Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13) Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2) Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5) Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. Conclusion Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants. PMID:23741188

  4. AB041. Genetic diversity of organic and fatty acid disorders detectable in expanded newborn screening in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Seiji; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Chí, Dũng Vũ; Thu, Nhan Nguen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the increasing number of children with organic acidemias (OAs) and fatty acid oxidation defects (FAODs) has been detected with development of diagnostic tools, like GC/MS or MS/MS, for inborn metabolic disease (IMD). We have performed collaboration study with some Asian countries, and have noticed the diversity of disease contribution and genetic aspects. Diversity of disease distribution: metabolic screening of children at high risk using GC/MS and NS/MS has been performed in collaboration with several Asian countries. In India, Vietnam, and China, as well as Japan, methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) was most common, followed by urea cycle disorder (UCD), propionic academia (PPA). In Vietnam and India, 3-ketothiolase deficiency (BKTD), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), and oxoprolinuria are also common, although they are extremely rare in Japan. In China, frequency of MMA seemed to be high, in particular combined MMA and homocystinuria many of which are B12 responsible. Genetic diversity: (I) MMA: in China, 42% of MMA are combined type of MMA and HCY due to CblC defect. 609G>A in MMACHC gene is a common mutation, covering 55%; (II) BKTD: in Vietnamese patients, c.662C>G in T2 gene is common, covering 72%; (III) PPA: in Japanese, Y435C mutation in PCCB gene is a common mutation in the mild form of PPA, at prevalence of 1 in 86 alleles in Japanese population; (IV) MCAD deficiency: common mutation 985A>C which covers about 90% of alleles among Caucasian is famous. A mutation study of Japanese cases, revealed a common mutation, c.449delCTGA, covering about 45% of the alleles. It is still unknown whether the mutation is Japanese specific, or East-Asian specific. Newborn mass screening (NBS) is increasingly popular in Asian countries. The diversity of disease distribution and genetic mutations will be made clear with the spread of collaboration studies and expanded NBS using MS/MS.

  5. Maternal and neonatal factors associated with mode of delivery under a universal newborn hearing screening programme in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Solanke, Olumuyiwa A

    2009-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence from a recent pilot universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) programme suggests that the burden of obstetric complications associated with mode of delivery is not limited to maternal and perinatal mortality but may also include outcomes that undermine optimal early childhood development of the surviving newborns. However, the potential pathways for this association have not been reported particularly in the context of a resource-poor setting. This study therefore set out to establish the pattern of delivery and the associated neonatal outcomes under a UNHS programme. Methods A cross-sectional study in which all consenting mothers who delivered in an inner-city tertiary maternity hospital in Lagos, Nigeria from May 2005 to December 2007 were enrolled during the UNHS programme. Socio-demographic, obstetric and neonatal factors independently associated with vaginal, elective and emergency caesarean deliveries were determined using multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results Of the 4615 mothers enrolled, 2584 (56.0%) deliveries were vaginal, 1590 (34.4%) emergency caesarean and 441 (9.6%) elective caesarean section. Maternal age, parity, social class and all obstetric factors including lack of antenatal care, maternal HIV and multiple gestations were associated with increased risk of emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery. Only parity, lack of antenatal care and prolonged/obstructed labour were associated with increased risk of emergency compared with elective caesarean delivery. Infants delivered by vaginal method or by emergency caesarean section were more likely to be associated with the risk of sensorineural hearing loss but less likely to be associated with hyperbilirubinaemia compared with infants delivered by elective caesarean section. Emergency caesarean delivery was also associated with male gender, low five-minute Apgar scores and admission into special care baby unit compared with vaginal or elective

  6. Newborn screening for lysosomal diseases: current status and potential interface with population medical genetics in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The aim of newborn screening (NBS) programs is to detect a condition in a presymptomatic baby and provide management measures which could significantly improve the natural history of the disease. NBS programs for metabolic diseases were first introduced in North America and Europe and in the 1960s for phenylketonuria, expanded a few years later to include congenital hypothyroidism, and have been growing steadily in terms of number of conditions tested for and number of countries and births covered. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of around 50 genetic conditions in which a defect in a lysosomal function occurs. LSDs are progressive conditions, being usually asymptomatic at birth, but with clinical features becoming apparent in childhood, with severe manifestations in most instances, high morbidity and shortened life span. Although individually rare, the prevalence of LSDs is significant when the group is considered as a whole (around 1:4,000-1:9,000 live births). Several management techniques, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate inhibition therapy, pharmacological chaperones and many other approaches are transforming the LSDs into treatable conditions. However, lack of awareness and lack of access to tests cause a significant delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Several lines of evidence showing that the earlier introduction of therapy may provide a better outcome, are bringing support to the idea of including LSDs in NBS programs. Due to advances in technology, high-throughput multiplex methods are now available for mass screening of several LSDs. Pilot projects were already developed in many countries for some LSDs, with interesting results. Although some NBS in Latin America has been carried out since the 1970s, it has so far been incorporated as a public health program in only a few countries in the region. It will probably take many years before NBS is implemented in most Latin American countries

  7. ARGININOSUCCINATE LYASE DEFICIENCY: LONGTERM OUTCOME OF 13 PATIENTS DETECTED BY NEWBORN SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Ficicioglu, C; Mandell, R; Shih, VE

    2009-01-01

    Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency is a urea cycle disorder which can present in the neonatal period with hyperammonemic encephalopathy, or later in childhood with episodic vomiting, growth and developmental delay. Abnormal hair, hepatomegaly, and hepatic fibrosis are unique features of this disorder. Twelve patients with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency were ascertained between 4 and 6 weeks of age by urine amino acid screening. One infant in a previously identified family was diagnosed shortly after birth. Diagnosis was confirmed by enzyme assay in red blood cells and/or skin fibroblasts. At the time of last follow-up, patients had been followed for 13–33 years. All patients were asymptomatic at detection, 7 had slightly increased blood ammonia, and all were initially treated with low-protein diet. Utilization of 14C-citrulline by intact skin fibroblasts measured by 14C incorporation into macromolecules was 74–135% of the control mean for 7 of the 8 patients studied. Nine patients had normal development, 4 had learning disability, 6 had EEG abnormalities, 3 had seizure disorder. None had any episodes of hyperammonemic coma. None had hepatomegaly. Patients detected by screening had higher enzyme activity measured by the 14C-citrulline incorporation assay than comparison groups of patients with neonatal onset and with late onset detected by clinical disease. The ability to utilize 14C-citrulline by intact fibroblasts seems to correlate with clinical outcome and may have prognostic value. It is likely that early diagnosis and treatment contributed to the relatively mild clinical course of the study group. PMID:19635676

  8. Pilot study of gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric screening of newborn urine for inborn errors of metabolism after treatment with urease.

    PubMed

    Kuhara, T; Shinka, T; Inoue, Y; Ohse, M; Zhen-wei, X; Yoshida, I; Inokuchi, T; Yamaguchi, S; Takayanagi, M; Matsumoto, I

    1999-08-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) techniques for urinary organic acid profiling have been applied to high-risk screening for a wide range of diseases, mainly for inborn errors of metabolism (IEM), rather than to low-risk screening or mass screening. Using a simplified procedure with urease-pretreatment and the GC-MS technique, which allows simultaneous determination of organic acids, amino acids, sugars and sugar acids, we performed a pilot study of the application of this procedure to neonatal urine screening for 22 IEM. Out of 16,246 newborns screened, 11 cases of metabolic disorders were chemically diagnosed: two each of methylmalonic aciduria and glyceroluria, four of cystinuria, and one each of Hartnup disease, citrullinemia and alpha-aminoadipic aciduria/alpha-ketoadipic aciduria. The incidence of IEM was thus one per 1477, which was higher than the one per 3000 obtained in the USA in a study targeting amino acids and acylcarnitines in newborn blood spots by tandem mass spectrometry. Also, 227 cases were found to have transient metabolic abnormalities: 108 cases with neonatal tyrosinuria, 99 cases with neonatal galactosuria, and 20 cases with other transient metabolic disorders. Two hundred and thirty-eight cases out of 16,246 neonates (approximately 1/68) were thus diagnosed using this procedure as having either persistent or transient metabolic abnormalities. PMID:10492000

  9. Healthy Start, Grow Smart: Your Newborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet offers guidance to parents in caring for their newborn babies. Advice is given on the following topics: (1) newborn health screening; (2) what a healthy newborn looks like; (3) newborn reflexes; (4) baby checkups; (5) fathers' role; (6) the baby blues; (7) sleeping position; (8) breast milk; (9) breast feeding; (10) bottle feeding;…

  10. Newborn jaundice

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborn; Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia; Bili lights - jaundice; Infant - yellow skin; Newborn - yellow skin ... efficiently. Most newborns have some yellowing of the skin, or jaundice. This is called physiological jaundice. It ...

  11. Sequencing from Dried Blood Spots in Infants with “False Positive” Newborn Screen for MCAD Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McCandless, Shawn E.; Chandrasekar, Ram; Linard, Sharon; Kikano, Sandra; Rice, Lorrie

    2012-01-01

    Background Newborn screening (NBS) for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), one of the most common disorders identified, uses measurement of octanoylcarnitine (C8) from dried blood spots. In the state of Ohio, as in many places, primary care providers, with or without consultation from a metabolic specialist, may perform “confirmatory testing”, with the final diagnostic decision returned to the state. Confirmatory testing may involve measurement of metabolites, enzyme analysis, mutation screening, or sequencing. We now report sequencing results for infants said to have “false positive” NBS results for MCAD deficiency, or who died before confirmatory testing could be performed. Methods Dried blood spots (DBS) were obtained from all 18 available NBS cards identified as “false positive” by NBS for the 3 year period after screening began in Ohio in 2003 (N=20, thus 2 had no DBS available), and from all 6 infants with abnormal screens who died before confirmatory testing could be obtained. DNA extracted from DBS was screened for the common c.985A>G mutation in exon 11 of the ACADM gene, using a specific restriction digest method, followed by sequencing of the 12 exons, intron-exon junctions, and several hundred base pairs of the 5′ untranslated region. Results The NBS cut-off value for C8 used was 0.7 μmol/L. Sequencing of ACADM in six neonates with elevated C8 on NBS who died before confirmatory testing was obtained did not identify any significant variants in the coding region of the gene, suggesting that MCADD was not a contributing factor in these deaths. The mean C8 for the 18 surviving infants labeled as “False Positives” was 0.90 (95%CI 0.77-1.15), much lower than the mean value for confirmed cases. Ten of the 18 were premature births weighing <1200 g, the rest were normal sized and full term. Eight infants, mostly full term with appropriate birth weight, were heterozygous for the common c.985A>G mutation; one of those also

  12. Protonation Sites and Dissociation Mechanisms of t-Butylcarbamates in Tandem Mass Spectrometric Assays for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Spáčil, Zdeněk; Hui, Renjie; Gelb, Michael H.; Tureček, František

    2011-01-01

    Structures of tert-butylcarbamate ions in the gas phase and methanol solution were studied for simple secondary and tertiary carbamates as well as for carbamate-containing products and internal standards for lysosomal enzyme assays used in newborn screening of a α-galactosidase A deficiency (GLA, Fabry disease), mucopolysaccharidosis I (Hurler disease), and mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter disease). Protonation of simple t-butylcarbamates can occur at the carbonyl group which is the preferred site in the gas phase. Protonation in methanol solution is more favorable if occurring at the carbamate nitrogen atom. Protonation of more complex t-butylcarbamates occurs at amide and carbamate carbonyl groups, and the ions are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding which is affected by solvation. Tertiary carbamates containing aminophenol amide groups were calculated to have substantially greater gas-phase basicities than secondary carbamates containing coumarin amide groups. The main diagnostically important ion dissociation by elimination of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene, i-C4H8) and carbon dioxide is shown by experiment and theory to proceed in two steps. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation of the Hurler’s disease enzymatic product ion, which is a coumarin-diamine linker-t-butylcarbamate conjugate (3a+), indicated separate energy thresholds for the loss of i-C4H8 and CO2. Computational investigation of the potential energy surface along two presumed reaction pathways indicated kinetic preference for the migration of a t-butyl hydrogen atom to the carbamate carbonyl resulting in the isobutylene loss. The consequent loss of CO2 required further proton migrations that had to overcome energy barriers. PMID:22012676

  13. How well does the capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone test for newborn thyroid screening predict the venous free thyroxine level?

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovska, Tzveta; Jones, Jeremy; Shaikh, M Guftar; Smith, Sarah; Donaldson, Malcolm D C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine, in newborn infants referred with elevated capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a threshold below which a frankly subnormal venous free thyroxine (fT4) level of <10 pmol/L is unlikely, so that treatment with levo-thyroxine (L-T4) might be deferred until venous thyroid function tests (TFTs) become available. Subjects and methods All infants referred in Scotland since 1979 with capillary TSH elevation were studied, with particular focus on infants screened using the AutoDELFIA assay between 2002 and 2013. Results Of the 321 infants referred with capillary TSH elevation using AutoDELFIA, 35 were excluded (fT4/TSH unavailable (12), venous sample either preceding or >10 days after capillary sampling (13, 10)), leaving 286 eligible for analysis (208 definite/probable hypothyroidism, 61 transient TSH elevation, 17 of uncertain thyroid status). Capillary TSH and venous T4 were strongly correlated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient −0.707355). The optimal capillary TSH threshold for predicting a venous fT4 of <10 pmol/L was found to be >40 mU/L (90.3% sensitivity and 65.9% specificity compared with 90.25% and 59.1% for >35 mU/L and 88.3% and 68.2% for >45 mU/L). 93 infants (32.5%) had capillary TSH ≤40 mU/L at referral of whom 15 (9.7%) had venous fT4 <10 pmol/L, comprising seven with true congenital hypothyroidism, five with transient TSH elevation and three with uncertain status, two of whom died. Conclusion For infants in whom capillary TSH is ≤40 mU/L, it is reasonable to defer L-T4 treatment until venous TFT results are known provided that the latter become available quickly. PMID:26966265

  14. Task-Oriented and Bottle Feeding Adversely Affect the Quality of Mother-Infant Interactions Following Abnormal Newborn Screens

    PubMed Central

    Tluczek, Audrey; Clark, Roseanne; McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Orland, Kate Murphy; Brown, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Examine effects of newborn screening (NBS) and neonatal diagnosis on the quality of mother-infant interactions in the context of feeding. Methods Study compared the quality of mother-infant feeding interactions among four groups of infants classified by severity of NBS and diagnostic results: cystic fibrosis (CF), congenital hypothyroidism, heterozygote CF carrier, and healthy with normal NBS. The Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment and a task-oriented item measured the quality of feeding interactions for 130 dyads, infant ages 3–19 weeks (M=9.19, SD=3.28). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory measured maternal depression and anxiety. Results Composite Indicator Structure Equation Modeling showed that infant diagnostic status and, to a lesser extent, maternal education predicted feeding method. Mothers of infants with CF were most likely to bottle feed, which was associated with more task-oriented maternal behavior than breastfeeding. Mothers with low task-oriented behavior showed more sensitivity and responsiveness to infant cues, as well as less negative affect and behavior in their interactions with their infants than mothers with high task-oriented scores. Mothers of infants with CF were significantly more likely to have clinically significant anxiety and depression than the other groups. However, maternal psychological profile did not predict feeding method or interaction quality. Conclusions Mothers in the CF group were the least likely to breastfeed. Research is needed to explicate long-term effects of feeding methods on quality of mother-child relationship and ways to promote continued breastfeeding following a neonatal CF diagnosis. PMID:20495477

  15. Newborn screening of inborn errors of metabolism by capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: a second-tier method with improved specificity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chalcraft, Kenneth R; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The advent of electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has given rise to expanded newborn screening programs for the early detection of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM). Despite the benefit of high-throughput screening for disease prognosis, conventional ESI-MS methods are limited by inadequate specificity, complicated sample handling, and low positive predictive outcome that can contribute to a high rate of false-positives. Herein, we report a robust strategy for neonatal screening based on capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) that offers a convenient platform for the direct analysis of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and their stereoisomers from dried blood spot (DBS) extracts without chemical derivatization. On-line sample preconcentration with desalting by CE-ESI-MS allowed for improved concentration sensitivity when detecting poorly responsive metabolites in complex biological samples without ionization suppression or isomeric/isobaric interferences. Method validation demonstrated that accurate yet precise quantification can be achieved for 20 different amino acid and acylcarnitine biomarkers associated with IEMs when using a single non-deuterated internal standard. CE-ESI-MS represents a promising second-tier method in newborn screening programs that is compatible with ESI-MS/MS technology in cases when improved specificity and sensitivity is warranted for diagnosis confirmation and subsequent monitoring. PMID:19117458

  16. Quantitation of Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid in Dried Blood Spots: Feasibility Assessment for Newborn Screening of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Sabrina; Pearl, Phillip L.; Gibson, K. Michael; Yu, Yuezhou; Sweetman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Objective SSADH deficiency, the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder of GABA degradation, is characterized by elevated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). Neurological outcomes may be improved with early intervention and anticipatory guidance. Morbidity has been compounded by complications, e.g. hypotonia, in undiagnosed infants with otherwise routine childhood illnesses. We report pilot methodology on the feasibility of newborn screening for SSADH deficiency. Method Dried blood spot (DBS) cards from patients affected with SSADH deficiency were compared with 2831 archival DBS cards for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid content. Following extraction with methanol, GHB in DBS was separated and analyzed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results Methodology was validated to meet satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility criteria, including intra-day and inter-day validation. Archival refrigerated dried blood spots samples of babies, infants and children (N=2831) were screened for GHB, yielding a mean +/- S.D. of 8 ± 5 nM (99.9 %-tile 63 nM) (Min 0.0 Max 78 nM). The measured mean and median concentrations in blood spots derived from seven SSADH deficient patients were 1182 nM and 699 nM respectively (Min 124, Max 4851nM). Conclusions GHB concentration in all 2831 dried blood spot cards was well below the lowest concentration of affected children. These data provide proof-of-principle for screening methodology to detect SSADH deficiency with applicability to newborn screening and earlier diagnosis. PMID:23742746

  17. Informing children of their newborn screening carrier result for sickle cell or cystic fibrosis: qualitative study of parents' intentions, views and support needs.

    PubMed

    Ulph, Fiona; Cullinan, Tim; Qureshi, Nadeem; Kai, Joe

    2014-06-01

    Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease enables the early identification and treatment of affected children, prolonging and enhancing their quality of life. Screening, however, also identifies carriers. There are minimal or no health concerns for carriers. There are, however, potential implications when carriers reach reproductive age, and thus research attention has been given to how best to convey information about these implications in a meaningful, balanced way which does not raise undue anxieties. Most research focuses on the communication from health professional to parent, yet ultimately this information is of greatest significance to the child. This study examines parents' intentions to inform their child of newborn screening carrier results. Semi-structured interviews with 67 family members explored their intentions to inform the child, and related views and support needs. Parents almost unanimously indicated they planned to inform the child themselves. Health professionals were expected, however, to provide guidance on this process either to parents through advice and provision of written materials, or directly to the child. Although parents initially stated that they would convey the result once their child had developed the ability to understand the information, many appeared to focus on discrete life events linked to informed reproductive decision making. The results highlight ways in which health care providers may assist parents, including providing written material suitable for intergenerational communication and ensuring that cascade screening is accessible for those seeking it. Priorities for further research are identified in light of the results. PMID:24306142

  18. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Has a Larger Analytical Range than Fluorescence Assays of Lysosomal Enzymes: Application to Newborn Screening and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidoses Types II, IVA, and VI

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun Babu; Masi, Sophia; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Chennamaneni, Naveen Kumar; Ito, Makoto; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.; Spacil, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is interest in newborn screening and diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that improve clinical outcome. Assays of lysosomal enzymes with high analytical range (ratio of assay response from the enzymatic reaction divided by the assay response due to nonenzymatic processes) are desirable because they are predicted to lead to a lower rate of false positives in population screening and to more accurate diagnoses. METHODS We designed new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assays that give the largest analytical ranges reported to date for the use of dried blood spots (DBS) for detection of mucopolysaccharidoses type II (MPS-II), MPS-IVA, and MPS-VI. For comparison, we carried out fluorometric assays of 6 lysosomal enzymes using 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU)-substrate conjugates. RESULTS The MS/MS assays for MPS-II, -IVA, and -VI displayed analytical ranges that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than those for the corresponding fluorometric assays. The relatively small analytical ranges of the 4MU assays are due to the intrinsic fluorescence of the 4MU substrates, which cause high background in the assay response. CONCLUSIONS These highly reproducible MS/MS assays for MPS-II, -IVA, and -VI can support multiplex newborn screening of these lysosomal storage diseases. MS/MS assays of lysosomal enzymes outperform 4MU fluorometric assays in terms of analytical range. Ongoing pilot studies will allow us to gauge the impact of the increased analytical range on newborn screening performance. PMID:26369786

  19. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Danieli B.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Azen, Colleen; Young, Suzanne; Raraigh, Karen S.; Keens, Thomas G.; Kharrazi, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California’s racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C); those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC); and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown). Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared. Results Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78) and 11% of Unknown (27/244) met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing. Conclusions While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed. PMID:27214204

  20. A simple method for the analysis by MS/MS of underivatized amino acids on dry blood spots from newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2012-05-01

    The analysis by electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry of amino acids with butyl esterification and isotopically labeled internal standard is routine in newborn screening laboratories worldwide. In the present study, we established a direct analysis method of higher accuracy that uses a non-deuterated internal standard. The automatic sampler and the pump of an LC apparatus were used to inject sample and mobile phase to MS, but no LC column was needed. The dry blood spot (DBS) material was prepared at levels of low, medium and high concentration; the running time was 1 min. In parallel to the new procedure, we applied the established method to analyze nine amino acids on DBS of healthy newborns and phenylketonuria newborns. The newly proposed method of product ion confirmation scan along with multiple reaction monitoring resulted in a very accurate identification of each amino acid. Our innovative protocol had high sensitivity and specificity in the analysis of cases of suspected metabolic diseases. PMID:21509487

  1. Factors Affecting Parent-Child Relationships One Year After Positive Newborn Screening for Cystic Fibrosis or Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Tluczek, Audrey; Clark, Roseanne; McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Brown, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine factors that mediate parent-infant relationships 12 months after positive newborn screening (NBS). Method We examined effects of infant diagnosis, parents’ perceptions of child vulnerability and child attachment, parental depression and anxiety on parent-infant feeding interactions for 131 mothers and 118 fathers of 131 infants whose NBS and diagnostics confirmed cystic fibrosis (CF, n=23), congenital hypothyroidism (CH, n=35), CF carrier status (CF-C, n=38), or healthy, normal NBS (H, n=35). Results Separate composite indicator structural equation models for mothers and fathers showed neonatal diagnosis was not associated with increased anxiety or depression. In comparison to the H group, CF group parents reported higher perceptions of child vulnerability (p< 0.001, p=0.002); and CF-C group fathers viewed their children as more attached (p=0.021). High maternal perception of child vulnerability was associated with low perceptions of child attachment (p=0.001) which was associated with task-oriented feeding behavior (p=0.016, p=0.029). Parental task-oriented feeding behavior was associated with less positive (p< 0.001, p< 0.001) and more negative interactions (p< 0.001, p= 0.001) with their infants. High paternal perception of child vulnerability was associated with negative parent interactions (p< 0.001). High parental affective involvement and verbalization was associated with high infant affective expressiveness, communicative skills, and social responsiveness (mothers’ p< 0.001, fathers’ p< 0.001). High parental negative affect and/or inconsistent and intrusive behavior was associated with infant dysregulation and irritability (mothers’ p< 0.001, fathers’ p< 0.001). Conclusion The severity of conditions identified through NBS can affect parents’ perceptions of their child’s vulnerability and attachment. Infant feeding problems in the context of chronic health conditions, like CF, could represent signs of more deeply rooted

  2. Newborn Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... PKU lack an enzyme needed to process the amino acid phenylalanine, which is necessary for normal growth in ... are missing an enzyme needed to process three amino acids that are essential for the body's normal growth. ...

  3. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... The blood is sent to a lab for analysis. Hearing test . A health care provider will place ... Morrow C et al. Reducing neonatal pain during routine heel lance procedures. MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing . 2010;35(6):346-54. ...

  4. News about Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For years "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") has been offering educational information and support to those challenged with disabilities and takes an equally pro-active role in disseminating vital information that could potentially prevent disabilities. This is evidenced by its past and ongoing efforts in being a proponent and champion for comprehensive…

  5. A Qualitative Secondary Evaluation of Statewide Follow-Up Interviews for Abnormal Newborn Screening Results for Cystic Fibrosis and Sickle Cell Hemoglobinopathy

    PubMed Central

    La Pean, Alison; Collins, Jenelle L.; Christopher, Stephanie A.; Eskra, Kerry L.; Roedl, Sara; Tluczek, Audrey; Farrell, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to assess parental acceptability of large-scale, telephone follow-up regarding their infants' newborn screening (NBS) results indicating carrier status for sickle cell hemoglobinopathy (SCH) and cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods Analysis of 195 interview transcripts focused on parents' responses to two open-ended questions “What was your reaction to being called by me?” and “What do you think of the state newborn screening program having follow-up people calling parents like you?” Responses were coded using conventional content analysis procedures and non-parametric tests were performed to analyze quantitative data. Results Most parents reported favorable opinions about the follow-up. Favorable opinions were associated with several emotional reactions to receiving follow-up (p<0.001), and three reasons why parents found the interview beneficial (p<0.05): it provided information, clarified NBS results, and answered questions. Seventeen parents of SCH carriers reportedly had not been told their infant's NBS results and received them for the first time during the follow-up interview. Conclusion Parents of CF and SCH carrier infants had favorable opinions and identified specific benefits to receiving follow-up contact. This analysis demonstrates an information deficit among carrier parents and illustrates the importance of NBS follow-up and need for comprehensive communication and counseling. PMID:22261754

  6. Medical devices; clinical chemistry and clinical toxicology devices; classification of newborn screening test systems for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying newborn screening test systems for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to the device is the guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Newborn Screening Test Systems for Amino Acids, Free Carnitine, and Acylcarnitines Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry." The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997, and the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002. The agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of a guidance document that is the special control for this device. PMID:15562554

  7. A column-switching HPLC-MS/MS method for mucopolysaccharidosis type I analysis in a multiplex assay for the simultaneous newborn screening of six lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Gucciardi, Antonina; Legnini, Elisa; Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Corbetta, Carlo; Tomanin, Rosella; Scarpa, Maurizio; Giordano, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders comprise a group of rare genetic diseases in which a deficit of specific hydrolases leads to the storage of undegraded substrates in lysosomes. Impaired enzyme activities can be assessed by MS/MS quantification of the reaction products obtained after incubation with specific substrates. In this study, a column-switching HPLC-MS/MS method for multiplex screening in dried blood spot of the lysosomal enzymes activities was developed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I, Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, Niemann-Pick A/B and Pompe diseases were simultaneously assayed. Dried blood spots were incubated with substrates and internal standards; thereafter, supernatants were collected with minor manipulations. Samples were injected, trapped into an online perfusion column and, by a six-port valve, switched online through the C18 analytical column to perform separation of metabolites followed by MS/MS analysis. A total of 1136 de-identified newborn screening samples were analyzed to determine references for enzymes activity values. As positive controls, we analyzed dried blood spots from three patients with Pompe, one with Fabry, one with Krabbe disease and two with MPS I, and in all cases the enzyme activities were below the cutoff values measured for newborns, except for an MPS I patient after successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24449175

  8. Inborn errors of metabolism identified via newborn screening: Ten-year incidence data and costs of nutritional interventions for research agenda planning.

    PubMed

    Therrell, Bradford L; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Camp, Kathryn M; Mann, Marie Y

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are genetic disorders in which specific enzyme defects interfere with the normal metabolism of exogenous (dietary) or endogenous protein, carbohydrate, or fat. In the U.S., many IEM are detected through state newborn screening (NBS) programs. To inform research on IEM and provide necessary resources for researchers, we are providing: tabulation of ten-year state NBS data for selected IEM detected through NBS; costs of medical foods used in the management of IEM; and an assessment of corporate policies regarding provision of nutritional interventions at no or reduced cost to individuals with IEM. The calculated IEM incidences are based on analyses of ten-year data (2001-2011) from the National Newborn Screening Information System (NNSIS). Costs to feed an average person with an IEM were approximated by determining costs to feed an individual with an IEM, minus the annual expenditure for food for an individual without an IEM. Both the incidence and costs of nutritional intervention data will be useful in future research concerning the impact of IEM disorders on families, individuals and society. PMID:25085281

  9. Inborn errors of metabolism identified via newborn screening: Ten-year incidence data and costs of nutritional interventions for research agenda planning✰

    PubMed Central

    Therrell, Bradford L.; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Camp, Kathryn M.; Mann, Marie Y.

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are genetic disorders in which specific enzyme defects interfere with the normal metabolism of exogenous (dietary) or endogenous protein, carbohydrate, or fat. In the U.S., many IEM are detected through state newborn screening (NBS) programs. To inform research on IEM and provide necessary resources for researchers, we are providing: tabulation of ten-year state NBS data for selected IEM detected through NBS; costs of medical foods used in the management of IEM; and an assessment of corporate policies regarding provision of nutritional interventions at no or reduced cost to individuals with IEM. The calculated IEM incidences are based on analyses of ten-year data (2001–2011) from the National Newborn Screening Information System (NNSIS). Costs to feed an average person with an IEM were approximated by determining costs to feed an individual with an IEM, minus the annual expenditure for food for an individual without an IEM. Both the incidence and costs of nutritional intervention data will be useful in future research concerning the impact of IEM disorders on families, individuals and society. PMID:25085281

  10. Newborn jaundice

    MedlinePlus

    Jaundice of the newborn; Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia; Bili lights - jaundice; Infant - yellow skin; Newborn - yellow skin ... lasts 1 to 2 days. Sometimes special blue lights are used on infants whose levels are very ...

  11. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn. PMID:26760414

  12. Showing Value in Newborn Screening: Challenges in Quantifying the Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Early Detection of Phenylketonuria and Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Decision makers sometimes request information on the cost savings, cost-effectiveness, or cost-benefit of public health programs. In practice, quantifying the health and economic benefits of population-level screening programs such as newborn screening (NBS) is challenging. It requires that one specify the frequencies of health outcomes and events, such as hospitalizations, for a cohort of children with a given condition under two different scenarios—with or without NBS. Such analyses also assume that everything else, including treatments, is the same between groups. Lack of comparable data for representative screened and unscreened cohorts that are exposed to the same treatments following diagnosis can result in either under- or over-statement of differences. Accordingly, the benefits of early detection may be understated or overstated. This paper illustrates these common problems through a review of past economic evaluations of screening for two historically significant conditions, phenylketonuria and cystic fibrosis. In both examples qualitative judgments about the value of prompt identification and early treatment to an affected child were more influential than specific numerical estimates of lives or costs saved. PMID:26702401

  13. Short-incubation mass spectrometry assay for lysosomal storage disorders in newborn and high-risk population screening.

    PubMed

    Mechtler, Thomas P; Metz, Thomas F; Müller, Hannes G; Ostermann, Katharina; Ratschmann, Rene; De Jesus, Victor R; Shushan, Bori; Di Bussolo, Joseph M; Herman, Joseph L; Herkner, Kurt R; Kasper, David C

    2012-11-01

    The interest in early detection strategies for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) in newborns and high-risk population has increased in the last years due to the availability of novel treatment strategies coupled with the development of diagnostic techniques. We report the development of a short-incubation mass spectrometry-based protocol that allows the detection of Gaucher, Niemann-Pick A/B, Pompe, Fabry and mucopolysaccharidosis type I disease within 4h including sample preparation from dried blood spots. Optimized sample handling without the need of time-consuming offline preparations, such as liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction, allows the simultaneous quantification of five lysosomal enzyme activities using a cassette of substrates and deuterated internal standards. Applying incubation times of 3h revealed in intra-day CV% values ranging from 4% to 11% for all five enzyme activities, respectively. In a first clinical evaluation, we tested 825 unaffected newborns and 16 patients with LSDs using a multiplexed, turbulent flow chromatography-ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer assay. All affected patients were identified accurately and could be differentiated from non-affected newborns. In comparison to previously published two-day assays, which included an overnight incubation, this protocol enabled the detection of lysosomal enzyme activities from sample to first result within half a day. PMID:23122395

  14. Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed; Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Ray, Abhishek; Folmsbeel, Caspian K; Gozales, Diana; Keles, Sevgi; Puck, Jennifer M; Chatila, Talal

    2011-11-01

    Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID. PMID:21763205

  15. Changing Trends within the Population of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Flanders (Belgium): Effects of 12 Years of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening, Early Intervention, and Early Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Raeve, Leo; Lichtert, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the changing trends within the population of children who are deaf and hard of hearing in Belgium over the last 12 years. The combination of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening programs, early intervention, and cochlear implants have tremendously influenced the education and support of children who are deaf or…

  16. [The mutation spectrum of the GJB2 gene in Belarussian patients with hearing loss. Results of pilot genetic screening of hearing impairment in newborns].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Marcul', D N; Khorov, O G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-02-01

    A total of 111 unrelated probands and their 8 sibs from Grodno oblast (Belarus) with bilateral isolated sensorineural hearing impairment were studied for the presence of mutations in the connexin 26--GJB2gene. Mutations were detected in 51 probands (46% of the sample). A significantly higher frequency of the GJB2gene mutations was observed in familial cases of the disease with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance (in 78% of families). Detected peculiarities of the GJB2 gene mutation spectrum demonstrated that use of the algorithm, which was developed for Russian patients, is optimal for the molecular study of patients from Be- larus. In the sample of patients with hearing loss, the highest (among other similar samples studied in the world) allele frequency of c.313_326de114 mutation (7% out of all pathological GJB2 alleles) was registered; Polish origin of this deletion was suggested. It was demonstrated that detection of the GJB2 gene mutation on only one patient's chromosome is insufficient to confirm a molecular genetic diagnosis of hearing loss of the DFNB1 genetic type (autosomal recessive hearing loss caused by the GJB2 gene mutations). Pilot screening in the presence of GJB2 gene mutations in newborns from Grodno oblast was conducted. The material from 235 children was studied during the screening; nine heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found. The c.35delG mutation was detected in a homozygous state in a single newborn (hearing loss of moderate severity was subsequently audiologically confirmed in this child). PMID:25711030

  17. Record linkage to obtain birth outcomes for the evaluation of screening biomarkers in pregnancy: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Linking population health data to pathology data is a new approach for the evaluation of predictive tests that is potentially more efficient, feasible and efficacious than current methods. Studies evaluating the use of first trimester maternal serum levels as predictors of complications in pregnancy have mostly relied on resource intensive methods such as prospective data collection or retrospective chart review. The aim of this pilot study is to demonstrate that record-linkage between a pathology database and routinely collected population health data sets provides follow-up on patient outcomes that is as effective as more traditional and resource-intensive methods. As a specific example, we evaluate maternal serum levels of PAPP-A and free β-hCG as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and compare our results with those of prospective studies. Methods Maternal serum levels of PAPP-A and free β-hCG for 1882 women randomly selected from a pathology database in New South Wales (NSW) were linked to routinely collected birth and hospital databases. Crude relative risks were calculated to investigate the association between low levels (multiples of the median ≤ 5th percentile) of PAPP-A or free β-hCG and the outcomes of preterm delivery (<37 weeks), small for gestational age (<10th percentile), fetal loss and stillbirth. Results Using only full name, sex and date of birth for record linkage, pregnancy outcomes were available for 1681 (89.3%) of women included in the study. Low levels of PAPP-A had a stronger association with adverse pregnancy outcomes than a low level of free β-hCG which is consistent with results in published studies. The relative risk of having a preterm birth with a low maternal serum PAPP-A level was 3.44 (95% CI 1.96–6.10) and a low free β-hCG level was 1.31 (95% CI 0.55–6.16). Conclusion This study provides data to support the use of record linkage for outcome ascertainment in studies evaluating predictive tests. Linkage

  18. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. 862.1055 Section 862.1055 Food and... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a... mass spectrometry is a device that consists of stable isotope internal standards, control...

  19. Screening the High-Risk Newborn for Hearing Loss: The Crib-O-Gram v the Auditory Brainstem Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, L. Clarke

    1988-01-01

    Presented are a rationale for identifying hearing loss in infancy and a history of screening procedures. The Crib-O-Gram and auditory brainstem response (ABR) tests are evaluated for reliability, validity, and cost-effectiveness. The ABR is recommended, and fully automated ABR instrumentation, which lowers expenses for trained personnel and…

  20. Using probabilistic record linkage methods to identify Australian Indigenous women on the Queensland Pap Smear Register: the National Indigenous Cervical Screening Project

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Abbey; Baade, Peter; Garvey, Gail; Cunningham, Joan; Brotherton, Julia M L; Canfell, Karen; Valery, Patricia C; O'Connell, Dianne L; Taylor, Catherine; Moore, Suzanne P; Condon, John R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of record linkage of existing population-based data sets to determine Indigenous status among women receiving Pap smears. This method may allow for the first ever population measure of Australian Indigenous women's cervical screening participation rates. Setting/participants A linked data set of women aged 20–69 in the Queensland Pap Smear Register (PSR; 1999–2011) and Queensland Cancer Registry (QCR; 1997–2010) formed the Initial Study Cohort. Two extracts (1995–2011) were taken from Queensland public hospitals data (Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection, QHAPDC) for women, aged 20–69, who had ever been identified as Indigenous (extract 1) and had a diagnosis or procedure code relating to cervical cancer (extract 2). The Initial Study Cohort was linked to extract 1, and women with cervical cancer in the initial cohort were linked to extract 2. Outcome measures The proportion of women in the Initial Cohort who linked with the extracts (true -pairs) is reported, as well as the proportion of potential pairs that required clerical review. After assigning Indigenous status from QHAPDC to the PSR, the proportion of women identified as Indigenous was calculated using 4 algorithms, and compared. Results There were 28 872 women (2.1%) from the Initial Study Cohort who matched to an ever Indigenous record in extract 1 (n=76 831). Women with cervical cancer in the Initial Study Cohort linked to 1385 (71%) records in extract 2. The proportion of Indigenous women ranged from 2.00% to 2.08% when using different algorithms to define Indigenous status. The Final Study Cohort included 1 372 823 women (PSR n=1 374 401; QCR n=1955), and 5 062 118 records. Conclusions Indigenous status in Queensland cervical screening data was successfully ascertained through record linkage, allowing for the crucial assessment of the current cervical screening programme for Indigenous women. Our study

  1. Eradication of hepatitis B: a nationwide community coalition approach to improving vaccination, screening, and linkage to care.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Chari; Caballero, Jeffrey; Martin, Melinda; Weerasinghe, Isha; Ninde, Michelle; Block, Joan

    2013-10-01

    Infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a significant public health concern in the US, disproportionately affecting Americans of Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander descent, despite the availability of a simple blood test, approved treatments, and an effective vaccine. Hep B United, a national campaign to support and leverage the success of community-based HBV coalitions, convened a partner summit in 2012 to develop a strategic response to the HHS Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis. The resulting community action plan focuses on advancing three areas of the HHS plan: educating providers and communities to reduce health disparities; improving testing and linkage to care to prevent HBV-related liver disease and cancer; and eliminating perinatal HBV transmission. PMID:23715963

  2. Save Babies through Screening Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... screenable disorders. More Practitioners Save Babies Videos Newborn screening saves babies, one foot at a time. For ... disease that could have been treated had newborn screening taken place before the baby left the hospital. ...

  3. The natural history of elevated tetradecenoyl-L-carnitine detected by newborn screening in New Zealand: implications for very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency screening and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Bryony; Knoll, Detlef; Love, Donald R; Shepherd, Phillip; Love, Jennifer M; Reed, Peter W; de Hora, Mark; Webster, Dianne; Glamuzina, Emma; Wilson, Callum

    2016-05-01

    Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD, OMIM #201475) has been increasingly diagnosed since the advent of expanded newborn screening (NBS). Elevated levels of tetradecenoyl-L-carnitine (C14:1) in newborn screening blood spot samples are particularly common in New Zealand, however this has not translated into increased VLCADD clinical presentations. A high proportion of screen-positive cases in NZ are of Maori or Pacific ethnicity and positive for the c.1226C > T (p.Thr409Met) ACADVL gene variant. We performed a retrospective, blinded, case-control study of 255 cases, born between 2006 and 2013, with elevated NBS C14:1 levels between 0.9 and 2.4 μmol/L, below the NZ C14:1 notification cut-off of 2.5 μmol/L. Coded healthcare records were audited for cases and age- and ethnicity- matched controls. The clinical records of those with possible VLCADD-related symptoms were reviewed. The follow-up period was 6 months to 7 years. Two of 247 cases (0.8 %) had possible VLCADD-like symptoms while four of 247 controls (2 %) had VLCADD-like symptoms (p = 0.81). Maori were overrepresented (68 % of the cohort vs 15 % of population). Targeted analysis of the c.1226 locus revealed the local increase in screening C14:1 levels is associated with the c.1226C > T variant (97/152 alleles tested), found predominantly in Maori and Pacific people. There was no increase in clinically significant childhood disease, irrespective of ethnicity. The study suggests that children with elevated C14:1, between 0.9-2.4 μmol/L, on NBS are at very low risk of clinically significant childhood disease. A minimally interventional approach to managing these patients is indicated, at least in the New Zealand population. PMID:26743058

  4. Simultaneous quantitation of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine, amino acids, acylcarnitines, and succinylacetone during FIA–ESI–MS/MS analysis of dried blood spot extracts for newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to include the quantitation of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine, a biomarker for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and other peroxisomal disorders, in the routine extraction and analysis procedure used to quantitate amino acids, acylcarnitines, and succinylacetone during newborn screening. Criteria for the method included use of a single punch from a dried blood spot, one simple extraction of the punch, no high-performance liquid chromatography, and utilizing tandem mass spectrometry to quantitate the analytes. Design and methods Dried blood spot punches were extracted with a methanolic solution of stable-isotope labeled internal standards, formic acid, and hydrazine, followed by flow injection analysis–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Quantitation of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine using this combined method was similar to results obtained using two separate methods. Conclusions A single dried blood spot punch extracted by a rapid (45 min), simple procedure can be analyzed with high throughput (2 min per sample) to quantitate amino acids, acylcarnitines, succinylacetone, and hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:26432925

  5. Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Zeni Drubi; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Kiya, Márcia Miyuki; Amorim, Tatiana; da Fonseca, Silvana Fahel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the breastfeeding history (BF) and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SCD aged between 2 and 6 years, regularly followed at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS) between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and gender. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 3.7 (1.1) years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SCA (hemoglobin SS). The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR) up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75) was 90.0 (24.0-180.0) days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75) was 360.0 (90.0-720.0) days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for a mean duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01), and were weaned later (p<0.05). Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had had SCA (hemoglobin SS) and were older than 4 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: EBF time and weaning age were greater than that found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBF and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators. PMID:25662563

  6. Successful diagnosis of HIBCH deficiency from exome sequencing and positive retrospective analysis of newborn screening cards in two siblings presenting with Leigh’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Ashlee R.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Besse, Arnaud; Appadurai, Vivek; Leydiker, Karen B.; Cambray-Forker, E.J.; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Abdenur, Jose E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 3-hydroxyisobutryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) deficiency is a rare disorder of valine metabolism. We present a family with the oldest reported subjects with HIBCH deficiency and provide support that HIBCH deficiency should be included in the differential for elevated hydroxy-C4-carnitine in newborn screening (NBS). Methods Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on one affected sibling. HIBCH enzymatic activity was measured in patient fibroblasts. Acylcarnitines were measured by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Disease incidence was estimated using a cohort of 61,434 individuals. Results Two siblings presented with infantile-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease. WES identified a novel homozygous variant in HIBCH c.196C>T; p.Arg66Trp. HIBCH enzymatic activity was significantly reduced in patients’ fibroblasts. Acylcarnitine analysis showed elevated hydroxy-C4-carnitine in blood spots of both affected siblings, including in their NBS cards, while plasma acylcarnitines were normal. Estimates show HIBCH deficiency incidence as high as 1 in ~130,000 individuals. Conclusion We describe a novel family with HIBCH deficiency at the biochemical, enzymatic and molecular level. Disease incidence estimates indicate HIBCH deficiency may be under-diagnosed. This together with the elevated hydroxy-C4-carnitine found in the retrospective analysis of our patient’s NBS cards suggests that this disorder could be screened by NBS programs and should be added to the differential diagnosis for elevated hydroxy-C4-carnitine which is already measured in most NBS programs using MS/MS. PMID:26026795

  7. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  8. Thrush in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Candidiasis - oral - newborn; Oral thrush - newborn; Fungal infection - mouth - newborn; Candida - oral - newborn ... the mother's nipples are perfect places for a yeast infection. Babies can also get a yeast infection on ...

  9. Thrush in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Candidiasis - oral - newborn; Oral thrush - newborn; Fungal infection - mouth - newborn; Candida - oral - newborn ... yeast called Candida albicans grows in a baby's mouth. Germs called bacteria and fungi naturally grow in ...

  10. [Prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis in France. Risk assessment. Results and perspectives of prenatal screening and newborn follow up].

    PubMed

    Ambroise-Thomas, P; Schweitzer, M; Pinon, J M; Thiebaugeorges, O

    2001-01-01

    In France, a national program for the prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis has been set up 25 years ago. This program is here presented and discussed in details. It is based on a decision tree well defined, with pre and/or per gravidic serological screening with several different tests, completed, if necessary, by ultrasounds examinations of the fetus, biomolecular tests (PCR) on amniotic fluid, and by clinical, biological, and radiological surveillance of neo-nates. The purpose of this prevention program is to: 1/identify nonimmune young women and limit their contamination risk during pregnancy by appropriate counseling on hygiene and diet; 2/screen and treat per gravidic toxoplasmosis as early as possible so as to prevent or limit transmission to the fetus and its consequences. 3/in utero diagnose and treat infestation of the fetus; 4/diagnose and treat asymptomatic congenital toxoplasmosis in neonates, to prevent risks of reactivation and late complications, especially ocular. Such a prevention program has a cost validated by the prevalence of acquired toxoplasmosis in adults in France (over 50% of the population) and by the yearly incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis (at least 0.1% of births according to the best hypothesis). These 6 to 700 congenital toxoplasmosis cases per year may be compared to the 6 to 7,000 per gravidic seroconversions which could lead to fetal contamination if no preventive measures are taken. Nevertheless, as it is often the case in the field of prevention, it is very difficult to statistically assess the efficacy of this program even though several arguments show that it allows to eliminate the most serious toxoplasmosis, sources of serious handicaps at birth, and to limit the frequency of late complications (especially retino-choroiditis) of asymptomatic infections in neonates. The position of European countries varies as to prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis. Some countries (Austria, Belgium) have national prevention programs

  11. Adapting the Andersen model to a francophone West African immigrant population: hepatitis B screening and linkage to care in New York City.

    PubMed

    Blanas, Demetri A; Nichols, Kim; Bekele, Mulusew; Shankar, Hari; Bekele, Saba; Jandorf, Lina; Izzeldin, Saria; Ndiaye, Daouda; Traore, Adama; Bassam, Motahar; Perumalswami, Ponni V

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic in West Africa and immigration from this region to the United States has greatly increased over the past quarter century. Using the Andersen Model as a conceptual framework, this study qualitatively examines francophone West African immigrants' perceptions of factors affecting access to HBV screening and linkage-to-care in New York City. Four focus groups were conducted with 39 purposefully selected participants. The focus groups were conducted in French, audio-recorded, translated into English, transcribed, analyzed, and coded for major themes. Participants identified increasing knowledge of HBV and opportunities to access care in a culturally-sensitive manner that decreases fatalism and avoids generating stigma as priorities. They also emphasized the importance of engaging religious establishments and social networks and employing the Internet to disseminate HBV-relevant information. Cost and health insurance are identified as future challenges that will need to be addressed in a health care environment in which undocumented immigrants are ineligible for health insurance. The qualitative analysis in this study highlights the recursive and interdependent nature of the Andersen Model, and a modification of the model is proposed that is intended to inform examinations of other minority communities' access to health care. PMID:25000917

  12. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  13. TORCH Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  14. Buen Comienzo, Buen Futuro: Su Recien Nacido. (Healthy Start, Grow Smart: Your Newborn).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet offers guidance to parents in caring for their newborn babies. Advice is given on the following topics: (1) newborn health screening; (2) what a healthy newborn looks like; (3) newborn reflexes; (4) baby checkups; (5) fathers' role; (6) the baby blues; (7) sleeping position; (8) breast milk; (9) breast feeding; (10) bottle feeding;…

  15. Purpose of Newborn Hearing Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > ...

  16. Nearby Newborns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image shows six of the three-dozen 'ultraviolet luminous galaxies' spotted in our corner of the universe by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. These massive galaxies greatly resemble newborn galaxies that were common in the early universe. The discovery came as a surprise, because astronomers had thought that the universe's 'birth-rate' had declined, and that massive galaxies were no longer forming.

    The galaxies, located in the center of each panel, were discovered after the Galaxy Evolution Explorer scanned a large portion of the sky with its highly sensitive ultraviolet-light detectors. Because young stars pack most of their light into ultraviolet wavelengths, young galaxies appear to the Galaxy Evolution Explorer like diamonds in a field of stones. Astronomers mined for these rare 'gems' before, but missed them because they weren't able to examine a large enough slice of the sky. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer surveyed thousands of nearby galaxies before finding three-dozen newborns.

    While still relatively close in astronomical terms, these galaxies are far enough away to appear small to the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Clockwise beginning from the upper left, they are called: GALEX_J232539.24+004507.1, GALEX_J231812.98-004126.1, GALEX_J015028.39+130858.5, GALEX_J021348.52+125951.3, GALEX_J143417.15+020742.5, GALEX_J020354.02-092452.5.

  17. Feeding Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... you choose to breastfeed or formula feed. About Breastfeeding Breastfeeding your newborn has many advantages. Perhaps most ... to care for her newborn. continue Limitations of Breastfeeding With all the good things known about breastfeeding, ...

  18. Low blood sugar - newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007306.htm Low blood sugar - newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A low blood sugar level in newborn babies is also called neonatal ...

  19. Skin characteristics in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  20. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  1. 75 FR 21645 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... have ready access to prenatal care, and, therefore, did not receive information about the newborn... that all families of newborns are ] educated about newborn screening as a part of prenatal and... improvement. While prenatal care should serve as the primary target of educational programs, they also...

  2. New Test Helps Identify Rare Genetic Diseases in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159097.html New Test Helps Identify Rare Genetic Diseases in Newborns ' ... 31, 2016 MONDAY, May 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New gene screening methods may greatly improve doctors' ability ...

  3. Global Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K

    2016-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made towards reducing under-5 childhood mortality in the Millennium Development Goals era. Reduction in newborn mortality has lagged behind maternal and child mortality. Effective implementation of innovative, evidence-based, and cost-effective interventions can reduce maternal and newborn mortality. Interventions aimed at the most vulnerable group results in maximal impact on mortality. Intervention coverage and scale-up remains low, inequitable and uneven in low-income countries due to numerous health-systems bottle-necks. Innovative service delivery strategies, increased integration and linkages across the maternal, newborn, child health continuum of care are vital to accelerate progress towards ending preventable maternal and newborn deaths. PMID:26613686

  4. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antibiotics Work Adenovirus Non-Polio Enterovirus Parent Portal Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) in Newborns Language: English Español (Spanish) ... can be very serious. Symptoms and Causes of Conjunctivitis in Newborns Newborns with conjunctivitis develop drainage from ...

  5. Genomic screening identifies novel linkages and provides further evidence for a role of MYH9 in nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Brett T; Hashmi, Syed S; Henry, Robin; Burt, Amber; Mulliken, John B; Stal, Samuel; Bray, Molly; Blanton, Susan H; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is a common birth anomaly that requires prolonged multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Although variation in several genes has been identified as contributing to NSCLP, most of the genetic susceptibility loci have yet to be defined. To identify additional contributory genes, a high-throughput genomic scan was performed using the Illumina Linkage IVb Panel platform. We genotyped 6008 SNPs in nine non-Hispanic white NSCLP multiplex families and a single large African-American NSCLP multiplex family. Fourteen chromosomal regions were identified with LOD>1.5, including six regions not previously reported. Analysis of the data from the African-American and non-Hispanic white families revealed two likely chromosomal regions: 8q21.3–24.12 and 22q12.2–12.3 with LOD scores of 2.98 and 2.66, respectively. On the basis of biological function, syndecan 2 (SDC2) and growth differentiation factor 6 (GDF6) in 8q21.3–24.12 and myosin heavy-chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) in 22q12.2–12.3 were selected as candidate genes. Association analyses from these genes yielded marginally significant P-values for SNPs in SDC2 and GDF6 (0.01≤P<0.05). Evidence for an altered transmission was found for four MYH9 SNPs (P<0.01). SNP rs1002246 exhibited altered transmission by all analytic methods. However, analysis of two SNP MYH9 haplotypes did not identify a single high-risk haplotype. Our results confirm a previous report that 8q21.3–24.12 may harbor a clefting gene and identify 22q12.2–12.3 as a new candidate region that contains MYH9. Most importantly, we confirm the previous report of an association with MYH9. PMID:18716610

  6. Genomic screening identifies novel linkages and provides further evidence for a role of MYH9 in nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Brett T; Hashmi, Syed S; Henry, Robin; Burt, Amber; Mulliken, John B; Stal, Samuel; Bray, Molly; Blanton, Susan H; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2009-02-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is a common birth anomaly that requires prolonged multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Although variation in several genes has been identified as contributing to NSCLP, most of the genetic susceptibility loci have yet to be defined. To identify additional contributory genes, a high-throughput genomic scan was performed using the Illumina Linkage IVb Panel platform. We genotyped 6008 SNPs in nine non-Hispanic white NSCLP multiplex families and a single large African-American NSCLP multiplex family. Fourteen chromosomal regions were identified with LOD>1.5, including six regions not previously reported. Analysis of the data from the African-American and non-Hispanic white families revealed two likely chromosomal regions: 8q21.3-24.12 and 22q12.2-12.3 with LOD scores of 2.98 and 2.66, respectively. On the basis of biological function, syndecan 2 (SDC2) and growth differentiation factor 6 (GDF6) in 8q21.3-24.12 and myosin heavy-chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) in 22q12.2-12.3 were selected as candidate genes. Association analyses from these genes yielded marginally significant P-values for SNPs in SDC2 and GDF6 (0.01

  7. Prevention of hepatitis B infection in newborns through mass screening and delayed vaccination of all infants of mothers with hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Schalm, S W; Mazel, J A; de Gast, G C; Heijtink, R A; Botman, M J; Bänffer, J R; Cerards, L J; Zwijnenberg, J; Fetter, W P; Nuijten, S M

    1989-06-01

    Beginning in 1982 all pregnant women undergoing prenatal routine blood analysis in three large city hospitals and one large rural area were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Infants of all HBsAg-positive mothers received hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIg), 0.5 mL/kg of body weight within two hours of birth and, after randomization, 10 micrograms of hepatitis B vaccine either at 0, 1, 2, and 11 months of age (schedule A) or at 3, 4, 5, and 11 months of age (schedule B). A second injection of HBIg (1 mL) was given to infants on schedule B at 3 months of age. Blood samples were obtained at 3, 6, 11, 12, 24, and 36 months. In a two-year period, 28,412 pregnant women were tested for HBsAg; screening efficiency varied between 85% and 98%. The overall prevalence of HBsAg was 0.8%, with a marked variation between urban centers (2.2%) and the rural area (0.3%). Vaccinations were received by 180 of 193 infants of HBsAg-positive mothers (90 on schedule A and 90 on schedule B). Concentrations of hepatitis B surface antibody less than 10 IU/L were observed in nine instances in five children from group A and in seven instances in six children from group B. Four hepatitis B viral infections (two HBsAg carriers, two who underwent antihepatitis B core seroconversions) were recorded in group A v one infection (antihepatitis B core seroconversion) in group B. The protective efficacy of the program (screening plus passive immunization and delayed vaccination) was 94%. The estimated cost of preventing one cae of hepatitis B infection in neonates was $3,000 (US currency).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2726331

  8. Communication and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Communication and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Communication and Your Newborn Print A A A Text ... first smile — a welcome addition to your baby's communication skills! continue What Should I Do? As soon ...

  9. Newborn health: everybody's business.

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Munar, Wolfgang; Henry, Sarah K

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in issue-attention and in evidence of what works to save newborn lives (e.g., kangaroo mother care, antenatal corticosteroids, immediate and exclusive breastfeeding), we are still falling short on impact. To advance the unfinished newborn survival agenda, newborns must become an integral priority in developing countries where the burden of neonatal mortality is highest. Interventions must be adapted to local contexts and cultures and integrated into packages along the continuum of care delivered through the primary health-care systems that countries have at their disposal. PMID:24953532

  10. AUTOGSCAN: powerful tools for automated genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis.

    PubMed

    Hiekkalinna, Tero; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Sammalisto, Sampo; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus

    2005-02-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis using multiple traits and statistical software packages is a tedious process which requires a significant amount of manual file manipulation. Different linkage analysis programs require different input file formats, making the task of analyzing data with multiple methods even more time-consuming. We have developed a software tool, AUTOGSCAN, that automates file formatting, the running of statistical analyses, and the summarizing of resulting statistics for whole genome scans with a push of a button, using several independent, and often idiosyncratic, statistical software packages such as MERLIN, SOLAR and GENEHUNTER. We also describe a program, ANALYZE, designed to run qualitative linkage analysis with several different statistical strategies and programs to efficiently screen for linkage and linkage disequilibrium for a given discrete trait. The ANALYZE program can also be used by AUTOGSCAN in a genome-wide sense. PMID:15836805

  11. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  12. Sleep and Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Your Newborn Sleep Establishing a bedtime routine (bathing, reading, singing) will help your baby relax and sleep ...

  13. Senses and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially mom's and dad's, are a baby's favorite "music." Your baby already knows that this is where ... your baby react to soft lullabies or other music? Even if your child passed the newborn hearing ...

  14. Low blood sugar - newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... to produce enough breast milk. (Hand expression and massage can help mothers express more milk.) The infant ... If you have diabetes during pregnancy, work with your health care ... sugar level. Be sure that your newborn's blood sugar level is ...

  15. Haemolytic disease of the newborn foal.

    PubMed

    Scott, A M; Jeffcott, L B

    1978-07-22

    Clinical features of haemolytic disease of the newborn foal (HDNF) are reviewed. The state of knowledge concerning the serological factors associated with isoimmunisation of mares and as assessment of the methods available for screening potential "haemolytic mares" are presented. The treatment of severely affected foals has principally involved exchange transfusion but more recently a simple transfusion of mare's packed erythrocytes has proved more successful. PMID:685106

  16. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  17. Deafness gene mutations in newborns in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Han, Shujing; Yang, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yi; Hao, Jinsheng; Shen, Adong; Xu, Fang; Chu, Ping; Jin, Yaqiong; Lu, Jie; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Jin; Liu, Haihong; Ni, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of congenital hearing loss (HL) in newborns by the rate of deafness-related genetic mutations. Design Clinical study of consecutive newborns in Beijing using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction-based universal array. Study sample This study tested 37 573 newborns within 3 days after birth, including nine sites in four genes: GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T), and GJB3 (538 C > T). The birth condition of infants was also recorded. Results Of 37 573 newborns, 1810 carried pathogenic mutations, or 4.817%. The carrier rates of GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), GJB3 (538 C > T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), and MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T) mutations were 0.005%, 0.104%, 1.924%, 0.551%, 0.295%, 0.253%, 1.387%, 0.024%, and 0.274%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis indicated no statistically significant relationship between mutations and infant sex, premature delivery, twin status, or birth weight. Conclusions The 235delC GJB2 mutation was the most frequent deafness-related mutation in the Chinese population. Genetic screening for the deafness gene will help detect more cases of newborn congenital HL than current screening practices. PMID:26766211

  18. Probabilistic record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Adrian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Blom, Ashley W; Steele, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Studies involving the use of probabilistic record linkage are becoming increasingly common. However, the methods underpinning probabilistic record linkage are not widely taught or understood, and therefore these studies can appear to be a ‘black box’ research tool. In this article, we aim to describe the process of probabilistic record linkage through a simple exemplar. We first introduce the concept of deterministic linkage and contrast this with probabilistic linkage. We illustrate each step of the process using a simple exemplar and describe the data structure required to perform a probabilistic linkage. We describe the process of calculating and interpreting matched weights and how to convert matched weights into posterior probabilities of a match using Bayes theorem. We conclude this article with a brief discussion of some of the computational demands of record linkage, how you might assess the quality of your linkage algorithm, and how epidemiologists can maximize the value of their record-linked research using robust record linkage methods. PMID:26686842

  19. How Are My Newborn's Screening Results Used?

    MedlinePlus

    ... might say, the results were "negative" or "in-range." Parents with concerns should feel free to contact their physician and ask about the results. Most states notify parents only when the results are out of range for a particular condition. 1 Out of Range ...

  20. Newborn Screening - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... اختبار السمع لطفلك - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Hearing Test for Your Baby Kontrola ... vaše bebe - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Hearing Test for Your Baby ...

  1. Newborn Screening Tests for your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... decides which tests are required. Ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. If your baby has ... state requires different tests, so ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. You also can visit ...

  2. Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Learning, Play, and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, ... juega su recién nacido What Is My Newborn Learning? Play is the chief way that infants learn ...

  3. Critical congenital heart disease screening

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  4. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  5. Toxicology screen

    MedlinePlus

    Barbiturates - screen; Benzodiazepines - screen; Amphetamines - screen; Analgesics - screen; Antidepressants - screen; Narcotics - screen; Phenothiazines - screen; Drug abuse screen; Blood alcohol test

  6. [Seizures in newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Eskola, Vesa; Jäntti, Ville; Eriksson, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Seizures in newborn infants are common. The may constitute a neurologic emergency or a nonepileptic, harmless symptom. Diagnostics is becoming more specific with current methodologies. Detailed description of seizures and their connection with EEG abnormalities are the diagnostic cornerstones. The treatment has made slow progress, but newer antiepileptic drugs may aid in the treatment of epileptic seizures in newborn infants in the future. For the time being, evidence-based research results for them are lacking, as well as data on long-term effects. Differential diagnosis of seizures has become increasingly important. PMID:21188877

  7. Body perception in newborns.

    PubMed

    Filippetti, Maria Laura; Johnson, Mark H; Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Dragovic, Danica; Farroni, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    Body ownership and awareness has recently become an active topic of research in adults using paradigms such as the "rubber hand illusion" and "enfacement" [1-11]. These studies show that visual, tactile, postural, and anatomical information all contribute to the sense of body ownership in adults [12]. While some hypothesize body perception from birth [13], others have speculated on the importance of postnatal experience [14, 15]. Through studying body perception in newborns, we can directly investigate the factors involved prior to significant postnatal experience. To address this issue, we measured the looking behavior of newborns presented with visual-tactile synchronous and asynchronous cues, under conditions in which the visual information was either an upright (body-related stimulus; experiment 1) or inverted (non-body-related stimulus; experiment 2) infant face. We found that newborns preferred to look at the synchronous condition compared to the asynchronous condition, but only when the visual stimulus was body related. These results are in line with findings from adults and demonstrate that human newborns detect intersensory synchrony when related to their own bodies, consistent with the basic processes underlying body perception being present at birth. PMID:24268410

  8. Growth and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... somewhere between 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams) and 8 pounds, 13 ounces (4,000 grams). A newborn who is lighter or heavier than ... less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams) at birth. That's the case for about 1 ...

  9. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  10. Nail care for newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001914.htm Nail care for newborns To use the sharing features on ... finger or toe instead of the nail. Baby's nails grow quickly, so you may have to cut the fingernails at least once a week. You may only need ... SG, Bedwell C, Cork MJ. Neonatal skin care and toxicology. In: Eichenfield LF, Frieden IJ, Mathes ...

  11. Hypothyroidism in the Newborn Period

    PubMed Central

    Wassner, Ari J.; Brown, Rosalind S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review summarizes significant advances in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of congenital hypothyroidism (CH), with a focus on thyroid dysfunction in preterm infants. Recent Findings CH appears to be increasing in incidence, primarily due to increased stringency of screening strategies, with smaller contributions from changing demographics and improved survival of increasingly premature infants. The greatest increase has been in mildly affected infants. Although many such cases are transient, some eventually prove to be severe and/or permanent. In preterm infants, transient hypothyroidism is common and may be delayed in onset. The etiology is probably multifactorial, and inadequate iodine intake may contribute to some cases. Transient hypothyroxinemia of prematurity (THOP), also common in premature infants, is correlated with markers of inflammation. Despite concern about the potential morbidity of THOP, the benefits and safety of treatment have not been established. Novel genetic causes of CH continue to be identified, and accumulating data support the sensitivity of infants with severe CH to small changes in levothyroxine formulation. Summary Changes in newborn screening strategies have increasingly identified thyroid function abnormalities of unclear clinical significance. Novel causes of CH continue to be identified, and new data continue to emerge regarding optimal therapy. PMID:23974774

  12. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion-communicative expression and physiological state-to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence. PMID:26903913

  13. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence

    PubMed Central

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion—communicative expression and physiological state—to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence. PMID:26903913

  14. 77 FR 47857 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ..., technologies, policies, guidelines, and programs for effectively reducing morbidity and mortality in newborns...) workgroup reports on the second screen study, and carrier screening; and (6) CDC's Morbidity and Mortality...) Condition Review Matrix; (3) Second Screen Study from CDC; and (4) the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly...

  15. [Resuscitation of newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, Kilian; Leonhardt, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Successful resuscitation of newborn infants depends on adequate preparation, exact evaluation and prompt initiation of support according to the recently updated recommendations by trained personnel. The key step in postnatal adaptation is the initiation of breathing with a subsequent increase in pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary gas exchange. Therefore, in compromised newborn infants, adequate ventilation is the most important step in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Ventilation should be initiated with room air in term infants and with low concentrations of supplemental oxygen in preterm infants. Subsequently, oxygen supplementation should always be guided by pulse oximetry. Chest compressions are only effective if adequate ventilation has been ensured. The compression ventilation ratio remains 3:1. The prevention of heat loss and maintaining a normal body temperature by adequate measures is an essential part of the care for healthy as well as asphyxiated infants. Therapeutic hypothermia should only be initiated after successful resuscitation and consultation with the regional neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:21815119

  16. Newborn male circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male. PMID:26435672

  17. Pain management in newborns.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard W; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2014-12-01

    As a standard of care for preterm/term newborns effective pain management may improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain is assessed using context-specific, validated, and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Therapeutic approaches reducing invasive procedures and using pharmacologic, behavioral, or environmental measures are used to manage neonatal pain. Nonpharmacologic approaches like kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose, and others can be used for procedural pain or adjunctive therapy. Local/topical anesthetics, opioids, NSAIDs/acetaminophen and other sedative/anesthetic agents can be incorporated into NICU protocols for managing moderate/severe pain or distress in all newborns. PMID:25459780

  18. Linkage results in Schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.

    1996-04-09

    In setting a model for replication studies, the collective effort by the various investigators is praiseworthy. The linkage reported is intriguing, but given the aforementioned caveats it would be premature to dub it {open_quotes}significant -- and, probably, confirmed.{close_quotes} The extent to which a real genetic effect exists on chromosome 6p24-22 remains to be seen. Compelling confirmation, which further study might proffer, would be a welcome boost to a fledgling enterprise, where other findings of promise have faltered or failed to gain unequivocal support. The caution advised in this commentary may guide the design and interpretation of other linkage studies in psychiatric disorders.

  19. Evidence for action on improving the maternal and newborn health workforce: The basis for quality care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jim; Sochas, Laura; Cometto, Giorgio; Matthews, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious new goals to end preventable maternal and newborn deaths will not only require increased coverage but also improved quality of care. Unfortunately, current levels of quality in the delivery of maternal and newborn care are low in high-burden countries, for reasons that are intimately linked with inadequate planning and management of the maternal and newborn health workforce. The Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health is a key opportunity to strengthen global and country-level accountability frameworks for the health workforce and its capacity to deliver quality care. In order to succeed, maternal and newborn health specialists must embrace this strategy and its linkages with the new Global Strategy for Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health; action is needed across high- and low-income countries; and any accountability framework must be underpinned by ambitious, measurable indicators and strengthened data collection on human resources for health. PMID:26725857

  20. Care of the well newborn.

    PubMed

    Warren, Johanna B; Phillipi, Carrie A

    2012-01-01

    The birth of an infant is one of the most memorable experiences a family shares. Pediatric health care professionals are privileged to participate in this experience and recognize it as a time to promote the health of the newborn and family. Ideally, a well-designed care system would be replete with comprehensive supports during the prenatal period, birth, and transition to home. Opportunities exist to improve the care we deliver with universal screening of all pregnant women; coordinated assessments of family health, including mental health; and access to coordinated supports and services for mother and infant. If 90% of US families could comply with medical recommendations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, it is estimated the United States would save billions of dollars per year and prevent more than 900 deaths, nearly all of which would be in infants. All infants, whether breastfed or formula fed, should receive 400 IU supplemental vitamin D. Influenza and TdaP vaccination of postpartum mothers and other caregivers helps cocoon the vulnerable infant from influenza and pertussis until he or she can be fully vaccinated. When children reach the highest weight or length allowed by the manufacturer of their infant-only seat, they should continue to ride rear-facing in a convertible seat. It is best for children to ride rear-facing as long as possible to the highest weight and height allowed by the manufacturer of their convertible seat. PMID:22210929

  1. Common hematologic problems in the newborn nursery.

    PubMed

    Watchko, Jon F

    2015-04-01

    "Common red blood cell disorders encountered in the normal newborn nursery include hemolytic disease of the newborn and resultant hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and polycythemia. A less frequent clinically relevant hematologic issue in newborns to be covered herein is thrombocytopenia." PMID:25836711

  2. Metabolomic Research on Newborn Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Li, Xiang-Wen; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Qiao

    2016-04-01

    To compare differences in metabolites between newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and those who are appropriate for gestational age (AGA) in order to understand the changes in metabolites of newborns with IUGR and to explore the possible metabolic mechanism of tissue and organ damages in patients with IUGR, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis for clinical intervention.A total of 60 newborns with IUGR and 60 AGA newborns who were hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital between January 2011 and December 2015 and who underwent metabolic disease screening were enrolled in this study. The differences in 21 amino acids and 55 carnitines in peripheral blood, as well as changes in the ratios of free carnitine and acylcarnitine to total carnitine, were compared.Metabolites, particularly alanine, homocysteine, leucine, methionine, ornithine, serine, tyrosine, isovaleryl carnitine, and eicosenoyl carnitine, differed according to newborns' birth weight (<3rd percentile, 3rd-5th percentiles, 5th-10th percentiles, and 10th-90th percentiles), with those with lower birth weight showing the greater difference (P < 0.05). Metabolites also differed by gestational age, and the differences observed were mainly as follows: preterm and full-term newborns showed differences in metabolites, mainly in alanine, proline, cerotoyl carnitine, and tetradecanedioyl carnitine (P < 0.05); preterm and full-term AGA newborns showed differences in metabolites, mainly in alanine, glutamine, homocysteine, pipecolic acid, proline, heptanoyl carnitine, and sebacoyl carnitine (P < 0.05); and preterm and full-term newborns with IUGR showed differences in metabolites, mainly in arginine, glutamic acid, homocysteine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, ornithine, serine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, heptanoyl carnitine, decanoyl carnitine, linoleyl carnitine, methylmalonyl carnitine, glutarylcarnitine, sebacoyl carnitine, hydroxyacetyl carnitine

  3. Linkages among reproductive health, maternal health, and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Blanc, Ann; Donnay, France

    2010-12-01

    Some interventions in women before and during pregnancy may reduce perinatal and neonatal deaths, and recent research has established linkages of reproductive health with maternal, perinatal, and early neonatal health outcomes. In this review, we attempted to analyze the impact of biological, clinical, and epidemiologic aspects of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes through an elucidation of a biological framework for linking reproductive, maternal and newborn health (RHMNH); care strategies and interventions for improved perinatal and neonatal health outcomes; public health implications of these linkages and implementation strategies; and evidence gaps for scaling up such strategies. Approximately 1000 studies (up to June 15, 2010) were reviewed that have addressed an impact of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes. These include systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and stand-alone experimental and observational studies. Evidences were also drawn from recent work undertaken by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), the interconnections between maternal and newborn health reviews identified by the Global Alliance for Prevention of Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS), as well as relevant work by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. Our review amply demonstrates that opportunities for assessing outcomes for both mothers and newborns have been poorly realized and documented. Most of the interventions reviewed will require more greater-quality evidence before solid programmatic recommendations can be made. However, on the basis of our review, birth spacing, prevention of indoor air pollution, prevention of intimate partner violence before and during pregnancy, antenatal care during pregnancy, Doppler ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, birth and newborn care preparedness via community-based intervention

  4. The Market Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Victor E.

    The Market Linkage Project (ML) for Special Education and the Basic Skills Validation and Marketing Program are two federally sponsored marketing projects developed under contract by LINC Resources, Inc., a professional marketing organization, for the U.S. Department of Education. LINC developed the marketing programs to provide the option for the…

  5. Transitions and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    If children are to benefit from a healthy, supportive early childhood experience, it is important to strengthen transitions between early childhood experiences in educational and care settings and the more formal educational system. This issue of Coordinator's Notebook focuses on strengthening linkages and transitions between home, preschool, and…

  6. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  7. The heritability of metabolic profiles in newborn twins

    PubMed Central

    Alul, F Y; Cook, D E; Shchelochkov, O A; Fleener, L G; Berberich, S L; Murray, J C; Ryckman, K K

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic and metabolic biomarkers in neonates has the potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of common complex neonatal diseases, and potentially lead to risk assessment and preventative measures for common adulthood illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. There is a wealth of information on using fatty acid, amino acid and organic acid metabolite profiles to identify rare inherited congenital diseases through newborn screening, but little is known about these metabolic profiles in the context of the ‘healthy' newborn. Recent studies have implicated many of the amino acid and fatty acid metabolites utilized in newborn screening in common complex adult diseases such as cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and obesity. To determine the heritability of metabolic profiles in newborns, we examined 381 twin pairs obtained from the Iowa Neonatal Metabolic Screening Program. Heritability was estimated using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression adjusting for gestational age, gender, weight and age at time of sample collection. The highest heritability was for short-chain acylcarnitines, specifically C4 (h2=0.66, P=2 × 10−16), C4-DC (h2=0.83, P<10−16) and C5 (h2=0.61, P=1 × 10−9). Thyroid stimulating hormone (h2=0.58, P=2 × 10−5) and immunoreactive trypsinogen (h2=0.52, P=3 × 10−9) also have a strong genetic component. This is direct evidence for a strong genetic contribution to the metabolic profile at birth and that newborn screening data can be utilized for studying the genetic regulation of many clinically relevant metabolites. PMID:23149456

  8. Prevalence of Toxoplasma Infection in Mexican Newborns and Children: A Systematic Review from 1954 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Galvan-Ramírez, Ma. de la Luz; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio; Roman, Sonia; Bernal-Redondo, Rosamaría; Vázquez Castellanos, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Recent studies in Mexico have shown that from 20/10,000 to 58/10,000 newborns with Toxoplasma infection could be undetected. The aim of this study was to determine the weighed prevalence of T. gondii infection and describe the epidemiological transition of infection in newborns. Methods. Research literature reporting Toxoplasma infection prevalence in Mexican newborns and children were searched in five international databases. Weighted prevalence was calculated by inverse variance-weighted method in asymptomatic and symptomatic study groups, and the epidemiological transition was estimated by a lineal regression analysis. Results. The weighed prevalence in 4833 asymptomatic newborns was 0.616%, CI95% (0.396%–0.835%) (P < 0.001), whereas, among 895 symptomatic newborns, the weighed prevalence was 3.02%, CI 95% (1.91%–4.1%) (P < 0.001). A downward trend of 0.25%/year represented an accumulated decrease of −13,75% in the prevalence in the symptomatic newborns throughout 55 years, whereas, in the asymptomatic children, the prevalence was similar over the course of the years. Conclusion. The high-weighted prevalence of congenital Toxoplasma infection in newborns justifies that Toxoplasma gondii testing be included in the screening programs for women during pregnancy and newborns in Mexico. A rapid diagnosis and treatment strategy could aid in limiting a potential damage to the newborns. PMID:23050161

  9. Haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Thurik, F F; Koelewijn, J M; van der Schoot, C E

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn (HDFN) is caused by maternal alloimmunization against red blood cell antigens. In severe cases, HDFN may lead to fetal anaemia with a risk for fetal death and to severe forms of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia with a risk for kernicterus. Most severe cases are caused by anti-D, despite the introduction of antental and postnatal anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. In general, red blood cell antibody screening programmes are aimed to detect maternal alloimmunization early in pregnancy to facilitate the identification of high-risk cases to timely start antenatal and postnatal treatment. In this review, an overview of the clinical relevance of red cell alloantibodies in relation to occurrence of HDFN and recent views on prevention, screening and treatment options of HDFN are provided. PMID:25899660

  10. Dangerous and Expensive Screening and Treatment for Rare Childhood Diseases: The Case of Krabbe Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantos, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Public policy surrounding newborn screening is in flux. New technology allows more screening for more diseases at lower cost. Traditional criteria for target diseases have been criticized by leading health policymakers. The example of newborn screening for Krabbe disease highlights many of the dilemmas associated with population-based screening…

  11. Metabolomic Research on Newborn Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Li, Xiang-Wen; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare differences in metabolites between newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and those who are appropriate for gestational age (AGA) in order to understand the changes in metabolites of newborns with IUGR and to explore the possible metabolic mechanism of tissue and organ damages in patients with IUGR, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis for clinical intervention. A total of 60 newborns with IUGR and 60 AGA newborns who were hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital between January 2011 and December 2015 and who underwent metabolic disease screening were enrolled in this study. The differences in 21 amino acids and 55 carnitines in peripheral blood, as well as changes in the ratios of free carnitine and acylcarnitine to total carnitine, were compared. Metabolites, particularly alanine, homocysteine, leucine, methionine, ornithine, serine, tyrosine, isovaleryl carnitine, and eicosenoyl carnitine, differed according to newborns’ birth weight (<3rd percentile, 3rd–5th percentiles, 5th–10th percentiles, and 10th–90th percentiles), with those with lower birth weight showing the greater difference (P < 0.05). Metabolites also differed by gestational age, and the differences observed were mainly as follows: preterm and full-term newborns showed differences in metabolites, mainly in alanine, proline, cerotoyl carnitine, and tetradecanedioyl carnitine (P < 0.05); preterm and full-term AGA newborns showed differences in metabolites, mainly in alanine, glutamine, homocysteine, pipecolic acid, proline, heptanoyl carnitine, and sebacoyl carnitine (P < 0.05); and preterm and full-term newborns with IUGR showed differences in metabolites, mainly in arginine, glutamic acid, homocysteine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, ornithine, serine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, heptanoyl carnitine, decanoyl carnitine, linoleyl carnitine, methylmalonyl carnitine, glutarylcarnitine, sebacoyl carnitine

  12. Linkage map integration

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, A.; Teague, J.; Morton, N.E.; Keats, B.J.

    1996-08-15

    The algorithms that drive the map+ program for locus-oriented linkage mapping are presented. They depend on the enhanced location database program ldb+ to specify an initial comprehensive map that includes all loci in the summary lod file. Subsequently the map may be edited or order constrained and is automatically improved by estimating the location of each locus conditional on the remainder, beginning with the most discrepant loci. Operating characteristics permit rapid and accurate construction of linkage maps with several hundred loci. The map+ program also performs nondisjunction mapping with tests of nonstandard recombination. We have released map+ on Internet as a source program in the C language together with the location database that now includes the LODSOURCE database. 28 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Neonatal thyroid screening: methods-efficiency-failures.

    PubMed

    Yordam, N; Ozon, A

    2003-12-01

    Newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is one of the major achievements of preventive medicine, as the condition occurs frequently (1/4000 newborns) and results in brain damage if not detected and treated in the first few days of life. Measurement of T4 and/or TSH in dried blood spots collected on the second through fifth days of life are the most widely used methods in screening programs for CH currently. Some children with the disease may be missd in any screening program, however, owing to factors related to the disease itself and the methods employed in its detection, as well as factors ascribed to the element of human error, ie screening errors. The methods employed in newborn screening programs for CH, their efficiency in disease detecetion, and biological factors as well as screening errors leading to missed cases are discussed. PMID:16444156

  14. Leucine metabolism in human newborns

    SciTech Connect

    Denne, S.C.; Kalhan, S.C. )

    1987-12-01

    The present study was designed to (1) determine whether a relationship exists between newborn birth weight and leucine metabolism and (2) compare leucine and energy metabolism in a period of rapid growth and development (i.e., newborn) with a constant nongrowth period (i.e., adult). Leucine kinetics and energy expenditure were measured in the postabsorptive state in 12 normal full-term newborns in early neonatal life and in 11 normal adults using a primed constant L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine infusion combined with respiratory calorimetry. A significant positive correlation between newborn birth weight and leucine flux was observed. These data suggest the following. (1) A relationship exists between newborn birth weight and protein metabolism, as reflected by the correlation between leucine flux when expressed as micromoles per kilogram per hour and birth weight. (2) The high rate of leucine flux measured in newborns probably reflects the rapid remodeling of protein that occurs in this period of development, even during fasting. (3) The similar values in newborns and adults of leucine kinetics and energy expenditure when normalized to metabolic body weight and the nearly equivalent allometric exponents relating body weight to leucine flux and energy expenditure support a close relationship between leucine and energy metabolism, at least at the extremes of human growth.

  15. Newborn Physiological Immaturity

    PubMed Central

    Fabrellas-Padrés, Núria; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Hurtado-Pardos, Bárbara; Martí-Cavallé, Montserrat; Gironès-Nogué, Marta; García-Berman, Rosa-Maria; Alonso-Fernandez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most standardized nursing care plans for healthy neonates include multiple nursing diagnoses to reflect nurses' judgments on the infant's status; however scientific literature concerning this issue is scarce. Newborn physiological immaturity is a concept in the ATIC terminology (architecture, terminology, interface, information, nursing [infermeria], and knowledge [coneixement]) to represent the natural status of vulnerability of the healthy neonate. Purpose: To identify the essential attributes of the concept and provide its conceptual and operational definition, using the Wilsonian approach. Findings: The concept under analysis embeds a natural cluster of vulnerabilities and environmental interactions that enhance the evolving maturation process. Implications for Practice: The use of this diagnosis may simplify the process of charting the nursing care plans and reduce time needed for documentation while maintaining the integrity of the information. Implications for Research: Consistent development and use of nursing concepts is essential for knowledge building. Studies on the actual use of nursing diagnoses are needed to inform decision making. PMID:25822514

  16. Human Newborns Match Tongue Protrusion of Disembodied Human and Robotic Mouths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soussignan, Robert; Courtial, Alexis; Canet, Pierre; Danon-Apter, Gisele; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    No evidence had been provided so far of newborns' capacity to give a matching response to 2D stimuli. We report evidence from 18 newborns who were presented with three types of stimuli on a 2D screen. The stimuli were video-recorded displays of tongue protrusion shown by: (a) a human face, (b) a human tongue from a disembodied mouth, and (c) an…

  17. Elevation of guanidinoacetate in newborn dried blood spots and impact of early treatment in GAMT deficiency.

    PubMed

    El-Gharbawy, Areeg H; Goldstein, Jennifer L; Millington, David S; Vaisnins, Amie E; Schlune, Andrea; Barshop, Bruce A; Schulze, Andreas; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P

    2013-06-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a good candidate disorder for newborn screening because early treatment appears to improve outcomes. We report elevation of guanidinoacetate in archived newborn dried blood spots for 3 cases (2 families) of GAMT deficiency compared with an unaffected carrier and controls. We also report a new case of a patient treated from birth with normal developmental outcome at the age of 42 months. PMID:23583224

  18. Fractured clavicle in the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborn had a broken collar bone. Exams and Tests A chest x-ray will show whether or ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 100. White KK, Goldberg MJ. Common neonatal orthopedic ailments. In: Gleason CA, ...

  19. Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborn. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have low levels of vitamin K ... Blood clotting tests will be done. The diagnosis is confirmed if a vitamin K shot stops the bleeding ...

  20. Health economic analysis of screening

    PubMed Central

    Krauth, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this article health economic implications of screening are analysed. First, requirements screening programmes should fulfil are derived, and methodical standards of health economic evaluation are outlined. Using the example of newborn hearing screening, it is then examined if empirical studies meet the methodical requirements of health economic evaluation. Some deficits are realised: Health economic studies of newborn hearing screening are not randomised, most studies are even not controlled. Therefore, most studies do not present incremental, but only average cost-effectiveness ratios (i.e. cost per case identified). Furthermore, evidence on long-term outcomes of screening and early interventions is insufficient. In conclusion, there is a need for controlled trials to examine differences in identified cases, but particularly to examine long-term effects. PMID:22073088

  1. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is of great importance for fisheries and aquaculture in the US. To construct a linkage map of striped bass, 480 microsatellite markers were screened for polymorphism among three parents of two half-sib mapping families that shared a common dam. A total of 289 markers ...

  2. Thyroid Function and Perchlorate in Drinking Water: An Evaluation among California Newborns, 1998

    PubMed Central

    Buffler, Patricia A.; Kelsh, Michael A.; Lau, Edmund C.; Edinboro, Charlotte H.; Barnard, Julie C.; Rutherford, George W.; Daaboul, Jorge J.; Palmer, Lynn; Lorey, Fred W.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4−) has been detected in groundwater sources in numerous communities in California and other parts of the United States, raising concerns about potential impacts on health. For California communities where ClO4− was tested in 1997 and 1998, we evaluated the prevalence of primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels among the 342,257 California newborns screened in 1998. We compared thyroid function results among newborns from 24 communities with average ClO4− concentrations in drinking water > 5 μg/L (n = 50,326) to newborns from 287 communities with average concentrations ≤5 μg/L (n = 291,931). ClO4− concentrations obtained from the California Drinking Water Program provided source-specific data for estimating weighted average concentrations in community water. Fifteen cases of PCH from communities with average concentration > 5 μg/L were observed, with 20.4 expected [adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.40–1.19]. Although only 36% of all California newborns were screened before 24 hr of age in 1998, nearly 80% of newborns with high TSH were screened before 24 hr of age. Because of the physiologic postnatal surge of TSH, the results for newborns screened before 24 hr were uninformative for assessing an environmental impact. For newborns screened ≥24 hr, the adjusted POR for high TSH was 0.73 (95% CI, 0.40–1.23). All adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were controlled for sex, ethnicity, birth weight, and multiple birth status. Using an assessment of ClO4− in drinking water based on available data, we did not observe an association between estimated average ClO4− concentrations > 5 μg/L in drinking water supplies and the prevalence of clinically diagnosed PCH or high TSH concentrations. PMID:16675440

  3. Thrombosis in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bacciedoni, Viviana; Attie, Myriam; Donato, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of thrombosis is higher among newborn infants than in any other stage of pediatric development. This fact is the consequence of labile characteristics of the neonatal hemostatic system, in addition to exposure to multiple risk factors and the wide use of vascular catheters. Venous thromboses, which mainly affect the limbs, the right atrium and renal veins, are more frequently seen than arterial thromboses. A stroke may be caused by the occlusion of the arterial flow entering the brain or by occlusion of its venous drainage system. Purpura fulminans is a very severe condition that should be treated as a medical emergency, and is secondary to severe protein C deficiency or, less frequently, protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Most thrombotic events should be managed with antithrombotic therapy, which is done with unfractionated and/or low molecular weight heparins. Purpura fulminans requires protein C replacement and/or fresh frozen plasma infusion. Thrombolytic therapy is done using tissue plasminogen activator and should only be used for life-, or limb-, or organ-threatening thrombosis. PMID:27079395

  4. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  5. LINKAGE programs: linkage analysis for monogenic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wang, Qing K; Rao, Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identification of the genes for a human disease provides significant insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of the disease. A human disease gene can be identified by its chromosomal location (positional cloning). Linkage analysis is a key step in positional cloning. For monogenic disorders with a known inheritance pattern, model-based linkage analysis is effective in mapping the disease location. Therefore, model-based linkage analysis can provide a powerful tool to positional cloning of some specific molecular determinants that co-segregate with disease phenotypes in the isolated samples (e.g., large and multiplex impaired pedigrees). This chapter describes model-based human genetic linkage analysis as implemented in the LINKAGE computer package. First, we introduce the basic concepts and principles for genetic analysis of monogenic disorders. Then, we demonstrate the usages of the programs by analyzing several examples of hypothetical pedigrees with the inheritance modes of autosomal-dominant, autosomal-recessive, and genetic heterogeneity. PMID:17071989

  6. Can Newborns Discriminate between Their Own Cry and the Cry of Another Newborn Infant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dondi, Marco; Simion, Francesca; Caltran, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments tested whether newborns could discriminate their own and another newborn's cry. Results indicated that awake newborns expressed facial distress more frequently and longer to another newborn's cry than to their own. Sucking decreased significantly between pretest phase and first minute of another infant's cry. Asleep infants'…

  7. Developing community-based intervention strategies and package to save newborns in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Kc, A; Thapa, K; Pradhan, Y V; Kc, N P; Upreti, S R; Adhikari, R K; Khadka, N; Acharya, B; Dhakwa, J R; Aryal, D R; Aryal, S; Starbuck, E; Paudel, D; Khanal, S; Devkota, M D

    2011-10-01

    In Nepal, the proportion of under 5 deaths that are neonatal (0-28 days) has been increasing in the last decade, due to faster declines in infant and child mortality than in neonatal mortality. This trend is likely due to a focus on maternal and child survival programs that did not adequately address newborn health needs. Policy and actions to save newborn lives resulted from increased attention to newborn deaths in 2001, culminating in the endorsement of the National Neonatal Health Strategy in 2004, a milestone that established newborn health and survival as a national priority. Operationalization of the National Neonatal Health Strategy took place in 2007 with the development of the Community-Based Newborn Care Package (CB-NCP). This paper describes how national stakeholders used global, regional and in-country research and policies to develop the CB-NCP, thus outlining key ingredients to make newborn health programming a reality in Nepal. A technical working group was constituted to review existing evidence on interventions to improve newborn survival, develop a tool to prioritize neonatal interventions, and conduct program learning visits to identify key components appropriate to the Nepal context that should be included in the Community Based Integrated Newborn Care Package. The group identified interventions based on the evidence of impact on newborn survival, potential mechanisms within the existing health system to deliver the interventions, and linkages with existing programs and different tiers of the health system. Not only was Nepal one of the first countries in south-east Asia where government adopted a national strategy to reduce neonatal deaths, but it was also one of the first to endorse a package of neonatal interventions for pilot testing and scaling up through existing community-based health systems that provide basic health services throughout the country. CB-NCP was designed to be gradually scaled up throughout the country by integration with

  8. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA Mandatory Coverage Mandatory Coverage of Pregnant Women, Children Under 19, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a...

  9. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., Children Under 8, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  10. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., Children Under 8, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  11. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., Children Under 8, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  12. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA Mandatory Coverage Mandatory Coverage of Pregnant Women, Children Under 19, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a...

  13. Newborns' Head Orientation toward Sounds Within Hemifields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Kimberley; And Others

    This experiment examined the accuracy with which newborn infants orient their heads toward a sound positioned off midline within hemifields. The study also evaluated newborns' ability to update the angle of their head turn to match a change in localization of an ongoing sound. Alert newborns were held in a supine position and presented a sound at…

  14. Screening for Multiple Genes Influencing Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shelley D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the "sib pair" method of linkage analysis designed to locate genes influencing dyslexia, which has several advantages over the "LOD" score method. Notes that the sib pair analysis was able to detect the same linkages as the LOD method, plus a possible third region. Confirms that the sib pair method is an effective means of screening. (RS)

  15. Newborns' Mooney-Face Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leo, Irene; Simion, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether newborns detect a face on the basis of a Gestalt representation based on first-order relational information (i.e., the basic arrangement of face features) by using Mooney stimuli. The incomplete 2-tone Mooney stimuli were used because they preclude focusing both on the local features (i.e., the fine…

  16. Protecting Your Newborn. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Esha

    This guide is intended to help instructors educate new and expectant parents about safely transporting their newborn babies. The guide accompanies a 27-minute video, developed by the National Traffic Safety Administration, which introduces some of the key safety issues that new parents should consider during their baby's first 6 months of life.…

  17. Newborn Infants Orient to Sounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Darwin; Field, Jeffrey

    1979-01-01

    In two experiments, the majority of 21 newborn infants who were maintained in an alert state consistently turned their heads toward a continuous sound source presented 90 degrees from midline. For most infants, this orientation response was rather slow, taking median latencies of 2.5 seconds to begin and 5.5 seconds to end. (JMB)

  18. Higher Education: Labor Market Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asayeghn, Desta

    1982-01-01

    Examines the methodology of three case studies investigating the linkage between higher education and the world of work in the Sudan, Zambia, and Tanzania. Summarizes 12 main findings. Suggests the studies remain traditional human resources planning efforts. (NEC)

  19. Exploring linkage disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Baird, Stuart J E

    2015-09-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD, association of allelic states across loci) is poorly understood by many evolutionary biologists, but as technology for multilocus sampling improves, we ignore LD at our peril. If we sample variation at 10 loci in an organism with 20 chromosomes, we can reasonably treat them as 10 'independent witnesses' of the evolutionary process. If instead, we sample variation at 1000 loci, many are bound to be close together on a chromosome. With only one or two crossovers per meiosis, associations between close neighbours decay so slowly that even LD created far in the past will not have dissipated, so we cannot treat the 1000 loci as independent witnesses (Barton ). This means that as marker density on genomes increases classic analyses assuming independent loci become mired in the problem of overconfidence: if 1000 independent witnesses are assumed, and that number should be much lower, any conclusion will be overconfident. This is of special concern because our literature suffers from a strong publication bias towards confident answers, even when they turn out to be wrong (Knowles ). In contrast, analyses that take into account associations across loci both control for overconfidence and can inform us about LD generating events far in the past, for example human/Neanderthal admixture (Fu et al. ). With increased marker density, biologists must increase their awareness of LD and, in this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Kemppainen et al. () make software available that can only help in this process: LDna allows patterns of LD in a data set to be explored using tools borrowed from network analysis. This has great potential, but realizing that potential requires understanding LD. PMID:26261040

  20. The clinical application of array CGH for the detection of chromosomal defects in 20,126 unselected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a powerful tool for detecting unbalanced chromosomal alterations. To validate the usefulness of array CGH in newborn screening, we examined 20,126 unselected infants. In addition, the number of newborns analyzed with array CGH is the largest one ever reported. Findings A total of 20,126 unselected newborns were investigated with array CGH and cytogenetic analyses. The analyses revealed 87 cases with chromosome abnormalities. Of these, 53 cases had significant chromosome aneuploidies, including trisomy 13, trisomy 21, 47,XXY or 45,X, and the other 34 cases presented partial chromosomal deletions or duplications. Conclusions In this study, we show that array CGH is an appropriate tool for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities in newborns, especially for the infants without distinct clinical features. PMID:23725218

  1. [THE COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF KAOLIN-ACTIVATED THROMBOELASTOGRAPHY IN HEALTHY NEWBORNS AND NEWBORNS WITH HEART AILMENTS].

    PubMed

    Leonov, N P; Karas'kov, A M; Litasova, E E; Strunin, O V; Karmadonova, N A; Akopov, G D; Vishegorodtseva, L I

    2016-02-01

    The study was carried out to diferentiate reference values for kaolin-activated thromboelastography in newborns with congenital heart disease. The study included two groups ofpatients. The first one consisted of 62 newborns with congenital heart disease and the second one consisted of 35 healthy newborns. The results of kaolin-activated thromboelastography implemented in groups are evaluated as condition of normal coagulation. The valuable diferences of homeostasis system in healthy newborns and newborns with congenital heart disease (without severe concomitant pathology) are not established. They have similar indicators of kaolin-activated thromboelastography. The derived results can be applied as standards in full-term newborns with congenital heart disease. PMID:27455561

  2. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids was studied. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins.

  3. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids has been studied further. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins

  4. PHENYLKETONURIA, DETECTION IN THE NEWBORN INFANT AS A ROUTINE HOSPITAL PROCEDURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUTHRIE, ROBERT; WHITNEY, STEWART

    A FIELD TRIAL OF AN INHIBITION ASSAY METHOD FOR SCREENING FOR PHENYLKETONURIA (PKU) TESTED MORE THAN 400,000 NEWBORN INFANTS PRIOR TO DISCHARGE FROM THE HOSPTIAL. IN ALL, 39 CASES WERE FOUND, A HIGHER INCIDENCE THAN HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN EXPECTED. THE PRACTICALITY OF THE INHIBITION ASSAY METHOD WAS ALSO DEMONSTRATED. THE REPORT DETAILS THE TRIAL'S…

  5. [Congenital ranula in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M K; Hückel, D; Hamala, D

    2007-05-01

    Ranulas are cystic lesions in the floor of the mouth. They are either retention cysts of the excretory duct of the sublingual gland or pseudocysts formed by excretory duct rupture followed by extravasation and accumulation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. We report the case of a premature newborn with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula caused no discomfort or complications, so that immediate intervention was not necessary. The cyst resolved completely by the age of 4 months. Complications in newborns especially include airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. Surgical treatment options are needle aspiration, excision of the ranula, marsupialization, cryosurgery, and--in addition to excision of the cyst--removal of the ipsilateral sublingual gland. Sclerotherapy has shown good results as well. As many congenital cysts resolve or rupture spontaneously, they should be observed for potential resolution for several months in uncomplicated cases. PMID:16770600

  6. [Anorectal manometry in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Núñez, R; Vargas, I; Cabrera, R; Espinosa, J; Blesa, E

    1993-07-01

    Anorectal manometry was performed in 32 newborn. There were 18 preterm and 14 fullterm infants, mean ages 6.1 and 7.1 days respectively. The rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RIR) was positive in 31 of the newborn, and the relaxation waves produced by rectal distention were recorded along the anal canal and were directly correlated to intensity of the stimulus. In the remaining patient RIR was negative, due to Hirschsprung's disease, confirmed at surgery. The length of the anal canal was 10.3 +/- 2 mm. in preterm newborn infants and 14.7 +/- 2.9 mm, in fullterm (p < 0.0001). These findings suggests that presence of RIR is independent of the weight, gestational age and birth age of the infant, and that anal canal length is correlated with the weight of the infant. We conclude that anorectal manometry, in the neonatal period, is a simple, reliable and safe method to test anorectal functionality, including the study of Hirschsprung's disease. PMID:8217504

  7. Ultrasonography of hydronephrosis in the newborn: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One

    2016-07-01

    Widespread use of fetal ultrasonography is accompanied by more frequent detection of antenatal hydronephrosis. Therefore, sonographic evaluation of neonates with a history of antenatal hydronephrosis is becoming more widespread. As an initial postnatal non-invasive imaging modality, ultrasonography is used to screen for persistence of hydronephrosis, determine the level and severity of obstruction, and contribute to appropriate diagnosis and treatment. This review aims to provide a practical overview of the sonographic evaluation of neonatal hydronephrosis and to describe the sonographic findings of conditions associated with hydronephrosis in the newborn. PMID:27156562

  8. Ultrasonography of hydronephrosis in the newborn: a practical review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Widespread use of fetal ultrasonography is accompanied by more frequent detection of antenatal hydronephrosis. Therefore, sonographic evaluation of neonates with a history of antenatal hydronephrosis is becoming more widespread. As an initial postnatal non-invasive imaging modality, ultrasonography is used to screen for persistence of hydronephrosis, determine the level and severity of obstruction, and contribute to appropriate diagnosis and treatment. This review aims to provide a practical overview of the sonographic evaluation of neonatal hydronephrosis and to describe the sonographic findings of conditions associated with hydronephrosis in the newborn. PMID:27156562

  9. Hospital stay for healthy term newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Benitz, William E

    2015-05-01

    The hospital stay of the mother and her healthy term newborn infant should be long enough to allow identification of problems and to ensure that the mother is sufficiently recovered and prepared to care for herself and her newborn at home. The length of stay should be based on the unique characteristics of each mother-infant dyad, including the health of the mother, the health and stability of the newborn, the ability and confidence of the mother to care for herself and her newborn, the adequacy of support systems at home, and access to appropriate follow-up care in a medical home. Input from the mother and her obstetrical care provider should be considered before a decision to discharge a newborn is made, and all efforts should be made to keep a mother and her newborn together to ensure simultaneous discharge. PMID:25917993

  10. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-U.

    PubMed

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Jens, Eduardo; Pagliarini, Thiago; Bonif cio, Silvia Le o; Dorlhiac-Llacer, Pedro Enrique; Chamone Dd, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2003-01-01

    Anti-U is a rare red blood cell alloantibody that has been found exclusively in blacks. It can cause hemolytic disease of the newborn and hemolytic transfusion reactions. We describe the case of a female newborn presenting a strongly positive direct antiglobulin test due to an IgG antibody in cord blood. Anti-U was recovered from cord blood using acid eluate technique. Her mother presented positive screening of antibodies with anti-U identified at delivery. It was of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses and showed a titer of 32. Monocyte monolayer assay showed moderate interaction of Fc receptors with maternal serum with a positive result (3.1%). The newborn was treated only with 48 hours of phototherapy for mild hemolytic disease. She recovered well and was discharged on the 4th day of life. We conclude that whenever an antibody against a high frequency erythrocyte antigen is identified in brown and black pregnant women, anti-U must be investigated. PMID:14762491

  11. Nepalese primiparous mothers' knowledge of newborn care.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sharmila; Adachi, Kumiko; Petrini, Marcia A; Shuda, Akihiro; Shrestha, Sarita

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to explore the knowledge level of newborn care and to investigate the relationship between newborn-care knowledge and selected demographic variables among primiparous mothers. It was carried in outpatient department of a maternity and women's hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal with 276 primiparous mothers between 38 and 42 weeks of gestation. Data were collected during the antenatal period with using two instruments: the Newborn-care Knowledge Questionnaire and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults. Participants had a moderate level of knowledge on newborn care (56%), and among its four components, participants had lowest knowledge in breastfeeding (44%) and adequate knowledge (78%) of immunization. Maternal education and socioeconomic status had a significant, positive association with newborn-care knowledge. Newborn-care knowledge was strongly predicted by anxiety. This is the first study to examine the maternal levels of knowledge of newborn care in Nepal. This study identified specific knowledge gaps in newborn care among primiparous mothers. Moreover, the results suggest the need of maternal-education programs in improving the health and well-being of mothers and newborns. PMID:25923293

  12. State of the World's Newborns: A Report from Saving Newborn Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Anthony; Francis, Victoria; Byrne, Ali; Puddephatt, Claire

    There has been little change in newborn mortality in the past 20 years, even through proven, cost-effective solutions exist to save many of these young lives. This report reviews the most recent data on the newborn, revealing the alarming poor health and quality of health care for mothers and newborns in virtually all impoverished countries. The…

  13. Newborn and Four-Week Retest on a Normative Population Using the Brazelton Newborn Assessment Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Frances Degan; And Others

    A survey of assessment procedures of the newborn and of the infant during the first month of life was conducted; the survey indicated that there were instruments for evaluating the newborn and for evaluating the four-week-old infant, but there was no single procedure which included an evaluation of both the newborn and the four-week-old infant.…

  14. [Acute adrenal insufficiency in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Limal, J-M; Bouhours-Nouet, N; Rouleau, S; Gatelais, F; Coutant, R

    2006-10-01

    Neonatal acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with 21-hydroxylase defect appears to be the most frequent cause, but the neonatal screening has improved its potential severe outcome. The other causes and the various clinical presentations have been exposed, with a special reference to the salt-wasting syndrome. Among them, the severity of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) deserves special attention. Two other causes of adrenal hypoplasia have been recently discovered, i.e. a mutation of the SF-1 gene and the syndrome IMAGe. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to ACTH deficiency is often unrecognised despite the risk of severe seizures and hypoglycaemia with brain damage. Finally, the hormonal diagnostic testing and the main therapeutic approach by corticosteroids have been indicated. The aim of this work is to focus the attention of paediatricians who examine a newborn because the risk of delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome may be limited if the clinical symptoms are soon recognized. PMID:16962294

  15. Task Structure Design: Beyond Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; Herman, Joan L.

    1983-01-01

    This analysis of the role of testing in educational programs and services maintains that the connection between tests and instruction is best made integrally through an understanding of the design of learning tasks rather than through linkage. The context for, use of, and limitations of task structures are described. (Author/CM)

  16. Isolated penile torsion in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Egemen; Gundogdu, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We reported on the incidence of isolated penile torsion among our healthy children and our approach to this anomaly. Methods: Between 2011 and 2014, newborn babies with penile torsion were classified according to the angle of torsion. Surgical correction (penile degloving and reattachment for moderate cases and dorsal dartos flap technique in case of resistance) after 6 months was advised to the babies with rotations more than 45°. Results: Among 1000 newborn babies, 200 isolated penile torsions were found, and among these, 43 had torsions more than 45°, and 4 of these had angles greater than 90°. The mean angle of the rotations was found 30.45° (median: 20°). In total, 8 children with 60° torsions were previously circumcised. Surgery was performed on 19 patients, with a mean patient age of 12 ± 2 months. Of these 19, 13 babies were corrected with degloving and reattachment. This technique was not enough on the remaining 6 patients; therefore, derotational dorsal dartos flap was added to correct the torsion. After a mean of 15.6 ± 9.8 months, residual penile rotation, less than 15°, was found only in 2 children. Conclusion: The incidence of isolated penile torsion is 20% in newborns. However, rotation more than 45° angles are seen in 4.3% of male babies. Correction is not necessary in mild degrees, and penile degloving with reattachment is enough in most cases. If the initial correction is insufficient, dorsal dartos flap rotation is easy and effective. Prior circumcision neither disturbs the operative procedure nor affects the outcomes. PMID:26600889

  17. 42 CFR 436.124 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Newborn children. 436.124 Section 436.124 Public... the Categorically Needy § 436.124 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  18. 42 CFR 436.124 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Newborn children. 436.124 Section 436.124 Public... the Categorically Needy § 436.124 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  19. 42 CFR 436.124 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Newborn children. 436.124 Section 436.124 Public... the Categorically Needy § 436.124 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  20. 42 CFR 436.124 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Newborn children. 436.124 Section 436.124 Public... the Categorically Needy § 436.124 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  1. 42 CFR 436.124 - Newborn children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Newborn children. 436.124 Section 436.124 Public... the Categorically Needy § 436.124 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is...

  2. Changes in the newborn at birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby's body is cold. The baby's body creates heat by burning stores of brown fat, a type of fat found only in fetuses and newborns. Newborns are rarely seen to shiver. LIVER In the baby, the liver acts as a storage site for sugar (glycogen) and iron. When the ...

  3. Annular rash on a newborn.

    PubMed

    Warner, Anne-Marie; Frey, Keith A; Connolly, Suzanne

    2006-02-01

    A full-term, healthy female newborn was delivered via cesarean section because the labor did not adequately progress. The mother, age 33 years and of Asian ancestry, had a significant medical and obstetrical history: chronic hepatitis B carrier without cirrhosis, cutaneous lupus erythematosus (positive anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies), and a positive group B streptococcal recto-vaginal culture at 35 weeks' gestation. The mother received 4 doses of intravenous ampicillin during labor. The infant's initial hospital course was complicated by a transient and otherwise asymptomatic bradycardia. An electrocardiogram (ECG) confirmed a heart rate of 96 with normal interval parameters, but there were changes suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy. An echocardiogram was normal. Follow-up office visits for common newborn feeding problems demonstrated consistent weight gain and normal vital signs, including heart rate and facial milia. However, by age 4 weeks an erythematous eruption extending from the frontal scalp and forehead to the cheek area had developed. What is the differential diagnosis? What tests should be done to make the diagnosis? PMID:16451779

  4. Septicaemia in newborns and infants.

    PubMed

    Pettay, O

    1982-01-01

    In the lifespan of a human being the two extremes, the early childhood and old age are prone to septicaemia because of poorly functioning anti-infectious defensive mechanisms. In a newborn full term baby these mechanisms are all present but still unexperienced. The importance of both specific and nonspecific factors will be discussed. The etiologic agents, causing septicaemia in nurseries undergo continuous change. In Helsinki we have during the last 20 years experienced staphylococci to start with, changing then to Gram-negative rods, to streptococci group B and now we have increasing difficulties with hospital infections. In the treatment of these children antibiotics alone are not sufficient but repeated exchange transfusions and granulocyte transfusions are needed. In infants after the first month of life, septicaemias produce a clinical picture different from that in newborns but still different also from that in adults. Also in this age group a shift in etiology has been observed. Increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents in the bacteria encountered makes a reconsideration of therapeutic schemes necessary. PMID:7048513

  5. [Premature newborn: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Pastor Rodríguez, Jesús David; Pastor Bravo, María Del Mar; López García, Visitación; Cotes Teruel, María Isabel; Mellado, Jesús Eulogio; Cárceles, José Jara

    2010-01-01

    A case is presented of a premature newborn of 27 weeks gestation and weighing 420 grams who was delivered as a result of a maternal pre-eclampsia and retarded intra-uterine growth. During the 125 days of hospitalisation, an individual care plan based on the Virginia Henderson model was devised and applied to both the child and her parents using NANDA diagnostics, interventions according to the NIC classification, and the expected results according to the NOC classification. The Marjory Gordon functional patterns were used for the initial assessment. By applying the pre-term newborn (PTNB) plan, all their needs were provided and were modified throughout the hospital stay, with new needs that were added to the established ones. These required a continuous assessment with the subsequent adapting of the care plan. Likewise, the care required by the parents varied from the initial grief due to the possible loss of their child to learning the alarm signs and the home care that their child would need. The child was finally discharged weighing 2900 grams and with normal neurological and psychomotor development, although with a lower weight appropriate to her age. Currently, at 2 years old, the child has a normal neurological and psychomotor development, but with weight and size lower than the P(3) percentile. She requires speech therapy treatment due to paralysis of the right vocal cord. PMID:20605104

  6. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrics . 2009 ; 124 : 823 – 836 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 2. ↵ Thangaratinam S , Brown K , Zamora J , Khan KS , ... Pediatrics . 2011 ; 128 : e1259 – e1267 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 6. ↵ http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/pediatricgenetics/cchdscreening. ...

  7. Newborn Screening Saves Lives Reauthorization Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Hagan, Kay [D-NC

    2013-08-01

    02/07/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.1281, which became Public Law 113-240 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Efficient Record Linkage Algorithms Using Complete Linkage Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2016-01-01

    Data from different agencies share data of the same individuals. Linking these datasets to identify all the records belonging to the same individuals is a crucial and challenging problem, especially given the large volumes of data. A large number of available algorithms for record linkage are prone to either time inefficiency or low-accuracy in finding matches and non-matches among the records. In this paper we propose efficient as well as reliable sequential and parallel algorithms for the record linkage problem employing hierarchical clustering methods. We employ complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms to address this problem. In addition to hierarchical clustering, we also use two other techniques: elimination of duplicate records and blocking. Our algorithms use sorting as a sub-routine to identify identical copies of records. We have tested our algorithms on datasets with millions of synthetic records. Experimental results show that our algorithms achieve nearly 100% accuracy. Parallel implementations achieve almost linear speedups. Time complexities of these algorithms do not exceed those of previous best-known algorithms. Our proposed algorithms outperform previous best-known algorithms in terms of accuracy consuming reasonable run times. PMID:27124604

  9. Can postpartum maternal urinary iodine be used to estimate iodine nutrition status of newborns?

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Pantea; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hedayati, Mehdi; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Delshad, Hossein; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-04-14

    I deficiency can lead to detrimental effects, particularly in neonates and young infants. The aim of this study was to explore whether postpartum maternal urinary I can be used to estimate the I status of newborns. In this cross-sectional study conducted in Tehran, lactating mothers and newborns, within 3-5 d postpartum, were randomly selected. Urine samples were collected from each mother and newborn, and a heel-prick blood sample was obtained from all newborns as part of the routine national newborn screening programme. According to the WHO criteria, median urinary I concentration (UIC) 5 mIU/l was considered as I insufficiency. A total of 147 postpartum women and neonates, aged 27·8 (SD 5·3) years and 4·2 (SD 0·6) d, respectively, completed this study. The median UIC was 68·0 (interquartile range (IQR) 39·4-133·5) and 212·5 (IQR 92·3-307·3) µg/l in postpartum mothers and newborns, respectively. The median neonatal TSH was 1·00 (IQR 0·50-1·70) mIU/l. There was no significant difference in the neonatal UIC and TSH of infants whose mothers had deficient and sufficient urinary I. In the multiple linear regression, neonatal UIC value was associated with maternal urinary I (P=0·048) and parity (P=0·039); a significant association was observed between neonatal TSH and infant sex (P=0·038) and birth weight (P=0·049). The findings of our study demonstrate that, despite postpartum mothers being mildly I deficient, I status of their infants was adequate as assessed by UIC and TSH values. It seems factors other than maternal urinary I may influence the I status in newborns. PMID:26857284

  10. Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamitani, Kanshi; Inomata, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism may cause irreversible intellectual disability or failure to thrive if left untreated. Because this disorder can be prevented by early identification and early treatment, newborn mass screening started in 1979 in Japan. A guideline for mass screening for this disease was prepared in 1998. Currently, approximately 100% of newborns undergo this mass screening. The screening results show significant improvement of the intellectual outcome of patients with this disease, with almost no patients having irreversible intellectual disturbance or failure to thrive. However, there are issues of a delayed increase in thyroid stimulating hormone, management of latent hypothyroidism, and detection of central hypothyroidism. In recent years, as studies on this disease have advanced at the molecular level, many causative genes have been reported, clarification of the etiology, pathology, and clinical features has progressed, and new findings have been obtained. PMID:23330249

  11. Record linkage for drug monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Skegg, D C; Doll, R

    1981-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the feasibility of using record linkage for drug monitoring. For two years, three types of records were collected for a total of 43 117 people: (1) details of basic attributes, such as sex and age; (2) details of prescriptions dispensed; and (3) records of hospital admissions, obstetric deliveries, and deaths. The records about each person were linked together, and analyses were performed to reveal associations between drugs and diagnoses. The study suggested that record linkage would be useful both for generating and for testing hypotheses about the adverse effects of drugs. The method would be especially valuable for detection of delayed effects (such as the induction of cancer), sudden deaths outside hospital, and effects of the fetus-all of which are difficult to study by other means. A full-scale project would need to cover a large population, and some of the practical issues that would arise are discussed. PMID:7264530

  12. Linkage isomerism in coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Samia; Setifi, Fatima; Triki, Smail; Gómez-García, Carlos J

    2012-02-20

    The use of the recently prepared polynitrile ligand tcnopr3OH(-) ([(NC)(2)CC(OCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)OH)C(CN)(2)](-)) with different salts of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) has led to a very rare example of linkage isomerism in a coordination chain. These pairs of linkage isomers can be formulated as [M(tcnopr3OH-κN,κO)(2)(H(2)O)(2)]; M = Fe (1), Co (3), and Ni(5) and [M(tcnopr3OH-κN,κN')(2)(H(2)O)(2)]; M = Fe (2), Co (4), and Ni (6). Compounds 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6 are three pairs of linkage isomers since they present the same formula and chain structure and they only differ in the connectivity of the polynitrile ligand bridging the metal ions in the chain: through a N and an O atom (1κN:2κO-isomer) or through two N atoms (1κN:2κN'-isomer). The magnetic properties show, as expected, very similar behaviors for both isomers. PMID:22296602

  13. Newborn cord care practices in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Norr, Kathleen; Sankar, Girija; Sipsma, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Newborn cord infections commonly lead to neonatal sepsis and death, particularly in low-resource countries where newborns may receive unhygienic cord care. Topical application of chlorhexidine to the newborn's cord has been shown to prevent infection. Such benefits may be particularly important in Haiti. We explored current cord care practices by conducting a qualitative study using five focus groups among key community stakeholders (mothers of newborns/children under age two years, pregnant women, traditional birth attendants, community health workers, traditional healers) in Petit-Goâve, Haiti. Data collection was guided by the Health Belief Model. Results suggest community stakeholders recognise that infants are susceptible to cord infection and that cord infection is a serious threat to newborns. Long-held traditional cord care practices are potential barriers to adopting a new cord care intervention. However, all groups acknowledged that traditional practices could be harmful to the newborn while expressing a willingness to adopt practices that would protect the newborn. Results demonstrate potential acceptability for altering traditional cord care practices among neonatal caretakers in Haiti. An informational campaign designed to educate local health workers and new mothers to eliminate unhygienic cord applications while promoting chlorhexidine application may be a strong approach for preventing neonatal cord infections. PMID:25727359

  14. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  15. Privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Hye-Chung; Krishnamurthy, Ashok; Machanavajjhala, Ashwin; Reiter, Michael K; Ahalt, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Objective Record linkage to integrate uncoordinated databases is critical in biomedical research using Big Data. Balancing privacy protection against the need for high quality record linkage requires a human–machine hybrid system to safely manage uncertainty in the ever changing streams of chaotic Big Data. Methods In the computer science literature, private record linkage is the most published area. It investigates how to apply a known linkage function safely when linking two tables. However, in practice, the linkage function is rarely known. Thus, there are many data linkage centers whose main role is to be the trusted third party to determine the linkage function manually and link data for research via a master population list for a designated region. Recently, a more flexible computerized third-party linkage platform, Secure Decoupled Linkage (SDLink), has been proposed based on: (1) decoupling data via encryption, (2) obfuscation via chaffing (adding fake data) and universe manipulation; and (3) minimum information disclosure via recoding. Results We synthesize this literature to formalize a new framework for privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL) with tractable privacy and utility properties and then analyze the literature using this framework. Conclusions Human-based third-party linkage centers for privacy preserving record linkage are the accepted norm internationally. We find that a computer-based third-party platform that can precisely control the information disclosed at the micro level and allow frequent human interaction during the linkage process, is an effective human–machine hybrid system that significantly improves on the linkage center model both in terms of privacy and utility. PMID:24201028

  16. Discharge criteria for the term newborn.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Michael A; Spitzer, Alan R

    2004-06-01

    The birthing process represents a traumatic eviction from the warm, quiet womb with a constant supply of food to the cold, bright world with nothing to eat. Tremendous physiologic strains are suddenly placed on the newborn infant. In a time frame of a few days, the neonate must transition successfully to extrauterine life, and the family must be prepared for the care of their newborn at home. This article reviews the physiologic and social issues that face the newborn and mother, discusses the specific issues created by early discharge, and provides suggested criteria for the timing of discharge of the well term neonate. PMID:15157587

  17. Views of healthcare professionals to linkage of routinely collected healthcare data: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Y M; Bond, C; Francis, J; Haughney, J; Helms, P J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the views of healthcare professionals to the linkage of healthcare data and to identify any potential barriers and/or facilitators to participation in a data linkage system. Methods Published papers describing the views of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to data sharing and linkage were identified by searches of Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. The searches were limited to papers published in the English language from 2001 to 2011. Results A total of 2917 titles were screened. From these, 18 papers describing the views of HCPs about data linkage or data sharing of routinely collected healthcare data at an individual patient level were included. Views were generally positive, and potential benefits were reported. Facilitators included having trust in the system including data governance, reliability, and feedback. Some negative views, identified as barriers were also expressed including costs, data governance, technical issues, and privacy concerns. Effects on the physician–patient relationship, and workload were also identified as deterrent. Discussion From the published literature included in this review, the views of HCPs were in general positive towards data sharing for public health purposes. The identification of barriers to contributing to a data linkage system allows these to be addressed in a planned data linkage project for pharmacovigilance. The main barriers identified were concerns about costs, governance and interference with the prescriber–patient relationship. These would have to be addressed if healthcare professionals are to support a data linkage system to improve patient safety. PMID:23715802

  18. Risk factors and prevalence of newborn hearing loss in a private health care system of Porto Velho, Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Juliana Santos; Rodrigues, Liliane Barbosa; Aurélio, Fernanda Soares; da Silva, Virgínia Braz

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of hearing loss and to analyze the results of newborn hearing screening and audiological diagnosis in private health care systems. METHODS Cross-sectional and retrospective study in a database of newborn hearing screening performed by a private clinic in neonates born in private hospitals of Porto Velho, Rondônia, Northern Brazil. The screening results, the risk for hearing loss, the risk indicators for hearing loss and the diagnosis were descriptively analyzed. Newborns cared in rooming in with their mothers were compared to those admitted to the Intensive Care Unit regarding risk factors for hearing loss. RESULTS: Among 1,146 (100%) enrolled newborns, 1,064 (92.8%) passed and 82 (7.2%) failed the hearing screening. Among all screened neonates, 1,063 (92.8%) were cared in rooming and 83 (7.2%) needed intensive care; 986 (86.0%) were considered at low risk and 160 (14.0%) at high risk for hearing problems. Of the 160 patients identified as having high risk for hearing loss, 83 (37.7%) were admitted to an hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit, 76 (34.5%) used ototoxic drugs and 38 (17.2%) had a family history of hearing loss in childhood. Hearing loss was diagnosed in two patients (0.2% of the screened sample). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hearing loss in newborns from private hospitals was two cases per 1,000 evaluated patients. The use of ototoxic drugs, admission to Intensive Care Unit and family history of hearing loss were the most common risk factors for hearing loss in the studied population. PMID:24142311

  19. Linkages Within the Reproductive and Maternal Health Continuum of Care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Lotus; Rusch, Melanie L A; Silverman, Jay G; Raj, Anita

    2016-07-01

    The continuum of care (CoC) is a fundamental approach to reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health policy and programs, but linkages along the CoC are inadequately understood. This article assesses linkages in reproductive and maternal health (RMH) services in Bangladesh using the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (n = 7170). Antenatal care (ANC) was positively associated with skilled birth attendance (SBA) among both pre-pregnancy contraceptive users and nonusers. Among women who used pre-pregnancy contraceptives but did not receive skilled ANC, there was a 26% decreased odds of SBA. Pre-pregnancy contraceptive use increased the odds of postpartum contraceptive use, but neither ANC nor SBA was associated with postpartum contraceptive use. There are clear linkages within maternal health services and within reproductive health services, but linkages across life stages were variable. Removing barriers to accessing health services early and addressing barriers in the transitions within RMH care will facilitate sustained engagement along the CoC. PMID:27371578

  20. Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborn. Other tests that may be done include: Blood clotting tests - prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time ( ... to reverse shock Medicines or procedures to correct blood clotting problems Oxygen therapy A therapy called extracorporeal membrane ...

  1. Cooling Therapy Helps Newborns Years Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Cooling Therapy Helps Newborns Years Later A cooling treatment for infants who lack oxygen at birth brings benefits that last for years, a new study shows. Blood loss and other ...

  2. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns. PMID:26175564

  3. Alternatives to hexachlorophene bathing of newborn infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.

    1977-01-01

    In controlled trials newborn infants were bathed with Lactacyd, pHisoHex, Hibitane, Lanohex or tap water. Bacteriologic samples were taken from three sites (groin, axilla and cord) immediately after birth, following an initial bath with one of the test agents, and on day 3 or 5 after a water bath. Initial bathing with all agents, including water, reduced the concentration of bacteria on the skin to a similar extent. However, comparisons of bacterial flora at birth versus those on days 3 and 5 indicated differences in the actions of the various agents on pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms. Lactacyd and Hibitane appeared to be suitable alternatives to hexachlorophene in the control of pathogenic bacteria on the skin of newborns. However, their absorption and toxicity in the newborn are unknown and, unless use of a skin disinfectant is warranted, routine bathing of newborns with tap water appears to be satisfactory. PMID:328126

  4. The aetiology of diarrhoea in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R F; Cameron, D J; Barnes, G L; Holmes, I H; Ruck, B J

    1976-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a common problem in newborn infants in hospital nurseries. In the past, sporadic diarrhoea was often attributed to dietary indiscretion by the mother, and epidemic diarrhoea was though to be caused by an unknown infectious agent. Techniques with which to locate non-cultivable viruses and untypable enteropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli allow reevaluation of the aetiology of diarrhoea in newborn infants. Preliminary results from Melbourne, Australia, suggest that most diarrhoea in newborn infants is induced by a specific infectious agent. During 1975 the agent most often identified from sporadic and epidemic diarrhoea in hospital nurseries was a reovirus-like particle ("duovirus"). Enterotoxin-producing strains of E. coli were rarely isolated. Future attempts to protect newborn infants from developing diarrhoea must be based on an accurate understanding of the aetiology of this disease. PMID:186236

  5. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Hilary EA; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns. PMID:26175564

  6. Crying in Newborn and Young Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsson, Katarina

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the reasons that newborns and young infants cry, the communicative effect and perception of crying, crying in sick and healthy infants, the sound spectograph, and crying for the use of clinical diagnostics. (RJC)

  7. Bilateral Pulmonary Agenesis: A Rare and Unexpected Finding in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lananh N.; Parks, W. Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bilateral pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly incompatible with life that can be missed on routine prenatal screening. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of this fatal anomaly can aid in prenatal counseling and postdelivery care. Case Study  We report the case of a newborn who was born prematurely at 29 weeks gestation and underwent several unsuccessful intubation attempts immediately after delivery. Conclusion  Autopsy examination revealed bilateral pulmonary agenesis with a short, blindly ending trachea. PMID:27551579

  8. Linkage map construction involving a reciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Farré, A; Benito, I Lacasa; Cistué, L; de Jong, J H; Romagosa, I; Jansen, J

    2011-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel statistical-genetic approach for the construction of linkage maps in populations obtained from reciprocal translocation heterozygotes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Using standard linkage analysis, translocations usually lead to 'pseudo-linkage': the mixing up of markers from the chromosomes involved in the translocation into a single linkage group. Close to the translocation breakpoints recombination is severely suppressed and, as a consequence, ordering markers in those regions is not feasible. The novel strategy presented in this paper is based on (1) disentangling the "pseudo-linkage" using principal coordinate analysis, (2) separating individuals into translocated types and normal types and (3) separating markers into those close to and those more distant from the translocation breakpoints. The methods make use of a consensus map of the species involved. The final product consists of integrated linkage maps of the distal parts of the chromosomes involved in the translocation. PMID:21153624

  9. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.; Killian, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  10. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.; Killian, M.A.

    1993-03-02

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  11. What parents want to know about the storage and use of residual newborn bloodspots.

    PubMed

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca A; Goldenberg, Aaron; Kuppermann, Miriam; Dolan, Siobhan M; Rose, Nancy C; Stark, Louisa

    2014-11-01

    Many state newborn screening programs retain residual newborn screening bloodspots for a variety of purposes including quality assurance, biomedical research, and forensic applications. This project was designed to determine the information that prospective parents want to know about this practice. Eleven focus groups were conducted in four states. Pregnant women and their partners and parents of young children (N = 128) were recruited from the general public. Focus group participants viewed two educational movies on newborn screening and DBS retention and use. Transcripts were analyzed with qualitative methods and the results were synthesized to identify key information items. We identified 14 categories of information from the focus groups that were synthesized into seven items prospective parents want to know about residual DBS. The items included details about storage, potential uses, risks and burdens, safeguards, anonymity, return of results, and parental choice. For those state programs that retain residual dried bloodspots, inclusion of the seven things parents want to know about residual dried bloodspots in educational materials may improve parental understanding, trust, and acceptance of the retention and use of stored bloodspots. PMID:25131714

  12. What Parents Want to Know about the Storage and Use of Residual Newborn Bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    Botkin, Jeffrey R.; Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Goldenberg, Aaron; Kuppermann, Miriam; Dolan, Siobhan M.; Rose, Nancy C.; Stark, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Many state newborn screening programs retain residual newborn screening bloodspots for a variety of purposes including quality assurance, biomedical research, and forensic applications. This project was designed to determine the information that prospective parents want to know about this practice. Eleven focus groups were conducted in four states. Pregnant women and their partners and parents of young children (N=128) were recruited from the general public. Focus group participants viewed two educational movies on newborn screening and DBS retention and use. Transcripts were analyzed with qualitative methods and the results were synthesized to identify key information items. We identified 14 categories of information from the focus groups that were synthesized into seven items prospective parents want to know about residual DBS. The items included details about storage, potential uses, risks and burdens, safeguards, anonymity, return of results, and parental choice. For those state programs that retain residual dried bloodspots, inclusion of the seven things parents want to know about residual dried bloodspots in educational materials may improve parental understanding, trust, and acceptance of the retention and use of stored bloodspots. PMID:25131714

  13. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. CLEFT PALATE IN HIV-EXPOSED NEWBORNS OF MOTHERS ON HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    James, Ayotunde; Oluwatosin, Babatunde; Njideka, Georgina; Babafemi; Benjamin, Onyekwere George; Olufemi, David; Leo, Robert; Folorunso, Isaac; Phylis; Olusina, Olusegun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cleft lip/palate, though rare, is the commonest head and neck congenital malformation. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis but the role of in-utero exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still being investigated. This short communication reports the occurrence of cleft palate in three newborns exposed in-utero to HIV and HAART. Material and methods This is a case series of HIV-exposed newborns observed to have cleft palate among a larger cohort of HIV-exposed and unexposed newborns in a study evaluating the effect of HIV infection and HAART on newborn hearing. The Risk Ratio (RR) was calculated to detect a potential association between in-utero exposure to Efavirenz containing ART and cleft palate. Results Three HIV-exposed newborns with cleft palate were identified during hearing screening performed on 126 HIV-exposed and 121 HIV unexposed newborns. Two had exposure to tenofovir+lamivudine+efavirenz (TDF+3TC+EFV) while the third had exposure to zidovudine+lamivudine+nevirapine (ZDV+3TC+NVP) during the first trimester. There was no statistically significant association between presence of cleft palate and exposure to an EFV containing HAART regimen (p=0.07, RR=10.95 [0.94-126.84]). Conclusions This communication highlights the possible aetiologic role of HAART in cleft palate, the need for further prospective follow-up studies and establishment of antiretroviral pregnancy, birth and neonatal registries. PMID:25653715

  15. Application of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Newborns with Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Beata; Sobecka, Katarzyna; Smyk, Marta; Castaneda, Jennifer; Klapecki, Jakub; Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Śmigiel, Robert; Bocian, Ewa; Radkowski, Marek; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Major congenital anomalies are detectable in 2-3 % of the newborn population. Some of their genetic causes are attributable to copy number variations identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The value of aCGH screening as a first-tier test in children with multiple congenital anomalies has been studied and consensus adopted. However, array resolution has not been agreed upon, specifically in the newborn or infant population. Moreover, most array studies have been focused on mixed populations of intellectual disability/developmental delay with or without multiple congenital anomalies, making it difficult to assess the value of microarrays in newborns. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal quality and clinical sensitivity of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in neonates with multiple congenital anomalies. We investigated a group of 54 newborns with multiple congenital anomalies defined as two or more birth defects from more than one organ system. Cytogenetic studies were performed using OGT CytoSure 8 × 60 K microarray. We found ten rearrangements in ten newborns. Of these, one recurrent syndromic microduplication was observed, whereas all other changes were unique. Six rearrangements were definitely pathogenic, including one submicroscopic and five that could be seen on routine karyotype analysis. Four other copy number variants were likely pathogenic. The candidate genes that may explain the phenotype were discussed. In conclusion, high-resolution array comparative hybridization can be applied successfully in newborns with multiple congenital anomalies as the method detects a significant number of pathogenic changes, resulting in early diagnoses. We hypothesize that small changes previously considered benign or even inherited rearrangements should be classified as potentially pathogenic at least until a subsequent clinical assessment would exclude a developmental delay or dysmorphism. PMID:26987320

  16. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  17. Examination of the newborn: the key skills. Part 3: the hips.

    PubMed

    Carr, Natasha; Foster, Paula

    2014-03-01

    Midwives are increasingly performing the examination of the newborn. his article considers the importance of the examination of the hips in the screening process. The significance of history taking, knowledge of risk factors and the hip examination will be explored. The necessity for early detection and treatment of hip abnormalities, along with referral pathways that the National Screening Committee quires will be highlighted. The impact of late detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) on the lives of families and children will also be considered. PMID:24669521

  18. [Lung ultrasound in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Yousef, N

    2016-03-01

    Lung ultrasound (LU) is becoming a bedside point-of-care technique in critical care and emergency medicine as it is performed and immediately interpreted by the clinician. LU is quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and provides accurate diagnostic information when compared with conventional lung imaging methods, such as CT scans and chest radiographs, with the additional advantage of being non-irradiating, adapted to bedside use, and easily repeatable with no side effects for the patient. LU is easy to learn, does not require sophisticated ultrasound machines or settings, and shows low intra- and interobserver variability when a standardized approach is used. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasound semiology has been described and validated in both adults and children. In summary, LU allows for quick easy recognition of a normally aerated lung in contrast to an interstitial or alveolar pattern. Recognition of these patterns may be even easier in neonates due to their small size and the absence of obesity and heavy musculature. Specific LU findings have been described for some types of neonatal lung injury, such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the neonate, meconium aspiration syndrome, and neonatal pneumonia. In the newborn, LU has proved its usefulness in predicting the need for hospital admission and/or intubation based on simple LU patterns. A recently proposed LU score, adapted for the neonate, correlates well with oxygenation status, independently of gestational age and underlying respiratory condition. The score reliably predicts the need for surfactant treatment in preterm babies less than 34 weeks gestation treated with nasal CPAP from birth. LU is a promising tool with numerous potential applications that warrant future studies. However, like every technique, LU has its limitations and should not completely replace standard radiography. LU can nevertheless largely reduce exposure to ionizing radiation by limiting the

  19. Examining the Linkage Between FRAMES and GMS

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.

    2006-02-13

    Because GMS provides so many features, of which some are also addressed by FRAMES, it could represent a platform to link to FRAMES, or FRAMES could represent a platform to link to GMS. The focus of this summary is to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the potential linkage direction and provide recommendations for the linkage between FRAMES and GMS.

  20. Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping of Meat Quality QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies based on linkage analysis have identified broad areas in the bovine genome associated with meat quality. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analyses have the potential to identify narrower regions and point towards candidate genes. Tenderness and marbling were chosen to be evaluated in a ...

  1. Compensating linkage for main rotor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffery, P. A. E.; Huber, R. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A compensating linkage for the rotor control system on rotary wing aircraft is described. The main rotor and transmission are isolated from the airframe structure by clastic suspension. The compensating linkage prevents unwanted signal inputs to the rotor control system caused by relative motion of the airframe structure and the main rotor and transmission.

  2. Common respiratory conditions of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Gallacher, David J.; Hart, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    Key points Respiratory distress is a common presenting feature among newborn infants. Prompt investigation to ascertain the underlying diagnosis and appropriate subsequent management is important to improve outcomes. Many of the underlying causes of respiratory distress in a newborn are unique to this age group. A chest radiograph is crucial to assist in diagnosis of an underlying cause. Educational aims To inform readers of the common respiratory problems encountered in neonatology and the evidence-based management of these conditions. To enable readers to develop a framework for diagnosis of an infant with respiratory distress. The first hours and days of life are of crucial importance for the newborn infant as the infant adapts to the extra-uterine environment. The newborn infant is vulnerable to a range of respiratory diseases, many unique to this period of early life as the developing fluid-filled fetal lungs adapt to the extrauterine environment. The clinical signs of respiratory distress are important to recognise and further investigate, to identify the underlying cause. The epidemiology, diagnostic features and management of common neonatal respiratory conditions are covered in this review article aimed at all healthcare professionals who come into contact with newborn infants. PMID:27064402

  3. Ending preventable newborn deaths in a generation.

    PubMed

    Akseer, Nadia; Lawn, Joy E; Keenan, William; Konstantopoulos, Andreas; Cooper, Peter; Ismail, Zulkifli; Thacker, Naveen; Cabral, Sergio; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-10-01

    The end of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era was marked in 2015, and while maternal and child mortality have been halved, MGD 4 and MDG 5 are off-track at the global level. Reductions in neonatal death rates (age <1 month) lag behind those for post-neonates (age 1-59 months), and stillbirth rates (omitted from the MDGs) have been virtually unchanged. Hence, almost half of under-five deaths are newborns, yet about 80% of these are preventable using cost-effective interventions. The Every Newborn Action Plan has been endorsed by the World Health Assembly and ratified by many stakeholders and donors to reduce neonatal deaths and stillbirths to 10 per 1000 births by 2035. The plan provides an evidence-based framework for scaling up of essential interventions across the continuum of care with the potential to prevent the deaths of approximately three million newborns, mothers, and stillbirths every year. Two million stillbirths and newborns could be saved by care at birth and care of small and sick newborns, giving a triple return on investment at this key time. Commitment, investment, and intentional leadership from global and national stakeholders, including all healthcare professionals, can make these ambitious goals attainable. PMID:26433505

  4. Brain Volume and Neurobehavior in Newborns with Complex Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Mallory; Shevell, Michael; Donofrio, Mary; Majnemer, Annette; McCarter, Robert; Vezina, Gilbert; Bouyssi-Kobar, Marine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Freeman, Dena; Weisenfeld, Neil; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between tissue-specific alterations in brain volume and neurobehavioral status in newborns with complex congenital heart defects preoperatively. Study design Three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance imaging was used to calculate tissue-specific brain volumes and a standardized neurobehavioral assessment was performed to assess neurobehavioral status in 35 full-term newborns admitted to the hospital before cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Multiple linear regression models were performed to evaluate relationships between neurobehavioral status and brain volumes. Results Reduced subcortical gray matter (SCGM) volume and increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume were associated with poor behavioral state regulation (SCGM, P = .04; CSF, P = .007) and poor visual orienting (CSF, P = .003). In cyanotic newborns, reduced SCGM was associated with higher overall abnormal scores on the assessment (P = .001) and poor behavioral state regulation (P = .04), and increased CSF volume was associated with poor behavioral state regulation (P = .02), and poor visual orienting (P = .02). Conversely, acyanotic newborns showed associations between reduced cerebellar volume and poor behavioral state regulation (P = .03). Conclusion Abnormal neurobehavior is associated with impaired volumetric brain growth before open heart surgery in infants with complex congenital heart defects. This study highlights a need for routine preoperative screening and early intervention to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:24367983

  5. A model for linkage analysis with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Lin, Shen; Li, Yao; Pang, Xiaoming; Zeng, Yanru; Wu, Rongling

    2011-09-01

    Apomixis, or asexual reproduction through seeds, occurs in over 400 species of angiosperms. Although apomixis can favorably perpetuate desired genotypes through successive seed generation, it may also bring about some difficulty for linkage analysis and quantitative trait locus mapping. In this article, we explore the issue of how apomixis affects the precision and power of linkage analysis with molecular markers. We derive a statistical model for estimating the linkage between different markers when some progeny are derived from apomixis. The model was constructed within the maximum likelihood framework and implemented with the EM algorithm. A series of procedures are formulated to test the linkage of markers, the rate of apomixis, and the degree of genetic interference during meiosis. The model was examined and validated through simulation studies. The model will provide a tool for linkage mapping and evolutionary studies for plant species that undergo apomixis. PMID:21625991

  6. Sudden Unexpected Postnatal Collapse of the Newborn.

    PubMed

    Ferrarello, Debi; Carmichael, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexpected postnatal collapse is a rare but devastating neonatal event. A well-appearing, full-term newborn with Agpar scores of eight or more suddenly crashes, often with full respiratory and cardiac arrest. Up to half of newborns with sudden unexpected postnatal collapse die, with many survivors suffering serious neurological damage. The first 2 hours of life are the hours of greatest risk, coinciding with the time frame when nurses encourage breastfeeding and uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact between women and newborns. Nursing assessments and measures to promote neonates' optimal transition to extrauterine life through skin-to-skin contact and early breastfeeding while decreasing the risk of this catastrophic event are described. Nursing surveillance to promote optimal transition in a safe environment is essential, and birth facilities should allocate staffing resources accordingly. PMID:27287353

  7. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  8. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  9. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  10. Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibitors and the Newborn Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Francine G.; Wade, Andrew W.; Lewis, Megan L.; Qi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COXI) in influencing the structural development as well as the function of the developing kidney. COXI administered either during pregnancy or after birth can influence kidney development including nephronogenesis, and can decrease renal perfusion and ultrafiltration potentially leading to acute kidney injury in the newborn period. To date, which COX isoform (COX-1 or COX-2) plays a more important role in during fetal development and influences kidney function early in life is not known, though evidence points to a predominant role for COX-2. Clinical implications of the use of COXI in pregnancy and in the newborn infant are also evaluated herein, with specific reference to the potential effects of COXI on nephronogenesis as well as newborn kidney function. PMID:24281306

  11. New Test Helps Identify Rare Genetic Diseases in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159097.html New Test Helps Identify Rare Genetic Diseases in Newborns 'Next-generation gene sequencing' could ... greatly improve doctors' ability to quickly diagnose rare genetic diseases in newborns, researchers say. The new test ...

  12. Implementing a perinatal substance abuse screening tool.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Carol M; Smith, Pat Bohling; Moore, Karen

    2011-08-01

    Newborns exposed to illicit drugs or alcohol in utero can face physical, social, and emotional obstacles. Outcomes for children with fetal alcohol syndrome disorders are well documented in the literature. Data exist on the effects of maternal illicit drug use. Identifying perinatal substance abuse can increase positive outcomes for newborns and create the opportunity for mothers to access assistance through referrals to community resources.This article provides insight on how hospitals can implement an effective screening tool through patient surveying and testing, nurse education, and collaboration with community agencies in a multidisciplinary advisory committee setting.This discussed method of universal perinatal screening results in increased positive screens and increased referrals for care and support. Emphasis is placed on universal screening and testing methods. Nurses are trained in motivational interview techniques that convey empathy, listening, and objectivity. Community agencies partner with hospital staff through onsite meetings with families that determine the best discharge plan for the newborn. The multidisciplinary advisory committee meets continually to discuss future enhancements. PMID:22123347

  13. Risk Factors for Discontinuation of Exclusive Breastfeeding by One Month of Postnatal Age Among High Risk Newborns: An Institution Based Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chandrika, Parul; Gathwala, Geeta; Narwal, Varun; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Background Beyond one month of age, there is generally a drop in the proportion of mothers providing exclusive breastfeeding to their infants. Infants with morbidities during neonatal period have been observed to be at higher risk of discontinuation. Objective To enumerate the prevalent factors behind discontinuation of breastfeeding among high risk newborns by first month of life. Materials and Methods A case control study conducted at high risk newborn followup clinic of a teaching medical institute in northern India between January and May 2013. Infants were divided on the basis of continuation (controls) or discontinuation (cases) of exclusive breastfeeding at one month of age. The socio-demographic factors along with maternal and neonatal medical factors were compared among groups. Results During the study period, 112 newborns were screened. Forty seven cases and thirty eight controls were enrolled and finally evaluated. Female gender of newborn, less educated mothers and large families were observed to be associated with discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding during first month of life among high risk newborns. Requirement of parenteral fluids during hospital stay emerged as the only independent medical reason. Conclusion As in healthy newborns, the socio-cultural factors overshadow the medical reasons for discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding during first month of life among high risk newborns. PMID:26266176

  14. Resource linkages and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouti, Yahya

    Historically, fossil fuel consumers in most developing hydrocarbon-rich countries have enjoyed retail prices at a discount from international benchmarks. Governments of these countries consider the subsidy transfer to be a means for sharing the wealth from their resource endowment. These subsidies create negative economic, environmental, and social distortions, which can only increase over time with a fast growing, young, and rich population. The pressure to phase out these subsidies has been mounting over the last years. At the same time, policy makers in resource-rich developing countries are keen to obtain the greatest benefits for their economies from the extraction of their exhaustible resources. To this end, they are deploying local content policies with the aim of increasing the economic linkages from extracting their resources. Against this background, this dissertation's three essays evaluate (1) the global impact of rationalizing transport fuel prices, (2) how resource-rich countries can achieve the objectives behind fuel subsidies more efficiently through direct cash transfers, and (3) the economic tradeoffs from deploying local content policies and the presence of an optimal path. We begin by reviewing the literature and building the case for rationalizing transport fuel prices to reflect their direct costs (production), indirect costs (road maintenance) and negative externalities (climate change, local pollutants, traffic accidents and congestion). To do so, we increase the scope of the economic literature by presenting an algorithm to evaluate the rationalized prices in different countries. Then, we apply this algorithm to quantify the rationalized prices across 123 countries in a partial equilibrium setting. Finally, we present the first comprehensive measure of the impact of rationalizing fuel prices on the global demand for gasoline and diesel, environmental emissions, government revenues, and consumers' welfare. By rationalizing transport fuel

  15. Reevaluation of the newborn thyroid dose from radioiodines

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; Milavickas, L.R.

    1987-07-01

    The basis for the current thyroid absorbed dose estimates for radioiodines has been examined. The values for the newborn thyroid dose were found to underestimate the dose by a factor of 3. This underestimation of the dose was caused by the assumption that the biokinetic distribution of iodine is the same for the newborn and the adult. Increased thyroid uptake by the newborn requires that higher cumulated activities be incorporated into the dose determinations for the newborn.

  16. Differential Facial Responses to Four Basic Tastes in Newborns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosentstein, Diana; Oster, Harriet

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the distinctiveness and recognizability of taste-elicited facial expressions in 12 newborns two hours of age. Findings demonstrated that newborns differentiate sour and bitter from each other and from salty, and discriminate between sweet and nonsweet. Judges accurately identified newborns' responses to sucrose, but systematically…

  17. The REBUS-MCNP linkage.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J. G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-24

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program uses the REBUS-PC computer code to provide reactor physics and core design information such as neutron flux distributions in space, energy, and time, and to track isotopic changes in fuel and neutron absorbers with burnup. REBUS-PC models the complete fuel cycle including shuffling capability. REBUS-PC evolved using the neutronic capabilities of multi-group diffusion theory code DIF3D 9.0, but was extended to apply the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP for one-group fluxes and cross-sections. The linkage between REBUS-PC and MCNP has recently been modernized and extended, as described in this manual. REBUS-PC now calls MCNP via a system call so that the user can apply any valid MCNP executable. The interface between REBUS-PC and MCNP requires minimal changes to an existing MCNP model, and little additional input. The REBUS-MCNP interface can also be used in conjunction with DIF3D neutronics to update an MCNP model with fuel compositions predicted using a DIF3D based depletion.

  18. Use of linkage disequilibrium approaches to map genes for bipolar disorder in the Costa Rican population

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, M.A.; Reus, V.I.; Smith, L.B.; Freimer, N.B.

    1996-05-31

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis provides a powerful means for screening the genome to map the location of disease genes, such as those for bipolar disorder (BP). As described in this paper, the population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica, which is descended from a small number of founders, should be suitable for LD mapping; this assertion is supported by reconstruction of extended haplotypes shared by distantly related individuals in this population suffering low-frequency hearing loss (LFHL1), which has previously been mapped by linkage analysis. A sampling strategy is described for applying LD methods to map genes for BP, and clinical and demographic characteristics of an initially collected sample are discussed. This sample will provide a complement to a previously collected set of Costa Rican BP families which is under investigation using standard linkage analysis. 42 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. An approach to investigating linkage for bipolar disorder using large Costa Rican pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Freimer, N.B.; Reus, V.I.; Vinogradov, S.

    1996-05-31

    Despite the evidence that major gene effects exist for bipolar disorder (BP), efforts to map BP loci have so far been unsuccessful. A strategy for mapping BP loci is described, focused on investigation of large pedigrees from a genetically homogenous population, that of Costa Rica. This approach is based on the use of a conservative definition of the BP phenotype in preparation for whole genome screening with polymorphic markers. Linkage simulation analyses are utilized to indicate the probability of detecting evidence suggestive of linkage, using these pedigrees. These analyses are performed under a series of single locus models, ranging form recessive to nearly dominant, utilizing both lod score and affected pedigree member analyses. Additional calculations demonstrate that with any of the models employed, most of the information for linkage derives from affected rather than unaffected individuals. 26 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Classification of major newborn birth injuries.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Jana L

    2008-01-01

    A classification system of various forms of major newborn birth injuries is clearly lacking in the literature. Currently, no scales exist for distinguishing degrees, extent, or distinctions of major birth injuries. The purpose of this study was to use published and online literature to explore the timing, prediction, and outcomes of major newborn birth injuries. Potential antecedents and causes were used in depicting what were reported to be major birth injuries. The outcome of this literature search was the development of a classification table synthesizing the most frequently reported (n = 20) major newborn birth injuries. This classification was developed according to (1) types of tissue involved in the primary injury, (2) how and when the injury occurred, and (3) the relationship of the injury to birth outcomes. A classification scheme is critically needed as the first step to achieving preventive interventions and plans for long-term recovery from birth injuries. Because major birth trauma contributes to increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, its occurrence requires careful study and preventive efforts to better promote newborn health. PMID:18287903

  1. Newborns' Face Recognition over Changes in Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turati, Chiara; Bulf, Hermann; Simion, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the origins of the ability to recognize faces despite rotations in depth. Four experiments are reported that tested, using the habituation technique, whether 1-to-3-day-old infants are able to recognize the invariant aspects of a face over changes in viewpoint. Newborns failed to recognize facial perceptual invariances…

  2. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Shabnam; Prendiville, Kevin John; Martinez, Eladio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia. Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam. Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2–3 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months. Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia. PMID:27625966

  3. Perceptual Completion in Newborn Human Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Eloisa; Leo, Irene; Gava, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of human infants, a still open question concerns the role of visual experience in the development of the ability to perceive complete shapes over partial occlusion. Previous studies show that newborns fail to manifest this ability, either because they lack the visual experience required for perceptual completion or…

  4. Auditory-Oral Matching Behavior in Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Striano, Tricia; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five newborn infants were tested for auditory-oral matching behavior when presented with the consonant sound /m/ and the vowel sound /a/--a precursor behavior to vocal imitation. Auditory-oral matching behavior by the infant was operationally defined as showing the mouth movement appropriate for producing the model sound just heard (mouth…

  5. Distinct DNA methylomes of newborns and centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Holger; Li, Ning; Ferreira, Humberto J.; Moran, Sebastian; Pisano, David G.; Gomez, Antonio; Diez, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Setien, Fernando; Carmona, F. Javier; Puca, Annibale A.; Sayols, Sergi; Pujana, Miguel A.; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Formiga, Francesc; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Fraga, Mario F.; Heath, Simon C.; Valencia, Alfonso; Gut, Ivo G.; Wang, Jun; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Human aging cannot be fully understood in terms of the constrained genetic setting. Epigenetic drift is an alternative means of explaining age-associated alterations. To address this issue, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) of newborn and centenarian genomes. The centenarian DNA had a lower DNA methylation content and a reduced correlation in the methylation status of neighboring cytosine—phosphate—guanine (CpGs) throughout the genome in comparison with the more homogeneously methylated newborn DNA. The more hypomethylated CpGs observed in the centenarian DNA compared with the neonate covered all genomic compartments, such as promoters, exonic, intronic, and intergenic regions. For regulatory regions, the most hypomethylated sequences in the centenarian DNA were present mainly at CpG-poor promoters and in tissue-specific genes, whereas a greater level of DNA methylation was observed in CpG island promoters. We extended the study to a larger cohort of newborn and nonagenarian samples using a 450,000 CpG-site DNA methylation microarray that reinforced the observation of more hypomethylated DNA sequences in the advanced age group. WGBS and 450,000 analyses of middle-age individuals demonstrated DNA methylomes in the crossroad between the newborn and the nonagenarian/centenarian groups. Our study constitutes a unique DNA methylation analysis of the extreme points of human life at a single-nucleotide resolution level. PMID:22689993

  6. Management of Newborn Infants with Phenylketonuria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The booklet covers the identification, diagnosis, and clinical treatment of newborns with Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error of metabolism, which, if untreated, can lead to mental retardation. An initial section considers biochemical and genetic factors of PKU including a diagram of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation systems. Screening…

  7. Sex Stereotyping in Parents' Perceptions of Newborns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karraker, Katherine Hildebrandt; Vogel, Dena Ann

    This study updates and extends the findings of Rubin, Provenzano, and Luria (1974), who found that parents perceived their newborn in sex stereotyped ways as early as a few hours after birth. In addition, fathers in their study showed more extreme sex stereotyping than mothers. Participants in the present study were 20 pairs of Caucasian,…

  8. [Communicating with premature newborns through touch].

    PubMed

    Berne-Audéoud, Frédérique; Marcus, Leila; Lejeune, Fleur; Gentaz, Edouard; Debillon, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    How does the premature newborn perceive the outside world? The first sense developed by the foetus is touch. Through the physiology of sensoriality and brain maturation, touch can constitute an essential vector in communicating with and caring for the premature child. PMID:20925301

  9. Unexpected behavioural consequences of preterm newborns' clothing.

    PubMed

    Durier, Virginie; Henry, Séverine; Martin, Emmanuelle; Dollion, Nicolas; Hausberger, Martine; Sizun, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions of preterm newborns' movements could have consequences ranging from stress enhancement to impairment of their motor development. Therefore, ability to freely express motor activities appears crucial for their behavioural and physiological development. Our aim was to evaluate behavioural issues of two types of clothing used in NICU. We observed 18 healthy 34-37 post-conception week-old preterm newborns, during resting periods, when they were undisturbed by any interventions. Newborns wore either light clothing (bodysuit and a light wrapping) or heavy clothing (pyjamas, cardigan and sleep-sack). The percentages of time each subject spent in different postures were compared between clothing situations. Arm and hand postures differed in relation to clothing: babies bent their arms more and held their hands nearer their heads when in bodysuits than when in sleepwear. Consequently, babies in bodysuits spent more time touching their body or their environment whereas the others generally were touching nothing. Self-touch is an important way to comfort one's self. Heavy clothing may impair self-soothing behaviours of preterm newborn babies that already lack other forms of contact. Results suggest that more attention should be paid to apparently routine and marginal decisions such as choice of clothes. PMID:25776252

  10. Unexpected behavioural consequences of preterm newborns' clothing

    PubMed Central

    Durier, Virginie; Henry, Séverine; Martin, Emmanuelle; Dollion, Nicolas; Hausberger, Martine; Sizun, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions of preterm newborns' movements could have consequences ranging from stress enhancement to impairment of their motor development. Therefore, ability to freely express motor activities appears crucial for their behavioural and physiological development. Our aim was to evaluate behavioural issues of two types of clothing used in NICU. We observed 18 healthy 34–37 post-conception week-old preterm newborns, during resting periods, when they were undisturbed by any interventions. Newborns wore either light clothing (bodysuit and a light wrapping) or heavy clothing (pyjamas, cardigan and sleep-sack). The percentages of time each subject spent in different postures were compared between clothing situations. Arm and hand postures differed in relation to clothing: babies bent their arms more and held their hands nearer their heads when in bodysuits than when in sleepwear. Consequently, babies in bodysuits spent more time touching their body or their environment whereas the others generally were touching nothing. Self-touch is an important way to comfort one's self. Heavy clothing may impair self-soothing behaviours of preterm newborn babies that already lack other forms of contact. Results suggest that more attention should be paid to apparently routine and marginal decisions such as choice of clothes. PMID:25776252

  11. Binocular Fixation in the Newborn Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan M.; Findlay, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments are reported in which 15 babies were presented with visual stimuli which varied in shape and distance from the eye. Results indicated that the majority of subjects binocularly fixated all three stimuli and it was concluded that the newborn baby has the basic requirements for binocular vision. (Author/GO)

  12. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  13. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  14. Linkage: from particulate to interactive genetics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    Genetics was established on a strict particulate conception of heredity. Genetic linkage, the deviation from independent segregation of Mendelian factors, was conceived as a function of the material allocation of the factors to the chromosomes, rather than to the multiple effects (pleiotropy) of discrete factors. Although linkage maps were abstractions they provided strong support for the chromosomal theory of inheritance. Direct Cytogenetic evidence was scarce until X-ray induced major chromosomal rearrangements allowed direct correlation of genetic and cytological rearrangements. Only with the discovery of the polytenic giant chromosomes in Drosophila larvae in the 1930s were the virtual maps backed up by physical maps of the genetic loci. Genetic linkage became a pivotal experimental tool for the examination of the integration of genetic functions in development and in evolution. Genetic mapping has remained a hallmark of genetic analysis. The location of genes in DNA is a modern extension of the notion of genetic linkage. PMID:12778899

  15. Prenatal and Newborn Immunoglobulin Levels from Mother-Child Pairs and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Grether, Judith K.; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Yolken, Robert H.; Anderson, Meredith C.; Torres, Anthony R.; Westover, Jonna B.; Sweeten, Thayne; Hansen, Robin L.; Kharrazi, Martin; Croen, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: An etiological role for immune factors operating during early brain development in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has not yet been established. A major obstacle has been the lack of early biologic specimens that can be linked to later diagnosis. In a prior study, we found lower risk of ASD associated with higher levels of maternally-derived total IgG and Toxoplasmosis gondii (Toxo) IgG in newborn blood spot specimens from children later diagnosed with ASD compared to population controls. Methods: We obtained maternal mid-gestational serum specimens and newborn screening blood spots from the California Genetics Disease Screening Program (GDSP) for linked mother-baby pairs for 84 children with ASD and 49 children with developmental delay but not ASD (DD) identified from California Department of Developmental Services records and for 159 population controls sampled from birth certificates.Immunoglobulin levels in maternal and newborn specimens were measured by solid phase immunoassays and analyzed in logistic regression models for total IgG, total IgM, and Toxo IgG, and, for maternal specimens only, Toxo IgM. Correlations between maternal and newborn ranked values were evaluated. Results: In both maternal and newborn specimens, we found significantly lower risk of ASD associated with higher levels of Toxo IgG. In addition, point estimates for all comparisons were < 1.0 suggesting an overall pattern of lower immunoglobulin levels associated with higher ASD risk but most did not reach statistical significance. We did not find differences in maternal or newborn specimens comparing children with DD to controls. Discussion: These results are consistent with evidence from our prior study and other published reports indicating that immune factors during early neurodevelopment may be etiologically relevant to ASD. Lowered immunoglobulin levels may represent suboptimal function of the maternal immune system or reduced maternal exposure to common

  16. Resource linkages and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouti, Yahya

    Historically, fossil fuel consumers in most developing hydrocarbon-rich countries have enjoyed retail prices at a discount from international benchmarks. Governments of these countries consider the subsidy transfer to be a means for sharing the wealth from their resource endowment. These subsidies create negative economic, environmental, and social distortions, which can only increase over time with a fast growing, young, and rich population. The pressure to phase out these subsidies has been mounting over the last years. At the same time, policy makers in resource-rich developing countries are keen to obtain the greatest benefits for their economies from the extraction of their exhaustible resources. To this end, they are deploying local content policies with the aim of increasing the economic linkages from extracting their resources. Against this background, this dissertation's three essays evaluate (1) the global impact of rationalizing transport fuel prices, (2) how resource-rich countries can achieve the objectives behind fuel subsidies more efficiently through direct cash transfers, and (3) the economic tradeoffs from deploying local content policies and the presence of an optimal path. We begin by reviewing the literature and building the case for rationalizing transport fuel prices to reflect their direct costs (production), indirect costs (road maintenance) and negative externalities (climate change, local pollutants, traffic accidents and congestion). To do so, we increase the scope of the economic literature by presenting an algorithm to evaluate the rationalized prices in different countries. Then, we apply this algorithm to quantify the rationalized prices across 123 countries in a partial equilibrium setting. Finally, we present the first comprehensive measure of the impact of rationalizing fuel prices on the global demand for gasoline and diesel, environmental emissions, government revenues, and consumers' welfare. By rationalizing transport fuel

  17. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  18. Setting up Multiplex Panels for Genetic Testing of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Based on Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    SAGHAFI, Hoorieh; HAGHJOO, Majid; SABBAGH, Sima; SAMIEE, Niloofar; VAKILIAN, Farve; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Taghi; DADASHI, Masoomeh; AMIN, Ahmad; KERAMATIPOUR, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomere proteins. Nowadays genetic testing of HCM plays an important role in clinical practice by contributing to the diagnosis, prognosis, and screening of high-risk individuals. The aim of this study was developing a reliable testing strategy for HCM based on linkage analysis and appropriate for Iranian population. Methods: Six panels of four microsatellite markers surrounding MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, and MYL2 genes (24 markers in total) were selected for multiplex PCR and fragment length analysis. Characteristics of markers and informativeness of the panels were evaluated in 50 unrelated Iranians. The efficacy of the strategy was verified in a family with HCM. Results: All markers were highly polymorphic. The panels were informative in 96–100% of samples. Multipoint linkage analysis excluded the linkage between the disease and all six genes by obtaining maximum LOD score ≤−2. Conclusion: This study suggests a reliable genetic testing method based on linkage analysis between 6 sarcomere genes and familial HCM. It could be applied for diagnostic, predictive, or screening testing in clinical setting. PMID:27141495

  19. Linkage and mutation analysis of Thomsen and Becker myotonia families

    SciTech Connect

    Koty, P.P.; Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-09-01

    Thomsen (autosomal dominant) and Becker (autosomal recessive) myotonias are characterized by the inability for muscle relaxation after voluntary, mechanical, or electrical stimulation. Families with both diseases have been linked to the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLC1) on chromosome 7q35; however, only 2 gene mutations have been identified, and the reasons underlying the alternative dominant or recessive inheritance are not clear. We used linkage analysis and SSCP of 23 exons to screen 8 families (56 individuals) and 7 isolated cases with the diagnosis of Thomsen/Becker myotonia. A novel mutation (1290M) in exon 8 was detected in a family with Thomsen disease. Three additional families showed the previously described G230E change. Thus, chloride channel mutations could be identified in 4/5 families showing dominant inheritance. We were able to exclude linkage to the CLC1 gene in the fifth family. In patients with recessive Becker disease, an isolated case had two unique conformers, one causing a novel A437T change in exon 12. We also identified the previously reported F413C change in a second family. We found significant differences in the clinical picture between families with different mutations but also in families with the same mutation. Our data indicates that DNA studies are critical for correct diagnosis of the myotonias.

  20. Positional Cloning by Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald’s likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to