Science.gov

Sample records for news emulsion liquid

  1. Research News: Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction in a Hollow-Fiber Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.; Hu, Shih-Yao

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how ELMs (emulsion liquid membranes) can be used for extraction. The article addresses the disadvantages of ELM extraction in a stirred contactor, and the advantages of SELMs (supported emulsion liquid membranes). The introduction of the article provides background information on liquid-liquid solvent extraction and dispersion-free solvent extraction.

  2. NEWS: Nuclear emulsion WIMP search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Gentile, V.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2015-01-01

    The most convincing candidate as main constituent of the dark matter in the Universe consists of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). WIMPs must be electrically neutral and interact with a very low cross-section ( σ<10^{-40} cm2) which makes them detectable in direct searches only through the observation of nuclear recoils induced by the WIMP rare scatterings. In the experiments carried out so far, recoiled nuclei are searched for as a signal over a background produced by Compton electrons and neutron scatterings. Signal found by some experiments have not been confirmed by other techniques. We propose an R&D program for a new experimental method able to observe the track of the scattered nucleus based on new developments in the nuclear emulsion technique. Nuclear emulsions would act both as the WIMP target and as the tracking detector able to reconstruct the direction of the recoiled nucleus. This unique characteristic would provide a new and unambiguous signature of the presence of the dark matter in our galaxy.

  3. NEWS: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, Natalia; NEWS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In the field of direct Dark Matter search a different and promising approach is the directionality: the observation of the incoming apparent direction of WIMPs would in fact provide a new and unambiguous signature. The NEWS project is a very innovative approach for a high sensitivity experiment aiming at the directional detection of WIMPs: the detector is based on a novel emulsion technology called NIT (Nano Imaging Trackers) acting both as target and tracking device. In this paper we illustrate the features of a NIT-based detector and the newly developed read-out systems allowing to reach a spatial resolution of the order of 10 nm. We present the background studies and the experimental design. Finally we report about the time schedule of the experiment and the expected sensitivity for DM searches.

  4. Evaporation from an ionic liquid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E

    2007-03-15

    The conditions during evaporation in a liquid crystal-in-ionic liquid microemulsion (LC/microEm) were estimated using the phase diagram of the system. The equations for selected tie lines were established and the coordinates calculated for the sites, at which the evaporation lines crossed the tie lines. These values combined with the coordinates for the phases connecting the tie lines were used to calculate the amounts and the composition of the fractions of the two phases present in the emulsion during the evaporation. One of the emulsion phases was a lamellar liquid crystal and high energy emulsification would lead to the liquid crystal being disrupted to form vesicles. Such a system tenders a unique opportunity to study the interaction between vesicles and normal micelles, which gradually change to inverse micelles over bi-continuous structures. The amount of vesicles in the liquid phase versus the fraction liquid crystal was calculated for two extreme cases of vesicle core size and shell thickness. The limit of evaporation while retaining the vesicle structure was calculated for emulsions of different original compositions assuming the minimum continuous liquid phase to be 50% of the emulsion. PMID:17207810

  5. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  6. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  7. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  8. Removal of pesticides from aqueous solutions using liquid membrane emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, V.M. III

    1991-12-31

    Extractive liquid membrane technology is based on a water-in-oil emulsion as the vehicle to effect separation. An aqueous internal reagent phase is emulsified into an organic phase containing a surfactant and optional complexing agents. The emulsion, presenting a large membrane surface area, is then dispersed in an aqueous continuous phase containing the species to be removed. The desired species is transferred from the continuous, phase through the organic liquid membrane and concentrated in the internal reagent phase. Extraction and stripping occur simultaneously rather than sequentially as in conventional solvent extraction. Experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of using liquid membranes to extract pesticides from rinsewaters typical of those generated by fertilizer/agrichemical dealers. A liquid membrane emulsion containing 10% NaOH as the internal reagent phase was used to extract herbicides from aqueous solution at a continuous phase:emulsion ratio of 5:1. Removals of 2,4-D, MCPA, Carbaryl, Diazinon, and Atrazine were investigated.

  9. Removal of pesticides from aqueous solutions using liquid membrane emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, V.M. III.

    1991-01-01

    Extractive liquid membrane technology is based on a water-in-oil emulsion as the vehicle to effect separation. An aqueous internal reagent phase is emulsified into an organic phase containing a surfactant and optional complexing agents. The emulsion, presenting a large membrane surface area, is then dispersed in an aqueous continuous phase containing the species to be removed. The desired species is transferred from the continuous, phase through the organic liquid membrane and concentrated in the internal reagent phase. Extraction and stripping occur simultaneously rather than sequentially as in conventional solvent extraction. Experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of using liquid membranes to extract pesticides from rinsewaters typical of those generated by fertilizer/agrichemical dealers. A liquid membrane emulsion containing 10% NaOH as the internal reagent phase was used to extract herbicides from aqueous solution at a continuous phase:emulsion ratio of 5:1. Removals of 2,4-D, MCPA, Carbaryl, Diazinon, and Atrazine were investigated.

  10. Hierarchical organization in liquid crystal-in-liquid crystal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2014-11-21

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = +0.18) and DSCG (Δn = -0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼10(4) kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering. PMID:25278032

  11. Hierarchical Organization in Liquid Crystal-in-Liquid Crystal Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Mushenheim, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4′-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = + 0.18) and DSCG (Δn = − 0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼104kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering. PMID:25278032

  12. Feasibility of Surfactant-Free Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Li, Jin; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) is an effective means to conduct liquid-liquid extraction. SELM extraction is particularly attractive for separation tasks in the microgravity environment where density difference between the solvent and the internal phase of the emulsion is inconsequential and a stable dispersion can be maintained without surfactant. In this research, dispersed two-phase flow in SELM extraction is modeled using the Lagrangian method. The results show that SELM extraction process in the microgravity environment can be simulated on earth by matching the density of the solvent and the stripping phase. Feasibility of surfactant-free SELM (SFSELM) extraction is assessed by studying the coalescence behavior of the internal phase in the absence of the surfactant. Although the contacting area between the solvent and the internal phase in SFSELM extraction is significantly less than the area provided by regular emulsion due to drop coalescence, it is comparable to the area provided by a typical hollow-fiber membrane. Thus, the stripping process is highly unlikely to become the rate-limiting step in SFSELM extraction. SFSELM remains an effective way to achieve simultaneous extraction and stripping and is able to eliminate the equilibrium limitation in the typical solvent extraction processes. The SFSELM design is similar to the supported liquid membrane design in some aspects.

  13. Stabilization of Pickering emulsions by generating complex colloidal layers at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun Ju; Son, Han Am; Cho, Jang Woo; Choi, Sang Koo; Kim, Hyun Tae; Kim, Jin Woong

    2014-01-01

    Typical Pickering emulsions accumulate particles to form a robust colloidal layer at an immiscible liquid-liquid interface. However, if the particles are smaller than tens of nanometers, they have a tendency toward coming off from the interface, thereby destabilizing emulsion drops. To solve this problem, a technique that can make the adsorbed nanoparticles stay at the interface should be developed. This study introduces a practical method that allows us to obtain a mechanically stable Pickering emulsions; n-decane was emulsified to form an oil-in-water emulsion of which interface was stabilized with a complex colloidal layer consisting of 12 nm-sized silica nanoparticles, a poly(vinyl alcohol) binder, and an alkyl-chained silane coupling agent. We have found that in the conditions of high salinity, the emulsion drops attract each other and form an emulsion gel phase. However, even in such harsh conditions, the complex silica layer maintains its original structure at the interface, thus stabilizing the emulsion drop against coalescence. PMID:24183436

  14. Emulsion-templated liquid core-polymer shell microcapsule formation.

    PubMed

    Ao, Zhuo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Jianfang; Zhang, Guangzhao; Ngai, To

    2009-03-01

    The fabrication of hollow microspheres to encapsulate functional molecules, such as drugs, insecticides, and proteins, is of ever-increasing importance. Many chemical and physicochemical methods have been tested for various specific encapsulations, but most of them have not been developed into an industrial process. In this work, we present a straightforward method to prepare liquid core-polymer shell microcapsules by first templating an oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by an interfacial monolayer of polystyrene latex particles (often referred to as "Pickering emulsion"), and subsequently locking the assembled particles into a robust polymeric shell through the precipitation of a biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) at the interface. The resultant microcapsules that have a solid polymeric enveloped around the oil droplets are stable and retain their integrity during the drying in air. Therefore, they should have great potential to serve as vehicles for encapsulating functional molecules especially hydrophobic in nature. PMID:19437681

  15. Counter current "emulsion flow" extractor for continuous liquid-liquid extraction from suspended solutions.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Nagano, Tetsushi; Noro, Junji

    2011-01-01

    A single current "emulsion flow" liquid-liquid extraction apparatus has a head with a number of holes from which micrometer-sized droplets of an aqueous phase spout into an organic phase to mix the two liquid phases. For practical use, however, a fatal problem can occur when particulate components in the aqueous phase plug the holes. In the present study, we have succeeded in solving the problem by applying a counter current-type emulsion flow extractor where micrometer-sized droplets of the organic phase are generated. PMID:21415518

  16. Controllable gas/liquid/liquid double emulsions in a dual-coaxial microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Chen, Ran; Wang, Yun-Dong; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a simple and novel approach to prepare monodispersed gas-in-oil-in-water (G/O/W) and gas-in-water-in-oil (G/W/O) double-emulsions in the same dual-coaxial microfluidic device. The effects of three phase flow rates on the sizes of microbubbles and droplets and the number of the encapsulated microbubbles were systematically studied. We successfully synthesized two different types of gas/liquid/liquid (G/L/L) double emulsions with different inner structures in the same geometry by adjusting the flow rates sequentially. Mathematical models were developed to predict the size and structures of the double emulsions. This simple approach gives a new idea for preparing hollow and porous microspheres with microbubbles as the direct core/pores templates. PMID:22508390

  17. Role of asphaltenes in stabilizing thin liquid emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Tchoukov, Plamen; Yang, Fan; Xu, Zhenghe; Dabros, Tadeusz; Czarnecki, Jan; Sjöblom, Johan

    2014-03-25

    Drainage kinetics, thickness, and stability of water-in-oil thin liquid emulsion films obtained from asphaltenes, heavy oil (bitumen), and deasphalted heavy oil (maltenes) diluted in toluene are studied. The results show that asphaltenes stabilize thin organic liquid films at much lower concentrations than maltenes and bitumen. The drainage of thin organic liquid films containing asphaltenes is significantly slower than the drainage of the films containing maltenes and bitumen. The films stabilized by asphaltenes are much thicker (40-90 nm) than those stabilized by maltenes (∼10 nm). Such significant variation in the film properties points to different stabilization mechanisms of thin organic liquid films. Apparent aging effects, including gradual increase of film thickness, rigidity of oil/water interface, and formation of submicrometer size aggregates, were observed for thin organic liquid films containing asphaltenes. No aging effects were observed for films containing maltenes and bitumen in toluene. The increasing stability and lower drainage dynamics of asphaltene-containing thin liquid films are attributed to specific ability of asphaltenes to self-assemble and form 3D network in the film. The characteristic length of stable films is well beyond the size of single asphaltene molecules, nanoaggregates, or even clusters of nanoaggregates reported in the literature. Buildup of such 3D structure modifies the rheological properties of the liquid film to be non-Newtonian with yield stress (gel like). Formation of such network structure appears to be responsible for the slower drainage of thin asphaltenes in toluene liquid films. The yield stress of liquid film as small as ∼10(-2) Pa is sufficient to stop the drainage before the film reaches the critical thickness at which film rupture occurs. PMID:24564447

  18. Influence of PEG-12 Dimethicone addition on stability and formation of emulsions containing liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Andrade, F F; Santos, O D H; Oliveira, W P; Rocha-Filho, P A

    2007-06-01

    Oil/water emulsions, containing liquid crystals, were developed employing Andiroba oil, PEG-12 Dimethicone and Crodafos CES. It was evaluated the influence of silicone surfactants on the emulsions stability and on the formation of liquid crystalline phases and therefore, physicochemical characteristics, such as rheology and zeta potential, were evaluated. Emulsions were prepared by the emulsions phase inversion method. All the formulations presented lamellar liquid crystalline phases. The PEG-12 Dimethicone addition did not change microscopically the liquid crystalline phases. The emulsions containing silicone demonstrated lower viscosity than those without the additive. This is an important feature, as the silicone did not change the rheological profile; however, the addition of silicone still can be used as a viscosity controller. The formulations had their viscosity increased 15 and 150 days after their preparation. This characteristic shows that the emulsions have their organization increased along the storing time. In the analysis of zeta potential, we could verify that all formulations presented negative values between -39.7 and -70.0 mV. Within this range of values, the emulsion physical stability is high (Fig. 10). It was concluded that the addition of PEG-12 Dimethicone kept the liquid crystalline phase of the emulsion obtained with Crodafos CES, influencing in a positive way in the system stability. PMID:18489351

  19. Liquid crystal Janus emulsion droplets: preparation, tumbling, and swimming.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Gross, Adam; Wei, Wei-Shao; Tu, Fuquan; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J; Yodh, A G

    2015-09-14

    This study introduces liquid crystal (LC) Janus droplets. We describe a process for the preparation of these droplets, which consist of nematic LC and polymer compartments. The process employs solvent-induced phase separation in emulsion droplets generated by microfluidics. The droplet morphology was systematically investigated and demonstrated to be sensitive to the surfactant concentration in the background phase, the compartment volume ratio, and the possible coalescence of multiple Janus droplets. Interestingly, the combination of a polymer and an anisotropic LC introduces new functionalities into Janus droplets, and these properties lead to unusual dynamical behaviors. The different densities and solubilities of the two compartments produce gravity-induced alignment, tumbling, and directional self-propelled motion of Janus droplets. LC Janus droplets with remarkable optical properties and dynamical behaviors thus offer new avenues for applications of Janus colloids and active soft matter. PMID:26171829

  20. Emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction of copper using a hollow-fiber contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.Y.B.; Wiencek, J.M.

    1998-03-01

    A novel extraction technique using an emulsion liquid membrane within a hollow-fiber contactor was developed and utilized to extract copper using LIX 84 extractant. Emulsion liquid membranes are capable of extracting metals from dilute waste streams to levels much below those possible by equilibrium-limited solvent extraction. Utilizing an emulsion liquid membrane within a hollow-fiber contactor retains the advantages of emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction, namely, simultaneous extraction and stripping, while eliminating problems encountered in dispersive contacting methods, such as swelling and leakage of the liquid membrane. Mathematical models for extraction in hollow-fiber contactors were developed. The models satisfactorily predict the outcome of both simple solvent extraction and emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction of copper by LIX 84 in a hollow-fiber contactor over a wide range of conditions. Emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction performs exceptionally well when the extraction is close to equilibrium limit. It is also capable of extracting a solute f/rom very dilute solutions. Stability of the liquid membrane is not crucial when used in hollow-fiber contactors; the surfactant in liquid membrane can be reduced or even eliminated without severely impairing the performance.

  1. Micro magnetofluidics: droplet manipulation of double emulsions based on paramagnetic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Misuk, Viktor; Mai, Andreas; Giannopoulos, Konstantinos; Alobaid, Falah; Epple, Bernd; Loewe, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The ability to control and manipulate discrete fluid droplets by magnetic fields offers new opportunities in microfluidics. A surfactant-free and easy to realize technique for the continuous generation of double emulsion droplets, composed of an organic solvent and a paramagnetic ionic liquid, is applied. The inner phase of the emulsion droplet consists of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with either iron, manganese, nickel or dysprosium containing anions which provide paramagnetic behaviour. The double emulsion droplets are dispersed in a continuous phase of FC-40. All substances - the organic phase, the paramagnetic ionic liquid and the continuous phase -are immiscible. The magnetic properties of ionic liquids allow, through the influence of external magnetic fields, the manipulation of individual emulsion droplets such as capture and release, rotation and distortion. Arrays of magnets allow a coalescence of emulsion droplets and their subsequent mixing by flowing through an alternating permanent magnetic field. In addition, the double emulsion droplets can be split and reunified, or continuously separated into their original phases. PMID:24108233

  2. Non-aqueous emulsions stabilized by block copolymers: application to liquid disinfectant-filled elastomeric films.

    PubMed

    Riess, Gérard; Cheymol, André; Hoerner, Pierre; Krikorian, Raffi

    2004-05-20

    The emulsifying and stabilization efficiency of polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(ter butylstyrene)-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymers is examined in non-aqueous emulsions. These emulsions are formed by a dispersion of polyethylene glycol mixed with a cationic surfactant acting as a biocide, in a continuous phase of a thermoplastic elastomer (SEBS) dissolved in methylcyclohexane. Emulsions with controlled droplet size and excellent stability could be obtained, which by solvent evaporation lead to elastomeric films containing droplets of confined disinfecting liquids. PMID:15072927

  3. Study on removal of cadmium from wastewater by emulsion liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Mortaheb, Hamid R; Kosuge, Hitoshi; Mokhtarani, Babak; Amini, Mohammad H; Banihashemi, Hamid R

    2009-06-15

    Removal of cadmium from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) is studied in the present study. A polyamine-type surfactant was used for stabilizing the emulsion phase. Tri-iso-octyl amine (TIOA) has been used as a carrier for transferring of cadmium through the membrane. The results show good performance in the separation process. To determine the optimum operation conditions, the effect of several parameters such as surfactant concentration, carrier concentration, pH of external and internal phases, oil to internal phase volume ratio, emulsion to external phase volume ratio, solvent type, solute concentration, presence of iodide and chloride in external phase, and mixing conditions have been investigated. PMID:19036507

  4. ASSESSMENT OF LIQUID EMULSION MEMBRANE FOR CLEAN UP OF AQUEOUS WASTE EFFLUENTS FROM HAZARDOUS ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    El-Reefy, Sohair A.; Selim, Y.T.; Hassan, M.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2003-02-27

    Four liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) systems are given to remove different hazardous elements such as uranium, thorium, cobalt, copper, lead, and cadmium from different aqueous waste effluents. The optimum conditions for use of these systems are deduced. The potentiality of LEM for removal of hazardous pollutants from aqueous waste solutions is given.

  5. Fertigation with liquid fish emulsion for organic production of highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid fish emulsion is a common fertilizer used for organic production of highbush blueberry. The product is often applied by hand or with a sprayer but can also be injected through a drip irrigation system, otherwise referred to as fertigation. Fertigation is more efficient and less labor-intensiv...

  6. Phase and Topological Behavior of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals in Double Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Jeong, Joonwoo; Tu, Fuquan; Lohr, Matt; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, assembled by non-covalent interactions, have fascinating temperature- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Using water-oil-water double emulsions, we are able control the inner droplet chromonic phase concentration by osmosis through the oil phase. We then study the configurations of the chromonic liquid crystal phases in droplets by varying the oil types, oil soluble surfactants, and inner droplet diameter. We employ polarization microscopy to observe resulting nematic and columnar phases of Sunset Yellow FCF, and we deduce the liquid crystal configuration of both phases within the droplets. Simulations based on Jones matrices confirm droplet appearance, and preliminary observations of chromonic liquid crystal shells in oil-water-oil double emulsions are reported. Supported by UPenn MRSEC DMR 11-20901 and NSF DMR 12-05463

  7. Application of Liquid Emulsion Membrane Technique for the Removal of As(V) from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binnal, Prakash; Hiremath, Poornima G.

    2012-08-01

    Liquid emulsion membrane technique was used to remove As(V) from synthetic aqueous solutions. The emulsion was composed of Aliquat 336 as an extractant, commercial kerosene as a diluent and Span 80 (Sorbiton monooleate) as an emulsifying agent. Different types of internal phases were used, namely, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, sodium sulphate and sodium chloride. The effect of process parameters affecting extraction efficiency, such as, initial concentration of As(V) in feed solution, pH of feed solution, concentrations of Aliquat 336 and Span 80 in membrane phase, volume ratio of stripping phase to membrane phase, concentration of internal phase, type of internal phase, volume ratio of emulsion to feed, agitation speed during extraction and time of extraction was investigated. The optimum conditions for the extraction were determined. A maximum As(V) removal rate of 97.8 was observed under optimum conditions.

  8. Optimization of cyanide extraction from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane system by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Juan Qin; Liu, Ni Na; Li, Guo Ping; Dang, Long Tao

    2016-01-01

    To solve the disposal problem of cyanide wastewater, removal of cyanide from wastewater using a water-in-oil emulsion type of emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was studied in this work. Specifically, the effects of surfactant Span-80, carrier trioctylamine (TOA), stripping agent NaOH solution and the emulsion-to-external-phase-volume ratio on removal of cyanide were investigated. Removal of total cyanide was determined using the silver nitrate titration method. Regression analysis and optimization of the conditions were conducted using the Design-Expert software and response surface methodology (RSM). The actual cyanide removals and the removals predicted using RSM analysis were in close agreement, and the optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: the volume fraction of Span-80, 4% (v/v); the volume fraction of TOA, 4% (v/v); the concentration of NaOH, 1% (w/v); and the emulsion-to-external-phase volume ratio, 1:7. Under the optimum conditions, the removal of total cyanide was 95.07%, and the RSM predicted removal was 94.90%, with a small exception. The treatment of cyanide wastewater using an ELM is an effective technique for application in industry. PMID:27533852

  9. Extraction of anionic dye from aqueous solutions by emulsion liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Dâas, Attef; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2010-06-15

    In this work, the extraction of Congo red (CR), an anionic disazo direct dye, from aqueous solutions by emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was investigated. The important operational parameters governing emulsion stability and extraction behavior of dye were studied. The extraction of CR was influenced by a number of variables such as surfactant concentration, stirring speed, acid concentration in the feed solution and volume ratios of internal phase to organic phase and of emulsion to feed solution. Under most favorable conditions, practically all the CR molecules present in the feed phase were extracted even in the presence of salt (NaCl). At the optimum experimental conditions, total removal of antharaquinonic dye Acid Blue 25 was attained after only 10 min. Influence of sodium carbonate concentration as internal receiving phase on the stripping efficiency of CR was examined. The best sodium carbonate concentration in the internal phase that conducted to excellent stripping efficiency (>99%) and emulsion stability was 0.1N. The membrane recovery was total and the permeation of CR was not decreased up to seven runs. ELM process is a promising alternative to conventional methods and should increase awareness of the potential for recovery of anionic dyes. PMID:20211520

  10. 4-nitrophenol removal from aqueous solutions by emulsion liquid membranes using type I facilitation.

    PubMed

    León, G; Guzmán, M A; Miguel, B

    2013-01-01

    Nitrophenols are common organic pollutants that enter the environment during the manufacture and processing of a variety of industrial products. The removal of 4-nitrophenol (4NP) from aqueous solutions by emulsion liquid membranes using the type I facilitated transport mechanism is investigated in this paper. The liquid membrane consisted of kerosene as the organic diluent, sorbitan monooleate as the emulsifying agent and sodium hydroxide as the stripping agent. The most important operational variables governing the emulsion stability and the 4NP removal process--such as the stripper agent and surfactant concentrations, the volume ratios of membrane phase/internal phase and emulsion phase/feed phase and stirring speed - were studied and the optimal conditions of the removal process were experimentally determined. Apparent initial permeabilities of the transport process in the different operational conditions were also obtained. Ninety-eight per cent of4NP was removed in 10 minutes and an apparent initial permeability of 1.2986 min(-1) was obtained in those optimal conditions. PMID:24350486

  11. Water-in-water emulsions stabilized by non-amphiphilic interactions: polymer-dispersed lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Sejwal, Preeti; Gerecht, Ryan B; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2007-01-30

    Emulsion systems involving surfactants are mainly driven by the separation of the hydrophobic interactions of the aliphatic chains from the hydrophilic interactions of amphiphilic molecules in water. In this study, we report an emulsion system that does not include amphiphilic molecules but molecules with functional groups that are completely solvated in water. These functional groups give rise to molecular interactions including hydrogen bonding, pi stacking, and salt bridging and are segregated into a dispersion of droplets forming a water-in-water emulsion. This water-in-water emulsion consists of dispersing droplets of a water-solvated biocompatible liquid crystal--disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)--in a continuous aqueous solution containing specific classes of water-soluble polymers. Whereas aqueous solutions of polyols support the formation of emulsions of spherical droplets consisting of lyotropic liquid crystal DSCG with long-term stability (for at least 30 days), aqueous solutions of polyamides afford droplets of DSCG in the shape of prolate ellipsoids that are stable for only 2 days. The DSCG liquid crystal in spherical droplets assumes a radial configuration in which the optical axis of the liquid crystal aligns perpendicular to the surface of the droplets but assumes a tangential configuration in prolate ellipsoids in which the optical axis of the liquid crystal aligns parallel to the surface of the droplet. Other classes of water-soluble polymers including polyethers, polycations, and polyanions do not afford a stable emulsion of DSCG droplets. Both the occurrence and the stability of this unique emulsion system can be rationalized on the basis of the functional groups of the polymer. The different configurations of the liquid crystal (DSCG) droplets were also found to correlate with the strength of the hydrogen bonding that can be formed by the functional groups on the polymer. PMID:17241072

  12. Liquid clay emulsion--alternate daily cover and erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Martell, L.

    1995-12-31

    Formula 480 Biodegradable Clay Based Product, developed in 1985, is a non-toxic liquid bentonite clay product that comes in concentrate form for dilution with water and/or leachate. The concentrate allows this product y to be used for erosion and dust control, grass seeding, as well as a daily or intermediate cover for landfills. It inhibits the activities of birds and vectors, while controlling dust, erosion, odor, and blowing debris. By varying the dilution of Formula 480, the product can be set up from porous and flexible, to durable and waterproof. Having a clay base, high cation exchange capacity offers nutrient stabilization for grass seeding. When using leachate for product dilution, it will percolate, waterproof, and be recycled back into the surface as a solid. The product is economical at $.03 to $.08/sq.ft., depending on thickness of application, smoothness of surface or compaction ratio. Application is done with a self-contained sprayer developed specifically for Formula 480. It can be sprayed with a high volume handgun or an economical and efficient spray boom. This product is cleared for use in over 15 states and is currently being used on hazardous and non-hazardous fills throughout the U.S. and Germany. Ease of application, economy, and effectiveness warrants people to look at this product for many uses.

  13. Recovery of kraft lignin from pulping wastewater via emulsion liquid membrane process.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Zing-Yi; Harruddin, Norlisa; Othman, Norasikin

    2015-01-01

    Kraft lignin (KL) is a renewable source of many valuable intermediate biochemical products currently derived from petroleum. An excessive of lignin comes from pulping wastewater caused an adverse pollution problems hence affecting human and aquatic life. A comprehensive study pertaining to emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) extraction of lignin from pulping wastewater was presented. ELM formulation contains Aliquat 336 as carrier, kerosene as diluent, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 ) as stripping agent and Span 80 as surfactant. The emulsion stability was investigated at different surfactant concentrations, homogenizer speed and emulsification time. Modifier (2-ethyl-1-hexanol) was added to avoid segregation of third phase while improving the emulsion stability. At optimum conditions, 95% and 56% of lignin were extracted and recovered, respectively at 10 min of extraction time, 0.007 M of Aliquat 336, 0.1 M of NaHCO3 and 1:5 of treat ratio. Additional of modifier was contributed to highest recovery up to 98%. The ELM process was found to be equally feasible and quite effective in the recovery of KL from real pulping wastewater. Therefore, ELM process provides a promising alternative technology to recover KL from pulping wastewater while solving the environmental problems simultaneously. PMID:26101101

  14. Development of a Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane System for Propionic Acid Separation in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Perstractive fermentation is a good way to increase the productivity of bioreactors. Using Propionibacteria as the model system, the feasibility of using supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) for perstractive fermentation is assessed in this study. Five industrial solvents were considered as the solvent for preparing the SELM. The more polar a solvent is, the higher the partition coefficient. However, toxicity of a solvent also increases with its polarity. CO-1055 (industrial decanol/octanol blend) has the highest partition coefficient toward propionic acid among the solvents that has no molecular toxicity toward Propionibacteria. A preliminary extraction study was conducted using tetradecane as solvent in a hydrophobic hollow fiber contactor. The result confirmed that SELM eliminates the equilibrium limitation of conventional liquid-liquid extraction, and allows the use of a non-toxic solvent with low partition coefficient.

  15. Bursting of Dilute Emulsion-Based Liquid Sheets Driven by a Marangoni Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernay, Clara; Ramos, Laurence; Ligoure, Christian

    2015-11-01

    We study the destabilization mechanism of thin liquid sheets expanding in air and show that dilute oil-in-water emulsion-based sheets disintegrate through the nucleation and growth of holes that perforate the sheet. The velocity and thickness fields of the sheet outside the holes are not perturbed by holes, and hole opening follows the Taylor-Culick law. We find that a prehole, which widens and thins out the sheet with time, systematically precedes the hole nucleation. The growth dynamics of the prehole follows the law theoretically predicted for a liquid spreading on another liquid of higher surface tension due to Marangoni stresses. Classical Marangoni spreading experiments quantitatively corroborate our findings.

  16. Rheology of a viscoelastic emulsion with a liquid crystalline polymer dispersed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.S.; Denn, M.M. |

    1999-11-01

    The steady-shear viscosity and first normal stress difference and the dynamic storage and loss moduli have been measured for a blend consisting of a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer dispersed in a thermoplastic fluoropolymer matrix. The components are immiscible and nonreacting. Consistency with the Palierne emulsion theory for viscoelastic blends is possible if and only if the interfacial tension contribution is negligible for droplets that are comparable in size to a liquid crystalline domain or smaller, while retaining the effect for larger droplets. Steady shear results are approximately described by the scaling of the Doi{endash}Ohta theory, but there is a significant reduction in the excess shear stress over a finite shear-rate range for the lowest concentration, which contains the smallest droplets. {copyright} {ital 1999 Society of Rheology.}

  17. Biopolymer-based structuring of liquid oil into soft solids and oleogels using water-continuous emulsions as templates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashok R; Rajarethinem, Pravin S; Cludts, Nick; Lewille, Benny; De Vos, Winnok H; Lesaffer, Ans; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-02-24

    Physical trapping of a hydrophobic liquid oil in a matrix of water-soluble biopolymers was achieved using a facile two-step process by first formulating a surfactant-free oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by biopolymers (a protein and a polysaccharide) followed by complete removal of the water phase (by either high- or low-temperature drying of the emulsion) resulting in structured solid systems containing a high concentration of liquid oil (above 97 wt %). The microstructure of these systems was revealed by confocal and cryo-scanning electron microscopy, and the effect of biopolymer concentrations on the consistency of emulsions as well as the dried product was evaluated using a combination of small-amplitude oscillatory shear rheometry and large deformation fracture studies. The oleogel prepared by shearing the dried product showed a high gel strength as well as a certain degree of thixotropic recovery even at high temperatures. Moreover, the reversibility of the process was demonstrated by shearing the dried product in the presence of water to obtain reconstituted emulsions with rheological properties comparable to those of the fresh emulsion. PMID:25133865

  18. Recovery of uranium from dilute solution using liquid emulsion membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Ghosh, S.K.; Juvekar, V.A.

    2008-07-01

    The liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) technique has great potential for application in the nuclear industry for large interfacial area, low consumption of organics, and high recovery from dilute streams. A LEM system composed DEHPA-kerosene-SPAN80-HNO{sub 3} has been developed for recovery of uranium from dilute nitrate solution, which gives 98% extraction and 88% stripping in a single stage. An attempt has been made to understand the mechanism of the LEM process, in which phenomena like per-traction, occlusion, swelling, and leakage occur simultaneously. The effect of various parameters on these phenomena has been described with a mathematical model, which is able to explain the experimental findings. (authors)

  19. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  20. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  1. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan E; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M=Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  2. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  3. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  4. A new emulsion liquid membrane based on a palm oil for the extraction of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Björkegren, Sanna; Karimi, Rose Fassihi; Martinelli, Anna; Jayakumar, Natesan Subramanian; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic diluent such as palm oil. The membrane phase so formulated includes the mobile carrier tri-n-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC), to facilitate the metal transport, and the hydrophilic surfactant Tween 80 to facilitate the dispersion of the ELM phase in the aqueous solution. Span 80 is used as surfactant and butanol as co-surfactant. Our results demonstrate that this novel ELM formulation, using the vegetable palm oil as diluent, is useful for the removal of hexavalent chromium with an efficiency of over 99% and is thus competitive with the already existing, yet less environmentally friendly, ELM formulations. This result was achieved with an optimal concentration of 0.1 M NaOH as stripping agent and an external phase pH of 0.5. Different water qualities have also been investigated showing that the type of water (deionized, distilled, or tap water) does not significantly influence the extraction rate. PMID:25915191

  5. A New Emulsion Liquid Membrane Based on a Palm Oil for the Extraction of Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Sanna; Fassihi Karimi, Rose; Martinelli, Anna; Jayakumar, Natesan Subramanian; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic diluent such as palm oil. The membrane phase so formulated includes the mobile carrier tri-n-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC), to facilitate the metal transport, and the hydrophilic surfactant Tween 80 to facilitate the dispersion of the ELM phase in the aqueous solution. Span 80 is used as surfactant and butanol as co-surfactant. Our results demonstrate that this novel ELM formulation, using the vegetable palm oil as diluent, is useful for the removal of hexavalent chromium with an efficiency of over 99% and is thus competitive with the already existing, yet less environmentally friendly, ELM formulations. This result was achieved with an optimal concentration of 0.1 M NaOH as stripping agent and an external phase pH of 0.5. Different water qualities have also been investigated showing that the type of water (deionized, distilled, or tap water) does not significantly influence the extraction rate. PMID:25915191

  6. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  7. Water transport in water-in-oil-in-water liquid emulsion membrane system for the separation of lactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Y.S.; Lee, W.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Liquid emulsion membranes (LEMs) were applied to the separation of lactic acid from an aqueous feed phase, and water transport (swelling) was investigated during the separation. Considering that as lactic acid was extracted into the internal stripping phase, osmotic pressure difference across the membrane was varied, the water transfer coefficient was evaluated. The water transfer coefficient was larger at higher carrier concentration and initial lactic acid concentration, which means that emulsion swelling can also be mediated by solute/carrier complexes although it is, in general, osmotically induced. The appropriate LEM formulation was given for separation and concentration of lactic acid. If both separation and concentration are desired, evidently emulsion swelling should be considered in conjunction with the transport rate of lactic acid. It was observed that the separated solute concentration in the internal phase was lowered due to swelling during the operation. Nevertheless, lactic acid could be concentrated in the internal phase more than 6 times in specific conditions, indicating that as the volume ratio of external phase to internal phase is increased, a still higher concentration in the internal phase can be obtained. 22 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Penicillin G extraction from model media using an emulsion liquid membrane: a theoretical model of product decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, K H; Lee, S C; Lee, W K

    1994-04-01

    To confirm the applicability for the extraction of penicillin G by an emulsion liquid membrane (ELM), the degree of decomposition of penicillin G during extraction was theoretically calculated. Decomposition was less than 1% provided that the initial sodium carbonate concentration in the internal phase was correctly determined, which proved the applicability of the ELM process. The procedure to determine the initial carbonate concentration in the internal phase was also described in order that the pH in the internal phase should be within the relatively stable range for penicillin G at the end of the extraction. PMID:7764816

  9. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  10. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  11. Equilibrium orientations of non-spherical and chemically anisotropic particles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the effect on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Nicholas; Bon, Stefan A F

    2015-06-15

    The effective stabilization of emulsions by solid particles, a phenomenon known as Pickering stabilization, is well known to be highly dependent on the wettability and the adhesion energy of the stabilizer employed at the liquid-liquid interface. We present a user-friendly computational model that can be used to determine equilibrium orientations and the adhesion energy of colloidal particles at interfaces. The model determines the free energy profile of particle adsorption at liquid-liquid interfaces using a triangular tessellation scheme. We demonstrate the use of the model, using a variety of anisotropic particles and demonstrate its ability to predict and explain experimental observations of particle behaviour at interfaces. In particular, we show that the concept of hydrophilic lipophilic balance commonly applied to molecular surfactants is insufficient to explain the complexity of the activity of colloidal particles at interfaces. In addition, we show the importance of the knowledge of the free energy adsorption profile of single particles at interfaces and the impact on overall free energy of emulsification of packed ensembles of particles. The delicate balance between optimization of adhesion energy, adsorption dynamics and particle packing is shown to be of great importance in the formation of thermodynamically stable emulsions. In order to use the model, the code is implemented by freely available software that can be readily deployed on personal computers. PMID:25792476

  12. Effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures in emulsions on dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone, salicylic acid and octadecenedioic acid.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Dederen, J C; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures on the dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC). Emulsions containing liquid crystalline phases were compared with an emulsion without liquid crystals. Skin permeation experiments were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells and human abdominal skin dermatomed to a thickness of 400 mum. The results indicate that emulsifiers arranging in liquid crystalline structures in the water phase of the emulsion enhanced the skin penetration of the active ingredients with the exception of SA. SA showed a different pattern of percutaneous absorption, and no difference in dermal and transdermal delivery was observed between the emulsions with and without liquid crystalline phases. The increase in skin penetration of HQ and DIOIC could be attributed to an increased partitioning of the actives into the skin. It was hypothesized that the interaction between the different emulsifiers and active ingredients in the formulations varied and, therefore, the solubilization capacities of the various emulsifiers and their association structures. PMID:20484969

  13. Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide: modeling the deep ocean release of a dense emulsion of liquid Co2-in-water stabilized by pulverized limestone particles.

    PubMed

    Golomb, D; Pennell, S; Ryan, D; Barry, E; Swett, P

    2007-07-01

    The release into the deep ocean of an emulsion of liquid carbon dioxide-in-seawater stabilized by fine particles of pulverized limestone (CaCO3) is modeled. The emulsion is denser than seawater, hence, it will sink deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration period. Also, the presence of CaCO3 will partially buffer the carbonic acid that results when the emulsion eventually disintegrates. The distance that the plume sinks depends on the density stratification of the ocean, the amount of the released emulsion, and the entrainment factor. When released into the open ocean, a plume containing the CO2 output of a 1000 MW(el) coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe into a valley on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as far because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the valley. A practical system is described involving a static mixer for the in situ creation of the CO2/seawater/pulverized limestone emulsion. The creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5 tons per ton of liquid CO2. That increases the cost of ocean sequestration by about $13/ ton of CO2 sequestered. However, the additional cost may be compensated by the savings in transportation costs to greater depth, and because the release of an emulsion will not acidify the seawater around the release point. PMID:17695916

  14. Interaction forces in thin liquid films stabilized by hydrophobically modified inulin polymeric surfactant. 2. Emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Exerowa, D; Gotchev, G; Kolarov, T; Khristov, Khr; Levecke, B; Tadros, Th

    2007-02-13

    The interaction forces in emulsion films stabilized using hydrophobically modified inulin (INUTEC SP1) were investigated by measuring the disjoining pressure of a microscopic horizontal film between two macroscopic emulsion drops of isoparaffinic oil (Isopar M). A special measuring cell was used for this purpose whereby the disjoining pressure Pi was measured as a function of the equivalent film thickness hw. The latter was determined using an interferometric method. In this way Pi-hw curves were established at a constant INUTEC SP1 concentration of 2x10(-5) mol.dm-3 and at various NaCl concentrations. At a constant disjoining pressure of 36 Pa, a constant temperature of 22 degrees C, and a film radius of 100 microm, hw decreased with an increase in the NaCl concentration, Cel, and reached a constant value of 11 nm at Cel=5x10(-2) mol.dm-3. This reduction in film thickness is due to the compression of the electrical double layer, and at the above critical NaCl concentration any electrostatic repulsion is removed and only steric interaction remains. This critical electrolyte concentration represents the transition from electrostatic to steric interaction. At a NaCl concentration of 2x10(-4) mol.dm-3 the Pi-hw isotherms showed a gradual decrease in hw with an increase in capillary pressure, after which there was a jump in hw from approximately 30 to approximately 7.2 nm when Pi reached a high value of 2-5.5 kPa. This jump is due to the formation of a Newton black film (NBF), giving a layer thickness of the polyfructose loops of approximately 3.6 nm. The film thickness did not change further when the pressure reached 45 kPa, indicating the high stability of the film. Pi-hw isotherms were obtained at various NaCl concentrations, namely, 5x10(-2), 5x10(-1), 1.0, and 2.0 mol.dm-3. The initial thicknesses are within the range 9-11 nm, after which a transition zone starts, corresponding to a pressure of about 0.5 kPa. In this zone all films transform to an NBF with a jump

  15. In vitro oxidation of i.v. lipid emulsions in different all-in-one admixture bags assessed by an iodometric assay and gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Steger, P J; Mühlebach, S F

    1997-02-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) of intravenous (IV) lipid emulsions can peroxidize to potentially harmful lipid hydroperoxides. In order to assess in vitro peroxidation of IV fat emulsions in all-in-one (AIO) admixture bags, an iodometric titration to determine lipid hydroperoxide content expressed by the peroxide value (PV) and a gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) assay to determine changes of the FA pattern were established. A long-chain triglyceride (LCT) and medium-chain triglyceride-LCT emulsion were compared for the PV and the pH during storage at room temperature and daylight in AIO bags made of ethylvinylacetate (EVA) and polypropylene:polyamide 7:3 (V90). In contrast to storage in glass bottles, significant peroxidation was detected in both emulsions with 0.5-3.4 mmol peroxides/L after 28 d (150 times the control PV). A pH drop of at least 0.3 (EVA) and 1.2 (V90) units was measured. Initial PVs and peroxidation kinetics of the emulsions were different; V90 material showed better barrier properties against oxygen. PV was increased by higher temperature and light exposure. The FA pattern of an LCT emulsion with a PV > 6 (storage: 40 degrees C in a dark room for 28 d in AIO bags) assayed by GLC remained unchanged. The iodometric peroxide and the GLC assay were reproducible and easy to handle. Only the iodometric method was sensitive enough to detect peroxidation effects (detection limit: 0.02 mmol peroxides/L). IV fat emulsions can be checked for lipid hydroperoxide content with the rapid iodometric assay to guarantee optimal quality of IV lipids used for AIO admixtures. To prevent peroxidation, lipids in AIO bags should be stored light-protected in a refrigerator an oxygen-tight overwrap is mandatory for extended periods. PMID:9106791

  16. Removal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and ketoprofen from water by emulsion liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Dâas, Attef; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the removal of the worldwide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (IBP) and ketoprofen (KTP) by emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was carried out. An ELM system is made up of hexane as diluent, Span 80 as the surfactant and sodium carbonate as the inner aqueous solution. Effect of experimental conditions that affect the extraction of IBP such as surfactant concentration, emulsification time, sulfuric acid concentration in external phase, acid type in external phase, internal phase concentration, type of internal phase, stirring speed, volume ratio of internal phase to membrane phase, treatment ratio, IBP initial concentration, diluent type and salt was investigated. The obtained results showed that by appropriate selection of the operational parameters, it was possible to extract nearly all of IBP molecules from the feed solution even in the presence of high concentration of salt. Under optimum operating conditions, the efficiencies of IBP removal from distilled water (99.3 %), natural mineral water (97.3 %) and sea water (94.0 %) were comparable, which shows that the ELM treatment process represents a very interesting advanced separation process for the removal of IBP from complex matrices such as natural and sea waters. Under the optimized experimental conditions, approximately 97.4 % KTP was removed in less than 20 min of contact time. PMID:24037298

  17. Effects of layer order on the mobility of mesogenic molecules in SmA liquid-crystalline emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Shinji; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun

    2016-03-01

    We fabricate smectic-A liquid-crystalline emulsions (SmA-LCEs) in which monodisperse 8CB-swollen micelles are dispersed in water. Synchrotron X-ray measurements reveal that the correlation length of the layer order in LCEs cannot diverge at the nematic (N)-SmA transition, and the saturated length linearly increases with the increase in the diameter of LC-swollen micelles. Moreover, we investigate the permeation of 7CB N molecules into 8CB SmA-LCEs by measuring the enhancement of the depolarized light scattering intensity due to the shift of the SmA-N phase transition, and confirm that the layer order suppresses the mobility of LC molecules in LCEs similar to the bulk state of SmA LCs. The mobility drastically accelerates near the SmA-N transition temperature due to the continuous extinction of the smectic layer order. The slow permeation process of 7CB is also confirmed via synchrotron X-ray diffraction examining the shrinkage of the smectic layer repeat distance, caused by intercalation of 7CB.

  18. Phase behavior and rheological analysis of reverse liquid crystals and W/I2 and W/H2 gel emulsions using an amphiphilic block copolymer.

    PubMed

    May, Anna; Aramaki, Kenji; Gutiérrez, José María

    2011-03-15

    This article reports the phase behavior determi-nation of a system forming reverse liquid crystals and the formation of novel disperse systems in the two-phase region. The studied system is formed by water, cyclohexane, and Pluronic L-121, an amphiphilic block copolymer considered of special interest due to its aggregation and structural properties. This system forms reverse cubic (I2) and reverse hexagonal (H2) phases at high polymer concentrations. These reverse phases are of particular interest since in the two-phase region, stable high internal phase reverse emulsions can be formed. The characterization of the I2 and H2 phases and of the derived gel emulsions was performed with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and rheometry, and the influence of temperature and water content was studied. The H2 phase experimented a thermal transition to an I2 phase when temperature was increased, which presented an Fd3m structure. All samples showed a strong shear thinning behavior from low shear rates. The elastic modulus (G') in the I2 phase was around 1 order of magnitude higher than in the H2 phase. G' was predominantly higher than the viscous modulus (G''). In the gel emulsions, G' was nearly frequency-independent, indicating their gel type nature. Contrarily to water-in-oil (W/O) normal emulsions, in W/I2 and W/H2 gel emulsions, G', the complex viscosity (|η*|), and the yield stress (τ0) decreased with increasing water content, since the highly viscous microstructure of the continuous phase was responsible for the high viscosity and elastic behavior of the emulsions, instead of the volume fraction of dispersed phase and droplet size. A rheological analysis, in which the cooperative flow theory, the soft glass rheology model, and the slip plane model were analyzed and compared, was performed to obtain one single model that could describe the non-Maxwellian behavior of both reverse phases and highly concentrated emulsions and to characterize their microstructure with

  19. Recovery of synthetic dye from simulated wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane process containing tri-dodecyl amine as a mobile carrier.

    PubMed

    Othman, N; Zailani, S N; Mili, N

    2011-12-30

    The extraction of Red 3BS reactive dye from aqueous solution was studied using emulsion liquid membrane (ELM). ELM is one of the processes that have very high potential in treating industrial wastewater consisting of dyes. In this research, Red 3BS reactive dye was extracted from simulated wastewater using tridodecylamine (TDA) as the carrier agent, salicyclic acid (SA) to protonate TDA, sodium chloride as the stripping agent, kerosene as the diluent and SPAN 80 as emulsifier. Experimental parameters investigated were salicyclic acid concentration, extraction time, SPAN 80 concentration, sodium chloride concentration, TDA concentration, agitation speed, homogenizer speed, emulsifying time and treat ratio. The results show almost 100% of Red 3BS was removed and stripped in the receiving phase at the optimum condition in this ELM system. High voltage coalesce was applied to break the emulsion hence, enables recovery of Red 3BS in the receiving phase. PMID:22023906

  20. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  1. Separation study of cadmium through an emulsion liquid membrane using triisooctylamine as mobile carrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Q M; Liu, Q; Zhang, Q F; Wei, X J; Guo, J Z

    1998-08-01

    A study of the transport of Cd(2+) ions through a triisooctylamine (TIOA)-sorbitan monooleate (Span 80)-dimethylbenzene liquid membrane has been performed with varying concentrations of HCl, KI, TIOA, Span 80 and NaOH in the feed, membrane and stripping solutions. Maximum transport was observed with 0.025 M HCl, 0.01 M KI, 0.02 M TIOA, 3% (w/v) Span 80 and 0.05 M NaOH. With this system cadmium could be completely separated with Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+) and Al(3+). The transport mechanism of this metal ions through the membrane has been discussed. PMID:18967215

  2. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  3. Water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yee; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2013-07-26

    A novel sample preparation method, "water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (WLSEME)", coupled with gas chromatography using an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was developed for the analysis of the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), heptachlor, α-endosulfan, 4,4-DDE, 2,4-DDD and endrin, in aqueous samples. A microsyringe is used to withdrew and discharge 10-12μL of the extraction solvent and 60-120μL of water as the dispersed solvent (containing 1mgL(-1), Tween 80) 4 times within 10s to form a cloudy emulsified solution in the syringe. This is then injected into an 8mL aqueous sample spiked with all above OCPs. Dodecyl acetate and 2-dodecanol were both selected as extraction solvents to optimize their conditions separately. The total extraction time was about 0.5min. Under optimum conditions, using dodecyl acetate (12μL) as extraction solvent, the linear range of the method was 10-1000ngL(-1) for all OCPs, and the the limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 1 to 5ngL(-1). The absolute recoveries and relative recoveries were from 20.8 to 43.5% and 83.2 to 109.8% for lake water, and 19.9-49.2% and 85.4-115.9% for seawater respectively. In the second method, 2-dodecanol as extraction solvent, the linear range was from 5 to 5000ngL(-1) for the target compounds, and the LODs were between 0.5 and 2ngL(-1). The absolute recoveries and relative recoveries ranged from 25.7 to 42.2% and 96.3-111.2% for sea water, and 22.4-41.9% and 90.7-107.9% for stream water. This could solve several problems, which commonly occur in ultrasound-assisted emulsification micro-extraction (USAEME), dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) and other assisted emulsification methods. These problems include analyte degradation, increased solubility of the extraction solvent and analyte, and high toxicity and large volume of the organic solvent used. PMID:23566919

  4. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods. PMID:25865459

  5. Research News

    MedlinePlus

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  6. High-internal-phase-emulsion polymeric monolith coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for enrichment and sensitive detection of trace cytokinins in plant samples.

    PubMed

    Du, Fuyou; Sun, Lin; Zhen, Xian; Nie, Honggang; Zheng, Yanjie; Ruan, Guihua; Li, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    High-internal-phase-emulsion polymers (polyHIPEs) show great promise as solid-phase-extraction (SPE) materials because of the tremendous porosity and highly interconnected framework afforded by the high-internal-phase-emulsion (HIPE) technique. In this work, polyHIPE monolithic columns as novel SPE materials were prepared and applied to trace enrichment of cytokinins (CKs) from complex plant samples. The polyHIPE monoliths were synthesized via the in-situ polymerization of the continuous phase of a HIPE containing styrene (STY) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in a stainless column, and revealed highly efficient and selective enrichment ability for aromatic compounds. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a method using a monolithic polyHIPE column combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and sensitive determination of trans-zeatin (tZ), meta-topolin (mT), kinetin (K), and kinetin riboside (KR). The proposed method had good linearity, with correlation coefficients (R (2)) from 0.9957 to 0.9984, and low detection limits (LODs, S/N = 3) in the range 2.4-47 pg mL(-1) for the four CKs. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CKs in real plant samples, and obtained good recoveries ranging from 68.8 % to 103.0 % and relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 16 %. PMID:26025552

  7. Strong stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate emulsion by ovalbumin: gaining insight into the mechanism of 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' processes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan E; Leiterer, Jork; Pipich, Vitaliy; Barrea, Raul; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-08-17

    The impact of the ovo proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme--present in the first stage of egg shell formation--on the homogeneous formation of the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate (LACC) precursor, was studied by a combination of complementing methods: in situ WAXS, SANS, XANES, TEM, and immunogold labeling. Lysozyme (pI = 9.3) destabilizes the LACC emulsion whereas the glycoprotein ovalbumin (pI = 4.7) extends the lifespan of the emulsified state remarkably. In the light of the presented data: (a) Ovalbumin is shown to behave commensurable to the 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' (PILP) process proposed by Gower et al. Ovalbumin can be assumed to take a key role during eggshell formation where it serves as an effective stabilization agent for transient precursors and prevents undirected mineralization of the eggshell. (b) It is further shown that the emulsified LACC carries a negative surface charge and is electrostatically stabilized. (c) We propose that the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate is affected by polymers by depletion stabilization and de-emulsification rather than 'induced' by acidic proteins and polymers during a so-called polymer-induced liquid-precursor process. The original PILP coating effect, first reported by Gower et al., appears to be a result of a de-emulsification process of a stabilized LACC phase. The behavior of the liquid amorphous carbonate phase and the polymer-induced liquid-precursor phase itself can be well described by colloid chemical terms: electrostatic and depletion stabilization and de-emulsification by depletion destabilization. PMID:21736300

  8. Coal desulfurization during the combustion of coal/oil/water emulsions: an economic alternative clean liquid fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the Phase II results of a combustion program designed to assess the feasibility of utilizing coal/oil/water (COW) emulsions as a fuel for fire tube package boilers. Also examined was the effect of the addition of alkaline absorbents to the fuel for sulfur dioxide capture. Presented are the findings of testing involving optimizing sulfur dioxide removal while still maintaining a rheologically favorable fuel. Overall performance of COW as a boiler fuel was evaluated over long term operation. Emphasis was placed on burner design as well as coal characteristics. Three different bituminous coals were used during this program. Results indicate that COW emulsions may be a feasible alternative for oil in industrial fire tube boilers if the major problem, deposition buildup, can be resolved. This appears possible with a proper soot blower design. Soda ash is a viable means for obtaining at least 80% removal, using a 1:1 molar ratio. However, the deposition problem with soda ash indicated that stack injection may be a more feasible approach.

  9. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G H; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  10. Double emulsions in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannacci, Nicolas; Lockhart, Thibaut; Willaime, Hervé; Tabeling, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Double emulsions (emulsion of two liquids dispersed in a third liquid phase) are widely used in cosmetics, medicine or food industry. We are interested in producing very well controlled double emulsions in a microfluidic device and predicting the morphology (complete engulfing, non-engulfing or partial engulfing called ``janus'') from classical energetic considerations. We use a double flow focusing geometry with a 100 micrometers cross section for the PDMS microsystem. We compare theoretical and experimental morphologies flowing thirty triplets of immiscible fluids. We observe quite a good agreement and show that microfluidic technology may permit to get non standard objects.

  11. New insight into microgel-stabilized emulsions using transmission X-ray microscopy: nonuniform deformation and arrangement of microgels at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Karen; Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Richtering, Walter

    2015-01-13

    Microgel-covered interfaces, e.g., in emulsions, have attracted much interest lately. Different imaging techniques have been used to image these interfaces, either flat or curved, to investigate their properties and appearance. Techniques such as cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and confocal microscopy have provided valuable insight into microgel-covered systems but still have some disadvantages such as part of the microgels being trapped in vitrified liquid or the need for fluorescent markers. Some of these disadvantages can be overcome by using transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), which has the advantage of allowing the investigation of adsorbed and free microgels simultaneously. We used TXM to acquire tomographic image series of microgel-covered droplets and calculated 3D reconstructions from these image stacks. As a result, we could show that microgels deform anisotropically and penetrate the oil droplets in the hydrated state. Additionally, 3D reconstruction gives an idea of the arrangement of microgels adsorbed to oil droplets and reveals that droplet stabilization is possible without full coverage of the interface with polymer segments. PMID:25496214

  12. Self-Assembly of Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles into Hierarchically Patterned Porous Architectures using Ionic Liquid/Oil Emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shenghu; Ma, Zhen; Baker, Gary A; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Zhu, Qing; Luo, Huimin; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Hierarchically patterned macroporous TiO2 structures can be fabricated via the spontaneous self-assembly of TiO2 nanoparticles prepared using a mixture of 1-octadecene (ODE) and an ODE-immiscible 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquid as the reaction medium. A study of the influence of side chain lengths of ionic liquids (n = 4, 8, or 16) reveals that this parameter can be further used to fine-tune the morphologies of the products. This synthetic methodology can also be extended to the formation of patterned macroporous ZrO2 and Fe3O4 structures. Finally, the potential reasons for the formation of hierarchical structures are discussed and the implications to further research are proposed.

  13. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  14. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  15. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  16. Emulsions on demand using microsturctured devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahe, Christian; Tranchant, Jean Francois; Tromeur, Melanie; Schwesinger, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    Emulsions are very common in the field of cosmetics. Unfortunately, most emulsions contain ineffective substances to increase the stability of the products for a long time. These stabilizers can cause some severe healthy problems in several cases. One possible solution is the production of emulsions on demand to prevent the use of stabilizers. Stable emulsion can be achieved if the diameters of the droplets of one solution surrounded by a second solution are smaller than 1μm. Microstructured devices are suited in principle to generate such droplet distributions. Basic task of the development was a micro emulsifier that can be integrated into cosmetic flacons and that can deliver emulsions on demand by pressing a human fingertip onto a part of the flacon. Standardized cosmetic flacons have been used as basic devices. They consist of two separate glass bottles for two different liquid phases and two mechanical pumps integrated in a multifunctional cap. Regarding the viscosity ranges of the two liquids different microemulsifier structures have been developed. External dimensions and connections of the device have been chosen in a way that allows an integration of the devices into the cap. The second design conists of several streaming paths in parallel that allow a reduction of the pressure drop. Furthermore, it consists of three structured silicon chips bonded together. Emulsions with a stability of about 15-30 min have been achieved without any stabilizers. External forces of less than 10N were sufficient to generate emulsions on demand.

  17. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  18. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  19. Recent Emulsion Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, A.

    2011-10-06

    Emulsion technologies are very much developed in the last decade and still developing in both the emulsion gel and the data taking. Emulsion detectors are suitable for the neutrino experiments because they can distinguish all 3 flavors of neutrino. The OPERA experiment, a recent pillar in the emulsion experiments aiming at the first observation of the neutrino oscillation in CNGS beam in appearance mode, is running, showing the good capability to separate 3 flavor neutrino interactions. In this poster, the recent developments and prospects of the emulsions for the next generation experiments are reported.

  20. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  1. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  2. Tuneable Rheological Properties of Fluorinated Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon Orellana, Laura Andreina; Riechers, Birte; Caen, Ouriel; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    Pickering emulsions are an appealing approach to stabilize liquid-liquid dispersions without surfactants. Recently, amphiphilic silica nanoparticles have been proposed as an alternative to surfactants for droplet microfluidics applications, where aqueous drops are stabilized in fluorinated oils. This system, proved to be effective in preventing the leakage of resorufin, a model dye that was known to leak in surfactant-stabilized drops. The overall capabilities of droplet-based microfluidics technology is highly dependent on the dynamic properties of droplets, interfaces and emulsions. Therefore, fluorinated pickering emulsions dynamic properties need to be characterized, understood and controlled to be used as a substitute of already broadly studied emulsions for droplet microfluidics applications. In this study, fluorinated pickering emulsions have been found to behave as a Herschel Bulkley fluid, representing a challenge for common microfluidic operations as re-injection and sorting of droplets. We found that this behavior is controlled by the interaction between the interfacial properties of the particle-laden interface and the bulk properties of the two phases

  3. Simple and double emulsions via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, Antonio; Loscertales, Ignacio G.

    2005-11-01

    Generation of nanoemulsions is of great interest in medical and pharmaceutical applications; drug delivery or antiviral emulsions are typical examples. The use of electrosprays for dispersing liquids inside liquid insulator baths have been recently reported, (Barrero et al. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 272, 104, 2004). Capsules, nanotubes and coaxial nanofibers have been obtained from electrified coaxial jets (Loscertales et al. Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; J. American Chem. Soc. 126, 5376, 2004). Here we present a method for making double emulsions (both water-oil-water and o/w/o) based on the generation of compound electrosprays inside insulator liquid baths. Basically, a conducting liquid injected throughout a capillary needle is electroatomized in cone-jet mode inside a dielectric liquid bath. A third insulating liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone to form a second meniscus. Then, a steady coaxial jet, in which the insulating liquid is coated by the conducting one, develops. A double emulsion forms as a result of the jet breaking up into compound droplets electrically charged. Experimental results carried out with glycerine and different oils in a bath of heptane are reported.

  4. Method of breaking and emulsion and an emulsion-emulsion breaker composition

    SciTech Connect

    Salathiel, W. M.

    1985-05-14

    This invention relates to a composition of matter and to a method for producing a controllable, residue-free break of an emulsion or a dispersion of a water-in-oil emulsion. An emulsion breaker is incorporated into the emulsion. It is temporarily-protected (deactivated) so that breaking of the emulsion is initially avoided. By removing the protection, the breaker becomes active, and it acts to break the emulsion into its separate phases.

  5. Rheology of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Derkach, Svetlana R

    2009-10-30

    The review is devoted to the historical and modern understanding of rheological properties of emulsions in a broad range of concentration. In the limiting case of dilute emulsions, the discussion is based on the analogy and differences in properties of suspensions and emulsions. For concentrated emulsions, the main peculiarities of their rheological behaviour are considered. Different approaches to understand the concentration dependencies of viscosity are presented and compared. The effects of non-Newtonian flow curves and the apparent transition to yielding with increasing concentration of the dispersed phase are discussed. The problem of droplet deformation in shear fields is touched. The highly concentrated emulsions (beyond the limit of closest packing of spherical particles) are treated as visco-plastic media, and the principle features of their rheology (elasticity, yielding, concentration and droplet size dependencies) are considered. A special attention is paid to the problem of shear stability of drops of an internal phase starting from the theory of the single drop behaviour, including approaches for the estimation of drops' stability in concentrated emulsions. Polymer blends are also treated as emulsions, though taking into account their peculiarities due to the coexistence of two interpenetrated phases. Different theoretical models of deformation of polymer drops were discussed bearing in mind the central goal of predictions of the visco-elastic properties of emulsions as functions of the properties of individual components and the interfacial layer. The role of surfactants is discussed from the point of view of stability of emulsions in time and their special influence on the rheology of emulsions. PMID:19683219

  6. Cationic bituminous emulsions and emulsion aggregate slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1986-07-01

    A cationic bituminous emulsion is described which consists of from about 30% to about 80% by weight of bitumen, from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of reaction products of a polyamine reacted with a member of the group consisting of epoxidized unsaturated fatty acids of chain lengths between C/sub 8/ and C/sub 22/ and the esters thereof and adding water to make up 100% by weight, the emulsion having a pH in the range of from 2-7.

  7. Simulation of Non-Newtonian Emulsion Flows in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanichev, I. V.; Akhmadiev, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation of emulsion flows in differently shaped microchannels to reproduce the choking of such flows as a result of the effect of dynamic blocking has been made. A model of a highly concentrated emulsion as a structure of tightly packed deformed droplets surrounded by elastic shells is considered. The motion of liquid was determined by the method of the lattice Boltzmann equations together with the immersed boundary method. The influence of the non-Newtonian properties and of elastic turbulence of the indicated emulsion, as well as of the elasticity of the shells of its droplets and of the interaction of these shells on the emulsion motion in a microchannel, has been investigated. It is shown that the flow of this emulsion can be slowed down substantially only due to the mutual attraction of the shells of its droplets.

  8. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  9. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  10. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  11. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  12. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  13. What's News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    News analysis and entertainment media is part of a media literacy that helps students access, analyze, evaluate and create messages using media in various forms. Media literacy is a key asset in a democracy as well as a bridge to reading comprehension, as skillful media use and script-reading activities can support the English acquisition skills,…

  14. Society News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart; Goward, Ken; Davenhall, Clive

    2005-03-01

    Council Meeting, February; The Antiquarian Astronomer; Joint WHS/SHA meeting in Bath, Saturday 5 March 2005; Future meetings; Spring conference and AGM; Summer picnic; Sir Robert Ball Library News; New SHA Library manual; Formal opening of the Sir Robert Ball Library; Visit to the ROE Library.

  15. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  16. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  17. Magnetofluid emulsion: New magnetocontrolled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtovoi, Victor G.; Yarmolchik, Yuri P.

    1994-03-01

    This study has shown that flow dynamics of emulsion consisting of magnetic and nonmagnetic fluids depends on applied magnetic field. So these emulsions may be considered as a magnetic field controlled medium, and in particular as a magnetic field controlled heat carrier. The new dates on rheological properties of these emulsions in the presence of magnetic field are described.

  18. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  19. Chitosan macroporous foams obtained in highly concentrated emulsions as templates.

    PubMed

    Miras, Jonathan; Vílchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Esquena, Jordi

    2013-11-15

    Emulsion templating is an effective route for the preparation of macroporous polymer foams, with well-defined pore structures. This kind of material is usually obtained by polymerization or crosslinking in the external phase of highly concentrated emulsions. The present article describes the synthesis of macroporous foams based on a cationic polymer, chitosan, crosslinked with genipin, a natural crosslinker. The phase behavior was used to study the influence of chitosan on surfactant self-aggregation. Hexagonal and lamellar liquid crystalline structures could be obtained in the presence of chitosan, and polymer did not greatly influence the geometric lattice parameters of these self-aggregates. O/W highly concentrated emulsions were obtained in the presence of chitosan in the continuous phase, which allowed reducing both droplet size and polydispersity. The emulsions were stable during the time required for crosslinking, obtaining macroporous foams with high pore volume and degree of crosslinking. PMID:24011788

  20. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence. PMID:19428022

  1. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with

  2. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of

  3. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  4. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  5. Double Emulsion Templated Celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga, Laura R.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Chang, Connie; Wilking, Jim; Monroy, Francisco; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating celloidosomes, which represent a hollow and spherical three-dimensional self-assembly of living cells encapsulating an aqueous core. Glass- capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion templates using lipids as stabilizers. Such templates allow for obtaining single but also double concentric celloidosomes. In addition, after a solvent removal step the double emulsion templates turn into monodisperse lipid vesicles, whose membrane spontaneously phase separates when choosing the adequate lipid composition, providing the adequate scaffold for fabricating Janus-celloidosomes. These structures may find applications in the development of bioreactors in which the synergistic effects of two different types of cells selectively adsorbed on one of the vesicle hemispheres may be exploited.

  6. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  7. Formulation, stability and degradation kinetics of intravenous cinnarizine lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Cui, Yue; Tang, Xing

    2009-05-21

    Cinnarizine was loaded in the lipid emulsion to develop an intravenous formulation with good physical and chemical stability. High-pressure homogenization was used to prepare the lipid emulsion. The factors influencing the stability of cinnarizine lipid emulsion, such as different drug loading methods, pH, temperature, sterilization methods and sterilization time were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatograph. The degradation of cinnarizine in aqueous solution and lipid emulsion both followed apparent first-order kinetics. A possible degradation mechanism was postulated by the bell-shaped pH-rate profile of cinnarizine. Localization of the drug in the interfacial lecithin layer significantly improved the chemical stability of cinnarizine and its stabilizing mechanism was thoroughly discussed and proved. The activation energy of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was calculated to be 51.27 kJ/mol which was similar to that in aqueous solution. This indicates that the stabilizing effect of the drug carrier on cinnarizine was not an alteration of the degradation reaction. In addition, shelf-life of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was estimated to be 1471.6 days at 4 degrees C, which is much longer compared with 19.8 days in aqueous solution. The final products were stable enough to resist a 121 degrees C rotating steam sterilization for 15 min. PMID:19429300

  8. Pickering emulsions with controllable stability.

    PubMed

    Melle, Sonia; Lask, Mauricio; Fuller, Gerald G

    2005-03-15

    We prepare solid-stabilized emulsions using paramagnetic particles at an oil/water interface that can undergo macroscopic phase separation upon application of an external magnetic field. A critical field strength is found for which emulsion droplets begin to translate into the continuous-phase fluid. At higher fields, the emulsions destabilize, leading to a fully phase-separated system. This effect is reversible, and long-term stability can be recovered by remixing the components with mechanical agitation. PMID:15752002

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning.

    You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  10. Formation and stability of polychlorinated biphenyl Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Perreault, Andréanne; Kueper, Bernard H.; Rawson, Jim

    2005-03-01

    An emulsion stabilized by colloidal suspensions of finely divided solids is known as a Pickering emulsion. The potential for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to form Pickering emulsions ex situ when in contact with powdered solids, such as clays and metal oxides, is investigated here. Bentonite, iron oxide and magnesium oxide dispersions proved to be robust Pickering emulsion stabilizers, whereas manganese oxide dispersions were not. Batch experiments revealed that emulsions can be formed using a moderately low energy input and can be stabilized with solid concentrations as low as 0.5 wt.%. For the base conditions (volumetric oil fraction ( ϕoil)=30 vol.%; solid concentration ( χ)=2 wt.%), the formed emulsions were indefinitely stable and the initial average droplet diameters varied from 80 to 258 μm, depending on the solid used in the colloidal dispersion. The average droplet size varied at early time, but for most conditions stabilized to a steady-state value 1 week after preparation. The effect of Ostwald ripening was limited. At greater than 0.5 wt.% concentration, the efficiency of the solid dispersion as a stabilizer was dependant on the volumetric oil fraction but not on the solid concentration. Generally, systems with volumetric oil fractions outside of the 20-70 vol.% range were unstable. The emulsions' droplet stability, average droplet size and size distribution were observed to vary as a function of the amount of energy provided to the system, the volumetric oil fraction, and the concentration of the solid in the aqueous dispersion. It is hypothesized that drilling through fractured rock in the immediate vicinity of dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) PCBs may provide both the energy and solid material necessary to form Pickering emulsions.

  11. Produced fluid emulsions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, C.F.; Himmelblau, A.; Trom, L.

    1984-09-01

    Emulsion production and stabilization may be due to one or more of several phenomenon including water-oil ratio, oil and brine chemistry, and surfactant and polymer type and concentration. They may influence emulsification either independently or with dependence on one or more of the other factors. Task One has tried to define which factors are dominant and what effect variations in them will have on the emulsion characteristics for each of the fields investigated. Emulsions were produced using a hand homogenizer at a fixed setting for a specific length of time to ensure all samples were produced uniformly. A du Nouy apparatus was used to measure surface and interfacial tensions and a binocular microscope was used in the micro-visual studies. The emulsions were treated in a similar manner with a wide variety of materials to not only break them, but also to help define which mechanisms are responsible for the stabilization of a particular emulsion. Core floods in Task Two utilized a six-foot sand-pack for a mixing medium. A six-inch long Berea core which followed, provided shear similar to that of the reservoir. The choice of oil, brine, surfactant and polymer were chosen to correlate to the Task One studies. Similarities and differences in the results between the bench-top and core flood studies are noted. The conditions of emulsion production and characteristics and the effectiveness of emulsion breakers are compared to help determine the mechanism of emulsion stabilization. 8 figures, 85 tables.

  12. E-Cig Liquid Nicotine Containers Often Mislabeled

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160108.html E-Cig Liquid Nicotine Containers Often Mislabeled Also, many aren't ... July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Containers that hold liquid nicotine for electronic cigarettes may not be labeled ...

  13. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workshop NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ... posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 ...

  14. Stabilization of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Noninterfacially Adsorbed Particles.

    PubMed

    Pilapil, Brandy K; Jahandideh, Heidi; Bryant, Steven L; Trifkovic, Milana

    2016-07-19

    Classical (surfactant stabilized) and Pickering (particle stabilized) type emulsions have been widely studied to elucidate the mechanisms by which emulsion stabilization is achieved. In Pickering emulsions, a key defining factor is that the stabilizing particles reside at the liquid-liquid interface providing a mechanical barrier to droplet coalescence. This interfacial adsorption is achieved through the use of nanoparticles that are partially wet by both liquid phases, often through covalent surface modification of or surfactant adsorption to the nanoparticle surfaces. Herein, we demonstrate particle-induced stabilization of an oil-in-water emulsion with fully water wet nanoparticles (no interfacial adsorption) via synergistic interaction with low concentrations of surfactants. Laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis allows for unique and vital insights into the properties of these emulsions via both three-dimensional imaging and real-time monitoring of particle dynamics at the oil-water interface. Investigation of these "non-Pickering" particle stabilized emulsions suggests that the nonadsorbed particles impart stability to the emulsion primarily via entropic forces imparted by the accumulation of silica nanoparticles in the coherent phase between dispersed oil droplets. PMID:27351486

  15. News: A Consumer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Ivan; Doig, Carol

    A guide to news media, this book describes how to tell when a report is biased; provides tips on spotting hoaxes and public relations ploys in the news; gives standards to judge expert opinion and reliable sources; lists critics and other sources of help for the news consumer; discusses the endless contest among politicians, newsmen, and…

  16. Protein Fibrils Induce Emulsion Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jinfeng; Simon, Joana Ralfas; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of an oil-in-water emulsion was studied in the presence of protein fibrils for a wide range of fibril concentrations by using rheology, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that above a minimum fibril concentration depletion flocculation occurred, leading to oil droplet aggregation and enhanced creaming of the emulsion. Upon further increasing the concentration of the protein fibrils, the emulsions were stabilized. In this stable regime both aggregates of droplets and single droplets are present, and these aggregates are smaller than the aggregates in the flocculated emulsion samples at the lower fibril concentrations. The size of the droplet aggregates in the stabilized emulsions is independent of fibril concentration. In addition, the droplet aggregation was reversible upon dilution both by a pH 2 HCl solution and by a fibril solution at the same concentration. The viscosity of the emulsions containing fibrils was comparable to that of the pure fibril solution. Neither fibril networks nor droplet gel networks were observed in our study. The stabilization mechanism of emulsions containing long protein fibrils at high protein fibril concentrations points toward the mechanism of a kinetic stabilization. PMID:26882086

  17. Freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Rousseau, D

    2009-11-01

    Factors influencing water-in-oil emulsion stability during freeze/thaw-cycling, namely interfacial crystallization vs. network crystallization and the sequence of crystallization events (i.e., dispersed vs. continuous phase or vice versa), are assessed. We show that destabilization is most apparent with a liquid-state emulsifier and a continuous oil phase that solidifies prior to the dispersed phase. Emulsions stable to F/T-cycling are obtained when the emulsifier crystallizes at the oil-water interface or in emulsions where the continuous phase crystallizes after the dispersed aqueous phase. The materials used are two food-grade oil-soluble emulsifiers - polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and glycerol monostearin (GMS) and two continuous oil phases with differing crystallization temperatures - canola oil and coconut oil. Emulsion stability is assessed with pulsed field gradient NMR droplet size analysis, sedimentation, microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. This study demonstrates the sequence of crystallization events and the physical state of the surfactant at the oil-water interface strongly impact the freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:19683718

  18. Double emulsion formation through hierarchical flow-focusing microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmanesh, Milad; Farhadi, Mousa; Azizian, Pooya

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic device is presented for creating double emulsions, controlling their sizes and also manipulating encapsulation processes. As a result of three immiscible liquids' interaction using dripping instability, double emulsions can be produced elegantly. Effects of dimensionless numbers are investigated which are Weber number of the inner phase (Wein), Capillary number of the inner droplet (Cain), and Capillary number of the outer droplet (Caout). They affect the formation process, inner and outer droplet size, and separation frequency. Direct numerical simulation of governing equations was done using volume of fluid method and adaptive mesh refinement technique. Two kinds of double emulsion formation, the two-step and the one-step, were simulated in which the thickness of the sheath of double emulsions can be adjusted. Altering each dimensionless number will change detachment location, outer droplet size and droplet formation period. Moreover, the decussate regime of the double-emulsion/empty-droplet is observed in low Wein. This phenomenon can be obtained by adjusting the Wein in which the maximum size of the sheath is discovered. Also, the results show that Cain has significant influence on the outer droplet size in the two-step process, while Caout affects the sheath in the one-step formation considerably.

  19. Sensory evaluation of sodium chloride-containing water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rietberg, Matthew R; Rousseau, Dérick; Duizer, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    The sensory perception of water-in-oil emulsions containing a saline-dispersed aqueous phase was investigated. Manipulating saltiness perception was achieved by varying the mass fraction aqueous phase (MFAP), initial salt load, and surfactant concentration [(polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PgPr)] of the emulsions, with formulations based on a central composite design. Saltiness and emulsion thickness were evaluated using a trained sensory panel, and collected data were analyzed using response surface analysis. Emulsion MFAP was the most important factor correlated with increased salt taste intensity. Emulsifier concentration and interactions between NaCl and PgPr had only minor effects. Emulsions more prone to destabilization were perceived as saltier irrespective of their initial salt load. The knowledge gained from this study provides a powerful tool for the development of novel sodium-reduced liquid-processed foods. PMID:22463684

  20. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  1. Absorption of morphine from a slow-release emulsion used to induce morphine dependence in rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, A; Hope, W

    1998-10-01

    This study was performed to measure absorption of morphine from the injection site following treatment of rats with slow-release emulsions formulated with morphine hydrochloride and morphine base. Samples of emulsion were collected from the injection site of halothane anesthetized animals at 24 and 48 h following emulsion treatment and concentrations of morphine remaining in the emulsion were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In another group of morphine-treated rats, at times equivalent to collecting samples of emulsion, the intensity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal behaviors was monitored. Both morphine base- and hydrochloride-containing emulsions induced a high degree of physical dependence in animals treated over 48 h. Release of morphine from emulsions containing morphine base was slower than that from the hydrochloride formulations. In the 24-h morphine base-treated animals, approximately 45% was absorbed from the injection site as opposed to 99% in the 24-h morphine hydrochloride-treated animals. These results suggest that morphine base containing emulsions provide a more sustained exposure to the opioid. PMID:10334632

  2. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  3. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  4. Water-oil Janus emulsions: microfluidic synthesis and morphology design.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xue-Hui; Huang, Jin-Pei; Xu, Jian-Hong; Chen, Jian; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2016-04-14

    In this work we developed a facile method to prepare water-oil Janus emulsions in situ with tunable morphologies by using a double-bore capillary microfluidic device. In addition, by combining the theory model and our liquids' properties, we propose a method to design the morphology of water-oil Janus emulsions. To systematically research Janus morphologies we combined the theory model and the fluids' properties. Under the model guidance, we carefully selected the liquids system where only the interfacial tension between the water phase and the continuous phase changed while keeping the other two interfacial tensions unchanged. Thus we could adjust the Janus morphology by changing the surfactant mass fraction in the continuous phase. In addition, with the double-bore capillary, we prepared water-oil Janus emulsions with a large flow ratio range. By adjusting the flow ratio and the surfactant mass fraction, we successfully prepared Janus emulsions with gradual morphology changes, which would be meaningful in fields that have a high demand for morphology designing of amphiphilic Janus particles. PMID:26947622

  5. Characterization of flaxseed oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-En; Choo, Wee-Sim

    2015-07-01

    The emulsifying capacity of surfactants (polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80 and soy lecithin) and proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil was measured based on 1 % (w/w) of emulsifier. Surfactants showed significantly higher emulsifying capacity compared to the proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil. The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a mixer was ranked in the following order: 1,000 rpm (58 min) ≈ 1,000 rpm (29 min) ≈ 2,000 rpm (35 min) >2,000 rpm (17.5 min). The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a homogenizer (Ultra Turrax) was independent of the speed and mixing time. The mean particle size of the flaxseed oil emulsions prepared using the two mixing devices ranged from 23.99 ± 1.34 μm to 47.22 ± 1.99 μm where else the particle size distribution and microstructure of the flaxseed oil emulsions demonstrated using microscopic imaging were quite similar. The flaxseed oil emulsions had a similar apparent viscosity and exhibited shear thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. The flaxseed oil emulsions had L* value above 70 and was in the red-yellow color region (positive a* and b* values). PMID:26139903

  6. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  7. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  8. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  9. "Good News" Tune Makes Discussion of "Bad News" Sing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    1984-01-01

    Recommends playing Anne Murray's recording of "A Little Good News" to promote discussion about the nature of news and Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe" for discussion on writing news stories about suicides. (CRH)

  10. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  11. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G″ (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G″ versus oil volume fraction ϕ show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ϕ(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness Δ which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft

  12. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  13. Influence of Steam Injection and Water-in-Oil Emulsions on Diesel Fuel Combustion Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Meagan

    Water injection can be an effective strategy for reducing NOx because water's high specific heat allows it to absorb heat and lower system temperatures. Introducing water as an emulsion can potentially be more effective at reducing emissions than steam injection due to physical properties (such as microexplosions) that can improve atomization and increase mixing. Unfortunately, the immiscibility of emulsions makes them difficult to work with so they must be mixed properly. In this effort, a method for adequately mixing surfactant-free emulsions was established and verified using high speed cinematography. As the water to fuel mass ratio (W/F) increased, emulsion atomization tests showed little change in droplet size and spray angle, but a shorter overall breakup point. Dual-wavelength planar laser induced fluorescence (D-PLIF) patternation showed an increase in water near the center of the spray. Steam injection flames saw little change in reaction stability, but emulsion flames experienced significant losses in stability that limited reaction operability at higher W/F. Emulsions were more effective at reducing NOx than steam injection, likely because of liquid water's latent heat of vaporization and the strategic injection of water into the flame core. OH* chemiluminescence showed a decrease in heat release for both methods, though the decrease was greater for emulsions. Both methods saw decreases in flame length for W/F 0.15. Lastly, flame imaging showed a shift towards a redder appearance with the addition or more water, as well as a reduction in flame flares.

  14. BACLOFEN, RACLOPRIDE, AND NALTREXONE DIFFERENTIALLY REDUCE SOLID FAT EMULSION INTAKE UNDER LIMITED ACCESS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    RE, Rao; FHE, Wojnicki; J, Coupland; S, Ghosh; RLW, Corwin

    2009-01-01

    Previous work in rats has demonstrated that an Intermittent (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) schedule of access promotes binge-type consumption of 100% vegetable shortening during a 1-hour period of availability. The present study used novel shortening-derived stable solid emulsions of various fat concentrations. These emulsions were the consistency of pudding and did not demonstrate oil and water phase separation previously reported with oil-based liquid emulsions. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were grouped according to schedule of access (Daily or Intermittent) to one of three concentrations (18%, 32%, 56%) of solid fat emulsion. There were no significant Intermittent vs. Daily differences in amount consumed, due to high intakes in all groups. This indicated the acceptability of the emulsions. Baclofen (GABA-B agonist) and raclopride (D2-like antagonist) both significantly reduced emulsion intake in all Daily groups, but only in the 56% fat Intermittent group. Naltrexone (opioid antagonist), in contrast, significantly reduced 32% and 56% fat emulsion intake in the Intermittent, as well as the Daily groups. These results indicate that the fat intake reducing effects of GABAB activation and D2 blockade depend upon fat concentration and schedule of fat access, while the fat intake reducing effects of opioid blockade depend upon fat concentration but not schedule of access. PMID:18353432

  15. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  16. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    : Heriot-Watt University 4 Nov: Strathclyde University 17 Nov: York University 24 Nov: Bristol University 1 Dec: Open University 7 Dec: Kent University 14 Dec: Cardiff University 15 Dec: University of Wales, Swansea 24 Jan: Reading University 10 Feb: Abingdon School 16 Feb: Plymouth University 2 Mar: Sheffield University 7 Mar: CLRC Daresbury Laboratory 8 Mar: Liverpool University 9 Mar: Manchester 10 Mar: Lancaster University 15 Mar: Surrey University 16 Mar: Brighton University 17 Mar: St Vincent College, Gosport 22 Mar: Leeds University 23 Mar: Loughborough Grammar School 24 Mar: Oakham School 30 Mar: St Peter's School, Wolverhampton 18 May: University of Hertfordshire 11 Jul: Science Museum 12 Jul: Royal Institution The assistance of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, CLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DERA Malvern is acknowledged in staging this year's events. Courses, lectures and competitions `Physics in perspective', the study course for sixth-formers and college students, will take place in London on 6 - 8 February 2000, offering insights into many different aspects of physics. The programme commences during the afternoon of Sunday 6 February at King's College London with a Balloon debate, followed by Brian O'Rourke's talk on the `Physics of Formula 1 cars'. On Monday 7 February at the Royal Institution, John Avison (former Honorary Editor of Physics Education) will develop the `Thinking physics' theme by presenting the audience with varied topics in an unusual and challenging way. The second talk of the afternoon, by Professor Roy Sambles, will cover `Lasers, light and liquid crystals'. On the final day (Tuesday 8 February), again at the Royal Institution, Sara Ellison will lead the audience in `Heavenly pursuits', whilst later Dr Colin Wright will entertain with `Juggling - theory and practice'. Futher information and bookings for the course can be made by contacting Mrs Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH

  17. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract and some of its active ingredients as potential emulsion stabilizers: a new approach to the formation of multiple (W/O/W) emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cizauskaite, Ugne; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Jakštas, Valdas; Marksiene, Ruta; Jonaitiene, Laimute; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, novel topical formulations loaded with natural functional actives are under intense investigations. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate how the rosemary extract and some of its active ingredients [rosmarinic acid (RA), ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA)] affect technological characteristics of multiple emulsion. Formulation has been prepared by adding investigated solutions (10%) in water/oil/water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion consisting of different lipophilic phases: olive oil and liquid paraffin, with 0.5% emulsifying agent (complex of sodium polyacrylate and polysorbate 20) under constant stirring with mechanical stirrer at room temperature. The emulsion parameters were evaluated using centrifugation test, freeze-thaw cycle test, microscopical and texture analyses. Rosemary's triterpenic saponins UA and OA showed the highest emulsion stabilizing properties: they decreased CI from 3.26% to 10.23% (p < 0.05). According to obtained interfacial tension data, the effect of rosemary active ingredients is not surfactant-like. Even though emulsifier itself at low concentration intends to form directly the multiple emulsion, the obtained results indicate that rosemary extract containing active ingredients does not only serve as functional cosmetic agent due to a number of biological activities, but also offer potential advantages as a stabilizer and an enhancer of W/O/W emulsions formation for dermopharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. PMID:26000558

  18. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  19. The Origins of Borrowed News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study was conducted to assess the indications in print of news borrowing (reporting news distributed by second hand or government controlled sources) in the 1970s, and to examine the relationship between borrowed news and the restrictions and reductions in newspapers' overseas news staff. The "New York Times" and the "Chicago Tribune" were…

  20. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  1. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  2. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of 'minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  3. Synthesis of nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2} particles by different emulsion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Supakanapitak, Sunisa; Boonamnuayvitaya, Virote; Jarudilokkul, Somnuk

    2012-05-15

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods of emulsion: (1) reversed micelle (RM); (2) emulsion liquid membrane (ELM); and (3) colloidal emulsion aphrons (CEAs). Ammonium cerium nitrate and polyoxyethylene-4-lauryl ether (PE4LE) were used as cerium and surfactant sources in this study. The powder was calcined at 500 Degree-Sign C to obtain CeO{sub 2}. The effect of the preparation procedure on the particle size, surface area, and the morphology of the prepared powders were investigated. The obtained powders are highly crystalline, and nearly spherical in shape. The average particle size and the specific surface area of the powders from the three methods were in the range of 4-10 nm and 5.32-145.73 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The CeO{sub 2} powders synthesized by the CEAs are the smallest average particle size, and the highest surface area. Finally, the CeO{sub 2} prepared by the CEAs using different cerium sources and surfactant types were studied. It was found that the surface tensions of cerium solution and the type of surfactant affect the particle size of CeO{sub 2}. - Graphical Abstract: The emulsion droplet size distribution and the TEM images of CeO{sub 2} prepared by different methods: reversed micelle (RM), emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) and colloidal emulsion aphrons (CEAs). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-sized CeO{sub 2} was successfully prepared by three different emulsion methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The colloidal emulsion aphrons method producing CeO{sub 2} with the highest surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface tensions of a cerium solution have slightly effect on the particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size control could be interpreted in terms of the adsorption of the surfactant.

  4. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  5. PLGA microdevices for retinoids sustained release produced by supercritical emulsion extraction: continuous versus batch operation layouts.

    PubMed

    Porta, Giovanna Della; Campardelli, Roberta; Falco, Nunzia; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2011-10-01

    Retinyl acetate (RA) was selected as a model compound to be entrapped in poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) microspheres using supercritical emulsion extraction (SEE). Several oil-in-water emulsions prepared using acetone and aqueous glycerol (80% glycerol, 20% water) were processed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 ) to extract the oily phase and to induce microspheres formation. The characteristics of the microspheres obtained by conventional liquid emulsion extraction and SEE were also compared: SEE produced spherical and free flowing microspheres, whereas the conventional liquid-liquid extraction showed large intraparticles aggregation. Emulsion extraction by SC-CO2 technology was tested using two different operation layouts: batch (SEE-B) and continuous (SEE-C). SEE-C was performed using a packed tower to produce emulsion/SC-CO2 contact in countercurrent mode, allowing higher microsphere recovery and process efficiencies. Operating at 80 bar and 36°C, SEE-C produced PLGA/RA microspheres with mean sizes between 3.3 and 4.5 μm with an excellent encapsulation efficiency of 80%-90%. Almost all the drug was released in about 6 days when charged at 2.7% (w/w), whereas only 40% and 10% of RA were released in the same period of time when the charge was 5.2% and 8.8% (w/w), respectively. Release kinetics constants calculated from the experimental data, using a mathematical model, were also proposed and discussed. PMID:21638283

  6. Monolithic microextraction tips by emulsion photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2009-03-20

    Monoliths formed by photopolymerization are excellent means for fabricating functional elements in miniaturized microdevices such as microextraction tips which are becoming important for sample preparation. Various silica-based and polymer-based materials have been used to fabricate monoliths with through pores of several nm to 4 microm. However, the back pressure created by such methods is still considered to be high for microtips that use suction forces to deliver the liquid. In this study, we demonstrated that emulsion techniques such as oil-in-water can be used to form monoliths with large through pores (>20 microm), and with rigid structures on small (10 microL) and large (200 microL) pipette tips by photopolymerization. We further showed that, with minor modifications, various functionalized particles (5-20 microm) can be added to form stable emulsions and successfully encapsulated into the monoliths for qualitative and quantitative solid-phase microextractions for a diverse application. Due to high permeability and large surface area, quick equilibration can be achieved by pipetting to yield high recovery rates. Using tryptic digests of ovalbumin as the standard, we obtained a recovery yield of 90-109% (RSD: 10-16%) with a loading capacity of 3 mug for desalting tips immobilized with C18 beads. Using tryptic digests of beta-casein and alpha-casein as standards, we showed that phosphopeptides were substantially enriched by tips immobilized with immobilized metal affinity chromatography or TiO(2) materials. Using estrogenic compounds as standards, we obtained a recovery yield of 95-108% (RSD: 10-12%) and linear calibration curves ranging from 5 to 100 ng (R(2)>0.99) for Waters Oasis HLB tips immobilized with hydrophilic beads. PMID:19203757

  7. Understanding Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Know the Science: The Facts About Health News Stories Understanding Health ... only on animals without explaining that such basic science may have little immediate significance to people. For ...

  8. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  9. National PKU News

    MedlinePlus

    ... and History Staff & Board How Much Phe Guthrie-Koch Scholarship Books Resources Support Us Contact Us Donors ... new Amino Acid Analysis Results This Year’s Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship Winners © 2016 National PKU News

  10. In the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Lauren

    2000-01-01

    A board member in an Iowa district explains the importance of presenting 4-minute summaries of educational news and trends at board meetings. In choosing items for presentation, she considers relevance, context, perspective, terminology, awareness, and national political developments. (MLH)

  11. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  12. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  13. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  14. Improved stability of w/o/w multiple emulsions by addition of hydrophilic colloid components in the aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, A; Warburton, B

    1995-01-01

    To improve the stability of w/o/w multiple emulsions of arachis and olive oil the stabilizing effect of cherry gum, in combination with acacia and gelatin, was examined. The outstanding film-forming properties of this gum having already been noted; the effect of its addition to the aqueous phases was measured by the coalescence of emulsion globules. The enhanced stability, as compared to controls, was achieved at a minimum concentration which liquid crystal-bearing interfacial films seem to appear. Creation of more coherent interfaces, inhibiting transfer of phases, could be the basis of the improved stability of the emulsion. PMID:7730952

  15. Changing Emulsion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob; Chen, Haosheng

    2015-11-01

    We elucidate the effect of heterogeneous surface wettability on the morphology and dynamics of microfluidic emulsions, generated by a co-flowing device. We first design a useful methodology of modifying a micro-capillary with desired heterogeneous wettability, such as alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Subsequently, the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion in the micro-capillary are investigated. Our experimental data reveal a universal critical time scale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain intact, whereas below this time-scale emulsions become adhesive or inverse. A simple model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition. These results show a control of emulsion dynamics by tuning the droplet size and the Capillary number, the ratio of viscous to surface effects, with heterogeneous surface wettability.

  16. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  17. Experiment S009: Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, F. W.; Shapiro, M. M.; Silberberg, R.; Stiller, B.; Tsao, C. H.; Durgaprasad, N.; Fichtel, C. E.; Guss, D. E.; Reames, D. V.

    1971-01-01

    The first exposure on a spacecraft of a nuclear emulsion apparatus designed to collect 1000 high quality tracks of heavy nuclei under a negligible thickness of matter (0.07 g/sq cm) is described. The cosmic ray detector consisted of a stack of nuclear emulsions that were designed to register at least 400 heavy nuclei tracks for each 10 hours of useful exposure. The spacecraft had to be oriented in a heads-up attitude during the 10-hour period to eliminate atmospheric albedo particles. The results are as follows: (1) a definite odd-even effect, with low abundances for elements of atomic number 7, 9, and 11; (2) a ratio O/C approximately 0.9; (3) Ne/C, Mg/C, and Si/C ratios between 0.2 and 0.3; (4) an abundance gap in the region 15 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 19; and (5) a ratio (20 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28)/C 0.2, with a large concentration at Z = 26. These results are indicative that successful exposures of nuclear emulsions were obtained on the Gemini 11 mission.

  18. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. PMID:27021875

  19. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  20. Spreading of Emulsions on Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2012-11-01

    The wettability of emulsions is an important factor with explicit influence in an extensive variety of industrial applications ranging from the petroleum to food industries. Surprisingly, there is no comprehensive study of emulsion spreading to date; this is due to the complexity of the structure of the emulsions and non-homogeneity of the dispersed phase bubbles in size as well as distribution through the emulsion. The spreading of water/silicone oil emulsions on glass substrates was investigated. The emulsions were prepared with varying volume fractions of water dispersed in silicone oil, with addition of small amounts of surfactant to stabilize the emulsion structure. The time dependent variation of dynamic contact angle, base diameter, and the spreading rate of the droplets of an emulsion are different from a pure substance. The effect of water/silicone oil weight percentage as well as the droplet size and dispersed phase bubble size were also investigated. The weight percentage of water/silicone oil emulsion and droplet size did not have significant influence on the spreading dynamics; however the dispersed phase drop size affected the spreading dynamics substantially.

  1. Deactivation efficiency of stabilized bactericidal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2011-09-20

    Biocide emulsions stabilized with various stabilizing agents were prepared and characterized, and their efficiency in bacteria deactivation was evaluated. A number of stabilizing agents were tested for their stabilizing effect on emulsions of thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMTB) biocide. Two agents, the most successful in stabilizing the biocide, were chosen for further studies: high molecular weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) and an amphiphilic block copolymer of poly(caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PCL(33)-b-PAA(33)). The emulsion droplet sizes varied between 325 and 500 nm. Deactivation of bacteria was studied by exposing E. coli ATCC 11229 bacteria dispersions to emulsions stabilized by positively charged PEI or negatively charged PCL-b-PAA micelles and by measuring their absorbance; E. coli do not grow with time in the presence of biocide emulsions. PEI molecules alone act as biocide and deactivate the bacteria. PCL-b-PAA micelles as stabilizing agent do not affect the growth of the E. coli ; bacteria are deactivated by TCMTB released from the emulsion droplets. The kinetics of emulsion dissolution studies revealed for both stabilizing agents a decrease in droplet size with time while the emulsions were subjected to dialysis. The biocide was released from the emulsions within ∼250 min; the droplet shells consist mostly of PEI or PCL-b-PAA insoluble complexes with the biocide, which do not dissolve during dialysis. SEM images confirm the presence of residual crumbled shells with holes after 24 h of dialysis. PMID:21823610

  2. An NMR study of diffusion in surfactant-free emulsions and molten triglyceride mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, Duncan A.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements have become extensively used analytical techniques, with applications in many fields. In this thesis these measurements have been employed to elucidate a mechanism of emulsion stabilization and to examine mobility of a mixture of substances at the molecular level. Emulsions (liquid-in-liquid mixtures) have widespread applications (pharmaceutical, food science, petrochemical, agrochemical), therefore it is important to understand what governs emulsion stability. It has been previously demonstrated that a degassing process stabilizes oil-in-water emulsions, however the mechanism behind this is debated. In this thesis the Cotts 13-interval NMR sequence was used to examine the effects of degassing, establishing which of two suggested mechanisms is responsible for producing stable emulsions. Triglyceride mixtures are commonly separated before characterisation, however, NMR measurements of diffusion in molten trilaurin-trimyristin mixes have been made. This sheds light on the behaviour of these mixtures and assisted in developing new methods for their characterisation. These applications illustrate the versatility of NMR diffusion measurements.

  3. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  4. Emulsion-templated fully reversible protein-in-oil gels.

    PubMed

    Romoscanu, Alexandre I; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2006-08-29

    We have developed a new method allowing us to transform low-viscous apolar fluids into elastic solids with a shear elastic modulus of the order of 10(3)-10(5) Pa. The elasticity of the elastic solid is provided by a percolating 3D network of proteins, which are originally adsorbed at the interface of an oil-in-water emulsion template. By cross-linking the protein films at the interface and upon removal of water, the template is driven into a structure resembling a dry foam where the protein interfaces constitute the walls of the foam and the air is replaced by oil confined within polyhedral, closely packed droplets. Depending on the density of the protein network, the final material consists of chemically unmodified oil in a proportion of 95 to 99.9%. The physical properties of the elastic solid obtained can be tuned by changing either the average diameter size of the emulsion template or the cross-linking process of the protein film. However, the original low-viscosity emulsion can be restored by simply rehydrating the solidified fluid. Therefore, the present procedure offers an appealing strategy to build up solid properties for hydrophobic liquids while preserving the low viscosity and ease of manufacturing. PMID:16922568

  5. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  6. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  7. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  8. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news ≈ 187, general health news ≈ 278, general news ≈ 378, general news across multiple publishers ≈ 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier. PMID:20351893

  9. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in…

  10. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  11. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  12. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  13. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  14. Breaking Bad News to Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the difficulty of breaking bad news to parents, whether the news pertains to center policy or a child's behavior. Provides strategies for presenting news and for helping parents to overcome difficult situations, including gathering facts in advance, arranging an appropriate time, and having resource materials available for parents. (MOK)

  15. Automatic Association of News Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Christina; Watters, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of electronic news delivery systems and the automatic generation of electronic editions focuses on the association of related items of different media type, specifically photos and stories. The goal is to be able to determine to what degree any two news items refer to the same news event. (Author/LRW)

  16. Dynamic modeling of emulsion polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Penlidis, A.; Hamielec, A.E.; MacGregor, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    This paper is a survey of recent published works on the dynamic and steady state modeling of emulsion homo- and copolymerization in batch, semicontinuous , and continuous latex reactors. Contributions to our understanding of diffusion-controlled termination and propagation reactions, molecular weight, long chain branching and crosslinking development, polymer particle nucleation, and of the dynamics of continuous emulsion polymerization are critically reviewed.

  17. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  18. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  19. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  20. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  1. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, C.T.; Harrison, R.J.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an oil-in-water emulsion containing water-soluble polymer such as polyacrylamide prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations (Zn, Al, Sn, and Co) to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal. 11 claims.

  2. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.J.; Presley, C.T.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an ''oil-in-water'' emulsion containing water-soluble polymer prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal.

  3. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  4. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  5. Cocoa particles for food emulsion stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Joanne; Vieira, Josélio; Wolf, Bettina

    2013-09-01

    Emulsifying properties of cocoa particles have been investigated in systems containing purified sunflower oil (PSO) and water at varying pH, concentration and source of cocoa particles including cocoa powders (CP), cocoa fibre (CF) and cocoa mass (CM). The effect of cocoa particle source, pH and cocoa particle concentration on emulsion stability was evaluated by following changes in characteristic droplet diameter. Size distributions acquired on the emulsions and aqueous cocoa particle suspensions overlapped. Based on cryo-SEM imaging of the emulsions, isolation of cocoa particle fines and a process of washing the cocoa particles to remove any water soluble molecules, it was concluded that the cocoa particle fines not captured by the small angle laser diffraction method employed for sizing, act as Pickering particles. This research has demonstrated a universal nature of a natural food particle to stabilise oil-in-water emulsions not requiring particle modification or adjusting of the solution properties of the emulsion phases. PMID:23851644

  6. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  7. Delivering bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  8. Inexpensive News Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  9. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This section includes three articles that review library news from the past year. Highlights include public library budgets, examined by geographic regions; government programs; flood damage; library school closings; school library media programs; publishing industry concerns, including mergers, broadening markets, and on-demand printing; and…

  10. Parent News Offline, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 2 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2000 issue contains the following articles: (1) "'Zero Tolerance': What Parents…

  11. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  12. News & Issues, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the two 1999 issues of "News and Issues," a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate, and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter/Spring issue includes the following articles: (1) "Innovative Strategies Help Families Cope…

  13. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  14. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  15. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  16. Parent News Offline, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues published in volume 1 (1999) of "Parent News Offline," a newsletter of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN), designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The spring 1999 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Child Care: How…

  17. New Suncook News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanehl, Bob

    The newspaper program at the New Suncook School, Lovell, Maine, is a multi-level, language arts based unit designed to develop in students strong writing and interpersonal relationship skills, and to bring relevance to writing. The monthly newspaper features interviews, surveys, news, and some fiction stories written by students. The newspaper is…

  18. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  19. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  20. Physical Properties of Polyester Fabrics Treated with Nano, Micro and Macro Emulsion Silicones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvinzadeh, M.; Hajiraissi, R.

    2007-08-01

    The processing of textile to achieve a particular handle is one of the most important aspects of finishing technology. Fabrics softeners are liquid composition added to washing machines during the rinse cycle to make clothes feel better to the touch. The first fabric softeners were developed by the textile industry during the early twentieth century. In this research polyester fabrics were treated with nano, micro and macro emulsion silicone softeners. Some of the physical properties of the treated fabric samples are discussed. The drapeability of treated samples was improved after treatment with nano silicone softeners. The colorimetric measurement of softener-treated fabrics is evaluated with a reflectance spectrophotometer. Moisture regain of treated samples is increased due to coating of silicone softeners. There is some increase in the weight of softener-treated samples. Samples treated with nano emulsion silicones gave better results compared to micro- and macro-emulsion treated ones.

  1. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  2. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  3. Kinetic Release of Alkalinity from Particle-Containing Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are typically employed during remediation to promote biotic reduction of contaminants. Emulsions, however, hold promise for encapsulated delivery of many types of active ingredients required for successful site remediation or long-term site stewardship. Our research is currently focused on using alkalinity-containing particles held within oil-in-water emulsions to sustain control of subsurface pH. Here we describe results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling conducted to quantify the kinetics associated with the emulsion delivery and alkalinity release process. Kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions containing (~60 nmCaCO3 or ~100 nm MgO particles) were previously developed using soybean oil and Gum Arabic as a stabilizing agent. Batch and column experiments were employed to assess the accessibility and release of the alkalinity from the emulsion. Successive additions of HCl were used in batch systems to produce several pH responses (pH rebounds) that were subsequently modeled to elucidate release mechanisms and rates for varying emulsion compositions and particle types. Initial results suggest that a linear-driving-force model is generally able to capture the release behavior in the batch system when the temporally-constant, lumped mass-transfer coefficient is scaled by the fraction of particle mass remaining within the droplets. This result suggests that the rate limiting step in the release process may be the interphase transfer of reactive species at the oil-water interface. 1-d column experiments were also completed in order to quantify the extent and rate of alkalinity release from emulsion droplets retained in a sandy medium. Alkalinity release from the retained droplets treated a pH 4 influent water for 25-60 pore volumes (the duration depended on particle type and mass loading), and the cessation in treatment corresponded to exhaustion of the particle mass held within the oil. Column experiments were simulated

  4. Electrocoagulation of cutting oil emulsions using aluminium plate electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bensadok, K; Benammar, S; Lapicque, F; Nezzal, G

    2008-03-21

    The treatment of very concentrated oil-water emulsions by electrocoagulation (EC) was experimentally investigated as a pre-treatment step prior to a membrane process. The oil-water emulsion was prepared from a cutting mineral oil B22 currently used for drilling and machining operations. The electrocoagulation progress was followed by the measurement of COD, turbidity and pH in a batch process with recirculation of the liquid. This study is mainly focused on the effects of operating parameters such as initial pH, current density, oil concentration and recirculation rate, on the de-emulsification efficiency. Kinetic curves showed that the EC process exhibits two phases: a "reactive phase" during which the COD and the turbidity removals increase with electrolysis, and a stationary phase for which further aluminium dissolution is useless in the pollution abatement. The results showed that the treatment efficiency increases with increasing current density, but decreases with oil concentration. It appears that treatment of the considered cutting oil is completed through dissolution of around 10mgAl/g oil, with a slight positive effect of the liquid flow rate. Best results are also obtained with initial pH near 7. PMID:17706345

  5. Breaking of double emulsions based on electrohydrodynamics principles.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Jovanovic, Jovan M; Manojlovic, Vaso; Jovanovic, Mica

    2016-10-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of the liquid-liquid dispersed system, including particular insight on the electrocoalescence (EC) process that occurs during the breaking of double emulsions. The representative system, used in this work, was taken from the pilot plant for solvent extraction of uranium from wet phosphoric acid. The chosen framework required for elucidation of the EC process is based on the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) principles. During the model development it was necessary to consider several theoretical concepts for easier understanding and description of the related events. The first is the concept of entities, and corresponding classification of finely dispersed systems. The second concept is an introduction of almost forgotten basic electrodynamics element the memdiode or memristor as a current controlled device, and corresponding memristive systems. Hence, the conclusions that may be withdrawn from the presented results and findings could enable easier designing of the solutions for a breaking of double emulsions problems, that is, the entrainment problems that may arise in some pilot or industrial plants. Finally, the perspectives and the remaining challenges, considering the here discussed concepts and model based on the EHD principles, are mentioned. PMID:27388130

  6. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel

    PubMed Central

    Böni, Lukas; Rühs, Patrick A.; Windhab, Erich J.; Fischer, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v) and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk) to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making “soy slime”, a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food products. PMID

  7. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel.

    PubMed

    Böni, Lukas; Rühs, Patrick A; Windhab, Erich J; Fischer, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v) and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk) to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making "soy slime", a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food products. PMID:26808048

  8. Influence of emulsification process on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by layered double hydroxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nana; Zhang, Li; Sun, Dejun

    2015-04-28

    This paper reports the influence of emulsification process on the packing of layered double hydroxide (LDH) particles at the aqueous/oil phase interface and the properties of the resulting Pickering emulsions. Emulsions prepared by ultrasonication display superior long-term stability and gel-like characteristics at the dispersed phase volume fraction well below the random close packing limit, whereas emulsions with same compositions prepared by vortex mixing show some extent of sedimentation and liquid-like behaviors. Rheological measurements demonstrate that the zero-shear elastic modulus and yield stress of gel-like emulsions exhibit power-law dependences on particle concentration and independence on aqueous/oil phase ratio. The microstructural origin of this behavior is investigated by optical microscopy, revealing the droplets become strongly adhesive and a heterogeneous percolating network is formed among neighboring droplets. Fluorescent confocal microscopy measurements further confirm that the droplet adhesion is due to particle layers bridging opposite interfaces. In contrast, homogeneous, isolated, and densely packed droplets are present in emulsions prepared by vortex mixing, which results in these systems being dominantly viscous like the suspending fluid. This study shows that the emulsification process can be used as a trigger to modify long-term stability and rheology of solid-stabilized multiphase mixtures, which greatly expands their potential technological applications. PMID:25853297

  9. Electric field-driven, magnetically-stabilized ferro-emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.

    1990-01-01

    Methods and systems for interfacial surface area contact between a dispersed phase liquid and a continuous phase liquid in counter-current flow for purposes such as solvent extraction. Initial droplets of a dispersed phase liquid material containing ferromagnetic particles functioning as a "packing" are introduced to a counter-current flow of the continuous phase. A high intensity pulsed electric field is applied so as to shatter the initial droplets into a ferromagnetic emulsion comprising many smaller daughter droplets having a greater combined total surface area than that of the initial droplets in contact with the continuous phase material. A magnetic field is applied to control the position of the ferromagnetic emulsion for enhanced coalescence of the daughter droplets into larger reformed droplets.

  10. Electric field-driven, magnetically-stabilized ferro-emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, T.C.

    1990-07-17

    Methods and systems are disclosed for interfacial surface area contact between a dispersed phase liquid and a continuous phase liquid in counter-current flow for purposes such as solvent extraction. Initial droplets of a dispersed phase liquid material containing ferromagnetic particles functioning as a packing'' are introduced to a counter-current flow of the continuous phase. A high intensity pulsed electric field is applied so as to shatter the initial droplets into a ferromagnetic emulsion comprising many smaller daughter droplets having a greater combined total surface area than that of the initial droplets in contact with the continuous phase material. A magnetic field is applied to control the position of the ferromagnetic emulsion for enhanced coalescence of the daughter droplets into larger reformed droplets. 2 figs.

  11. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  12. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  13. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  14. Aging properties of Kodak type 101 emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W.

    1984-01-01

    Aging tests for several batches of Kodak type 101 emulsion show that storage conditions significantly influence how well the film will maintain its sensitometric properties, with sensitivity and density increasing to a maximum during this period. Any further aging may result in higher fog levels and sensitivity loss. It is noted that storage in an environment free of photographically active compounds allows film property optimization, and that film batches with different sensitivities age differently. Emulsions with maximum 1700-A sensitivity are 2.5 times faster than those at the low end of the sensitivity scale. These sensitive emulsions exhibit significantly accelerated changes in aging properties. Their use in space applications requires careful consideration of time and temperature profiles, encouraging the use of less sensitive emulsions when the controllability of these factors is limited.

  15. Emulsion formation at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Van Den Bos, P.; Berg, S.

    2012-12-01

    The use of surfactant cocktails to produce ultra-low interfacial tension between water and oil is an enhanced oil recovery method. In phase behavior tests three distinct emulsion phases are observed: (1) oil-in-water emulsion; (2) microemulsion; and (3) water-in-oil emulsion. However, it is unknown how phase behavior manifests at the pore-scale in a porous media system. What is the time scale needed for microemulsion formation? Where in the pore-space do the microemulsions form? And in what order do the different emulsion phases arrange during oil bank formation? To answer these questions micromodel experiments were conducted. These experiments are used to build a conceptual model for phase behavior at the pore-scale.

  16. Concentrated emulsion pathway to novel composite polymeric membranes and their use in pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckenstein, E.; Sun, F.

    1995-10-01

    Pervaporation is becoming recognized as an energy-efficient alternative to distillation and other separation methods of liquid mixtures, especially in cases in which the traditional separation techniques are not efficient, such as the separation of azeotropic mixtures, close-boiling-point components, isomeric components, and recovery or removal of trace organic substances from aqueous solutions. Novel composite polymeric membranes have been prepared, using concentrated emulsions as precursors, and employed in the pervaporation of various liquid mixtures. In order to improve the stability of the concentrated emulsion, the hydrophilicity and/or the hydrophobicity of the phases involved must be increased by replacing them with their solutions in water and/or in a hydrocarbon, respectively. Another possibility of improving the stability is to increase the viscosity of the phases, by partial polymerization of one or both phases before preparing the concentrated emulsion. The emulsion gel was subsequently transformed into a polymer composite by polymerizing both phases. The dispersed phase should be selected to yield a hydrophobic (hydrophilic) polymer which is compatible with the components selected for separation and incompatible with the other components, while the continuous phase should be selected to yield a hydrophilic (hydrophobic) polymer which is incompatible with all of the components of the mixture, and thus it can ensure the integrity of the membrane. As examples, several composite polymeric membranes were designed, prepared, and employed in the separation by pervaporation of water-ethanol,aromatics-paraffinics, and aromatics-alcohol mixtures.

  17. International News Bowwowing: A Trend Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that the increased "borrowing" of news from foreign news agencies may not be due to the declining number of United States foreign correspondents but to Third World restrictions on access to news. (FL)

  18. The effect of butter grains on physical properties of butter-like emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rønholt, Stine; Buldo, Patrizia; Mortensen, Kell; Andersen, Ulf; Knudsen, Jes C; Wiking, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Milk fat exists as globules in its natural state in milk. The potential of using globular fat to modulate the rheological properties and crystallization behavior in butter-like emulsions was studied in the present work. We conducted a comparative study of butter-like emulsions, with a fat phase consisting of 0, 10, 25, 50, or 100% anhydrous milk fat (AMF), the remaining fat being butter grains, and all samples containing 20% water, to obtain systematic variation in the ratio of globular fat. All emulsions were studied over 4wk of storage at 5°C. By combining small and large deformation rheology, we conducted a detailed characterization of the rheological behavior of butter-like emulsions. We applied differential scanning calorimetry to monitor thermal behavior, confocal laser scanning microscopy for microstructural analysis, and low-field pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry to measure solid fat content. By combining these techniques, we determined that increasing the fraction of globular fat (by mixing with butter grains) decreases the hardness of butter-like emulsions up to an order of magnitude at d 1. However, no difference was observed in thermal behavior as a function of butter grain content, as all emulsions containing butter grains revealed 2 endothermal peaks corresponding to the high (32.7°C ± 0.6) and medium (14.6°C ± 0.1) melting fractions of fatty acids. In terms of microstructure, decreasing the amount of butter grains in the emulsions resulted in formation of a denser fat crystal network, corresponding to increased hardness. Moreover, microstructural analysis revealed that the presence of butter grains resulted in faster formation of a continuous fat crystal network compared with the 100% AMF sample, which was dominated by crystal clusters surrounded by liquid oil. During storage, hardness remained stable and no changes in thermal behavior were observed, despite an increase in solid fat content of up to 5%. After 28d of storage, we

  19. Two-dimensional materials as emulsion stabilizers: interfacial thermodynamics and molecular barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Megan A; Ohata, Yuzo; Miyawaki, Jin; Bose, Arijit; Hurt, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    A new application for two-dimensional (2D) materials is emulsification, where they can serve as ultrathin platelike interfacial stabilizers in two-liquid systems. We present a first detailed thermodynamic analysis of atomically thin 2D materials at organic-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces and derive expressions for the transfer free energies of emulsion stabilization that account for material geometry, van der Waals transparency or opacity, and variable hydrophobicity. High mass potency is shown to be an intrinsic property of the 2D geometry, which at the atomically thin limit places every atom in contact with both liquid phases, resulting in unit atom efficiency. The thermodynamic model successfully predicts that graphene oxide but not pristine graphene has a favorable hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance for oil-water emulsion stabilization. Multilayer tiling is predicted to occur by the passivation of droplet surface patches left uncovered by packing inefficiencies in the first monolayer, and complete multilayer coverage is confirmed by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. The molecular barrier function of graphene interfacial films causes a significant suppression of dispersed-phase evaporation rates with potential applications in controlled release. Finally, these emulsions can be used as templates for creating solid graphene foams or graphene microsacks filled with lipophilic cargos. Emerging 2D materials are promising as dispersants or emulsifiers where high mass potency and multifunctional properties are desired. PMID:24625132

  20. Method for treating tar sands emulsion and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for resolving a hot bitumen emulsion comprised primarily of bitumen, water and chemical diluents. The method consists of: providing separate but communicated emulsion mixing, and emulsion settling chamber, passing the hot bitumen emulsion through a first elongated mixing passage in the mixing chamber wherein a rapidly flowing stream of recycled emulsion is combined with a minor portion of unrecycled bitumen emulsion, to form a combined bitumen emulsion stream, thereafter passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an elongated discontinuous mixing passage comprised of vertically arranged and interconnected mixing passages within the emulsion mixer, where in the combined bitumen emulsion stream passes at a slower rate than in the first elongated mixing passage, passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an overflow passage communicated with the second elongated mixing passage, introducing a part of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the emulsion settling chamber, recycling the remainder of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the first elongated mixing passage, and removing separated flows of bitumen and water from the settling chamber.

  1. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making…

  2. Effect of soybean lecithin on iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of canola oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jeesu; Oh, Boyoung; Choe, Eunok

    2014-11-01

    The effect of soybean lecithin addition on the iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of emulsions consisting of purified canola oil and water (1:1, w/w) was studied based on headspace oxygen consumption using gas chromatography and hydroperoxide production using the ferric thiocyanate method. Addition levels of iron sulfate, chlorophyll, and soybean lecithin were 5, 4, and 350 mg/kg, respectively. Phospholipids (PLs) during oxidation of the emulsions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography. Addition of soybean lecithin to the emulsions significantly reduced and decelerated iron-catalyzed oil oxidation by lowering headspace oxygen consumption and hydroperoxide production. However, soybean lecithin had no significant antioxidant effect on chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of the emulsions. PLs in soybean lecithin added to the emulsions were degraded during both oxidation processes, although there was little change in PL composition. Among PLs in soybean lecithin, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol were degraded the fastest in the iron-catalyzed and the chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation, respectively. The results suggest that addition of soybean lecithin as an emulsifier can also improve the oxidative stability of oil in an emulsion. PMID:25312008

  3. Fabrication and characterization of Pickering emulsions and oil gels stabilized by highly charged zein/chitosan complex particles (ZCCPs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wu, Lei-Yan; Qi, Jun-Ru; Guo, Jian; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-12-15

    Herein, we reported a facile method to fabricate ultra-stable, surfactant- and antimicrobial-free Pickering emulsions by designing and modulating emulsions' interfaces via zein/chitosan colloid particles (ZCCPs). Highly charged ZCCPs with neutral wettability were produced by a facile anti-solvent procedure. The ZCCPs were shown to be effective Pickering emulsifiers because the emulsions formed were highly resistant to coalescence over a 9-month storage period. The ZCCPs were adsorbed irreversibly at the interface during emulsification, forming a hybrid network framework in which zein particles were embedded within the chitosan network, yielding ultra-stable food-grade zein/chitosan colloid particles stabilized Pickering emulsions (ZCCPEs). Moreover, stable surfactant-free oil gels were obtained by a one-step freeze-drying process of the precursor ZCCPEs. This distinctive interfacial architecture accounted for the favourable physical performance, and potentially oxidative and microbial stability of the emulsions and/or oil gels. This work opens up a promising route via a food-grade Pickering emulsion-template approach to transform liquid oil into solid-like fats with zero trans-fat formation. PMID:27451205

  4. Liquid Biopsy May Help Doctors Track Changes in Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159208.html Liquid Biopsy May Help Doctors Track Changes in Tumors ... Now, researchers report that a new blood-based "liquid biopsy" could be a groundbreaking alternative. Doctors used ...

  5. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  6. Simple, reversible emulsion system switched by pH on the basis of chitosan without any hydrophobic modification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Wang, Chaoyang; Zou, Shengwen; Wei, Zengjiang; Tong, Zhen

    2012-07-31

    Chitosan without hydrophobic modification is not a good emulsifier itself. However, it has a pH-tunable sol-gel transition due to free amino groups along its backbone. In the present work, a simple reversible Pickering emulsion system based on the pH-tunable sol-gel transition of chitosan was developed. At pH > 6.0, as adjusted by NaOH, chitosan was insoluble in water. Chitosan nanoparticles or micrometer-sized floccular precipitates were formed in situ. These chitosan aggregates could adsorb at the interface of oil and water to stabilize the o/w emulsions, so-called Pickering emulsions. At pH < 6.0, as adjusted by HCl, chitosan was soluble in water. Demulsification happened. Four organic solvents (liquid paraffin, n-hexane, toluene, and dichloromethane) were chosen as the oil phase. Reversible emulsions were formed for all four oils. Chitosan-based Pickering emulsions could undergo five cycles of emulsification-demulsification with only a slight increase in the emulsion droplet size. They also had good long-term stability for more than 2 months. Herein, we give an example of chitosan without any hydrophobic modification to act as an effective emulsifier for various oil-water systems. From the results, we have determined that natural polymers with a stimulus-responsive sol-gel transition should be a good particulate emulsifier. The method for in situ formation of pH-responsive Pickering emulsions based on chitosan will open up a new route to the preparation of a wide range of reversible emulsions. PMID:22762435

  7. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  8. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  9. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  10. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  11. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  12. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  13. Disjoining pressure isotherms of water-in-bitumen emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shawn D; Czarnecki, Jan; Masliyah, Jacob

    2002-08-01

    In the oil sands industry, undesirable water-in-oil emulsions are often formed during the bitumen recovery process where water is used to liberate bitumen from sand grains. Nearly all of the water is removed except for a small percentage (approximately 1 to 2%), which remains in the solvent-diluted bitumen as micrometer-sized droplets. Knowledge of the colloidal forces that stabilized these water droplets would help to increase our understanding of how these emulsions are stabilized. In this study, the thin liquid film-pressure balance technique has been used to measure isotherms of disjoining pressure in water/toluene-diluted bitumen/water films at five different toluene-bitumen mass ratios. Even though a broad range of mass ratios was studied, only two isotherms are obtained, indicating a possible change in the molecular orientation of surfactant molecules at the bitumen/water interfaces. At low toluene-bitumen mass ratios, the film stability appears to be due to a strong, short-range steric repulsion created by a surfactant bilayer. Similar isotherms were obtained for water/toluene-diluted asphaltene/water films, indicating that the surface active material at the interface probably originated from the asphaltene fraction of the bitumen. However, unlike the bitumen films, films of toluene-diluted asphaltenes often formed very rigid interfaces similar to the "protective skin" described by other researcher. PMID:16290773

  14. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  15. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1-10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200-400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  16. Encapsulation of emulsion droplets by organo-silica shells.

    PubMed

    Zoldesi, C I; Steegstra, P; Imhof, A

    2007-04-01

    Surfactant-stabilized emulsion droplets were used as templates for the synthesis of hollow colloidal particles. Monodisperse silicone oil droplets were prepared by hydrolysis and polymerization of dimethyldiethoxysiloxane monomer, in the presence of surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, anionic) or Triton X-100 (non-ionic). A sharp decrease in the average droplet radius with increasing surfactant concentration was found, with a linear dependence of the droplet radius on the logarithm of the surfactant concentration. The surfactant-stabilized oil droplets were then encapsulated with a solid shell using tetraethoxysilane, and hollow particles were obtained by exchange of the liquid core. The size and polydispersity of the oil droplets and the thickness of the shell were determined using static light scattering, and hollow particles were characterized by electron microscopy. Details on the composition of the shell material were obtained from energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. In the case of sodium dodecyl sulphate, the resulting shells were relatively thin and rough, while when Triton X-100 was used, smooth shells were obtained which could be varied in thickness from very thick ( approximately 150 nm) to very thin shells ( approximately 17 nm). Finally, hexane droplets were encapsulated using the same procedure, showing that our method can in principle be extended to a wide range of emulsions. PMID:17240392

  17. Location and Influence of Added Block Copolymers on the Droplet Size in Oil-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Itaru; So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2015-07-14

    We have investigated the effect of added polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SO) copolymer on the stability of oil-in-oil (O/O) emulsions containing polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in chloroform (CHCl3) and directly visualized the location of SO in the emulsions by using dye-labeled SO (SO*) with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The emulsion formed by PS/PEG/CHCl3 = 14/6/80 (wt %) consisted of a droplet phase of PS in CHCl3 and a continuous phase containing PEG in CHCl3. SO*s with various molecular weights (Mn,SO) and volume fractions of the PS block in SO (fPS) were prepared via living anionic polymerization and subsequent end-esterification. The effect of SO on the droplet size in the emulsions was investigated as a function of both Mn,SO and fPS. Increasing Mn,SO and decreasing fPS were effective at reducing the droplet size down to less than 1 μm, which is 100 times smaller than in the absence of SO. The location of SO*s in the O/O emulsions was further investigated by CLSM. We found that the location of SO*s changed from the droplet interior to the liquid-liquid interface and then to the continuous phase with decreasing fPS. We discuss the possible mechanism in terms of the relation of SO* location to the droplet size. PMID:26134549

  18. The physicochemical stability and in vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene in oil-in- water sodium caseinate emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene (BC), the most important dietary source of provitamin A, is necessary for optimum human health. BC is insoluble or only slightly soluble in most liquids but its bioavailability improves when ingested with fat. Therefore lipid emulsions are ideal matrices for BC delivery. BC (0.1%) in ...

  19. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  20. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  1. Emulsifying potency of new amino acid-type surfactant (II): stable water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions containing 85 wt% inner water phase.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Kouchi, J; Tabohashi, T; Harusawa, F; Yamaguchi, A; Sakai, H; Abe, M

    2001-10-01

    The ternary phase diagram for N-[3-lauryloxy-2-hydroxypropyl]-L-arginine L-glutamate (C12HEA-Glu), a new amino acid-type surfactant, /oleic acid (OA)/water system was established. The liquid crystal and gel complex formations between C12HEA-Glu and OA were applied to a preparation of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. Stable W/O emulsions containing liquid paraffin (LP) as the oil and a mixture of C12HEA-Glu and OA as the emulsifier were formed. The preparation of stable W/O emulsions containing 85 wt% water phase was also possible, in which water droplets would be polygonally transformed and closely packed, since the maximum percentage of inner phase is 74% assuming uniformly spherical droplets. Water droplets would be taken into the liquid crystalline phase (or the gel complex) and the immovable water droplets would stabilize the W/O emulsion system. The viscosity of emulsions abruptly increased above the 75 wt% water phase (dispersed phase). The stability of W/O emulsions with a lower weight ratio of OA to C12HEA-Glu and a higher ratio of water phase was greater. This unusual phenomenon may be related to the formation of a liquid crystalline phase between C12HEA-Glu and OA, and the stability of the liquid crystal at a lower ratio of oil (continuous phase). W/O and oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing LP were selectively prepared using a mixture of C12HEA-Glu and OA since the desirable hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) number for the emulsification was obtainable by mixing the two emulsifiers. PMID:11605664

  2. Minimizing liquid contaminants in natural gas liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Wines, T.H.; Williamson, K.M.

    1996-12-31

    In processing natural gas liquids, significant contamination occurs with liquid dispersions and emulsions. Natural gas liquids (NGL) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) streams are treated with caustic to remove residual organic sulfur compounds such as mercaptans and with amines to remove hydrogen sulfide. In both cases a liquid/liquid contactor is used. Significant amounts of the caustic or amine can be carried over into the product stream in process units that are running at rates above design capacity, are treating high sulfur feed stocks, or have other operational problems. The carried over liquid results in off-spec products, excessive loses of caustic or amine, and can cause operating problems in downstream processes. In addition, water is a significant contaminant which can cause LPG and natural gasoline to be off-specification. This paper discusses a new technique for separating very stable liquid dispersions of caustic, amine, or water from natural gas liquids using liquid/liquid cartridge coalescers constructed with specially formulated polymer and fluoropolymer medium with enhanced surface properties. In addition, factors influencing the coalescer mechanism will be discussed including interfacial tension, concentration of surface active compounds, steric repulsion, and electrostatic charge affects. Results from field tests, operating data from commercial installations, and economic benefits will also be presented.

  3. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  4. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  5. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

  6. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  7. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  8. The Diffusion of "Shocking" Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Harvey, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    A study of the diffusion of news about the Mormon Church's approval of Blacks for the priesthood revealed that "shocking" good news can ignite the interpersonal communications system, that news has more credibility when obtained from media than when obtained interpersonally, and that people use mass media to verify news obtained interpersonally.…

  9. Television News and the Miners' Strike.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Guy; And Others

    A content analysis was performed on all of the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) Nine O'Clock News and ITV (Independent Television) News at Ten programs that were broadcast during Britain's year-long miners' strike--March 1984-March 1985--and a four-month sample of Channel 4 news to examine how television news covered a protracted story of…

  10. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...