Science.gov

Sample records for news entries based

  1. Content-based analysis of news video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Junqing; Zhou, Dongru; Liu, Huayong; Cai, Bo

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, we present a schema for content-based analysis of broadcast news video. First, we separate commercials from news using audiovisual features. Then, we automatically organize news programs into a content hierarchy at various levels of abstraction via effective integration of video, audio, and text data available from the news programs. Based on these news video structure and content analysis technologies, a TV news video Library is generated, from which users can retrieve definite news story according to their demands.

  2. Chemistry Is in the News: Taxonomy of authentic news media-based learning activities1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-09-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of ‘authentic news media-based learning activities’ to provide a conceptual framework for the description and discussion of such approaches. The Chemistry Is in the News project was designed to allow students to draw explicit connections between the course content and real world issues in ways that engage the students in a full range of cognitive skills. The activities consisted in the study, creation, and peer review of news portfolios by student collaborative groups. A news portfolio consists of an authentic news article taken from the popular press with interpretive comments and questions.

  3. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. PMID:25089769

  4. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Belfast: On the next level above Galileo Wales: 2nd All Wales Physics Teachers Meeting England: Good afternoon Natural Philosphers... Communication: Posters win prizes Careers: Physics On Course 2004 Visits: Refreshing Physics Sport: Cheating at baseball Physics on Stage: Polish performance Space: Forces that affect GPS satellites New Zealand: It’s not All Black News these days New Initiatives: NOISE Physics on Stage 3: Lively stars heading for ESA

  5. Text-based search of TV news stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rakesh

    1996-11-01

    Our goal is to enable viewers to access TV programs based on their content. Towards this end, we present a system that automatically captures and processes TV news programs into a database that can be searched over the internet. Users browse this database by submitting simple English queries. The results of the query is a hyperlinked list of matching news stories. Clicking on any item in the list immediately launches a video of the pertinent part of the news broadcast. We segment TV news broadcasts into distinct news stories. We then index each story as a separate entity. In reply to a query, videos for these news stories are displayed rather than the whole TV program. News program s ar usually accompanied by a transcript in closed caption text. The closed caption text contains markers for story boundaries. Due to the live nature of TV news programs, the closed caption lags the actual audio/video by varying amounts of time up to a few seconds. The closed caption text, thus, has to be shifted to be aligned in time to the video. We use video and audio events to do this synchronization. The closed caption for each story is entered into a database. In response to a query, the database retrieves and ranks the matching closed caption stores. An HTML document is returned to the user which lists: 1) the name and time of the news program that this story belongs to, 2) thumbnails providing a visual summary of the story, 3) closed caption text. To view a news story, the user simply clicks on an item form the list and the video for that story is streamed onto a media player at the user side. This system maintains the manner of presentation of the media, namely video for TV programs, while allowing the common search and selection techniques used on the web.

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  7. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  8. Efficient Tracking of News Topics Based on Chronological Semantic Structures in a Large-Scale News Video Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Mo, Hiroshi; Katayama, Norio; Satoh, Shin'ichi; Murase, Hiroshi

    Recent advance in digital storage technology has enabled us to archive a large volume of video data. Thanks to this trend, we have archived more than 1,800 hours of video data from a daily Japanese news show in the last ten years. When considering the effective use of such a large news video archive, we assumed that analysis of its chronological and semantic structure becomes important. We also consider that providing the users with the development of news topics is more important to help their understanding of current affairs, rather than providing a list of relevant news stories as in most of the current news video retrieval systems. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a structuring method for a news video archive, together with an interface that visualizes the structure, so that users could track the development of news topics according to their interest, efficiently. The proposed news video structure, namely the “topic thread structure”, is obtained as a result of an analysis of the chronological and semantic relation between news stories. Meanwhile, the proposed interface, namely “mediaWalker II”, allows users to track the development of news topics along the topic thread structure, and at the same time watch the video footage corresponding to each news story. Analyses on the topic thread structures obtained by applying the proposed method to actual news video footages revealed interesting and comprehensible relations between news topics in the real world. At the same time, analyses on their size quantified the efficiency of tracking a user's topic-of-interest based on the proposed topic thread structure. We consider this as a first step towards facilitating video authoring by users based on existing contents in a large-scale news video archive.

  9. "Chemistry Is in the News": Taxonomy of Authentic News Media-Based Learning Activities. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of 'authentic news media-based learning…

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  11. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results. PMID:25093207

  12. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results. PMID:25093207

  13. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Astronomy: Trust founder receives heavenly honour Africa: UK teaching methods make the difference in Rwandan schools Spaced Out: UK-based scale model places Jodrell Bank at the centre of our solar system Teaching Support: Teacher Network makes its mark in the classroom Correction Art on Stage: Galileo lacks momentum Meeting: Teachers are inspired by US gathering Online Study: PPLATO Foundation promotes new avenue to university study Conference: GIREP '04 creates atmosphere of 'curiosity and enthusiasm' Meeting: SonSD meeting allows exchange of teaching ideas Competition: Win a digital camera! Physics in Perspective: Events highlight how rewarding physics can be Meeting: ASE conference to deliver the best of Physics Education

  15. 2. LOOKING WNW AT BASE OF ENTRY STAIRWAY ON CONVERGING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LOOKING WNW AT BASE OF ENTRY STAIRWAY ON CONVERGING CAMERA AXES Copy photograph of photogrammetric plate LC-HABS-GS05-B-1979-1402L. - Rose Pauson House (Ruins), Thirty-Second Street, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. Interior Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Resources: Online schools video library GIREP Seminar: A seminar not a conference New Teaching Resource: Free living for teachers Space: NASA proposes MEER - Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic-Reboost Electronic Teaching Materials: Superconductivity motivates need for upper secondary curriculum subjects Gifted and Talented: Seminars seek challenges Space: Comet chasing Particle Physics: Playing with single electrons Physics on Stage: Teachers explore the meaning of life Physics on Stage: Greek national event Physics on Stage: Physics on the Slovak stage Physics on Stage: Clubbing in Germany Physics on Stage: The Sun's star performance Higher Education: Physics: so refreshing USA: Broadening the Base AAPT Summer Meeting: US teachers in good form Astronomy: High school astronomy in the Czech Republic Space: Express to Mars Particle Physics: Journey to the centre of the Earth? ASE 2004: Flight from the ASE Physics Songs: A powerful melody Teacher Training: European training looks for ideal model

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Microscopy: Schools to gain remote access to Oxford University-based SEM Canada: Perimeter Institute calls international applicants to its 2005 summer school ASE: ASE 2005 refreshes the teaching parts that other conferences cannot reach Scotland: Glasgow hosts Kelvin exhibition Climate Analysis: Met Office sets up project to predict climate change Wales: Welsh teachers meet at Christ College, Brecon ESERA: ESERA 2005 unveils its conference programme Higher Education: Educators address school-university transition Christmas Lecture Series: Royal Institution supports Christmas Lecture series with interactive CD-ROM Events: UK’s Science Week kicks off in March Grants: PPARC and IOP to provide grants worth up to £400 Camera Competition: Congratulations go to camera winners Teachers’ TV: Teachers’ channel hits the small screen Physics and Music: Foster and Liebeck presentation combines physics and music Science on Stage: SOS gears up for Geneva festival Nanoworld: Hirsch lecture at Oxford focuses on the nanoworld GIREP: GIREP conference aims to raise physics’ profile Course: STELAR offers free radio-communication course

  19. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heat shields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kWcm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses.With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to spherical geometries of diameters ranging from 1 to 100 m for an entry velocity of 20 kms and stagnation pressures ranging from 1 to 100 atm; (ii) the influence of shape and departure of heating environment predictions from those for a simple spherical geometry; (iii) assessment of thermal response models for silica subject to intense radiation; and (iv) results for porosity-driven gross fragmentation of meteors, idealized as a collection of smaller objects. Lessons learned from these simulations will be used to help understand the Chelyabinsk meteor entry up to its first point of fragmentation.

  20. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to spherical geometries of diameters ranging from 1 to 100 m for an entry velocity of 20 kms and stagnation pressures ranging from 1 to 100 atm; (ii) the influence of shape and departure of heating environment predictions from those for a simple spherical geometry; (iii) assessment of thermal response models for silica subject to intense radiation; and (iv) results for porosity-driven gross fragmentation of meteors, idealized as a collection of smaller objects. Lessons learned from these simulations will be used to help understand the Chelyabinsk meteor entry up to its first point of fragmentation.

  1. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is less than 13 km/s (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/cm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to greater than 20 km/s; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to spherical geometries of diameters ranging from 1 to 100 m for an entry velocity of 20 km/s and stagnation pressures ranging from 1 to 100 atm; (ii) the influence of shape and departure of heating environment predictions from those for a simple spherical geometry; (iii) assessment of thermal response models for silica subject to intense radiation; and (iv) results for porosity-driven gross fragmentation of meteors, idealized as a collection of smaller objects. Lessons learned from these simulations will be used to help understand the Chelyabinsk meteor entry up to its first point of fragmentation.

  2. Calibration of Radar Based Re-Entry Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, S.; Bastida Virgili, B.; Flohrer, T.; Gini, F.; Krag, H.; Steiger, C.

    2015-03-01

    The availability of GPS observations via the telemetry during GOCE’s (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) entire re-entry campaign enabled the generation of high quality orbit products which can be used as input to re-entry predictions. These high precision orbits can be used as reference to assess the quality of orbits generated from other sources. Here we verify the accuracy of orbits based on radar tracking data, obtained by dedicated observations with the Tracking & Imaging Radar system from the Fraunhofer High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques institute, with respect to the a post-processed GPS based reference orbit. This leads to time-depended quantification of the orbit determination uncertainties on the re-entry predictions. Furthermore, the ballistic coefficient determined by the orbit determination and its time dependent evolution can be used to a priori estimate the attitude behaviour of GOCE, which can be compared to the telemetry. The attitude behaviour can be analysed by the use of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images, also obtained by dedicated observation by TIRA. The effect of adding this knowledge on the attitude evolution to the re-entry predictions is evaluated.

  3. Evaluation of Mars Entry Reconstructured Trajectories Based on Hypothetical 'Quick-Look' Entry Navigation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor, P. Rick; Bishop, Robert H.; Striepe, Scott A.

    2000-01-01

    A first order simulation analysis of the navigation accuracy expected from various Navigation Quick-Look data sets is performed. Here quick-look navigation data are observations obtained by hypothetical telemetried data transmitted on the fly during a Mars probe's atmospheric entry. In this simulation study, navigation data consists of 3-axis accelerometer sensor and attitude information data. Three entry vehicle guidance types are studied: I. a Maneuvering entry vehicle (as with Mars 01 guidance where angle of attack and bank angle are controlled); II. Zero angle-of-attack controlled entry vehicle (as with Mars 98); and III. Ballistic, or spin stabilized entry vehicle (as with Mars Pathfinder);. For each type, sensitivity to progressively under sampled navigation data and inclusion of sensor errors are characterized. Attempts to mitigate the reconstructed trajectory errors, including smoothing, interpolation and changing integrator characteristics are also studied.

  4. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  5. Engineering graphics data entry for space station data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacovara, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The entry of graphical engineering data into the Space Station Data Base was examined. Discussed were: representation of graphics objects; representation of connectivity data; graphics capture hardware; graphics display hardware; site-wide distribution of graphics, and consolidation of tools and hardware. A fundamental assumption was that existing equipment such as IBM based graphics capture software and VAX networked facilities would be exploited. Defensible conclusions reached after study and simulations of use of these systems at the engineering level are: (1) existing IBM based graphics capture software is an adequate and economical means of entry of schematic and block diagram data for present and anticipated electronic systems for Space Station; (2) connectivity data from the aforementioned system may be incorporated into the envisioned Space Station Data Base with modest effort; (3) graphics and connectivity data captured on the IBM based system may be exported to the VAX network in a simple and direct fashion; (4) graphics data may be displayed site-wide on VT-125 terminals and lookalikes; (5) graphics hard-copy may be produced site-wide on various dot-matrix printers; and (6) the system may provide integrated engineering services at both the engineering and engineering management level.

  6. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals

  7. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  8. Automatic textual annotation of video news based on semantic visual object extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujemaa, Nozha; Fleuret, Francois; Gouet, Valerie; Sahbi, Hichem

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we present our work for automatic generation of textual metadata based on visual content analysis of video news. We present two methods for semantic object detection and recognition from a cross modal image-text thesaurus. These thesaurus represent a supervised association between models and semantic labels. This paper is concerned with two semantic objects: faces and Tv logos. In the first part, we present our work for efficient face detection and recogniton with automatic name generation. This method allows us also to suggest the textual annotation of shots close-up estimation. On the other hand, we were interested to automatically detect and recognize different Tv logos present on incoming different news from different Tv Channels. This work was done jointly with the French Tv Channel TF1 within the "MediaWorks" project that consists on an hybrid text-image indexing and retrieval plateform for video news.

  9. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  10. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  11. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  12. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  13. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  14. Creating COMFORT: A Communication-Based Model for Breaking Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villagran, Melinda; Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Baldwin, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This study builds upon existing protocols for breaking bad news (BBN), and offers an interaction-based approach to communicating comfort to patients and their families. The goal was to analyze medical students' (N = 21) videotaped standardized patient BBN interactions after completing an instructional unit on a commonly used BBN protocol, commonly…

  15. Lost in Translation? Deconstructing Science in the News through an Inquiry-Based Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangachari, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes an experiment to introduce freshmen science students to inquiry-based learning. The overarching theme was the communication of scientific information to the public by the mass media. Students, working in groups, deconstructed news items (many dealing with basic biomedical issues) and assessed the veracity of statements with…

  16. Assisted entry mitigates text messaging-based driving detriment.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Benjamin D; Hancock, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using cell phones indicates that manual manipulation is not a principal component of text messaging relating driving detriment. This paper suggests that manipulation of a phone in conjunction with the cognitive need to compose the message itself co-act to contribute to driving degradation. This being so, drivers sending text messages might experience reduced interference to the driving task if the text messaging itself were assisted through the predictive T9 system. We evaluated undergraduate drivers in a simulator who drove and texted using either Assisted Text entry, via Nokia's T9 system, or unassisted entry via the multitap interface. Results supported the superiority of the T9 system over the multitap system implying that specific assistive technologies can modulate the degradation of capacity which texting tragically induces. PMID:22317377

  17. Design of a Template for Handwriting Based Hindi Text Entry in Handheld Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Diya; Vasal, Ityam; Yammiyavar, Pradeep

    Mobile phones, in the recent times, have become affordable and accessible to a wider range of users including the hitherto technologically and economically under-represented segments. Indian users are a gigantic consumer base for mobile phones. With Hindi being one of the most widely spoken languages in the country and the primary tool of communication for about a third of its population, an effective solution for Hindi text entry in mobile devices is expected to be immensely useful to the non English speaking users. This paper proposes a mobile phone handwriting based text entry solution for Hindi language, which allows for an easy text entry method, while facilitating better recognition accuracy.

  18. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News

  8. Maintaining a News Perspective Remotely through Online Information Retrieval: Task-Based Web Experiences of Foreign News Correspondents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kuanyuh Tony

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage mixed methods approach was used to examine how foreign correspondents stationed in the United States use World Wide Web technology to maintain their news perspectives remotely. Despite emerging technology playing an increasingly significant role in the production of international journalism, the subject under investigation has been

  9. Maintaining a News Perspective Remotely through Online Information Retrieval: Task-Based Web Experiences of Foreign News Correspondents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kuanyuh Tony

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage mixed methods approach was used to examine how foreign correspondents stationed in the United States use World Wide Web technology to maintain their news perspectives remotely. Despite emerging technology playing an increasingly significant role in the production of international journalism, the subject under investigation has been…

  10. Hybrid hill-climbing and knowledge-based methods for intelligent news filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, K.J.

    1996-12-31

    As the size of the Internet increases, the amount of data available to users has dramatically risen, resulting in an information overload for users. This work involved the creation of an intelligent information news filtering system named INFOS (Intelligent News Filtering Organizational System) to reduce the user`s search burden by automatically eliminating Usenet news articles predicted to be irrelevant. These predictions are learned automatically by adapting an internal user model that is based upon features taken from articles and collaborative features derived from other users. The features are manipulated through keyword-based techniques and knowledge-based techniques to perform the actual filtering. Knowledge-based systems have the advantage of analyzing input text in detail, but at the cost of computational complexity and the difficulty of scaling up to large domains. In contrast, statistical and keyword approaches scale up readily but result in a shallower understanding of the input. A hybrid system integrating both approaches improves accuracy over keyword approaches, supports domain knowledge, and retains scalability. The system would be enhanced by more robust word disambiguation.

  11. 2013 CAEL Forum & News: Competency-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, CAEL released the report "Competency-Based Degree Programs in the U.S.: Postsecondary Credentials for Measurable Student Learning and Performance," which examined the current state of competency-based postsecondary education in the U.S., profiling the various types of competency-based, or competency-focused, models that…

  12. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chinnapongse, Ronald; Munk, Michelle; Dillman, Robert; Feldman, Jay; Prabhu, Dinesh; Beerman, Adam

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-shield for extreme entry environment.

  13. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnapongse, Ronald; Ellerbe, Donald; Stackpoole, Maragaret; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beerman, Adam; Feldman, Jay; Peterson Keith; Prabhu, Dinesh; Dillman, Robert; Munk, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely severe entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-­-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-­-shield for extreme entry environment.

  14. Data Entry Errors and Design for Model-Based Tight Glycemic Control in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality but require human data entry, particularly of blood glucose (BG) values, which can be significantly prone to error. This study presents the design and optimization of data entry methods to minimize error for a computerized and model-based TGC method prior to pilot clinical trials. Method To minimize data entry error, two tests were carried out to optimize a method with errors less than the 5%-plus reported in other studies. Four initial methods were tested on 40 subjects in random order, and the best two were tested more rigorously on 34 subjects. The tests measured entry speed and accuracy. Errors were reported as corrected and uncorrected errors, with the sum comprising a total error rate. The first set of tests used randomly selected values, while the second set used the same values for all subjects to allow comparisons across users and direct assessment of the magnitude of errors. These research tests were approved by the University of Canterbury Ethics Committee. Results The final data entry method tested reduced errors to less than 1–2%, a 60–80% reduction from reported values. The magnitude of errors was clinically significant and was typically by 10.0 mmol/liter or an order of magnitude but only for extreme values of BG < 2.0 mmol/liter or BG > 15.0–20.0 mmol/liter, both of which could be easily corrected with automated checking of extreme values for safety. Conclusions The data entry method selected significantly reduced data entry errors in the limited design tests presented, and is in use on a clinical pilot TGC study. The overall approach and testing methods are easily performed and generalizable to other applications and protocols. PMID:22401331

  15. Print News Coverage of School-Based HPV Vaccine Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Casciotti, Dana; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based HPV vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding these legislative activities. Messages communicated through the media are an important influence on adolescent and parent understanding of school-based vaccine mandates. METHODS We conducted structured text analysis of newspaper coverage, including quantitative analysis of 169 articles published in mandate jurisdictions from 2005-2009, and qualitative analysis of 63 articles from 2007. Our structured analysis identified topics, key stakeholders and sources, tone, and the presence of conflict. Qualitative thematic analysis identified key messages and issues. RESULTS Media coverage was often incomplete, providing little context about cervical cancer or screening. Skepticism and autonomy concerns were common. Messages reflected conflict and distrust of government activities, which could negatively impact this and other youth-focused public health initiatives. CONCLUSIONS If school health professionals are aware of the potential issues raised in media coverage of school-based health mandates, they will be more able to convey appropriate health education messages, and promote informed decision-making by parents and students. PMID:25099421

  16. Drag-based composite super-twisting sliding mode control law design for Mars entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenhua; Yang, Jun; Li, Shihua; Guo, Lei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the drag-based trajectory tracking guidance problem is investigated for Mars entry vehicle subject to uncertainties. A composite super twisting sliding mode control method based on finite-time disturbance observer is proposed for guidance law design. The proposed controller not only eliminates the effects of matched and mismatched disturbances due to uncertainties of atmospheric models and vehicle aerodynamics but also guarantees the continuity of control action. Numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of Mars Science Laboratory mission, where the results show that the proposed methods can improve the Mars entry guidance precision as compared with some existing guidance methods including PID and ADRC.

  17. Parsing Glucose Entry into the Brain: Novel Findings Obtained with Enzyme-Based Glucose Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular levels of glucose in brain tissue reflect dynamic balance between its gradient-dependent entry from arterial blood and its use for cellular metabolism. In this work, we present several sets of previously published and unpublished data obtained by using enzyme-based glucose biosensors coupled with constant-potential high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats. First, we consider basic methodological issues related to the reliability of electrochemical measurements of extracellular glucose levels in rats under physiologically relevant conditions. Second, we present data on glucose responses induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by salient environmental stimuli and discuss the relationships between local neuronal activation and rapid glucose entry into brain tissue. Third, by presenting data on changes in NAc glucose induced by intravenous and intragastric glucose delivery, we discuss other mechanisms of glucose entry into the extracellular domain following changes in glucose blood concentrations. Lastly, by showing the pattern of NAc glucose fluctuations during glucose-drinking behavior, we discuss the relationships between “active” and “passive” glucose entry to the brain, its connection to behavior-related metabolic activation, and the possible functional significance of these changes in behavioral regulation. These data provide solid experimental support for the “neuronal” hypothesis of neurovascular coupling, which postulates the critical role of neuronal activity in rapid regulation of vascular tone, local blood flow, and entry of glucose and oxygen to brain tissue to maintain active cellular metabolism. PMID:25490002

  18. WWW-based data entry for document clearance requests

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiak, D.M.

    1997-10-08

    All documents created at Argonne must be cleared before being published. The clearance process is coordinated by the Publications and Record Services. The Electronic Document Review and Clearance System (EDRC) consists of a Web-based system for submission of clearance requests, an electronic staging area for document awaiting review, and Web-based review and clearance of documents. This report covers the document clearing process, the EDRC system, expected benefits/costs, and a demonstration.

  19. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School NewsPrograms for Social StudiesClassrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for

  20. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School News Programs for Social Studies Classrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for…

  1. Computer-based physician order entry: the state of the art.

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, D F; Stead, W W

    1994-01-01

    Direct computer-based physician order entry has been the subject of debate for over 20 years. Many sites have implemented systems successfully. Others have failed outright or flirted with disaster, incurring substantial delays, cost overruns, and threatened work actions. The rationale for physician order entry includes process improvement, support of cost-conscious decision making, clinical decision support, and optimization of physicians' time. Barriers to physician order entry result from the changes required in practice patterns, roles within the care team, teaching patterns, and institutional policies. Key ingredients for successful implementation include: the system must be fast and easy to use, the user interface must behave consistently in all situations, the institution must have broad and committed involvement and direction by clinicians prior to implementation, the top leadership of the organization must be committed to the project, and a group of problem solvers and users must meet regularly to work out procedural issues. This article reviews the peer-reviewed scientific literature to present the current state of the art of computer-based physician order entry. PMID:7719793

  2. 19 CFR 123.14 - Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... taxicabs in international traffic. 123.14 Section 123.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... International Traffic § 123.14 Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic. (a) Admission without entry or payment of duty. Trucks, busses, and taxicabs, however owned, which have...

  3. 19 CFR 123.14 - Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... taxicabs in international traffic. 123.14 Section 123.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... International Traffic § 123.14 Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic. (a) Admission without entry or payment of duty. Trucks, busses, and taxicabs, however owned, which have...

  4. 19 CFR 123.14 - Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... taxicabs in international traffic. 123.14 Section 123.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... International Traffic § 123.14 Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic. (a) Admission without entry or payment of duty. Trucks, busses, and taxicabs, however owned, which have...

  5. 19 CFR 123.14 - Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... taxicabs in international traffic. 123.14 Section 123.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... International Traffic § 123.14 Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic. (a) Admission without entry or payment of duty. Trucks, busses, and taxicabs, however owned, which have...

  6. Simulation-Based Analysis of Reentry Dynamics for the Sharp Atmospheric Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillier, Clemens Emmanuel

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the reentry dynamics of a high-performance lifting atmospheric entry vehicle through numerical simulation tools. The vehicle, named SHARP, is currently being developed by the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems branch of NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The goal of this project is to provide insight into trajectory tradeoffs and vehicle dynamics using simulation tools that are powerful, flexible, user-friendly and inexpensive. Implemented Using MATLAB and SIMULINK, these tools are developed with an eye towards further use in the conceptual design of the SHARP vehicle's trajectory and flight control systems. A trajectory simulator is used to quantify the entry capabilities of the vehicle subject to various operational constraints. Using an aerodynamic database computed by NASA and a model of the earth, the simulator generates the vehicle trajectory in three-dimensional space based on aerodynamic angle inputs. Requirements for entry along the SHARP aerothermal performance constraint are evaluated for different control strategies. Effect of vehicle mass on entry parameters is investigated, and the cross range capability of the vehicle is evaluated. Trajectory results are presented and interpreted. A six degree of freedom simulator builds on the trajectory simulator and provides attitude simulation for future entry controls development. A Newtonian aerodynamic model including control surfaces and a mass model are developed. A visualization tool for interpreting simulation results is described. Control surfaces are roughly sized. A simple controller is developed to fly the vehicle along its aerothermal performance constraint using aerodynamic flaps for control. This end-to-end demonstration proves the suitability of the 6-DOF simulator for future flight control system development. Finally, issues surrounding real-time simulation with hardware in the loop are discussed.

  7. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

  8. An efficient fault-tolerant out-patient order entry system based on special distributed client/server architecture.

    PubMed

    Chuang, C T

    1998-01-01

    An automatic order entry system is very important for processing out-patient information. This system not only helps physicians to enter their orders directly, but can also reduce order communication error and thus improve medical quality. Therefore, many hospitals have high aspirations to generate and implement direct order entry systems, but they are also concerned about the setbacks of system failure. In this paper, we present an effective and efficient fault-tolerant order entry system based on special distribution client/server architecture that satisfies the requirements of out-patient order entry very well. From the experimental results carried out on a prototype, we found that this system can improve the system response time of order entry and can also generate an operational method having a user friendly interface. The physicians can enter their orders easily, accurately, directly, flexibly and at a faster rate by making choices from standardized and personalized menus in this system. PMID:9667048

  9. A Diachronic Study of Initial Stress and Other Prosodic Features in the French News Announcer Style: Corpus-Based Measurements and Perceptual Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mareuil, Philippe Boula; Rilliard, Albert; Allauzen, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on prosodic evolution in the French news announcer style, based on acoustic and perceptual analysis of French audiovisual archives. A 10-hour corpus covering six decades of broadcast news is investigated automatically. Two prosodic features, which may give an impression of emphatic style, are explored: word-initial stress and…

  10. A Well-Clear Volume Based on Time to Entry Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Upchurch, Jason M.; Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    A well-clear volume is a key component of NASA's Separation Assurance concept for the integration of UAS in the NAS. This paper proposes a mathematical definition of the well-clear volume that uses, in addition to distance thresholds, a time threshold based on time to entry point (TEP). The mathematical model that results from this definition is more conservative than other candidate definitions of the wellclear volume that are based on range over closure rate and time to closest point of approach.

  11. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Highlights important 1985 science stories appearing in "Science News" under these headings: anthropology and paleontology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and mathematics, earth sciences, environment, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. Each entry includes the volume and page number in…

  12. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Bruno; Liang, Shuaiyi; Park, Jongwoo; Schön, Arne; Courter, Joel R; LaLonde, Judith M; Wendler, Daniel J; Princiotto, Amy M; Seaman, Michael S; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Smith, Amos B

    2016-03-10

    The optimization, based on computational, thermodynamic, and crystallographic data, of a series of small-molecule ligands of the Phe43 cavity of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been achieved. Importantly, biological evaluation revealed that the small-molecule CD4 mimics (4-7) inhibit HIV-1 entry into target cells with both significantly higher potency and neutralization breadth than previous congeners, while maintaining high selectivity for the target virus. Their binding mode was characterized via thermodynamic and crystallographic studies. PMID:26985324

  13. A Dual Microscopy-Based Assay To Assess Listeria monocytogenes Cellular Entry and Vacuolar Escape.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan J; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Balestrino, Damien; Bobard, Alexandre; Danckaert, Anne; Aulner, Nathalie; Shorte, Spencer; Enninga, Jost; Cossart, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium and a facultative intracellular pathogen that invades mammalian cells, disrupts its internalization vacuole, and proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm. Here, we describe a novel image-based microscopy assay that allows discrimination between cellular entry and vacuolar escape, enabling high-content screening to identify factors specifically involved in these two steps. We first generated L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua strains expressing a β-lactamase covalently attached to the bacterial cell wall. These strains were then incubated with HeLa cells containing the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CCF4 in their cytoplasm. The CCF4 probe was cleaved by the bacterial surface β-lactamase only in cells inoculated with L. monocytogenes but not those inoculated with L. innocua, thereby demonstrating bacterial access to the host cytoplasm. Subsequently, we performed differential immunofluorescence staining to distinguish extracellular versus total bacterial populations in samples that were also analyzed by the FRET-based assay. With this two-step analysis, bacterial entry can be distinguished from vacuolar rupture in a single experiment. Our novel approach represents a powerful tool for identifying factors that determine the intracellular niche of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26497455

  14. Entry guidance with real-time planning of reference based on analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenbin; Chen, Wanchun

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, first, we develop new analytical solutions to hypersonic gliding problem. In the derivation of these solutions, we propose an innovative method based on spectral decomposition for solving a special type of linear system with variable coefficients, where the system matrix can be expressed as the product of a scale function and a constant matrix. Next, we design an entry guidance based on these analytical solutions. In the guidance, the downrange analytical expression is used to plan the longitudinal reference profile satisfying the downrange requirement in real time. Two bank reversals are needed to eliminate the crossrange error. The first is planned by the crossrange analytical expression such that the second is at a specified point near the end of the flight. After the first bank reversal is performed, the second is slightly corrected using the trajectory simulation. Because the longitudinal reference profile and bank reversals are planned onboard, the entry guidance can handle various urgent tasks and deal well with large dispersions in the initial conditions, aerodynamic model and atmospheric model.

  15. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  16. Development and deployment of a web-based physician order entry system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y L; Hsu, C Y; Hsieh, D; Li, Y C

    2001-07-01

    The computer-based Physician Order Entry System (POES) has been employed in many clinical institutes in Taiwan. Most of the POES systems are developed in the two-tier client-server architecture, and a large portion of the systems are constructed on a mainframe or even a single PC. The exponential growth of the Internet has had a tremendous impact on our society in recent years. In consideration of the future user interface and system architecture, we have developed a three-tier web-based Physician Order Entry System and successfully deployed it in the Wang-Fang Hospital in Taipei. The system is the first POES based on three-tier and World Wide Web (WWW) in Taiwan. The system provides the Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) structure for the physician to enter subject, object, diagnoses, medicine dosage, treatment and laboratory test request, and prints out the prescription and necessary document. The doctor can also retrieve the patient's medical record on the system. One of the special characteristics of the system is its personalized design. The doctor can define their own diagnosis, medicine and treatment database and any combination of these to facilitate their clinical work. The system has been reviewed since February 1999. The result shows that the clinical procedure has become more efficient, and the chances of omission have been reduced. The system is very stable and the Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) database access did not show any delay in the network. Since we have incorporated many new web-programming techniques, the progress of the techniques will improve the system performance in the future. PMID:11470616

  17. Internal ribosome entry site-based vectors for combined gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Renaud-Gabardos, Edith; Hantelys, Fransky; Morfoisse, Florent; Chaufour, Xavier; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Prats, Anne-Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy appears as a promising strategy to treat incurable diseases. In particular, combined gene therapy has shown improved therapeutic efficiency. Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), RNA elements naturally present in the 5 untranslated regions of a few mRNAs, constitute a powerful tool to co-express several genes of interest. IRESs are translational enhancers allowing the translational machinery to start protein synthesis by internal initiation. This feature allowed the design of multi-cistronic vectors expressing several genes from a single mRNA. IRESs exhibit tissue specificity, and drive translation in stress conditions when the global cell translation is blocked, which renders them useful for gene transfer in hypoxic conditions occurring in ischemic diseases and cancer. IRES-based viral and non viral vectors have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical assays of combined gene therapy and resulted in therapeutic benefits for various pathologies including cancers, cardiovascular diseases and degenerative diseases. PMID:25699230

  18. Problem-Based Learning in Professional Entry-Level Therapy Education: A Review of Controlled Evaluation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Grainne; McMahon, Sinead; Doody, Catherine; Smith, Kathyrn; Cusack, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Although there has been growing interest in problem-based learning (PBL) by professional entry-level therapy educators, its effectiveness is as yet unclear. Existing overviews of the field do not provide high-quality evidence in terms of the effectiveness or otherwise of PBL in professional therapy education. The purposes of this article is to…

  19. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  20. The Importance of Radio News to Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ernie

    While the news is considered a vitally important aspect of most radio stations' formats, broadcasters need to determine what a listener wants from the news-listening experience and how a station can program news in the form most desirable for the listener. This study, based on a Lawrence, Kansas, telephone survey of radio listeners, found that…

  1. FLPP IXV Re-Entry Vehicle, Supersonic Charectisation Based on DNW SST Wind Tunnel Tests and CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapteijn, C.; Maseland, H.; Chiarelli, C.; Mareschi, V.; Tribot, J.-P.; Binetti, P.; Walloscheck, T.

    2009-01-01

    The European Space Agency ESA, has engaged in 2004, the IXV project (Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle) which is part of the FLPP (Future Launcher Preparatory Programme) aiming at answering to critical technological issues for controlled re-entry, while supporting the future generation launchers and to improve in general European capabilities in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry for future space transportation, exploration and scientific applications. The IXV key mission and system objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on- ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re- entry system, integrating the critical re- entry technologies at the system level. In particular, the IXV shall demonstrate system integrated key technologies such as lifting flight control by means of aerodynamic surfaces that are one of the main primary objectives of the experimental investigation. Lifting and aerodynamic controlled re-entry represents a significant capability advancement with respect to the ballistic re-entry of capsules like the ARD. Since hypersonic aerodynamics is essentially different from supersonic aerodynamics, the current mission is to perform an atmospheric re-entry in combination with a safe recovery the in supersonic flight regime. However, mission extension to trimmed transonic flight is under consideration based on a preliminary analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of the IXV configuration. Since the beginning of the IXV project, an aerodynamic data base (AEDB) has been built up and continuously updated integrating the additional information mainly provided by means of CFD (ie: Euler and Navier-Stokes) and lately also by means of WTTs. This AEDB serves for flying qualities analysis and for re-entry simulations. During the development phase B2/C1, the effectiveness of the control surfaces and their impact on te vehicle's aerodynamic forces in the supersonic regime is measured for a number of discrete deflection settings in the Super-Sonic wind Tunnel (SST) of DNW. Enabling an improved understanding of the measured aerodynamic characteristics, complementary computations were performed by Thales Alenia Space. The complete set of data was analyzed and compared enabling a consolidation of the nominal aerodynamic and aerodynamic uncertainties as well. The paper presents the main objectives of the supersonic characterisation of IXV including WTTs, and the main outcomes of the current data comparisons.

  2. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Its pages are brimming with useful information to help sixth-formers and college students who wish to study physics make the very important decision regarding their particular choice of course and university. Under the heading `Summary tables of physics courses' every university listed in the publication has a table which includes all the courses on offer, their entrance requirements, duration and the awards given. Another section of the book entitled `Departmental information' includes data on the teaching and assessment styles of the Physics Department, special facilities plus a contact name and address. These sections, together with an expanded set of case studies of recent students and various other interesting articles, make this publication a must for anyone who is considering studying physics at university. Copies of Physics on Course 2001 will be available from Leila Solomon, Education Department, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London, W1N 3DH. The Particle Physics Wallchart (PCET) This full-colour chart, with a set of Teachers Notes, was published recently. It has been developed by PCET with Professor Peter Kalmus acting as expert consultant. The cost of the chart and notes is £7.75 plus VAT and copies can be purchased from PCET, 27 Kirchen Road, London W13 0UD (fax: 020 8566 5120). Inspire II The second part of Inspire was published in the Spring. It is a highly visual, full-colour leaflet which can be used as a stand-alone item but which was designed to `nest' inside the first four-page spread which was distributed in February. The occupational areas for physicists covered in the second leaflet include the media/leisure, finance and engineering (at technician level) industries. The third of the intended four sheets will be published later this year. (Copies of Inspire II have been included in the Affiliated schools/colleges package; other schools/colleges will be sent copies on request.) Nanotechnology - a technical brief The Industrial Affairs Department of the Institute is working on a series of Technical Briefs to broaden the provision of physics information to Members. The first title in the series, `Nanotechnology', is due to be published last month. The aim of this new series is to provide technical updates on current applications of physics, targeted at the nonspecialist scientist and engineer. The emphasis will be on burgeoning areas of physics with potential application across several or many fields. `Nanotechnology', for example, will sketch the background to the field, indicate the current state of the art and give a realistic view on future developments. The target readers are Institute of Physics Members in general, not specialists in nanotechnology or related topics and, in this respect, the Briefs could be of great interest to teachers. They are free of charge to Members but £7.50 for non-members. To obtain a copy, contact Emma Woods on 020 7470 4927 or by e-mail (emma.woods@iop.org). Courses Physics Update: 8-10 July, University of York The information leaflet/booking form for this course was sent to schools and colleges at the beginning of this term. Lecture topics include Ultrasonic imaging, Chaos, and The search for extra-terrestrial intelligent life. There will be workshops on New activities from Salters Horners physics, Computer modelling in A2 physics and Misconceptions in the learning of forces. Further information and booking forms are available from Leila Solomon. The venues and dates of subsequent Update courses are: 8-10 December, Oxford University 31 March-2 April 2001, Malvern College 7-9 July 2001, Royal Holloway College, London Teaching Physics INSET Days Following successful pilot runs in the summer term last year and at IOP Congress, the Education Department is organizing four (possibly five) INSET days for those teaching physics at KS3 without a strong background in the subject. The recent dates in June were all fully booked. The programme will be basically same for all the events with an introductory talk Inspiring Your Pupils, followed by workshops on Forces, Electricity and Light designed to enhance participants' knowledge of physics and its applications and to improve their confidence in teaching that knowledge. At each venue there will be an opportunity to tour the facilities, meet the staff and to assess the potential for school visits or link activities. The fee including course materials, lunch and other refreshments is £25. Leaflets have been sent to schools in the localities but further copies will be sent on request. Places are limited and prompt booking is essential. Further courses are planned for the autumn term as follows: Explore@Bristol (4 October) and possibly London in November. Substantially similar events may be organized for those teaching physics at KS4 in the Spring term of 2001. Physics Discipline Network Workshop: 14/15 September, University of Leeds `Our assessment of students and the media's assessment of us!' is the focus of this two-day event. The network was established in 1994 to encourage debate and discussion of teaching and learning initiatives among university physicists. Over the past five years the annual workshops have attracted over 200 delegates from most of the UK university physics departments. This year's workshop looks set to get off to a lively start with Professor Paul Black questioning the typical format of university physics examinations. This will be followed by a session on `A question of chemistry - creative problems for critical thinkers' which it is hoped will prompt thinking about comparable approaches in physics. This is just the start of a full programme of presentations including grass roots innovative practices as well as lead speakers of national prominence. Attention will focus on schools, too, with an input on the Pupil Researcher Initiative as a way of promoting physics at school level. Further details of this event are available from Dr Ashley Clarke in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently evident throughout Europe. CERN, ESA and ESO (the European centres for high-energy physics, cosmology, space and astronomy) have just launched Physics on Stage, a Europe-wide programme which aims to draw attention to some of the best practices in physics teaching in schools and colleges. During this year, national programmes are being planned in 22 nations, leading on to a celebratory event at CERN during the European Week for Science and Technology (6-11 November). Here 400 delegates from the 22 participating nations will gather to present selected projects. The UK will have 40 delegates present, funded by the EC and we are seeking practising teachers to contribute their simple, transferable, practical ideas. These can be kitemarked and your school can use the Physics on Stage logo. We would like to hear from both primary and secondary schools in the UK. Teachers can apply to join the delegation by saying what they have to offer to the festival and how they would contribute to the dissemination of good practice afterwards. This would be an opportunity to discover what novel ideas and insights there are on the continent and then to share what you have learned with colleagues at home. It would also be an excellent opportunity to show off some of the good practice from UK classrooms. In return for the week's trip to Geneva (and cover) we ask that participants commit themselves to sharing what they have learned with UK teachers - through meetings, advanced skills teaching or perhaps even writing an article (for Physics Education?). Applications should be supported by a letter from your headteacher. Schools, other organizations and individuals may apply for a kite-mark for a project but the application should be supported by a letter from someone unconnected with the organization of the project. Nominations should be sent to Dr Steven Chapman, Secretary to the UK National Steering Committee Physics on Stage, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (e-mail: steven.chapman@iop.org), from whom further information about this initiative can also be obtained. More details can additionally be found on the website at www.physics-on-stage.co.uk. The closing date for kite-marking of projects is 30 September and that for applications to travel to Geneva is 30 July.

  3. A template-based computerized instruction entry system helps the comunication between doctors and nurses.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki; Nakagawa, Rie; Manabe, Shiro; Shimai, Yoshie; Teramoto, Kei; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In a hospital, doctors and nurses shares roles in treating admitted patients. Communication between them is necessary and communication errors become the problem in medical safety. In Japan, verbal instruction is prohibited and doctors write their instruction on paper instruction slips. However, because it is difficult to ascertain revision history and the active instructions on instruction slips, human errors can occur. We developed template-based computerized instruction entry system to reduce ward workloads and contribute to medical safety. Templates enable us to input the instructions easily and standardize the descriptions of instructions. By standardizing and combine the instruction into one template for one instruction item, the systems could prevent instructions overlap. We created sets of templates (e.g., admission set, preoperative set), so that doctors could enter their instructions easily. Instructions entered via any of the sets can be subdivided into separate items by the system before being submitted, and can also be changed on a per-item basis. The instructions were displayed as calendar form. Calendar form represents the instruction shift and current active instructions. We prepared 382 standardized instruction templates. In our system, 66% of instructions were entered via templates, and 34% were entered as free-text comments. Our system prevents communication errors between medical staff. PMID:25991148

  4. Processing ground-based near-infrared imagery of space shuttle re-entries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Kennerly, Stephen W.; Osei-Wusu, Kwame; Gibson, David M.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Kerns, Robert V.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-06-01

    Ground-based high-resolution, calibrated, near-infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle STS-134 Endeavour during reentry has been obtained as part of NASA's HYTHIRM (Hypersonic Thermodynamic InfraRed Measurements) project. The long-range optical sensor package called MARS (Mobile Aerospace Reconnaissance System) was positioned in advance to acquire and track part of the shuttle re-entry. Imagery was acquired during a few minutes, with the best imagery being processed when the shuttle was at 133 kft at Mach 5.8. This paper describes the processing of the NIR imagery, building upon earlier work from the airborne imagery collections of several prior shuttle missions. Our goal is to calculate the temperature distribution of the shuttle's bottom surface as accurately as possible, considering both random and systematic errors, while maintaining all physical features in the imagery, especially local intensity variations. The processing areas described are: 1) radiometric calibration, 2) improvement of image quality, 3) atmospheric compensation, and 4) conversion to temperature. The computed temperature image will be shown, as well as comparisons with thermocouples at different positions on the shuttle. A discussion of the uncertainties of the temperature estimates using the NIR imagery is also given.

  5. FLPP IXV Re-entry Vehicle, Transonic Characterisation Based on FOI T1500 Wind Tunnel Tests and CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torngren, L.; Chiarelli, C.; Mareschi, V.; Tribot, J.-P.; Binetti, P.; Walloschek, T.

    2009-01-01

    The European Space Agency ESA, has engaged in 2004, the IXV project (Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle) which is part of the FLPP (Future Launcher Preparatory Programme) aiming at answering to critical technological issues, while supporting the future generation launchers and to improve in general European capabilities in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry for space transportation, exploration and scientific applications. The IXV key mission and system objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on-ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, integrating the critical re-entry technologies at the system level. The current IXV vehicle is a slender body type exhibiting rounded shape, thick body controlled by means of two control surfaces. The current mission is to perform an atmospheric re- entry ended by a safe recovery in supersonic regime. A potential extension of the flight domain down to the transonic regime was proposed to be analyzed. The objectives were to study the capability of the IXV for flying autonomously enabling a recovery of the vehicle by means of a subsonic parachute based DRS. The vehicle designed for the hypersonic speeds integrating a large base with only two control surfaces located close to the plane of symmetry is definitively not tuned for transonic ones. CFD done by Thales Alenia Space and wind tunnel activities involving FOI T1500 facility contributed to built up an Aerodynamic Data Base (AEDB) to be used as inputs for flying qualities analysis and re-entry simulations. The paper presents the main objectives of the transonic activities with emphasis on CFD and WTT including a description of the different prediction tools and discussing the main outcomes of the current data comparisons.

  6. What's News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    News analysis and entertainment media is part of a media literacy that helps students access, analyze, evaluate and create messages using media in various forms. Media literacy is a key asset in a democracy as well as a bridge to reading comprehension, as skillful media use and script-reading activities can support the English acquisition skills,…

  7. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  8. Understanding Public Perceptions of the HPV Vaccination Based on Online Comments to Canadian News Articles

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Yael; Pereira, Jennifer A.; Quach, Susan; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Wilson, Sarah E.; Guay, Maryse; Lei, Yang; Deeks, Shelley L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the variation in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage across Canada, and debate regarding delivery of HPV vaccines in Catholic schools, we studied online comments on Canadian news websites to understand public perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccine. Methods We searched English- and French-language Canadian news websites for 2012 articles that contained the terms “HPV” or “human papillomavirus.” Articles about HPV vaccinations that contained at least one comment were included. Two researchers independently coded comments, analyzing them for emerging themes. Results We identified 3073 comments from 1198 individuals in response to 71 news articles; 630 (52.6%) individuals expressed positive sentiments about HPV vaccination (2.5 comments/individual), 404 (33.7%) were negative (3.0 comments/individual), 34 (2.8%) were mixed (1.5 comments/individual) and 130 (10.8%) were neutral (1.6 comments/individual). Vaccine-supportive commenters believed the vaccine is safe and effective. Common themes in negative comments included concerns regarding HPV vaccine safety and efficacy, distrust of pharmaceutical companies and government, and belief that school-age children are too young for HPV vaccine. Many comments focused on whether the Catholic Church has the right to inform health policy for students, and discussion often evolved into debates regarding HPV and sexual behaviour. We noted that many individuals doubted the credibility of vaccine safety information. Conclusion The majority of commenters do not appear to be against HPV vaccination, but public health messaging that focuses on both the vaccine’s safety profile, and its use as a means to prevent cancer rather than sexually transmitted HPV infection may facilitate its acceptance. PMID:26053866

  9. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Hwang, Helen; Prabhu, Dinesh; Aliaga, Jose; Marley, Mark; McGuire, Kathy; Huynh, Loc; Garcia, Joseph; Moses, Robert; Winski, Rick; Skylanskiy, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    The Objectives of this work are: 1) Establish a range of probe atmospheric entry environments based on the Uranus Flagship mission outlined in the Planetary Science Decadal Survey for two launch windows: Year 2021 and 2034. 2) Define Uranus entry trade space by performing parametric studies, by varying vehicle mass and size and entry Flight Path Angle (FPA). 3) Investigate various trajectory options, including direct ballistic entry and aero-capture entry. 4) Identify entry technologies that could be leveraged to enable a viable mission to Uranus that meets science objectives.

  10. Comparison of National Operative Mortality in Gastroenterological Surgery Using Web-based Prospective Data Entry Systems.

    PubMed

    Anazawa, Takayuki; Paruch, Jennifer L; Miyata, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Ko, Clifford Y; Cohen, Mark E; Hirahara, Norimichi; Zhou, Lynn; Konno, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Go; Sugihara, Kenichi; Mori, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    International collaboration is important in healthcare quality evaluation; however, few international comparisons of general surgery outcomes have been accomplished. Furthermore, predictive model application for risk stratification has not been internationally evaluated. The National Clinical Database (NCD) in Japan was developed in collaboration with the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP), with a goal of creating a standardized surgery database for quality improvement. The study aimed to compare the consistency and impact of risk factors of 3 major gastroenterological surgical procedures in Japan and the United States (US) using web-based prospective data entry systems: right hemicolectomy (RH), low anterior resection (LAR), and pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD).Data from NCD and ACS-NSQIP, collected over 2 years, were examined. Logistic regression models were used for predicting 30-day mortality for both countries. Models were exchanged and evaluated to determine whether the models built for one population were accurate for the other population.We obtained data for 113,980 patients; 50,501 (Japan: 34,638; US: 15,863), 42,770 (Japan: 35,445; US: 7325), and 20,709 (Japan: 15,527; US: 5182) underwent RH, LAR, and, PD, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rates for RH were 0.76% (Japan) and 1.88% (US); rates for LAR were 0.43% versus 1.08%; and rates for PD were 1.35% versus 2.57%. Patient background, comorbidities, and practice style were different between Japan and the US. In the models, the odds ratio for each variable was similar between NCD and ACS-NSQIP. Local risk models could predict mortality using local data, but could not accurately predict mortality using data from other countries.We demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of the international collaborative research between Japan and the US, but found that local risk models remain essential for quality improvement. PMID:26656350

  11. Mesh-Based Entry Vehicle and Explosive Debris Re-Contact Probability Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Mark A.; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2011-01-01

    The risk to a crewed vehicle arising from potential re-contact with fragments from an explosive breakup of any jettisoned spacecraft segments during entry has long sought to be quantified. However, great difficulty lies in efficiently capturing the potential locations of each fragment and their collective threat to the vehicle. The method presented in this paper addresses this problem by using a stochastic approach that discretizes simulated debris pieces into volumetric cells, and then assesses strike probabilities accordingly. Combining spatial debris density and relative velocity between the debris and the entry vehicle, the strike probability can be calculated from the integral of the debris flux inside each cell over time. Using this technique it is possible to assess the risk to an entry vehicle along an entire trajectory as it separates from the jettisoned segment. By decoupling the fragment trajectories from that of the entry vehicle, multiple potential separation maneuvers can then be evaluated rapidly to provide an assessment of the best strategy to mitigate the re-contact risk.

  12. VESL for Data Entry: A Competency-based Curriculum Guide. Project OSCAER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Valadez, Jeanne, Ed.; Pankratz, David, Ed.

    This guide is intended for vocational educators developing the vocational English as a second language (VESL) component of a course in data entry. The introductory section examines assumptions about second language learning and instruction and VESL classes, local adaptations of the curriculum, and sample VESL lessons. The chapter on language…

  13. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer subtype. All NCI news All NCI news Media Resources Media Contacts B-roll for Media Multicultural ... NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ...

  14. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses.

    Welch Award

    Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome and establishing its role in gene regulation; for his discovery of a giant complex of 20 proteins known as the "Mediator", which regulates the transcription process; and for determining the atomic structure of RNA polymerase II. The 300,000 award salutes Kornberg's lifetime contributions to biochemistry.

    NSTA Teacher Awards

    During its 2001 national convention the National Science Teachers Association presented prizes and awards to teachers for their exemplary teaching practices and commitment to quality science education. Many appear below.
    Distinguished Service to Science Education Award
    • JoAnne Vasquez, Science Consultant, Gilbert, AZ
    • Richard F. Duncan, Beaverton Administrative Center, Beaverton, OR
    • Mitchell E. Batoff, New Jersey City University, Jersey City, NJ
    Distinguished Informal Science Education Award
    • Al Stenstrup, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI
    Ciba Specialty Chemicals Education Foundation Exemplary Science Teaching Award, High School Level
    • Gerald Friday, Marquette High School, Milwaukee, WI
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, High School
    • Mark Stefanski, Marin Academy, San Rafael, CA (first place)
    • James A. Szoka, Clarke County High School, Berryville, VA (second place)
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, College
    • William F. McComas, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (first place)
    • Barbara M. Lom, Davidson College, Davidson, NC (second place)

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Proposal Deadlines

    Proposal Deadlines will not appear this month. Readers should consult page 876 of the July 2001 issue or JCE Online.

    National Educators' Workshop

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology's Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory will host the 16th annual National Educators' Workshop (NEW: Update): Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology. NEW: Update is part of the NIST centennial celebration. It will be held in Gaithersburg, MD, and at the University of Maryland, College Park, October 14-17, 2001. NEW: Update, is a partnership involving industry, government, and education. It will have a program of Experiments and Demonstrations, Mini Workshops, and Plenary Sessions. For registration information, contact Jim Jacobs, NEW: Update 2001, School of Science and Technology, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504-8060; phone: 757/823-8109/9072; fax: 757/823-8215; dplaclaire@nsu.edu. The latest information about the workshop will be at http://MST-Online.nsu.edu/new.

    Chemistry Is in the News Conference

    Chemistry Is in the News-Teaching Organic Chemistry in the Context of Real World Issues, will be held at the University of Missouri-Columbia September 21-23, 2001. Funding from the Dreyfus Foundation will support 18 participants and will offer some partial travel grants. The conference will instruct faculty about the philosophy, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment of the project, doing so in small collaborative groups. It will focus on facilitating news-media-based authentic learning activities aimed at connecting real-world social, economic, and political issues to the teaching of organic chemistry and the development of student-assisted collaborative learning groups. The conference organizers are Rainer Glaser and James Groccia. Those interested should contact Rainer Glaser, University of Missouri, Department of Chemistry, Columbia, MO 65211; phone: 573/882-0331; fax: 573/882-2754; GlaserR@missouri.edu.

    ChemNet-Chemistry Lecture on the Internet

    A multimedia chemistry lecture, developed by R. Demuth, S. Nick, K. Rabe, L. Lensment, S. Schanze, J. Andresen, and W. Bensch of the University of Kiel, Germany, is being provided without charge over the Internet. The lecture is directed at students of chemistry, agricultural science, medicine, biology, and engineering and other interested persons. The lecture is in German but an English version is planned. With the aid of ChemNet the group plans to attain some information on the use and efficiency of multimedia teaching and learning software. The lecture deals with the fundamentals of general and inorganic chemistry. In addition to traditional content, new ways of chemical reasoning are considered. The presentation includes topics from the living world and everyday life such as household chemicals, renewable materials, and acid rain, and includes links from the text to other content. Graphics, animations, photos, and videos illustrate the topics discussed. A table of contents on the home page lists all the main topics and directs users into specific chapters; there are also a search function and a glossary. A feedback option allows students to contact the developing team. ChemNet can be found at www.chemievorlesung.uni-kiel.de. To gain access, a registration form needs to be completed.

    Future Meetings: 2YC3

    Upcoming conferences sponsored by 2YC3, the Two-Year College Chemistry Consortium, an activity of the ACS Division of Chemical Education, are listed below. Details of each conference are available at that conference's Web site.
    • September 14-15, 2001: 156th Conference (Midwestern), Anoka-Ramsey Community College, Coon Rapids, MN 55433; http://www.ar.cc.mn.us/2yc3/. Contact Lance S. Lund (llund@an.cc.mn.us) or Patty Pieper (ppieper@an.cc.mn.us).
    • November 2-3, 2001: 157th Conference (Western), Community College of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89102. Contact Kaveh Zarrabi (zarrabi@nevada.edu).
    • April 5-6, 2002: 158th Conference (Southern), in conjunction with the National ACS Meeting, Orlando, FL; site pending.
    • July 30-August 3, 2002: 159th Conference (Western), in conjunction with the 17th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA; http://atom.chem.wwu.edu/acs/bcce2002.html. Contact Clarita Bhat (ccbhat@msn.com).

    Future Meetings: NSTA

    Upcoming meetings of the National Science Teachers Association, including those at both the regional and national levels, appear below.
    • October 25-27, 2001: Salt Lake City, UT (Western Area)
    • November 8-10, 2001: Columbus, OH (Midwestern Area)
    • December 6-8, 2001: Memphis, TN (Southern Area)
    • March 27-30, 2002: San Diego, CA (2002 National Convention)
    For details, see the NSTA Web site, www.nsta.org.

  15. Self-Organization with Additional Learning Based on Category Mapping and Its Application to Dynamic News Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Tetsuya; Nobuhara, Hajime

    The Internet news are texts which involve from various fields, therefore, when a text data that will show a rapid increase of the number of dimensions of feature vectors of Self-Organizing Map (SOM) is added, these results cannot be reflected to learning. Furthermore, it is difficult for users to recognize the learning results because SOM can not produce any label information by each cluster. In order to solve these problems, we propose SOM with additional learning and dimensional by category mapping which is based on the category structure of Wikipedia. In this method, input vector is generated from each text and the corresponding Wikipedia categories extracted from Wikipedia articles. Input vectors are formed in the common category taking the hierarchical structure of Wikipedia category into consideration. By using the proposed method, the problem of reconfiguration of vector elements caused by dynamic changes in the text can be solved. Moreover, information loss in newly obtained index term can be prevented.

  16. Video segmentation techniques for news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Wolf, Wayne H.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes our experiences in video analysis for a video library on the World Wide Web. News and documentary programs, though seemingly simple, have some characteristics which can cause problems in simple shot segmentation algorithms. We have developed a methodology, based on our experience with the analysis of several hours of news/documentary footage, which improve the results of shot segmentation on this type of material and which in turn allows for higher-quality storyboards for our video library.

  17. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable (gift subscriptions are 37/year (U.S.), 50/year (non-U.S.), but has lasting value. This is a really good way to help someone just starting out on a teaching career. An idea worth sharing comes from Carl Minnier of Essex Community College in Baltimore. He is chair of the Student Awards Committee of the Maryland Section of the ACS. This section has asked for 25 certificates because they honor annually an outstanding student from each of the two-year and four-year colleges within the territory of the Maryland Section. Want another interesting idea: give a one-year subscription to each Undergraduate Research Symposium participant. Classroom Activities for Outreach Many of our readers are involved with outreach programsindividually in their child's class, in a regional group that visits schools, in a van program, or as a demonstrator at their local science museum. Many readers have enthusiastically reported that our Classroom Activities series is a great resource for such programs. Since the Activities are designed for a high school classroom or lab (Activity 24 in this continuing series can be found in this issue), they are purposely not demanding of equipment, facilities, or time. But outreach activities often take place in very restricted environments, perhaps without sinks or electricity, sometimes with limited table space. So that we can provide timely advice in recommending activities for you to take "on the road", Nancy Gettys and Erica Jacobsen of the Journal staff have done an analysis of each, recommending whether it might be done in a workshop setting (where tables, a sink, and electricity could be expected) or in a booth (probably no sink and very limited space). There are also very useful notes. Some sample entries are: Activity:What's Gluep? Characterizing a Cross-Linked Polymer. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1432A (November 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?could show properties of pre-made gluep Notes:Need access to water. Can be messy. People usually enjoy the activity. Works well. Activity:CD Light: An Introduction to Spectroscopy. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1568A (December 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?yes, with colored plastic onlynot solutions Notes:Can be difficult to measure and cut cardboard for spectroscope. Pre-made spectroscopes and partially constructed ones to show method could be provided. Needs good light source to work well. Activity:Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1461A (October 1999). Workshop?yes Booth?could demonstrate tubes of soapy water with and without zeolite Notes:Need access to water. Quick and easy. More information about JCE Classroom Activities is available on JCE Online at: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/AboutJCE/Features/JCE_CA/. Here you will find the notes described above and a list of all published Classroom Activities. The site is updated regularly.

    Awards Announced

    United Nations Environment Program The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has selected Mario J. Molina, professor of earth, atmosphere, and planetary sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as the winner of the 1999 UNEP Sasakawa Environment Prize. The prize, worth $200,000, is for his outstanding global contributions in the field of atmospheric chemistry. ACS Northeastern Section The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society has awarded the Henry A. Hill Award to Morton Z. Hoffman, professor of chemistry at Boston University. The award is given annually to a member of the section for outstanding service.

    Award Deadlines

    Mettler-Toledo Thermal Analysis Education Grant Mettler-Toledo has established a grant to honor Edith A. Turi of the Polymer Research Institute, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, for her lifelong contribution to the cause of thermal analysis education. The grant will be awarded on an annual basis to not-for-profit organizations in North America that confer degrees up to the Ph. D. level and provide or intend to provide education in thermal analysis; it will consist of Mettler-Toledo thermal analysis instrumentation, peripherals, training and service. Applications must be submitted by April 1, 2000. Application forms may be downloaded from http://www.na.mt.com. Questions should be directed to Jon Foreman, Product Manager, Thermal Analysis, Mettler-Toledo, Inc., 1900 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240; phone: 1-800/638-8537; fax: 614/438-4871; email: Thermal.Grant@mt.com.

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Cosmos in the Classroom 2 A national symposium on the trials and tribulations of teaching astronomy to college non-science majors will be held at the Pasadena, California, Convention Center on July 17-19, 2000, as part of the 112th Annual Meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. Designed for everyone who teaches introductory astronomy, the symposium will focus on ways to improve teaching, to involve students more effectively, and to put astronomy in a wider context. Specific discussion topics will include: getting out of lecture mode, using the Web effectively, dealing with creationism and astrology, and laboratory and observation projects. The 2.5-day program will involve panels of mentor instructors, an exchange of handouts and teaching resources, hands-on workshops for trying new techniques and approaches, and lots of time for discussion. Participants will range from veteran instructors to nervous graduate students about to teach their first solo course. We especially hope to involve those teaching astronomy in small colleges without extensive astronomy research programs, and colleagues in other sciences who teach astronomy on a part-time basis. To get on the mailing list for the meeting, send your name, institution, email, and postal mailing address (indicating an interest in the 2000 Education Symposium) via: email: meeting@aspsky.org; fax: 415/337-5205 (Attn: 2000 Education Symp.) mail: 2000 Education Symposium, ASP, 390 Ashton Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94112. Green Chemistry 4th Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference "Sustainable Technologies: From Research to Industrial Implementation", the 4th Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference, will be held June 27-29, 2000, at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Technical sessions will highlight recent advances in green chemistry and engineering including greener solvents, catalysis, benign synthesis and processing, bio-based synthesis and processing, designing safer chemicals and materials, process design and measurement, and modeling/computational methods. For information on the conference, visit the ACS Web site: http://www.acs.org/meetings/greencfp.htm or contact the ACS Meetings Department by phone: 202/872-6286; fax: 202/872-6013; email: d_ruddy@acs.org. Gordon Conference on Green Chemistry The 5th Gordon Research Conference on Green Chemistry will be held July 16-21, 2000, at Connecticut College, New London, CT. For more information contact either of the symposium organizers: Tracy C. Williamson, OPPT (mail code 7406), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; phone: 202/260-2659; fax: 202/260-0816; email: williamson.tracy@epa.gov; www.epa.gov/greenchemistry.; Isvan Horvath, Department of Organic Chemistry, Eotvos Lorand University, Pazmany Peter setany 1/A, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary; phone: 36-1-209-0590; fax: 36-1-372-2620; email: ithorvath@compuserve.com. Green Chemistry Symposium at ACS Meeting The symposium, "Green Chemistry: Applications in Academia and Industry" will be held at the Fall 2000 American Chemical Society Meeting, from August 20-25, 2000, in Washington, DC. The symposium is being sponsored by the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Papers are invited on all areas of green chemistry. For more information, contact one of the symposium organizers: Tracy C. Williamson, williamson.tracy@epa.gov; Paul T. Anastas, anastas.paul@epa.gov; Mary M. Kirchhoff, kirchhoff.mary@epa.gov. All are at the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (mail code 7406), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20560; phone: 202/260-2659; fax: 202/260-0816; http://www.epa.gov/greenchemistry. 16th BCCE, July 30-August 3, 2000 The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, between July 30 and August 3, 2000. The meeting is promising to have a very full program. As of December 3, 1999 (the deadline for the submission of proposals for symposia and workshops), 64 of each had been submitted. Information about these proposed presentations, as well as about other aspects of the conference, are posted on the BCCE website at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. If you wish to hold a meeting of your organization at the time of the conference, please let the organizers know at bcce@umich.edu so that space can be set aside. And please plan to attend! Teaching/Research Sabbatical Fellowships The University of Tennessee-Knoxville announces its designation by the National Science Foundation as one of three Research Sites for Educators in Chemistry (RSE). The program offers 12- 15-month teaching/research sabbatical fellowships. Fellows will spend a semester at University of Tennessee-Knoxville, a semester at a research-active partner (Berea College, the University of the South-Sewanee, or the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga), and a summer in research at UT-K, a partner school, or in industry. Fellows will have minimal teaching loads, continuous involvement in collaborative research in environmental and/or chemical analysis, and exposure to a successful model for establishing a thriving undergraduate research program. For information contact Kelsey D. Cook; kcook@utk.edu; phone: 865-974-8019. The other two RSEC sites are Georgia Tech (contact is Kent Barefield; kent.barefield@chemistry.gatech.edu) and the University of New Mexico (contact is Dana Brabson; gb6s@unm.edu). Soaring Endowments: Research Corp. Report "The Midas Touch: Do Soaring Endowments Have Any Impact on College Science?" is the title of their 1998 annual report, just published by Research Corporation. In it the foundation reports that endowment growth appears to have only incidental effects on ongoing support for college research and education in the physical sciences. More likely targets for expenditures are new and remodeled buildings and student aid. Interviews with college administrators support the conclusion that large endowments do not guarantee the funds needed to hire enough faculty scientists to teach and do related research with students, to house the sciences in up-to-date buildings, or equip laboratories with modern instrumentation. Copies of "The Midas Touch" are available without charge from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711. The report will also be available in January 2000 on the foundation's Web site at http://www.rescorp.org. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 5, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships Program (CSEMS) TBA
    • Advanced Techological Education (ATE) Preliminary April 13, 2000 (anticipated) Formal Oct. 13, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Graduate Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) TBA (anticipated late spring 2000)
    • Online DUE forms available at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/documents/general/forms/forms.htm
    • NSF Documents Online available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/pubsys/browser/odbrowse.pl
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 15, 2000
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: June 30, 2000
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 15, 2000
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 15, 2000
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: June 30, 2000
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: Preliminary Proposals: June 15, 2000 Complete Proposals: September 1, 2000
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: March 1, 2000
    • Senior Scientist Mentor: September 1, 2000
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW:http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; WWW:http://www.rescorp.org

  18. The Lilongwe Central Hospital Patient Management Information System: A Success in Computer-Based Order Entry Where One Might Least Expect It

    PubMed Central

    GP, Douglas; RA, Deula; SE, Connor

    2003-01-01

    Computer-based order entry is a powerful tool for enhancing patient care. A pilot project in the pediatric department of the Lilongwe Central Hospital (LCH) in Malawi, Africa has demonstrated that computer-based order entry (COE): 1) can be successfully deployed and adopted in resource-poor settings, 2) can be built, deployed and sustained at relatively low cost and with local resources, and 3) has a greater potential to improve patient care in developing than in developed countries. PMID:14728338

  19. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  20. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  1. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  2. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  3. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  4. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to celebrate the Group's 50th anniversary by examining what has been done, focusing on why and how it was done, with lessons and ambitions for the future. The meeting will be held at Institute Headquarters and the programme is as follows: 10.45 - 11.00 Welcome and introduction (Philip Britton: Chair of the Education Group) 11.00 - 11.45 Examinations and assessment through the ages (Tim Akrill, Chief Examiner for A-level Physics with Edexcel) 11.45 - 12.30 Curriculum reform in physics, past, present and future (Professor Jon Ogborn, Director of the Post-16 Physics Initiative) 14.00 - 14.15 Physics education and the Institute of Physics, some personal reflections (speaker to be announced) 14.15 - 15.00 Connecting with Advancing Physics: the first year in HE physics (Professor Mick Brown, University of Cambridge) 15.15 - 15.35 Physics education, the next 50 years! (Ken Dobson, Honorary Editor of Physics Education) The day should hold something for everyone, so reserve your place if you can. Schools and Colleges lecture Dr Zbig Sobiesierski of the University of the West of England is the 1999 - 2000 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges lecturer, touring the country with his talk `Seeing is believing?'. He will demonstrate the different physical ways in which we can both make and mix colour and will then proceed to discuss why our eyes respond to light in the way they do. The lecture will be aimed primarily at students aged 14 and above, but it will also be suitable for older audiences. The intention, as with previous series, will be to show the relevance of the physics concepts to the members of the audience and the world in which they live. To find out more about the lecture in your area and to make a booking, contact should be made with the local organizer (full details of the list can be obtained from Catherine Wilson at Institute Headquarters). The dates and venues planned so far are as follows: 1 Nov: Northern College, Aberdeen 2 Nov: University of St Andrews 3 Nov: Heriot-Watt University 4 Nov: Strathclyde University 17 Nov: York University 24 Nov: Bristol University 1 Dec: Open University 7 Dec: Kent University 14 Dec: Cardiff University 15 Dec: University of Wales, Swansea 24 Jan: Reading University 10 Feb: Abingdon School 16 Feb: Plymouth University 2 Mar: Sheffield University 7 Mar: CLRC Daresbury Laboratory 8 Mar: Liverpool University 9 Mar: Manchester 10 Mar: Lancaster University 15 Mar: Surrey University 16 Mar: Brighton University 17 Mar: St Vincent College, Gosport 22 Mar: Leeds University 23 Mar: Loughborough Grammar School 24 Mar: Oakham School 30 Mar: St Peter's School, Wolverhampton 18 May: University of Hertfordshire 11 Jul: Science Museum 12 Jul: Royal Institution The assistance of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, CLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DERA Malvern is acknowledged in staging this year's events. Courses, lectures and competitions `Physics in perspective', the study course for sixth-formers and college students, will take place in London on 6 - 8 February 2000, offering insights into many different aspects of physics. The programme commences during the afternoon of Sunday 6 February at King's College London with a Balloon debate, followed by Brian O'Rourke's talk on the `Physics of Formula 1 cars'. On Monday 7 February at the Royal Institution, John Avison (former Honorary Editor of Physics Education) will develop the `Thinking physics' theme by presenting the audience with varied topics in an unusual and challenging way. The second talk of the afternoon, by Professor Roy Sambles, will cover `Lasers, light and liquid crystals'. On the final day (Tuesday 8 February), again at the Royal Institution, Sara Ellison will lead the audience in `Heavenly pursuits', whilst later Dr Colin Wright will entertain with `Juggling - theory and practice'. Futher information and bookings for the course can be made by contacting Mrs Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4800, fax: 020 7470 4848, e-mail: leila.solomon@iop.org). The cost for the complete series of lectures is £20 - one teacher accompanying a minimum of ten students will be admitted free. `Paperclip physics' is the contest for students who have the admirable desire to explain physics to nonscientists and who can also build a physics demonstration from items found around the home! Closing date for entries to the 2000 competition is 30 November 1999 with regional heats and finals planned for January/February and the Grand Final on 22 March 2000 at the Institute's Headquarters in London. Entries will be welcomed from Year 12, S5, Transition Year/First-year Leaving Certificate students or equivalents from schools and colleges: each team must consist of no fewer than three and no more than six students. Presentations should take no longer than five minutes and a hazard assessment must be submitted for each entry beforehand. As for the course mentioned above, more details and entry forms can be obtained from Leila Solomon at the Institute of Physics. Finally, the programme is now available for education events to be staged at the annual Physics Congress being held in Brighton on 27 - 30 March 2000. There will be hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 - 12 (school years 6 - 7), which must be booked in advance, as well as lectures and activities for students in years 8 - 10 on Music and sound (28 - 29 March) and Static electricity (30 March). In addition there will be INSET for teachers and technicians based on `Teaching physics at key stage 3' - hands-on workshops open to nonspecialist teachers of physics at an affordable cost. Further details can be found at the Congress website (www.iop.org/IOP/Congress), and bookings should be made through Leila Solomon. The public lectures during the Congress and commencing each evening at the Brighton Centre at 6 pm will be: 27 Mar: Mike & Wendy Gluyas `Musical Squares' 28 Mar: Professor Malcolm Longair 29 Mar: Adam Hart-Davis 30 Mar: Peter Barham `The physics of ice-cream'

  5. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz/TD/TDhome.html. This site also has links to JCE guidelines for prospective authors. Volunteers should contact Vitz by the medium of their preference: Ed Vitz, Editor, Tested Demonstrations, Journal of Chemical Education, Department of Chemistry, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; phone: 610/683-4443; fax: 610/683-1352; email: vitz@kutztown.edu.

    Awards Announced

    ACS Regional Awards in High School Chemistry Teaching The American Chemical Society has announced winners of regional awards in high school chemistry teaching for 1999. Winners have demonstrated excellence in teaching, exceptional ability to challenge and inspire students, extracurricular work, and willingness to keep up to date in the field. The award consists of two certificates (one for the recipient, the other for display at the recipient's school) and a cash prize of 1,000.
    • Thomas W. Adams, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics & Humanities at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana: Central Region
    • Arthur J. Crumm, Barstow School, Kansas City, Missouri: Midwest Region
    • Esther H. Freeman, Tabb High School, Yorktown, Virginia: Southeast Region
    • Joan A. Laredo-Liddell, St. Barnabas High School, Bronx, New York: Middle Atlantic Region, 1998
    • David T. Lee, Mountain Lakes High School, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey: Middle Atlantic Region, 1999
    • Diane Coley McGann, Santa Ana High School, Santa Ana, California: Western Region
    • William J. Pilotte, Newington High School, Newington, Connecticut: Northeast Region
    • Judith C. Seydel, Idaho Falls High School, Idaho Falls, Idaho: Northwest Region
    • Brenda A. Wolpa, Canyon Del Oro High School, Tucson, Arizona: Southwest/Rocky Mountain Region
    NSF Distinguished Public Service Award As a part of its celebration in 2000 of its half-century in existence, the National Science Foundation has announced the recipient of its Distinguished Public Service Award.
    • Samuel P. Massie, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland (Emeritus)
    1999 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Academies have announced the recipients in the 1999 fellowship programs. The names of those in chemistry or chemistry-related programs appear below. The complete list and background information about fellowship programs are available at http://national-academies.org. Information about the next (2000) competition can be obtained by contacting the Fellowship Office of the National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418; email: infofell@nas.edu; WWW: http://fellowships.nas.edu. 1999 Predoctoral Fellows
    • Martin Elliott Hayes, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Organic Chemistry
    1999 Dissertation Fellows
    • Robyn P. Hickerson, University of Utah, Chemistry
    1999 Postdoctoral Fellows
    • Luke Koenigs Lightning, University of California, San Francisco, Biochemistry
    • Eric W. Wong, University of California, Los Angeles, Physical Chemistry
    University of Wisconsin System Award Alliant Energy has announced the recipient of its 1999 Underkofler Excellence in Teaching Award, to recognize and reward outstanding teachers at University of Wisconsin System institutions.
    • Kim Kostka, University of Wisconsin-Rock County, Janesville, Wisconsin
    Kim is also the recipient of the 1999 Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. She is co-editor of the JCE feature column Teaching with Problems and Case Studies.

    Award Deadlines

    James Flack Norris Award The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society is receiving nominations for the 2000 James Flack Norris Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Teaching of Chemistry. The Norris Award, one of the oldest awards given by a Section of the American Chemical Society, is presented annually and consists of a certificate and an honorarium of 3,000. Nominees must have served with special distinction as teachers of chemistry at any level: secondary school, college, or graduate school. Since 1951, awardees have included eminent and less-widely-known but equally effective teachers at all levels. The awardee for 1999 is Joseph J. Lagowski of the University of Texas at Austin. Nominating material must be limited to 30 pages and focus specifically on the nominee's contribution to and effectiveness in teaching chemistry, as distinguished from research. These qualities are demonstrated by a condensed curriculum vitae as a portion of a nominating letter, which, in turn, is supported by as many seconding letters as are necessary to convey the nominee's qualification for the award. These may show the impact of the nominee's teaching in inspiring colleagues and students toward an active life on chemistry or related sciences, or may attest to the influence of the nominee's other activities in chemical education, such as textbooks, journal articles, or other professional activity at the national level. Materials should be of 8.5 x 11-in. size and should not include books or reprints. Nomination materials for 2000 should be sent to Robert S. Umans, Chemistry Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215-2521; email: umans@chem.bu.edu. They should be received before April 15, 2000. Undergraduate Analytical Research Program Grant The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP) has established a 10,000 annual grant to promote high-quality, innovative undergraduate research in the field of analytical chemistry and to promote training and development of undergraduate students in the field of analytical chemistry. Chemistry faculty at U.S. colleges and universities not having a graduate program in the chemical sciences are eligible to apply. Application forms for the Undergraduate Analytical Research Program (UARP) grant may be obtained by calling 1-800/825-3221 ext. 208 or by visiting the SACP's Web site at www.sacp.org. The deadline for applications for the year 2000 grant is March 31, 2000. American Microchemical Society Undergraduate Student Awards The American Microchemical Society announces its undergraduate awards for students who have done research in any area of analytical chemistry. Awardees receive 1000, travel expenses up to 250, and accommodation for two nights to receive the awards at the Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) to be held October 29-November 3, 2000. Applications should include a cover letter, a two-page summary of analytical research conducted by the student written in his or her own words, at least three letters of recommendation (one must be from a research director), a one-page summary of career goals, and official transcripts from undergraduate institution(s). Awardees are expected to present their work at EAS as a poster at the Undergraduate Research Poster Session. More details and a list of former awardees is available at http://chemweb.chem.uconn.edu/microchem/. Three copies of all materials, including letters and transcripts, should be sent to David J. Butcher, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723; phone: 828/227-3683; fax: 828/227-7647; email: butcher@wpoff.wcu.edu; WWW: http://www3.wcu.edu/ butcher/. The deadline for applications for 2000 awards is March 15, 2000. Dimick Award for Chromatography The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP) solicits nominations for the year 2001 Keene P. Dimick Award for Chromatography. The award is presented annually for noteworthy accomplishments in the area of gas and supercritical fluid chromatography (GC, SFC). The award, administered by SACP, consists of 5,000 cash prize presented at a symposium arranged by the awardee during the Pittsburgh Conference. There are no restrictions of age, nationality, sex, or professional affiliation. Letters of nomination, including a complete resume for the candidate, should be sent to Keene P. Dimick Award Committee, Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh, 300 Penn Center Boulevard, Suite 332, Pittsburgh, PA 15235-5503. The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2000.

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Upcoming Conferences PITTCON The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy will present its annual event, PITTCON 2000, at the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, LA, March 12-17, 2000. There will be more than 1,900 technical presentations and 3,000 exposition booths. Further information is available on the Web at http://www.pittcon.org or by telephone at 412/826-3220, ext. 142. Oilseed Conference The 49th Oilseed Conference will be held March 19-21, 2000, at the Doubletree Hotel in New Orleans, LA. The theme of the meeting is "Surviving in a Changing Global Economy". More information is available at the conference Web site: www.aocs.org/oilseed.htm, by phone: 217/359-2344, or by fax: 217/351-8091. American Oil Chemists' Society The 91st American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) Annual Meeting and Expo will be held April 25-28, 2000, at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA. Further information is available by contacting the AOCS Meetings & Exhibits Department; phone: 217/359-2344; fax: 217/351-8091; email: meetings@aocs.org. Chem 13 News: In Memory of Reg Friesen Issue 278 of Chem 13 News (October 1999) is in memory of Reg Friesen (see also JCE, 1999, 76, 27). A complimentary copy of this memorial issue is available upon request to kjackson@uwaterloo.ca. Free Source of Problems The Moles Web site (http://138.100.72.157/moles) is a free source of problems (in the Spanish language) that can be used in teaching problems of chemistry at the college/university level. While it is specially devoted to engineering education, it is also of interest for other studies where chemistry is involved. This site seeks to broaden its base by soliciting contributions from the United States and other American countries. Those interested in submitting problems for peer review (papers in English would be translated into Spanish) should contact Gabriel Pinto, Department of Chemical Engineering, Polytechnical University of Madrid, 28006 Madrid, Spain; email: gpinto@iqi.etsii.upm.es.

    Proposal Deadlines

    National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 5, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships Program (CSEMS) TBA
    • Advanced Techological Education (ATE) Preliminary April 13, 2000 (anticipated) Formal Oct. 13, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Graduate Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) TBA (anticipated late spring 2000)
    • Online DUE forms available at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/documents/general/forms/forms.htm
    • NSF Documents Online available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/pubsys/browser/odbrowse.pl
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 15, 1999, and November 15, 2000
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: June 30, 2000
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 15, 2000
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 15, 2000
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: June 30, 2000
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: Preliminary Proposals: June 15, 2000 Complete Proposals: September 1, 2000
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: March 1, 2000
    • Senior Scientist Mentor: September 1, 2000
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW:http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; WWW:http://www.rescorp.org

  6. Autonomous navigation method based on unbiased minimum-variance estimation during Mars entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huimin; Yang, Yusong; Xiao, Qiang; Wu, Yunzhang; Zhang, Yongbo

    2015-03-01

    Accurate navigation systems are required for future pinpoint Mars landing missions. A radio ranging augmented inertial measurement unit (IMU) navigation system concept is considered for the guided atmospheric entry phase. The systematic errors associated to the radio ranging and inertial measurements, and the atmospheric mission uncertainties are considered to be unknown. This paper presents the extension of an unbiased minimum-variance (EUMV) filter of a radio beacon/IMU navigation system. In the presence of unknown dynamics inputs, the filter joins the system state and the unknown systematic error estimation of a stochastic nonlinear time-varying discrete system. 3-DOF simulation results show that the performances of the proposed navigation filter algorithm, 100 m estimated altitude error and 8 m/s estimated velocity error, fulfills the need of future pinpoint Mars landing missions.

  7. Air entry-based characteristic length improves permeability estimates for compacted earth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Or, D.

    2007-12-01

    The permeability, k, of porous media is required for quantifying flow and transport processes in hydrology, civil, agriculture and petroleum engineering and is often estimated from medium porosity and additional constraints. Changes in porosity of earth materials due to compaction by anthropogenic activities or overburden result in a reduction in mean pore sizes and a decrease of k. Permeability is often expressed as proportional to a characteristic length squared and inversely proportional to a porosity factor, pore shape, and tortuosity of the material. Various characteristic lengths for the porous medium were proposed such as the hydraulic radius of Kozeny-Carman, or limiting pore size derived from critical path analysis. We introduce a characteristic length related to the air entry value compatible with Aissen formula that accommodates complex pore shapes. The proposed model includes a geometrical (tortuosity) factor and links relative changes in porosity to concurrent changes in k. The model was evaluated for three different groups of natural porous media: sands, sandstones with different cementing agents, and unconsolidated soils. For clay-free sands and unconsolidated soils, the model provides reasonable predictions for the entire range of porosities found in laboratory or field experiments. However, for sandstones with cementing agents, the model is valid up to a critical porosity where pore structure seems to collapse and k reduces drastically. The geometrical factor for soils was influenced by silt-to-clay ratio, while for granular media, it was correlated with mean grain diameter. The model offers improvement in predicting k and provides a means for incorporating critical pore size (air entry) information in addition to porosity.

  8. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: ONAV entry expert system code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    A complete listing is given of the expert system rules for the Entry phase of the Onboard Navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert Trainer System for aircraft/space shuttle navigation. These source listings appear in the same format as utilized and required by the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) expert system shell which is the basis for the ONAV entry system. A schematic overview is given of how the rules are organized. These groups result from a partitioning of the rules according to the overall function which a given set of rules performs. This partitioning was established and maintained according to that established in the knowledge specification document. In addition, four other groups of rules are specified. The four groups (control flow, operator inputs, output management, and data tables) perform functions that affect all the other functional rule groups. As the name implies, control flow ensures that the rule groups are executed in the order required for proper operation; operator input rules control the introduction into the CLIPS fact base of various kinds of data required by the expert system; output management rules control the updating of the ONAV expert system user display screen during execution of the system; and data tables are static information utilized by many different rule sets gathered in one convenient place.

  9. Linking Topics of News and Blogs with Wikipedia for Complementary Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Yokomoto, Daisuke; Nakasaki, Hiroyuki; Kawaba, Mariko; Utsuro, Takehito; Fukuhara, Tomohiro

    We study complementary navigation of news and blog, where Wikipedia entries are utilized as fundamental knowledge source for linking news articles and blog feeds/posts. In the proposed framework, given a topic as the title of a Wikipedia entry, its Wikipedia entry body text is analyzed as fundamental knowledge source for the given topic, and terms strongly related to the given topic are extracted. Those terms are then used for ranking news articles and blog posts. In the scenario of complementary navigation from a news article to closely related blog posts, Japanese Wikipedia entries are ranked according to the number of strongly related terms shared by the given news article and each Wikipedia entry. Then, top ranked 10 entries are regarded as indices for further retrieving closely related blog posts. The retrieved blog posts are finally ranked all together. The retrieved blog posts are then shown to users as blogs of personal opinions and experiences that are closely related to the given news article. In our preliminary evaluation, through an interface for manually selecting relevant Wikipedia entries, the rate of successfully retrieving relevant blog posts improved.

  10. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,

  11. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  12. Activity and Safety of Synthetic Lectins Based on Benzoboroxole-Functionalized Polymers for Inhibition of HIV Entry

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Alamelu; Geonnotti, Anthony R.; Balzarini, Jan; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Lectins derived from plant and microbial sources constitute a vital class of entry inhibitors that target the oligomannose residues on the HIV envelope gp120. Despite their potency and specificity, success of lectin-based entry inhibitors may be impeded by issues in regards to economical production, formulation and potential mitogenicity. Therefore, there exists a gap in the HIV therapeutics pipeline that underscores the need for mass producible, synthetic, broad-spectrum, and biocomptabile inhibitors of HIV entry. Here, we present the development of a polymeric synthetic lectin, based on benzoboroxole (BzB), which exhibits weak affinity (~25 M?1) for non-reducing sugars, similar to those found on the HIV envelope. High molecular weight BzB-functionalized polymers demonstrated antiviral activity that increased with an increase in ligand density and molecular weight of the polymer construct; revealing that polyvalency improves activity. Polymers showed significant increase in activity from 25 to 75 mol% BzB functionalization with EC50 of 15 ?M and 15 nM, respectively. A further increase in mole functionalization to 90% resulted in an increase of the EC50 (59 5 nM), likely due to the elongated rigid structure of the polymer chain compelled by electrostatic repulsion between the boronic acid groups. An increase in molecular weight of the polymer at 50 mol% BzB functionalization showed a gradual but significant increase in antiviral activity, with the highest activity seen with the 382 kDa polymer (EC50 of 1.1 0.5 nM in CEM cells and 11 3 nM in TZM-bl cells). Supplementing the polymer backbone with 10 mol% sulfonic acid not only increased the aqueous solubility of the polymers by at least 50-fold, but also demonstrated a synergistic increase in anti-HIV activity (4.0 1.5 nM in TZM-bl cells), possibly due to electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged polymer backbone and the positively charged V3-loop in the gp120. The benzoboroxole-sulfonic acid copolymers showed no decrease in activity in the presence of a seminal concentration of fructose (p > 0.05). Additionally, the co-polymers exhibit minimal, if any effect on the cellular viability, barrier properties, or cytokine levels in human reconstructed ecto-cervical tissue after 3 days of repeated exposure and did not show pronounced activity against a variety of other RNA and DNA viruses. PMID:21879735

  13. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is whatever

  14. News: A Consumer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Ivan; Doig, Carol

    A guide to news media, this book describes how to tell when a report is biased; provides tips on spotting hoaxes and public relations ploys in the news; gives standards to judge expert opinion and reliable sources; lists critics and other sources of help for the news consumer; discusses the endless contest among politicians, newsmen, and…

  15. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding

  16. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  17. Scenario-based simulation of runoff-related pesticide entries into small streams on a landscape level.

    PubMed

    Probst, Michael; Berenzen, Norbert; Lentzen-Godding, Annette; Schulz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    The prediction of runoff-related pesticide entry into surface waters on a landscape level usually requires considerable efforts with regard to input data, time, and personnel. Therefore, the need for an easy to use simulation tool with easily accessible input data, for example from already existing public sources, is obvious. In this paper, we present a simulation tool for the simulation of pesticide entry from arable land into adjacent streams. Our aim was to develop a tool applicable on the landscape level using "real world data" from numerous sites and for the simulation of parameter case studies concerning particular parameters at single sites. We used the ratio of exposure to toxicity (REXTOX) model proposed by the OECD, which had been successfully validated in the study area as part of a previous study and which was extended to calculate pesticide concentrations in adjacent streams. We simulated the pesticide entry on the landscape level at 737 sites in small streams situated in the central lowland of Germany with winter wheat, barley, and sugar beat as the main agricultural crops. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most significant model parameters were the width of the no-application zone and the degree of plant interception. The simulation was carried out for the 15 most frequently detected substances found in the study area using eight different environmental scenarios, covering variation of the width of the no-application zone, climate, and seasonal scenarios. The highest in-stream concentrations were predicted for a scenario using no (0m) buffer zone in conjunction with increased precipitation. According to the predicted concentrations, the risk for the aquatic communities was estimated based on standard toxicity tests and the application of a safety factor. The simulation results are presented both by means of risk maps for the study area showing the simulated pesticide concentration and the resulting ecological risk for numerous sites under varying scenarios and by case study diagrams with focus on the model behavior under the influence of single parameters. Risk maps confirmed the importance of no-application (buffer) zones for the levels of pesticide input. They also indicated the importance of the existing no-application zones for certain compounds and in some cases the need for a further evaluation of these regulations. The simulation tool was implemented as a standard PC software combining the REXTOX model with a geographical information system and can be used on any current personal computer. All input data was taken from public sources of German authorities. With little effort the tool should be applicable for other areas with similar data quality. PMID:15953635

  18. One Small Droplet: News Media Coverage of Peer-Reviewed and University-Based Education Research and Academic Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yettick, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Most members of the American public will never read this article. Instead, they will obtain much of their information about education from the news media. Yet little academic research has examined the type or quality of education research and expertise they will find there. Through the lens of gatekeeping theory, this mixed-methods study aims to…

  19. One Small Droplet: News Media Coverage of Peer-Reviewed and University-Based Education Research and Academic Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yettick, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Most members of the American public will never read this article. Instead, they will obtain much of their information about education from the news media. Yet little academic research has examined the type or quality of education research and expertise they will find there. Through the lens of gatekeeping theory, this mixed-methods study aims to

  20. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  1. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  2. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  3. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  4. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  5. Preparation, assembly and entry of data into the SPEAKEASY data base. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide assistance of non-policy nature in preparing data bases relating to the supply demand and price of crude oil, natural gas and other petroleum products. The data bases were to be used in determining the impact of decontrol of oil prices, announced by the President on April 5, 1979, on oil production, conservation of existing energy supplies, development of alternative energy sources, and dependency on foreign oil.

  6. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the findings from a reconstruction analysis of the Genesis capsule entry. First, a comparison of the atmospheric properties (density and winds) encountered during the entry to the pre-entry profile is presented. The analysis that was performed on the video footage (obtained from the tracking stations at UTTR) during the descent is then described from which the Mach number at the onset of the capsule tumble was estimated following the failure of the drogue parachute deployment. Next, an assessment of the Genesis capsule aerodynamics that was extracted from the video footage is discussed, followed by a description of the capsule hypersonic attitude that must have occurred during the entry based on examination of the recovered capsule heatshield. Lastly, the entry trajectory reconstruction that was performed is presented.

  7. Modeling of Radiative Heating in Base Region of Jovian Entry Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model is derived to determine the average thermodynamic properties in the expanding region, recirculating region, recompression region, and neck region through application of one-dimensional conservation equations. Radiative transfer is calculated using spectrally detailed computer codes accounting for nonequilibrium. The results show that the most severe heating occurs immediately behind the frustum, and that the recompression and neck regions are the major sources of radiation that heats the base stagnation point, The radiation flux to the base point is slightly stronger with ablation than without. Its value is 0.11(43 P(sub b)/P(sub s))(sup 2) times that to the front stagnation point where the base pressure P(sub b) is defined as the average pressure in the recirculating region and P(sub s) is the front stagnation-point pressure. The time-integrated heat load to the base point is 18(43 P(sub b)/P(sub s))(sup 2) kJ/sq cm.

  8. Automotive Technician. A Competency-Based Curriculum Designed To Prepare Students for Entry-Level Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Curriculum Resource Center of Maine, Fairfield.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist instructors in the development and implementation of a comprehensive, competency-based automotive curriculum. It contains an instructional unit for each task listed on the enclosed job analysis or DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) chart. These units include introduction, performance objectives, suggested…

  9. Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Based Bicistronic In Situ Reporter Assays for Discovery of Transcription-Targeted Lead Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lang, Liwei; Ding, Han-Fei; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Shi-Yong; Liu, Gang; Yan, Chunhong

    2015-07-23

    Although transgene-based reporter gene assays have been used to discover small molecules targeting expression of cancer-driving genes, the success is limited due to the fact that reporter gene expression regulated by incomplete cis-acting elements and foreign epigenetic environments does not faithfully reproduce chemical responses of endogenous genes. Here, we present an internal ribosome entry site-based strategy for bicistronically co-expressing reporter genes with an endogenous gene in the native gene locus, yielding an in situ reporter assay closely mimicking endogenous gene expression without disintegrating its function. This strategy combines the CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing tool with the recombinase-mediated cassette-exchange technology, and allows for rapid development of orthogonal assays for excluding false hits generated from primary screens. We validated this strategy by developing a screening platform for identifying compounds targeting oncogenic eIF4E, and demonstrated that the novel reporter assays are powerful in searching for transcription-targeted lead compounds with high confidence. PMID:26144883

  10. 32 CFR 770.29 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry procedures. 770.29 Section 770.29 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Installations in the State of Hawaii § 770.29 Entry procedures....

  11. Parallel, Gradient-Based Anisotropic Mesh Adaptation for Re-entry Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Jones, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Two gradient-based adaptation methodologies have been implemented into the Fun3d refine GridEx infrastructure. A spring-analogy adaptation which provides for nodal movement to cluster mesh nodes in the vicinity of strong shocks has been extended for general use within Fun3d, and is demonstrated for a 70 sphere cone at Mach 2. A more general feature-based adaptation metric has been developed for use with the adaptation mechanics available in Fun3d, and is applicable to any unstructured, tetrahedral, flow solver. The basic functionality of general adaptation is explored through a case of flow over the forebody of a 70 sphere cone at Mach 6. A practical application of Mach 10 flow over an Apollo capsule, computed with the Felisa flow solver, is given to compare the adaptive mesh refinement with uniform mesh refinement. The examples of the paper demonstrate that the gradient-based adaptation capability as implemented can give an improvement in solution quality.

  12. Development of FIAT-Based Parametric Thermal Protection System Mass Estimating Relationships for NASA's Multi-Mission Earth Entry Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepka, S. A.; Samareh, J. A.

    2014-06-01

    Mass estimating relationships have been formulated to determine a vehicle's Thermal Protection System material and required thickness for safe Earth entry. We focus on developing MERs, the resulting equations, model limitations, and model accuracy.

  13. An efficient fault-tolerant order entry management information system based on special distributed client/server architecture.

    PubMed

    Chuang, C T

    1998-11-01

    An automatic order entry system is very important for the processing of out-patient information, not only helping doctors to enter their orders directly but also reducing errors of communication. Many hospitals are anxious to set up a direct order entry system but are concerned about possible system failures. In this paper we report on an effective and efficient fault-tolerant order entry management system which satisfies the requirements for out-patient order entry. From the results of experiments on a prototype we found that the system was user friendly and reduced the time taken. Doctors are able to enter their orders more easily, accurately and quickly by selecting from the standardized and personalized menus to be found in the system. PMID:10338694

  14. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: ONAV entry knowledge requirements specification update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    A revised version of expert knowledge for the onboard navigation (ONAV) entry system is given. Included is some brief background information together with information describing the knowledge that the system does contain.

  15. A fuzzy ontology and its application to news summarization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Shing; Jian, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Lin-Kai

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy ontology and its application to news summarization are presented. The fuzzy ontology with fuzzy concepts is an extension of the domain ontology with crisp concepts. It is more suitable to describe the domain knowledge than domain ontology for solving the uncertainty reasoning problems. First, the domain ontology with various events of news is predefined by domain experts. The document preprocessing mechanism will generate the meaningful terms based on the news corpus and the Chinese news dictionary defined by the domain expert. Then, the meaningful terms will be classified according to the events of the news by the term classifier. The fuzzy inference mechanism will generate the membership degrees for each fuzzy concept of the fuzzy ontology. Every fuzzy concept has a set of membership degrees associated with various events of the domain ontology. In addition, a news agent based on the fuzzy ontology is also developed for news summarization. The news agent contains five modules, including a retrieval agent, a document preprocessing mechanism, a sentence path extractor, a sentence generator, and a sentence filter to perform news summarization. Furthermore, we construct an experimental website to test the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the news agent based on the fuzzy ontology can effectively operate for news summarization. PMID:16240764

  16. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds.

    ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers; materials that augment laboratory experiments are a good example.

    ·Supplementary videos, such as the videos, still images, and excerpts from interviews with nuclear chemists that give fuller meaning to the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements- One Atom at a Time" referred to below.

    ·Internet feature columns are more effective in a dynamic medium. Two that are in place are Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum (edited by Theresa Zielinski) and Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems (edited by William Robinson and Susan Nurrenbern).

    ·Buyers Guides have their content updated often and link to other useful sites. There is one for books and software and another for supplies and equipment. Elements Added to Periodic Table Two new transuranic elements have been added to the list in the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest ElementsOne Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee (JCE, 1999, 76, 331). The new elements have atomic numbers 118 and 116. The path to the discovery of these elements was predicted by Robert Smolanczuk, a young Polish theorist whose calculations led him to conclude that a lead-krypton collision technique could produce element 118, which then decays to element 116. Others questioned his results, but Hoffman invited him to join the team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a decision was made to try out his ideas. The result was almost complete verification of Smolanczuk's calculations. The experimental team was headed by Kenneth E. Gregorich; Darleane Hoffman is one of 15 codiscoverers of element 118. Awards Willard Gibbs Medal Lawrence F. Dahl of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the recipient of 1999 Willard Gibbs Medal, the highest award of the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society. It is awarded annually to a world-renowned scientist selected by a jury of panelists composed of eminent chemists elected by the Board of Directors of the Chicago Section. The award was presented at the Chicago Section's meeting in May 1999. Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities Grant Program for Senior Scientist Mentors The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation announces a new initiative within its Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: the Senior Scientist Mentors. Undergraduate participation in research is generally acknowledged to be one of the most effective ways for students to learn and appreciate chemistry. Key to a meaningful research experience is the advising and counseling a student can receive from leaders in chemical research. Application Details Emeritus faculty who maintain active research programs in the chemical sciences may apply for one of a limited number of awards that will allow undergraduates to do research under their guidance. Successful applicants, who are expected to be closely engaged in a mentoring relationship with the students, will receive grants of 10,000 annually for two years (20,000 total) for undergraduate stipends and modest research support. In approximately three pages, applicants should describe their ongoing research and the nature of the participation by undergraduates in the research activity. The role of the applicant as mentor should be clearly outlined. The application should also contain a curriculum vitae of no more than five pages that includes representative publications; a letter of support from the department chair that also commits appropriate space and facilities for the undergraduate participants; and a letter of support from a colleague (preferably from outside the department) who is familiar with the applicant's research and teaching. This initiative is open to all institutions that offer bachelor's or higher degrees in the chemical sciences. Use the standard cover page for the Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences, which is available at www.dreyfus.org. "Senior Scientist Mentors" should be entered as the project title. An original and five copies of the application are required. Applications should be received in the Foundation office (555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022) by September 1, 1999; awards will be announced toward the end of January 2000.

    Proposal Deadlines

    National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/

    Research Corporation

    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org

  17. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

    PubMed

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

  18. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

  19. Development of FIAT-Based Parametric Thermal Protection System Mass Estimating Relationships for NASA's Multi-Mission Earth Entry Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Zarchi, Kerry; Maddock, Robert W.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2013-01-01

    Part of NASAs In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program is the development of the tradespace to support the design of a family of multi-mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV) to meet a wide range of mission requirements. An integrated tool called the Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing or M-SAPE tool is being developed as part of Entry Vehicle Technology project under In-Space Technology program. The analysis and design of an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application many disciplines. Part of M-SAPE's application required the development of parametric mass estimating relationships (MERs) to determine the vehicle's required Thermal Protection System (TPS) for safe Earth entry. For this analysis, the heat shield was assumed to be made of a constant thickness TPS. This resulting MERs will then e used to determine the pre-flight mass of the TPS. Two Mers have been developed for the vehicle forebaody. One MER was developed for PICA and the other consisting of Carbon Phenolic atop an Advanced Carbon-Carbon composition. For the the backshell, MERs have been developed for SIRCA, Acusil II, and LI-900. How these MERs were developed, the resulting equations, model limitations, and model accuracy are discussed in this poster.

  20. A Trial of Inpatient Indication Based Prescribing During Computerized Order Entry with Medications Commonly Used Off-Label

    PubMed Central

    Walton, S.M.; Galanter, W.L.; Rosencranz, H.; Meltzer, D.; Stafford, R.S.; Tiryaki, F.; Sarne, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Requiring indications for inpatient medication orders may improve the quality of prescribing and allow for easier placement of diagnoses on the problem list. Indications for inpatient medication orders are also required by some regulators. Objective This study assessed a clinical decision support (CDS) system designed to obtain indications and document problems during inpatient computerized physician order entry (CPOE) of medications frequently used off-label. Methods A convenience sample of three medications frequently used off-label were selected: the PPI lansoprazole; intravenous immune globulin, and recombinant Factor VIIa. Alerts triggered when a medication was ordered without an FDA approved indication in the problem list. The alerts prompted clinicians to enter either a labeled or off-label indication for the order. Chart review was used as the gold standard to assess the accuracy of clinician entered information. Results The PPI intervention generated 873 alerts during 60 days of operation; IVIG 55 alerts during alerts during 93 days; Factor VIIa 25 alerts during 175 days. Agreement between indications entered and chart review was 63% for PPI, 49% for IVIG, and 29% for Factor VIIa. The alerts for PPI, IVIG and Factor VIIa alerts produced accurate diagnoses for the problem list 9%, 16% and 24% respectively. Rates of off-label use measured by chart review were 87% for PPI, and 100% for IVIG and factor VIIa, which were higher than if measured using the ordering clinicians' indications. Conclusion This trial of indication-based prescribing using CDS and CPOE produced less than optimal accuracy of the indication data as well as a low yield of accurate problems placed on the problem list. These results demonstrate the challenge inherent in obtaining accurate indication information during prescribing and should raise concerns over potential mandates for indication based prescribing and motivate further study of appropriate mechanisms to obtain indications during CPOE. PMID:23616862

  1. Broadcast News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyak, Paul G.

    This book is designed to introduce the fundamentals of broadcast news writing. The first three chapters concern leads, organization of material, and grammar and style. Chapter four brings the news writer into contact with the technological and aesthetic demands of radio and discusses interviews, lead-ins, and tag lines. Chapter five deals with…

  2. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  3. cctbx news

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Adams, Paul D.

    2006-11-22

    The 'Computational Crystallography Toolbox' (cctbx, http://cctbx.sourceforge.net/) is the open-source component of the Phenix project (http://www.phenix-online.org/). Most recent cctbx developments are geared towards supporting new features of the phenix.refine application. Thus, the open-source mmtbx (macromolecular toolbox) module is currently being most rapidly developed. In this article we give an overview of some of the recent developments. However, the main theme of this article is the presentation of a light-weight example command-line application that was specifically developed for this newsletter: sequence alignment and superposition of two molecules read from files in PDB format. This involves parameter input based on the Phil module presented in Newsletter No. 5, fast reading of the PDB files with the new iotbx.pdb.input class, simple sequence alignment using the new mmtbx.alignment module, and use of the Kearsley (1989) superposition algorithm to find the least-squares solution for superposing C-alpha positions. The major steps are introduced individually, followed by a presentation of the complete application. The example application is deliberately limited in functionality to make it concise enough for this article. The main goal is to show how the open-source components are typically combined into an application. Even though the example is quite specific to macromolecular crystallography, we believe it will also be useful for a small-molecule audience interested in utilizing the large open-source library of general crystallographic algorithms (see our previous articles in this newsletter series) to build an application. We describe recent developments of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox.

  4. Miniaturized transfer models to predict the precipitation of poorly soluble weak bases upon entry into the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sandra; Buchanan, Norma L; Buchanan, Charles M

    2012-12-01

    For poorly soluble weak bases, the possibility of drug precipitation upon entry into the small intestine may affect the amount of drug available for uptake through the intestinal mucosa. A few years ago, a transfer model was introduced which has been developed to simulate the transfer of a dissolved drug out of the stomach into the small intestine. However, this setup requires the use of clinically relevant doses of the drug, which are typically not available in the early stages of formulation development. The present series of tests was performed to check whether it is possible to create a miniaturized but physiologically relevant transfer model that can be applied in the early formulation development. Experiments were performed with two miniaturized setups: a 96-well plate model and a mini-paddle transfer system. Itraconazole and tamoxifen were used as model drugs. An appropriate amount of each drug formulation was dissolved in simulated gastric fluid and then transferred into an acceptor phase consisting of fasted/fed state simulated small intestinal fluid. The amount of drug dissolved in the acceptor phase was monitored over a period of 4 h. Results from both setups were very similar. The tamoxifen preformulation did not precipitate, whereas the itraconazole formulation precipitated to the same extent in both setups. Due to the possibility of generating physiologically relevant results but using smaller sample sizes and smaller volumes of media, both miniaturized transfer systems offer various advantages in terms of substance and analytical and material cost savings when evaluating the precipitation potential of poorly soluble weakly basic drug candidates. PMID:22968547

  5. Community of Learners: Charting Learning in First Year Graduate Entry Medical Students during Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsmond, Paul; Zvauya, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers social learning practices within and outside the overt curriculum. A thematic approach was used to analyse data from six focus group interviews with 11 graduate entry medical students from a UK university over a year of study. The results indicate that: (1) during their first year of study students form a community of learning…

  6. Evaluation of a Command-line Parser-based Order Entry Pathway for the Department of Veterans Affairs Electronic Patient Record

    PubMed Central

    Lovis, Christian; Chapko, Michael K.; Martin, Diane P.; Payne, Thomas H.; Baud, Robert H.; Hoey, Patty J.; Fihn, Stephan D.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To improve and simplify electronic order entry in an existing electronic patient record, the authors developed an alternative system for entering orders, which is based on a command- interface using robust and simple natural-language techniques. Design: The authors conducted a randomized evaluation of the new entry pathway, measuring time to complete a standard set of orders, and users' satisfaction measured by questionnaire. A group of 16 physician volunteers from the staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System–Seattle Division participated in the evaluation. Results: Thirteen of the 16 physicians (81%) were able to enter medical orders more quickly using the natural-language–based entry system than the standard graphical user interface that uses menus and dialogs (mean time spared, 16.06 ± 4.52 minutes; P=0.029). Compared with the graphical user interface, the command-–based pathway was perceived as easier to learn (P<0.01), was considered easier to use and faster (P<0.01), and was rated better overall (P<0.05). Conclusion: Physicians found the command- interface easier to learn and faster to use than the usual menu-driven system. The major advantage of the system is that it combines an intuitive graphical user interface with the power and speed of a natural-language analyzer. PMID:11522769

  7. How Much News Is Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Ronald G.

    Although the apparent audiences of the news media are quite large, the real audience for news, in particular hard news of politics and public affairs, is much smaller than is commonly assumed. This situation, while antithetical to the democratic ideal of a news-hungry, well-informed electorate, in practice makes little difference in the way the…

  8. The Origins of Borrowed News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study was conducted to assess the indications in print of news borrowing (reporting news distributed by second hand or government controlled sources) in the 1970s, and to examine the relationship between borrowed news and the restrictions and reductions in newspapers' overseas news staff. The "New York Times" and the "Chicago Tribune" were…

  9. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  10. Activity-based and fraction-guided analysis of Phyllanthus urinaria identifies loliolide as a potent inhibitor of hepatitis C virus entry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chueh-Yao; Liu, Ching-Hsuan; Burnouf, Thierry; Wang, Guey-Horng; Chang, Shun-Pang; Jassey, Alagie; Tai, Chen-Jei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Huang, Ching-Jang; Richardson, Christopher D; Yen, Ming-Hong; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lin, Liang-Tzung

    2016-06-01

    Without a vaccine, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a global medical and socio-economic burden, predisposing about 170 million carriers worldwide to end-stage liver diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the recently developed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have revolutionized hepatitis C treatment, most of them are unsuitable for monotherapy due to risks of resistance, thus necessitating combination with interferon (IFN)-alpha, ribavirin, or additional DAAs. More importantly, the high cost associated with the DAAs restricts their accessibility to most parts of the world. Developing novel cost-effective anti-HCV therapeutics may help expand the scope of antivirals and treatment strategies against hepatitis C. Herein, we applied an activity-based and fraction-guided analysis of extracts from the medicinal plant Phyllanthus urinaria (P. urinaria), which yielded fraction 13 (F13) as possessing the most potent inhibitory activity against early viral entry of cell-culture HCV infection. Chemical analysis (silica gel chromatography followed by ESI LC-MS plus (1)H and (13)C NMR) of F13 identified loliolide (LOD), a monoterpenoid lactone, as a novel inhibitor of HCV entry. Specifically, LOD could efficiently inactivate HCV free virus particles, abrogate viral attachment, and impede viral entry/fusion, with minimal effect on viral replication/translation, particle production, and induction of type I IFN host antiviral immune response. ELISA-based binding analysis confirmed the monoterpenoid's ability in efficiently blocking HCV particle attachment to the host cell surface. Furthermore, LOD could inhibit infection by several genotypic strains of HCV. This is the first report characterizing P. urinaria and its bioactive compound LOD as potent HCV entry inhibitors, which merit further evaluation for development as candidate antiviral agents against hepatitis C. PMID:27012176

  11. Development of FIAT-based Thermal Protection System Mass Estimating Relationships for NASA's Multi-Mission Earth Entry Concep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven Andrew; Zarchi, Kerry Agnes; Maddock, Robert W.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2011-01-01

    Mass Estimating Relationships (MERs) have been developed for use in the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) as part of NASA's multi-mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) concept. MERs have been developed for the thermal protection systems of PICA and of Carbon Phenolic atop Advanced Carbon-Carbon on the forebody and for SIRCA and Acusil II on the backshell. How these MERs were developed, the resulting equations, model limitations, and model accuracy are discussed herein.

  12. Development Of FIAT-Based Thermal Protection System Mass Estimating Relationships For NASA's Multi-Mission Earth Entry Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven; Trumble, Kerry A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Samareh, Jamshid

    2012-01-01

    Mass Estimating Relationships (MERs) have been developed for use in the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) as part of NASA's multi-mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) concept. MERs have been developed for the thermal protection systems of PICA and of Carbon Phenolic atop Advanced Carbon-Carbon on the forebody and for SIRCA and Acusil II on the backshell. How these MERs were developed, the resulting equations, model limitations, and model accuracy are discussed herein.

  13. Biodegradation of news inks

    SciTech Connect

    Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

  14. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  15. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  16. Waikupanaha ocean entry

    At the Waikupanaha ocean entry (left), three separate steam plumes merge into one as the wind blows the steam offshore. The west Waikupanaha entry is spread out over a larger area with at least 5 separate lava entry points. This photo was taken looking southeast....

  17. An effective news recommendation method for microblog user.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  18. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  19. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, III, Amos B.

    2012-06-19

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4-gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43{sub CD4} and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59{sub CD4} and Asp368{sub gp120}. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structures of gp120 in complex with small molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 tier 2 clades B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4-gp120 protein-protein interaction.

  20. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, Amos B.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4:gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43CD4 and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59CD4 and Asp368gp120. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization and structures of gp120 in complex with small-molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots of gp120. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 Tier 2 clade B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4:gp120 protein-protein interaction. PMID:22497421

  1. Entry inhibitor-based microbicides are active in vitro against HIV-1 isolates from multiple genetic subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ketas, Thomas J.; Schader, Susan M.; Zurita, Juan; Teo, Esther; Polonis, Victoria; Lu Min; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-08-01

    Inhibitors of viral entry are under consideration as topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Small molecules targeting HIV-1 gp120 (BMS-378806) or CCR5 (CMPD167), and a peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), each blocks vaginal infection of macaques by a SHIV. A microbicide, however, must be active against multiple HIV-1 variants. We therefore tested BMS-C (a BMS-378806 derivative), CMPD167, C52L and the CXCR4 ligand AMD3465, alone and in combination, against 25 primary R5, 12 X4 and 7 R5X4 isolates from subtypes A-G. At high concentrations (0.1-1 {mu}M), the replication of most R5 isolates in human donor lymphocytes was inhibited by > 90%. At lower concentrations, double and triple combinations were more effective than individual inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with X4 viruses when AMD3465 was substituted for CMPD167. The R5X4 viruses were inhibited by combining AMD3465 with CMPD167, or by the coreceptor-independent compounds. Thus, combining entry inhibitors may improve microbicide effectiveness.

  2. PureMD: a Computerized Patient Record software for direct data entry by physicians using a keyboard-free pen-based portable computer.

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, Y. A.; Maksud, M.; Desruisseaux, B.; Yale, P. P.; St-Arneault, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the data acquisition features of the PureMD Computerized Patient Record (CPR) software designed specifically for physicians. The physician uses a stylus to point, draw and handwrite on a Dynamic Dialog Interface that provides the same flexibility as the paper record and numerous other advantages. The clinical data thus entered is highly organized, easily legible and retrievable in many ways. The underlying Medical Knowledge Base (MKB) was optimized for rapid, intuitive and consistent data entry and automatic coding with minimum handwriting. PMID:1482879

  3. Do you want the good news or the bad news first? The nature and consequences of news order preferences.

    PubMed

    Legg, Angela M; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-03-01

    Information often comes as a mix of good and bad news, prompting the question, "Do you want the good news or the bad news first?" In such cases, news-givers and news-recipients differ in their concerns and considerations, thus creating an obstacle to ideal communication. In three studies, we examined order preferences of news-givers and news-recipients and the consequences of these preferences. Study 1 confirmed that news-givers and news-recipients differ in their news order preferences. Study 2 tested two solutions to close the preference gap between news-givers and recipients and found that both perspective-taking and priming emotion-protection goals shift news-givers' delivery patterns to the preferred order of news-recipients. Study 3 provided evidence that news order has consequences for recipients, such that opening with bad news (as recipients prefer) reduces worry, but this emotional benefit undermines motivation to change behavior. PMID:24177520

  4. Rereading Bad News: Compliance-Gaining Features in Management Memos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Carol; Baker, Margaret Ann

    1994-01-01

    Shows how compliance-gaining theory (more accurately than the "bad news formula") can help to explain the content and style of two kinds of memos that deliver bad news from managers to subordinates. Finds that features of compliance gaining governing message production explicate the power base, verbal strategies and tactics, and negotiating…

  5. Do Children Really Take Note of Science in the News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2007-01-01

    For ten days in August 2006, Pluto was rarely out of the news as members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) deliberated on its planetary status. For the members of the "News in Science Education" group, based at Queen's University, Belfast, this offered a great opportunity for educators to explore a number of interesting and important…

  6. eSchool News Online: www.eschoolnews.org.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2001-01-01

    Briefly describes content of eSchool News Online, an Internet-based publication for school officials containing reviews of current events, news relevant to schools, searchable archives, funding sources, technology forums, a calendar, and online access to hardcopy publications and special reports. Web address is www.eschoolnews.org. (PKP)

  7. Do Children Really Take Note of Science in the News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2007-01-01

    For ten days in August 2006, Pluto was rarely out of the news as members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) deliberated on its planetary status. For the members of the "News in Science Education" group, based at Queen's University, Belfast, this offered a great opportunity for educators to explore a number of interesting and important

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory will be the first Mars mission to attempt a guided entry with the objective of safely delivering the entry vehicle to a survivable parachute deploy state within 12.5 km of the pre-designated parachute deploy coordinates. The Entry Terminal Point Controller guidance algorithm is derived from the final phase Apollo Command Module guidance and, like Apollo, modulates the bank angle to control range based on deviations in range, altitude rate, and drag acceleration from a reference trajectory. For application to Mars landers which must make use of the tenuous Martian atmosphere, it is critical to balance the lift of the vehicle to minimize the range while still ensuring a safe deploy altitude. An overview of the process to generate optimized guidance settings is presented, discussing improvements made over the last nine years. Performance tradeoffs between ellipse size and deploy altitude will be presented, along with imposed constraints of entry acceleration and heating. Performance sensitivities to the bank reversal deadbands, heading alignment, attitude initialization error, and entry delivery errors are presented.

  9. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  10. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  11. How Newsmakers Make the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, George

    1978-01-01

    Presents illustrations from the Carter presidential campaign to demonstrate the credentials procedures for newspeople, and discusses schedules, pools, and mults that aid in coverage of the news while enabling the newsmaker to make the news. (JMF)

  12. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  13. NIS and Radio's All-News Predicament. Journalism Monographs No. 69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Eugene F.; Riffe, Daniel

    Based on case studies of 15 all-news radio stations, this report isolates major factors contributing to the all-news format's frequent failure and assesses its potential for success. The history of the News and Information Service (NIS), which the NBC radio network operated between 1975 and 1977, serves as a backdrop for the information presented…

  14. A Modest Proposal: No More Main Entry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of main entry in MARC bibliographic records based on the definition in the revised second edition of the "Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules." Access points versus entries are considered; differences between card catalog and online catalog environments are examined; and primary access is suggested as an appropriate replacement

  15. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news ≈ 187, general health news ≈ 278, general news ≈ 378, general news across multiple publishers ≈ 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier. PMID:20351893

  16. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in

  17. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  18. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  19. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in…

  20. The Structure of Foreign News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; Thompson, Kirstin D.

    To examine the ways in which aspects of foreign news content are linked together, an analysis was performed on the data collected during a content analysis of foreign news in major national daily newspapers and broadcast news programs over 12 days. The analysis included the identification of (1) up to four topics from an all-inclusive descriptive…

  1. Television News; Anatomy and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Maury

    Primarily for the journalist, this book explores three aspects of television news--its techniques, its journalistic concepts, and its effects on society--in developing its argument that the relationship of television news technique to concept is extremely intimate and widely misunderstood, and that the effects of television news on society are so…

  2. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  3. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  4. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article

  5. FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  7. Physician-patient communication: breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Fields, Scott A; Johnson, W Michael

    2012-01-01

    Physicians often struggle with how to manage the task of breaking bad news with patients. Moreover, the arduous nature of the task can contribute to physician detachment from the patient or an avoidance of breaking the news in a timely manner. A plan of action can only improve physician confidence in breaking bad news, and also make the task more manageable. Over a decade ago, Rabow and McPhee offered a strategy; the ABCDE plan, which provided a patient centered framework from which to deliver troubling news to patients and families. At the heart of this plan was the creation of a safe environment, the demonstration of timely communication skills, and the display of empathy on the physician's part. Careful consideration of the doctor's own reactions to death and dying also played an important role. A close review of the five tenets of this plan indicates the relevance of Rabow and McPhee's strategy today. The patient base in our nation and state continues to be older, on average, and physicians are faced with numerous patients who have terminal illness. A constructive plan with specific ideas for breaking bad news can help physicians effectively navigate this difficult task. PMID:22655433

  8. News "Speed Dating" for Scientists and Journalists: Conveying geoscience news in haiku-short form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybas, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    As Rachel Carson wrote in her 1956 book, The Sense of Wonder, it's important for everyone to develop an appreciation of "land, sea and sky." One of the best ways of getting the word out to the public about these realms is through the media. How do scientists capture the interest of the press in a society with a seemingly shorter and shorter attention span? Studies show that as the amount of scientific jargon and number of complex concepts in a news story increase, "filter-feeding" by the public of that news declines. When scientific jargon/complex concepts are few, the public "consumes" much more news. These results also apply to news story headlines: shorter headlines get the most interest. Based on these findings, one organization has started an experiment in "scientific speed dating": giving presenters three minutes to discuss results. They may have discovered something: news coverage of the research has been excellent. In today's world, conveying news about the geosciences in haiku-short form may be the best way of relating the wonders of land, sea and sky.

  9. Delivering bad news to patients

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  10. Figuring Out Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the American Psychiatric Association (APA), are other good sources. previous continue Getting Help The best way to get a full understanding of medical news is to ask someone like a doctor or science teacher for help in figuring out what it ...

  11. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  12. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  13. News from LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1994-01-26

    We present a brief summary of recent news from LBL related to accelerator physics. This talk was given on October 29, 1993 at the 6th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on the subject ``Synchro- Betraton Resonances,`` held in Funchal (Madeira, Portugal), October 24--30, 1993.

  14. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  15. Parent News Offline, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues published in volume 1 (1999) of "Parent News Offline," a newsletter of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN), designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The spring 1999 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Child Care: How…

  16. Parent News Offline, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 4 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2002 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Middle College High Schools:…

  17. Parent News Offline, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 2 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2000 issue contains the following articles: (1) "'Zero Tolerance': What Parents…

  18. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  19. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  20. News & Issues, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the two 1999 issues of "News and Issues," a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate, and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter/Spring issue includes the following articles: (1) "Innovative Strategies Help Families Cope…

  1. Localisation-based imaging of malarial antigens during erythrocyte entry reaffirms a role for AMA1 but not MTRAP in invasion

    PubMed Central

    Riglar, David T.; Whitehead, Lachlan; Cowman, Alan F.; Rogers, Kelly L.; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microscopy-based localisation of proteins during malaria parasite (Plasmodium) invasion of the erythrocyte is widely used for tentative assignment of protein function. To date, however, imaging has been limited by the rarity of invasion events and the poor resolution available, given the micron size of the parasite, which leads to a lack of quantitative measures for definitive localisation. Here, using computational image analysis we have attempted to assign relative protein localisation during invasion using wide-field deconvolution microscopy. By incorporating three-dimensional information we present a detailed assessment of known parasite effectors predicted to function during entry but as yet untested or for which data are equivocal. Our method, termed longitudinal intensity profiling, resolves confusion surrounding the localisation of apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) at the merozoite–erythrocyte junction and predicts that the merozoite thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (MTRAP) is unlikely to play a direct role in the mechanics of entry, an observation supported with additional biochemical evidence. This approach sets a benchmark for imaging of complex micron-scale events and cautions against simplistic interpretations of small numbers of representative images for the assignment of protein function or prioritisation of candidates as therapeutic targets. PMID:26604223

  2. Localisation-based imaging of malarial antigens during erythrocyte entry reaffirms a role for AMA1 but not MTRAP in invasion.

    PubMed

    Riglar, David T; Whitehead, Lachlan; Cowman, Alan F; Rogers, Kelly L; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy-based localisation of proteins during malaria parasite (Plasmodium) invasion of the erythrocyte is widely used for tentative assignment of protein function. To date, however, imaging has been limited by the rarity of invasion events and the poor resolution available, given the micron size of the parasite, which leads to a lack of quantitative measures for definitive localisation. Here, using computational image analysis we have attempted to assign relative protein localisation during invasion using wide-field deconvolution microscopy. By incorporating three-dimensional information we present a detailed assessment of known parasite effectors predicted to function during entry but as yet untested or for which data are equivocal. Our method, termed longitudinal intensity profiling, resolves confusion surrounding the localisation of apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) at the merozoite-erythrocyte junction and predicts that the merozoite thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (MTRAP) is unlikely to play a direct role in the mechanics of entry, an observation supported with additional biochemical evidence. This approach sets a benchmark for imaging of complex micron-scale events and cautions against simplistic interpretations of small numbers of representative images for the assignment of protein function or prioritisation of candidates as therapeutic targets. PMID:26604223

  3. a Reflective Perspective Towards Agricultural Information-Based System Development in General Rural China and Farmers' Economic Association as the Entry Point of Icts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Miao; Zuo, Ting; Leninhan, Eamon

    The information-based agricultural system plays a profound role in agricultural economic and social development in long term. There are various practices worldwide, both successful and unsuccessful. In recent years new technologies blossomed, if those new technologies succeed in the developed world, does it hold true for China? The alternative choices in informationbased system development should be noticed in China. This article argues that China’s development policy should choose the way that adapts to China’s circumstances, not totally adopt the western way. In the current situation of general rural China, the theme of information-based agricultural system needs to be further addressed. It is suggested that the Farmers’ Economic Association can be considered as one of the most accessible entry-points for further development way.

  4. Ultrasmall Gold Nanoparticles as Carriers for Nucleus-Based Gene Therapy Due to Size-Dependent Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the size-dependent penetration ability of gold nanoparticles and the potential application of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles for intranucleus delivery and therapy. We synthesized gold nanoparticles with diameters of 2, 6, 10, and 16 nm and compared their intracellular distribution in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm (2 and 6 nm) could enter the nucleus, whereas larger ones (10 and 16 nm) were found only in the cytoplasm. We then investigated the possibility of using ultrasmall 2 nm nanoparticles as carriers for nuclear delivery of a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) that binds to the c-myc promoter. Compared to free TFO, the nanoparticle-conjugated TFO was more effective at reducing c-myc RNA and c-myc protein, which resulted in reduced cell viability. Our result demonstrated that the entry of gold nanoparticles into the cell nucleus is critically dependent on the size of the nanoparticles. We developed a strategy for regulating gene expression, by directly delivering TFOs into the nucleus using ultrasmall gold nanoparticles. More importantly, guidelines were provided to choose appropriate nanocarriers for different biomedical purposes. PMID:24824865

  5. Stardust Entry Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Stardust capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.1 km north-northwest of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analyses of infrared video footage and radar range data (obtained from tracking stations) during the descent show that drogue parachute deployment was 4.8 s later than the pre-entry prediction, while main parachute deployment was 19.3 s earlier than the pre-set timer indicating that main deployment was actually triggered by the backup baroswitch. Reconstruction of a best estimated trajectory revealed that the aerodynamic drag experienced by the capsule during hypersonic flight was within 1% of pre-entry predications. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry estimates of small hypersonic angles of attack, since there was very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Stardust capsule entry were consistent with flight performance close to nominal pre-entry predictions. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  6. Ki Ocean Entry

    Since reaching the water a few weeks ago, the Ki ocean entry has formed a small delta, seen here, with a surface area of about 7 acres. A small steam plume rises above the entry, indicating that relatively little lava is making it into the ocean....

  7. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  8. Thermal Soak Analysis of Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Sepka, Steven A.; Aliaga, Jose F.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle project is developing an integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing that will provide key technology solutions including mass sizing, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and thermal and structural analysis for any given sample return mission. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various components including the payload container of the entry vehicle are part of the solution that this tool will offer to mission designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into the tool.

  9. Rethinking Child Welfare to Keep Families Safe and Together: Effective Housing-Based Supports to Reduce Child Trauma, Maltreatment Recidivism, and Re-Entry to Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Marny; Sullivan, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of children who are placed in child protective custody have parents with a substance use disorder. This placement occurs despite evidence that the trauma of removal is associated with poor long-term child outcomes. This article describes a collaborative model of a continuum of housing-based clinical and support services for the whole family that has safely reduced foster care placement. An external evaluation of this pilot in Jackson County, Oregon, found significant differences in subsequent maltreatment, foster care re-entry, and family permanency outcomes favoring the treatment group. After initial external grant funds, this program is continuing and expanding across Oregon due to state legislation, and funding and can be a model for other states. PMID:26827482

  10. Evaluation of training programs and entry-level qualifications for nuclear-power-plant control-room personnel based on the systems approach to training

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P M; Selby, D L; Hanley, M J; Mercer, R T

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. Variables (performance shaping factors) of potential importance to personnel selection and training are identified, and research to more rigorously define an operationally useful taxonomy of those variables is recommended. A high-level model of the Systems Approach to Training for use in the nuclear industry, which could serve as a model for NRC evaluation of industry programs, is presented. The model is consistent with current publically stated NRC policy, with the approach being followed by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and with current training technology. Checklists to be used by NRC evaluators to assess training programs for NPP control-room personnel are proposed which are based on this model.

  11. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  12. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:26827033

  13. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  14. Online News vs. Traditional Media: Students' News Acquisition Preferences. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terkla, Dawn Geronimo; McKnight, Jennifer

    This study at Tufts University (Massachusetts) evaluated College NewsLink, a web-based newsclipping service, as part of a larger study to assess student preferences regarding the acquisition of current events information. The methodology was multi-pronged: first, faculty were surveyed concerning their familiarity with web-based products; second,…

  15. 5. PORTICO AND ENTRY DETAIL, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION. This entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PORTICO AND ENTRY DETAIL, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION. This entry replaces original twin entries to southeast and southwest rooms from portico, and was installed when south entry hall was built. - Oak Island (House), County Road 768 vicinity, Edisto Island, Charleston County, SC

  16. Available hardware for automated entry control

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.P.

    1990-11-01

    Automated entry control has become an increasingly important issue at facilities where budget constraints are limiting options for manned entry control points. Three questions are immediately raised when automated entry control is considered: What hardware is available How much does it cost How effective is it in maintaining security Ongoing work at Sandia National Labs is attempting to answer these questions and establish a data base for use by facility security managers working the problem of how to maintain security on a limited budget. 14 refs.

  17. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making

  18. Mars Underground News.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K.

    Contents: Next entry to Mars (Mars Pathfinder and the microrover Sojourner). Hello, Mars, we're back! Mars Global Surveyor update. The Mars program - 2001 and beyond. Schedule of missions to Mars (as of June 11, 1997). Mars on the Web.

  19. Distant Fume from Lava Entry

    View looking toward the ocean entries in the distance. The 'Ili'ili entry is marked by the tiny plume to the left. The very broad Puhiokalaikini entry comprises the rest of the plumes along the shoreline. The tube system feeding the ocean entries is delineated by the fume in the foreground....

  20. 19 CFR 123.14 - Entry of foreign-based trucks, busses, and taxicabs in international traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incidental to the immediately prior or subsequent engagement of that vehicle in international traffic. Any... vehicle to its base country shall be considered incidental to its engagement in international traffic....

  1. Advances in spacecraft atmospheric entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito Manrique, Joel

    In order to advance entry guidance technology two different research areas have been explored with the objective of increasing the reachable landing area and the landing accuracy for future Mars missions. Currently only the northern hemisphere of Mars is available for landing due to its low elevation. Only low elevation landing sites have the necessary atmospheric density to allow landing using current Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology. In order to reach most of the Ancient Highlands, the majority of the southern hemisphere, advanced EDL technology is needed in multiple fields, including entry guidance. The first research area is the definition and applications of reachable and controllable sets for entry. The definition of the reachable and controllable sets provides a framework for the study of the capabilities of an entry vehicle in a given planet. Reachable and controllable sets can be used to comprehensively characterize the envelope of trajectories that a vehicle can fly, the sites it can reach and the entry states that can be accommodated. The sets can also be used for the evaluation of trajectory planning algorithms and to assist in the selection of the entry or landing sites. In essence, the reachable and controllable sets offer a powerful vehicle and trajectory analysis and design framework that allows for better mission design choices. In order to illustrate the use of the sets, they are computed for a representative Mars mission using two different vehicle configurations. The sets characterize the impact of the vehicle configuration on the entry capability. Furthermore, the sets are used to find the best skip-entry trajectory for a return from the Moon mission, highlighting the utility of the sets in atmospheric maneuvers other than entry. The second research area is the development of the components of an entry guidance algorithm that allow high elevation landing and provide as well high landing accuracy. The approach taken follows the acceleration guidance approach successfully used in missions like the Space Shuttle. Based on this approach, a new planner has been developed that is computationally fast and provides trajectories with both high final altitude and high control authority. A new tracking law based on nonlinear predictive control has been developed to track the reference trajectory. The new tracking law accounts for control saturation, which is a common feature of trajectories in the thin Martian atmosphere with a low lift vehicle. Finally, a final position guidance algorithm that aligns the vehicle's heading towards the target and provides altitude and range control, has been developed. The new guidance algorithm provides increased accuracy as well as higher final altitude compared to an entry guidance algorithm representative of the current capabilities.

  2. Values Analysis in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuse, Loretta S.; Kuse, Hildegard R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students examine the value content of news presentations. Explains that after classroom brainstorming, students watch news broadcasts and answer values-related questions. Suggests references for teachers on the sources of U.S. values. (SG)

  3. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  4. Getting Out the Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  5. Myth, Method and International News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth and news,…

  6. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews major science news stories of 1988 as reported in the pages of Science News. Covers the areas of anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, food science, mathematics and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (YP)

  7. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories of 1989 as reported in the pages of "Science News." Topics include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, environment, food science, math and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (CW)

  8. Media Choices for Specialized News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Herbert H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines preferred media sources for four categories of special news--medicine, science, business, and consumer economics. Found that respondents ranked the media in the following order as preferred sources of specialized news: (1) local television affiliates, (2) local newspapers, (3) magazines, (4) radio, (5) cable networks, and (6) national

  9. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  10. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  11. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories of 1981 as reported in "Science News." Gives a one-sentence summary and volume and page references for each story. Groups items by topic including space and astronomy, archaeology and anthropology, technology, behavior, science and society, energy, environment, and specific science disciplines. (DC)

  12. Television News Exchanges in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Don M.

    In 1984, a project was initiated in Asia under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union that represents a major break-through in achieving a better balance in the collection, editing, and distribution of the world's news. This break-through was the Asiavision Satellite News Exchange, which has made it possible for many Asian…

  13. Is Early Center-Based Child Care Associated with Tantrums and Unmanageable Behavior over Time up to School Entry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Suna; Barnes, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Background: Existing research suggests that there is a relationship between greater exposure to center-based child care and child behavioral problems though the mechanism for the impact is unclear. However the measure used to document child care has usually been average hours, which may be particularly unreliable in the early months when fewer…

  14. An Investigative Study of the Perceptions of Nationally Certified Massage Practitioners toward Entry Level Web Based Massage Therapy Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlahos, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the current status of online education in massage therapy with respect to the development of web based curriculums. Participants are drawn from the public listing of the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The Online Curriculum Survey in Massage Therapy is used as an…

  15. An Investigative Study of the Perceptions of Nationally Certified Massage Practitioners toward Entry Level Web Based Massage Therapy Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlahos, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the current status of online education in massage therapy with respect to the development of web based curriculums. Participants are drawn from the public listing of the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The Online Curriculum Survey in Massage Therapy is used as an

  16. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  17. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  18. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  19. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  20. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  1. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  2. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  3. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  4. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  5. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  6. NEWS: Eclipse matters (still)!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    This collection of snippets has as its theme the 1999 Solar Eclipse, and covers items that might be of interest to eclipse watchers and their associates. Much information can be obtained from the national web site at http://www.eclipse.org.uk. Set up by the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on behalf of the UK Eclipse Group, the site is intended to keep viewers abreast of developments during the countdown to the eclipse. The list of contents includes: about eclipses; eclipse pictures; eclipse science; safety advice; latest news; and local information. There is also a wealth of images and video footage, so the site has been organized with the visitor having a small PC and modem in mind, so that the key information can be accessed as quickly as possible. Free colour leaflets containing useful details for eclipse watchers can be obtained from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. `The Sun - our local star' and `Neutrinos' are additions to PPARC's series introducing key areas of its science. They answer such questions as what the Sun is, what eclipses are, why the Sun is important and where neutrinos come from. They support the National Curriculum Key Stages 3 and 4 plus A-level physics. The A5 leaflets open out into an A2 sized double-sided wall chart and bulk quantitites are available for class sets, visitor centres, exhibitions, open days etc. A full list of PPARC materials can be found at the website http://www.pparc.ac.uk or by order from Mark Wells, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1SZ (fax: 01793 442002). A message has been received from George Care, Head of Physics in the Science Department at Mounts Bay School, Penzance, which we now pass on to our readers. During his application for electronic access to Physics Education via the Institute of Physics Affiliated Schools and Colleges scheme, George notes that his school is on the track of the eclipse this summer and he has invited us to pass on the details to anyone who would like to research the event. At the time of his correspondence, no-one had requested use of the school's facilities. The school's address is Boscathnoe Lane, Heamoor, Penzance TR18 3JT, Cornwall (fax: 01736 331633) if you want to get in touch. Finally we include the following article from a Guernsey-based company committed to supplying equipment for safe observation of the solar eclipse this summer. Eclipse posters are also available, at £10 each, from the company at Belle Etoile, Rue du Hamel, Castel, Guernsey GY5 7QJ (fax: 01481 64871) and more information can be viewed at their website http://ds.dial.pipex.com/eclipse99page/.

  7. Guidelines for Improving Entry Into and Retention in Care and Antiretroviral Adherence for Persons With HIV: Evidence-Based Recommendations From an International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care Panel

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Amico, K. Rivet; Cargill, Victoria A.; Chang, Larry W.; Gross, Robert; Orrell, Catherine; Altice, Frederick L.; Bangsberg, David R.; Bartlett, John G.; Beckwith, Curt G.; Dowshen, Nadia; Gordon, Christopher M.; Horn, Tim; Kumar, Princy; Scott, James D.; Stirratt, Michael J.; Remien, Robert H.; Simoni, Jane M.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2014-01-01

    Description After HIV diagnosis, timely entry into HIV medical care and retention in that care are essential to the provision of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART adherence is among the key determinants of successful HIV treatment outcome and is essential to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care convened a panel to develop evidence-based recommendations to optimize entry into and retention in care and ART adherence for people with HIV. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to produce an evidence base restricted to randomized, controlled trials and observational studies with comparators that had at least 1 measured biological or behavioral end point. A total of 325 studies met the criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted and coded data from each study using a standardized data extraction form. Panel members drafted recommendations based on the body of evidence for each method or intervention and then graded the overall quality of the body of evidence and the strength for each recommendation. Recommendations Recommendations are provided for monitoring of entry into and retention in care, interventions to improve entry and retention, and monitoring of and interventions to improve ART adherence. Recommendations cover ART strategies, adherence tools, education and counseling, and health system and service delivery interventions. In addition, they cover specific issues pertaining to pregnant women, incarcerated individuals, homeless and marginally housed individuals, and children and adolescents, as well as substance use and mental health disorders. Recommendations for future research in all areas are also provided. PMID:22393036

  8. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  9. Feasibility study of low angle planetary entry. [probe design for Jovian entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a Jovian entry by a probe originally designed for Saturn and Uranus entries is examined. An entry probe is described which is capable of release near an outer planet's sphere of influence and descent to a predetermined target entry point in the planet's atmosphere. The probe is designed so as to survive the trapped particle radiation belts and an entry heating pulse. Data is gathered and relayed to an overflying spacecraft bus during descent. Probe variations for two similar missions are described. In the first flyby of Jupiter by a Pioneer spacecraft launched during the 1979 opportunity is examined parametrically. In the second mission an orbiter based on Pioneer and launched in 1980 is defined in specific terms. The differences rest in the science payloads and directly affected wiring and electronics packages.

  10. MCC level C formulation requirements. Entry guidance and entry autopilot, optional TAEM targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The level C software formulations requirements for the entry guidance and the simplified autopilot to be used by the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor are presented. The modifications required to functionally simulate optional Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) targeting capability (OTT) are incorporated. Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the orbiter avionics entry guidance software. Descriptions of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, and the targeting routine are given. Also included are a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  11. Shuttle program. MCC Level C formulation requirements: Entry guidance and entry autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Hill, O.

    1980-01-01

    A set of preliminary entry guidance and autopilot software formulations is presented for use in the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor. These software formulations meet all level B requirements. Revision 2 incorporates the modifications required to functionally simulate optimal TAEM targeting capability (OTT). Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the Orbiter avionics entry guidance software. This MCC requirements document contains a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, a description of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, a description of the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, a description of the targeting routine, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  12. Time card entry system

    SciTech Connect

    Montierth, B.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Time Card Entry System was developed to interface with the DOE Headquarters Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure Numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills US Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. Tours of Duty (e.g. ten hour day, four day week with Friday through Sunday off), established in the ETA system, are imported into the Time Card Entry System by the Timekeepers. An individual`s Tour of Duty establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two week cycle, data is exported by the Timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA data files.

  13. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  14. Entry Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Rummler, Donald R.; Bersch, Charlie; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1993-01-01

    The Entry Systems Panel was chaired by Don Rummler, LaRC and Dan Rasky, ARC. As requested, each panel participant prior to the workshop prepared and delivered presentations to: (1) identify technology needs; (2) assess current programs; (3) identify technology gaps; and (4) identify highest payoff areas R&D. Participants presented background on the entry systems R&D efforts and operations experiences for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These participants represented NASA Centers involved in research (Ames Research Center), development (Johnson Space Center) and operations (Kennedy Space Center) and the Shuttle Orbiter prime contractor. The presentations lead to the discovery of several lessons learned.

  15. Viral Entry into Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  16. Entry effects of droplet in a micro confinement: Implications for deformation-based circulating tumor cell microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Deformation-based circulating tumor cell (CTC) microchips are a representative diagnostic device for early cancer detection. This type of device usually involves a process of CTC trapping in a confined microgeometry. Further understanding of the CTC flow regime, as well as the threshold passing-through pressure, is a key to the design of deformation-based CTC filtration devices. In the present numerical study, we investigate the transitional deformation and pressure signature from surface tension dominated flow to viscous shear stress dominated flow using a droplet model. Regarding whether CTC fully blocks the channel inlet, we observe two flow regimes: CTC squeezing and shearing regime. By studying the relation of CTC deformation at the exact critical pressure point for increasing inlet velocity, three different types of cell deformation are observed: (1) hemispherical front, (2) parabolic front, and (3) elongated CTC co-flowing with carrier media. Focusing on the circular channel, we observe a first increasing and then decreasing critical pressure change with increasing flow rate. By pressure analysis, the concept of optimum velocity is proposed to explain the behavior of CTC filtration and design optimization of CTC filter. Similar behavior is also observed in channels with symmetrical cross sections like square and triangular but not in rectangular channels which only results in decreasing critical pressure. PMID:25945134

  17. Entry effects of droplet in a micro confinement: Implications for deformation-based circulating tumor cell microfiltration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Deformation-based circulating tumor cell (CTC) microchips are a representative diagnostic device for early cancer detection. This type of device usually involves a process of CTC trapping in a confined microgeometry. Further understanding of the CTC flow regime, as well as the threshold passing-through pressure, is a key to the design of deformation-based CTC filtration devices. In the present numerical study, we investigate the transitional deformation and pressure signature from surface tension dominated flow to viscous shear stress dominated flow using a droplet model. Regarding whether CTC fully blocks the channel inlet, we observe two flow regimes: CTC squeezing and shearing regime. By studying the relation of CTC deformation at the exact critical pressure point for increasing inlet velocity, three different types of cell deformation are observed: (1) hemispherical front, (2) parabolic front, and (3) elongated CTC co-flowing with carrier media. Focusing on the circular channel, we observe a first increasing and then decreasing critical pressure change with increasing flow rate. By pressure analysis, the concept of optimum velocity is proposed to explain the behavior of CTC filtration and design optimization of CTC filter. Similar behavior is also observed in channels with symmetrical cross sections like square and triangular but not in rectangular channels which only results in decreasing critical pressure. PMID:25945134

  18. Models of radon entry: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper reviews existing models of radon entry into houses. The primary mechanism of radon entry in houses with high indoor concentrations is, in most cases, convective entry of radon bearing soil-gas from the surrounding soil. The driving force for this convective entry is the small indoor-outdoor pressure difference arising from the stack effect and other causes. Entry points for the soil-gas generally are the cracks or gaps in the building substructure, or though other parts of the building shell in direct contact with the soil, although entry may also occur by flow though permeable concrete or cinder block walls of the substructure. Models using analytical solutions to idealized geometrical configurations with simplified boundary conditions obtain analytical tractability of equations to be solved at the cost of severe approximations; their strength is in the insights they offer with their solutions. Models based on lumped parameters attempt to characterize the significant physical behavioral characteristics of the soil-gas and radon flow. When realistic approximations are desired for the boundary conditions and terms in the governing equations, numerical models must be used; these are usually based on finite difference or finite element solutions to the governing equations. Limited data are now available for experimental verification of model predictions. The models are briefly reviewed and their strengths and limitations are discussed.

  19. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both 3-D calculations and obtained flight data. Experience in this field and flight data are rare. But there are data bases in the USA, where public access is often difficult. The data mostly deal with reuseable launch vehi- cle technology which is a concern for the understanding of entry missions to earth and for the aim to reduce payload transportation costs in future. For X-38 about 40 international partners have been collaborating to develop, qualify and fly X-38 which is a technology demonstrator for the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) of the International Space Station (ISS). About 1000 sensors will be operated to obtain a data base which will be combined with a aerothermodynamic data base (European contribution). Additionally, a lot of instrumentation has been contributed. PYREX-KAT38 meas- uring the temperature distribution in the X-38 nose structure was developed by IRS. The data of the PYREX sensor system contribute to several fields of interest i.e. temperature histories at 5 positons in the nose structure, information about rotational degrees of freedom of the vehicle during entry, statements on the behavior of the TPS material and heat flux distribution. The paper presents experiments that are being developed at IRS. Below summaries of such experi- ments are given: PYREX is a pyrometric entry experiment measuring rear side temperatures of ceramic TPS. It has already been flown twice. The first flight was with the German-Japanese capsule EXPRESS, the second with the capsule MIRKA. PY- REX-KAT38 was delivered to NASA. It is a fully qualified temperature measurement system and will be operated aboard the X-38 vehicle. RESPECT is a spectrometer that will be used to gain spectral data in the flow field around a space vehicle. The main goal is to obtain information about the plasma state in the post shock regime of a vehicle by measuring the spectrally resolved radiation. The obtained database will provide radiation of multiple species for a comparison with computer simulations. PHLUX: Based on experiences with PYREX, a sensor for heat flux measurements is being developed at IRS. This experiment is to estimate the dissociation degree during a entry using measured heat fluxes on different catalytic sur- faces. Such information are of importance for the understanding of thermo-chemical relation between plasma and TPS wall. The sensor delivers heat fluxes at wall temperature while most of the existing heat flux measurement systems use heat sink based methodologies meaning that temperatures on these sensors are not the real wall temperatures. Such measurements were planned in the PYREX-KAT38 (X-38) program but had to be set back due to problems with the foreseen catalytic surfaces. Boundary Layer Probe is to determine the boundary layer thickness and pressure. The retractable probe is used to measure the pressure in the flight body boundary layer perpendicular to the material surface. The pressure curve can be used to determine the position and thickness of the shock front. Radiometer: With high enthalpy entries and many interplanetary missions such as missions to Mars or Venus, the radiative portion of the heat flux to a vehicle cannot be neglected. High enthalpy and radiative intensities of some car- bonaceous molecules cause high radiation intensities which is, e.g., the case for the Huygens mission. At IRS, the heat shield material for Huygens was tested and the qualification was carried out. Within this context a radiometer probe for wind tunnel application was developed.

  20. A (210)Pb-based chronological model for recent sediments with random entries of mass and activities: Model development.

    PubMed

    Abril Hernández, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbexc) vs. mass depth profiles do not contain enough information as to extract a unique chronology when both, (210)Pbexc fluxes and mass sediment accumulation rates (SAR) independently vary with time. Restrictive assumptions are needed to develop a suitable dating tool. A statistical correlation between fluxes and SAR seems to be a quite general rule. This paper builds up a new (210)Pb-based dating tool by using such a statistical correlation. It operates with SAR and initial activities that closely follow normal distributions, what leads to the expected correlation between fluxes and SAR. An intelligent algorithm solves their best arrangement downcore to fit the experimental (210)Pbexc vs. mass depth profile, generating then solutions for the chronological line, and for the histories of SAR and fluxes. Parametric maps of a χ-function serve to find out the solution and to support error estimates. Optionally, the model's answers can be better constrained through the use of time markers. The performance of the model is illustrated with a synthetic core, and with real cases using published data for varved sediment cores. PMID:26421913

  1. The Diffusion of "Shocking" Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Harvey, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    A study of the diffusion of news about the Mormon Church's approval of Blacks for the priesthood revealed that "shocking" good news can ignite the interpersonal communications system, that news has more credibility when obtained from media than when obtained interpersonally, and that people use mass media to verify news obtained interpersonally.…

  2. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  3. Television News and the Miners' Strike.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Guy; And Others

    A content analysis was performed on all of the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) Nine O'Clock News and ITV (Independent Television) News at Ten programs that were broadcast during Britain's year-long miners' strike--March 1984-March 1985--and a four-month sample of Channel 4 news to examine how television news covered a protracted story of…

  4. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  5. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  6. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  7. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  8. [The making of AIDS news].

    PubMed

    Spink, M J; Medrado, B; Menegon, V M; Lyra, J; Lima, H

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of the overall research effort on the role of the media in making sense of events in late modernity. The main objective is to investigate the context in which news about AIDS is produced at the interface between norms for producing news (as expressed by professional journalists) and an analysis of news stories published in four mainstream Brazilian newspapers. The results are organized in three broad topics: (a) the construction of news about AIDS; (b) the visibility of AIDS news during the study period; and (c) factors that facilitate or hinder the production of AIDS news. Important factors include exclusiveness of the story and/or novelty of the content, the notion of hot (or cold) news, and the specific contents. The authors also emphasize the inevitable chance elements associated with organizational characteristics and daily journalism. They conclude by pointing to recent changes in both the shape of the AIDS epidemic and the communications dynamics resulting from recent developments in the electronic media. PMID:11514866

  9. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition planning…

  10. Data Entry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document describes a project that provides full-time training in the microcomputing area of data entry/word processing as well as job-specific English as a second language (ESL) to adults whose first language is Chinese. The project includes a component that develops the trainees' language proficiency in business communications while…

  11. Double-Entry Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Explains the principles and mechanics of double-entry bookkeeping as a part of the accounting cycle to produce a functioning set of accounting records. Suggests that libraries need to have accurate and timely information about their spending to gain financial control and protect against fraud and abuse. (LRW)

  12. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition planning

  13. Ocean Entry Aerial View

    As evident by the small plume at the ocean entry, the amount of lava traveling through the tubes from the vent to the ocean has diminished. The most active area of the flow field is above the pali where the new rootless shield is forming. ...

  14. Waikupanaha Ocean Entry

    The Waikupanaha ocean entry remains active with its typical white steam plume blowing inland. The Hawaii County viewing area is marked by the white dots just below and left of the image center. The viewing area trailhead is at the white structure at the far right. ...

  15. Globalisation and temporary entry.

    PubMed

    Birrell, B; Healy, E

    1997-01-01

    "Beginning on 1 August 1996 the Australian Government implemented a radical deregulation of temporary entry provisions governing foreign persons working in Australia on contracts of three months to four years. The result has been a significant increase in the numbers visaed, particularly on-shore, plus evidence that the program is being exploited in ways inconsistent with the Government's objectives." PMID:12293218

  16. 9. FIRST FLOOR, ENTRY HALL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FIRST FLOOR, ENTRY HALL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS FRONT ENTRY WITH OPEN DOORWAY TO WINDER STAIRWAY ON RIGHT - Open Gate Farm, House, Ridge Road, 1 mile East of Elephant Road, Perkasie, Bucks County, PA

  17. INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH SIDE, VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Telephone Exchange, Coral Sea Road north of Bismarck Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  18. What makes gambling news?

    PubMed

    McMullan, J L; Mullen, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines print media coverage of casino and electronic gambling in one Canadian province from 1992 to 1997. It provides a theme analysis of content of 234 gambling stories printed in the top two daily newspapers in Nova Scotia. The findings of our content analysis indicate that pro-gambling corporate and political newspaper sources waged a successful media campaign and constructed a powerful public rhetoric in support of new gambling products, services, and institutions. The media, for their part, gave visibility and form to these structured messages. They helped create expectations about gambling and economics and gambling and government. Law and order, and moral and medical discourses about gambling, we discovered, were minor representations in the news coverage, although moral narratives were a pervasive secondary theme in much of the reporting. At bottom, the press produced a "politics of truth" about gambling that was both an external exercise of power and an internal organizational production. PMID:11842527

  19. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Allen, G. A.; Hwang, H. H.; Marley, M. S.; McGuire, M. K.; Garcia, J. A.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Huynh, L. C.; Moses, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    To better understand the technology requirements for Uranus atmospheric entry probe, Entry Vehicle Technology project funded an internal study with a multidisciplinary team from NASA Ames, Langley and JPL. The results of this study are communicated.

  20. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Allen, G. A.; Hwang, H. H.; Marley, M. S.; McGuire, M. K.; Garcia, J. A.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Huynh, L. C.; Moses, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    To better understand the technology requirements for a Uranus atmospheric entry probe, an internal NASA study funded by ISPT program was conducted. The talk describes two different approaches to the planet: 1) direct ballistic entry and 2) Aerocapture.

  1. Patients’ Attitude toward Breaking Bad News; a Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Darzi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Delivering bad news is a stressful moment for both physicians and patients. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the patients’ preferences and attitudes toward being informed about the bad news. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on patients admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Sari, Iran, from September 2014 to February 2015. Patient attitude regarding breaking bad news was evaluated using a reliable and valid questionnaire. Results: 130 patients were evaluated (61.5% male, mean age = 46.21 ± 12.1 years). 118 (90.76%) participants believed that the patient himself/herself should be informed about the disease’s condition. 120 (92.30%) preferred to hear the news from a skillful physician and 105 (80.76%) believed that emergency department is not a proper place for breaking bad news. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, most participants believed that the most experienced and skillful physician should inform them completely regarding their medical condition. At the same time they declared that, it is best to hear bad news in a calm and suitable place and time rather than emergency department or hospital corridors during teaching rounds. PMID:26862548

  2. Medical Residents' First Clearly Remembered Experiences of Giving Bad News

    PubMed Central

    Orlander, Jay D; Graeme Fincke, B; Hermanns, David; Johnson, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Communication of bad news to patients or families is a difficult task that requires skill and sensitivity. Little is known about doctors' formative experiences in giving bad news, what guidance they receive, or what lessons they learn in the process. OBJECTIVE To learn the circumstances in which medical residents first delivered bad news to patients or families, the nature of their experience, and their opinions about how best to develop the needed skills. DESIGN Confidential mailed survey. SETTING AND SUBJECTS All medicine house officers at 2 urban, university-based residency programs in Boston. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Details of medical residents' first clearly remembered experiences of giving bad news to a patient or family member; year in training; familiarity with the patient; information about any planning prior to, observation of, or discussion after their first experience; and the usefulness of such discussions. We also asked general questions about delivering bad news, such as how often this was done, as well as asking for opinions about actual and desired training. RESULTS One hundred twenty-nine of two hundred thirteen surveys (61%) were returned. Most (73%) trainees first delivered bad news while a medical student or intern. For this first experience, most (61%) knew the patient for just hours or days. Only 59% engaged in any planning for the encounter. An attending physician was present in 6 (5%) instances, and a more-senior trainee in 14 (11%) others. Sixty-five percent of subjects debriefed with at least 1 other person after the encounter, frequently with a lesser-trained physician or a member of their own family. Debriefing focused on the reaction of those who were given the bad news and the reaction of the trainee. When there were discussions with more-senior physicians, before or after the encounter, these were judged to be helpful approximately 80% of the time. Most subjects had given bad news between 5 and 20 times, yet 10% had never been observed doing so. Only 81 of 128 (63%) had ever observed an attending delivering bad news, but those who did found it helpful 96% of the time. On 7-point scales, subjects rated the importance of skills in delivering bad news highly, (mean 6.8), believed such skill can be improved (mean 6.6), and thought that more guidance should be offered to them during such activity (mean 5.8). CONCLUSION Medical students and residents frequently deliver bad news to patients and families. This responsibility begins early in training. In spite of their inexperience, many do not appear to receive adequate guidance or support during their earliest formative experiences. PMID:12406353

  3. NEWS: Design and creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Delcam, a manufacturing software developer, has supplied substantial funding towards a UK Government initiative intended to revolutionize the study of design and technology in schools. The computer-aided design software for schools (CAD-CAM) programme will give students a bridge into industry by enabling them to employ video links with engineers at companies such as British Aerospace and Rolls Royce. They will then be able to convert their virtual reality designs into a finished product. When the revised National Curriculum comes into effect this year, CAD-CAM will become compulsory from Key Stage 3, reflecting the greater focus on work-related learning, as well as the added importance being given to Information and Communications Technology (ICT) within the curriculum. Under the new scheme, schools can use a range of software designed in the UK (currently used for such items as jet aircraft and Formula One racing cars), which is being made available free of charge. The Design and Technology Association is monitoring the programme and the schools taking part have had to propose targets, focused on curriculum innovation, pupil outcomes and staff development. Still on the theme of design is the `Young Foresight' project launched in January and inviting 13 to 14 year-olds to tackle the challenges of the future through designing a new product for the world of 2020. The aim here is to encourage creativity, enterprise and innovation among young people by giving them an idea of what is involved in the design and development of a successful product. The students will be supported by mentors drawn from the local business community and there will be related BBC schools television programmes early in March with classroom resources, teacher training and an interactive website. The first phase of the initiative, based on 100 schools from across England and Wales, should be completed by autumn 2000, with phase 2 for 3000 schools over a three-year period incorporating a further nine programmes reflecting the work of the national Foresight Panels. The national Foresight programme is about preparing for the future by identifying market drivers, threats and opportunities and using that knowledge to inform the decisions that need to be taken today. Details can be viewed at www.foresight.gov.uk And for those with any remaining untapped ingenuity, the deadline is fast approaching for this year's `Young Engineer for Britain' competition. Young people, either individually or in teams of up to four, are invited to demonstrate their engineering skills in an event with a total prize value of over £65 000. The individual winner takes away a personal prize of £2500 plus a trophy, and their school receives an additional £2500 for engineering teaching equipment. Entry details can be obtained from Young Engineers for Britain, Engineering Council, 10 Maltravers Street, London WC2R 3ER and the closing date is 28 April 2000 .

  4. TV Producer Juggles Daily News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Bill

    1989-01-01

    Brennan discusses the daily activities required in the production of a television news show. In "The Not-So-Glamorous Life of a TV Reporter," Linda Yu describes the time and effort required to become a television reporter. (LS)

  5. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  6. Increasing Learning from TV News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

  7. Discovery and optimization of novel small-molecule HIV-1 entry inhibitors using field-based virtual screening and bioisosteric replacement

    PubMed Central

    Tuyishime, Marina; Danish, Matt; Princiotto, Amy; Mankowski, Marie K.; Lawrence, Rae; Lombart, Henry-Georges; Esikov, Kirill; Berniac, Joel; Liang, Kuang; Jingjing, Ji; Ptak, Roger G.; Madani, Navid; Cocklin, Simon

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of drug-resistant strains and the cumulative toxicities associated with current therapies, demand remains for new inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. The inhibition of HIV-1 entry is an attractive, yet underexploited therapeutic approach with implications for salvage and preexposure prophylactic regimens, as well as topical microbicides. Using the combination of a field-derived bioactive conformation template to perform virtual screening and iterative bioisosteric replacements, coupled with in silico predictions of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, we have identified new leads for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25454268

  8. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  9. The Myth of Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; White, Kathryn P.

    After critiquing the usual estimates of the importance of television as a source of news, the national audience for television news over a two-week period is identified from the 1974-1975 W.R. Simmons study (which uses a diary technique for gathering data). Analysis showed that, in the two-week period, 49% of the adult population did not watch a…

  10. Time Card Entry System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore » payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  11. What's unusual in online disease outbreak news?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate and timely detection of public health events of international concern is necessary to help support risk assessment and response and save lives. Novel event-based methods that use the World Wide Web as a signal source offer potential to extend health surveillance into areas where traditional indicator networks are lacking. In this paper we address the issue of systematically evaluating online health news to support automatic alerting using daily disease-country counts text mined from real world data using BioCaster. For 18 data sets produced by BioCaster, we compare 5 aberration detection algorithms (EARS C2, C3, W2, F-statistic and EWMA) for performance against expert moderated ProMED-mail postings. Results We report sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), mean alerts/100 days and F1, at 95% confidence interval (CI) for 287 ProMED-mail postings on 18 outbreaks across 14 countries over a 366 day period. Results indicate that W2 had the best F1 with a slight benefit for day of week effect over C2. In drill down analysis we indicate issues arising from the granular choice of country-level modeling, sudden drops in reporting due to day of week effects and reporting bias. Automatic alerting has been implemented in BioCaster available from http://born.nii.ac.jp. Conclusions Online health news alerts have the potential to enhance manual analytical methods by increasing throughput, timeliness and detection rates. Systematic evaluation of health news aberrations is necessary to push forward our understanding of the complex relationship between news report volumes and case numbers and to select the best performing features and algorithms. PMID:20618980

  12. SOUTHWEST REAR, SHOWING CLOSED ENTRY HATCH, BUILDING 1934. Looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHWEST REAR, SHOWING CLOSED ENTRY HATCH, BUILDING 1934. Looking north - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Observation Bunker Types, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  14. Study of advanced atmospheric entry systems for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Entry system designs are described for various advanced Mars missions including sample return, hard lander, and Mars airplane. The Mars exploration systems for sample return and the hard lander require decleration from direct approach entry velocities of about 6 km/s to terminal velocities consistent with surface landing requirements. The Mars airplane entry system is decelerated from orbit at 4.6 km/s to deployment near the surface. Mass performance characteristics of major elements of the Mass performance characteristics are estimated for the major elements of the required entry systems using Viking technology or logical extensions of technology in order to provide a common basis of comparison for the three entry modes mission mode approaches. The entry systems, although not optimized, are based on Viking designs and reflect current hardware performance capability and realistic mass relationships.

  15. Aerodynamic design of a re-entry capsule for high-speed manned re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhan, Huiling; Zhou, Weijiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic configuration of the capsule for manned re-entry at the second cosmic speed requires a relatively higher lift-to-drag ratio compared to the configuration for manned re-entry at the first cosmic speed. The present capsule configurations with high lift-to-drag ratio, for instance, the Apollo and the Orion, have secondary statically stable trim points, which is highly undesirable since it would cause disastrous result once the vehicle flies at the secondary trim point during re-entry. In the present study, effective design methodology for improving the monostability characteristics of re-entry capsules without compromising the lift-to-drag ratio is revealed based on flow field characteristics analysis. As a result, aerodynamic configuration design of a capsule with high lift-to-drag ratio and monostable characteristics is proposed. And the aerodynamic characteristics of the capsule ranging from subsonic to hypersonic speed are predicted by numerical simulations.

  16. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418, via email at infofell@nas.edu, or at http://fellowships.nas.edu. 1998 Pre-Doctoral Fellows Rafael Alcala, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Chemical Engineering Diego J. Díaz, Cornell University, Analytical Chemistry Kanya Lynn Henderson, Colorado State University, Biochemistry Félix Mario Rivas, State University of New York, Buffalo, Organic Chemistry 1998 Dissertation Fellows Kristala Lanett Jones, Arizona State University, Chemical Engineering 1998 Postdoctoral Fellows Edgardo Tabión Farinas, Yale University, Interdisciplinary Chemistry Data Base of Online Courses TeleEducation NB, a province-wide distributed distance learning network in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, has implemented an international online course database of more than 9,000 courses. The database includes public and private courses at all levels from more than 15 countries and includes only those courses that can be completed fully online. Courses vary from graduate-level engineering offerings to simple "How to" courses. The database provides access to courses and programs leading to accredited degrees, diplomas, and certificates. Professional development and personal interest courses are also included. Students can access course information by browsing subject areas or by searching specific fields. Hotlinks connect students directly to the delivering institutions. In the past year, there has been an exponential rise in the number of courses being offered online, from fewer than 2,000 in January 1998 to more than 10,000 in December 1998. It is expected that there will be more than 40,000 online courses by the year 2000. The TeleCampus Online Course Database provides students with a means of finding information on courses that meet their needs. The database can be accessed from TeleCampus at http://telecampus.edu. Change in the Introductory Chemistry Course, an Online Course An online conference, Proposals for Change in the Introductory Chemistry Course, will take place from March 29 to April 10, 1999. The conference will be chaired by James N. Spencer, Chemistry Department, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604; j_spencer@acad.fandm.edu. While both process and content need to be considered in making changes, this conference will be limited to a discussion of content. It will take the approach that if we begin to examine the current content and how and why certain topics came to be considered as essential for the course, we may be able to approach a common curriculum so that the process of how to best to implement it may then be developed. Stephen J. Hawkes of Oregon State University compiled suggestions for the content of general chemistry and served as leader of the Zero Base Course discussion group for the Task Force on the General Chemistry Curriculum. The goal of the zero base approach is a detailed curriculum in which topics are developed so that students understand the phenomena considered necessary for the course. This analysis requires that the principles that should be in the course be identified, that those not necessary be removed, and perhaps additional principles be added. This online conference will list more than 100 proposals compiled from many viewpoints. Proposals are worded as debatable propositions to engender serious discussion. After discussion, amendment, deletion, extension, and some consensus, the proposals will be distributed to the chemistry community in various forms. Future discussions are also planned. The CONFCHEM World Wide Web site has the URL http://www.chem.vt.edu/confchem/. The March and April session is free to all Internet users. To subscribe to the CONFCHEM Listserv send the message: SUBSCRIBE CONFCHEM your-first-and-last-name to LISTSERV@CLVM.CLARKSON.EDU X-ray Structure Solution Manual Allen Hunter announces the release of the second edition of his lab manual for introductory diffraction methods courses. It was written as a step-by-step guide to solving routine crystal structures for crystallographic novices and is entitled "Allen Hunter's Youngstown State University X-ray Structure Analysis Lab Manual: A Beginner's Introduction". The manual has been developed in an undergraduate course that enrolls a broad mixture of chemists, engineers, geologists, and biologists. It is optimized for use with the SHELXTL suite of programs but should prove useful to those using other structure solution packages as well. This edition has been reviewed at twelve sites and will be available for general use in January 1999. The lab manual is available without charge as a .pdf file to academic users, provided that each copy is registered and users inform the author about how it is used in their teaching. Those interested in obtaining a copy should contact the author at adhunter@cc.ysu.edu. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
    • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
    • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm or contact the DUE Information Center; phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www:http://www.rescorp.org

  17. Entry Systems Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Rummler, Donald R.; Bersch, Charlie; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1993-02-01

    As general findings, lessons learned from shuttle are: (1) bridge established between development center (JSC) Research Centers (ARC, LARC), and industry (RI, LMSC, Corning, Mansville, 3M LTV, Union Carbide, Hexcel) for shuttle TPS; (2) not all test results adequately analyzed or in hindsight, completely encompassing all failure modes; (3) gap heating effects from ground facilities not totally indicative of flight experience; (4) need to design with operations in mind (not just to cost) example: moisture intrusion of GR/EP, many other examples; (5) RSI- developed as point design for maneuvering entry vehicle of high L/D; and (6) RSI - 15 years from invention to use on flight hardware.

  18. Entry Systems Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Rummler, Donald R.; Bersch, Charlie; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1993-01-01

    As general findings, lessons learned from shuttle are: (1) bridge established between development center (JSC) Research Centers (ARC, LARC), and industry (RI, LMSC, Corning, Mansville, 3M LTV, Union Carbide, Hexcel) for shuttle TPS; (2) not all test results adequately analyzed or in hindsight, completely encompassing all failure modes; (3) gap heating effects from ground facilities not totally indicative of flight experience; (4) need to design with operations in mind (not just to cost) example: moisture intrusion of GR/EP, many other examples; (5) RSI- developed as point design for maneuvering entry vehicle of high L/D; and (6) RSI - 15 years from invention to use on flight hardware.

  19. Planetary entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results from three research areas: (1) window design for the radiometric measurement of the forebody radiative heating experienced by atmospheric entry spaceraft; (2) survey of the current understanding of chemical species on selected solar system bodies and assess the importance of measurements with regard to vehicle environment and with regard to understanding of planetary atmospheres with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Titan; and (3) measure and analyze the radiation (VUV to near-IR) from the shock heated gas cap of a blunt body in an Ames arc Jet wind-tunnel facility.

  20. DSMC simulations of OREX entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Gupta, Roop N.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Results of direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solutions are presented for the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle, a 50 deg half-angle spherically blunted cone with a nose radius of 1.35 m and a base diameter of 3.4 m. The flow conditions simulated are those for entry into the Earth's atmosphere at a nominal velocity of about 7.4 km/s and zero incidence. Calculations are made for the higher altitude portion of entry, encompassing the transitional flow regime (altitudes of 200 to 80 km). Comparisons with flight measured values are made for axial acceleration, surface pressure, and stagnation point heating.

  1. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach--Coping and Media Literacy (CML)--emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and

  2. Examining Readers' Evaluations of Objectivity and Bias in News Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Peter; Eisenhart, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Readers' objectivity and bias evaluations of news texts were investigated in order to better understand the process by which readers make these kinds of judgments and the evidence on which they base them. Readers were primed to evaluate news texts for objectivity and bias, and their selections and metacommentary were analyzed. Readers

  3. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach--Coping and Media Literacy (CML)--emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and…

  4. A Study of How Australia, Canada and Japan are Perceived on United States Television Network News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    A study was conducted to explore the way network television news observes three countries friendly to the United States: Australia, Canada, and Japan. Every news story from 1968 to 1983 on the ABC, CBS, and NBC networks that mentioned any of the three countries or their people was examined. Coders classified the 4,038 stories based on origin,…

  5. 75 FR 43563 - Dow Jones & Company, Sharon Pennsylvania Print Plant a Subsidiary of News Corporation, West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... June 7, 2010 (75 FR 32224). The workers are engaged in the production of print publications. Pursuant... News Corporation, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application... subsidiary of News Corporation, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania, was based on the finding that the...

  6. "Space Science News": From Archive to Teaching Resource, the Secret Life of Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClune, Billy; Jarman, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This article illustrates the use of newspapers as a resource for teaching and learning about science. Science teachers in Northern Ireland have produced a special edition news magazine, "Space Science News," to support the teaching and learning of aspects of space science in secondary school. The resource is based on authentic newspaper articles…

  7. From the Boob Tube to the Black Box: TV News Comprehension from an Information Processing Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodall, W. Gill; And Others

    Based on data drawn from a larger study concerning what people learn from television news broadcasts, this paper suggests ways that researchers might conceptualize audience comprehension of television news. Following a review of the information processing literature, the paper analyzes several conceptualizations taken from the literature and…

  8. Examining Readers' Evaluations of Objectivity and Bias in News Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Peter; Eisenhart, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Readers' objectivity and bias evaluations of news texts were investigated in order to better understand the process by which readers make these kinds of judgments and the evidence on which they base them. Readers were primed to evaluate news texts for objectivity and bias, and their selections and metacommentary were analyzed. Readers…

  9. Entry guidance and entry autopilot (STS-1 baseline)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Hill, O.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary entry guidance and autopilot software formulations, for use in the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor, are presented. The MCC requirements are met by a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, a description of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, a description of the detailed autopilot formualtion requirements, a description of the targeting routine, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  10. Entry and Landing Probe for Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Butts, A. J.; Carroll, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a recent study of entry and landing probes for the exploration of Titan are presented. The probes considered were based on a wide range of exploration mission possibilities. They included: an atmospheric science probe, an intermediate atmospheric and limited surface science probe, and a larger atmospheric and expanded surface science probe. Because of lower gravity on Titan and its atmospheric characteristics, the entry environment is less severe than that of Mars. However, the large uncertainties in the current definition of the atmosphere and the uncertainties in Titan's surface characteristics have required tradeoffs of various combinations of entry and descent shapes and hard lander configurations. Results show that all probe classes are feasible without major developments.

  11. Lessons learned from planetary entry probe missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kasprzak, Wayne

    Probing the atmospheres and surfaces of the planets and their moons with fast moving entry probes has been a very useful and essential technique to obtain in situ or quasi in situ scientific data (ground truth) which could not otherwise be obtained from fly by or orbiter only missions and where balloon, aircraft or lander missions are too complex and too costly. Planetary entry probe missions have been conducted successfully on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Titan after having been first demonstrated in the Earth's atmosphere. Future planetary missions should also include more entry probe missions back to Venus and to the outer planets. The success of and science returns from past missions, the need for more and unique data, and a continuously advancing technology generate confidence that future missions will be even more successful with respect to science return and technical performance. There are, however, unique challenges associated with entry probe missions and with building instruments for an entry probe, as compared to orbiters, landers, or rovers. Conditions during atmospheric entry are extreme. There are operating time constraints due to the usually short duration of the probe descent, and the instruments experience rapid environmental changes in temperature and pressure. In addition, there are resource limitations, i.e. mass, power, size and bandwidth. Because of the protective heat shield and the high acceleration the probe experiences during entry, the ratio of payload to total probe mass is usually much smaller than in other missions. Finally, the demands on the instrument design are determined in large part by conditions (pressure, temperature, composition) unique to the particular body under study, and as a result, there is no one-size-fits-all instrument for an atmospheric probe. Many of these requirements are more easily met by miniaturizing the probe instrumentation and consequently reducing the required size of the probe. Improved heat shield technology will also play an important role. The emergence over the past twenty years of Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS), utilizing lithographic semiconductor fabrication techniques to produce instrument systems in miniature, holds great promise for application to spaceflight. For example, a highly miniaturized, high performance and low-power gas chromatograph mass spectrometer would enormously benefit entry probe missions, allowing, for example, parallel measurements (e.g., multiple simultaneous gas chromatographic and direct atmospheric measurements). Such an instrument would also enable mass spectrometry on board small multiple entry probes. The challenge facing us in the development of MEMS based instruments is to move beyond the proof-of-concept, where research dollars tend to focus, and carry out the detailed work of developing high performance flight instrument systems on a chip which reach the required high technical readiness level for space flight.

  12. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.)

    • A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg
    • Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret
    • The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg
    • First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970
    • The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator
    • Discovery of Lawrencium
    • How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms
    • The Discovery of Element 106-Finally
    • The Naming of Element 106
    • The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements
    • What Good Is a Heavy Element?
    To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any single chemical discovery. Ridgway: What was the state of the "art" in your field when you first decided to bend your energies in this direction? Seaborg: In nuclear science? Very crude. I mean we had difficulty even making the simplest Geiger counter work. This facet alone was always a challenge. Ridgway: What do you look for in a young person who wishes to work with you in your research program? Seaborg: Certainly I try to identify intelligence and creativity and very importantly, industry, that is the willingness to work hard which leads to dedication. Ridgway: ...research and teaching or research versus teaching. Do you consider in your own pursuits in the academic life a dichotomy between teaching and research? Seaborg: Definitely not! I think they go together very well. I teach freshman chemistry and it's a joy to meet my freshman chemistry sections. It gives me a better perspective even though it's at the beginning level. In addition, the fact that I'm conducting research helps (in my opinion) freshman chemistry. As your readers well know, freshman chemistry is a sophisticated and complicated subject these days. Pimentel Award Address: Regarding the CHEM Study project: Although my heavy schedule as Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and numerous other commitments should have made me decline this added responsibility, the unusual circumstances of our meeting and the ardor of the group led to my somewhat bewildered acceptance. Report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education (1983): If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war. As it stands, We have allowed this to happen to ourselves Discussing Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS): It is an unfortunate fact, borne out by research and much anecdotal experience, that by the time they reach high school most students have already decided whether or not they like chemistry, and whether or not they are good at it. In Summary: Having served in many capacities, educational and governmental over my career, I have no illusions about the complexities involved in implementing change. Yet there is really no choice if we are to survive and thrive as a nation. We must shine a strong spotlight on education, with special and lasting emphasis on science and technology, and the real-world connections so apparent to us in chemistry and all the sciences. Lab Safety Training The Laboratory Safety Workshop announces laboratory safety training in six locations this summer. The 24-hour short courses are for secondary and college/university science educators. The dates and locations are:
    June 16-19: TBA, Minneapolis, MN June 23-26: Southwest Texas State Univ., San Marcos, TX July 7-10: University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV July 14-17: Northeastern University, Boston, MA August 3-6: College of Charleston, Charleston, SC August 16-19: TBA, Seattle, WA
    For further information contact Laboratory Safety Workshop, 192 Worcester Road, Natick, MA 01760-2552; phone: 508/647-1900; fax: 508/647-0062; email: lswpfm@aol.com. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . Contact the DUE Information Center at phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org

  13. News Reporters and News Sources: What Happens Before the Story is Written.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strentz, Herbert

    The purpose of this book is to make student journalists, reporters, and news audiences more sensitive to the complexities of the news gathering and reporting process. The five chapters discuss news gathering and the power of the press; pitfalls and pratfalls awaiting the reporter; interviewing; informing, protecting, and promoting news sources;…

  14. Media Orientation and Television News Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Daniel G.

    1990-01-01

    Uses factor analysis to compare the surveillance role and communication utility of television and newspapers. Finds much variance explained by these two uses. Finds those who seek hard news on television also seek hard news in newspapers. (RS)

  15. Society for the History of Psychology News.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shayna Fox

    2016-05-01

    Presents the Society for the History of Psychology News column. This column records miscellaneous publication news, announcements, research notes, reviews of books, and conference information, as well as references that support their writings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100928

  16. Return on investment point of service Computerized Provider Charge Entry.

    PubMed

    Kiepek, Wendy; FitzHenry, Fern; Shultz, Edward K

    2003-01-01

    Provider charge entry systems offer many benefits to users and organizations. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a web-based provider charge entry system promises to deliver benefits in reducing days in accounts receivable, reducing labor required for claims and edit processing, and implementing business rules that deliver both strategic and financial benefits. PMID:14728396

  17. Return on Investment Point of Service Computerized Provider Charge Entry

    PubMed Central

    Kiepek, Wendy; FitzHenry, Fern; Shultz, Edward K

    2003-01-01

    Provider charge entry systems offer many benefits to users and organizations. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a web-based provider charge entry system promises to deliver benefits in reducing days in accounts receivable, reducing labor required for claims and edit processing, and implementing business rules that deliver both strategic and financial benefits. PMID:14728396

  18. The Administrative Career: A Casebook on Entry, Equity, and Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Catherine; Kasten, Katherine L.

    This book presents an in-depth look, from entry to retirement, at all aspects of the administrative career. It uses the case-method teaching approach to discuss critical issues in education, specifically, cases of entry, equity, and endurance dilemmas. A total of 133 fictional cases are presented, based on interviews with school administrators and…

  19. 30 CFR 778.15 - Right-of-entry information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Right-of-entry information. 778.15 Section 778... § 778.15 Right-of-entry information. (a) An application shall contain a description of the documents upon which the applicant bases his legal right to enter and begin surface coal mining and...

  20. Reconstruction of the Stardust Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Stardust capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.1 km northwest of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Frequency analysis on the infrared video data indicates that the aerodynamics generated for the Stardust capsule reasonably predicted the drag and static stability. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry simulation estimates of a small hypersonic angles-of-attack, since there is very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Stardust entry is consistent with flight performance close to the nominal pre-entry prediction. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  1. Expectations among the elderly about nursing home entry.

    PubMed Central

    Lindrooth, R C; Hoerger, T J; Norton, E C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the covariates that explain expectations of nursing home entry are consistent with the characteristics of those who enter nursing homes. DATA SOURCES: Waves 1 and 2 of the Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey. STUDY DESIGN: We model expectations about nursing home entry as a function of expectations about leaving a bequest, living at least ten years, health condition, and other observed characteristics. We use an instrumental variables and generalized least squares (IV-GLS) method based on Hausman and Taylor (1981) to obtain more efficient estimates than fixed effects, without the restrictive assumptions of random effects. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expectations about nursing home entry are reasonably close to the actual probability of nursing home entry. Most of the variables that affect actual entry also have significant effects on expectations about entry. Medicaid subsidies for nursing home care may have little effect on expectations about nursing home entry; individuals in the lowest asset quartile, who are most likely to receive these subsidies, report probabilities not significantly different from those in other quartiles. Application of the IV-GLS approach is supported by a series of specification tests. CONCLUSIONS: We find that expectations about future nursing home entry are consistent with the characteristics of actual entrants. Underestimation of risk of nursing home entry as a reason for low levels of long-term care insurance is not supported by this analysis. PMID:11130816

  2. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  3. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  4. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  5. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  6. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  7. 16. EAST FRONT ELEVATION OF BUILDING 345 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EAST FRONT ELEVATION OF BUILDING 345 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  8. 23. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN ASSEMBLY AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  9. 17. NORTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING 345 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. NORTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING 345 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  10. 6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 (STORAGE STRUCTURE) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  11. 24. CONTEXT VIEW OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CONTEXT VIEW OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) LOOKING NORTH THROUGH SECURITY GATES. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  12. 22. NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 220 (ENTRY CONTROL BUILDING) IN ASSEMBLY AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  13. An Economic Theory of News Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, John

    Over the years, journalists, social scientists, and government commissions have defined news in a variety of ways, but their definitions consistently lack the notion that, above all, news is a commodity and must sell. Within the journalism profession, and particularly in television news, the potential for conflict between a media corporation's…

  14. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  15. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short

  16. Network Evening News Coverage of Environmental Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael R.; And Others

    Focusing on ABC, NBC, and CBS's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986, a study examined network news coverage of environmental risk--defined as manmade chemical, biological, and physical agents that create risk in the indoor, outdoor, and occupational environments. Using the Vanderbilt University "Television News Index…

  17. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  18. Making Your News Service More Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Joel S., Ed.

    "CASE Currents" and "Techniques" articles, materials written especially for this manual, and papers from the 1976 CASE News/Information Special Conference make up this updated handbook on how to make a college news service more effective. Part I, "Managing the News Service" contains nine papers dealing with such issues as managing, staffing,…

  19. Confronting Danger: AIDS in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.; And Others

    Using metaphors drawn from news stories to chart the progression, a study documented the change of meaning of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) as reflected in the news during a 15-month period beginning July 1, 1985. More than 3,200 news stories about AIDS from four wire services were examined for metaphoric content, and 300 AIDS-related…

  20. The Nature of News in Three Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Walter J.; And Others

    Five studies conducted at Oklahoma State University on the nature of news are reported in this volume. The first study reports the similarities and differences in news values among 10 city editors. The second and third studies replicate the first, one with city news editors and the other with wire service newsmen as subjects. Study 4 summarizes a…

  1. AIDS and the news media.

    PubMed

    Nelkin, D

    1991-01-01

    News reports on AIDS have appeared at a time of general public concern about health risks, and, like the coverage of risk, the reporting on AIDS has been controversial. Perceptions of this disease have been linked to economic and personal stakes, professional ideologies, administrative responsibilities, and moral beliefs. It is from this perspective that news coverage of AIDS must be understood. The norms and practices of journalism, the technical uncertainties of risk evaluation, and the pressures placed on the media by various interests have influenced the reporting on this disease. However, media reports also shape the social context of the epidemic, affecting public perceptions, personal behavior, and policy agendas. PMID:1791792

  2. [Entry mechanism of morbillivirus family].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Hideo; Chen, Surui; Takeda, Shin; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    The genus Morbillivirus includes measles virus, canine distemper virus and rinderpest virus. These are highly contagious and exhibit high mortality. These viruses have the attachment glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (H), at the virus surface, which bind to signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) and Nectin 4 as receptors for the entry. However, the molecular mechanism for this entry has been limitedly understood. Here we summarize the current topics, (1) newly identified receptor, Nectin 4, (2) crystal structures of H-receptor complexes and (3) detail biochemical studies of the H-F communication for the entry. These provide insight on the mechanism of morbillivirus entry event and furthermore drug developments. PMID:23649396

  3. Incremental visual text analytics of news story development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Milos; Najm-Araghi, Mohammad; Mansmann, Florian; Keim, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Online news sources produce thousands of news articles every day, reporting on local and global real-world events. New information quickly replaces the old, making it difficult for readers to put current events in the context of the past. Additionally, the stories have very complex relationships and characteristics that are difficult to model: they can be weakly or strongly connected, or they can merge or split over time. In this paper, we present a visual analytics system for exploration of news topics in dynamic information streams, which combines interactive visualization and text mining techniques to facilitate the analysis of similar topics that split and merge over time. We employ text clustering techniques to automatically extract stories from online news streams and present a visualization that: 1) shows temporal characteristics of stories in different time frames with different level of detail; 2) allows incremental updates of the display without recalculating the visual features of the past data; 3) sorts the stories by minimizing clutter and overlap from edge crossings. By using interaction, stories can be filtered based on their duration and characteristics in order to be explored in full detail with details on demand. To demonstrate the usefulness of our system, case studies with real news data are presented and show the capabilities for detailed dynamic text stream exploration.

  4. Shuttle entry guidance revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Kremer, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle entry guidance concept is reviewed which is aimed at tracking a reference drag trajectory that leads to the specified range and velocity for the initiation of the terminal energy management phase. An approximate method of constructing the domain of attraction is proposed, and its validity is ascertained by simulation. An alternative guidance law yielding global exponential tracking in the absence of control saturation is derived using a feedback linearization method. It is noted that the alternative guidance law does not improve on the stability and performance of the current guidance law, for the operating domain and control capability of the Shuttle. It is suggested that the new guidance law with a larger operating domain and increased lift-to-drag capability would be superior.

  5. Water Entry of Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Belden, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    The free-surface impact of solid objects has been investigated for well over a century. This canonical problem is influenced by many physical parameters, including projectile geometry, material properties, fluid properties, and impact parameters. Through advances in high-speed imaging and visualization techniques, discoveries about the underlying physics have improved our understanding of these phenomena. Improvements to analytical and numerical models have led to critical insights into cavity formation, the depth and time of pinch-off, forces, and trajectories for myriad different impact parameters. This topic spans a wide range of regimes, from low-speed entry phenomena dominated by surface tension to high-speed ballistics, for which cavitation is important. This review surveys experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies over this broad range, utilizing canonical images where possible to enhance intuition and insight into the rich phenomena.

  6. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  7. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This is a review of important science news stories of 1990 as reported in the pages of this journal. Areas covered include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and math, earth sciences, environment, food science, materials science, paleobiology, physics, science and society, and space sciences. (CW)

  8. How to Tell Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  9. Temporal and Cross Correlations in Business News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Takei, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    We empirically investigate temporal and cross correlations inthe frequency of news reports on companies, using a dataset of more than 100 million news articles reported in English by around 500 press agencies worldwide for the period 2003--2009. Our first finding is that the frequency of news reports on a company does not follow a Poisson process, but instead exhibits long memory with a positive autocorrelation for longer than one year. The second finding is that there exist significant correlations in the frequency of news across companies. Specifically, on a daily time scale or longer the frequency of news is governed by external dynamics, while on a time scale of minutes it is governed by internal dynamics. These two findings indicate that the frequency of news reports on companies has statistical properties similar to trading volume or price volatility in stock markets, suggesting that the flow of information through company news plays an important role in price dynamics in stock markets.

  10. 19 CFR 10.31 - Entry; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry; bond. 10.31 Section 10.31 Customs Duties U... Under Bond § 10.31 Entry; bond. (a)(1) Entry of articles brought into the United States temporarily and... consumption entry summary, each temporary importation bond entry summary shall include: (i) The...

  11. Strategies of TV News Dramatization: An Attempt of Discourse Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancini, Paolo

    This paper defines indicators related to the dramatization of television and formulates a methodology for analyzing the discourse of the television news based on empirical studies. This methodology is used to isolate some indicators of dramatization as it relates to the structure and form of the message. The changes that have affected the text of…

  12. Foreign Policy News in the 1980 Presidential Election Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovall, James Glen

    A survey was conducted to determine the extent and content of newspaper coverage of foreign policy issues in the 1980 United States presidential campaign. Fifty daily newspapers from every region of the country were selected randomly based on circulation. A list of 757 news events was divided into party and nonparty events, and the party events…

  13. Rural Matters: The Rural Challenge News, 1997-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Matters: The Rural Challenge News, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the 10 quarterly issues of "Rural Matters: The Rural Challenge News," published from Fall 1997 to Winter 2000 (the final issue). This newsletter focused on projects funded by the Annenberg Rural Challenge, as well as research summaries and opinion pieces on the benefits of small schools, place-based education, and community…

  14. Data validation and other strategies for data entry.

    PubMed

    Kupzyk, Kevin A; Cohen, Marlene Z

    2015-04-01

    Data entry can result in errors that cause analytic problems and delays in disseminating research. Invalid responses can lead to incorrect statistics and statistical conclusions. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers some basic strategies for avoiding out-of-range data entry errors and streamlining data collection. This article identifies some basic strategies using Microsoft® Excel, which is an inexpensive method of data entry that can be used when research budgets are constrained. Data files can be structured so that out-of-range values cannot be entered. When string variables are entered, researchers may be inconsistent in the way they code responses. Data validation can be accomplished through the use of restricting response options and skipping items can be avoided by using count functions to tabulate the number of valid responses. We also discuss advantages and disadvantages of several methods of data entry, including using web-based data entry and relational databases. PMID:24782433

  15. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  16. 19 CFR 147.11 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as follows: Entry for Exhibition Entry No. ______ Entry at the port of of articles consigned or... exhibition purposes under the Trade Fair Act of 1959. Mark Number Package and contents Quality Invoice...

  17. 19 CFR 143.36 - Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.36 Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary. (a) Electronic form of data. If Customs...

  18. 19 CFR 143.36 - Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.36 Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary. (a) Electronic form of data. If Customs...

  19. 19 CFR 143.36 - Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.36 Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary. (a) Electronic form of data. If Customs...

  20. 19 CFR 143.36 - Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.36 Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary. (a) Electronic form of data. If Customs...

  1. FRONT LANAI, SHOWING WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT LANAI, SHOWING WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. INTERIOR; VIEW OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING AND ENTRY DOOR, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR; VIEW OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING AND ENTRY DOOR, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Entry Grades and Academic Performance in Nigerian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojo, Folayan

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of Nigeria's entry qualification examinations as a predictor of success at the university level is examined. Results indicate a positive correlation in the science-based fields and very low predictability in the social sciences. (JMF)

  4. 3. Underground blast doors, BC corridor, at entry to building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Underground blast doors, BC corridor, at entry to building 501, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. 43. Main entry to SAC Control offices, second floor, Awing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Main entry to SAC Control offices, second floor, A-wing, building 500, looking southeast - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  6. 44. Dwing hallway, building 500, looking east from entry to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. D-wing hallway, building 500, looking east from entry to SAC Control offices - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ENTRY STAIRWAY ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ENTRY STAIRWAY ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. OBLIQUE OF THE NORTHEAST END (MAIN ENTRY) AND NORTHWEST SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF THE NORTHEAST END (MAIN ENTRY) AND NORTHWEST SIDE, WITH FACILITY 346 ON LEFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. INTERIOR OF ENTRY AREA LOOKING TOWARDS STAIRWELL WITH THE LIBRARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ENTRY AREA LOOKING TOWARDS STAIRWELL WITH THE LIBRARY TO LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Commandant's Quarters, 6 Hale Alii Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM, TAKEN FROM ENTRY, LOOKING TOWARDS FIREPLACE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM, TAKEN FROM ENTRY, LOOKING TOWARDS FIREPLACE. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Commandant's Quarters, 6 Hale Alii Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. INTERIOR OF FORMAL DINING ROOM, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF FORMAL DINING ROOM, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Commandant's Quarters, 6 Hale Alii Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Interior view of entry hall in Communication Center (now Break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of entry hall in Communication Center (now Break Room and Storage Area), facing north - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  13. GOCE Re-Entry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, B.; Flohrer, T.; Lemmens, S.; Krag, H.

    2015-03-01

    Every year ESA, through the Space Debris Office, participates to an Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) Re-entry Test Campaign.. For the campaign of 2013, ESA’s proposal to select GOCE's re-entry was accepted. The campaign opened on the 21st October 2013 after fuel depletion of the drag-compensating ion propulsion. GOCE was expected to enter into a phase of attitude-controlled fine-pointing mode (FPM) until the attitude controllers would be unable to cope with the atmospheric torques and then the satellite would enter in a phase of fully uncontrolled flight. In this paper, we present the evolution of ESA’s daily predictions on the re-entry epoch using different sources of orbital information. The uncertainties on the spacecraft operability (i.e. the physical limits of the attitude controller) led to a non-standard re-entry scenario were different attitudes had to be considered (instead of the commonly assumed random tumbling mode case that is used whenever no information on the physical properties of a re-entering object is available). A daily assessment of the status, in coordination with the flight control team, was required and implied a continuous update on the predicted failure point of the attitude controller. This in turn imposed the need for considering an asymmetric re-entry window. These operation-bound uncertainties were simulated to predict the attitude evolution after failure at different altitudes and their effects evaluated to be taken into account for the re-entry predictions. We present ESA’s re-entry prediction activities for GOCE, internally, and within the IADC, and address specific technical aspects and challenges for re-entry predictions, which are related to the expected and occurred attitude of GOCE during the final re-entry phase.

  14. The GoodNEWS (Genes, Nutrition, Exercise, Wellness, and Spiritual Growth) Trial: A community-based participatory research (CBPR) trial with African-American church congregations for reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors — recruitment, measurement, and randomization☆

    PubMed Central

    DeHaven, Mark J.; Ramos-Roman, Maria A.; Gimpel, Nora; Carson, JoAnn; DeLemos, James; Pickens, Sue; Simmons, Chris; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany; Banks-Richard, Kamakki; Shuval, Kerem; Duval, Julie; Tong, Liyue; Hsieh, Natalie; Lee, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death among Americans, significant disparities persist in CVD prevalence, morbidity, and mortality based on race and ethnicity. However, few studies have examined risk factor reduction among the poor and ethnic minorities. Methods Community-based participatory research (CBPR) study using a cluster randomized design — African-American church congregations are the units of randomization and individuals within the congregations are the units of analysis. Outcome variables include dietary change (Diet History Questionnaire), level of physical activity (7-Day Physical Activity Recall), lipoprotein levels, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Results Eighteen (18) church congregations were randomized to either a health maintenance intervention or a control condition. Complete data were obtained on 392 African-American individuals, 18 to 70 years of age, predominantly employed women with more than a high school diploma. Treatment and intervention groups were similar at baseline on saturated fat intake, metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS) per day, and other risk factors for CVD. Conclusions The GoodNEWS trial successfully recruited and evaluated CVD-related risk among African-American participants using a CBPR approach. Several logistical challenges resulted in extending the recruitment, preliminary training, and measurement periods. The challenges were overcome with the assistance of a local community consultant and a professional event planner. Our experience supports the need for incorporating non-traditional community-based staff into the design and operational plan of CBPR trials. PMID:21664298

  15. 27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry door in transmitter building no. 102 (note coded key pad to left and intercom phone on left) and door to the central systems monitor room (CSMR) to right (out of sight). - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. Single-particle Tracking as a Quantitative Microscopy-based Approach to Unravel Cell Entry Mechanisms of Viruses and Pharmaceutical Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, Nadia; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Highly sensitive fluorescence microscopy techniques allow single nanoparticles to be tracked during their uptake into living cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. From analysis of the trajectories, random motion can be discriminated from active transport and the average transport velocity and/or diffusion coefficient determined. Such an analysis provides important information regarding the uptake pathway and location of viruses and nanoparticles. In this review, we give an introduction into single-particle tracking (SPT) and determination of the mean-squared displacement. We also give an overview of recent advances in SPT. These include millisecond alternating-laser excitation for removal of spectral crosstalk, alternating wide-field (WF), and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for sensitive experiments at the plasma membrane and three-dimensional tracking strategies. Throughout the review, we highlight recent advances regarding the entry (and egress) of natural and artificial viruses obtained via SPT. PMID:21654634

  17. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  18. STS-99 Crew News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle Crew (Mission Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri, and Gerhard P.J. Thiele) are shown in a live news conference presenting the mission objectives of STS-99. The main objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth. This project is named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM).

  19. Implicit Operational Definitions of Economic News Literacy in the Printed News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes study which focused on the economic vocabulary used in national and international news magazines and papers. Compares findings with definitions of economic literacy proposed by economists and suggests that economics courses include economic news literacy. (KC)

  20. Atmospheric maneuvering during Martian entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Yang, Lily

    A comparative-advantages study is made of two different Martian atmospheric entry maneuvers, on the basis of calculation results for the case of a vehicle with a maximum L/D ratio of 2.3. Entries from a highly elliptical Martian orbit at 5 km/sec are more difficult than those from a lower altitude and speed orbit at 3.5 km/sec, due to their more stringent guidance requirements. Efforts to reduce the deceleration for the higher speed entry by lift-modulation achieved a 40-percent reduction, but at the cost of a 50-percent decrease in lateral range. The lower-speed entry's gliding trajectory is noted to encounter a far more benign atmospheric environment.

  1. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  2. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  3. Orion Entry Handling Qualities Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, B.; Tiggers, M.; Strahan, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Sullivan, K.; Stephens, J. P.; Hart, J.; Law, H., III; Bilimoria, K.; Bailey, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Command Module (CM) is a capsule designed to bring crew back from the International Space Station (ISS), the moon and beyond. The atmospheric entry portion of the flight is deigned to be flown in autopilot mode for nominal situations. However, there exists the possibility for the crew to take over manual control in off-nominal situations. In these instances, the spacecraft must meet specific handling qualities criteria. To address these criteria two separate assessments of the Orion CM s entry Handling Qualities (HQ) were conducted at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) using the Cooper-Harper scale (Cooper & Harper, 1969). These assessments were conducted in the summers of 2008 and 2010 using the Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) six degree of freedom, high fidelity Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) simulation. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities criteria, the vehicle configuration, the scenarios flown, the simulation background and setup, crew interfaces and displays, piloting techniques, ratings and crew comments, pre- and post-fight briefings, lessons learned and changes made to improve the overall system performance. The data collection tools, methods, data reduction and output reports will also be discussed. The objective of the 2008 entry HQ assessment was to evaluate the handling qualities of the CM during a lunar skip return. A lunar skip entry case was selected because it was considered the most demanding of all bank control scenarios. Even though skip entry is not planned to be flown manually, it was hypothesized that if a pilot could fly the harder skip entry case, then they could also fly a simpler loads managed or ballistic (constant bank rate command) entry scenario. In addition, with the evaluation set-up of multiple tasks within the entry case, handling qualities ratings collected in the evaluation could be used to assess other scenarios such as the constant bank angle maintenance case. The 2008 entry assessment was divided into two sections (see Figure 1). Entry I was the first, high speed portion of a lunar return and Entry II was the second, lower speed portion of a lunar return, which is similar (but not identical) to a typical ISS return.

  4. Educating children's nurses for communicating bad news.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Corkin, Doris; Coad, Jane; Hollis, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    Some parents are unhappy with the way news is broken to them. This article seeks to educate and inform the reflective practitioner on a series of communication strategies to enhance their skills. This is important because the way news is disclosed can affect the way news is accepted and the level of support the family will require. The importance of clarity, honesty and empathy is emphasised. PMID:24112022

  5. A trajectory generation framework for modeling spacecraft entry in MDAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D`Souza, Sarah N.; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper a novel trajectory generation framework was developed that optimizes trajectory event conditions for use in a Generalized Entry Guidance algorithm. The framework was developed to be adaptable via the use of high fidelity equations of motion and drag based analytical bank profiles. Within this framework, a novel technique was implemented that resolved the sensitivity of the bank profile to atmospheric non-linearities. The framework's adaptability was established by running two different entry bank conditions. Each case yielded a reference trajectory and set of transition event conditions that are flight feasible and implementable in a Generalized Entry Guidance algorithm.

  6. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  7. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  8. Tactile Data Entry for Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron B.; Hannaford, Blake; Sands, O Scott

    2012-01-01

    In the task-saturated environment of extravehicular activity (EVA), an astronaut's ability to leverage suit-integrated information systems is limited by a lack of options for data entry. In particular, bulky gloves inhibit the ability to interact with standard computing interfaces such as a mouse or keyboard. This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into a system that permits the space suit gloves themselves to be used as data entry devices. Hand motion tracking is combined with simple finger gesture recognition to enable use of a virtual keyboard, while tactile feedback provides touch-based context to the graphical user interface (GUI) and positive confirmation of keystroke events. In human subject trials, conducted with twenty participants using a prototype system, participants entered text significantly faster with tactile feedback than without (p = 0.02). The results support incorporation of vibrotactile information in a future system that will enable full touch typing and general mouse interactions using instrumented EVA gloves.

  9. Orion Exploration Mission Entry Interface Target Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is required to return to the continental United States at any time during the month. In addition, it is required to provide a survivable entry from a wide range of trans-lunar abort trajectories. The Entry Interface (EI) state must be targeted to ensure that all requirements are met for all possible return scenarios, even in the event of no communication with the Mission Control Center to provide an updated EI target. The challenge then is to functionalize an EI state constraint manifold that can be used in the on-board targeting algorithm, as well as the ground-based trajectory optimization programs. This paper presents the techniques used to define the EI constraint manifold and to functionalize it as a set of polynomials in several dimensions.

  10. Fixed-Base Simulator Studies of the Ability of the Human Pilot to Provide Energy Management Along Abort and Deep-Space Entry Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Goode, M. W.

    1962-01-01

    A simulation study has been made to determine a pilot's ability to control a low L/D vehicle to a desired point on the earth with initial conditions ranging from parabolic orbits to abort conditions along the boost phase of a deep-space mission. The program was conducted to develop procedures which would allow the pilot to perform the energy management functions required while avoiding the high deceleration or skipout region and to determine the information display required to aid the pilot in flying these procedures. The abort conditions studied extend from a region of relatively high flight-path angles at suborbital velocities while leaving the atmosphere to a region between orbital and near-escape velocity outside the atmosphere. The conditions studied included guidance from suborbital and superorbital aborts as well as guidance following return from a deepspace mission. In this paper, the role of the human pilot?s ability to combine safe return abort procedures with guidance procedures has been investigated. The range capability from various abort and entry conditions is also presented.

  11. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  12. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  13. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  14. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  15. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  16. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  17. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  18. 19 CFR 142.16 - Entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry summary documentation. 142.16 Section 142.16... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.16 Entry summary documentation. (a) Entry summary not filed at time of entry. When the entry documentation is filed before the entry...

  19. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  20. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students

  1. Words analysis of online Chinese news headlines about trending events: a complex network perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines' keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words' networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly. PMID:25807376

  2. Words Analysis of Online Chinese News Headlines about Trending Events: A Complex Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines’ keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words’ networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly. PMID:25807376

  3. New/Small News in the English Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that schools are trapped in a print-based past, while their students inhabit a nonprint-based age, and that this has accompanied a shift from traditional mass media to media driven by computer technology. This article draws on the work of Stuart Allan to examine some of the history of this shift in term of news and asks what

  4. New/Small News in the English Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that schools are trapped in a print-based past, while their students inhabit a nonprint-based age, and that this has accompanied a shift from traditional mass media to media driven by computer technology. This article draws on the work of Stuart Allan to examine some of the history of this shift in term of news and asks what…

  5. The "Roles" of the Game: The Influence of News Consumption Patterns on the Role Conceptions of Journalism Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandoc, Edson C., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on a survey of 364 undergraduate journalism students and looks at how news consumption patterns influence the journalistic role conceptions that students hold. This study finds that students rated the interpreter role as most important. Students who prioritized the interpreter role also tend to get their news from online…

  6. News from IPNS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    Niobium-base alloys are candidate materials for the dive structure in fusion reactors. For this application, the materials should exhibit resistance to aqueous corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and radiation damage and should have high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion. Results of corrosion and embrittlement screening tests of several binary and ternary alloys in high-temperature water indicated that Nb-1Zr, Nb-5Mo-1Zr and Nb-5V-1Zr (wt.%) showed sufficient promise for further investigation. These alloys, together with pure Nb and Zircaloy-4, have been exposed to high-purity water containing a low concentration of dissolved oxygen (<12 ppb) at 170, 230, and 300C for up to {approx}3200 h. Weight-change data, microstructural observations, and qualitative mechanical-property evaluations reveal that Nb-5V-1Zr is the most promising alloy at higher temperatures. Below {approx}200C the alloys exhibit similar corrosion behavior.

  7. Atmospheric entry heating of micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer simulation of the atmospheric entry deceleration and heating of cosmic dust particles has been developed and the predicted peak temperatures are compared to the earlier closed-form mathematical solutions of Whipple (195) and Fraundorf (1980). A 20-micron diameter particle of density 1 gm/cu cm having a velocity of 10 km/s at infinity and entering the atmosphere at normal incidence reaches a peak temperature of 1159 K. The duration of the heating pulse is about 8 s but the particle remains within 100 K of the peak temperature for only 1.0 s. As the angle of incidence decreases, the peak temperature reached on entry also decreases, and the duration of the temperature pulse increases. Comparison with the Whipple amd Fraundorf models indicates that they accurately assess the entry heating for cosmic dust particles of moderate or higher densities and entry angles near normal incidence. As particle density decreases or the entry angle nears grazing incidence, they overestimate the peak temperature.

  8. Atmospheric Entry Simulator at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The Atmospheric Entry Simulator at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Visible in the foreground is a large tank containing air under high pressure. In the middle ground directly behind it is a special trumpet- shaped nozzle, contured so that air flowing through it gradually changes in density in the same way that the Earth's atmosphere changes in density with altitude. Not visible in this photograph is a high speed gun used to launch a test model at earth re-entry speed (17,000 mph) upstream through a special nozzle while air is flowing through it. Technicians are adjusting the spark shadowgraph station required to make accurate picture and time recording of the model in flight. When a gun-launched model flies at full re-entry velocity into the simulator nozzle, it experiences the decelerations, stresses, pressures and temperatures of actual re-entry during a few thousandths of a second. The simulator can quickly and economically determine in the laboratory whether a specific design can survive atmospheric re-entry.

  9. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Genesis capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry prior to the drogue deployment failure was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.3 km south of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analysis on infrared video footage (obtained from the tracking stations) during the descent estimated the onset of the capsule tumble at Mach 0.9. Frequency analysis on the infrared video data indicates that the aerodynamics generated for the Genesis capsule reasonably predicted the drag and static stability. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry simulation estimates of a small hypersonic angles-of-attack, since there is very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Genesis entry is consistent with flight performance that was close to the nominal preentry prediction. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  10. Public understanding of chemistry research in print news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, Michael D., Jr.

    Despite numerous calls for improving scientific literacy, many American adults show a lack of understanding of experiments, scientific study, and scientific inquiry. News media is one important avenue for science learning, but previous research investigating health and/or environmental science news has shown that it is inconsistent in the presentation of scientific research limitations, potentially impacting reader understanding. In the first phase of this dissertation, seventeen news articles reporting on a single chemistry research article, along with associated press releases and research articles, were analyzed using move analysis to determine the structure of each type of text. It was found that the overall structure of each text genre was similar, with the main difference being that research articles start by presenting background information, while the others lead with highlighting overall research outcomes. Analysis of the steps revealed that, as seen for health and environmental science news articles, descriptions of the study limitations and methods were generally omitted in the news articles. Using these findings, a pilot study was conducted where study limitations were added to a chemistry research news article and the effect of its presence on staff members employed at a large Midwestern university (n=12) and science faculty employed at the same institution (n=6) was explored. Interviews with the participants revealed that including limitations enhanced readers' ability to identify conclusions and evaluate claims, but decreased their trust in the information. In the final part of this study, the trends seen in the previous phase were explored to determine their generalizability. Members of the public (n=232) and science faculty (n=191) read a randomly assigned news article either presenting or omitting the study limitations and research methods. Participants reading articles presenting limitations were able to evaluate the reasonableness of claims based on the article better than those who read the article omitting limitations when accounting for their views on the tentativeness of science (ToS). Presenting limitations was important in identifying unreasonable claims for both public and science faculty, while ToS views predicted ability to identify reasonable claims for the public. Including limitations also decreased readers' trust in the conclusions of the research. However, it did not impact their ability to determine the conclusions of the research and including methods did not have any effect on the measured outcomes.

  11. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for public debate. PMID:11281408

  12. News in Brief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Vice President Shen Meets with CIP Guests Vice President Shen visits Finland, the Netherlands and Germany NSFC-JST Workshop on Energy Saving Held in Beijing NSFC President Meets with Guests from K.T. Li Foundation Northeastern Asian Symposium on Network Held in Xi'an Pilot Program of China-US Collaborative Research on Biomedical Research Announced Program of China-US Collaborative Research in Advanced Sensors and Bio-inspired Technology (ASBIT) Announced The Eighth A-HORCs Meeting Held in Xi'an Prof. Chen Yiyu, NSFC President meets with NRF President, South Africa NSFC-CIHR MoU Renewed in Ottawa NSFC and NIH Signs Collaborative MoU in Biomedical Research 10th Anniversary of the Sino-German Center Celebrated International Symposium on Internet-based Science Grants Management System Held in NSFC MOU between NSFC and UNEP signed in Beijing Plenary Meeting of the International Committee for the Evaluation of NSFC's Funding and Management Performance Held in Beijing

  13. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. PMID:23856023

  14. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

  15. News Media Presence and Southeast Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliesch, Ralph E.

    1980-01-01

    Field research in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia indicates that only a relative handful of the world's nations are directly involved in collecting news from these countries; the research also reveals that vast regions of the Third World have little or no direct news-seeking contact with one another. (GT)

  16. Science News and the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  17. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

  18. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently

  19. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  20. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification...

  1. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification...

  2. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how

  3. Television and the News: A Critical Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skornia, Harry J.

    This book contains a documented critical analysis of the state of broadcast journalism in the United States. It also examines the conditions that prevent news broadcasting as a practice from being a profession, and suggests steps needed to achieve professionalism in providing the kind of news service the nation needs but is not getting. Some of…

  4. Children's Fright Reactions to Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Joanne; Nathanson, Amy I.

    1996-01-01

    Finds that 37% of a random sample of children had been frightened by a news story on television; percentage of children frightened by news increased from kindergarten to the elementary school years, whereas the tendency to be frightened by fantastic, unreal content showed a decreasing trend; and tendency to respond with fright to violence between…

  5. Transmission of News in the Turkish Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Blake, Reed H.

    In the traditional Turkish village, the coffee house acts as a modern-day parish pump in news transmission. Within the coffee house, there is evidence of a two-step flow of communication. The role of the influential person in this study is the same as that in other studies: as a mediator and interpreter of news. In social characteristics, however,…

  6. Listening to Monotony: All-News Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael

    A study analyzed statistically the monotony of all-news radio listening and identified stylistic figures that elicit attention in listeners. Subjects were 30 graduate students whose experience with radio news ranged from occasional listening over several months to regular listening five or seven days per week for several years. Respondents were…

  7. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how…

  8. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanich, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

  9. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  10. News Research for Better Newspapers. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the summaries of news-editorial research reported in the American Newspaper Publishers Association News Research Bulletins during 1967. Of the 44 studies reported in this volume, twenty were done by universities, ten by individuals, nine by research agencies, and five by other organizations. The studies are arranged…

  11. Library Media Specialists: Doing the News!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Newspapers in Education (NIE) Week and how it can relate to school library media specialists. Highlights include the convergence of news media, including news on the Web; ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) resources, including lesson plans; relevant books; Web sites; and Web journalism. (LRW)

  12. Satellite News Feeds: Protecting a Transient Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Tony; And Others

    Satellite news gathering (SNG) has been widely adopted in broadcast journalism in recent years, and appears likely to grow in importance as local television news operations increase their reliance on it. However, because the technology for SNG is so new, information transmitted through SNG systems is not adequately protected under current laws.…

  13. TV News Analysis Project Motivates Broadcast Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the use of content analysis by a journalism class in studying television news. Indicates that the method is flexible, generates familiarity with quantitative approaches to the analysis of broadcast journalism, can result in increased awareness of the complexity of the broadcast news medium, and increases student motivation. (TJ)

  14. NIH News in Health: September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wein, Harrison, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…

  15. Predicting Political News Coverage by Newspaper Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Gilbert Len, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Concludes that the only significant factors explaining the amount of political news published by the Arkansas daily press during the 1972 senatorial primary election campaign were the size of the daily news hole and the number of wire services a newspaper used. (GT)

  16. Mass News: Practices, Controversies, and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy, David J., Ed.; Sterling, Christopher H., Ed.

    This selection of readings, primarily intended for a college journalism course, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the major sources of the public news--the wire services, newspapers, and television. The first part of the book deals with the context of mass news and serves as an introduction to some of the crucial ideas shaping thinking…

  17. Gated entry into the ciliary compartment.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play important roles in cell motility and cell signaling. These functions require that the cilium establishes and maintains a unique lipid and protein composition. Recent work indicates that a specialized region at the base of the cilium, the transition zone, serves as both a barrier to entry and a gate for passage of select components. For at least some cytosolic proteins, the barrier and gate functions are provided by a ciliary pore complex (CPC) that shares molecular and mechanistic properties with nuclear gating. Specifically, nucleoporins of the CPC limit the diffusional entry of cytosolic proteins in a size-dependent manner and enable the active transport of large molecules and complexes via targeting signals, importins, and the small G protein Ran. For membrane proteins, the septin protein SEPT2 is part of the barrier to entry whereas the gating function is carried out and/or regulated by proteins associated with ciliary diseases (ciliopathies) such as nephronophthisis, Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome. Here, we discuss the evidence behind these models of ciliary gating as well as the similarities to and differences from nuclear gating. PMID:26472341

  18. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The session concluded with the talk by this year's award winner for Excellence in Introductory College teaching, Dr Dwight Neuenschwander from Southern Nazarene University in Oklahoma. Dwight's talk, invoking both Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and Robert Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, was memorable for clarifying both the connections and the differences between physics and physics teaching. At a second ceremonial session on Tuesday, Terrence Walker of The Ohio State University gave the Klopsteg Memorial Lecture, entitled The Big Bang: Seeing Back to the Beginning. This was followed by the presentation of the Robert A Millikan Award Lecture - Beauty in Physics and the Arts, by Thomas Rossing of Northern Illinois University. Over the years Tom has made many contributions to the teaching of the physics of sound and music, and his lecture made wonderful connections between physics and the arts. At the first plenary session on Monday, Dr Elaine Seymour, a sociologist from the University of Colorado, gave a talk entitled: We Know Science Majors Are Lost Because of Poor Teaching, But Why Do They Resist Our Efforts To Improve Their Learning Experience? She described students' responses and resistance to the implementation of active-learning methods. The talk was thought-provoking, particularly when so many other talks at this meeting described new attempts to incorporate such methods in different educational settings. At the second plenary session on Wednesday, Eric Poisson from the University of Guelph gave a very interesting talk about Gravitational Wave Astronomy and the LIGO and VIRGO projects, including their theoretical motivation and expected experimental results. On Tuesday evening there was a very special show of physics demonstrations by the `Third Eye' group from China. Their presentations embody a very interesting philosophy. Each demonstration is designed to illustrate one or more basic concepts in physics in a way that will be both memorable and thought-provoking. Often these presentations have evolved, and at each stage their goal is to be able to accomplish the same demonstration with ever-simpler equipment. Given that we all live under financial constraints, the `third eye' refers to the ability to look around and find a useful piece of a demonstration apparatus amongst what others might perceive to be junk. All in all, it was a very stimulating and interesting presentation, and one can easily see why this group tours China to the rave reviews of the students there. As is true every year, the wealth of interesting and valuable work shared in the parallel sessions of contributed papers was astounding. As always, I found myself running from building to building in an attempt to hear as many talks as I could possibly attend. Often a colleague and I would split up to hear different talks, and then share what we'd learned over a meal later in the day. What follows are a few highlights of what we heard and saw in some of those sessions. As one would expect given the trend of recent years, there were many interesting talks about the incorporation of computers and instructional media in introductory physics teaching. Paris Naik from the University of Illinois presented a paper on their web-based Interactive Examples. These are very well thought-out homework problems that provide interactive help in the spirit of a Socratic dialogue. They can be viewed at webug.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/ie.html. Mario Belloni and Wolfgang Christian, both from Davidson College, each gave a talk on the use of Physlets, scriptable Java-based interactive physics problems. These can be sampled at webphysics.davidson.edu/physletprob. Ruth Chabay from Carnegie Mellon University presented the Visual Python real-time, three-dimensional graphics environment in which their first-year students are programming their own visualization of physical phenomena. Its power, ease of use and freeware usage make it a must-see at cil.andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual. David Sokoloff (University of Oregon) and Priscilla Laws (Dickinson College) led a discussion session on the Interactive Lecture Demonstrations that they have been developing to promote active learning in the classroom. Loren Winters of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics showed some very fine work done with digital video cameras, both in producing motion videos for frame-by-frame analysis and in producing still images of high-speed phenomena. Finally, Patrick Tam of Humboldt State University in California talked about the Multimedia Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT), a project to organize and review the proliferation of internet-based teaching materials that are rapidly becoming available. Their purpose is to make it easier for teachers like us to sift through the plethora of new innovations, to locate those that are potentially useful in our teaching, and finally to implement them effectively. You can check out the project on the web at www.merlot.org. As is evident from the number of sessions of contributed papers and the tandem conference, the quality and quantity of physics education research into new curricula and teaching methods continue to increase. A number of interesting areas were discussed including interactive lecture techniques, studio-classroom approaches combining lectures and labs, assessment techniques, and identifying and correcting student misconceptions. In addition to the plenary talks on current research topics in physics mentioned above, there were sessions on Space Physics and Hot Topics in Physics. There were sessions on professional and career concerns including Preparing Future Physics Faculty, New Faculty Experiences and Concerns, Balancing Career and Family, How Physics Topics Support the Job Market and Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics. Whether one was a high school teacher or a university professor, this was an enjoyable and educational meeting. We all look forward to the Winter 2001 meeting from 6-11 January in San Diego, and to next summer's meeting from 21-25 July in Rochester, New York.

  19. NEWS: Solid foundations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Among the initiatives to be found at UK universities is a vocational award with the title `University Foundation Degree' at Nottingham Trent University. This qualification will be offered in 14 different subjects including four in the Faculty of Science and Mathematics, in the areas of applied biology, applied sciences, chemistry and physics. The courses will be available on a two-year full-time, three-year sandwich or a part-time basis. Set at a higher standard and specification than the Higher National Diplomas which it replaces, the UFD has been devised in consultation with industry and will cover the technical and specialist areas demanded by employers to combat skills shortages. The UFD in applied sciences concentrates on practical applications through laboratory, IT and project work, supported by lectures and seminars. At the end students can enter the employment market or transfer onto the second year of a degree course. Science-based careers including research and development would be the aim of those taking the UFD in physics. The first year develops the fundamentals of modern physics supported by studies in mathematics, IT and computer programming, whilst year 2 is vocational in nature with industrial problem solving and work experience as well as an academic theme associated with environmental aspects of the subject. Those who complete the UFD will be allowed automatic progression to a specified honours degree course and would normally be expected to study for a further two years for this award. However, those demonstrating an outstanding academic performance can transfer to the linked degree programme at the end of the first year via fast-track modules. Back in May the UK's Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) announced new standard benchmarks for degrees. These will be introduced into higher education institutions from 2002 to outline the knowledge, understanding and skills a student should gain from a particular higher education course. These benchmark statements should help students to make informed choices about their degree and subsequent employability, as well as informing employers about the skills and knowledge of the graduates they propose to employ. Academics from each discipline have agreed the statements for their areas of expertise to a common framework.

  20. Entry Vehicle Control System Design for the Mars Smart Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Queen, Eric M.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center, in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, participated in a preliminary design study of the Entry, Descent and Landing phase for the Mars Smart Lander Project. This concept utilizes advances in Guidance, Navigation and Control technology to significantly reduce uncertainty in the vehicle landed location on the Mars surface. A candidate entry vehicle controller based on the Reaction Control System controller for the Apollo Lunar Excursion Module digital autopilot is proposed for use in the entry vehicle attitude control. A slight modification to the phase plane controller is used to reduce jet-firing chattering while maintaining good control response for the Martian entry probe application. The controller performance is demonstrated in a six-degree-of-freedom simulation with representative aerodynamics.

  1. Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations Analysis for the Genesis Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Lyons, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    On September 8, 2004, the Genesis spacecraft returned to Earth after spending 29 months about the sun-Earth libration point (L1) collecting solar wind particles. Four hours prior to Earth arrival, the sample return capsule containing the samples was released for entry and subsequent landing at the Utah Test and Training Range. This paper provides an overview of the entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis that was performed during the mission operations phase leading up to final approach to Earth. The final orbit determination solution produced an inertial entry flight-path angle of -8.002 deg (which was the desired nominal value) with a 3-sigma error of +/-0.0274 deg (a third of the requirement). The operations effort accurately delivered the entry capsule to the desired landing site. The final landing location was 8.3 km from the target, and was well within the allowable landing area. Overall, the Earth approach operation procedures worked well and there were no issues (logistically or performance based) that arose. As a result, the process of targeting a capsule from deep space and accurately landing it on Earth was successfully demonstrated.

  2. NEWS: TRUMP resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    2000-05-01

    Support for astronomy in A-level physics aslogo Help is at hand for teachers and students choosing astronomy as part of A-level physics. The Teaching Resources Unit for Modern Physics (TRUMP) has produced a resource package covering all the astronomical options in the Edexcel, OCR and AQA (NEAB) syllabuses. The forerunner to TRUMP was the project that produced the highly successful Particle Physics Pack, sponsored by the Institute of Physics, which was instrumental in introducing particle physics into A-level syllabuses. The TRUMP Astrophysics Resource Package fills a gap between the colourful stimulus of popular materials on the one hand, and professional texts on the other. But this is not just another A-level textbook; the six-part resource pack has a similar structure and purpose to the Particle Physics Pack. It provides over 400 pages of comprehensive information for teachers, building on their existing subject knowledge and bringing them up to date as well as giving suggestions for teaching and notes on syllabus coverage. The package includes nearly 40 photocopiable sheets for students. The emphasis is on the physics that underpins the astronomy. There are details of student activities requiring no specialist equipment beyond that normally found in A-level labs, exercises using authentic data, and plenty of questions (all with worked solutions). The development of the TRUMP Astrophysics Package was funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the Institute of Physics and York University. The package is available by mail order, price £48 (inc. UK p&p) from the TRUMP Project, Science Education Group, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD. Some parts may be purchased separately; for details contact the project's director, Elizabeth Swinbank (tel: 01904 434537, fax: 01904 434078, e-mail: es14@york.ac.uk) or consult the web page www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/trump. The BaBar experiment balogo In the spring of 1999, scientists began to collect data from the BaBar experiment - an international collaboration involving the UK, several other European countries and the USA. The experiment is designed to throw light on the puzzling question of why there is so little antimatter in the universe and so much matter. The TRUMP BaBar resource package brings the mystery of antimatter into schools. There are notes and colourful posters on the physics of BaBar, and photocopiable sheets supporting student activities. These include explorations of symmetry, templates for making a scale model of the BaBar detector, and a web-based research project. The pack is designed mainly for A-level physics (particularly those courses that include some particle physics) but parts also relate to GCSE science, Scottish Higher physics and Standard physics. The BaBar resource package is available free from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, which fully funded its development and production. Contact the Publicity Team, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon, Wiltshire SN2 1SZ (tel: 01973 442123, e-mail: pr_pus@pparc.ac.uk).

  3. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Internal ribosome entry site-based attenuation of a flavivirus candidate vaccine and evaluation of the effect of beta interferon coexpression on vaccine properties.

    PubMed

    Frese, Michael; Lee, Eva; Larena, Maximilian; Lim, Pek Siew; Rao, Sudha; Matthaei, Klaus I; Khromykh, Alexander; Ramshaw, Ian; Lobigs, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Infectious clone technologies allow the rational design of live attenuated viral vaccines with the possibility of vaccine-driven coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules for additional vaccine safety and efficacy. The latter could lead to novel strategies for vaccine protection against infectious diseases where traditional approaches have failed. Here we show for the flavivirus Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) that incorporation of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of Encephalomyocarditis virus between the capsid and prM genes strongly attenuated virulence and that the resulting bicistronic virus was both genetically stable and potently immunogenic. Furthermore, the novel bicistronic genome organization facilitated the generation of a recombinant virus carrying an beta interferon (IFN-β) gene. Given the importance of IFNs in limiting virus dissemination and in efficient induction of memory B and T cell antiviral immunity, we hypothesized that coexpression of the cytokine with the live vaccine might further increase virulence attenuation without loss of immunogenicity. We found that bicistronic mouse IFN-β coexpressing MVEV yielded high virus and IFN titers in cultured cells that do not respond to the coexpressed IFN. However, in IFN response-sufficient cell cultures and mice, the virus produced a self-limiting infection. Nevertheless, the attenuated virus triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses evidenced by the induced expression of Mx proteins (used as a sensitive biomarker for measuring the type I IFN response) and the generation of neutralizing antibodies, respectively. IMPORTANCE The family Flaviviridae includes a number of important human pathogens, such as Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and Hepatitis C virus. Flaviviruses infect large numbers of individuals on all continents. For example, as many as 100 million people are infected annually with Dengue virus, and 150 million people suffer a chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus. However, protective vaccines against dengue and hepatitis C are still missing, and improved vaccines against other flaviviral diseases are needed. The present study investigated the effects of a redesigned flaviviral genome and the coexpression of an antiviral protein (interferon) on virus replication, pathogenicity, and immunogenicity. Our findings may aid in the rational design of a new class of well-tolerated and safe vaccines. PMID:24307589

  5. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is up and running at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. Organizers of symposia and workshops as well as proposers of papers are invited to submit their ideas over the Web or in writing to the Program Chair, Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu, or to the Workshop Coordinator, Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext 204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. For general information please contact Seyhan Ege, phone: 734/764-7340, email: snege@umich.edu. ChemCareers Debuts on ChemCenter The ACS ChemCenter website has recently launched a moderated career forum where chemists, chemical engineers, scientists in related fields, students, and other interested persons pose their questions related to career development in the chemical sciences. At the site you can hear what your peers think about preparing for, launching, maintaining, and advancing a career in chemistry. You can bring questions, share experiences, or offer advice. The forum is moderated by ACS career consultants who offer their expert opinions as a part of the discussion. The address is http://www.chemcenter.org. Click on the "discussions" hypertext link under "Discover Chemistry." Green Chemistry The closing date for grant funding from the EPA/NSF Technologies for a Sustainable Environment Solicitation is July 26, 1999. For specific grant information, visit the Web site www.nsf.gov/pubs/1999/nsf99108/nsf99108.txt. For general grant information about green chemistry, go to www.epa.gov/greenchemistry, es.epa.gov/ncerqa/grants, and www.nsf.gov; phone: 202/260-2659. Grad Resources Hotline A national crisis hotline sponsored by Grad Resources was set up effective April 1999. Graduate students who face overwhelming stress or despair may call 1/877-GRAD-HLP, toll-free, 24 hours a day, every day, to speak anonymously with a counselor specially trained in graduate issues. Grad Resources is a non-profit organization serving graduate students. For further references and information, visit the Grad Resources Website at www.gradresources.org or contact Nick Repak at 1-800/867-0188. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
      • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
      • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
      • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
      • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
      • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
      • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
      • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
      Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
      • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
      • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
      • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
      • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
      • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
      Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org ACS Division of Chemical Education Change in 1999 Election of Officers The notice of the 1999 election of CHED officers originally appeared on page 755 of the June 1999 issue of the Journal. The slate has changed because Frank Torre has withdrawn as a candidate for Treasurer. His new responsibilities as department chair at Springfield College will not permit him to devote the time necessary to serve the Division well. The Committee on Personnel and Nominations has submitted to the Executive Committee the name of Tamar (Uni) Susskind to replace Torre, and the Executive Committee has approved this change. As a result, the candidates on the revised 1999 ballot are below. Candidate statements for Chair-Elect and Treasurer are on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Jul /p896_4.html Treasurer (2000-2002) (amended)
      • Tamar (Uni) Susskind, Oakland Community College, Auburn Hills, MI
      • Anna Wilson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
      For Chair-Elect (Chair in 2001) Arlene Russell, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
    • Conrad Stanitski, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
    Councilor/Alternate Councilor (2000-2002)
    • Craig Bowen, Clemson University, Clemson, SC
    • Mark Freilich, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
    • Marcy Towns, Ball State University, Muncie, IN
    • Carol White, Athens Area Technical Institute, Athens, GA
    Ballots will be mailed in August. Ballots must be received by the Secretary by October 1, 1999.

  6. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    Classroom Activities Mean Teamwork As much as any other facet of the editing and production of the Journal, the Classroom Activity series means teamwork! The aim is for activities to be interesting and accessible to introductory students, based on inexpensive and readily available materials, connected by content to some part of the Journal issue, able to be integrated into the high school curriculum, and safe. There need to be questions posed and answers at the ready. Additional information in print and on the Web needs to be identified and checked. The activities are designed to be ready for teachers to hand to students, so they really need to work-that means that they go through a lot of testing in Journal House where there is, quite fittingly, no lab. This is a tall order, one requiring someone with experience in high school teaching. From the start of the Activities in September 1997, Nancy Gettys has had a major role in their success. While Nancy's primary responsibility is as the Technical Editor of JCE Software, she has experience in teaching high school and has called on that experience to try and test, expand, try again, plan the illustrations (remember the photographs of the activities with surface phenomena that were featured in the table of contents of the February 1998 issue?), and perhaps hardest of all-tell us when something will just not work in high school. Nancy continues to work with the Classroom Activities, but she now has a colleague in fellow high school teacher Erica Jacobsen who has recently joined our staff. Introducing... Erica Jacobsen joined our staff last fall as an editorial assistant and has recently become an assistant editor. She received her undergraduate degree in education from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her teaching licenses include certifications in chemistry, physics, biology, and natural science for grades six through twelve. During her undergraduate years, she worked with the Chemical Education Group. Her undergraduate research and senior thesis were directed by John W. Moore and centered on the subject of HIV and its use as a topic in the chemistry curriculum. The research culminated in writing and publishing "HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work," a videotape and teacher/student guide offered by the Journal of Chemical Education Software. After graduation, Erica taught chemistry, AP chemistry, and physics for two years at a rural public high school in Minnesota. During her teaching, as a reader of the Journal, she was delighted to see the introduction of the Classroom Activities feature. She found the ready-made activities a great complement to her "hands-on, minds-on" curriculum. Due to her husband's job transfer, she has returned to Madison and is even more delighted to now be a part of the development of Classroom Activities. Her duties at Journal House include helping to test, research, and write Classroom Activities. She divides her time between working at Journal House, taking additional science coursework at the university for professional development, and tutoring chemistry students. She is settling in to her new life in Madison and she and her husband enjoy exploring the Wisconsin outdoors together. European Conference on Research in Chemical Education The 5th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education (5th ECRICE) will be held from September 21-25, 1999, at the University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. It will include plenary lectures, symposia, workshops, poster sessions, and social events. The working language of the conference will be English, but contributions in French are also invited. For more information contact Georgios Tsarparlis, University of Ioannina, Department of Chemistry, GR-451 10 Ioannina, Greece; phone: +30 651 98431; fax: +30 651 44989; email: gtsepar@cc.uoi.gr. The conference World Wide Web site is http://www.uoi.gr/conf_sem/ecrice5. Symposium on Natural Products: Chemistry and Bioactivity Hauser and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado at Boulder are offering a three-day symposium on natural products which include pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and consumer products, to be held May 19-21, 1999. For further information or to make arrangements to attend, contact University of Colorado at Boulder, Attn: Rosemary Trujillo, Campus Box 215, Boulder, CO 80309-0215; email: rosemary.trujillo@colorado.edu; fax: 303/492-0439. Workshops for Small-Scale Chemistry The Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Colorado State University announces two workshop programs for summer 1999. Interested community college faculty are invited to apply for the Small-Scale Chemistry for Pollution Prevention Summer Institute, June 7-18, 1999. The Institute features hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Travel to Fort Collins, CO, lodging, per diem, and classroom/laboratory materials are funded for selected participants with a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in collaboration with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE). For more information contact Barry Carroll by email: barry_carroll@csmate.colostate.edu; phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/Programs/PETE_Page.html. Interested high school teachers are invited to apply for two one-week workshops in Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for the Regular Chemistry Course (June 21-25, 1999) and Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for Advanced Placement Chemistry (June 28-July 2, 1999). The workshops feature hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Classroom/laboratory materials, books, and two graduate credits are included in the $395 fee for each course. For more information contact Courtney Butler by email: courtney@ csmate.colostate.edu, phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/. 16th BCCE: Call for Suggestions The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor from July 30-August 3, 2000. Information about the conference is posted on the World Wide Web at www.umich.edu/ bcce or may be obtained from the following persons. General Chair: Seyhan Ege; phone: 734/764-7340; fax: 734/647-4865; email: snege@umich.edu. Program Chair: Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu. Workshop Coordinator: Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext.204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. Massachusetts State Science Fair The 50th Massachusetts State Science Fair will take place April 30 and May 1, 1999. To celebrate the anniversary, we plan to hold a gathering of all Fair alumni/alumnae. Thus we are trying to contact all persons who have ever exhibited science projects at this state-wide high school Fair that has been held each year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Anyone who has exhibited a science project at the State Fair should send their name, present address, the name of the school they were attending when participating in the Fair, and the date(s) they exhibited to the Fair office: Massachusetts State Science Fair, 45 Howlands Lane, Kingston, MA 02364-1637. If there are questions, contact Micheline M. Mathews-Roth, M.D., the chair of the alumni/alumnae committee, by phone at 617/525-2249. Call for Proposals, EDUCAUSE '99 Celebrating New Beginnings is the title of the EDUCAUSE '99 annual conference, to be held October 26-29, 1999, in Long Beach, California. The conference will be a celebration of new beginnings and a forum to shape and define our agenda for the 21st century. This is a new association focused on enabling information technology to shape the nature of teaching, learning, scholarship, research, and institutional management and invite you to participate. At this first EDUCAUSE annual conference, we will identify the opportunities, address the issues, and celebrate the potential for transforming education through information technology; we will bring together information resource professionals to participate in a diverse, comprehensive, carefully focused program with many opportunities for interactive and one-on-one communication. The conference has five tracks with each track having five focus areas: technical infrastructure; planning and strategy; service delivery; applications and best practices; and management and organization. Speakers at the general session include Colin Powell, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation; and Barry Munitz, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust. For more information visit the conference WWW site at http://www.educause.edu/conference/e99. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53
    available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm or contact the DUE Information Center; phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org Virtual Conference on Molecular Simulation The journal Molecular Simulation is sponsoring a virtual conference on the latest applications and techniques in the field, to be held April 19-May 4, 1999. Applications and Methodology of Molecular Simulation in the Physical and Biological Sciences will bring together experts in a wide range of disciplines encompassed within the physical and biological sciences. An important aim of the meeting is to foster cross fertilization of ideas, algorithms, and applications between them. Sessions will include papers on topics in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and pharmacology. Comment and discussion will be encouraged and the resulting material will be edited and form part of the proceedings. The format of the virtual conference will be formal sessions with invited and contributed papers, posters and subsequent interactive discussions with authors, where comment and criticism will be sought on the formal lectures (along the lines of a Faraday Discussion). During the conference all material will be accessible at the conference Web site, http://molsim.vei.co.uk/ and accepted papers will be published after the end of the conference (following refereeing and editing) in Molecular Simulation. To register, fill in the form at http://molsim.vei.co.uk/register/index.html. Smallscale and Microscale Chemistry This is a call for presenters and participants to the 150th 2YC3 conference, November 5-6, 1999 in Fort Smith, Arkansas. The theme of this conference is "Smallscale and Microscale Chemistry-Steps into the 21st Century" and considers techniques, the escalating cost of chemicals, and their disposal. Environmental concerns are also topics that need to be addressed if this laboratory science will teach an awareness of man's responsibility to the environment. Please send abstracts for paper and poster presentations or workshop proposals to Thomas R. Clark at the address below. Westark College is committed to supporting your participation and will present a enthusiastic program. Additional assistance can be obtained from Thomas R. Clark, Department of Chemistry, Westark College, Fort Smith, AR 72913; phone: 501/788-7623; fax: 501/788-7612; email: tclark@systema.westark.edu. Information Requested from AP Chemistry Teachers in Intensive Scheduling A chemistry teacher in western Pennsylvania who is working on her Master's thesis, "The Impact of Intensive Scheduling on Student Achievement in Chemistry", is seeking pre- and post-Block Scheduling AP Chemistry Exam Scores. Data from Block, A/B Rotational, and Copernican schedules is of particular interest. Please send comments and scores to Chris Ann Slye, 1200 Tenth Avenue, Irwin, PA 15642; email: cabst71@pitt.edu; phone: 724/861-0250. A Great Student Award! Spring is award season, and a subscription to the Journal has lasting value as well as a reasonable price. We have personalized subscription award certificates and accompanying sample issues, ready for presentation. Whether it is one subscription to an outstanding student or 50 to each of this year's graduates in an ACS Local Section, we stand ready to help.

  7. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Herschel papers catalogued and accessible; Maskelyne papers accepted for the nation; centenary of the Hamburg Observatory; oldest astrologer's board found; Groupe Flammarion sold; ancient sundial found; keeping time (modern folk song about John Harrison).

  8. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2011-09-01

    Townsend Observatory destroyed; BAA Lunar Section archives; Astro-Cymru; Royal star identified; Formation of Johannes Kepler Working Group; Tycho Brahe exhumed; Ancient observatory discovered in Iran...; ... and in Mexico; Calling all ex-occupants of interplanetary craft.

  9. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Cyber Workshop: The Teacher Network visits Second Life Festival: Alarm clock rings for European science Grant Project: The reality of university science Student Physics: Young physicists' tournament in Korea Environment: Climate change documentary to be shown in every secondary school in England and Wales Centenary: Glasgow celebrates life of Kelvin

  11. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    SHAP Awards: SHAP students come out on top APECS Seminar: Able Pupils Experience Challenging Science project gets support SHAP Awards : Teachers get awards too Institute Awards: Musical squares: musical pair continue to share their adventures in sound Meeting: Rugby School hosts Schools’ Physics Group Meeting Germany: German didactics group puts on a full programme for spring meeting Radio Communication: GB4FUN: mobile radio shack hits the airwaves and is a hit with schools Saturn: Cassini Huygens mission: Saturn here we come! World Year of Physics: Conference continues with its preparations for 2005 Resources: New resources on radioactive materials available JG was supported by KBN grant no 2 P03A 020 24.

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    11-14 Curriculum: Supporting Physics Teaching (11-14) Europe: Sci-tech couldn't be without it! Art-Science: Makrolab in Mountain Year Digital Curriculum: Should the BBC learn from the past? Scotland: Teachers get Rocket Science Malaysia: Controversy over the language medium for science teaching UK Science: Next stage of Science Year announced Special Educational Needs: Science for special needs students Folk Physics: Good vibrations Environment: IoM3 - a move towards sustainability? UK Primary Science: The threat of afternoon science

  13. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    LINKS WITH PRIMARY SCIENCE SAD Physics; PHYSICS RESEARCH In a hurry...; PHYSICS COMMUNITY Scottish Stirling Meeting; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Global warming forecasts rise in skin cancer; EVENTS 2001 SET week; E-MAIL DISCUSSIONS Learning in science; STUDENT ACTIVITY Paperclip Physics; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Perspectives on Science; AWARDS Award for causing chaos; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Physics and public heath: Do electrical power lines cause cancer? HIGHER EDUCATION First-year course development; INTERSCHOOL COLLABORATION Monitoring geomagnetic storms; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT UK course goes international; PHYSICS IN SCIENCE YEAR Website launched

  15. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Meetings: Physics Teachers@CERN 2003 Education Group Annual Conference: Observations by a first-time participant... Summer Workshop: Making Music Competition: Physics in the fast lane Bristol Festival of Physics: Ice cream ice-breakers Online Resources: Old favourites go online UK Curriculum: What does society want? UK Curriculum: Assessment of Science Learning 14-19 Forthcoming Events

  16. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Einstein year: Einstein is brought back to life for a year of educational events Workshop: Students reach out for the Moon Event: Masterclasses go with a bang Workshop: Students search for asteroids on Einstein's birthday Scotland: Curriculum for Excellence takes holistic approach Conference: Reporting from a mattress in Nachod Conference: 'Change' is key objective at ICPE conference 2005 Lecture: Institute of Physics Schools Lecture series Conference: Experience showcase science in Warwick National network: Science Learning Centre opens Meeting: 30th Stirling Physics Meeting breaks records Competition: Win a digital camera! Forthcoming Events

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage focuses on life Women in Physics: DNA posters highlight the role of women Physics on Stage: Not just fair but better than ever Physics on Stage: Food inspires teaching of physics Physics on Stage: Powerful performances dispel the myth of boring physics Physics Songs: Physics inspires some of our readers to sing Physics on Stage: Awards recognize achievements of science teachers in Europe Curriculum: Japan tests Advancing Physics UK Assessment System: Assessment overhaul is overdue Future Physicists: Ambassadors are bringing physics alive Physics at work: Physics at work still going strong Teaching Teachers: US coalition helps new teachers Forthcoming Events

  19. News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two new combination pediatric vaccines advancing to use in infants Oncolytic viruses successfully delivered intravenously Cuba eliminates hepatitis B among minors under 15 Alzheimer's vaccine trial a success Study: Shingles vaccine safe for patients on immune-suppressing drugs Therapeutic cancer vaccine against metastatic renal cell carcinoma enters Phase 3 Pfizers Men B vaccine shows promise in Phase 2 Biovest initiates formal regulatory approval process for BiovaxID in Europe PMID:22914446

  20. Planetary Landers and Entry Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew J.; Garry, James R. C.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.

    2007-05-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Engineering Issues Specific to Entry Probes, Landers or Penetrators: 1. Mission goals and system engineering; 2. Accommodation, launch, cruise and arrival from orbit or interplanetary trajectory; 3. Entering atmospheres; 4. Descent through an atmosphere; 5. Descent to an airless body; 6. Planetary balloons, aircraft, submarines and cryobots; 7. Arrival at a surface; 8. Thermal control of landers and entry probes; 9. Power systems; 10. Communication and tracking of entry probes; 11. Radiation environment; 12. Surface activities: arms, drills, moles and mobility; 13. Structures; 14. Contamination of spacecraft and planets; Part II. Previous Atmosphere/Surface Vehicles and Their Payloads: 15. Destructive impact probes; 16. Atmospheric entry probes; 17. Pod landers; 18. Legged landers; 19. Payload delivery penetrators; 20. Small body surface missions; Part III. 'Case Studies': 21. Surveyor landers; 22. Galileo probe; 23. Huygens; 24. Mars Pathfinder and Sojourner; 25. Deep Space 2 Mars microprobes; 26. Rosetta lander Philae; 27. Mars exploration rovers: Spirit and Opportunity; Appendix: Some key parameters for bodies in the Solar System; List of acronyms; Bibliography; References; Index.

  1. Planetary Landers and Entry Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew; Garry, James; Lorenz, Ralph; Kerzhanovich, Viktor

    2010-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Engineering Issues Specific to Entry Probes, Landers or Penetrators: 1. Mission goals and system engineering; 2. Accommodation, launch, cruise and arrival from orbit or interplanetary trajectory; 3. Entering atmospheres; 4. Descent through an atmosphere; 5. Descent to an airless body; 6. Planetary balloons, aircraft, submarines and cryobots; 7. Arrival at a surface; 8. Thermal control of landers and entry probes; 9. Power systems; 10. Communication and tracking of entry probes; 11. Radiation environment; 12. Surface activities: arms, drills, moles and mobility; 13. Structures; 14. Contamination of spacecraft and planets; Part II. Previous Atmosphere/Surface Vehicles and Their Payloads: 15. Destructive impact probes; 16. Atmospheric entry probes; 17. Pod landers; 18. Legged landers; 19. Payload delivery penetrators; 20. Small body surface missions; Part III. 'Case Studies': 21. Surveyor landers; 22. Galileo probe; 23. Huygens; 24. Mars Pathfinder and Sojourner; 25. Deep Space 2 Mars microprobes; 26. Rosetta lander Philae; 27. Mars exploration rovers: Spirit and Opportunity; Appendix: Some key parameters for bodies in the Solar System; List of acronyms; Bibliography; References; Index.

  2. Numerical Skip-Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael; Crull, Timothy; Rea, Jeremy; Johnson, Wyatt

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses a preliminary guidance and targeting strategy for accomplishing Skip-Entry (SE) flight during a lunar return-capsule entry flight. One of the primary benefits of flying a SE trajectory is to provide the crew with continuous Continental United States (CONUS) landing site access throughout the lunar month. Without a SE capability, the capsule must land either in water or at one of several distributed land sites in the Southern Hemisphere for a significant portion of a lunar month using a landing and recovery scenario similar to that employed during the Apollo program. With a SE trajectory, the capsule can land either in water at a site in proximity to CONUS or at one of several distributed landing sites within CONUS, thereby simplifying the operational requirements for crew retrieval and vehicle recovery, and possibly enabling a high degree of vehicle reusability. Note that a SE capability does not require that the vehicle land on land. A SE capability enables a longer-range flight than a direct-entry flight, which permits the vehicle to land at a much greater distance from the Entry Interface (EI) point. This does not exclude using this approach to push the landing point to a water location in proximity of CONUS and utilizing water or airborne recovery forces.

  3. Delayed School Entry in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 Uganda has seen a large increase in school enrolment. Despite this increased enrolment, universal education has remained elusive. Many children enrol in school, but not at the recommended age, and they drop out before completing school. This article focuses on one of these problems--delayed school entry. What household factors are…

  4. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  5. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read

  6. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  7. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  8. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1993. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  9. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1992. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  10. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  11. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  12. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  14. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  15. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  16. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  17. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  18. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  19. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  20. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  1. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  2. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  3. "Good" News vs. "Bad": A Relative Impact Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Gerald; Hartung, Barbara W.

    A two-part study was designed to measure the amount of good news and bad news in newspapers and to measure readers' recall of stories that represented good news and bad news. The stories used in the study appeared on the front pages and on one of the inside pages of eight California newspapers during October 1978. A total of 559 telephone…

  4. Cancer News Coverage and Information Seeking

    PubMed Central

    NIEDERDEPPE, JEFF; FROSCH, DOMINICK L.; HORNIK, ROBERT C.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

  5. Cancer news coverage and information seeking.

    PubMed

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Frosch, Dominick L; Hornik, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

  6. Predictors of student success in entry-level science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta K.

    Although the educational evaluation process is useful and valuable and is supported by the Higher Education Act, a strong research base for program evaluation of college entry-level science courses is still lacking. Studies in science disciplines such as, biology, chemistry, and physics have addressed various affective and demographic factors and their relationships to student achievement. However, the literature contains little information that specifically addresses student biology content knowledge skills (basics and higher order thinking skills) and identifies factors that affect students' success in entry-level college science courses. These gate-keeping courses require detailed evaluation if the goal of an institution is to increase students' performance and success in these courses. These factors are, in fact, a stepping stone for increasing the number of graduates in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors. The present study measured students' biology content knowledge and investigated students' performance and success in college biology, chemistry, and physics entry-level courses. Seven variables---gender, ethnicity, high school Grade Point Average (GPA), high school science, college major, school financial aid support, and work hours were used as independent variables and course final performance as a dichotomous dependent variable. The sample comprised voluntary student participants in entry-level science courses. The study attempted to explore eight research questions. Content knowledge assessments, demographic information analysis, multiple regression analysis, and binary logistic regression analysis were used to address research questions. The results suggested that high school GPA was a consistently good predictor of students' performance and success in entry-level science courses. Additionally, high school chemistry was a significant predictor variable for student success in entry-level biology and chemistry courses. Similarly, students' performance and success in entry-level physics courses were influenced by high school physics. Finally, the study developed student success equation with high school GAP and high school chemistry as good predictors of students' success in entry-level science courses.

  7. Thermal Testing of Woven TPS Materials in Extreme Entry Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, G.; Stackpoole, M.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs future robotic missions to Venus and outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of current mid density ablators (PICA or Avcoat). Therefore mission planners assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heatshield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS however its high density and thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, high heat fluxes, high pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program in NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System to meet the needs of NASAs most challenging entry missions. The high entry conditions pose certification challenges in existing ground based test facilities. Recent updates to NASAs IHF and AEDCs H3 high temperature arcjet test facilities enable higher heatflux (2000 Wcm2) and high pressure (5 atm) testing of TPS. Some recent thermal tests of woven TPS will be discussed in this paper. These upgrades have provided a way to test higher entry conditions of potential outer planet and Venus missions and provided a baseline against carbon phenolic material. The results of these tests have given preliminary insight to sample configuration and physical recession profile characteristics.

  8. Selection of peptide entry motifs by bacterial surface display.

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Sabine; Meinke, Andreas; von Gabain, Alexander; Boyd, Aoife P

    2002-01-01

    Surface display technologies have been established previously to select peptides and polypeptides that interact with purified immobilized ligands. In the present study, we designed and implemented a surface display-based technique to identify novel peptide motifs that mediate entry into eukaryotic cells. An Escherichia coli library expressing surface-displayed peptides was combined with eukaryotic cells and the gentamicin protection assay was performed to select recombinant E. coli, which were internalized into eukaryotic cells by virtue of the displayed peptides. To establish the proof of principle of this approach, the fibronectin-binding motifs of the fibronectin-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus were inserted into the E. coli FhuA protein. Surface expression of the fusion proteins was demonstrated by functional assays and by FACS analysis. The fibronectin-binding motifs were shown to mediate entry of the bacteria into non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells and brought about the preferential selection of these bacteria over E. coli expressing parental FhuA, with an enrichment of 100000-fold. Four entry sequences were selected and identified using an S. aureus library of peptides displayed in the FhuA protein on the surface of E. coli. These sequences included novel entry motifs as well as integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs and promoted a high degree of bacterial entry. Bacterial surface display is thus a powerful tool to effectively select and identify entry peptide motifs. PMID:12144529

  9. Simulation of the ATV Re-Entry Obsrvations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, B.; Krag, H.; Lips, T.; De Pasquale, E.

    2010-09-01

    The first ATV was launched on 9th March 2008 and, after a successful mission, the last phase was a controlled destructive re-entry on 29th September 2008, shortly after 13:30 UTC, in which the remains of the ATV and its load fell into the South Pacific Ocean. In order to better understand the re-entry processes, an insitu optical observation campaign was launched to record and analyze the ATV controlled re-entry with several instruments on board of two airplanes and also from the ISS. This observation campaign was successful and triggered several different still-ongoing studies on the extraction and analysis of data to draw conclusions on the adequacy of the re-entry break-up and explosion models used for the safety analysis of the ATV re-entry. This paper addresses the validation process for ESA’s model for re-entry survivability and on-ground risk assessment for explosive re-entry events using the observation data. The underlying rationale is to improve the models for the benefit of planning and execution of future controlled re-entries and in risk calculation in case of uncontrolled ones. The re-entry trajectory of the ATV, the explosive event and the trajectories of the fragments are simulated with the existing ESA tools and the EVOLVE explosion model. Additional software has been developed to simulate airborne sensor field of view(FOV) crossings based on the aircraft trajectories, attitude profile, sensor mounts and FOVs. Sensor performance and object radiation are modeled in order to generate synthetic images for the different sensors in the ISS and the two airplanes. These synthetic images and synthetic videos are compared with the available reentry observations of the ATV. This paper will present the software and techniques to generate synthetic imagery. It will give results of the comparison between the simulated and the real trajectories and fragmentation and explain the subsequent validation process of the ESA re-entry tools and the potential calibration of the EVOLVE fragmentation model in the case of explosive re-entry events.

  10. Italian news coverage of radiation in the early decades of the twentieth century: A qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Candela, Andrea; Pasquarè Mariotto, Federico

    2016-02-01

    This work uses a qualitative approach coupled with a quantitative software-based methodology to examine the Italian news media coverage of radiation in the early decades of the twentieth century. We analyze 80 news stories from two of the most influential Italian newspapers from that time: La Stampa (a daily newspaper) and La Domenica del Corriere (an Italian Sunday supplement). While much of previous research on media coverage of scientific topics was generally focused on present-day news, our work revolves around the ground-breaking discovery of X-rays and radioactivity at the dawn of the last century. Our analysis aims to identify journalistic frames in the news coverage of radiation that journalists might have used to emphasize the benefits (or the risks) of the new discoveries. We also hypothesize how this kind of news coverage might have influenced public perception of technological, commercial, and public health applications of the new scientific advancements. PMID:25186561

  11. Satellite Re-entry Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, M.

    2012-09-01

    LEO trajectory modeling is a fundamental aerospace capability and has applications in many areas of aerospace, such as maneuver planning, sensor scheduling, re-entry prediction, collision avoidance, risk analysis, and formation flying. Somewhat surprisingly, modeling the trajectory of an object in low Earth orbit is still a challenging task. This is primarily due to the large uncertainty in the upper atmospheric density, about 15-20% (1-sigma) for most thermosphere models. Other contributions come from our inability to precisely model future solar and geomagnetic activities, the potentially unknown shape, material construction and attitude history of the satellite, and intermittent, noisy tracking data. Current methods to predict a satellite's re-entry trajectory typically involve making a single prediction, with the uncertainty dealt with in an ad-hoc manner, usually based on past experience. However, due to the extreme speed of a LEO satellite, even small uncertainties in the re-entry time translate into a very large uncertainty in the location of the re-entry event. Currently, most methods simply update the re-entry estimate on a regular basis. This results in a wide range of estimates that are literally spread over the entire globe. With no understanding of the underlying distribution of potential impact points, the sequence of impact points predicted by the current methodology are largely useless until just a few hours before re-entry. This paper will discuss the development of a set of the High Performance Computing (HPC)-based capabilities to support near real-time quantification of the uncertainty inherent in uncontrolled satellite re-entries. An appropriate management of the uncertainties is essential for a rigorous treatment of the re-entry/LEO trajectory problem. The development of HPC-based tools for re-entry analysis is important as it will allow a rigorous and robust approach to risk assessment by decision makers in an operational setting. Uncertainty quantification results from the recent uncontrolled re-entry of the Phobos-Grunt satellite will be presented and discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Print news and health psychology: some observations.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Esther

    2006-03-01

    This commentary overviews the look of health news in American print journalism and the research that suggests how health news creates influence at both the individual and policy levels. Crime and violence are argued to be public health issues, but unfortunately they are often not treated as such. There is clearly room for improvement in all areas of health news, but unfortunately the extreme stress that newspapers are under to maintain their high profit margins suggests that the resources for such improvement are unlikely to be available. Examination of the Minneapolis Star Tribune's coverage of health, crime and violence exemplifies problematic aspects. PMID:16464917

  13. ATLAS-2 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video presents a Marshall Space Flight Center-Television (MSFC-TV) news release describing the objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-2 (ATLAS-2), which is being flown on STS-56. Dr. Tim Miller (Mission Scientist), Dr. Marsha Torr (Mission Scientist), and Teresa Vanhooser (Mission Manager) explain that the ATLAS-2 mission is being launched to study earth atmospheric interactions with the sun in general and how manmade chemicals and pollution are contributing to ozone depletion in our atmosphere in particular. Seven instruments comprise the core payload. ATLAS-2 is an integral part of the Spacelab contribution to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and characterizes the chemical and physical components of Earth's middle atmosphere and the solar energy injected in the atmosphere, studies that began on ATLAS-1.

  14. ATLAS-1 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Allen Kenitzer, from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), narrates this NASA Kennedy Space Center video presenting a MSFC-Television news release describing the overall scientific objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-1 (ATLAS-1) Spacelab mission. Byron Lichtenberg (NASA Science Astronaut) and Anthony O'Neil (ATLAS-1 Mission Manager) explain that the 13 sophisticated and complementary instruments carried in shuttle Atlantis' payload bay are designed to identify the chemical species in our atmosphere, to measure the Sun's energy falling on and entering the atmosphere, to study the behavior of charged particles in the electric and magnetic fields surrounding the earth, and to gather ultraviolet light from stars and galaxies. ATLAS-1 is the first Spacelab flight of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Mission to Planet Earth.

  15. Metal-based nanoparticle interactions with the nervous system: The challenge of brain entry and the risk of retention in the organism

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review of metal and metal-oxide based nanoparticles focuses on factors that influence their distribution into the nervous system, evidence that they enter brain parenchyma, and nervous system responses. Emphasis is placed on gold as a model metal-based nanoparticle and for r...

  16. 31 CFR 359.55 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.55 Section 359.55 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Book-Entry Series I Savings Bonds § 359.55 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series I savings bonds? We base current...

  17. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  18. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  19. 31 CFR 359.55 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.55 Section 359.55 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Book-Entry Series I Savings Bonds § 359.55 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series I savings bonds? We base current...

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.