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Sample records for nickel-base alloys innere

  1. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  2. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  3. Welding and brazing of nickel and nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortland, J. E.; Evans, R. M.; Monroe, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The joining of four types of nickel-base materials is described: (1) high-nickel, nonheat-treatable alloys, (2) solid-solution-hardening nickel-base alloys, (3) precipitation-hardening nickel-base alloys, and (4) dispersion-hardening nickel-base alloys. The high-nickel and solid-solution-hardening alloys are widely used in chemical containers and piping. These materials have excellent resistance to corrosion and oxidation, and retain useful strength at elevated temperatures. The precipitation-hardening alloys have good properties at elevated temperature. They are important in many aerospace applications. Dispersion-hardening nickel also is used for elevated-temperature service.

  4. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  5. Nitrogen-atomized, nickel-based, corrosion-resistant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Frank J.

    1996-04-01

    Nitrogen gas atomization has been used for many years to produce iron-based powder-metal materials such as stainless and tool steels. However, it is more typical to use argon atomization with nickel-based alloys because it avoids the formation of nitrides that, in some cases, can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of these materials. In this article, two nickel-based materials— alloy 625 and alloy 690—normally used for applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance were evaluated in their nitrogen-atomized powder metal form. Nitrogen atomization uncovered attributes of these nickel alloys that are not present in their conventionally produced counterparts or in argon-atomized versions of the same compositions.

  6. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  7. The metallography of a nickel base casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-10-01

    Three groups of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy and employing induction fusion in each case. The first group was produced fro new metal, the second from metal which had been recast four times, and the third from new overheated metal. Samples of alloy were cut from each group, and together with a piece from an original ingot, were mounted, polished, etched, and examined under a metallurgical microscope. PMID:1108851

  8. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content.

  9. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  10. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  11. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  12. Permeability of hydrogen isotopes through nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Edge, E.M.; Mitchell, D.J.

    1983-04-01

    Permeabilities and diffusivities of deuterium in several nickel-based alloys were measured in this investigation. Measurements were made by the gas-phase breakthrough technique in the temperature range 200 to 450/sup 0/C with applied pressures ranging from 1 to 100 kPa. The results were extrapolated to predict the permeabilities (K) of the alloys at room temperature. The alloy with the smallest deuterium permeability is Carpenter 49, for which K = 4.3 x 10/sup -18/ mol s/sup -1/ m/sup -1/ Pa/sup -//sup 1/2/ at 22/sup 0/C. The permeability of deuterium in Kovar or Ceramvar is about 80% greater than that for Carpenter 49. Premeabilities of Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 750 and Monel K-500 are all equal to about 5 x 10/sup -17/ mol m/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ Pa/sup -//sup 1/2/ at 22/sup 0/C. The validity (from a statistical standpoint) of the extrapolation of the permeabilities to room temperature is considered in detail. Published permeabilities of stainless steels and nickel-iron alloys are also reviewed. The greatest differences in permeabilities among the nickel-based alloys appear to be associated with the tendency for some alloys to form protective oxide layers. Permeabilities of deuterium through laminates containing copper are smaller than for any of the iron-nickel alloys.

  13. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  14. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  15. Pulsed-Current Welding Of Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Kurgan, C.; Malone, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Joints as strong (or stronger than) joints made with constant current. Report based on study of pulsed-current versus constant-current gas/tungsten arc welding of butt joints between panels of nickel-based alloy 718. In pulsed-current welding, arc current alternated between high and low value. Enables greater control of freezing and depth of penetration of weld puddle at given heat input. Thicker sections joined. Readily incorporated into automated welding system, with resultant greater uniformity and reproducibility of welds than attained in manual welding.

  16. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  17. Permeation characteristics of some iron and nickel based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.J.; Edge, E.M.

    1985-06-15

    The permeation characteristics of deuterium in several iron and nickel based alloys were measured by the gas phase breakthrough technique in the temperature range 100 to 500 /sup 0/C with applied pressures ranging from 10 Pa to 100 kPa. The restriction of the gas flux imposed by surface oxides was modeled in order to evaluate the effects of surface oxide retardation of the gas flux on the effective values of the deuterium permeabilities and diffusivities in the alloys. The most permeable alloys were 430 and 431 stainless steels. The next most permeable alloy was Monel K-500, which exceeded the permeability of pure Ni by more than a factor of five at room temperature. The alloys with permeabilities less than pure Ni were, in order of decreasing permeability: the Inconels 625, 718, and 750, the Fe-Ni-Co glass-sealing alloys Kovar and Ceramvar, and the 300-series stainless steels. Deuterium trapping within the alloys appeared to influence the values of bulk diffusivities, which were not correlated with either the permeabilities or the chemical compositions of the alloys.

  18. Exploratory Investigation of Advanced-Temperature Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, John C.; Waters, William J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy with properties suitable for aircraft turbine blades as well as for possible space vehicle applications. An entire series of alloys that do not require vacuum melting techniques and that generally provide good stress-rupture and impact properties was evolved. The basic-alloy composition of 79 percent nickel, 8 percent molybdenum, 6 percent chromium, 6 percent aluminum, and 1 percent zirconium was modified by a series of element additions such as carbon, titanium, and boron, with the nickel content adjusted to account for the additives. Stress-rupture, impact, and swage tests were made with all the alloys. The strongest composition (basic alloy plus 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon) displayed 384- and 574-hour stress-rupture lives at 1800 F and 15,000 psi in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, respectively. All the alloys investigated demonstrated good impact resistance. Several could not be broken in a low-capacity Izod impact tester and, on this basis, all compared favorably with several high-strength high-temperature alloys. Swaging cracks were encountered with all the alloys. In several cases, however, these cracks were slight and could be detected only by zyglo examination. Some of these compositions may become amenable to hot working on further development. On the basis of the properties indicated, it appears that several of the alloys evolved, particularly the 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon basic-alloy modification, could be used for advanced- temperature turbine blades, as well as for possible space vehicle applications.

  19. Tungsten wire-nickel base alloy composite development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Moracz, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Further development and evaluation of refractory wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites is described. Emphasis was placed on evaluating thermal fatigue resistance as a function of matrix alloy composition, fabrication variables and reinforcement level and distribution. Tests for up to 1,000 cycles were performed and the best system identified in this current work was 50v/o W/NiCrAlY. Improved resistance to thermal fatigue damage would be anticipated for specimens fabricated via optimized processing schedules. Other properties investigated included 1,093 C (2,000 F) stress rupture strength, impact resistance and static air oxidation. A composite consisting of 30v/o W-Hf-C alloy fibers in a NiCrAlY alloy matrix was shown to have a 100-hour stress rupture strength at 1,093 C (2,000 F) of 365 MN/square meters (53 ksi) or a specific strength advantage of about 3:1 over typical D.S. eutectics.

  20. Elevated temperature fretting fatigue of nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gean, Matthew C.

    This document details the high temperature fretting fatigue of high temperature nickel based alloys common to turbine disk and blade applications. The research consists of three area of focus: Experiments are conducted to determine quantitatively the fretting fatigue lives of advanced nickel based alloys; Analytical tools are developed and used to investigate the fretting fatigue response of the material; Fractographic analysis of the experimental results is used to improve the analytical models employed in the analysis of the experiments. Sixty three fretting fatigue experiments were conducted at 649 °C using a polycrystalline Nickel specimen in contact with directionally solidified and single crystal Nickel pads. Various influences on the fretting fatigue life are investigated. Shot peened Rene' 95 had better fretting fatigue life compared to shot peened Rene' 88. Shot peening produced a 2x increase in life for Rene' 95, but only a marginal improvement in the fretting fatigue life for Rene' 88. Minor cycles in variable amplitude loading produces significant damage to the specimen. Addition of occasional overpeaks in load produces improvements in fretting fatigue life. Contact tractions and stresses are obtained through a variety of available tools. The contact tractions can be efficiently obtained for limited geometries, while FEM can provide the contact tractions for a broader class of problems, but with the cost of increased CPU requirements. Similarly, the subsurface contact stresses can be obtained using the contact tractions as a boundary condition with either a semi-analytical FFT method or FEM. It is found that to calculate contact stresses the FFT was only marginally faster than FEM. The experimental results are combined with the analysis to produce tools that are used to design against fretting fatigue. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surface indicates the nature of the fretting fatigue crack behavior. Interrupted tests were performed to analyze

  1. HIP clad nickel base Alloy 625 for deep sour wells

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, W.K.; Pendley, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    The hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process was used to clad nickel base Alloy 625 to AISI 4130 low alloy steel. The performance of the HIP clad material in the corrosive environment characteristic of deep, sour oil and gas wells was evaluated in laboratory tests. Included in the test program were NACE TM-01-77 sulfide stress cracking tests, chloride stress corrosion cracking tests in boiling MgCl /SUB 2'/ , and pitting and crevice corrosion tests. The HIP clad 625 performed excellently, displaying essentially the same corrosion resistance as wrought 625. Specifically the HIP clad 625 resisted sulfide stress cracking at applied stresses as high as 120% of yield strength and resisted chloride stress corrosion cracking at stresses exceeding 100% of yield. The HIP clad 625 also displayed immunity to pitting and crevice corrosion, with corrosion rates of <0.025 mm/y (1 mil/y). The 4130 base metal, however, was attacked severly in all tests. SEM/EDX analysis of the 625/4130 interface demonstrated that dilution of the cladding by the base metal was essentially eliminated.

  2. The effect of aluminium on the metallography of a nickel base removable partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1978-12-01

    Three special nickel-chromium alloys were prepared in which the aluminum levels were adjusted both above and below that of a commercial nickel base dental casting alloy. Tensile and metallographic evaluation of representative samples of the alloys were made and the changes in the properties of the alloys are reported. PMID:285671

  3. High strength nickel-base alloy with improved oxidation resistance up to 2200 degrees F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Modifying the chemistry of the NASA TAZ-8 alloy and utilizing vacuum melting techniques provides a high strength, workable nickel base superalloy with improved oxidation resistance for use up to 2200 degrees F.

  4. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  5. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  6. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  7. Thermogravimetric study of reduction of oxides present in oxidized nickel-base alloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and hydrogen plus carbon reduction of three oxidized nickel-base alloy powders (a solid solution strengthened alloy both with and without the gamma prime formers aluminum and titanium and the solid solution strengthened alloy NiCrAlY) were evaluated by thermogravimetry. Hydrogen and hydrogen plus carbon were completely effective in reducing an alloy containing chromium, columbium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. However, with aluminum and titanium present the reduction was limited to a weight loss of about 81 percent. Carbon alone was not effective in reducing any of the alloys, and none of the reducing conditions were effective for use with NiCrAlY.

  8. The metallography of heat treatment effects in a nickel-base casting alloy. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Goodall, T G; Lewis, A J

    1979-08-01

    A series of standard tensile specimens produced from a nickel-base removable partial denture casting alloy were subjected to heat treatments at three temperatures and three periods at each temperature. The microstructures developed within the castings disclose changes in both the matrix and interdendritic zones. PMID:296698

  9. Joining precipitation-hardened nickel-base alloys by friction welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Solid state deformation welding process, friction welding, has been developed for joining precipitation hardened nickel-base alloys and other gamma prime-strengthened materials which heretofore have been virtually unweldable. Method requires rotation of one of the parts to be welded, but where applicable, it is an ideal process for high volume production jobs.

  10. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  11. A crystallographic model for nickel base single crystal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel-base single-crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components. This objective is achieved by developing a rate-dependent anisotropic constitutive model and implementing it in a nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurgical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. An extension of Schmid's law is combined with the Bodner-Partom equations to model the inelastic tension/compression asymmetry and orientation-dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is used to approximate the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response and strain-rate sensitivity of the single-crystal superalloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are also discussed. The model is implemented in a finite-element code, and the computed and experimental results are compared for several orientations and loading conditions.

  12. Corrosion initiation and propagation of nickel base alloys in severe sea water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, J.W.

    1995-10-01

    Nickel base alloys such as Alloy 625, C22, C276 and 59 are generally considered to have exceptional corrosion resistances in critical sea water applications at ambient temperature. Test results published in recent years however indicate that sever crevice corrosion of some of these alloys may occur under certain conditions. Exposure testes have been carried out in natural and chlorinated sea water on these alloys, together with two high N alloys, Alloy 24 and Alloy 654SMO. Electrochemical studies and simple mathematical mode.lling have also been carried out. These data, together with surface studies, help explain the observed phenomena and assist in the safe selection of alloys for critical sea water applications.

  13. Combined thermodynamic study of nickel-base alloys. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C. R.; Meschter, P. J.

    1981-02-15

    Achievements during this period are the following: (1) initiation of a high-temperature study of the Ni-Ta system using the galvanic cell technique, (2) emf study of high-temperature thermodynamics in the Ni-Mo system, (3) measured heat capacity data on ordered and disordered Ni/sub 4/Mo, (4) heat capacities of Ni and disordered Ni/sub 3/Fe, and (5) computer correlation of thermodynamic and phase diagram data in binary Ni-base alloys. (MOW)

  14. Environmentally enhanced crack growth in nickel-based alloys at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M.; Chen, S.F.; Chen, G.S.; Wei, R.P.

    1997-12-31

    A recent understanding of environmentally enhanced sustained-load crack growth in nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures is presented. This understanding is based on the results of coordinated studies of crack growth kinetics, surface chemistry, and microstructure in a commercial Inconel 718. The results suggest that environmental enhancement of sustained-load crack growth in Inconel 718 is associated with the formation and rupture of niobium oxides at grain boundary surfaces and is controlled mainly by the rate of oxidation and decomposition of niobium carbides at the grain boundaries. Data on other nickel-based alloys in the literature appear to support this suggested role of niobium. Initial results from a study of a niobium-free Ni-18Cr-18Fe alloy (its base composition is identical to Inconel 718) confirm the possible influence of niobium and the proposed mechanism. Some open issues for further investigation are discussed.

  15. Dendritic growth and structure of undercooled nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this overall investigation are to: study means for obtaining high undercooling in levitation melted droplets, and study structures produced upon the solidification of these undercooled specimens. Thermal measurements are made of the undercooling, and of the rapid recalescence, to develop an understanding of the solidification mechanism. Comparison of results is made with the modeling studies. Characterization and metallographic work is done to gain an understanding of the relationship between rapid solidification variables and the structures so produced. In ground based work to date, solidification of undercooled Ni-25 wt percent Sn alloy was observed by high-speed cinematography and the results compared with optical temperature measurements. Also in ground based work, high-speed optical temperature measurements were made of the solidification behavior of levitated metal samples within a transparent glass medium. Two undercooled Ni-Sn alloys were examined. Measurements were carried out on samples at undercoolings up to 330 K. Microstructures of samples produced in ground based work were determined by optical metallography and by SEM, and microsegregation by electron microprobe measurements. A series of flight tests were planned to conduct experiments similar to the ground based experiments. The Space Shuttle Columbia carried an alloy undercooled experiment in the STS 61-C mission in January 1986. A sample of Ni-32.5 wt percent Sn eutectic was melted and solidified under microgravity conditions.

  16. A nickel base alloy, NASA WAZ-16, with potential for gas turbine stator vane application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A nickel-base superalloy based on the nickel-aluminum-tungsten system designated WAZ-16 was developed for high strength in the 1095 C (2000 F) to 1205 C (2200 F) range. Its tensile strength at the latter temperature is approximately 186 MN/m2 (27,000 psi). The combination of properties of the alloy suggest that it has potential as a stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines.

  17. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Existing Dual Microstructure Heat Treat (DMHT) technology was successfully applied to Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, to produce a disk with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim. Specimens were extracted from the DMHT disk and tested in tension, creep, fatigue, and crack growth using conditions pertinent to disk applications. These data were then compared with data from "traditional" subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments for Alloy 10. The results showed the DMHT disk to have a high strength, fatigue resistant bore comparable to that of subsolvus Alloy 10. Further, creep resistance of the DMHT rim was comparable to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. Crack growth resistance in the DMHT rim, while better than that for subsolvus, was inferior to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. The slow cool at the end of the DMHT conversion and/or the subsolvus resolution step are thought to be responsible for degrading rim DMHT crack growth resistance.

  18. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07718 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, James W.; Billiard, Phillip A.; Hurley, James A.; Mcdermott, Kathleen M.; Vazquez, Isaura

    1989-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel based alloy UNS N07718. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to destruction from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, endothermic events occurred as the alloy was heated, many at reproducible temperatures. Many endothermic events occurred prior to abrupt increases in surface temperature and appeared to accelerate the rate of increase in specimen temperature. It appeared that the source of some endotherms may increase the oxidation rate of the alloy. Ignition parameters are defined and the temperatures at which these parameters occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  19. Effects of neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of nickel-base fastener alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Burke, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior and deformation microstructure of high-strength nickel-base alloy fastener materials, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition, and Alloy 625 in the direct aged condition were irradiated to a fluence of 2.4x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 264 C in the Advanced Test Reactor. Deformation structures at low strains were examined. It was previously shown that Alloy X-750 undergoes hardening, a significant degradation in ductility and an increase in intergranular fracture. In contrast, Alloy 625 had shown softening with a concomitant increase in ductility and transgranular failure after irradiation. The deformation microstructures of the two alloys were also different. Alloy X-750 deformed by a planar slip mechanism with fine microcracks forming at the intersections of slip bands with grain boundaries. Alloy 625 showed much more homogeneous deformation with fine, closely spaced slip bands and an absence of microcracks. The mechanism(s) of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are discussed.

  20. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ion irradiation induced disappearance of dislocations in a nickel-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. C.; Li, D. H.; Lui, R. D.; Huang, H. F.; Li, J. J.; Lei, G. H.; Huang, Q.; Bao, L. M.; Yan, L.; Zhou, X. T.; Zhu, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Under Xe ion irradiation, the microstructural evolution of a nickel based alloy, Hastelloy N (US N10003), was studied. The intrinsic dislocations are decorated with irradiation induced interstitial loops and/or clusters. Moreover, the intrinsic dislocations density reduces as the irradiation damage increases. The disappearance of the intrinsic dislocations is ascribed to the dislocations climb to the free surface by the absorption of interstitials under the ion irradiation. Moreover, the in situ annealing experiment reveals that the small interstitial loops and/or clusters induced by the ion irradiation are stable below 600 °C.

  2. Thermal and mechanical treatments for nickel and some nickel-base alloys: Effects on mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. M.; Beuhring, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with heat treating and working nickel and nickel-base alloys, and with the effects of these operations on the mechanical properties of the materials. The subjects covered are annealing, solution treating, stress relieving, stress equalizing, age hardening, hot working, cold working, combinations of working and heat treating (often referred to as thermomechanical treating), and properties of the materials at various temperatures. The equipment and procedures used in working the materials are discussed, along with the common problems that may be encountered and the precautions and corrective measures that are available.

  3. Comparative erosion yields, topographical changes and depth profile analysis of ion eroded nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navinšek, B.; Panjan, P.; Peternel, M.; Žabkar, A.

    1982-03-01

    Polished polycrystalline alloy targets of Inconel 600, Inconel 625 and Nimonic alloy PE 16 were bombarded with 10 keV He + and A + ions at normal incidence and at room temperature. Comparative studies of the ion erosion yield, as measured by step-height measurements, were made. The correlation between the observed topography and the changes in surface composition and depth profile was studied on irradiated samples by AES. Additionally, total sputtering yields were measured on sputtered films of these materials using a quartz crystal microbalance. The results showed that ion erosion yields are different for the three materials studied, while sputtering yields were similar for He + ions and different for A + ions. A non-linear effect was observed for low dose yields when ion dose and fluence dependence was studied. The topography of ion irradiated nickel-based alloys is specific for a chosen metallographic treatment, determining the bulk and surface structure of the target material.

  4. The corrosion performance of nickel-based alloys in a reverse osmosis plant utilizing seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Odwani, A.

    1998-12-31

    Four nickel-based alloys, UNS N06625, UNS N08825, UNS N10276, and UNS N05500, were evaluated in terms of their corrosion performance in a seawater reverse osmosis plant using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open circuit potential (OCP) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements. Slight changes in the EIS spectra were observed for UNS N06625, UNSN10276 and UNS N05500 at low frequencies. However, UNS N08825 EIS spectra exhibited more changes than the other alloys at low frequencies. The OCP of UNS N10276 was more noble than the other alloys under the same conditions. The LPR measurements indicated that UNS N10276 and UNS N05500 exhibited lower corrosion rates than UNS NO6625 and UNS N08825.

  5. Laser rapid manufacturing of special pattern Inco 718 nickel-based alloy component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Minlin; Yang, Lin; Liu, Wenjin; Huang, Ting; He, Jingjiang

    2005-01-01

    Laser rapid manufacturing based on laser cladding is a novel layer additive manufacturing technology, which can be well used for producing specific material, geometry and properties components normally unavailable or very costly by conventional methods. This paper presents a project research work on laser rapid manufacturing of special pattern Inco 718 nickel based alloy component with special pattern for aeronautical application. The required pattern Inco 718 nickel based alloy component was manufactured directly by laser deposition with optimized parameters: laser power: 800W, laser beam diameter: 0.8 mm, scanning speed: 0.5 m/min, powder feeding rate: 3g/min; The basic microstructure of laser deposited sample is directionally solidified columnar structure, with metallurgical bound to the substrate. Laser deposited component has good metallurgical and compositional and hardness homogeneity. The average hardness is about Hv0.2 440. The tensile strength of the laser deposited Inco 718 sample is respectively 121 and 116 kgf/mm2 at room temperature and at 650°C, which are a little bit less than the data of forged Inco 718 plate 142 and 127 kgf/mm2 due to its directional solidified columnar structure perpendicular to the tensile test force.

  6. Comparison of joining processes for Haynes 230 nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, David Hugh

    Haynes 230 is a nickel based, solid-solution strengthened alloy that is used for high-temperature applications in the aero-engine and power generation industries. The alloy composition is balanced to avoid precipitation of undesirable topologically closed-packed (TCP) intermetallic phases, such as Sigma, Mu, or Laves-type, that are detrimental to mechanical and corrosion properties. This material is currently being used for the NASA's J2X upper stage rocket nozzle extension. Current fabrication procedures use fusion welding processes to join blanks that are subsequently formed. Cracks have been noted to occur in the fusion welded region during the forming operations. Use of solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding are being proposed to eliminate the fusion weld cracks. Of interest is a modified friction stir welding process called thermal stir welding. Three welding process: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Thermal Stir Welding (TSWing) are compared in this study.

  7. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  8. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2002-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic aircraft will require nickel-base disk alloys that can be used at temperatures in excess of 1300 F. Smaller turbine engines, with higher rotational speeds, also require disk alloys with high strength. To address these challenges, NASA funded a series of disk programs in the 1990's. Under these initiatives, Honeywell and Allison focused their attention on Alloy 10, a high-strength, nickel-base disk alloy developed by Honeywell for application in the small turbine engines used in regional jet aircraft. Since tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are strongly influenced by alloy grain size, the effect of heat treatment on grain size and the attendant properties were studied in detail. It was observed that a fine grain microstructure offered the best tensile and fatigue properties, whereas a coarse grain microstructure offered the best creep resistance at high temperatures. Therefore, a disk with a dual microstructure, consisting of a fine-grained bore and a coarse-grained rim, should have a high potential for optimal performance. Under NASA's Ultra-Safe Propulsion Project and Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, a disk program was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center to assess the feasibility of using Alloy 10 to produce a dual-microstructure disk. The objectives of this program were twofold. First, existing dual-microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) technology would be applied and refined as necessary for Alloy 10 to yield the desired grain structure in full-scale forgings appropriate for use in regional gas turbine engines. Second, key mechanical properties from the bore and rim of a DMHT Alloy 10 disk would be measured and compared with conventional heat treatments to assess the benefits of DMHT technology. At Wyman Gordon and Honeywell, an active-cooling DMHT process was used to convert four full-scale Alloy 10 disks to a dual-grain microstructure. The resulting microstructures are illustrated in the

  9. Characterization of constitutional liquid film migration in nickel-base alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acoff, V. L.; Thompson, R. G.

    1996-09-01

    When multiphase alloys are rapidly heated, it is possible to cause melting of the interface between phases. This is called constitutional liquation if, during melting, the bulk composition is in a nonliquid region of the phase diagram but the tie-line between the liquating phases passes through a liquid region. The liquid produced during constitutional liquation can spread along grain boundaries and promote liquid film migration (LFM). This is known as constitutional liquid film migration (CLFM), which is thermodynamically similar to liquid film migration; however, mechanistically there are significant differences. Nickel-base alloy 718 has been studied to show the features of migration that are unique to CLFM. Experimentation consisted of heat-treating rods of alloy 718 to promote the trapping of niobium carbide particles on the grain boundaries. These samples were then subjected to isothermal treatments above their constitutional-liquation temperature, which produced CLFM of the grain boundaries. The movement of the liquid films away from their centers of curvature, the formation of a new solid solution behind the migrated liquid films, and the reversals of curvature of the migrated liquid films confirmed that CLFM was the phenomenon observed. The concentration of niobium behind the migrated liquid films for isothermal treatments below the solidus temperature was shown to be greater than the niobium concentration in the matrix. Above the solidus temperature, there was no increase in niobium concentration. The validity of the coherency strain hypothesis as the driving force for CLFM in alloy 718 is discussed.

  10. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Billiard, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top surface of a cylindrical specimen with a continuous-wave CO2 laser. Two heating procedures were used. In the first, laser power was adjusted to maintain an approximately linear increase in surface temperature. In the second, laser power was periodically increased until autoheating (self-heating) was established. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to combustion from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, the alloy had a tendency to develop combustion zones (hot spots) at high oxygen pressures when the incremental (step) heating test mode was used. Unique points on the temperature-time curves that describe certain events are defined and the temperatures at which these events occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  11. Constitutional liquid film migration in the weld heat affected zone of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Acoff, V.L.; Thompson, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    It has been discovered that when multiphase alloys are rapidly heated, it is possible to cause melting of the interface between phases. This phenomenon was discovered to exist in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of several alloys and is called constitutional liquation. Constitutional liquation occurs if during melting, the bulk composition is in a non-liquid region of the phase diagram but the tie-line between the liquating phases passes through a liquid region. The liquid produced during constitutional liquation can spread along grain boundaries and promote constitutional liquid film migration (CLFM). Nickel-base alloy 718 has been studied to determine the effect that HAZ peak temperature has on supersaturated solute concentration in the areas behind CLFM grain boundaries. In order to promote CLFM, a Gleeble 1000 thermomechanical device was used to subject heat treated rods of alloy 718 to rapid thermal cycles. Results show that the concentration of niobium in the migrated region (area behind the migrated boundary) was higher than the niobium concentration in the matrix for HAZ peak temperatures below the solidus temperature (1,227 C and 1,240 C). For an HAZ peak temperature above the solidus temperature (1,250 C), there was no significant difference between the niobium concentration in the migrated region and the matrix.

  12. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained in a program to evaluate dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys for use in a metallic radiative thermal protection system operating at surface temperatures to 1477 K for the space shuttle were presented. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr characteristics of material used in the current study are compared with previous results; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on sheet material residual strength are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded joints are evaluated; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full scale subsize heat shield panels in two configurations are described. Initial tests of full scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests, simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating, programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions, and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced during boost flight.

  13. Environmentally-enhanced cavity growth in nickel and nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.M.; Delph, T.J.; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P.; Dwyer, D.J.

    1996-08-01

    Environmental factors have a strong effect on the elevated-temperature failure behavior of nickel-based alloys. It has been proposed that this effect is due to the reactions of oxygen with carbon in the interior of creep cavities. Such reactions can lead to quite high internal gas pressures, sufficient to result in substantial increases in the cavity growth rates. This hypothesis is investigated by carrying out detailed calculations for a simple system which take into account the coupled effects of oxygen diffusion into the cavity and concurrent cavity growth. The results show that creep cavity growth may or may not be affected by internal, gas-producing reactions, depending upon the nature of the carbon-containing particle, the ratio of the grain boundary oxygen diffusivity to the self-diffusivity of nickel, and upon other factors as well.

  14. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  15. Erosion-corrosion performance of nickel-based and copper-based alloys in the Arabian Gulf seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Sayegh, A.

    1996-10-01

    The erosion-corrosion behavior of nickel-based (UNS N0 6022) and copper-based (UNS C71500) alloy tubes in water flowing seawater containing sulfide ions is investigated. Visual, optical and scanning electron microscopy examinations of the internal surfaces of the tubes were conducted to compare the susceptibilities to erosion-corrosion attack of these two alloys, taking into consideration the nature of the product films formed.

  16. Alloying-Element Loss During High-Temperature Processing of a Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Shank, J. M.; Saurber, W. M.; Pilchak, A. L.; Ballard, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Gleeson, B.

    2014-02-01

    The effect of exposure at temperatures commonly used for wrought processing/heat treatment of nickel-base superalloys on the loss of alloying elements at the free surface has been determined. For this purpose, LSHR superalloy samples were exposed at 1408 K (1135 °C) for 0.25 to 4 hours in a vacuum or air furnace. Samples heat treated in the air furnace were either bare or enclosed in quartz capsules that had been evacuated or backfilled with argon. Following heat treatment, the alloy composition as a function of depth below the surface was determined by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Samples that had been heat treated in the vacuum furnace exhibited significant depletion of only chromium, a behavior explained on the basis of its high activity in nickel solid solution and corresponding rapid rate of evaporation. By contrast, samples heat treated in air exhibited an irregular scale at the surface and an underlying grain-coarsened, gamma-prime-depleted metal layer lean in aluminum, titanium, and chromium. A yet different behavior characterized primarily by aluminum loss at the surface was noted for samples that had been heat treated in evacuated or argon-backfilled capsules. These observations were interpreted in the context of a reaction between the quartz capsule and the aluminum evaporant.

  17. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and nickel-base alloys in molten carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Vossen, J.P.T.; Plomp, L.; Rietveld, G.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1995-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of five commercially available alloys (AISI 316L, AISI 310S, Inconel 601, Thermax 4762, and Kanthal A1) in molten carbonate under reducing gas atmospheres was investigated with cyclic voltammetry and quasi-stationary polarization curve measurements. The reactions that proceed on these materials at distinct potentials could be deduced by comparison of the cyclic voltammograms and polarization curves with those of pure metals and model alloys. The shape of the polarization curves of all materials strongly depends on the preceding electrochemical treatment. A polarization curve recorded immediately after immersion of a sample resulted in a high anodic current. This implies that the passivation of the materials is poor. When a specimen was conditioned at {minus}1,060 mV for 10 h before recording the polarization curve, the anodic current diminished, which indicates passivation. This occurred for all materials except AISI 316L. A ranking of the corrosion properties was determined from polarization curves of samples that had been conditioned assuming the current densities to be representative. The resistance against corrosion of the alloys increases in the order: AISI 316Lnickel-base alloys.

  18. Optimization of Weld Conditions and Alloy Composition for Welding of Single-Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, John Michael; David, Stan A; Babu, Sudarsanam S

    2007-01-01

    Calculations were carried out to identify optimum welding conditions and weld alloy compositions to avoid stray grain formation during welding of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys. The calculations were performed using a combination of three models: a thermal model to describe the weld pool shape and the local thermal gradient and solidification front velocity; a geometric model to identify the local active dendrite growth variant, and a nucleation and growth model to describe the extent of stray grain formation ahead of the advancing solidification front. Optimum welding conditions (low weld power, high weld speed) were identified from the model calculations. Additional calculations were made to determine potential alloy modifications that reduce the solidification temperature range while maintaining high gamma prime content. The combination of optimum weld conditions and alloy compositions should allow for weld repair of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys without sacrificing properties or performance.

  19. Creep and stress rupture of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion and precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Mervyn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and gamma-prime precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloy (alloy MA 6000E) was studied at intermediate and elevated temperatures. At 760 C, MA 6000E exhibits the high creep strength characteristic of nickel-base superalloys and at 1093 C the creep strength is superior to other ODS nickel-base alloys. The stress dependence of the creep rate is very sharp at both test temperatures and the apparent creep activation energy measured around 760 C is high, much larger in magnitude than the self-diffusion energy. Stress rupture in this large grain size material is transgranular and crystallographic cracking is observed. The rupture ductility is dependent on creep strain rate, but usually is low. These and accompanying microstructural results are discussed with respect to other ODS alloys and superalloys and the creep behavior is rationalized by invoking a recently-developed resisting stress model of creep in materials strengthened by second phase particles.

  20. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  1. Spectrophotometric studies and applications for the determination of yttrium in pure and in nickel base alloys.

    PubMed

    Amin, A S; Mohammed, T Y; Mousa, A A

    2003-09-01

    Yttrium reacts with 5-(4'-chlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (I), 5-(2'-bromophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (II), 5-(2',4'-dimethylphenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (III), 5-(4'-nitro-2',6'-dichlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (IV), 5-(2'-methyl-4'-hydroxyphenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (V) to form a dark pink complexes, having an absorption maximum at 610, 577, 596, 567 and 585 nm, respectively. The complex formation was completed spontaneously in theil buffer solution and the resulting complex was stable for at least 3 h after dilution. Under the optimum conditions employed, the molar absorptivities were found to be 1.60 x 10(4), 1.29 x 10(4), 1.96 x 10(4), 1.45 x 10(4) and 1.21 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1) and the molar ratios were (1:1) and (1:2) (M:L). The linear ranges were found within 95 microg of yttrium in 25 ml solution. One of the characteristics of the complex was its high tolerance for calcium and hence a method of separation and enrichment of microamounts of yttrium by using calcium oxalate precipitate was developed and applied to measure yttrium in nickel-base alloys. Interfering species and their elimination have been studied. The precision and recovery are both satisfactory. PMID:12963454

  2. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  3. The impact of carbon on single crystal nickel-base superalloys: Carbide behavior and alloy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Andrew Jay

    Advanced single crystal nickel-base superalloys are prone to the formation of casting grain defects, which hinders their practical implementation in large gas turbine components. Additions of carbon (C) have recently been identified as a means of reducing grain defects, but the full impact of C on single crystal superalloy behavior is not entirely understood. A study was conducted to determine the effects of C and other minor elemental additions on the behavior of CMSX-4, a commercially relevant 2nd generation single crystal superalloy. Baseline CMSX-4 and three alloy modifications (CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C, CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 68 ppm boron (B), and CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 23 ppm nitrogen (N)) were heat treated before being tested in high temperature creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF). Select samples were subjected to long term thermal exposure (1000 °C/1000 hrs) to assess microstructural stability. The C modifications resulted in significant differences in microstructure and alloy performance as compared to the baseline. These variations were generally attributed to the behavior of carbide phases in the alloy modifications. The C modification and the C+B modification, which both exhibited script carbide networks, were 25% more effective than the C+N modification (small blocky carbides) and 10% more effective than the baseline at preventing grain defects in cast bars. All C-modified alloys exhibited reduced as-cast gamma/gamma' eutectic and increased casting porosity as compared to baseline CMSX-4. The higher levels of porosity (volume fractions 0.002 - 0.005 greater than the baseline) were attributed to carbides blocking molten fluid flow during the final stages of solidification. Although the minor additions resulted in reduced solidus temperature by up to 16 °C, all alloys were successfully heat treated without incipient melting by modifying commercial heat treatment schedules. In the B-containing alloy, heat treatment resulted in the transformation of

  4. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  5. Plastic Behavior of a Nickel-Based Alloy under Monotonic-Tension and Low-Cycle-Fatigue Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Wang, Yandong; Clausen, Bjorn; Li, Li; Liaw, Peter K; Ice, Gene E; Yang, Dr Ren; Choo, Hahn; Pike, Lee M; Klarstrom, Dwaine L

    2008-01-01

    The plasticity behavior of the annealed HASTELLOY C-22HSTM alloy, a face-centered cubic (FCC), nickel-based superalloy, was examined by the in-situ neutron-diffraction experiments at room temperature. Monotonic-tension and low-cycle-fatigue experiments were conducted to observe the plastic behavior of the alloy. The tension straining and cyclic-loading deformation were studied as a function of the stress. The plastic behaviors during the deformation are discussed in the light of the relationship between the stress and dislocation-density evolutions. The calculated dislocation-density evolutions within the alloys reflect the strain hardening and cyclic hardening/softening. Experimental lattice strains are compared to verify the hardening mechanism at the selected stress levels for tension and cyclic loadings. Combining with the calculations of the dislocation densities, the neutron-diffraction experiments give an evidence of the strain and cyclic hardening of the alloy.

  6. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  7. Elevated temperature creep-fatigue crack propagation in nickel-base alloys and 1 Cr-Mo-V steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmy, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Wüthrich, C.

    1988-04-01

    The crack growth behavior of several high temperature nickel-base alloys, under cyclic and static loading, is studied and reviewed. In the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) MA 6000 and MA 754 alloys, the high temperature crack propagation exhibited orientation dependence under cyclic as well as under static loading. The creep crack growth (CCG) behavior of cast nickel-base IN-738 and IN-939* superalloys at 850 °C could be characterized by the stress intensity factor, K 1. In the case of the alloy IN-901 at 500 °C and 600 °C, K 1 was found to be the relevant parameter to characterize the creep crack growth behavior. The energy rate line integral, C*, may be the appropriate loading parameter to describe the creep crack growth behavior of the nickel-iron base IN-800H alloy at 800 °C. The creep crack growth data of 1 Cr-Mo-V steel, with bainitic microstructure, at 550 °C could be correlated better by C * than by K 1.

  8. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  9. Development, processing and fabrication of a nickel based nickel-chromium-iron alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlade, Dotun Adebayo

    An optimal powder metallurgy (P/M) approach to produce a nickel base Superalloy similar in composition to INCONEL(TM) 600 was carried out utilising a simple uniaxial pressing process. The efficiencies of a lubricant addition, binder, sintering times and temperatures were measured in terms of green and sintered densities as well as microstructural changes that occurred during processing. It was observed that with increasing % polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), an overall decrease in density of compact was obtained and that using 0.75wt % of lubricant (microwax) green densities in excess of 70% can be obtained. The samples were subsequently sintered in air at 1270°C for times ranging from 0.5h to 5h and also in vacuum (6 millitorr) with temperatures ranging from 1260 through to 1400°C. The air sintering was carried out to optimize sintering time, whereas the vacuum sintering was employed to optimize sintering temperature. On sintering for 5h in air, chromium enrichment occurred at the grain boundaries with subsequent depletion of nickel and iron; this was not noted for 2h sintering or for sintering under vacuum. The optimum sintering conditions were determined to be at 1300°C sintering for 2h in vacuum. The samples processed under the optimum conditions were successfully cold rolled to 40% of the original thickness without cracking. An investigation was also undertaken to determine the effect of Al concentration (1-12w/o) on the microstructure of the powder metallurgically (P/M) processed Ni-Cr-Fe ternary alloy, with a view to determine the concentration of aluminium that would yield a homogenously distributed and optimum volume fraction of the intermetallic-gamma'(Ni3Al) phase without the formation of topologically closed packed phases in the ternary alloy. The phases that were likely to form with the variation in concentration of Al were first simulated by JMatPro(TM) thermodynamic software package, and then Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with varying concentration of aluminum were

  10. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  11. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper in nickel-base alloys with various chemical modifiers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Shiue, Chia-Chann; Chang, Shiow-Ing

    1997-07-01

    The analytical characteristics of copper in nickel-base alloys have been investigated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Deuterium background correction was employed. The effects of various chemical modifiers on the analysis of copper were investigated. Organic modifiers which included 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino-phenol) (Br-PADAP), ammonium citrate, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-naphthol, 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and Triton X-100 were studied. Inorganic modifiers palladium nitrate, magnesium nitrate, aluminum chloride, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate were also applied in this work. In addition, zirconium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide precipitation methods have also been studied. Interference effects were effectively reduced with Br-PADAP modifier. Aqueous standards were used to construct the calibration curves. The detection limit was 1.9 pg. Standard reference materials of nickel-base alloys were used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The copper contents determined with the proposed method agreed closely with the certified values of the reference materials. The recoveries were within the range 90-100% with relative standard deviation of less than 10%. Good precision was obtained.

  12. Physical properties of a nickel-base alloy prepared by isostatic pressing and sintering of the powdered metal.

    PubMed

    Fuys, R A; Craig, R G; Asger, K

    1976-04-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of samples of a nickel-base alloy fabricated by powder metallurgy were determined. The particle sizes of the powders used to make the samples varied from -80/ +200 mesh to -325 mesh. The compaction pressure varied from 138 to 414 MN/m2 and the sintering temperature varied from 1150 to 1250 degrees C. The shrinkage during processing, the porosity, tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and elastic modulus were used to characterize the samples. The strength of the samples generally increased with decreasing particle size of the powder and increasing compaction pressure and sintering temperatures. The porosity and strength, therefore, could be varied over a wide range by controlling the various parameters. The properties of the samples prepared by powder metallurgy were compared with those of the cast alloy and compact bone. Conditions can be selected that will yield equivalent or better properties by powder metallurgy than by casting. PMID:1066448

  13. The Influence of Dynamic Strain Aging on Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Characterization of Nickel-Base Solid Solution Strengthened Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Carroll; W.R. Lloyd; J.A. Simpson; R.N. Wright

    2010-12-01

    The nickel-base solid solution alloys, Alloy 617 and Alloy 230, have been observed to exhibit serrated yielding or dynamic strain aging (DSA) in a temperature/strain rate regime of interest for intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) of high temperature nuclear reactors. At 800°C, these nickel-base alloys are prone to large serrated yielding events at relatively low strains. The presence of DSA introduces challenges in characterizing the creep-fatigue and low cycle fatigue behavior. These challenges include inability to control the target strains as a result of DSA induced strain excursions and distorted hysteresis loops. Methods to eliminate or reduce the influence of DSA on creep-fatigue testing have been investigated, including varying the strain rate, stepping to the target strain, and adjusting servo-hydraulic tuning parameters. It has not been possible to eliminate the impact of serrated flow in the temperature range of interest for these alloys without compromising the desired test protocols.

  14. The role of salt melts on the corrosion of steels and nickel-based alloys in waste incineration plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, M.

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to study the corrosion behavior of steels and nickel-based alloys beneath heavy-metal-rich chloride and sulfate melts. Exposure tests on low- and high alloy steels in (Ca, K, Na, Pb, Zn)-sulfate mixtures in N{sub 2} - 5 vol.% O{sub 2} at 600 C have shown accelerated corrosion after addition of PbSO{sub 4} and ZnSO{sub 4}. The corrosion products were identified as (Fe, Ni)-oxide precipitates in contact with the gas phase and chromium-rich corrosion products close to the metal. Thermogravimetric investigations in He-5 vol.% O{sub 2} with the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel and also Alloy 625 have shown that severe corrosion occurred in the presence of a 50 wt.% ZnCl{sub 2}-50wt.% KCl salt mixture in the temperature range from 300 to 500 C. The corrosion products on 2.25Cr-1Mo were found to be Zn-rich iron-oxide precipitates in contact with the gas phase and a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer underneath. In contact with the metal, a mixture of iron-chlorides and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected, together with variable amounts of K and Zn. A thick scale has formed on Alloy 625, consisting of nickel- and chromium-oxides with some dissolved Mo.

  15. Effects of prior deformation and annealing process on microstructure and annealing twin density in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhigang; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Nairong; Sun, Yanle; Shan, Aidang

    2014-09-15

    The nickel based alloys with different Σ3 boundary density were achieved by cold-rolling and subsequent annealing treatment. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size distribution changed with the processing parameters, and the discontinuous Σ3 boundary became continuous with the increase of prior deformation level. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundary density was found to be manipulated by both grain size distribution and Σ3 boundary density per grain which showed an increasing trend with prior deformation level and annealing temperature. - Highlights: • The prior deformation amount influenced the morphology of Σ3 boundary. • The grain size was not the only factor influencing Σ3 boundary density. • The fact that grain size distribution had an important effect on Σ3 boundary density was confirmed. • The nature of grain size distribution on Σ3 boundary density was revealed. • There was a great deviation in Σ3 boundary density between experimental results and predictions.

  16. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  17. Arrhenius-Type Constitutive Model for High Temperature Flow Stress in a Nickel-Based Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Cheng, J. J.; Zuo, Q.; Chen, C. F.

    2016-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of Nickel-based corrosion-resistant alloy (N08028) was studied in compression tests conducted in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The flow stress behavior and microstructural evolution were observed during the hot deformation process. The results show that the flow stress increases with deformation temperature decreasing and strain rate increasing, and that the deformation activation energy ( Q) is not a constant but increases with strain rate increasing at a given strain, which is closely related with dislocation movement. On this basis, a revised strain-dependent hyperbolic sine constitutive model was established, which considered that the "material constants" in the original model vary as functions of the strain and strain rate. The flow curves of N08028 alloy predicted by the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental results, which indicates that the revised constitutive model can estimate precisely the flow curves of N08028 alloy.

  18. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  19. Nickel-based gadolinium alloy for neutron adsorption application in RAM packages.

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald A.; Dupont, John Neuman; McConnell, Paul E.; Robino, Charles Victor

    2005-02-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), coordinates and integrates national efforts in management and disposal of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include development of standardised systems for long-term disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Nuclear criticality control measures are needed in these systems to avoid restrictive fissile loading limits because of the enrichment and total quantity of fissile material in some types of the DOE spent nuclear fuel. This need is being addressed by development of corrosion-resistant, neutron-absorbing structural alloys for nuclear criticality control. This paper outlines results of a metallurgical development programme that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this programme includes chemical composition definition, primary and secondary melting studies, ingot conversion processes, properties testing, and national consensus codes and standards work. The microstructural investigation of these alloys shows that the gadolinium addition is present in the alloy as a gadolinium-rich second phase. The mechanical strength values are similar to those expected for commercial Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. The alloys have been corrosion tested with acceptable results. The initial results of weldability tests have also been acceptable. Neutronic testing in a moderated critical array has generated favourable results. An American Society for Testing and Materials material specification has been issued for the alloy and a Code Case has been submitted to the

  20. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  1. The crevice corrosion behavior of chromium stainless steel and nickel base alloys in a reverse osmosis plant utilizing seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Odwani, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Hashem, A.

    1999-11-01

    The crevice corrosion tests were performed on UNS S31603, UNS S31703, UNS S31726, UNS S31254, UNS N08904, UNS N625, UNS N825 and UNS N276 was investigated in seawater and neutral brine solution using a multiple crevice washer assembly. PTFE multiple-crevice washers were bolted to both sides of the test specimens with PTFE bolts and nuts. The specimens were exposed to seawater flowing at a rate of 100 L/h for periods of 3,000 h and 6,000 h. Duplicate specimens were immersed in a plexiglass cell containing the flowing seawater at a temperature of 30 C. The results showed that all the tested coupons were susceptible to some degree of crevice corrosion attack. However, the stainless steels were the most severely affected. The degree of crevice corrosion attack for the nickel base alloys decreased as the percentage of molybdenum content in the alloys increased. Destruction of the passive layer by the concentration of chloride or acidity and reduction of hydrogen ions at the crevices is believed to be the cause of the crevice attack.

  2. The effect of carbon on the metallography of a nickel base removable partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1979-04-01

    This study has demonstrated the pattern of carbide development associated with progressive increases in carbon content in a series of six nickel chromium alloys. The carbon content is critical since it influences the production and distribution of carbides, which have been shown to alter the mechanical properties, of the nickel chromium alloys, that are dependent upon the development of gamma prime. Furthermore, it has been shown that the attainment of suitable strength is invariably associated with an unacceptable level of ductility. PMID:288385

  3. Physical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel-Base Alloys Using Hot Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, James R.; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-01

    The Gleeble hot torsion test was utilized in an attempt to simulate the friction stir-processed microstructure of three Ni-base alloys: Hastelloy X, Alloy 625, and Alloy 718. The simulation temperatures were based on actual thermal cycles measured by embedded thermocouples during friction stir processing of these alloys. Peak process temperatures were determined to be approximately 1423 K (1150 °C) for Hastelloy X and Alloy 625 K and 1373 K (352 °C and 1100 °C) for Alloy 718. The peak temperature and cooling rates were programed into the Gleeble™ 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to reproduce the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) microstructures. The TMAZ was successfully simulated using this technique, but the stir zone microstructure could not be accurately reproduced, with hot torsion samples exhibiting larger grain size than actual friction stir processing trials. Shear stress and strain rates as a function of temperature were determined for each material using hot torsion simulation.

  4. Interdiffusional effects between tungsten fibers and an iron-nickel-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulfield, T.; Bellows, R. S.; Tien, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Tungsten fibers in the INCOLOY 903 alloy were annealed for over 100 hours at 1038 C and 1200 C. It was found that interdiffusion results in the formation of a reaction zone. SEM-EDS probe analysis showed that the chemistries across this zone were constant, suggesting the zone was a compound phase. The composition of the compound was estimated to be that of a mu-type phase. The local chemistry (in atomic percent) at the reaction zone/alloy matrix interface was found to be approximately 8 pct W, 1.2 pct Nb, 40 pct Fe, 14 pct Co, and 36 pct Ni. In addition, recrystallization was observed in both the remaining tungsten fiber and the nearby INCOLOY 903 matrix after annealing at 1200 C, but not at 1038 C. The results of this study suggest that reaction zone growth kinetics can be minimized by the reduction of Co and Fe and the increase of W in the matrix alloy.

  5. Evaluation and Characterization of Iron- and Nickel-Based Alloys for Microturbine Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Trejo, Rosa M; More, Karren Leslie; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2005-01-01

    The effects of stress, temperature and time of exposure to microturbine exhaust gases on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of alloys HR-120(reg. sign) and 230(reg. sign) was investigated at turbine exhaust temperatures between 620 C and 760 C. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength and ductility of alloy 230(reg. sign) decreased by 30% and 60%, respectively, after 500 hours exposure at 752 C. At the lowest exposure temperature of 679 C the ultimate tensile strength and ductility decreased by 10% and 25%, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and ductility of HR-120(reg. sign) alloy decreased by 15% and 50%, respectively, after 500 hours exposure at 745 C. At the lowest exposure temperature of 632 C the ultimate tensile strength and ductility decreased by 10% and 23%, respectively. The microstructural changes associated with exposure to microturbine exhaust gases are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Crack propagation in stainless steels and nickel base alloys in a commercial operating BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, A.; Morin, U.; Bengtsson, B.; Jansson, C.

    1995-12-31

    Crack propagation was investigated to study critical stress intensity factors for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), and crack growth rates in various materials. Modified bolt loaded compact tension (CT) specimens were exposed to BWR normal water chemistry (NWC) in a commercially operating BWR. The test facility was a pressure vessel, originally designed for high temperature magnetite filters. Stainless steels (SS) of Types 304 SS and 316 SS were included in the test matrix, as well as the Ni base weld materials alloys 82 and 182. The SS were investigated both in sensitized and in cold worked condition. For alloy 182 various parameters were studied, such as the effect of the carbon stabilization parameter, and the as-welded condition versus a post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Crack growth was measured annually, during the normal outages, by an optical microscope. The results were evaluated as crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity. A few specimens have been removed from testing for fractographic examination. Most of the specimens were exposed to NWC for more than 30,000 hours. Alloy 82 in as welded condition was found to be susceptible to IGSCC, at least at stress intensities above 30 MPa{radical}m. For alloy 182, in as welded condition, significant crack growth was detected in all specimens. No beneficial effect of the carbon stabilization parameter could be found. PWHT had a beneficial effect on the IGSCC susceptibility of alloy 182, and at stress intensities below 30 MPa{radical}m the crack growth rates were one to two orders of magnitude lower, compared to alloy 182 in as welded condition. As expected, an increasing susceptibility to IGSCC with increasing degree of cold work was found for stainless steel. At 5% cold work Type 304 SS cracked at a higher rate than Type 316NG with the same degree of cold work. At 20% cold work Type 304 SS and Type 316NG cracked at essentially the same rate.

  7. Growth Stresses in Thermally Grown Oxides on Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke H.; Laux, Britta; He, Ming Y.; Hovis, David; Heuer, Arthur H.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-03-01

    Growth stresses that develop in α-Al2O3 scale that form during isothermal oxidation of three Ni-based single crystal alloys have been studied to elucidate their role in coating and substrate degradation at elevated temperatures. Piezospectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate large room temperature compressive stresses in the oxides formed at 1255 K or 1366 K (982 °C or 1093 °C) on the alloys, ranging from a high of 4.8 GPa for René N4 at 1366 K (1093 °C) to a low of 3.8 GPa for René N5 at 1255 K (982 °C). Finite element modeling of each of these systems to account for differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the oxide and substrate indicates growth strains in the range from 0.21 to 0.44 pct at the oxidation temperature, which is an order of magnitude higher than the growth strains measured in the oxides on intermetallic coatings that are typically applied to these superalloys. The magnitudes of the growth strains do not scale with the parabolic oxidation rate constants measured for the alloys. Significant spatial inhomogeneities in the growth stresses were observed, due to (i) the presence of dendritic segregation and (ii) large carbides in the material that locally disrupts the structure of the oxide scale. The implications of these observations for failure during cyclic oxidation, fatigue cycling, and alloy design are considered.

  8. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  9. Effect of Specific Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel-Base Intermetallic Alloy Deposited by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kumar, Santosh; Chandra, Kamlesh; Vishwanadh, B.; Kishore, R.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the microstructural features and mechanical properties of nickel-base intermetallic alloy laser-clad layers on stainless steel-316 L substrate, with specific attention on the effect of laser-specific energy input (defined as the energy required per unit of the clad mass, kJ/g) on the microstructure and properties of the clad layer, keeping the other laser-cladding parameters same. Defect-free clad layers were observed, in which various solidified zones could be distinguished: planar crystallization near the substrate/clad interface, followed by cellular and dendritic morphology towards the surface of the clad layer. The clad layers were characterized by the presence of a hard molybdenum-rich hexagonal close-packed (hcp) intermetallic Laves phase dispersed in a relatively softer face-centered cubic (fcc) gamma solid solution or a fine lamellar eutectic phase mixture of an intermetallic Laves phase and gamma solid solution. The microstructure and properties of the clad layers showed a strong correlation with the laser-specific energy input. As the specific energy input increased, the dilution of the clad layer increased and the microstructure changed from a hypereutectic structure (with a compact dispersion of characteristic primary hard intermetallic Laves phase in eutectic phase mixture) to near eutectic or hypoeutectic structure (with reduced fraction of primary hard intermetallic Laves phase) with a corresponding decrease in the clad layer hardness.

  10. Lubricating Properties of Ceramic-Bonded Calcium Fluoride Coatings on Nickel-Base Alloys from 75 to 1900 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1962-01-01

    The endurance life and the friction coefficient of ceramic-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) coatings on nickel-base alloys were determined at temperatures from 75 F to 1900 F. The specimen configuration consisted of a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad.) sliding against the flat surface of a rotating disk. Increasing the ambient temperature (up to 1500 F) or the sliding velocity generally reduced the friction coefficient and improved coating life. Base-metal selection was critical above 1500 F. For instance, cast Inconel sliding against coated Inconel X was lubricated effectively to 1500 F, but at 1600 F severe blistering of the coatings occurred. However, good lubrication and adherence were obtained for Rene 41 sliding against coated Rene 41 at temperatures up to 1900 F; no blisters developed, coating wear life was fairly good, and the rider wear rate was significantly lower than for the unlubricated metals. Friction coefficients were 0.12 at 1500 F, 0.15 at 1700 F, and 0.17 at 1800 F and 1900 F. Because of its ready availability, Inconel X appears to be the preferred substrate alloy for applications in which the temperature does not exceed 1500 F. Rene 41 would have to be used in applications involving higher temperatures. Improved coating life was derived by either preoxidizing the substrate metals prior to the coating application or by applying a very thin (less than 0.0002 in.) burnished and sintered overlay to the surface of the coating. Preoxidation did not affect the friction coefficient. The overlay generally resulted in a higher friction coefficient than that obtained without the overlay. The combination of both modifications resulted in longer coating life and in friction coefficients intermediate between those obtained with either modification alone.

  11. Tensile Deformation of a Nickel-base Alloy at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ajit K.; Venkatesh, Anand; Marthandam, Vikram; Ghosh, Arindam

    2008-08-01

    The results of tensile testing involving Waspaloy indicate that the failure strain was gradually reduced at temperatures ranging between ambient and 300 °C. Further, serrations were observed in the engineering stress versus strain diagrams in the temperature range of 300-600 °C. The reduced failure strain and the formation of serrations in these temperature regimes could be the result of dynamic strain aging of this alloy. The extent of work hardening due to plastic deformation was reduced at temperatures above 300 °C. A combination of ductile and intergranular brittle failures was seen at temperatures above 600 °C. γ' was detected at all tested temperatures.

  12. High temperature corrosion of a nickel base alloy by helium impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillard, F.; Cabet, C.; Wolski, K.; Terlain, A.; Tabarant, M.; Pijolat, M.; Valdivieso, F.

    2007-05-01

    High temperature corrosion properties of Haynes 230 were investigated in a purposely-designed facility under a typical very high temperature reactor (VHTR) impure helium medium. The study was focused on the surface oxide scale formation and its stability at about 1223 K. The alloy developed a Mn/Cr rich oxide layer on its surface under impure helium at 1173 K. Nevertheless, a deleterious reaction destructing the chromium oxide was evidenced above a critical temperature, TA. Reagents and products of this last reaction were investigated.

  13. Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

    1957-01-01

    The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

  14. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  15. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  16. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  17. Metallographic examination of TD-nickel base alloys. [thermal and chemical etching technique evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques are evaluated for chemical, electrochemical, and thermal etching of thoria dispersed (TD) nickel alloys. An electrochemical etch is described which yielded good results only for large grain sizes of TD-nickel. Two types of thermal etches are assessed for TD-nickel: an oxidation etch and vacuum annealing of a polished specimen to produce an etch. It is shown that the first etch was somewhat dependent on sample orientation with respect to the processing direction, the second technique was not sensitive to specimen orientation or grain size, and neither method appear to alter the innate grain structure when the materials were fully annealed prior to etching. An electrochemical etch is described which was used to observe the microstructures in TD-NiCr, and a thermal-oxidation etch is shown to produce better detail of grain boundaries and to have excellent etching behavior over the entire range of grain sizes of the sample.

  18. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni-based coating obtained presents a significantly superior hardness than cast iron.

  19. Physical and welding metallurgy of Gd-enriched austenitic alloys for spent nuclear fuel applications. Part II, nickel base alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Michael, Joseph Richard; Williams, David Brian; Dupont, John Neuman; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-06-01

    The physical and welding a metallurgy of gadolinium- (Gd-) enriched Ni-based alloys has been examined using a combination of differential thermal analysis, hot ductility testing. Varestraint testing, and various microstructural characterization techniques. Three different matrix compositions were chosen that were similar to commercial Ni-Cr-Mo base alloys (UNS N06455, N06022, and N06059). A ternary Ni-Cr-Gd alloy was also examined. The Gd level of each alloy was {approx}2 wt-%. All the alloys initiated solidification by formation of primary austenite and terminated solidification by a Liquid {gamma} + Ni{sub 5}Gd eutectic-type reaction at {approx}1270 C. The solidification temperature ranges of the alloys varied from {approx}100 to 130 C (depending on alloy composition). This is a substantial reduction compared to the solidification temperature range to Gd-enriched stainless steels (360 to 400 C) that terminate solidification by a peritectic reaction at {approx}1060 C. The higher-temperature eutectic reaction that occurs in the Ni-based alloys is accompanied by significant improvements in hot ductility and solidification cracking resistance. The results of this research demonstrate that Gd-enriched Ni-based alloys are excellent candidate materials for nuclear criticality control in spent nuclear fuel storage applications that require production and fabrication of large amounts of material through conventional ingot metallurgy and fusion welding techniques.

  20. Chemical reactivity of nickel and nickel-based alloys with a SiAlON ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Vleugels, J.; Van Der Biest, O.

    1995-11-01

    At the high cutting speeds typical for machining with ceramics and the concomitant high temperatures generated at the cutting edge and the rake face of the tool, chemical interaction between tool and workpiece material becomes the predominant mode of tool wear. To obtain more information concerning this chemical interaction mechanism, the chemical interaction of a {beta}{prime}-O{prime} SiAlON ceramic with pure nickel, Inconel 600, and Nimonic 105 is studied. The chemical reactivity was assessed by studying ceramic-alloy interaction couples after exposure at elevated temperatures (1,100--1,200 C) for times long enough to be able to characterize the interaction layer. At 1,200 C, the {beta}{prime}-O{prime} SiAlON ceramic dissociates in contact with pure nickel. Silicon from the dissociation of the ceramic dissolves and diffuses into the nickel, whereas Al and O form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. At the interface, a nitrogen pressure is built up. Inconel 600 is very reactive with the SiAlON ceramic, with the formation of molten silicides at 1,200 C. Cr{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ni{sub 31}Si{sub 12} are the major reaction products. The reactivity of Nimonic 105 is less than that of pure nickel because of the formation of a continuous protective TiN layer at the ceramic-metal interface.

  1. Structural evaluation of a nickel base super alloy metal foam via NDE and finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, G.; Garg, Mohit; Young, P. G.

    2008-03-01

    Cellular materials are known to be useful in the application of designing light but stiff structures. This applies to various components used in various industries such as rotorcraft blades, car bodies or portable electronic devices. Structural application of the metal foam is typically confined to light weight sandwich panels, made up of thin solid face sheets and a metallic foam core. The resulting high-stiffness structure is lighter than that constructed only out of the solid metal material. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads and the role of the foam core is separate the face sheets to carry some of the shear stresses, while remaining integral with the face sheet. Many challenges relating to the fabrication and testing of these metal foam panels continue to exist due to some mechanical properties falling short of their theoretical potential. Hence in this study, a detailed three dimensional foam structure is generated using series of 2D Computer Tomography (CT) scans, on Haynes 25 metal foam. Series of the 2D images are utilized to construct a high precision solid model including all the fine details within the metal foam as detected by the CT scanning technique. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is then performed on an as fabricated metal foam microstructures to evaluate the foam structural durability and behavior under tensile and compressive loading conditions. The analysis includes a progressive failure analysis (PFA) using GENOA code to further assess the damage initiation, propagation, and failure. The open cell metal foam material is a cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten alloy that combines excellent high-temperature strength with good resistance to oxidizing environments up to 1800 °F (980 °C) for prolonged exposures. The foam is formed by a powder metallurgy process with an approximate 100 pores per inch (PPI).

  2. Development of improved low-strain creep strength in Cabot alloy R-41 sheet. [nickel base sheet alloy for reentry shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of improving the low-strain creep properties of a thin gauge nickel base sheet alloy through modified heat treatment or through development of a preferred crystal-lographic texture was investigated. The basic approach taken to improve the creep strength of the material by heat treatment was to increase grain size by raising the solution treatment temperature for the alloy to the range of 1420 K to 1475 K (2100 F to 2200 F). The key technical issue involved was maintenance of adequate tensile ductility following the solutioning of M6C primary carbides during the higher temperature solution treatment. The approach to improve creep properties by developing a sheet texture involved varying both annealing temperatures and the amount of prior cold work. Results identified a heat treatment for alloy R-14 sheet which yields a substantial creep-life advantage at temperatures above 1090 K (1500 F) when compared with material given the standard heat treatment. At the same time, this treatment provides reasonable tensile ductility over the entire temperature range of interest. The mechanical properties of the material given the new heat treatment are compared with those for material given the standard heat treatment. Attempts to improve creep strength by developing a sheet texture were unsuccessful.

  3. Influence of surface modifications on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718. Part 1: Effect of machine hammer peening

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    The effect of surface modifications induced by machine hammer peening on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution is investigated. Severe work hardening and high compressive residual stress are generated with surface smoothing and microstructure evolution in terms of formation of nano-grains and nano-twins in the near surface region after machine hammer peening. Electrochemical tests results show that machine hammer peening has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance, indicated by a significant increase of the critical pitting potential (+134 mV) accompanied with lower corrosion current density and higher polarization resistance.

  4. Neutron Diffraction Study on Plastic behavior of a Nickel-Based Alloy Under the Monotonic-Tension and the Low-Cyclic-Fatigue Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-W.; Barabash, R.; Clausen, B.; Wang, Y.; Yang, R.; Li, L.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P.K.

    2007-11-02

    The plastic behavior of an annealed HASTELLOY C-22HS alloy, a face-centered cubic (FCC), nickel-based superalloy, was examined by in-situ neutron-diffraction measurements at room temperature. Both monotonic-tension and low-cycle-fatigue experiments were conducted. Monotonic-tension straining and cyclic-loading deformation were studied as a function of stress. The plastic behavior during deformation is discussed in light of the relationship between the stress and dislocation-density evolution. The calculated dislocation-density evolution within the alloy reflects the strain hardening and cyclic hardening/softening. Experimentally determined lattice strains are compared to verify the hardening mechanism at selected stress levels for tension and cyclic loadings. Combined with calculations of the dislocation densities, the neutron-diffraction experiments provide direct information about the strain and cyclic hardening of the alloy.

  5. Effects of alloy composition on cyclic flame hot-corrosion attack of cast nickel-base superalloys at 900 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, Nb, and W content on the hot corrosion of nickel base alloys were investigated. The alloys were tested in a Mach 0.3 flame with 0.5 ppmw sodium at a temperature of 900 C. One nondestructive and three destructive tests were conducted. The best corrosion resistance was achieved when the Cr content was 12 wt %. However, some lower-Cr-content alloys ( 10 wt%) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content alloys ( 10 wt %) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content was 2.5 wt % and the Ti content was Aa wt %. The effect of W, Ta, Mo, and Nb contents on the hot-corrosion resistance varied depending on the Al and Ti contents. Several commercial alloy compositions were also tested and the corrosion attack was measured. Predicted attack was calculated for these alloys from derived regression equations and was in reasonable agreement with that experimentally measured. The regression equations were derived from measurements made on alloys in a one-quarter replicate of a 2(7) statistical design alloy composition experiment. These regression equations represent a simple linear model and are only a very preliminary analysis of the data needed to provide insights into the experimental method.

  6. Brushing-Induced Surface Roughness of Two Nickel Based Alloys and a Titanium Based Alloy: A Comparative Study - In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, B L Guruprasanna; Nadiger, Ramesh; Shetty, Bharathraj; Gururaj, G; Kumar, K Naveen; Darshan, D D

    2014-01-01

    be given to the selection of the toothbrushes and toothpastes with the medium abrasives in patients with these restorations. How to cite the article: Acharya BL, Nadiger R, Shetty B, Gururaj G, Kumar KN, Darshan DD. Brushing induced surface roughness of two nickel based alloys and a titanium based alloy: A comparative study - In vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):36-49. PMID:25083031

  7. Synthesis and characterization of binder-free Cr3C2 coatings on nickel-based alloys for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brupbacher, Michael C.; Zhang, Dajie; Buchta, William M.; Graybeal, Mark L.; Rhim, Yo-Rhin; Nagle, Dennis C.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-06-01

    Under various conditions, chromium carbides appear to be relatively stable in the presence of molten fluoride salts and this suggests that their use in corrosion resistant coatings for fluoride salt environments could be beneficial. One method for producing these coatings is the carburization of sprayed Cr coatings using methane-containing gaseous precursors. This process has been investigated for the synthesis of binder-free chromium carbide coatings on nickel-based alloy substrates for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance. The effects of the carburization process on coating microstructure have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both plasma-sprayed and cold-sprayed Cr coatings have been successfully converted to Cr3C2, with the mechanism of conversion being strongly influenced by the initial porosity in the as-deposited coatings.

  8. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys in supercritical water and novel control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: (1) Introduction; (2) Thermodynamics of Alloy Oxidation; (3) Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels and Ni-Base Alloys in SCW; (4) Novel Corrosion Control Methods; (5) Factors Influencing Corrosion; (6) Summary; and (7) References.

  9. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships in transient liquid phase bonded nickel-based superalloys and iron-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluru, Sreenivasa Charan Rajeev

    The research work presented here discusses the microstructure-mechanical property relationships in wide gap transient liquid phase (TLP) bonds, between the single crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-4 and two polycrystalline superalloys, IN 738 and IN 939, using wide-gap style composite interlayers. Fabrication of complicated geometries and successful repair development of gas turbine engine components made of superalloys requires a high performance metallurgical joining technique and a complete understanding of microstructure-mechanical property relationships. A number of joining processes have been investigated, but all of them have significant disadvantages that limit their ability to produce sound joints. TLP bonding has proved to be a successful method and is the most preferred joining method for nickel-based superalloys, with microstructures and compositions of the joint similar to that of the bulk substrates resulting in mechanical properties close to that of the parent metal. The current joining process used two proprietary wide-gap style composite interlayers, Niflex-110 and Niflex-115, consisting of a nickel-based core with boron-rich surfaces, and a conventional rapidly solidified metallic glass foil interlayer BNi-3 was chosen for comparison. When composite interlayers were employed, competition between wetting of the faying surfaces and formation of the eutectic along the grain boundaries was observed to lead to non-bonded regions at the faying surfaces, unless a boron-rich interlayer was employed. Composite interlayers resulted in the suppression of bondline boride formation. With the exception of this competition, adequate wetting of the substrates occurred for all interlayers. Two factors dominated the room temperature mechanical properties of the wide-gap bonds. The first was the extent of gamma-prime formation at the bondline. Results from shear testing and fractography of the bonds indicated ductile shear failure at the bondline. This was due to

  10. Corrosion behavior of experimental and commercial nickel-base alloys in HCl and HCl containing Fe3+

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    The effects of ferric ions on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of a series of Ni-based alloys in 20% HCl at 30ºC were investigated. The alloys studied were those prepared by the Albany Research Center (ARC), alloys J5, J12, J13, and those sold commercially, alloys 22, 242, 276, and 2000. Tests included mass loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and linear polarization.

  11. Physics-based simulation modeling and optimization of microstructural changes induced by machining and selective laser melting processes in titanium and nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisoy, Yigit Muzaffer

    Manufacturing processes may significantly affect the quality of resultant surfaces and structural integrity of the metal end products. Controlling manufacturing process induced changes to the product's surface integrity may improve the fatigue life and overall reliability of the end product. The goal of this study is to model the phenomena that result in microstructural alterations and improve the surface integrity of the manufactured parts by utilizing physics-based process simulations and other computational methods. Two different (both conventional and advanced) manufacturing processes; i.e. machining of Titanium and Nickel-based alloys and selective laser melting of Nickel-based powder alloys are studied. 3D Finite Element (FE) process simulations are developed and experimental data that validates these process simulation models are generated to compare against predictions. Computational process modeling and optimization have been performed for machining induced microstructure that includes; i) predicting recrystallization and grain size using FE simulations and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, ii) predicting microhardness using non-linear regression models and the Random Forests method, and iii) multi-objective machining optimization for minimizing microstructural changes. Experimental analysis and computational process modeling of selective laser melting have been also conducted including; i) microstructural analysis of grain sizes and growth directions using SEM imaging and machine learning algorithms, ii) analysis of thermal imaging for spattering, heating/cooling rates and meltpool size, iii) predicting thermal field, meltpool size, and growth directions via thermal gradients using 3D FE simulations, iv) predicting localized solidification using the Phase Field method. These computational process models and predictive models, once utilized by industry to optimize process parameters, have the ultimate potential to improve performance of

  12. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] < 1 the alloys' specimens get a more negative stationary electrode potential than equilibrium electrode potentials of some uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface

  13. Creep and tensile properties of several oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys at 1365 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile properties at room temperature and at 1365 K and the tensile creep properties at low strain rates at 1365 K were measured for several oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. The alloys examined included ODS Ni, ODS Ni-20Cr, and ODS Ni-16Cr-Al. Metallography of creep tested, large grain size ODS alloys indicated that creep of these alloys is an inhomogeneous process. All alloys appear to possess a threshold stress for creep. This threshold stress is believed to be associated with diffusional creep in the large grain size ODS alloys and normal dislocation motion in perfect single crystal (without transverse low angle boundaries) ODS alloys. Threshold stresses for large grain size ODS Ni-20Cr and Ni-16Cr-Al type alloys are dependent on the grain aspect ratio. Because of the deleterious effect of prior creep on room temperature mechanical properties of large grain size ODS alloys, it is speculated that the threshold stress may be the design limiting creep strength property.

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  15. Silver and lanthanum as effective modifiers in trace determination of cadmium in nickel-base alloys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Chang, Li-Lin; Chang, Shiow-Ing

    1997-01-01

    Trace cadmium in nickel-base superalloys was determined by a stabilized temperature platform furnace using atomic absorption spectrometry with a deuterium arc background correction system. The volatility of cadmium limits the pyrolysis temperature. This prevents the removal of the interfering alloy matrix at the thermal pretreatment step. Hence, an enormously high background signal has been observed. Chemical modifiers including ammonium citrate, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-naphthol, 4-(2pyridylazo)resorcinol, 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)-phenol, Triton-X 100, EDTA, potassium nitrate, palladium nitrate, magnesium nitrate, aluminum chloride, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, lanthanum oxide, lanthanum chloride and silver nitrate have been studied. Matrix interferences were effectively reduced by silver and lanthanum. The 100-300°C increase in the pyrolysis temperature effectively reduced the non-specific absorption from the alloy matrix. Interferences from foreign ions were also investigated. The merit of the proposed method was increased by the excellent agreement between the certified and the experimental values of Cd in the standard reference material, IN100, and the recovery obtained (100-104%). The precision of six successive replicate measurements was 4.9% with Ag modifier and 2.5% with La modifier, respectively. The results of analysing Tracealloy B were also satisfactory.

  16. Grinding as an approach to the production of high-strength, dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, N. W.; Quatinetz, M.; Weeton, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical process produces dispersion-strengthened metal alloys. Power surface contamination during milling is removed by a cleaning method that involves heating thin shapes or partially-compacted milled powder blends in hydrogen to carefully controlled temperature schedules.

  17. Oxidation behavior of nickel-base superalloys and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talekar, Anjali S.

    Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels are candidate materials for use in outer layer of waste storage packages and as rock bolts in the underground roof supports at Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository respectively. Oxidation kinetics of three Ni-base Superalloys and two HSLA Steels, Split Set Friction Rock Stabilizers (SS-46) and Swellex Mn-24, have been determined by isothermal high temperature continuous measurement thermogravimetry at temperatures ranging between 600°C to 1100°C in pure oxygen atmosphere for predetermined periods of exposures (48 hours for the Superalloys and 100 hours for HSLA steels). The two other Ni-base Superalloys selected were Alloy-263 (UNS N07263) and Alloy-282. These are similar in their Cr composition to Alloy C-22 and have variations in the contents of other alloying elements namely Co and Mo. The alloys were selected for comparison of their oxidation resistance with C-22 as a baseline material. All three Superalloys are known chromia formers. All the superalloys were evaluated for determining their kinetic parameters and the activation energies for the superalloys were also calculated. The activation energy for the parabolic regime of Alloy-282 is found to be 232 kJ/mol. The slope of the curves on a plot of kp as a function of (1/T) show Alloy-282 to have better oxidation resistance up to 980°C and thereafter the rate constants are similar for all three alloys, but when activation energies over the whole temperature range are calculated, Alloy-263 shows the best average oxidation resistance. Surface characterization by means of microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the nature of oxides formed. Based on the kinetics and the characterization, proposed mechanisms for oxidation of these alloys at high temperatures are put forth. Temperature modulated thermogravimetry was used for studies on HSLA steels. The imposed sinusoidal temperature modulations on the isothermal temperature

  18. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  19. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Bangxin; Bai, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-Σ coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: • Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing • Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. • Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. • More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. • Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  20. Friction and wear of oxide-ceramic sliding against IN-718 nickel base alloy at 25 to 800 C in atmospheric air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    The friction and wear of oxide-ceramics sliding against the nickel base alloy IN-718 at 25 to 800 C were measured. The oxide materials tested were mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2); lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi(x)O(y)); polycrystalline monolithic alpha alumina (alpha-Al2O3); single crystal alpha-Al2O3 (sapphire); zirconia (ZrO2); and silicon carbide (SiC) whisker-reinforced Al2O3 composites. At 25 C the mullite and zirconia had the lowest friction and the polycrystalline monolithic alumina had the lowest wear. At 800 C the Al2O3-8 vol/percent SiC whisker composite had the lowest friction and the Al2O3-25 vol/percent SiC composite had the lowest wear. The friction of the Al2O3-SiC whisker composites increased with increased whisker content while the wear decreased. In general, the wear-resistance of the ceramics improve with their hardness.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  2. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  3. A feasibility study of a diffusion barrier between Ni-Cr-Al coatings and nickel-based eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems have been proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines. In a study to prevent the deterioration of such systems by diffusion, a tungsten sheet 25 microns thick was placed between eutectic alloys and an Ni-Cr-Al layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as 500 h. Without the tungsten barrier the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of niobium into the Ni-Cr-Al. Insertion of the tungsten barrier stopped the diffusion of niobium from the delta phase. Chromium diffusion from the Ni-Cr-Al into the gamma/gamma-prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time, and tungsten diffused into both the Ni-Cr-Al and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were aligned parallel rather than perpendicular to the Ni-Cr-Al layer, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  4. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  5. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  6. Materials Reliability Program Low-Temperature Cracking of Nickel-Based Alloys and Weld Metals (MRP-108)

    SciTech Connect

    B. Young

    2004-02-01

    OAK-B135 A rising load test in low-temperature (50-100 degree C) pH 10 water containing a high concentration of dissolved hydrogen (150 cc/kg) has demonstrated that Alloy 690 as well as weld metals 82 and 52 exhibit a marked loss of ductility. A similar loss of ductility has been shown to occur in widely used weld metal 182 under replica test conditions and simulated PWR primary water containing 100 cc/kg of hydrogen. The objective of this report was to confirm the Bettis test results for weld metal 82 and determine whether weld metal 182 is susceptible to the same reductions in toughness. This report documents the first industry effort to reckon with the low temperature crack propagation (LTCP) issue.

  7. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  8. The Effect of Alloying on Topologically Close Packed Phase Instability in Advanced Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Arenas, David; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability as a function of composition in the advanced Ni-base superalloy Rene N6. TCP phases are detrimental to overall high-temperature performance of Ni-base superalloys because of their brittle nature and because they deplete the Ni-rich matrix of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 determined from a design-of-experiments approach were cast and homogenized at 1315"C for 80 hours followed by exposure at 10930C for 400 hours to promote TCP formation. The alloys had the following composition ranges in atomic percent: Co 10.61 to 16.73%, Mo 0.32 to 1.34%, W 1.85 to 2.52%, Re 1.80 to 2.1 1 %, Ta 2.36 to 3.02%, Al 11.90 to 14.75%, and Cr 3.57 to 6.23%. Physical and chemical characteristics of all n-ticrostructures obtained were described using various analytical techniques. From these observations, a mathematical description of TCP occurrence (omega and P phase) was generated for polycrystalline Rene N6.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation thresholds for long and short cracks in Rene 95 nickel-base super alloy

    SciTech Connect

    McCarver, J.F.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1981-10-01

    A study has been made of the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a wroght Ni-base superalloy, Rene 95, with reference to the effect of crack size on the threshold stress intensity ..delta..K/sub 0/ for no detectable crack growth. Measured threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/ values at low load ratios (R = 0.1) for physically short cracks (0.01 to 0.20 mm) were found to be 60% smaller than the corresponding ..delta..K/sub 0/ values for long cracks (approx. 25 mm). However, short crack threshold values at R = 0.1 were found to be similar to long crack thresholds at R = 0.8. Such behavior is rationalized in terms of fatigue crack closure, specifically involving the role of fracture surface roughness from crystallographic crack growth in Ni-base alloys. The large difference observed in threshold values for long and physically-short cracks serves to illustrate the potential problems in applying conventional (long crack) fatigue data to defect-tolerant lifetime predictions for structural components containing small flaws.

  10. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  11. Investigation on the Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of the Butt Weld Welded with ENiCrFe-7 Nickel-Base Alloy-Covered Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Wang, Huang; He, Guo

    2015-03-01

    The weld metal of the ENiCrFe-7 nickel-based alloy-covered electrodes was investigated in terms of the microstructure, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Besides the dendritic gamma-Ni(Cr,Fe) phase, several types of precipitates dispersed on the austenitic matrix were observed, which were determined to be the Nb-rich MC-type carbides with "Chinese script" morphology and size of approximately 3 to 10 µm, the Mn-rich MO-type oxides with size of approximately 1 to 2 µm, and the spherical Al/Ti-rich oxides with size of less than 1 µm. The discontinuous Cr-rich M23C6-type carbides predominantly precipitate on the grain boundaries, which tend to coarsen during reheating but begin to dissolve above approximately 1273 K (1000 °C). The threshold strain for DDC at each temperature tested shows a certain degree of correlation with the grain boundary carbides. The DDC susceptibility increases sharply as the carbides coarsen in the temperature range of 973 K to 1223 K (700 °C to 950 °C). The growth and dissolution of the carbides during the welding heat cycles deteriorate the grain boundaries and increase the DDC susceptibility. The weld metal exhibits the minimum threshold strain of approximately 2.0 pct at 1323 K (1050 °C) and the DTR less than 873 K (600 °C), suggesting that the ENiCrFe-7—covered electrode has less DDC susceptibility than the ERNiCrFe-7 bare electrode but is comparable with the ERNiCrFe-7A.

  12. Separating the Influence of Environment from Stress Relaxation Effects on Dwell Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental embrittlement and crack tip visco-plastic stress relaxation play a significant role in determining the dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) resistance of nickel-based disk superalloys. In the current study performed on the Low Solvus High Refractory (LSHR) disk alloy, the influence of these two mechanisms were separated so that the effects of each could be quantified and modeled. Seven different microstructural variations of LSHR were produced by controlling the cooling rate and the subsequent aging and thermal exposure heat treatments. Through cyclic fatigue crack growth testing performed both in air and vacuum, it was established that four out of the seven LSHR heat treatments evaluated, possessed similar intrinsic environmental resistance to cyclic crack growth. For these four heat treatments, it was further shown that the large differences in dwell crack growth behavior which still persisted, were related to their measured stress relaxation behavior. The apparent differences in their dwell crack growth resistance were attributed to the inability of the standard linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) stress intensity parameter to account for visco-plastic behavior. Crack tip stress relaxation controls the magnitude of the remaining local tensile stresses which are directly related to the measured dwell crack growth rates. It was hypothesized that the environmentally weakened grain boundary crack tip regions fail during the dwells when their strength is exceeded by the remaining local crack tip tensile stresses. It was shown that the classical creep crack growth mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding did not contribute to crack growth, but the local visco-plastic behavior still plays a very significant role by determining the crack tip tensile stress field which controls the dwell crack growth behavior. To account for the influence of the visco-plastic behavior on the crack tip stress field, an empirical modification to the LEFM stress

  13. Oxidation in oxygen at 900 deg and 1000 deg C of four nickel-base cast superalloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, alloy 713C, and IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation at 900 and 1,000 C of four nickel-base superalloys in 1 atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen was investigated. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for periods to 100 hours. The morphology and composition of the oxide scales formed after 100 hours were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA). Alloys B-1900 and VIA were found to be primarily alumina formers, though probably 25 percent of their surface was covered by CR2O3-containing oxides at 900 C. Alloys 713C and IN-738 were primarily chromia formers, though the surface of 713C at 1,000 C was covered with NiO, and the surface of IN-738 at both temperatures was covered with a thin layer of TiO2.

  14. Nickel Base Superalloy Turbine Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Gauda, John (Inventor); Telesman, Ignacy (Inventor); Kantzos, Pete T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low solvus, high refractory alloy having unusually versatile processing mechanical property capabilities for advanced disks and rotors in gas turbine engines. The nickel base superalloy has a composition consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 3.0-4.0 N, 0.02-0.04 B, 0.02-0.05 C, 12.0-14.0 Cr, 19.0-22.0 Co, 2.0-3.5 Mo, greater than 1.0 to 2.1 Nb, 1.3 to 2.1 Ta,3.04.OTi,4.1 to 5.0 W, 0.03-0.06 Zr, and balance essentially Ni and incidental impurities. The superalloy combines ease of processing with high temperature capabilities to be suitable for use in various turbine engine disk, impeller, and shaft applications. The Co and Cr levels of the superalloy can provide low solvus temperature for high processing versatility. The W, Mo, Ta, and Nb refractory element levels of the superalloy can provide sustained strength, creep, and dwell crack growth resistance at high temperatures.

  15. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  16. {tau} phase formation in a TiC + TiB{sub 2} composite bonded with a nickel based binder alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogwu, A.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1999-05-21

    Densification and ductility has been achieved in a TiC + TiB{sub 2} cermet prepared by pressureless sintering using a nickel based binder with an additive, based on their proposed empirical model. In the context of bonding in the binary, Holleck et al have suggested that the structures of TiC and TiB{sub 2} allows coherence to be established between their most densely packed lattice planes. This favorable interfacial match in the TiC + TiB{sub 2} composite is assumed to encourage a high mobility of atoms across the interface, leading to densification during sintering. The fracture toughness of a TiC + TiB{sub 2} composite would also be expected to improve when good interfacial coherence exists between TiC and TiB{sub 2}. In the case of their preferred nickel-based binder, one of the reasons for selecting the additive is to prevent the formation o deleterious grain boundary phases like the {tau} phase which often forms in Ni-TiB{sub 2} systems, with the expectation that if new phases do form they would be soluble in a TiC + TiB{sub 2} matrix. Previous attempts to find suitable sintering additives for TiB{sub 2} revealed that Fe, Co and Ni binders reacted with the TiB{sub 2} at the sintering temperatures forming secondary borides of the type M{sub 2}B. The formation of these undesirable (secondary) borides has been identified to be linked to either the presence of contaminants like oxygen, carbon and nitrogen which react with Ti, leaving behind free boron for reaction with the selected metallic binder, or, a direct reaction between the metal binder and TiB{sub 2}.

  17. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  18. High weldability nickel-base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    This is a nickel-base superalloy with excellent weldability and high strength. Its composition consists essentially of, by weight percent, 10-20 iron, 57-63 nickel, 7-18 chromium, 4-6 molybdenum, 1-2 niobium, 0.2-0.8 silicon, 0.01-0.05 zirconium, 1.0-2.5 titanium, 1.0-2.5 aluminum, 0.02-0.06 carbon, and 0.002-0.015 boron. The weldability and strength of this alloy give it a variety of applications. The long-time structural stability of this alloy together with its low swelling under nuclear radiation conditions, make it especially suitable for use as a duct material and controlling element cladding for sodium-cooled nuclear reactors.

  19. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation at 1000 and 1100 deg C of four nickel-base alloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Santoro, G. J.; Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation resistance of four cast Ni-base gamma + gamma prime alloys, NASA-TRW Via, B-1900, 713C, and 738X, was determined in still air at 1000 and 1100 C. The oxidation process was evaluated by specific sample weight change with time, sample thickness change, X-ray diffraction of the scales, and sample metallography. The behavior is discussed in terms of the Cr, Al, and refractory metal contents of the alloys.

  20. The role of grain boundary character in the environmentally-assisted integranular cracking mechanism of nickel-base alloys: Progress report, August 1, 1988--July 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1989-07-01

    Over the past year additional experimental results and more accurate modeling were obtained for the grain boundary chemistry and structure of controlled purity alloys 690 and X-750 material as a function of thermal treatment. High purity heats of Ni-30Cr-9Fe (alloy 690) and Ni-16Cr-9Fe-2.5Ti-0.7Al (alloy X-750) were prepared by the Materials Preparation Center, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University. Each were doped with 0.03 wt % C. The material was delivered in the form of 3.05 mm rods for the convenience of transmission electron microscopy sample preparation. Due to casting defects in the alloys, the base stock materials were purified by electron beam melting before alloying to reduce the levels of any tramp elements that would form these casting defects. Chromium depletion profiling and analysis of precipitate composition were conducted in a JEOL 100CX STEM using energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Precipitate structure was determined by convergent beam electron diffraction in a JEOL 2000 FX STEM in addition to selected area diffraction in the JEOL 100 CX STEM. Computer modeling was done on a Macintosh II computer with the codes operating in the FORTRAN language. 8 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. The continuing battle against defects in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the six decades since the identification of age hardenable nickel-base superalloys their compositions and microstructures have changed markedly. Current alloys are tailored for specific applications. Thus their microstructures are defined for that application. This paper briefly reviews the evolution of superalloy microstructures and comments on the appearance and implications of microstructural defects in high performance superalloys. It is seen that new alloys and proceses have generated new types of defects. Thus as the industry continues to develop new alloys and processes it must remain vigilant toward the identification and control of new types of defects.

  2. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp alloy plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincot, A.; Cardin, Ph.; Deguen, R.; Merkel, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  3. Seismic parameters of hcp-Fe alloyed with Ni and Si in the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu; Alatas, Ahmet; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-02-01

    Iron alloyed with Ni and Si has been suggested to be a major component of the Earth's inner core. High-pressure results on the combined alloying effects of Ni and Si on seismic parameters of iron are thus essential for establishing satisfactory geophysical and geochemical models of the region. Here we have investigated the compressional (VP) and shear (Vs) wave velocity-density (ρ) relations, Poisson's ratio (ν), and seismic heterogeneity ratios (dlnρ/dlnVP, dlnρ/dlnVS, and dlnVP/dlnVS) of hcp-Fe and hcp-Fe86.8Ni8.6Si4.6 alloy up to 206 GPa and 136 GPa, respectively, using multiple complementary techniques. Compared with the literature velocity values for hcp-Fe and Fe-Ni-Si alloys, our results show that the combined addition of 9.0 wt % Ni and 2.3 wt % Si slightly increases the VP but significantly decreases the VS of hcp-Fe at a given density relevant to the inner core. Such distinct alloying effects on velocities of hcp-Fe produce a high ν of about 0.40 for the alloy at inner core densities, which is approximately 20% higher than that for hcp-Fe. Analysis of the literature high P-T results on VP and VS of Fe alloyed with light elements shows that high temperature can further enhance the ν of hcp-Fe alloyed with Ni and Si. Most significantly, the derived seismic heterogeneity ratios of this hcp alloy present a better match with global seismic observations. Our results provide a multifactored geophysical constraint on the compositional model of the inner core which is consistent with silicon being a major light element alloyed with Fe and 5 wt % Ni.

  4. Directionally solidified eutectic gamma-gamma nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A directionally solidified multivariant eutectic gamma-gamma prime nickel-base superalloy casting having improved high temperature properties was developed. The alloy is comprised of a two phase eutectic structure consisting essentially of on a weight percent base, 6.0 to 9.0 aluminum, 5.0 to 17.0 tantalum, 0-10 cobalt, 0-6 vanadium, 0-6 rhenium, 2.0-6.0 tungsten, and the balance being nickel, subject to the proviso that the sum of the atomic percentages of aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 19-22, and the ratio of atomic percentages of tantalum to aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 0.12 to 0.23. Embedded within the gamma nickel-base matrix are aligned eutectic gamma prime phase (primarily nickel-aluminum-tantalum) reinforcing fibers.

  5. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  6. In Situ Micro-mechanical Testing of a PM Nickel-Base Superalloy Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwasegun, K. M.; Olawale, J. O.; Oyatogun, G. M.; Shittu, M. D.; Ige, O. O.; Malomo, B. O.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructural variations between the bond line and the base alloy of welds have been reported in various nickel-base superalloys that have found their applications as structural materials in aero- and land-based engines. This microstructural variation occurs within 50 to 100 μm of majority of welds. Thus, in order to characterize the strength variations between the weld and the base alloy, mechanical testing at micron level is required. This paper presents the use of a newly developed microtensile testing system for an in situ micro-mechanical testing of a powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy, RR1000 performed in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope.

  7. Stability of body-centered cubic iron-magnesium alloys in the Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Kádas, Krisztina; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-09-15

    The composition and the structure of the Earth's solid inner core are still unknown. Iron is accepted to be the main component of the core. Lately, the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron was suggested to be present in the inner core, although its stability at core conditions is still in discussion. The higher density of pure iron compared with that of the Earth's core indicates the presence of light element(s) in this region, which could be responsible for the stability of the bcc phase. However, so far, none of the proposed composition models were in full agreement with seismic observations. The solubility of magnesium in hexagonal Fe has been found to increase significantly with increasing pressure, suggesting that Mg can also be an important element in the core. Here, we report a first-principles density functional study of bcc Fe-Mg alloys at core pressures and temperatures. We show that at core conditions, 5-10 atomic percent Mg stabilizes the bcc Fe both dynamically and thermodynamically. Our calculated density, elastic moduli, and sound velocities of bcc Fe-Mg alloys are consistent with those obtained from seismology, indicating that the bcc-structured Fe-Mg alloy is a possible model for the Earth's inner core. PMID:19805214

  8. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  9. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The United States imports over 90% of its cobalt, chromium, columbium, and tantalum, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. Research progress in understanding the roles of cobalt and some possible substitutes effects on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed.

  10. The structure of Fe-Si alloy in Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-05-01

    Phase relations of iron-silicon alloy (Fe-6.5 wt.% Si and Fe-9 wt.% Si) were investigated up to 407 GPa and 5960 K in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, which likely covers the entire pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth's inner core. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements show that Fe-9 wt.% Si with a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure is stable to 4800 K at 330 GPa, corresponding to the pressure at the inner/outer core boundary, and decomposes into a mixture of Si-poor hcp and Si-rich CsCl-type (B2) phases at higher temperatures. We also found that the solubility of silicon in solid iron is relatively insensitive to temperature, decreasing from 9 to >6.5 wt.% over a range of 1500 K at 70 GPa. These suggest that the inner core is composed solely of the hcp phase, when the silicon content is up to 7 wt.% that likely accounts for the inner core density deficit as well as for the Mg/Si ratio and the Si isotopic composition of the mantle. Additionally, the present experiments demonstrate that the incorporation of silicon in iron expands the stability of hcp with respect to that of fcc.

  11. Quench Crack Behavior of Nickel-base Disk Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete; Miller, Jason

    2002-01-01

    There is a need to increase the temperature capability of superalloy turbine disks to allow higher operating temperatures in advanced aircraft engines. When modifying processing and chemistry of disk alloys to achieve this capability, it is important to preserve the ability to use rapid cooling during supersolvus heat treatments to achieve coarse grain, fine gamma prime microstructures. An important step in this effort is an understanding of the key variables controlling the cracking tendencies of nickel-base disk alloys during quenching from supersolvus heat treatments. The objective of this study was to investigate the quench cracking tendencies of several advanced disk superalloys during simulated heat treatments. Miniature disk specimens were rapidly quenched after solution heat treatments. The responses and failure modes were compared and related to the quench cracking tendencies of actual disk forgings. Cracking along grain boundaries was generally observed to be operative. For the alloys examined in this study, the solution temperature not alloy chemistry was found to be the primary factor controlling quench cracking. Alloys with high solvus temperatures show greater tendency for quench cracking.

  12. Mechanical properties of nanostructured nickel based superalloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Sh; Ermachenko, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper will describe the investigations of a nanostructured (NS) state of nickel based INCONEL® alloy 718. This structure was generated in bulk semiproducts by severe plastic deformation (SPD) via multiple isothermal forging (MIF) of a coarse-grained alloy. The initial structure consisted of γ-phase grains with disperse precipitations of γ"-phase in the forms of discs, 50-75 nm in diameter and 20 nm in thickness. The MIF generated structures possess a large quantity of non-coherent plates and rounded precipitations of δ-phase, primarily along grain boundaries. In the duplex (γ+δ) structure the grains have high dislocation density and a large number of nonequilibrium boundaries. Investigations to determine mechanical properties of the alloy in a nanostructured state were carried out. Nanocrystalline Inconel 718 (80 nm) possesses a very high room-temperature strength after SPD. Microcrystalline (MC) and NS states of the alloy were subjected to strengthening thermal treatment, and the obtained results were compared in order to determine their mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures.

  13. Investigation of the inner corrosion layer formed in pulse electrodeposition coating on Mg-Sr alloy and corresponding degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Yongming; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Fan, Xinmin; Qin, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium-based metals are considered as promising biodegradable orthopedic implant materials due to their potentials of enhancing bone healing and reconstruction, and in vivo absorbable characteristic without second operation for removal. However, the rapid corrosion has limited their clinical applications. Ca-P coating by electrodeposition has been supposed to be effective to control the degradation rate and enhance the bioactivity. In this work, a brushite coating was fabricated on the Mg-Sr alloy by pulse electrodeposition (PED) to evaluate its efficacy for orthopedic application. Interestingly, an inner corrosion layer was observed between the PED coating and the alloy substrate. Meanwhile the results of in vitro immersion and electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy was undermined in comparison with the uncoated alloy. It was deduced that the existence of this corrosion layer was attributed to the worse corrosion performance of the alloy. The mechanism on formation of the inner corrosion layer and its influence on consequent degradation were analyzed. It can be concluded that the electrodeposition coating should be not suitable for those magnesium alloys with poor corrosion resistance such as the Mg-Sr alloy. More importantly, it should be noted that the process of coating formation combined with the nature of substrate alloy is important to evaluate the efficacy of coating for biodegradable Mg-based implants application. PMID:27450886

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of nickel and nickel-base alloy surface alterations in simulated hot corrosion conditions with emphasis on eventual application to turbine blade corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateescu, G. D.; Smith, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the high temperature oxidation and Na2SO4 induced hot corrosion of some nickel base superalloys was accomplished by using ESCA to determine the surface composition of the oxidized or corroded samples. Oxidation was carried out at 900 or 1000 C in slowly flowing O2 for samples of B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C, and IN-738. Oxidation times ranged from 0.5 to 100 hr. Hot corrosion of B-1900 was induced applying a coating of Na2SO4 to peroxidized samples, the heating to 900 C in slowly flowing O2. For oxidized samples, the predominant type of scale formed by each superalloy was determined, and a marked surface enrichment of Ti was found in each case. For corroded samples, the transfer of significant amounts of material from the oxide layer to the surface of the salt layer was observed to occur long before the onset of accelerating weight-gain. Changes in surface composition were observed to coincide with the beginning of accelerating corrosion, the most striking of which was a tenfold decrease in the sulfur to sodium ration and an increase in the Cr(VI) ratio.

  15. Effects of cobalt on the hot workability of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Collier, J. P.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the workability of nickel-base superalloys is examined with reference to experimental results for four heats of alloys based on the Nimonic 115 composition with varying amounts of nickel substituted for the nominal 14 percent cobalt. It is shown that Co lowers the gamma-prime solvus, which in turn lowers the Cr23C6 carbide solvus. It is further shown that these solvus temperatures bracket the hot working range for the alloys. However, thermomechanical processing modifications reflecting the effect of Co on the gamma-prime and carbide solvi are shown to restore the workability and the properties of alloys with little or no cobalt.

  16. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  17. High Poisson's ratio of Earth's inner core explained by carbon alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescher, C.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Bykova, E.; Kupenko, I.; Glazyrin, K.; Kantor, A.; McCammon, C.; Mookherjee, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Miyajima, N.; Sinmyo, R.; Cerantola, V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Prakapenka, V.; Rüffer, R.; Chumakov, A.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-03-01

    Geochemical, cosmochemical, geophysical, and mineral physics data suggest that iron (or iron-nickel alloy) is the main component of the Earth’s core. The inconsistency between the density of pure iron at pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth’s core and seismological observations can be explained by the presence of light elements. However, the low shear wave velocity and high Poisson’s ratio of the Earth’s core remain enigmatic. Here we experimentally investigate the effect of carbon on the elastic properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures and report a high-pressure orthorhombic phase of iron carbide, Fe7C3. We determined the crystal structure of the material at ambient conditions and investigated its stability and behaviour at pressures up to 205 GPa and temperatures above 3,700 K using single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear inelastic scattering. Estimated shear wave and compressional wave velocities show that Fe7C3 exhibits a lower shear wave velocity than pure iron and a Poisson’s ratio similar to that of the Earth’s inner core. We suggest that carbon alloying significantly modifies the properties of iron at extreme conditions to approach the elastic behaviour of rubber. Thus, the presence of carbon may explain the anomalous elastic properties of the Earth’s core.

  18. Effects of fabrication practices and techniques on the corrosion and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Mo nickel based alloys UNS N10276, N06022, N06686, and N06625

    SciTech Connect

    Hinshaw, E.B.; Crum, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent resistance to both oxidizing and reducing type environments; however, heat treating, surface condition, welding, and type of welding consumable can have a significant affect on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of these alloys. It is also important when performing standard ASTM intergranular corrosion tests on welded test coupons to make an accurate comparison of alloys being tested. A standard weld procedure and consistent post-weld sample conditioning method should be incorporated into the comparison test program. An evaluation of the effect of various fabrication practices on the corrosion resistance of the alloy was performed using accelerated corrosion tests ASTM G28B. The fabrication conditions examined were as-welded, welded-pickled, welded-annealed-pickled, welded annealed ground, welded-ground, using over matching filler metals, and various levels of heat input. In addition to fabrication techniques, the effect of ASTM G28B test duration on corrosion rates of UNS N10276, N06022, N06686, and N06625 was evaluated. ASTM G28A intergranular corrosion and mechanical testing using welded coupons of UNS N06625 were also performed to determine the affect of post-weld annealing and aging heat treatments on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of UNS N06625.

  19. Low Strain Rate Deformation of Directionally Solidified Alloys, and the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, M. I.; Karato, S.

    2009-05-01

    The elastic anisotropy of the Earth's inner core (IC) is likely due to a lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of Fe crystals, though there is debate about the stable phase of Fe under inner core conditions. The cause of the LPO is likely due to either solidification or deformation, though it seems increasingly likely that no one explanation may suffice to understand the complex IC structure that seismologists are beginning to reveal. We have begun experiments to understand the high temperature deformation mechanism, recovery, and recrystallization of directionally solidified alloys. We start with directionally solidified, 3 weight percent Sn-Zn castings that have the columnar, dendritic structure that has been proposed for the IC. Zn is hexagonal close- packed (hcp), a probable phase of Fe in the IC. Hcp dendrites assume a platelet morphology. Typical grain sizes in our castings are 5 mm in the short dimension, with .4 mm platelet spacings. We then heat a slice of a casting to a high homologous temperature (greater than .95), at which the interdendritic Sn-rich phase melts, but the primary Zn-rich phase remains solid. While held at this temperature, we subject the slice to torsion at constant strain rate, while measuring the torque to infer the stress. We examine each slice before and after deformation for changes in crystalline orientation, microstructure (morphology and grain size), and chemical variations. So far we have obtained order one strains at low strain rates (2 x 10-6 1/s), which for fine-grained (.1 mm), pure Zn is near the boundary between diffusional flow and recrystallization. Inferring the stress during deformation (as of this writing we know only the maximum normalized stress is less than 10-5 Pa) and observing changes in microstructure and LPO will hopefully yield the deformation mechanism of these coarse-grained, dendritic alloys, as well as the lengthscale (grain size or dendritic spacing) relevant to deformation. As a control, we anneal (no

  20. Compositional Effects on Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystal Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Garg,Anita; Rogers, Richard B.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing 0 to 5 wt% chromium (Cr), 0 to 11 wt% cobalt (Co), 6 to 12 wt% molybdenum (Mo), 0 to 4 wt% rhenium (Re), and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta) were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including gamma' solvus, gamma' volume fraction, volume fraction of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, phase chemistries, and gamma - gamma'. lattice mismatch. Regression models were developed to describe the influence of bulk alloy composition on the microstructural parameters and were compared to predictions by a commercially available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in gamma' solvus over the wide compositional range used in this study, and Mo produced the largest effect on the gamma lattice parameter and the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch over its compositional range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had a significant impact on their concentrations in the gamma matrix and, to a smaller extent, in the gamma' phase. The gamma phase chemistries exhibited strong temperature dependencies that were influenced by the gamma and gamma' volume fractions. A computational thermodynamic modeling tool significantly underpredicted gamma' solvus temperatures and grossly overpredicted the amount of TCP phase at 982 C. Furthermore, the predictions by the software tool for the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch were typically of the wrong sign and magnitude, but predictions could be improved if TCP formation was suspended within the software program. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters based on bulk alloy composition, thereby demonstrating their usefulness.

  1. Near-Surface Residual Stress Assessment in Inhomogeneous Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P. B.

    2006-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that shot-peened nickel-base superalloys exhibit an approximately 1% increase in apparent eddy current conductivity at high inspection frequencies, which can be exploited for nondestructive subsurface residual stress assessment. Unfortunately, microstructural inhomogeneity in certain as-forged and precipitation hardened nickel-base superalloys, like Waspaloy, can lead to significantly larger electrical conductivity variations of as much as 4-6%. This intrinsic conductivity variation adversely affects the accuracy of residual stress evaluation in shot-peened and subsequently thermal-relaxed specimens, but does not completely prevent it. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that the conductivity variation resulting from volumetric inhomogeneities in as-forged engine alloys do not display significant frequency dependence. This characteristic independence of frequency can be exploited to distinguish these inhomogeneities from near-surface residual stress and cold work effects caused by surface treatment, which, in contrast, are strongly frequency-dependent.

  2. Near-Surface Residual Stress Assessment in Inhomogeneous Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P. B.

    2006-03-06

    Recently, it has been shown that shot-peened nickel-base superalloys exhibit an approximately 1% increase in apparent eddy current conductivity at high inspection frequencies, which can be exploited for nondestructive subsurface residual stress assessment. Unfortunately, microstructural inhomogeneity in certain as-forged and precipitation hardened nickel-base superalloys, like Waspaloy, can lead to significantly larger electrical conductivity variations of as much as 4-6%. This intrinsic conductivity variation adversely affects the accuracy of residual stress evaluation in shot-peened and subsequently thermal-relaxed specimens, but does not completely prevent it. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that the conductivity variation resulting from volumetric inhomogeneities in as-forged engine alloys do not display significant frequency dependence. This characteristic independence of frequency can be exploited to distinguish these inhomogeneities from near-surface residual stress and cold work effects caused by surface treatment, which, in contrast, are strongly frequency-dependent.

  3. Annealing of directionally solidified alloys revisited: No loss of solidification texture in Earth’s inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khatatbeh, Yahya; Bergman, Michael I.; Lewis, Daniel J.; Mason, Zachary; Zhu, Laura; Rosenstock, Sarita

    2013-10-01

    Bergman et al. (2010) found experimental evidence for recrystallization and loss of solidification texture during annealing of directionally solidified hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Zn-rich Sn alloys. They suggested that this could support the model of Alboussiere et al. (2010) and Monnereau et al. (2010), in which the Earth’s inner core translates convectively eastwards with enhanced solidification in the western hemisphere and melting in the eastern, because as inner core material translates eastwards and anneals it might lose texture, as inferred seismically. The 2010 study hypothesized that the alloys recrystallized rather than coarsened via diffusion due to the very low solubility of Sn in the Zn-rich phase. This study tests this hypothesis by annealing directionally solidified hcp Zn-rich Al alloys, in which there is greater solubility. Indeed, we find the Zn-rich Al alloys coarsen without recrystallization or fundamental change in texture. However, in contrast to the 2010 study the current study also did not find recrystallization in Zn-rich Sn alloys. This might tend to support models such as those by Cormier (2007) and Aubert et al. (2008) where long term mantle control over fluid flow near the base of the outer core might result in a weaker solidification texture in the eastern hemisphere. Although we do believe the results of the previous study are valid because they were repeatable at that time, it shows that there is something subtle that we cannot yet account for, and it remains unclear whether there is loss of solidification texture due to annealing of Earth’s inner core.

  4. Solid-liquid boundaries in iron-rich alloys and the age of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Gao, L.

    2006-05-01

    Melting and solidification cause major chemical differentiation in the Earth. As the Earth cools, the liquid core solidifies from the center and the inner core grows at the expense of the outer core. The timing of the onset of core solidification remains poorly constrained. Labrosse et al. (2001) estimated the age of the Earth's inner core based on energy budget considerations. In their analysis, the latent heat and gravitational energy are calculated according to dislocation melting theory. We have conducted melting experiments on pure iron and an iron-sulfur alloy containing 15 at.% sulfur, in order to determine the effect of pressure on the Clapeyron slopes of the solid-liquid boundaries. Our results allow a critical examination of the energy estimates, hence the age of the inner core. The implications for the budget of radioactive elements will be discussed.

  5. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the role of cobalt in Udimet 700, a representative nickel-base superalloy containing 17 percent or more cobalt. The study spans the spectrum of microstructural, microchemical, and mechanical behavior aspects which together form a basis for superalloy performance in jet engines. The results suggest that cobalt affects the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, which leads to enhanced gamma-prime volume fraction and to the stabilization of MC-type carbides and sigma phase. However, these microstructural and microchemical changes are too slight to significantly affect the strength and ductile properties. Depending on the heat treatment, the creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt-sensitive. In the coarse-grained, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17 percent Co can be replaced by nickel without decreasing the creep and stress rupture resistance. These findings are discussed with reference to existing theories and experimental data obtained by other workers.

  6. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  7. Thermal stability of the nickel-base superalloy B-1900 + Hf with tantalum variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. S.; Pletka, B. J.; Janowski, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The microstructure of the solutionized and aged nickel-base superalloy B-1900 + Hf was examined after additional aging at 982 C for 72, 250, and 1000 hours. Alloy compositions that were examined contained the normal 1.34 at. pct (4.3 wt pct) Ta as well as 0.67 at. pct and zero Ta levels. The gamma-prime phase agglomerated, became platelike in morphology, and decreased in volume fraction for all three alloys throughout the aging treatments. Changes which occurred in the gamma and gamma-prime phase compositions were nearly complete after 72 hours of aging while changes in the MC carbide composition continued throughout the aging. Blocky M6C carbides precipitated along the grain boundaries of all three alloys in the first 72 hours of aging. In addition, an acicular form of this Mo/Cr/Ni-rich carbide developed in the intragranular regions of the Ta-containing alloys.

  8. Methodology Developed for Modeling the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their superior high-temperature properties, gas generator turbine airfoils made of single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys are fast becoming the standard equipment on today's advanced, high-performance aerospace engines. The increased temperature capabilities of these airfoils has allowed for a significant increase in the operating temperatures in turbine sections, resulting in superior propulsion performance and greater efficiencies. However, the previously developed methodologies for life-prediction models are based on experience with polycrystalline alloys and may not be applicable to single-crystal alloys under certain operating conditions. One of the main areas where behavior differences between single-crystal and polycrystalline alloys are readily apparent is subcritical fatigue crack growth (FCG). The NASA Lewis Research Center's work in this area enables accurate prediction of the subcritical fatigue crack growth behavior in single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures.

  9. A concept for the EQ coating system for nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagishi, K.; Sato, A.; Harada, H.

    2008-07-01

    Nickel-based single-crystal superalloys with high concentrations of refractory elements are prone to generate a diffusion layer called a secondary reaction zone (SRZ) beneath their bond coating during long exposure to high temperatures. The SRZ causes a reduction of the load-bearing cross section and it is detrimental to the creep properties of thin-walled turbine airfoils. In this study, a new bond coat system, “EQ coating,” which is thermodynamically stable and suppresses SRZ has been proposed. Diffusion couples of coating materials and substrate alloys were made and heat treated at 1,100°C for 300 h and 1,000 h. Cyclic oxidation examinations were carried out at 1,100°C in air and the oxidation properties of EQ coating materials were discussed. High-velocity frame-sprayed EQ coatings designed for second-generation nickel-based superalloys were deposited on fourth-and fifth-generation nickel-based superalloys, and the stability of the microstructure at the interface and creep property of the coating system were investigated.

  10. The Axial Ratio of hcp Fe and Fe-Ni-Si Alloys to the Conditions of Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Campbell, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's iron-rich inner core is seismically anisotropic, which may be due to the preferred orientation of Fe-rich hexagonal close packed (hcp) alloy crystals. Elastic anisotropy in a hexagonal crystal is related to its c/a axial ratio; therefore, it is important to know how this ratio depends on volume (or pressure), temperature, and composition. Experimental data on the axial ratio of iron and alloys in the Fe-Ni-Si system from 15 previous studies are combined here to parameterize the effects of these variables. The axial ratio increases with increasing volume, temperature, silicon content, and nickel content. When an hcp phase coexists with another structure, sample recovery and chemical analysis from each pressure-temperature point is one method for determining the phase's composition and thus the position of the phase boundary. An alternate method is demonstrated here, using this parameterization to calculate the composition of an hcp phase whose volume, temperature, and axial ratio are measured. The hcp to hcp+B2 phase boundary in the Fe-FeSi system is parameterized as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition, showing that a silicon-rich inner core may be an hcp+B2 mixture. These findings could help explain observations of a layered seismic anisotropy structure in the Earth's inner core.

  11. Nondestructive evaluation of near-surface residual stress in shot-peened nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng

    Surface enhancement methods, which produce beneficial compressive residual stresses and increased hardness in a shallow near-surface region, are widely used in a number of industrial applications, including gas-turbine engines. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress gradients in surface-enhanced materials has great significance for turbine engine component life extension and their reliability in service. It has been recently found that, in sharp contrast with most other materials, shot-peened nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, which can be exploited for nondestructive residual stress assessment. The primary goal of this research is to develop a quantitative eddy current method for nondestructive residual stress profiles in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. Our work have been focused on five different aspects of this issue, namely, (i) validating the noncontacting eddy current technique for electroelastic coefficients calibration, (ii) developing inversion procedures for determining the subsurface residual stress profiles from the measured apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), (iii) predicting the adverse effect of surface roughness on the eddy current characterization of shot-peened metals, (iv) separating excess AECC caused by the primary residual stress effect from intrinsic conductivity variations caused by material inhomogeneity, and (v) investigating different mechanisms through which cold work could influence the AECC in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. The results of this dissertation have led to a better understanding of the underlying physical phenomenon of the measured excess AECC on nickel-base engine alloys, and solved a few critical applied issues in eddy current nondestructive residual stress assessment in surface-treated engine components and, ultimately, contributed to the better utilization and safer operation of the Air Force's aging

  12. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research progress in understanding the effects of cobalt and some possible substitute on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed. The United States imports over 90 percent of its cobalt, chromium, tantalum and columbium, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. NASA, through joint government/industry/university teams, undertook a long range research program aimed at reducing or eliminating these strategic elements by examining their basic roles in superalloys and identifying viable substitutes.

  13. Gamma prime shape changes during creep of a nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the shape of the gamma-prime phase in the single-crystal nickel base alloy NASAIR 100 during tensile and compressive creep have been investigated experimentally by Laue X-ray diffractometry. It is found that under tensile loading, gamma-prime changes from the initial cubic shape to plates perpendicular to the applied stress. This change occurs during primary creep at 1000 C, 148 MPa. Prolonged creep exposures result in a thickening of the gamma-prime plates that is similar to Ostwald ripening often observed in other superalloys during creep. Under compressive loading, two sets of gamma-prime plates parallel to the applied stress are formed.

  14. Directionally solidified eutectic gamma plus beta nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A directionally solidified multivariant eutectic gamma + beta nickel-base superalloy casting having improved high temperature strength and oxidation resistance properties is provided. This comprises a two phase eutectic structure containing, on a weight percent basis, 5.0-15.0 tungsten, 8.5-14.5 aluminum, 0.0-35.0 cobalt and the balance being nickel. Embedded within the gamma phase nickel-base matrix are aligned eutectic beta phase (primarily (NiCo)Al reinforcing lamellae.

  15. Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy CMSX-4 Fabricated by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsperger, Markus; Singer, Robert F.; Körner, Carolin

    2016-03-01

    Powder bed-based additive manufacturing (AM) processes are characterized by very high-temperature gradients and solidification rates. These conditions lead to microstructures orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional casting processes. Especially in the field of high performance alloys, like nickel-base superalloys, this opens new opportunities for homogenization and alloy development. Nevertheless, the high susceptibility to cracking of precipitation-hardenable superalloys is a challenge for AM. In this study, electron beam-based AM is used to fabricate samples from gas-atomized pre-alloyed CMSX-4 powder. The influence of the processing strategy on crack formation is investigated. The samples are characterized by optical and SEM microscopy and analyzed by microprobe analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to demonstrate the effect of the fine microstructure on characteristic temperatures. In addition, in situ heat treatment effects are investigated.

  16. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of several nickel-base superalloys at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the bulk deformation characteristics of seven nickel-base superalloys tested in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 C. The alloys were Waspalloy, HIP Astroloy, H plus F Astroloy, H plus F Rene 95, IN 100, MERL 76, and NASA IIB-7. The amount of bulk deformation observed in all the alloys was low. In tests with inelastic strain amplitudes less than about 0.003, only some grains exhibited yielding and the majority of those had the 110 line near the tensile axis. Deformation occurred on octahedral systems for all of the alloys except MERL 76 which also showed abundant primary cube slip. Creep-fatigue cycling occasionally produced extended faults between partial dislocations, but otherwise deformation was much the same as for fatigue cycling.

  17. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  18. Nucleation in a nickel-based superalloy utilizing computational thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutwell, Brett Allen Rohrer

    A model for predicting nucleation kinetics of coherent, homogeneous precipitates using thermodynamic and diffusion kinetic data calculated by computer modeling software was developed. The nucleation model incorporated classical nucleation theory along with derivations of the incubation time using the theory of time reversal symmetry. An atomic mobility database was developed for a seven-element nickel-based superalloy to allow for the calculation of multicomponent diffusivities to be used in the incubation time calculations. The seven elements modeled in the database were: nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti), aluminum (Al), and carbon (C). The process of assessing an atomic mobility database is discussed, and the difficulties of assembling such a database are reviewed. The nucleation model and atomic mobility database were then applied to modeling the nucleation kinetics of gamma' in two nickel-aluminum binary alloys. The results of the nucleation model were in good agreement with one binary alloy but did not agree well with the results for the second alloy. Enhanced diffusion due to excess vacancy concentrations was identified as the most probable reason for the discrepancy with the second nickel-aluminum alloy. The nucleation model and atomic mobility database were then tested on an industrial, multicomponent nickel-based superalloy, Inconel alloy 706. The precipitation kinetics of two coherent precipitates, gamma' and gamma'', were modeled and compared to Time-Temperature-Transformation diagrams and Time-Temperature-Hardness diagrams for the alloy. The calculated incubation times for gamma ' and gamma'' were faster than the experimentally observed transformation start times. The results of the gamma' incubation time calculations were in close approximation to the experimental data at higher temperatures. The results of the gamma'' calculations did not agree well with the experimental data.

  19. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  20. Micrographic detection of plastic deformation in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    1980-09-20

    A method for detecting low levels of plastic deformation in metal articles comprising electrolytically etching a flow free surface of the metal article with nital at a current density of less than about 0.1 amp/cm/sup 2/ and microscopically examining the etched surface to determine the presence of alternating striations. The presence of striations indicates plastic deformation in the article.

  1. Micrographic detection of plastic deformation in nickel base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for detecting low levels of plastic deformation in metal articles comprising electrolytically etching a flow free surface of the metal article with nital at a current density of less than about 0.1 amp/cm.sup.2 and microscopically examining the etched surface to determine the presence of alternating striations. The presence of striations indicates plastic deformation in the article.

  2. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  3. Advanced microcharacterization of nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Miller, M.K.; Pike, L.M.; Klarstrom, D.L.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize the microstructural and microchemical effects of a process revision on HAYNES{reg{underscore}sign} 242{trademark}, a polycrystalline Ni-base superalloy used principally for high temperature applications, such as seal and containment rings in gas turbine engines. The process revision from the current one-step heat treating cycle to a two-step heat treatment would result in savings of energy and ultimately cost to the consumer. However, the proposed process revision could give rise to unforeseen microstructural modifications, such as a change in the size distribution of the ordered particles responsible for alloy strength or the formation of additional phases, which could affect alloy properties and hence performance. Advanced microcharacterization methods that allow images of the microstructure to be acquired at length scales from one micrometer down to the atomic level were used to reveal the effect of the process revision on alloy microstructure. Energy filtered imaging was used to characterize the size distribution and morphology of ordered precipitates and other phases, as well as the partitioning behavior of major elements (Ni, Mo, Cr) among these phases. The compositions of individual ordered particles, including fine-scale compositional variations at precipitate-matrix interfaces, and solute segregation behavior at grain boundaries were characterized at the atomic level by atom probe tomography. The atomic site distributions of selected elements in the ordered precipitates were characterized by atom-location by channeling-enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI). The results of these advanced microcharacterization methods were correlated with mechanical testing of similar alloys to address structure-property relationships.

  4. Effect of casting geometry on mechanical properties of two nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Collins, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine mechanical properties of two rhenium-free modifications of alloy TRW, and to evaluate the suitability of the alloy for use in a small integrally cast turbine rotor. The two alloys were initially developed using stress rupture properties of specimens machined from solid gas turbine blades. Properties in this investigation were determined from cast to size bars and bars cut from 3.8 by 7.6 by 17.8 cm blocks. Specimens machined from blocks had inferior tensile strength and always had markedly poorer rupture lives than cast to size bars. At 1,000 C the cast to size bars had shorter rupture lives than those machined from blades. Alloy R generally had better properties than alloy S in the conditions evaluated. The results show the importance of casting geometry on mechanical properties of nickel base superalloys and suggest that the geometry of a component can be simulated when developing alloys for that component.

  5. Resonance ultrasound spectroscopy forward modeling and inverse characterization of nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Eric; Jauriqui, Leanne; Aldrin, John C.; Goodlet, Brent; Pollock, Tresa; Torbet, Chris; Mazdiyasni, Siamack

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) measurement models to more precisely connect changes in the resonance frequencies of nickel-based super-alloy material to the macro/microscopic state. RUS models using analytical solutions and the finite element method (FEM) were developed to address varying elastic properties, grain structures and creep. Experimental studies were performed investigating the effect of exposure to high temperatures and stress for varying part shape and three grain structure classes: single crystals, directionally-solidified and polycrystalline structures. Inversion using both traditional analytical models was enhanced in order to simultaneously estimate varying material properties and changes in part geometry due to creep. Inversion using surrogate models from FEM simulations was also developed, addressing varying crystal orientation and complex geometries. Results are presented comparing the forward model trends and inversion results with nickel alloy parts under various test conditions.

  6. A Comparison of Residual Stress Development in Inertia Friction Welded Fine Grain and Coarse Grain Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, N.; Rolph, J.; Moat, R.; Hughes, D.; Hofmann, M.; Kelleher, J.; Baxter, G.; Withers, P. J.; Preuss, M.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the base material microstructure on the development of residual stresses across the weld line in inertia friction welds (IFWs) of high-strength nickel-base superalloy RR1000 was studied using neutron diffraction. A comparison was carried out between tubular IFW specimens generated from RR1000 heat treated below (fine grain (FG) structure) and above (coarse grain (CG) structure) the γ'-solvus. Residual stresses were mapped in the as-welded (AW) condition and, after a postweld heat treatment (PWHT), optimized for maximum alloy strength. The highest tensile stresses were generally found in the hoop direction at the weld line near the inner diameter of the tubular-shaped specimens. A comparison between the residual stresses generated in FG and CG RR1000 suggests that the starting microstructure has little influence on the maximum residual stresses generated in the weld even though different levels of energy must be input to achieve a successful weld in each case. The residual stresses in the postweld heat treated samples were about 35 pct less than for the AW condition. Despite the fact that the high-temperature properties of the two parent microstructures are different, no significant differences in terms of stress relief were found between the FG and CG RR1000 IFWs. Since the actual weld microstructures of FG and CG RR1000 inertia welds are very similar, the results suggest that it is the weld microstructure and its associated high-temperature properties rather than the parent material that affects the overall weld stress distribution and its subsequent stress relief.

  7. Experimental Design for Evaluation of Co-extruded Refractory Metal/Nickel Base Superalloy Joints

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek

    2005-12-16

    Prior to the restructuring of the Prometheus Program, the NRPCT was tasked with delivering a nuclear space reactor. Potential NRPCT nuclear space reactor designs for the Prometheus Project required dissimilar materials to be in contact with each other while operating at extreme temperatures under irradiation. As a result of the high reactor core temperatures, refractory metals were the primary candidates for many of the reactor structural and cladding components. They included the tantalum-base alloys ASTAR-811C and Ta-10W, the niobium-base alloy FS-85, and the molybdenum base alloys Moly 41-47.5 Rhenium. The refractory metals were to be joined to candidate nickel base alloys such as Haynes 230, Alloy 617, or Nimonic PE 16 either within the core if the nickel-base alloys were ultimately selected to form the outer core barrel, or at a location exterior to the core if the nickel-base alloys were limited to components exterior to the core. To support the need for dissimilar metal joints in the Prometheus Project, a co-extrusion experiment was proposed. There are several potential methods for the formation of dissimilar metal joints, including explosive bonding, friction stir welding, plasma spray, inertia welding, HIP, and co-extrusion. Most of these joining methods are not viable options because they result in the immediate formation of brittle intermetallics. Upon cooling, intermetallics form in the weld fusion zone between the joined metals. Because brittle intermetallics do not form during the initial bonding process associated with HIP, co-extrusion, and explosive bonding, these three joining procedures are preferred for forming dissimilar metal joints. In reference to a Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory report done under a NASA sponsored program, joints that were fabricated between similar materials via explosive bonding had strengths that were directly affected by the width of the diffusion barrier. It was determined that the diffusion zone should not exceed

  8. Dendritic growth and crystalline quality of nickel-base single grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siredey, Nathalie; Boufoussi, M'Bareck; Denis, Sabine; Lacaze, Jacques

    1993-05-01

    It is a usual observation that subgrains exist in nickel-base single grain components solidified by the lost wax process. The associated misorientations are generally small, but they can eventually lead to casting defects in the case of highly complex mold shapes. This work presents an attempt to relate the formation of subgrain boundaries with the development of the dendritic solidification microstructure. Experimental investigations have been undertaken on cast components made of AM1 nickel-base superalloy designed for high temperature turbine blades. Single grains were obtained by means of a grain selector at the bottom of each part. Metallographic observations have been made to characterize the dendritic array, together with gamma diffraction to measure the crystalline quality of the material and X-ray topography for mapping of misorientations on a dendritic scale. Small misorientations between dendrite stems have been found at the upper end of the selector which lead to the formation of subgrains. Moreover, during the growth process, the total mosaicity of the material increases, firstly as a consequence of an increase in the misorientations between subgrains, and secondly because of a decrease of the internal quality of each subgrain. It is proposed that misorientations are due to thermomechanical stresses which build up during λ' precipitation at temperatures slightly below the solidus temperature of the alloy.

  9. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  10. Oxidation of a Commercial Nickel-Based Superalloy under Static Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, B. J.; Hardy, M. C.; Child, D. J.; McPhail, D. S.; Shollock, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The current demands of the aviation industry for increased gas-turbine efficiency necessitate higher turbine entry temperatures, requiring that alloys exhibit superior oxidation resistance. The synergistic effects of oxidation and mechanical stresses pose a complex issue. The purpose of the current research was to examine the effects of stress on the oxidation and oxygen transport in a commercial nickel-based superalloy. Fine grain RR1000 in both polished and shot-peened conditions was studied for classic (zero load) and statically loaded conditions using integrated two-stage isotopic tracing combined with focused-ion-beam secondary ion mass spectrometry (FIB-SIMS). Cr2O3 external oxide formed with semicontinuous TiO2 above and below. Preferential grain boundary Al2O3 internal oxide formation, γ'-dissolution, and recrystallization occurred subsurface. Oxidation mechanisms were dominated by anionic/cationic growth in the external oxide with inward oxygen transport, initially through the partially unprotective external oxide, then along internal oxide/alloy interfaces. Loading did not influence the oxidation products formed but did bring about expedited oxidation kinetics and changes to the oxide morphology. The oxygen diffusivity D {O/ * } (×10-13 cm2s-1) ranged from 0.39 for the polished alloy to 3.7 for the shot-peened condition under compressive stress. Arguably, the most significant effects took place in the subsurface regions. Increased oxidation kinetics were attributed to the development of fast cation diffusion paths as the alloy deformed by creep.

  11. The stability of lamellar gamma-gamma-prime structures. [nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of stress-annealed gamma/gamma-prime lamellar structures were investigated using three nickel-base single-crystal alloys (the NASAIR 100 and two similar alloys, E and F, containing 5 and 10 wt pct Co, respectively) stress-annealed at 1000 C to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress. The rate of the lamellar thickening under various thermal and creep exposures was examined by SEM. For unstressed aging at 1100 C, the lamellar structures of the NASAIR and the E alloys exhibited continuous but slow lamellar coarsening, whereas the lamellae of the alloy F showed pronounced thickening plus spheroidization. Resistance to lamellar thickening was correlated with high magnitudes of lattice mismatch, which promoted a more regular lamellar structure and a finer spacing of misfit dislocations. Specimens which were tension-annealed prior to compressive creep testing exhibited an earlier onset of tertiary creep in comparison with only heat-treated specimens. This was associated with accelerated lamellar coarsening in the stress-annealed specimens.

  12. Electronic correlations in Fe at Earth's inner core conditions: Effects of alloying with Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilova, O. Yu.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phases of Fe alloyed with 25 at.% of Ni at Earth's core conditions using an ab initio local density approximation + dynamical mean-field theory approach. The alloys have been modeled by ordered crystal structures based on the bcc, fcc, and hcp unit cells with the minimum possible cell size allowing for the proper composition. Our calculations demonstrate that the strength of electronic correlations on the Fe 3 d shell is highly sensitive to the phase and local environment. In the bcc phase, the 3 d electrons at the Fe site with Fe only nearest neighbors remain rather strongly correlated, even at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, with the local and uniform magnetic susceptibility exhibiting a Curie-Weiss-like temperature evolution and the quasiparticle lifetime Γ featuring a non-Fermi-liquid temperature dependence. In contrast, for the corresponding Fe site in the hcp phase, we predict a weakly correlated Fermi-liquid state with a temperature-independent local susceptibility and a quadratic temperature dependence of Γ. The iron sites with nickel atoms in the local environment exhibit behavior in the range between those two extreme cases, with the strength of correlations gradually increasing along the hcp-fcc-bcc sequence. Further, the intersite magnetic interactions in the bcc and hcp phases are also strongly affected by the presence of Ni nearest neighbors. The sensitivity to the local environment is related to modifications of the Fe partial density of states due to mixing with Ni 3 d states.

  13. Microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fencheng; Lin, Xin; Yang, Gaolin; Song, Menghua; Chen, Jing; Huang, Weidong

    2011-02-01

    The microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed (LRFed) nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 was investigated. The as-deposited microstructure of an LRFed Inconel 718 alloy is composed of columnar dendrites growing epitaxially along the deposition direction, and the columnar dendrites transformed to unevenly distributed equiaxed grains after annealing treatment at high temperature. Residual stress evaluation in microstructure scale by Vickers micro-indentation method indicates that the residual thermal stress is unevenly distributed in the LRFed sample, and it has a significant effect on the recrystallization during solution annealing treatment. The residual stress is introduced by rapid heating and cooling during laser rapid forming. There is an alternative distribution between high residual stress regions and low residual stress regions, within a single deposited layer, resulting in a similar distribution of recrystallized grain size.

  14. Yielding and deformation behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Interrupted tensile tests were conducted to fixed plastic strain levels in 100 ordered single crystals of the nickel based superalloy PWA 1480. Testing was done in the range of 20 to 1093 C, at strain rate of 0.5 and 50%/min. The yield strength was constant from 20 to 760 C, above which the strength dropped rapidly and became a stong function of strain rate. The high temperature data were represented very well by an Arrhenius type equation, which resulted in three distinct temperature regimes. The deformation substructures were grouped in the same three regimes, indicating that there was a fundamental relationship between the deformation mechanisms and activation energies. Models of the yielding process were considered, and it was found that no currently available model was fully applicable to this alloy. It was also demonstrated that the initial deformation mechanism (during yielding) was frequently different from that which would be inferred by examining specimens which were tested to failure.

  15. Microstructure-property relationships in directionally solidified single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the microstructural features which influence the creep properties of directionally solidified and single crystal nickel-base superalloys are discussed. Gamma precipitate size and morphology, gamma-gamma lattice mismatch, phase instability, alloy composition, and processing variations are among the factors considered. Recent experimental results are reviewed and related to the operative deformation mechanisms and to the corresponding mechanical properties. Special emphasis is placed on the creep behavior of single crystal superalloys at high temperatures, where directional gamma coarsening is prominent, and at lower temperatures, where gamma coarsening rates are significantly reduced. It can be seen that very subtle changes in microstructural features can have profound effects on the subsequent properties of these materials.

  16. On the Detection of Creep Damage in a Directionally Solidified Nickel Base Superalloy Using Nonlinear Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jidong; Qu, Jianmin; Saxena, Ashok; Jacobs, Larry

    2004-02-01

    A limited experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using nonlinear ultrasonic technique for assessing the remaining creep life of a directionally solidified (DS) nickel base superalloy. Specimens of this alloy were subjected to creep testing at different stress levels. Creep tests were periodically interrupted at different creep life fractions to conduct transmission ultrasonic tests to explore if a correlation exists between the higher order harmonics and the accumulated creep damage in the samples. A strong and unique correlation was found between the third order harmonic of the transmitted wave and the exhausted creep life fraction. Preliminary data also show an equally strong correlation between plastic deformation accumulated during monotonic loading and the second harmonic of the transmitted ultrasonic wave while no correlation was found between plastic strain and the third order harmonic. Thus, the nonlinear ultrasonic technique can potentially distinguish between damage due to plastic deformation and creep deformation.

  17. Stereological characterization of {gamma}' phase precipitation in CMSX-6 monocrystalline nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Szczotok, Agnieszka; Richter, Janusz; Cwajna, Jan

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to study in detail the means to quantitatively evaluate {gamma}' phase precipitation. Many of the mechanical properties of superalloys are directly influenced by the presence of the {gamma}' (gamma prime) precipitate phase dispersed in a {gamma} matrix phase. The {gamma}' precipitates act as effective barriers to dislocation motion and restrict plastic deformation, particularly at high temperatures. Due to this, it is essential to accurately quantify the {gamma}' precipitate size, volume fraction and distribution. Investigations based on quantitative metallography and image analysis were performed on a monocrystalline nickel-base superalloy taking into consideration various {gamma}' precipitate sizes present in that alloy microstructure. The authors of the present paper propose a new method of quantifying the total volume fraction of the {gamma}' phase applying images of the microstructure with {gamma}' phase precipitates registered using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (at two different magnifications) and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Mapelli, Carlo

    2013-08-15

    Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. γ′-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and γ″-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of γ″-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type

  19. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  20. Analysis of the Influence of Laser Welding on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Newly Developed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckson, R. A.; Ojo, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of laser welding on fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a newly developed nickel-base superalloy, Haynes 282 was studied. Laser welding resulted in cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the alloy during welding and FCG test results show that this produces deleterious effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Haynes 282. However, two post weld heat treatments, including a new thermal treatment schedule developed in this work, are used to significantly improve the resistance of the Haynes 282 fatigue crack growth after laser welding. The effects of laser welding and thermal treatments are discussed in terms of HAZ cracking and heterogeneity of slip, respectively.

  1. Tensile Behavior of Long-term Aged Nickel-base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, P. C.; Chen, F. W.; Xie, K.; Yu, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    The microstructural change of directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy which was aged at 900 °C for 1500 hours and tensile behavior at different temperatures were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). γ' phase of the alloy coarsens and rafts in the course of aged treatment. The driving force of rafting is the decrease of interface energy and elastic strain energy. The stress of aged alloy increases slightly with the testing temperature. This arises from a few dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates. There is a peak stress value at 760 °C, which is attributed to the high strength of the γ' phase, the homogeneous deformation structure, and dislocation-γ' precipitate and dislocation-dislocation interactions. The stress then decreases rapidly with increased temperature. The low stress of the γ' phase and γ' rafting at high temperature contribute to the drop of alloy strength. The change of elongation is inverse to that of the stress.

  2. Computational Thermodynamic Study to Predict Complex Phase Equilibria in the Nickel-Base Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2001-01-01

    A previous study by Ritzert et al. on the formation and prediction of topologically closed packed (TCP) phases in the nickel-base superalloy Rene' N6 is re-examined with computational thermodynamics. The experimental data on phase distribution in forty-four alloys with a composition within the patent limits of the nickel-base superalloy Rene' N6 provide a good basis for comparison to and validation of a commercial nickel superalloy database used with ThermoCalc. Volume fraction of the phases and partitioning of the elements are determined for the forty-four alloys in this dataset. The baseline heat treatment of 400 h at 1366 K was used. This composition set is particularly interesting since small composition differences lead to dramatic changes in phase composition. In general the calculated values follow the experimental trends. However, the calculations indicated no TCP phase formation when the experimental measurements gave a volume percent of TCP phase less than 2 percent. When TCP phases were predicted, the calculations under-predict the volume percent of TCP phases by a factor of 2 to 8. The calculated compositions of the gamma and gamma' phases show fair agreement with the measurements. However, the calculated compositions of the P Phase do not agree with those measured. This may be due to inaccuracies in the model parameters for P phase and/or issues with the microprobe analyses of these phases. In addition, phase fraction diagrams and sigma and P phase solvus temperatures are calculated for each of the alloys. These calculations indicate that P phase is the primary TCP phase formed for the alloys considered here at 1366 K. Finally, a series of isopleths are calculated for each of the seven alloying elements. These show the effect of each alloying element on creating TCP phases.

  3. Selection of etching methods of primary carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-base superalloy for computer-aided quantitative metallography

    SciTech Connect

    Szczotok, Agnieszka . E-mail: agnieszka.szczotok@polsl.pl; Szala, Janusz . E-mail: janusz.szala@polsl.pl; Cwajna, Jan . E-mail: jan.cwajna@polsl.pl; Hetmanczyk, Marek . E-mail: marek.hetmanczyk@polsl.pl

    2006-06-15

    The usefulness of various etching methods for revealing the structure of MAR-M247 nickel-base superalloy and image acquisition methods were analyzed from a desire to estimate primary carbides quantitatively. The analysis was carried out on images registered using light and scanning electron microscopes. The analyzed images contained a complete range of primary carbides occurring in the matrix and on the grain boundaries of MAR-M247 alloy.

  4. Mechanical properties of white layers formed by different machining processes on nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Edouard

    Nickel-based superalloys are widely used in the aerospace industry in the production of turbine discs and blades because of their good mechanical properties and great corrosion resistance at high temperature. Although very useful, these alloys are hard to machine. Their structure is responsible for rapid wear of cutting tools. Moreover, under certain machining conditions, near-surface regions of the material undergo a phase transformation resulting in the formation of a thin layer called "white etching layer" at the surface of the machined workpiece. Because turbine discs are safety critical components, no defects can be tolerated on the workpiece. Therefore, efforts should be made to ensure that this white etching layer can't influence the operating life of the workpiece and make its operation unsafe. Even if the existence of the white etching layer is well known, its mechanical properties have never been assessed in detail. In this thesis, we present a study of the mechanical (hardness and Young's modulus) and microstructural properties of white etching layers formed at the surface of nickel-based superalloy IN100 turbine discs fabricated by different machining processes. This work aims at evaluating the impact of the machining process and of fatigue on the properties of the white etching layers under study. The originality of this study primarily lies in the employed characterization technique. Using nanoindentation has allowed us to very precisely assess the variations of both the hardness and the Young's modulus along the white etching layers. Also, the use of a sophisticated indentation system has enabled the acquisition of very precise surface images of the samples and therefore to study the microstructure of the white etching layers. This research has demonstrated that the mechanical and microstructural properties of the white etching layers are closely linked to the machining conditions of the material. Therefore, our study will help researchers gain a

  5. Refining the chemical composition of the inner core with multicomponent alloys: from first-principles to thermodynamics and seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Asimow, P. D.; Wolf, A. S.; Harvey, J. P.; Martin, A.; Torrent, M.

    2015-12-01

    We compute the solubility limits of Si in the hexagonal-close packed (hcp) phase of iron using standard thermodynamical treatment of solid solutions with data obtained from first-principles calculations. For this, we consider the system with end-members hcp Fe and the B2 phase of FeSi. Si and Fe enter both structures in substitution of one another. The system is characterized by an immiscibility gap, which according to our results widens with pressure. At core conditions about 5 wt.% Si can be dissolved into the hcp phase of Fe. Comparatively there is much more Fe that can enter the FeSi B2 phase. In a second step we start with the hcp Fe-Si alloys and add the most probable light elements found in the core: H, C, O, and S. The light elements can enter the hcp structure either as interstitial impurities, in case of H, C, O, or in substitution of Fe, in case of S. We consider several insertion patterns with the light elements both adjacent and far apart. For each of these new phases we compute the elastic constants tensors and the seismic properties. Based on our theoretical results and the comparisons with PREM we discuss in detail the possible composition of the Earth's inner core, we rule out certain light elements, like H, and we show that the distribution pattern is not important. This is also the first time the elastic constants tensor is computed from lattice dynamics using the response function in the Planar Augmented Wavefunction approach of the Density Functional Theory [1]. [1] A. Martin, M. Torrent, R. Caracas, submitted (2015); A. Martin, PhD thesis (2015).

  6. Effects of Cobalt on Structure, Microchemistry and Properties of a Wrought Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Robert N.; Tien, John K.

    1982-06-01

    Cobalt in a 17 pct cobalt containing wrought nickel-base superalloy is systematically substituted for by nickel in order to determine the role of cobalt. The eventual goal is to reduce the levels of cobalt, a critical strategic element, in superalloys. It is found that the strengthening γ microstructure is highly heat treatment sensitive. Reducing cobalt did not result in a reduction of the fine γ precipitates after a coarse grain type (blading) heat treatment, but did after a fine grain type (disk) heat treatment. Representative mechanical properties were determined for each case to isolate microstructural and microchemistry effects. Ambient yield strength and tensile strength were seen to decrease by no more than 15 pct and 7 pct, respectively, even when all the cobalt was removed. The decrease in strength is quantitatively discussed and shown to be consistent with the observed microstructural results and microchemistry results obtained using STEM/EDS. Elevated temperature creep and stress rupture resistances were concluded to be affected by alloy cobalt content through its effect on strengthening γ volume fraction. Significant decreases in these properties were observed for the lower cobalt content alloys. Long term aging, precipitate coarsening, and carbide stability results are also presented and discussed.

  7. Method of improving fatigue life of cast nickel based superalloys and composition

    DOEpatents

    Denzine, Allen F.; Kolakowski, Thomas A.; Wallace, John F.

    1978-03-14

    The invention consists of a method of producing a fine equiaxed grain structure (ASTM 2-4) in cast nickel-base superalloys which increases low cycle fatigue lives without detrimental effects on stress rupture properties to temperatures as high as 1800.degree. F. These superalloys are variations of the basic nickel-chromium matrix, hardened by gamma prime [Ni.sub.3 (Al, Ti)] but with optional additions of cobalt, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, columbium, tantalum, boron, zirconium, carbon and hafnium. The invention grain refines these alloys to ASTM 2 to 4 increasing low cycle fatigue life by a factor of 2 to 5 (i.e. life of 700 hours would be increased to 1400 to 3500 hours for a given stress) as a result of the addition of 0.01% to 0.2% of a member of the group consisting of boron, zirconium and mixtures thereof to aid heterogeneous nucleation. The alloy is vacuum melted and heated to 250.degree.-400.degree. F. above the melting temperature, cooled to partial solidification, thus resulting in said heterogeneous nucleation and fine grains, then reheated and cast at about 50.degree.-100.degree. F. of superheat. Additions of 0.1% boron and 0.1% zirconium (optional) are the preferred nucleating agents.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interactions are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1988-01-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interaction are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  10. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    SciTech Connect

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T.P.; Miner, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interactions are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Arc Sprayed Nickel-Base Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dingyong; Dong, Na; Jiang, Jianmin

    2007-12-01

    In this study, nickel-base cored wires were prepared by using NiCr strip to wrap metal powders of nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and chromium boron (CrB). Nickel-base coatings were prepared by electric arc spraying. Microstructures of Ni-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-B coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive analysis (EDAX), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings have a compact surface and presented a bonding strength higher than 40 MPa. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements and salt-spray test were carried out to determine the corrosion behavior of the coatings. The results showed that Ni-base coatings containing Mo (5%) or B (2-4%) had better antichlorine ion corrosion performance than that of Ni-base coatings without Mo element, and PS45 (Ni-Cr-Ti) coating. The antichlorine ion corrosion coatings could be used for resolving the corrosion protection problem of the equipment and piping contacting sour, alkali, salt liquid in petrochemical engineering applications.

  12. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of several nickel-base superalloys at 650 °c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-10-01

    Specimens of seven nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine disk application that had been failed in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 °C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to observe the effects of composition and microstructure on the deformation characteristics of the alloys. The alloys were Waspaloy, HIP Astroloy, H+F Astroloy, H+F René 95, IN 100, MERL 76, and NASA IIB-7. The amount of bulk deformation observed in all the alloys was low. At inelastic strain amplitudes less than about 10-3 only favorably oriented grains exhibited yielding, and the majority of those had <110> near the tensile axis. Deformation occurred on octahedral systems for all the alloys except MERL 76, which also exhibited primary cube slip. The difference in slip behavior between MERL 76 and its parent composition, IN 100, was attributed to the addition of Nb. Deformation occurred in well-defined slip bands in the alloys that contained only fine aging γ', 0.01 to 0.06 μm in size. Alloys which also contained a population of larger aging γ' particles, 0.1 to 0.3 μm, exhibited more homogeneous deformation. Deformation in the creep-fatigue cycle, which employed a 15 minute dwell at the maximum tensile strain of the cycle, was not greatly different from fatigue deformation except that a few extended faults were formed.

  13. Multi-objective constrained design of nickel-base superalloys using data mining- and thermodynamics-driven genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Edern; Ramstein, Gérard; Bertrand, Emmanuel; Tancret, Franck

    2016-06-01

    A new computational framework for systematic and optimal alloy design is introduced. It is based on a multi-objective genetic algorithm which allows (i) the screening of vast compositional ranges and (ii) the optimisation of the performance of novel alloys. Alloys performance is evaluated on the basis of their predicted constitutional and thermomechanical properties. To this end, the CALPHAD method is used for assessing equilibrium characteristics (such as constitution, stability or processability) while Gaussian processes provide an estimate of thermomechanical properties (such as tensile strength or creep resistance), based on a multi-variable non-linear regression of existing data. These three independently well-assessed tools were unified within a single C++ routine. The method was applied to the design of affordable nickel-base superalloys for service in power plants, providing numerous candidates with superior expected microstructural stability and strength. An overview of the metallurgy of optimised alloys, as well as two detailed examples of optimal alloys, suggest that improvements over current commercial alloys are achievable at lower costs.

  14. Creep data analyses of a columnar-grained nickel-base superalloy by conventional and {beta}-envelope methods

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, M.S.G.; Sriramamurthy, A.M.; Radhakrishnan, V.M.

    1998-08-01

    Creep-rupture properties of a columnar-grained nickel-base superalloy have been evaluated over a wide temperature range (1,033 to 1,311 K) and stress levels (80 to 850 MPa). Creep data analyses based on the conventional approach as well as on a new graphical method--the {beta}-envelope method--have been carried out for creep strain and life estimation purposes. The relation between minimum creep rate of the alloy with the applied stress obeys simple power law, whereas the rupture data of the alloy fits well to the Larson-Miller parameter. Also, the Monkman-Grant relation between the minimum creep rate and the rupture life produces a trend with some degree of scatter in the data. The latter relation in its generalized form by the {beta}-envelope method exhibited the best correlation with significantly reduced scatter in the data.

  15. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys - B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In order of decending susceptibility to hot corrosion, these alloys were ranked: B-1900, 713C, NASA-TRW VIA, IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  16. High temperature low-cycle fatigue mechanisms in single crystals of nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W.; Jayaraman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty three high temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200. Tests were conducted at 760 and 870 C. SEM fractography and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine mechanisms responsible for the observed orientation dependent fatigue behavior. It has been concluded that the plastic characteristics of the alloy lead to orientation-dependent strain hardening and fatigue lives at 760 C. At 870 C, the elastic characteristics of the alloy dominated the behavior, even though the plastic strain ranges were about the same as they were at 760 C. This led to orientation-dependent fatigue lives, but the trends were not the same as they were at 760 C.

  17. Properties of Nickel-Based Hydrogen-Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.; Warren, J. P.; Cowles, B. A.; Shoemaker, D.; Teel, J. R. J.; Pearson, D. L.; Annis, C. G. J.; Wilson, D. A.; Schwartz, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    120 page report presents data on mechanical properties of cast nickelbased alloys for turbine blades operating in hydrogen and steam at high temperatures. Tests on alloys for hydrogen-burning engines of future are described.

  18. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the application of single mode high power fiber laser (HPFL) for the welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625. Butt joints of Inconel 625 sheets 0,8 mm thick were laser welded without an additional material. The influence of laser welding parameters on weld quality and mechanical properties of test joints was studied. The quality and mechanical properties of the joints were determined by means of tensile and bending tests, and micro hardness tests, and also metallographic examinations. The results showed that a proper selection of laser welding parameters provides non-porous, fully-penetrated welds with the aspect ratio up to 2.0. The minimum heat input required to achieve full penetration butt welded joints with no defect was found to be 6 J/mm. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the joints are essentially equivalent to that for the base material.

  19. Wave propagation in an anisotropic nickel-based superalloy

    PubMed

    Amulele; Every

    2000-03-01

    The effects of elastic anisotropy on ultrasound propagation in a nickel-based single crystal test component are studied using a 25 MHz focused probe in a water immersion system. Anisotropy gives rise to directionally dependent acoustic wavespeeds, beam steering, acoustic energy focusing and mode conversion for normal incidence. Transverse mode echoes are particularly strong in the vicinity of crystallographic directions in which the Gaussian curvature of the slowness surface is zero and divergence of the echo amplitude is predicted on the basis of the stationary phase approximation. There are other directions where the transverse mode echoes vanish for symmetry reasons. The longitudinal mode echo amplitude also shows significant variation with direction. Overall there is good agreement between the echo signal arrival times and amplitudes we measure and calculation. Progress in applying this technique to gas turbine blades is reported. PMID:10829669

  20. Influence of composition on microstructural parameters of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    MacKay, R.A.; Gabb, T.P.; Garg, A.; Rogers, R.B.; Nathal, M.V.

    2012-08-15

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing a range of chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and rhenium (Re) levels, and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta), were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including {gamma} Prime solvus, {gamma} Prime volume fraction, topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries, and {gamma}-{gamma} Prime lattice mismatch. Regression models describing the influence of bulk alloy composition on each of the microstructural parameters were developed and compared to predictions by a commercially-available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in {gamma} Prime solvus over the wide compositional range explored and Mo produced the biggest effect on the {gamma} lattice parameter over its range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had an impact on their concentrations in the {gamma} matrix and to a smaller extent in the {gamma} Prime phase. The software tool under-predicted {gamma} Prime solvus temperatures and {gamma} Prime volume fractions, and over-predicted TCP phase volume fractions at 982 Degree-Sign C. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters and demonstrated the usefulness of such formulas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Cr, Co, Mo, and Re on microstructure in new low density superalloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co produced a large change in {gamma} Prime solvus; Mo had a large effect on lattice mismatch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Re exhibited very potent influence on all microstructural parameters was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries both varied with temperature and alloy composition. Black

  1. Elevated temperature creep-rupture behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of 001-line-oriented single crystals of the nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100 was investigated at temperatures of 925 and 1000 C. In the stress and temperature ranges studied, the steady state creep rate, time to failure, time to the onset of secondary creep, and the time to the onset of tertiary creep all exhibited power law dependencies on the applied stress. The creep rate exponents for this alloy were between seven and eight, and the modulus-corrected activation energy for creep was approximately 350 kjoule/mole, which was comparable to the measured activation energy for Ostwald ripening of the gamma-prime precipitates. Oriented gamma-prime coarsening to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress was very prominent during creep. At 1000 C, the formation of a continuous gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure was completed during the primary creep stage. Shear through the gamma-gamma-prime interface is considerd to be the rate limiting step in the deformation process. Gradual thickening of the lamellae appeared to be the cause of the onset of tertiary creep. At 925 C, the fully developed lamellar structure was not achieved until the secondary or tertiary creep stages. At this temperature, the gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure did not appear to be as beneficial for creep resistance as at the higher temperature.

  2. Effect of crystallographic orientation on plastic deformation of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrooke, Eboni F.

    Nickel-base superalloys, with gamma/gamma' microstructure, are the primary material used in turbines for aerospace applications. The blades in the hottest region of the turbine engine are made of single crystal Ni-base superalloys. It has been shown that the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) of these materials is orientation dependent (also known as non-Schmid effect). The purpose of this research was to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of single crystal Ni-base superalloys as a function of crystallographic orientation in order to understand the factors that contribute to the non-Schmid effect. The superalloys in this study possessed alloying elements in amounts which defined them as 1st and 2nd generation superalloys. Tensile samples of various orientations were loaded to different strain levels. The mechanisms of plastic deformation were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of deformation bands as well as the dislocation structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was confirmed that the CRSS of the single crystals did not follow Schmid's law and the near <111> specimens showed the lowest values. The degree of non-Schmid behavior in the <111> specimens was diminished by HIP'ing, which resulted in closure of solidification pores. Furthermore, it was shown that the CRSS for the <100> loaded samples was smallest when loaded along the secondary dendrite arms. The slip analysis by optical microscopy showed that the deformation bands did not follow the expected {111} slip planes for all samples. Studies in SEM proved that those slip bands that followed the {111} planes were associated with extensive shearing of gamma' particles. In addition, it was found that the presence of tri-axial stress states within the macrostructure influenced the deformation path significantly. The TEM observations of deformed specimens revealed that plastic deformation took place mainly in the gamma channels in specimens

  3. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2000-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas-turbine engines is a pervasive problem affecting a wide range of components and materials. HCF is currently the primary cause of component failures in gas turbine aircraft engines. Turbine blades in high performance aircraft and rocket engines are increasingly being made of single crystal nickel superalloys. Single-crystal Nickel-base superalloys were developed to provide superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys previously used in the production of turbine blades and vanes. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493 and PWA 1484. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. PWA1493, identical to PWA1480, but with tighter chemical constituent control, is used in the NASA SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) alternate turbopump, a liquid hydrogen fueled rocket engine. Objectives for this paper are motivated by the need for developing failure criteria and fatigue life evaluation procedures for high temperature single crystal components, using available fatigue data and finite element modeling of turbine blades. Using the FE (finite element) stress analysis results and the fatigue life relations developed, the effect of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientations on life is determined, at critical blade locations. The most advantageous crystal orientation for a given blade design is determined. Results presented demonstrates that control of secondary and primary crystallographic orientation has the potential to optimize blade design by increasing its resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  4. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime solvus temperature, an increase in gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in gamma-prime solvus temperature, gamma-prime volume fraction, and gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with gamma-prime particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed gamma-prime particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 C resulted in the formation of gamma-prime lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  5. Effects of composition and testing conditions on oxidation behavior of four cast commercial nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Four cast nickel-base superalloys were oxidized at 1000 and 1100 C for times up to 100 hr in static air and a Mach 1 gas stream. The oxidation resistance was judged by weight change, metal thickness loss, depletion-zone formation, and oxide formation and morphology. The alloys which formed mostly nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) (B-1900, VIA, and to a lesser extent 713C) were more oxidation resistant. Poorer oxidation resistance was associated with the appearance of chromium sesquioxide (Cr2O3) and chromite spinel (738X). Refractory metal content had little effect on oxidation resistance. Refractory metals appeared in the scale as tapiolite (NiM2O6, where M represents the refractory metal). Thermal cycling in static air appeared to supply sufficient data for the evaluation of oxidation resistance, especially for alloys which form oxides of low volatility. For alloys of higher chromium levels with high propensities toward forming a chromium-bearing scale of higher volatility, testing under conditions of high gas velocity is necessary to assess fully the behavior of the alloy.

  6. Anisotropy of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of crystal orientation on the mechanical properties of single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M247 are investigated. Tensile tests at temperatures from 23 to 1093 C and stress rupture tests at temperatures from 760 to 1038 C were performed for 52 single crystals at various orientations. During tensile testing between 23 and 760 C, single crystals with high Schmid factors were found to be favorably oriented for slip and to exhibit lower strength and higher ductility than those with low Schmid factors. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for cross slip were observed to have the shortest stress rupture lives at 760 C, while those which required little or no rotation had the longest lives. In addition, stereographic triangles obtained for Mar-M247 and Mar-M200 single crystals reveal that crystals with orientations near the -111 had the highest lives, those near the 001 had high lives, and those near the 011 had low lives.

  7. Bithermal fatigue of a nickel-base superalloy single crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    The thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a nickel-base superalloy single crystal was investigated using a bithermal test technique. The bithermal fatigue test was used as a simple alternative to the more complex thermomechanical fatigue test. Both in-phase and out-of-phase bithermal tests were performed on (100)-oriented coated and bare Rene N4 single crystals. In out-of-plane bithermal tests, the tensile and compressive halves of the cycle were applied isothermally at 760 and 982 C, respectively, while for the in-phase bithermal tests the temperature-loading sequence was reversed. The bithermal fatigue lives of bare specimens were shorter than the isothermal fatigue lives at either temperature extreme when compared on an inelastic strain basis. Both in-phase and out-of-phase bithermal fatigue life curves converged in the large strain regime and diverged in the small strain regime, out-of-phase resulting in the shortest lives. The coating had no effect on life for specimens cycled in-phase; however, the coating was detrimental for isothermal fatigue at 760 C and for out-of-phase fatigue under large strains.

  8. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Rene 77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of laser bead-on-plate welding of nickel based superalloy Rene 77 using single mode high power fiber laser has been undertaken to determine the effect of process parameters, such as laser power, welding speed and laser beam defocusing, on the weld geometry and quality. Non-porous and crack-free welds can be achieved for a relatively wide range of fiber laser welding parameters. The welding speed has a major effect on the weld aspect ratio. The laser beam defocusing significantly affects the weld bead geometry, the stability of the keyhole and pore formation. The transition from keyhole mode to conduction mode welding occurs between focal point position +2.0 mm and +4.0 mm. The high porosity was observed at the focal point position of +2.0 mm. The heat input higher than18 J/mm results to hot cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Moreover, it was found that the welds with the weld aspect ratio higher than 1.5 contain cracks, which propagate from the HAZ into the weld metal.

  9. The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of the nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10% versions of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy. The microstructures of the alloys were examined in as-cast, heat treated, aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions using a variety of metallographic techniques and differential thermal analysis. As cobalt concentration was reduced from 10 to 0 wt %, the gamma-prime weight fraction decreased from 59 to 41%; W and Ti concentrations in the gamma-prime phase increased from 5 to 8 and 2 to 3 at.%, respectively; the mean gamma-prime particle size increased from 0.6 to 0.8 micron; Cr and Al concentrations in the gamma matrix decreased from 17 to 13 and 15 to 12 at.%, respectively; and the weight fraction of carbides increased by approximately 1%.

  10. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of nickel-based superalloy IN 617 subjected to cyclic loading at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Oskay, Caglar

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model considering isothermal, large deformation and cyclic loading conditions has been formulated and employed to investigate the mechanical response of a nickel-based alloy at high temperature. The investigations focus on fatigue and creep-fatigue hysteresis response of IN 617 subjected to fatigue and creep-fatigue cycles. A new slip resistance evolution equation is proposed to account for cyclic transient features induced by solute drag creep that occur in IN 617 at 950 °C. The crystal plasticity model parameters are calibrated against the experimental fatigue and creep-fatigue data based on an optimization procedure that relies on a surrogate modeling (i.e. Gaussian process) technique to accelerate multi-parameter optimizations. The model predictions are validated against experimental data, which demonstrates the capability of the proposed model in capturing the hysteresis behavior for various hold times and strain ranges in the context of fatigue and creep-fatigue loading.

  11. Effects of silicon on the oxidation, hot-corrosion, and mechanical behavior of two cast nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cast specimens of nickel-base superalloys 713C and Mar-M200 with nominal additions of 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% Si were evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance, tensile and stress-rupture properties, microstructure, and phase relations. Results are compared with those of an earlier study of the effects of Si in B-1900. Si had similar effects on all three superalloys. It improves oxidation resistance but the improvement in 713C and Mar-M200 was considerably less than in B-1900. Hot-corrosion resistance is also improved somewhat. Si is, however, detrimental to mechanical properties, in particular, rupture strength and tensile ductility. Si has two obvious microstructural effects. It increases the amount of gamma-prime precipitated in eutectic nodules and promotes a Mo(Ni,Si)2 Laves phase in the alloys containing Mo. These microstructural effects do not appear responsible for the degradation of mechanical properties, however.

  12. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys: B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel base superalloys has been studied at 900 deg and 1000 deg C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of NaSO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In general, the order of susceptibility found was: B-1900 is greater than 713C is greater than NASA-TRW VIA and is greater than IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  13. Effects of sigma-phase formation on some mechanical properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy (IN-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sigma phase formation on an extruded and forged nickel base superalloy with the composition of the casting alloy IN-100 was studied. By adding only aluminum and titanium to remelt stock, three compositions were produced which had varying propensities for sigma formation. These compositions were given a four step heat treatment and were stress-ruptured or tensile tested. The very sigma prone composition had a shorter rupture life than the sigma-free or moderately sigma prone compositions when tested at 843 and 885 C. Elongation in room temperature tensile tests was considerably lower for the very sigma prone composition than for the other two wrought compositions after prolonged exposure at 732 or 843 C.

  14. Liquation Microfissuring in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of an Overaged Precipitation-Hardened Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    The effect of preweld overaging heat treatment on the microstructural response in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a precipitation-hardened nickel-base superalloy INCONEL 738LC subjected to the welding thermal cycle ( i.e., rapid) was investigated. The overaging heat treatment resulted in the formation of an interfacial microconstituent containing M23X6 particles and coarsening of primary and secondary γ' precipitates. The HAZ microstructures around welds in the overaged alloy were simulated using the Gleeble thermomechanical simulation system. Microstructural examination of simulated HAZs and those present in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded specimens showed the occurrence of extensive grain boundary liquation involving liquation reaction of the interfacial microconstituents containing M23X6 particles and MC-type carbides. In addition, the coarsened γ' precipitate particles present in the overaged alloy persisted well above their solvus temperature to temperatures where they constitutionally liquated and contributed to considerable liquation of grain boundaries, during continuous rapid heating. Intergranular HAZ microfissuring, with resolidified product formed mostly on one side of the microfissures, was observed in welded specimens. This suggested that the HAZ microfissuring generally occurred by decohesion across one of the solid-liquid interfaces during the grain boundary liquation stage of the weld thermal cycle. Correlation of simulated HAZ microstructures with hot ductility properties of the alloy revealed that the temperature at which the alloy exhibited zero ductility during heating was within the temperature range at which grain boundary liquation was observed. The on-cooling ductility of the alloy was significantly damaged by the on-heating liquation reaction, as reflected by the considerably low ductility recovery temperature (DRT). Important characteristics of the intergranular liquid that could influence HAZ microfissuring of the alloy in overaged

  15. A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel-base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing. Ph.D. ThesisFinal Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, William O.

    1987-01-01

    A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing was performed. The two elements used as partial substitutes for chromium were Si and Zr. The microstructure of conventionally solidified materials was characterized using microscopy techniques. These alloys were rapidly solidified using the chill block melt spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy. The spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures was assessed following heat treatments at 1033 and 1272 K. Rapidly solidified material of three alloys was reduced to particulate form and consolidated using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The consolidated materials were also characterized using microscopy techniques. In order to evaluate the relative strengths of the consolidated alloys, compression tests were performed at room temperature and 1033 K on samples of as-HIPed and HIPed plus solution treated material. Yield strength, porosity, and oxidation resistance characteristics are given and compared.

  16. Effect of minor carbon additions on the high-temperature creep behavior of a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Li, X.W.; Jiang, W.G.; Zhang, G.; Lou, L.H.

    2015-06-15

    Different amounts of carbon were added to a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The microstructural evolution of these alloys before and after high-temperature creep tests was investigated by employing scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Upon increasing the carbon contents, the volume fraction and diameter of the carbides increased gradually: however, the creep lives of the alloys increased slightly at first and subsequently decreased. The formation of second-phase particles, such as the nano-sized M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, blocky and needle-shaped μ phase, was observed in the creep samples, which was closely related to the high-temperature creep behaviors. - Highlights: • Creep behaviors of alloys with different amounts of carbon were investigated. • The creep rupture lives increased and later decreased with more carbon. • Second-phase particles were responsible for the different creep behaviors.

  17. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247. For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta-plus-W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of gamma-prime volume fraction, gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  18. The fracture morphology of nickel-base superalloys tested in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of compact tension specimens from seven nickel-base superalloys fatigue tested at 650 C were studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography to determine the nature and morphology of the crack surface in the region of stable growth. Crack propagation testing was performed as part of an earlier study at 650 C in air using a 0.33 Hz fatigue cycle and a creep-fatigue cycle incorporating a 900 second dwell at maximum load. In fatigue, alloys with a grain size greater than 20 micrometers, HIP Astroloy, Waspaloy, and MERL 76, exhibited transgranular fracture. MERL 76 also displayed numerous fracture sites which were associated with boundaries of prior powder particles. The two high strength, fine grain alloys, IN 100 and NASA IIB-7, exhibited intergranular fracture. Rene 95 and HIP plus forged Astroloy displayed a mixed failure mode that was transgranular in the coarse grains and intergranular in the fine grains. Under creep-fatigue conditions, fracture was found to be predominantly intergranular in all seven alloys.

  19. Creep-rupture in powder metallurgical nickel-base superalloys at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. C.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1980-03-01

    To gain insight into the factors which control the creep-rupture properties of powder metallurgical nickel-base superalloys at intermediate temperatures (650 to 775°C), a comparative study was conducted on the alloys AF115, modified MAR-M432 (B6) and modified IN100 (MERL76). Creep-rupture properties in these alloys were characterized in terms of the stress and temperature dependence of the secondary creep rate, ɛS, andrupture time, t R . Within the limited stress ranges used, the stress dependence of both ɛS and t R at 704°C can be represented by power laws ɛS and C n and t R = Mσ -p ; where C, M, n, and p are constants. The stress exponents n and p are approximately equal for both AF115 and B6 with values of 16 and 7, respectively. In the case of MERL76, n and p are different, with values of 15 and 5, respectively. The apparent activation energies, Q, are 700, 370 and 520 KJ mol-1 for AF115, B6 and MERL76, respectively. For these alloys, long creep-rupture lives are associated with large values of n and Q. The sig-nificant differences in n and Q values between AF115 and B6 were related to creep re-covery processes for which the lattice misfit between the gamma and the gamma prime was identified to be an important parameter. However, the unequal n and p values in MERL76 compared with those in AF115 and B6, were traced to differences in fracture mode. Failures in AF115 and B6 were initiated at carbide particles at grain boundaries. In contrast, fracture in MERL76 was initiated at grain boundary triple junctions. The rupture lives of AF115 and B6 can be modeled reasonably well by the growth of cavities during secondary creep and propagation of a surface-nucleated crack during the tertiary creep.

  20. The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion has been determined for Type 303 stainless steel, A286 CRES, and Waspaloy and IN100 nickel-base alloys. It was found that hydrogen diffusion coefficients are not significantly affected by stress, while the hydrogen permeabilities are greatly affected in Type 303 stainless steel and A286 CRES (iron-based alloys), but are affected little in Waspaloy (nickel-base) and not affected in all in IN100 (nickel base). These observations might be taken as an indication that hydrogen permeabilities are affected by stress in iron-based alloys, but only slightly affected in nickel-based alloys. However, it is too early to make such a generalization based on the study of only these four alloys.

  1. Modelling short crack growth behaviour in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, L.; King, J. E.

    1992-06-01

    This paper provides a description of the features and mechanisms of facetted short crack growth in Ni-base superalloys and briefly reviews existing short crack growth models in terms of their application to Ni-base alloys. The concept of soft barriers is introduced to produce a new two-phase model for local microstructural effects on short crack growth in Waspaloy. This is derived from detailed observations of crack growth through individual grains. The model differs from all previous approaches in highlighting the importance of crack path perturbations within grains. Potential applications of the model in alloy development are discussed.

  2. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  3. Irradiation-induced microstructural changes in alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    Alloy X-750 is a nickel base alloy that is often used in nuclear power systems for it`s excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The present study examines the microstructure and composition profiles in a heat of Alloy X-750 before and after neutron irradiation.

  4. Environment-assisted cracking of a nickel-based superalloy in hydrogen-producing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, Jennifer Anne

    The environment assisted cracking (EAC) of nickel-based superalloy 718 was characterized in acidic chloride solutions under hydrogen-producing conditions using a rising-load fracture mechanics method. The stress intensity at the onset of crack growth (KTH) was used to measure EAC susceptibility as a function of applied electrode potential and solution chemistry. For all test conditions KTH was reduced from the air fracture initiation toughness (KICi). EAC susceptibility depended on both the electrode potential and solution pH. When the electrode potential was constant, susceptibility increased as the solution pH decreased. When the solution pH was constant, there was a minimum in KTH at intermediate electrode potentials. The appearance of the fracture surface gradually changed from voids and transgranular facets to voids with transgranular and intergranular facets as KTH decreased. The amount of plasticity associated with the voids and transgranular facets decreased as KTH decreased. Transgranular cracking dominated the onset of crack growth and occurred primarily by slip band fracture. A ductile fracture model, based on a critical fracture strain as measured by void growth, accurately predicted KTH and microstructure effects, suggesting that absorbed hydrogen lowered KTH from K ICi by promoting secondary microvoid nucleation which lead to intravoid strain localization and transgranular cracking. An empirical model of hydrogen production and absorption, based on a local crack chemistry that was less acidic than the bulk, was developed and used to predict the pH dependence of KTH at -1.0 VSCE . Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement data from the literature, hydrogen charging results, potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization data, and data from a buffered solution were combined to predict KTH of Alloy 718 as a function of solution pH at -1.0 VSCE in acidic chloride environments. The model accurately predicted KTH over the pH range studied.

  5. Modeling creep behavior in a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Alejandro R.

    Directionally solidified (DS) nickel-base superalloys provide significant improvements relative to the limitations inherent to equiaxed materials in the areas of creep resistance, oxidation, and low and high cycle fatigue resistance. Since these materials are being pushed to the limits of their capability in gas turbine applications, accurate mathematical models are needed to predict the service lives of the hot-section components to prevent unscheduled outages due to sudden mechanical failures. The objectives of this study are to perform critical experiments and investigate the high temperature tensile, fracture toughness, creep deformation, creep rupture and creep crack growth behavior of DS GTD111 as well as to apply creep deformation, rupture and crack growth models that will enable the accurate representation of the life times of the DS GTD111 superalloy gas turbine components that are exposed to high temperatures under sustained tensile stresses. The applied models will be capable of accurately representing the creep deformation, rupture and crack growth behavior as a function of stress, time and temperature. The yield strength and fracture toughness behavior with temperature is governed by the gamma particles. The longitudinal direction showed higher ductility and strength than the transverse direction. The TL direction exhibited higher fracture toughness than the LT orientation because the crack follows a more tortuous path. The longitudinal direction showed higher creep ductility, lower minimum strain rates and longer creep rupture times than the transverse direction. The results in the transverse direction were similar to the ones for the equiaxed version of this superalloy. Two models for creep deformation have been evaluated. The power-law model includes a secondary and a tertiary creep term with the primary creep represented by a constant. A theta-projection model has also been evaluated and it appears to provide a more accurate representation of creep

  6. Exploration of Local Strain Accumulation in Nickel-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jennifer Lynn Walley

    Deformation in polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys is a complex process dependent on the interaction of dislocations with both the intra-granular γ'' particles and the grain boundaries. An extensive body of work exists on understanding the interaction between dislocations and the γ'' particles, but understanding the interaction between dislocations and grain boundaries has been historically hindered by the experimental techniques. In this work a full field strain mapping technique was developed and utilized to explore surface strain accumulation at grain boundaries of René 104 samples with different microstructures. The full field strain mapping technique utilized Correlated Solutions VIC-2D software for digital image correlation to measure strain accumulation from secondary electron images taken during constant load tests at elevated temperature. This technique indicated that the two different microstructures of René 104, one with microscopically flat grain boundaries and the other with serrated grain boundaries, accumulate strain by different methods. Analysis of discrete offsets in grid lines placed prior to deformation indicate that grain boundary sliding (GBS) is an active deformation mechanism at these temperature and strain rate regimes, and that the development of serrated high angle grain boundaries can decrease the activity of this mechanism by 30%. Slip transmission parameters, which mathematically assess the ease of slip transmission across a grain boundary, were calculated based on grain boundary misorientation and grain boundary trace. These parameters proved unsuccessful at predicting strain localization sites in these materials, indicating that slip transmission is not the only factor dictating strain localization sites. AAA Full field strain maps were used to site-specifically extract grain boundaries of interest to study dislocation interaction and sub-surface grain boundary neighborhood. Representative from each of four types of

  7. Repassivation potential for localized corrosion of Alloys 625 and C22 in simulated repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cragnolino, G.A.; Dunn, D.S.; Sridhar, N.

    1998-12-31

    Two corrosion resistant nickel-based alloys, 625 and C22, have been selected by the US Department of Energy as candidate materials for the inner container of high-level radioactive waste packages. The susceptibility of these materials to localized corrosion was evaluated by measuring the repassivation potential as a function of solution chloride concentration and temperature using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and lead-in-pencil potential step test methods. At intermediate Cl{minus} concentrations, e.g., 0.028--0.4 M, the repassivation potential of alloy 625 is greater than that for alloy 825 and is dependent on the Cl{minus} concentration. However, at higher concentrations, the repassivation potential is slightly less than that for alloy 825 and is weakly dependent on Cl{minus} concentration. The repassivation potentials for alloy C-22 under all test conditions are considerably higher than those of either alloy 625 or 825 and are in the range where oxygen evolution is expected to occur.

  8. Microstructure evolution and FEM analysis of a [111] oriented single crystal nickel-based superalloy during tensile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sugui; Li, Qiuyang; Su, Yong; Yu, Huichen; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Shu

    2015-03-01

    By means of the elastic-plastic stress-strain finite element method (FEM), the distribution of the von Mises stress and strain energy density in the regions near the interfaces of the cuboidal γ/ γ' phases is calculated to investigate the rafted behaviors of γ' phase in a [111] oriented single crystal (SC) nickel-based superalloy. Results show that, after fully heat treated, the microstructure of the superalloy consists of the cuboidal γ' phase embedded coherently in the γ matrix and arranged regularly along the <100> orientation. And the parameters and misfits of γ'/ γ phases in the alloy increase with the temperature. After crept for 50 h, the γ' phase in alloy has transformed into the mesh-like rafted structure on (010) plane along [001] and [100] orientations. When the tensile stress is applied along [111] direction, the change of the strain energy on the planes of the cuboidal γ' phase results in the directional diffusion of the elements. Thereinto, compared with (010) plane, the bigger expanding strain occurs on (100) and (001) planes along the [010], [001] and [010], [100] directions, which may trap the Al and Ti atoms with bigger radius to promote the directional growth of γ' phase on (010) plane along [100] and [001] directions. This is thought to be the main reason for the γ' phase directionally growing into the mesh-like rafted structure on (010) plane.

  9. Competing fatigue mechanisms in Nickel-base superalloy Rene 88DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul N.

    Nickel base superalloys exhibit superior high temperature mechanical properties required for aircraft engine components. It has been known that the processing of these alloys by the powder metallurgy route introduces inclusions inside the material. The presence of such inclusions often leads to competing failure modes in fatigue that is described by a step-wise or two distinct S-N curves involving both the surface and internally-initiated cracks, resulting in large uncertainties of fatigue life. A clear understanding of such behavior is yet to be established. The principal objective of this research is to examine the effect of inclusions on the extent of fatigue failure competition from surface and internal initiators at two different specimen test volumes. Experimental fatigue testing has been performed to explore how the presence of inclusions affects the competing fatigue failure modes. In addition, how the competing failure modes will behave with changes in the specimen size was also studied. Two groups of material each with two different specimen sizes were used in this study. It has been shown that the two crack initiation mechanisms occurred in the small unseeded Rene 88DT specimens tested at 650ºC over the stress range tested. Additionally, the fatigue lives were reduced with increase in specimen volume. All fatigue failures in seeded material occurred due to crack initiations from the seeded inclusions. In the fatigue life of seeded material, two competing and separate S-N curves were found in small test volume, whereas, in the large test volume, the regions were separated by a "step" in S-N curve. It has been found that the largest inclusion size observed in metallographic surfaces was smaller than the size determined from the fatigue failure origin. An analysis method based on extreme value statistics developed by Murakami was used to predict the largest size of inclusion in the test volume. The results of this study clearly show that competition for

  10. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  11. Susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys, NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C and IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base, cast superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C. The test consisted of coating alloy samples with known amounts of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally in 1 atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen, the weight-gain being monitored on a sensitive recording microbalance. Susceptibility to hot corrosion decreased in the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Preoxidation of samples before hot-corrosion testing markedly increased the induction period observed prior to the inception of hot corrosion for all alloys tested. X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxide scales were made. All samples that underwent hot corrosion showed the presence of a (Ni,Co)MoO4 layer near the alloy-oxide interface. Several specimens displayed resistance to hot corrosion and these showed NaTaO3 as a prominent feature in their oxide scale. Our results may be interpreted as indicating that molybdenum in an alloy is detrimental, with respect to hot corrosion, while tantalum is beneficial.

  12. Corrosion of selected metal alloys in Utah geothermal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.K.; Pitt, C.H.

    1983-09-01

    A potentiodynamic polarization technique has been applied to characterize the corrosion behavior of AISI 316L stainless steel, an iron-based alloy (9Cr-1Mo), a nickel-based alloy (INCONEL/SUP R/ alloy 625), and mild steel ASTM A-36. Corrosion rate was affected greatly by temperature. The pitting potentials decreased with increasing temperature. The nickel-based alloywas resistant to the geothermal water and did not undergo pitting corrosion. All measurements of corrosion--corrosion rate, pit density, maximum pit depth, charge consumed, and polarization resistance--corroborate the decrease in corrosion rate at tested temperatures.

  13. Thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelloux, R. M.; Marchand, N.

    1986-01-01

    The main achievements of a 36-month research program are presented. The main objective was to gain more insight into the problem of crack growth under thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. This program was conducted at M.I.T. for the period of September 1982 to September 1985. The program was arranged into five technical tasks. Under Task I, the literature of TMF data was reviewed. The goal was to identify the crack propagation conditions in aircraft engines (hot section) and to assess the validity of conventional fracture mechanics parameters to address TMF crack growth. The second task defined the test facilities, test specimen and the testing conditions needed to establish the effectiveness of data correlation parameters identified in Task I. Three materials (Inconel X-750, Hastelloy-X, and B-1900) were chosen for the program. Task II was accomplished in collaboration with Pratt & Whitney Aircraft engineers. Under Task III, a computerized testing system to measure the TMF behavior (LCF and CG behaviors) of various alloys systems was built. The software used to run isothermal and TMF tests was also developed. Built around a conventional servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of push-pull tests under stress or strain and temperature controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25C to 1050C. A crack propagation test program was defined and conducted under Task IV. The test variables included strain range, strain rate (frequency) and temperature. Task V correlated and generalized the Task IV data for isothermal and variable temperature conditions so that several crack propagation parameters could be compared and evaluated. The structural damage (mode of cracking and dislocation substructure) under TMF cycling was identified and contrasted with the isothermal damage to achieve a sound fundamental mechanistic understanding of TMF.

  14. High temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 1: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  15. High-temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 2: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  16. An investigation of the initiation stage of hot corrosion in Ni-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. T.; Meier, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The commercial nickel base alloy, IN-738, and high purity laboratory alloys were prepared to simulate the effects of the major elements in IN-738. Results indicate that the initiation of hot corrosion attack of IN-738 and other similar alloys is the result of local penetration of molten salt through the protective oxide scale.

  17. Description of a high temperature quenching furnace for the study of the directional solidification of nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Kelley, J.B.; Damkroger, B.K.

    1994-06-01

    A high temperature resistance furnace has been modified for the study of directional solidification of nickel-base superalloys such as alloys 718 and 625. The furnace will be used to study segregation and solidification phenomena that occur in consumable-electrode melting processes such as vacuum arc remelting and electro-slag remelting. The system consists of a water cooled high temperature furnace (maximum temperature {approximately}2900 C), roughing vacuum,system, cooling system, cooled hearth, molten metal quenching bath, and a mechanism to lower the hearth from the furnace into the molten metal bath. The lowering mechanism is actuated by a digital stopping motor with a programmable controller. The specimen (1.9 cm dia {times} 14 cm long) is melted and contained within an alumina tube (2.54 cm dia {times} 15.24 cm long) which is seated on a copper hearth cooled with {approximately}13 C water. Directional solidification can then be accomplished by decreasing the furnace temperature while holding the specimen in position, maintaining the temperature gradient in the furnace and lowering the specimen at a controlled rate or a combination of both. At any point the specimen can be lowered rapidly into the 70 C molten metal bath to quench the specimen, preserve the solidification structure, and minimize solid state diffusion, enhancing the ability to study the localized solidification conditions.

  18. Effects of Solutioning on the Dissolution and Coarsening of γ' Precipitates in a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Zihua; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    The dissolution and the coarsening of the γ' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy GTD-111 solutionized under various solution heat treatment conditions were investigated. The γ' solvus temperature for the GTD-111 superalloy was about 1180.79 °C obtained by differential scanning calorimetry test. The dissolution and the coarsening of γ' in the dendrite core were simultaneously observed, but the γ' precipitates in the interdendritics only occurred to coarsen under the condition of 1125 °C/2 h. The γ' dissolution, including dendrite core and interdendritics, gradually played a dominant role in the competition between the dissolution and the coarsening of γ' during the solutioning with the increase of solution temperature and holding time, indicating that the elastic strain field of the alloy gradually reduced. The solution condition of 1225 °C/6 h or 1250 °C/2 h was the optimal solutioning schedule than the other schedules. For a lower solution temperature, the volume fraction of primary γ' precipitates can faster reach its equilibrium value which is larger than that for a higher solution temperature. With the increase of holding time, the γ' dissolution rate continuously decreased, and the dissolution activation energy of γ' gradually increased.

  19. Effect of hydrogen on deformation structure and properties of CMSX-2 nickel-base single-crystal superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollar, M.; Bernstein, I. M.; Walston, S.; Prinz, F.; Domnanovich, A.

    1987-01-01

    Material used in this study was a heat of the alloy CMSX-2. This nickel-based superalloy was provided in the form of oriented single crystals, solutionized for 3 hrs at 1315 C. It was then usually heat treated as follows: 1050 C/16h/air cool + 850 C/48h/air cool. The resulting microstructure is dominated by cuboidal, ordered gamma precipitates with a volume fraction of about 75% and an average size of 0.5 microns. In brief, the most compelling hydrogen induced-changes in deformation structure are: (1) enhanced dislocation accumulation in the gamma matrix; and (2) more extensive cross-slip of superdislocations in the gamma precipitates. The enhanced dislocation density in gamma acts to decrease the mean free path of a superdislocation, while easier cross slip hinders superdislocation movement by providing pinning points in the form of sessile jobs. Both processes contribute to the increase of flow stress and the notable work hardening that occurs prior to fracture.

  20. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  1. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-07-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: (1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; (2) fabrication of the selected materials; (3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and (4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  2. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    The work reported constitutes the first phase of a two-phase program. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr material characteristics are reviewed and compared with TD Ni-20Cr produced in previous development efforts; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on TD Ni-20Cr sheet material are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded, diffusion-bonded, or seam-welded joints are evaluated through tests of simple lap-shear joint samples; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full-scale subsize heat shield panels are described. Tests of full-scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests; simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating in an arc-heated plasma stream; programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions; and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced by heat shields during about boost flight. Test results are described, and the performances of two heat shield designs are compared and evaluated.

  3. In-Situ Electrochemical Investigations of a Nickel-Based Alloy Subjected to Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, R. V.; Wang, G.; Buchanan, R. A.; Liaw, P. K.; Saleh, T. A.; Klarstrom, D. L.; Meck, S. N.

    2007-09-01

    The HASTELLOY C2000 superalloy is a commercially designed superalloy manufactured to function in reducing and oxidizing corrosive solutions. The industrial applications have tremendous potential in automotive, structural, aviation, and storage components. Although C2000 demonstrates good reducing and oxidizing traits in extremely aggressive media (which are attractive features of its chemistry), changes in the mechanical properties are believed to be insignificant due to its strong propensity to passivate under corrosive conditions. The ductility behavior and corrosion properties of C2000 are superior to those of stainless steels. The objective of the present study is to examine the corrosion-fatigue behavior of C2000 in a 3.5 wt pct sodium-chloride (NaCl) solution. C2000 submerged in 3.5 wt pct NaCl at room temperature is not susceptible to localized corrosion, such as pitting, during fatigue. At an accelerated potential of 350 mV, the current responses show an increase in the current due to slip steps emerging to the surface as a result of fatigue. The crack-initiation site and the examination of the fracture morphology are discussed.

  4. Burner Rig Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Eight plasma sprayed bond coatings were evaluated for their potential use with ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TECs) which are being developed for coal derived fuel fired gas turbines. Longer TBC lives in cyclic burner rig oxidation to 1050 C were achieved with the more oxidation resistant bond coatings. These were Ni-14.1Cr-13.4A1-0.10Ar, Ni-14.1C4-14.4Al-0.16Y, and Ni-15.8Cr-12.8Al-0.36Y on Rene 41. The TBC systems performed best when 0.015-cm thick bond coatings were employed that were sprayed at 20 kW using argon 3.5v/o hydrogen. Cycling had a more life limiting influence on the TBC than accumulated time at 1050 C.

  5. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a full-size, full-scale TD Ni-20Cr heat shield test array in simulated mission environments is described along with the design and fabrication of two additional full-size, full-scale test arrays to be tested in flowing gas test facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Cost and reusability evaluations of TD Ni-20Cr heat shield systems are presented, and weight estimates of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system for use on a shuttle orbiter vehicle are made. Safe-line expectancy of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system is assessed. Non-destructive test techniques are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in quality assurance checks of TD Ni-20Cr components such as heat shields, heat shield supports, close-out panels, formed cover strips, and edge seals. Results of tests on a braze reinforced full-scale, subsize panel are included. Results show only minor structural degradation in the main TD Ni-20Cr heat shields of the test array during simulated mission test cycles.

  6. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

  7. Joining of NiAl to nickel-base alloys by transient liquid phase bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Z.A.M.; Guan, Y.; Gale, W.F.

    1999-07-01

    A transmission and scanning electron microscope investigation is undertaken to study microstructural development during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of NiAl to Ni-base substrates. The bonds were produced through a conventional technique employing a Cu foil interlayer or a wide-gap technique using a composite preform containing powders of NiAl and Cu. The time required for completion of isothermal solidification was greatly reduced in wide-gap bonds as compared to conventional bonds. Microstructural features of conventional TLP bonds of polycrystalline-NiAl/Ni were controlled by the ratio of Al: Cu across the joint. The precipitation of the {sigma} phase encountered in polycrystalline-NiAl/Martin Marietta 247 superalloy (MM247) bonds was suppressed in wide-gap bonds of single crystal-NiAl(Hf) and MM247. In general, the extent of second phase precipitation, in the as-bonded condition, was greatly reduced by the use of the wide-gap technique. However, extensive precipitation of HfC and W-rich phases was observed after post-bond heat treatments.

  8. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys - B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Janowski, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of changing the content of Ta on the gamma/gamma-prime carbide microstructure was investigated in two crystalline nickel-base superalloys: conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf, and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247. The changes occurring in the microstructure effects were similar in both alloys. The gamma-prime and carbide volume fractions increased linearly with Ta additions, while the gamma-prime phase compositions did not change. Bulk Ta additions increased the levels of Cr and Co (in addition to that of Ta) of the gamma phase, a result of the approximately constant partitioning ratios for these two elements. The addition of Ta led to a partial replacement of Hf in the MC carbides. In addition, Cr-rich M(23)C(6) carbides formed as a result of MC carbide decomposition during heat treatment.

  9. Niobium enrichment and environmental enhancement of creep crack growth in nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M.; Wei, R.P.; Dwyer, D.J.

    1995-04-15

    In this paper, the possible role of niobium in the environmental enhancement of creep crack growth in nickel-base superalloys is further examined. The examination included (1) surface enrichment of Nb in a commercial Inconel 718; (2) a source of niobium and its interaction with oxygen; (3) preferential oxidation of Nb at the crack tip, and (4) correlations between environmental sensitivity and niobium concentration of nickel-base superalloys from the literature. The role of niobium was suggested by recent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies. The XPS studies show a significant increase in the concentration of niobium on the (001) surface of an Inconel 718 single crystal after heating at temperatures above 775 K. Considerable segregation of niobium was also found on the grain boundaries of a thermally aged commercial (polycrystalline) Inconel 718. The CCGR data showed significant enhancement by oxygen and water vapor at temperatures of 800--975 K where niobium enrichment occurred.

  10. Strainrange partitioning behavior of the nickel-base superalloys, Rene' 80 and in 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made to assess the ability of the method of Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) to both correlate and predict high-temperature, low cycle fatigue lives of nickel base superalloys for gas turbine applications. The partitioned strainrange versus life relationships for uncoated Rene' 80 and cast IN 100 were also determined from the ductility normalized-Strainrange Partitioning equations. These were used to predict the cyclic lives of the baseline tests. The life predictability of the method was verified for cast IN 100 by applying the baseline results to the cyclic life prediction of a series of complex strain cycling tests with multiple hold periods at constant strain. It was concluded that the method of SRP can correlate and predict the cyclic lives of laboratory specimens of the nickel base superalloys evaluated in this program.

  11. On the development of a new pre-weld thermal treatment procedure for preventing heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking in nickel-base IN 738 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ola, O. T.; Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Hot cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, such as IN 738, during fusion welding remains a major factor limiting reparability of nickel-base gas turbine components. The problem of HAZ intergranular cracking can be addressed by modifying the microstructure of the pre-weld material through thermal treatment, which requires significant understanding of the critical factors controlling cracking behaviour. The decomposition of Mo-Cr-W-and Cr-rich borides in the alloy, among other factors, has been observed to contribute significantly to non-equilibrium intergranular liquation and, hence, intergranular liquation cracking during welding. Gleeble physical simulation of HAZ microstructure has also shown that non-equilibrium liquation is more severe in the vicinity of decomposed borides in the alloy and can occur at temperatures as low as 1,150 °C. Although currently existing pre-weld heat treatments for IN 738 superalloy minimize the contributions of dissolution of second phases, including borides, to HAZ intergranular liquation, these heat treatments are not industrially feasible due to process-related difficulties. Therefore, a new industrially feasible and effective pre-weld thermal treatment process, designated as FUMT, was developed during the present research by controlling both the formation of borides and the segregation of boron at the grain boundaries in the pre-weld heat-treated material. This thermal treatment was observed to very significantly reduce intergranular HAZ cracking in welded IN 738 superalloy. The details of the development process and developed procedure are presented in this paper.

  12. Evolution of Microstructure in a Nickel-based Superalloy as a Function of Ageing Time

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Smith, Gregory Scott; Porcar, L.; Liaw, Peter K; Kai, Ji-Jung; Ren, Yang

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation, combining synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, small-angle neutron-scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, has been undertaken to study the microstructure of nanoprecipitates in a nickel-based superalloy. Upon increasing the ageing time during a heat-treatment process, the average size of the precipitates first decreases before changing to a monotonical growth stage. Possible reasons for this observed structural evolution, which is predicted thermodynamically, are suggested.

  13. Mechanism of beneficial effect of tantalum in hot corrosion of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses were used to examine a prominent NaTaO3 pattern formed in a number of nickel-base superalloys. It is found that a beneficial effect of tantalum with respect to hot corrosion attack arises from the ability of Ta2O5 to tie up Na2O and prevent the formation of a molten Na2MoO4 phase.

  14. Method of Making a Nickel Fiber Electrode for a Nickel Based Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The general purpose of the invention is to develop a high specific energy nickel electrode for a nickel based battery system. The invention discloses a method of producing a lightweight nickel electrode which can be cycled to deep depths of discharge (i.e., 40% or greater of electrode capacity). These deep depths of discharge can be accomplished by depositing the required amount of nickel hydroxide active material into a lightweight nickel fiber substrate.

  15. Effect of microstructure on high-temperature mechanical behavior of nickel-base superalloys for turbine disc applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Heather Joan

    2007-05-01

    Engineers constantly seek advancements in the performance of aircraft and power generation engines, including, lower costs and emissions, and improved fuel efficiency. Nickel-base superalloys are the material of choice for turbine discs, which experience some of the highest temperatures and stresses in the engine. Engine performance is proportional to operating temperatures. Consequently, the high-temperature capabilities of disc materials limit the performance of gas-turbine engines. Therefore, any improvements to engine performance necessitate improved alloy performance. In order to take advantage of improvements in high-temperature capabilities through tailoring of alloy microstructure, the overall objectives of this work were to establish relationships between alloy processing and microstructure, and between microstructure and mechanical properties. In addition, the projected aimed to demonstrate the applicability of neural network modeling to the field of Ni-base disc alloy development and behavior. The first phase of this work addressed the issue of how microstructure varies with heat treatment and by what mechanisms these structures are formed. Further it considered how superalloy composition could account for microstructural variations from the same heat treatment. To study this, four next-generation Ni-base disc alloys were subjected to various controlled heat-treatments and the resulting microstructures were then quantified. These quantitative results were correlated to chemistry and processing, including solution temperature, cooling rate, and intermediate hold temperature. A complex interaction of processing steps and chemistry was found to contribute to all features measured; grain size, precipitate distribution, grain boundary serrations. Solution temperature, above a certain threshold, and cooling rate controlled grain size, while cooling rate and intermediate hold temperature controlled precipitate formation and grain boundary serrations. Diffusion

  16. Mechanistic study of nickel based catalysts for oxygen evolution and methanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dayi; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel based catalysts have been studied as catalysts for either organic compound (especially methanol) oxidation or oxygen evolution reactions in alkaline medium for decades, but methanol oxidation and oxygen evolution reactions occur at a similar potential range and pH with nickel based catalysts. In contrast to previous studies, we studied these two reactions simultaneously under various pH and methanol concentrations with electrodes containing a series of NiOOH surface concentrations. We found that nickel based catalysts are more suitable to be used as oxygen evolution catalysts than methanol oxidation catalysts based on the observation that: The rate-determining step of methanol oxidation involves NiOOH, OH- and methanol while high methanol to OH- ratio could poison the NiOOH sites. Since NiOOH is involved in the rate-determining step, methanol oxidation suffers from high overpotential and oxygen evolution is favored over methanol oxidation in the presence of an equivalent amount (0.1 M) of alkali and methanol.

  17. Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

    1994-12-31

    The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

  18. Manufacturing of nickel-base superalloys with improved high-temperature performance

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; George, E.P.; Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.; Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted as part of CRADA ORNL95-0327 between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Teledyne Allvac (now Allvac, an Allegheny Teledyne Co.). The objective was to gain a better understanding of the role of trace elements in nickel-based superalloys, with the ultimate goal of enhancing performance without significantly increasing production cost. Two model superalloys, IN 718 and Waspaloy, were selected for this study, and the synergistic effects of P and B additions on creep and stress rupture properties were determined. Wherever possible the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed effects were investigated.

  19. Process of welding gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Speigel, Lyle B.; White, Raymond Alan; Murphy, John Thomas; Nowak, Daniel Anthony

    2003-11-25

    A process for welding superalloys, and particularly articles formed of gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys whose chemistries and/or microstructures differ. The process entails forming the faying surface of at least one of the articles to have a cladding layer of a filler material. The filler material may have a composition that is different from both of the articles, or the same as one of the articles. The cladding layer is machined to promote mating of the faying surfaces, after which the faying surfaces are mated and the articles welded together. After cooling, the welded assembly is free of thermally-induced cracks.

  20. Development of a high strength hot isostatically pressed /HIP/ disk alloy, MERL 76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.; Eng, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A nickel-based powder metal disk alloy developed for use in advanced commercial gas turbines is described. Consideration is given to final alloy chemistry modifications made to achieve a desirable balance between tensile strength and stress rupture life and ductility. The effects of post-consolidation heat treatment are discussed, the preliminary mechanical properties obtained from full-scale turbine disks are presented.

  1. Special features of structural changes of amorphizing nickel alloys in liquid and heterogeneous state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagunov, G. B.; Baryshev, E. E.; Shmakova, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Polytherms of kinematic viscosity of nickel-based alloys with Cr, Si, Fe and B additives have been studied. It was found out that the first liquid phase volumes appear when temperatures are well below the tabular values of the solidus temperature ts. The critical temperature of the alloy was defined. The ways of obtaining materials of higher amorphization ability were suggested.

  2. Corrosion of experimental superheater alloys in waste fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyloef, L.; Haeggblom, E.

    1997-08-01

    A number of experimental nickel base alloys have been evaluated regarding their resistance against high temperature corrosion in waste fuel combustion. Specimens were produced by hot extrusion of 50 kg ingots and exposed at 450 C and 490 C on cooled testing probes in the superheater section of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration plant. The effect on corrosion by different chromium, molybdenum and niobium concentrations were studied in terms of wall thickness reduction during test periods of up to 2,160 hours. Comparison was made with reference materials such as low alloyed pressure vessel steel (ASME SA213 T12), Alloy 28 (UNS N08028) and Alloy 625 (UNS N06625). The results indicated a positive effect in nickel base alloys on corrosion resistance especially of molybdenum but to some extent also of chromium. Nickel, niobium and iron showed no significant effect on corrosion resistance.

  3. Inner Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollhagen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author states that she has always loved self portraits but most teenagers do not enjoy looking too closely at their own faces in an effort to replicate them. Thanks to a new digital camera, she was able to use this new technology to inspire students to take a closer look at their inner image. Prior to the self-portrait…

  4. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  5. Quantitative experimental determination of the solid solution hardening potential of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in single-crystal nickel-based superalloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fleischmann, Ernst; Miller, Michael K.; Affeldt, Ernst; Glatzel, Uwe

    2015-01-31

    Here, the solid-solution hardening potential of the refractory elements rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in the matrix of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys was experimentally quantified. Single-phase alloys with the composition of the nickel solid-solution matrix of superalloys were cast as single crystals, and tested in creep at 980 °C and 30–75 MPa. The use of single-phase single-crystalline material ensures very clean data because no grain boundary or particle strengthening effects interfere with the solid-solution hardening. This makes it possible to quantify the amount of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum necessary to reduce the creep rate by a factor of 10. Rhenium is moremore » than two times more effective for matrix strengthening than either tungsten or molybdenum. The existence of rhenium clusters as a possible reason for the strong strengthening effect is excluded as a result of atom probe tomography measurements. If the partitioning coefficient of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum between the γ matrix and the γ' precipitates is taken into account, the effectiveness of the alloying elements in two-phase superalloys can be calculated and the rhenium effect can be explained.« less

  6. Quantitative experimental determination of the solid solution hardening potential of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in single-crystal nickel-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmann, Ernst; Miller, Michael K.; Affeldt, Ernst; Glatzel, Uwe

    2015-01-31

    Here, the solid-solution hardening potential of the refractory elements rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in the matrix of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys was experimentally quantified. Single-phase alloys with the composition of the nickel solid-solution matrix of superalloys were cast as single crystals, and tested in creep at 980 °C and 30–75 MPa. The use of single-phase single-crystalline material ensures very clean data because no grain boundary or particle strengthening effects interfere with the solid-solution hardening. This makes it possible to quantify the amount of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum necessary to reduce the creep rate by a factor of 10. Rhenium is more than two times more effective for matrix strengthening than either tungsten or molybdenum. The existence of rhenium clusters as a possible reason for the strong strengthening effect is excluded as a result of atom probe tomography measurements. If the partitioning coefficient of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum between the γ matrix and the γ' precipitates is taken into account, the effectiveness of the alloying elements in two-phase superalloys can be calculated and the rhenium effect can be explained.

  7. Underwater wet flux-cored arc welding development of stainless steel and nickel-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Frederick, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The inaccessibility and high radiation fields of components in the lower two thirds of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has generated the need for an automated underwater wet welding process to address repair applications. Mechanical methods presently employed for this type of repair application produce crevices, which promote concerns of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), crevice corrosion and pitting. To address these concerns, the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center (RRAC) has developed underwater wet flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) technology for the welding of stainless steel and nickel based materials. The benefits of underwater wet welding include: (1) provides a permanent repair; (2) offers crevice-five conditions; (3) reduces future inspection requirements (4) eliminates the potential for ``loose parts`` (5) can be performed in a timely approach. Underwater wet shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been successfully used to repair components in radiation areas of the upper section of the RPV, although this process is a manual operation and is impractical for remote applications. The developmental work at the EPRI RRAC is directed towards remote repair applications of nickel-based and stainless steel components, which are inaccessible with normal manual repair techniques, e.g., access hole covers. The flux-cored arc welding process (FCAW) was considered a viable option for underwater development, due to the ease of automation, out of position welding proficiency and self-shielding capabilities.

  8. Eddy Current Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment in Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, M.P.; Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B.

    2005-04-09

    Shot peening and other mechanical surface enhancement methods improve the fatigue resistance and foreign-object damage tolerance of metallic components by introducing beneficial near-surface compressive residual stresses and hardening the surface. However, the fatigue life improvement gained via surface enhancement is not explicitly accounted for in current engine component life prediction models because of the lack of accurate and reliable nondestructive methods that could verify the presence of compressive near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened hardware. In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated components. This technique is based on the so-called piezoresistivity effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electrical resistivity. We found that, in contrast with most other materials, surface-treated nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, i.e., at decreasing penetration depths. Experimental results are presented to illustrate that the excess frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity of shot-peened nickel-base superalloys can be used to estimate the absolute level and penetration depth of the compressive residual stress layer both before and after partial thermal relaxation.

  9. Hydrogen induced fracture characteristics of single crystal nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Wilcox, Roy C.

    1990-01-01

    A stereoscopic method for use with x ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of rough surfaces was adapted and applied to the fracture surfaces single crystals of PWA 1480E to permit rapid orientation determinations of small cleavage planes. The method uses a mathematical treatment of stereo pair photomicrographs to measure the angle between the electron beam and the surface normal. One reference crystal orientation corresponding to the electron beam direction (crystal growth direction) is required to perform this trace analysis. The microstructure of PWA 1480E was characterized before fracture analysis was performed. The fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was studied. The hydrogen-induced fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was also studied. In order to understand the temperature dependence of hydrogen-induced embrittlement, notched single crystals with three different crystal growth orientations near zone axes (100), (110), and (111) were tensile tested at 871 C (1600 F) in both helium and hydrogen atmospheres at 34 MPa. Results and conclusions are given.

  10. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  11. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  12. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 in simulated nuclear high level waste medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samantaroy, Pradeep Kumar; Suresh, Girija; Paul, Ranita; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-11-01

    Nickel based alloys are candidate materials for the storage of high level waste (HLW) generated from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the present investigation Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 are assessed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique for their corrosion behavior in 3 M HNO 3, 3 M HNO 3 containing simulated HLW and in chloride medium. Both the alloys were found to possess good corrosion resistance in both the media at ambient condition. Microstructural examination was carried out by SEM for both the alloys after electrolytic etching. Compositional analysis of the passive film formed on the alloys in 3 M HNO 3 and 3 M HNO 3 with HLW was carried out by XPS. The surface of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693, both consists of a thin layer of oxide of Ni, Cr, and Fe under passivation in both the media. The results of investigation are presented in the paper.

  13. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R

    2004-07-12

    Nickel can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its austenitic structure. That is, nickel based alloys can be tailored for specific applications. The family of nickel alloys is large, from high temperature alloys (HTA) to corrosion resistant alloys (CRA). In general, CRA are less susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) than stainless steels. The environments where nickel alloys suffer EAC are limited and generally avoidable by design. These environments include wet hydrofluoric acid and hot concentrated alkalis. Not all nickel alloys are equally susceptible to cracking in these environments. For example, commercially pure nickel is less susceptible to EAC in hot concentrated alkalis than nickel alloyed with chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). The susceptibility of nickel alloys to EAC is discussed by family of alloys.

  14. The high temperature deformation in cyclic loading of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature cyclic stress softening response of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 was investigated. Specimens oriented near the 001- and 111-lines were tested at 1050 C in low-cycle fatigue and then microstructurally evaluated. The 001- and 111-line specimens had dissimilar flow behavior in monotonic tensile tests, but comparable softening in low-cycle fatigue. This softening was accompanied by rapid generation of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces and by a slower time-dependent coarsening of gamma-prime precipitates. Due to the rapid formation of a dislocation substructure at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces, the cyclic stress softening could be modeled with an existing theory which related cyclic stress to the evolving microstructure and dislocation structure.

  15. Surface Roughness, Areal Topographic Measurement, and Correlation to LCF Behavior in a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardi, D. T.; Li, Y. G.; Chan, K. H. K.; Bache, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    Surface roughness often determines fatigue performance of advanced engineering components making definition of this parameter essential subsequent to manufacture. Traditionally, topography measurements employ an average amplitude parameter, R a, obtained from a two-dimensional contact measurement. This parameter, however, is highly localised making it relatively unreliable. This study attempts to correlate areal (3D) topographic, measurements with the low cycle fatigue (LCF) performance defined for a nickel-based superalloy (Waspaloy). Three different surface finishes, namely longitudinal polished, circumferential ground, and longitudinal ground were applied to fatigue specimens. The height and orientation of the topographic features with respect to the loading axis were found to affect LCF performance. Results indicate a close correlation between cycles to failure and the maximum height ( S z) and ten-point height ( S 5z) parameters. A power fit to account for the topographic effect was generated based on the experimental data.

  16. Nickel based superalloy containment case design: constitutive modeling and computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Bonora, Nicola; Torrice, Giovanni; di Sciuva, Marco; Degiovanni, Marco; Mattone, Massimiliano; Gherlone, Marco; Frola, Carlo

    2007-06-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic characterization of nickel based superalloy Waspaloy has been performed at the University of Cassino. Quasy-static tensile tests have been carried out on both round bar specimens, to obtain the flow stress curve at low strain rates, and hourglass specimens, to investigate damage evolution with plastic strain. The mechanical behavior at high strain rates has been obtained by means of a direct tension split Hopkinson Bar, which allows the characterization of the material up to failure. Experimental results show that when strain rates increases, the failure strain increases while the yield strength decreases, in some intervals of the range considered. This singular behavior has been modeled and implement in a Finite Element Method commercial code in order to perform numerical simulations of experimental ballistic tests carried out at the Polytechnics of Turin, using an airgun facility. Good agreement has been found between FEM simulations and experimental results..

  17. Nickel Based Superalloy Containment Case Design: Constitutive Modeling and Computational Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Bonora, N.; Torrice, G.; Di Sciuva, M.; Degiovanni, M.; Mattone, M.; Gherlone, M.; Frola, C.

    2007-12-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic characterization of nickel based superalloy Waspaloy® has been performed at the University of Cassino. Quasi-static tensile tests have been carried out on both round bar specimens, to obtain the flow stress curve at low strain rates, and hourglass specimens, to investigate damage evolution with plastic strain. The mechanical behavior at high strain rates has been obtained by means of a direct tension split Hopkinson Bar, which allows the characterization of the material up to failure. Experimental results show that when strain rates increases, the failure strain increases while the yield strength decreases, in some intervals of the range considered. This singular behavior has been modeled and implement in a Finite Element Method commercial code in order to perform numerical simulations of experimental ballistic tests carried out at the Politecnico di Torino, using an airgun facility. Good agreement has been found between FEM simulations and experimental results.

  18. Behavior of nickel-base superalloy single crystals under thermal-mechanical fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, E.; Rémy, L.

    1994-12-01

    The thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of AM1 nickel-base superalloy single crystals is studied using a cycle from 600 °C to 1100 °C. It is found to be strongly dependent on crystallo-graphic orientation, which leads to different shapes of the stress-strain hysteresis loops. The cyclic stress-strain response is influenced by variation in Young’s modulus, flow stress, and cyclic hardening with temperature for every crystallographic orientation. The thermalmechanical fatigue life is mainly spent in crack growth. Two main crack-initiation mechanisms occur, depending on the mechanical strain range. Oxidation-induced cracking is the dominant damage mechanism in the lifetime of interest for turbine blades.

  19. Temperature dependence of gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch of three different nickel-base superalloys at temperatures between 18 and 1000 C. The measurements were performed on oriented single-crystal disks which had been aged to produce a semicoherent gamma-gamma prime structure. The thermal expansion of the lattice parameters of the gamma and gamma-prime phases was described by a second-order polynomial expression. The expansion of the gamma-prime phase was consistently smaller than that of the gamma phase, which caused the lattice mismatch to become more negative at higher temperatures. It was also shown that high values of lattice mismatch resulted in increased rates of directional gamma-prime coarsening during elevated temperature creep exposure.

  20. Replacing critical and strategic refractory metal elements in nickel-base superalloys. [NASA's COSAM program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Nathal, M. V.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the import status and essential nature of their use, cobalt, chromium, tantalum, and niobium were identified as strategic and critical in the aerospace industry. NASA's Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) program aims to reduce the need for strategic materials used in gas turbine engines. Technological thrusts in two major areas are under way to meet the primary objective of conserving the use of strategic materials in nickelbase superalloys. These thrusts consist of strategic element substitution and alternative material identification. The program emphasizes cooperative research teams involving NASA Lewis Research Center, universities, and industry. The adoption of refractory metals in nickel-base superalloys is summarized including their roles in mechanical strengthening and environmental resistance; current research activities under way in the COSAM Program are presented as well as research findings to date.

  1. Shock wave loading of Nickel based superalloy and microstructural features of the compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. D.; Sharma, A. K.; Thakur, N.

    2015-02-01

    Explosive shock wave loading has been employed to consolidate micro-sized nickel based IN718 superalloy powder. Cylindrical geometry configuring the various critical parameters with optimized detonation pressure has been used to consolidate the powder with desirable means. The thrust on the work is to compact the powder nearer to theoretical density having almost negligible density gradient and without melting the core of the specimen. XRD study indicates that the crystal structure of the post compacts remains the same. Shock wave loading deformed the particles as has been inferred from SEM. The variation in particle size has been measured from Laser Diffraction based Particle Size Analyzer (LDPSA). It is found that this is a rapid fast technique to produce larger and crack free compacts of metal powders without their melting and with less particle size variation.

  2. Development of a unified constitutive model for an isotropic nickel base superalloy Rene 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V. G.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate analysis of stress-strain behavior is of critical importance in the evaluation of life capabilities of hot section turbine engine components such as turbine blades and vanes. The constitutive equations used in the finite element analysis of such components must be capable of modeling a variety of complex behavior exhibited at high temperatures by cast superalloys. The classical separation of plasticity and creep employed in most of the finite element codes in use today is known to be deficient in modeling elevated temperature time dependent phenomena. Rate dependent, unified constitutive theories can overcome many of these difficulties. A new unified constitutive theory was developed to model the high temperature, time dependent behavior of Rene' 80 which is a cast turbine blade and vane nickel base superalloy. Considerations in model development included the cyclic softening behavior of Rene' 80, rate independence at lower temperatures and the development of a new model for static recovery.

  3. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  4. Method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2009-06-30

    A method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a preferred nickel base alloy substrate has been discovered. A cerium oxide paste containing a halide activator is applied to the polished substrate and then dried. The workpiece is heated in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to diffuse cerium into the substrate. After cooling, any remaining cerium oxide is removed. The resulting cerium diffusion coating on the nickel base substrate demonstrates improved resistance to oxidation. Cerium coated alloys are particularly useful as components in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).

  5. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction. PMID:26440576

  6. Dual-Alloy Disks are Formed by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.; Miner, R. V.; Kortovich, C. S.; Marder, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    High-performance disks have widely varying properties from hub to rim. Dual property disk is fabricated using two nickel-base alloys, AF-115 for rim and Rene 95 for hub. Dual-alloy fabrication may find applications in automobiles, earth-moving equipment, and energy conversion systems as well as aircraft powerplants. There is potential for such applications as shafts, gears, and blades.

  7. Grain boundary intermetallic phases in alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, M.G. . Science and Technology Center); Miller, M.K. )

    1990-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy which is widely used in power generation applications, Alloy 718, has been studied by analytical electron microscopy in order to elucidate the development of the complex microstructure which is produced during a typical multistage thermal treatment. The distribution of {delta}, {gamma}{double prime}, {gamma}{prime} and Laves phases was found to be strongly dependent on aging treatment. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. II - Low cycle fatigue behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of a single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4, have been examined at 760 and 980 C in air. Specimens having crystallographic orientations near the 001, 011, -111, 023, -236, and -145 lines were tested in fully reversed, total-strain-controlled LCF tests at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. At 760 C, this alloy exhibited orientation dependent tension-compression anisotropies of yielding which continued to failure. Also at 760 C, orientations exhibiting predominately single slip exhibited serrated yielding for many cycles. At 980 C, orientation dependencies of yielding behavior were smaller. In spite of the tension-compression anisotropies, cyclic stress range-strain range behavior was not strongly orientation dependent for either test temperature. Fatigue life on a total strain range basis was highly orientation dependent at 760 and 980 C and was related chiefly to elastic modulus, low modulus orientations having longer lives. Stage I crack growth on 111 planes was dominant at 760 C, while Stage II crack growth occurred at 980 C. Crack initiation generally occurred at near-surface micropores, but occasionally at oxidation spikes in the 980 C tests.

  9. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. I - Tensile behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Voigt, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal specimens of a nickel-base superalloy with axes near 001, 011, and -112 were tested in tension at room temperature, 760, and 980 C. The alloy Rene N-4, was developed for gas turbine engine blades and has the nominal composition 3.7 Al, 4.2 Ti, 4 Ta, 0.5 Nb, 6 W, 1.5 Mo, 9 Cr, 7.5 Co, balance Ni, (all in weight percent). Analysis of slip band traces, specimen axis rotation, and dislocation Burgers vectors showed that at 760 and 980 C primary cube slip supplanted normal octahedral slip for the -112 line-oriented specimens. The other two orientations, which have lower resolved shear stresses on the cube system, exhibited octahedral slip at all three temperatures. The critical resolved shear stress is considerably greater on the cube system than on the octahedral system at room temperature. However, at 760 and 980 C the critical resolved shear stresses on the two systems are about the same. While the room temperature and 980 C yield strengths for the two orientations exhibiting octahedral slip could be rationalized on the basis of resolved shear stress, those at 760 C could not. Such violations of Schmid's law have previously been observed in other superalloys and single phase gamma-prime.

  10. The characteristics of gamma-prime dislocation pairs in a nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.; Welsch, G.

    1987-01-01

    The gamma-prime dislocation pairs of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy, PWA 1480, after tensile and fatigue loading at 650 C are analyzed. The existence and extent of cube cross slip in octahedral slip, and the nature of gamma-prime dislocation pairs in primary cube slip are investigated. It is observed that the PWA 1480 specimens oriented near (001) and (-3 6 10) line directions deform by octahedral slip and specimens oriented near (-1 1 1) and (-2 3 4) lines deform by primary cube slip. It is determined that the overall dislocation distributions are more homogeneous in low cycle fatigue (LCF) loading than in monotonic tensile loading; however, the gamma-prime dislocation pair characteristics are similar for tensile and LCF test specimens. The data reveal that the gamma-prime dislocation pairs of octahedral slip specimens are near-screw and on the cube cross slip plane and for the cube slip specimens, the dislocation pairs are of various characters and on the primary cube slip plane.

  11. Functional nickel-based deposits synthesized by focused beam induced processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, R.; Barcones, B.; Roelfsema, E.; Verheijen, M. A.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-02-01

    Functional nanostructures fabricated by focused electron/ion beam induced processing (FEBIP/FIBIP) open a promising route for applications in nanoelectronics. Such developments rely on the exploration of new advanced materials. We report here the successful fabrication of nickel-based deposits by FEBIP/FIBIP using bis(methyl cyclopentadienyl)nickel as a precursor. In particular, binary compounds such as nickel oxide (NiO) are synthesized by using an in situ two-step process at room temperature. By this method, as-grown Ni deposits transform into homogeneous NiO deposits using focused electron beam irradiation under O2 flux. This procedure is effective in producing highly pure NiO deposits with resistivity of 2000 Ωcm and a polycrystalline structure with face-centred cubic lattice and grains of 5 nm. We demonstrate that systems based on NiO deposits displaying resistance switching and an exchange-bias effect could be grown by FEBIP using optimized parameters. Our results provide a breakthrough towards using these techniques for the fabrication of functional nanodevices.

  12. Studies on the hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700, was studied in the temperature range of 884 to 965 C and with different amounts of Na2SO4. Two different modes of degradation were identified: (1) formation of Na2MoO4 - MoO3 melt and fluxing by this melt, and (2) formation of large interconnected sulfides. The dissolution of Cr2O3, TiO2 in the Na2SO4 melt does not play a significant role in the overall corrosion process. The conditions for the formation of massive interconnected sulfides were identified and a mechanism of degradation due to sulfide formation is described. The formation of Ns2MoO4 - MoO3 melt requires an induction period and various physiochemical processes during the induction period were identified. The factors affecting the length of the induction period were also examined. The melt penetration through the oxide appears to be the prime mode of degradation whether the degradation is due to the formation of sulfides or the formation of the Na2MoO4 - MoO3 melt.

  13. A continuum model for the creep of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Sharat C.; Rao, I.J.; Rajagopal, K.R. . E-mail: krajagopal@mengr.tamu.edu

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a constitutive theory within a thermodynamic setting to describe the creep of single crystal superalloys that gainfully exploits the fact that the configuration that the body would attain on the removal of the external stimuli, referred to as the 'natural configuration', evolves, with the response of the body being elastic from these evolving natural configurations. The evolution of the natural configurations is determined by the tendency of the body to undergo a process that maximizes the rate of dissipation. Here, the elastic response is assumed to be linearly elastic with cubic symmetry associated with the body which remains the same as the configuration evolves. A form for the inelastic stored energy (the energy that is 'trapped' within dislocation networks) is utilized based on simple ideas related to the motion of the dislocations. The rate of dissipation is assumed to be proportional to the density of mobile dislocations and another term that takes into account the damage accumulation due to creep. The model developed herein is used to simulate uniaxial creep of <0 0 1> oriented single crystal nickel-base superalloys. The predictions of the theory agree well with the available experimental data for CMSX-4.

  14. Functional nickel-based deposits synthesized by focused beam induced processing.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, R; Barcones, B; Roelfsema, E; Verheijen, M A; Mulders, J J L; Trompenaars, P H F; Koopmans, B

    2016-02-12

    Functional nanostructures fabricated by focused electron/ion beam induced processing (FEBIP/FIBIP) open a promising route for applications in nanoelectronics. Such developments rely on the exploration of new advanced materials. We report here the successful fabrication of nickel-based deposits by FEBIP/FIBIP using bis(methyl cyclopentadienyl)nickel as a precursor. In particular, binary compounds such as nickel oxide (NiO) are synthesized by using an in situ two-step process at room temperature. By this method, as-grown Ni deposits transform into homogeneous NiO deposits using focused electron beam irradiation under O2 flux. This procedure is effective in producing highly pure NiO deposits with resistivity of 2000 Ωcm and a polycrystalline structure with face-centred cubic lattice and grains of 5 nm. We demonstrate that systems based on NiO deposits displaying resistance switching and an exchange-bias effect could be grown by FEBIP using optimized parameters. Our results provide a breakthrough towards using these techniques for the fabrication of functional nanodevices. PMID:26759183

  15. Thermally induced grinding damage in cast equiaxed nickel-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was to increase the understanding and productivity of conventional grinding operations utilized in the finishing of cast equiaxed nickel-based superalloy components. To achieve this overall goal a four phase approach was employed. Initially, a grinding energy partition relationship for conventional grinding of superalloys was developed. Secondly, the mechanisms and conditions that influence superalloy microcracking during abusive grinding were determined. Third, building on the above relationships, a means of readily predicting the onset of grinding damage in cast Rene-77 and B-1900 superalloys was established. Finally, the results were implemented in production surface grinding operations to increase superalloy grinding quality and productivity. Finite element analyses were utilized to determine the superalloy grinding zone temperatures and residual stresses. The results indicated that Rene-77 microcracks are not formed by the residual stresses alone. The effects of constitutional liquation or weakening of the grain boundaries due to rapid heating to such temperatures were shown to be significant. It was then demonstrated that workplace damage would occur when the combined conducted and convected heat flux exceeded a critical limit.

  16. Characterization of porosity of isostatically pressed and sintered nickel-base powdered metal.

    PubMed

    Fuys, R A; Craig, R G; Asgar, K

    1976-07-01

    Characterization of the pore structure of compacted and sintered parts made from a nickel-base powder was accomplished using the mercury porosimetry method. The theoretical density values for the sintered specimens varied from 56.3 to 96.7% which corresponds to a porosity of 43.7 to 3.3%. A maximum interconnecting median pore diameter of 21 mum resulted from a -80/+200 mesh powder compacted at 138 MN/m2 and sintered for 2 h at 1250 degrees C. Photomicrographs of the same sample showed that it had a maximum pore diameter of 200 mum. The interconnected pore volume decreased with decreasing particle size of the powder, increasing compaction pressure, and increasing sintering temperature. Mechanical properties of tensile strength, yield strength, elastic modulus and percentage elongation were correlated with the pore structure. Proper selection of particle size, compaction pressure, sintering times and sintering temperatures should permit parts with controlled porosity characteristics to be produced that possess adequate mechanical properties for application as implants. PMID:1068234

  17. High cycle fatigue and fracture behaviour of a hot isostatically pressed nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chunlei; Wu, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Powder of a nickel-based superalloy, RR1000, has been hot isostatically pressed (HIPped) at a supersolvus temperature and post-HIP heat treated to produce different microstructures. Microstructures were investigated using a scanning electron microscope together with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and a wave-length dispersive X-ray spectrometer. High cycle four-point bending fatigue and tension-tension fatigue tests have been performed on the fabricated samples. It was found that HIPped and aged samples showed the best four-point bending fatigue limit while HIPped and solution-treated and aged samples had the lowest fatigue limit. The four-point bending fatigue crack initiations all occurred from the sample surfaces either at the sites of inclusion clusters or by cleavage through large grains on the surfaces. The tension-tension fatigue crack initiation occurred mainly due to large hafnia inclusion clusters, with lower fatigue lives for samples where inclusions were closer to the surface. Crack initiation at the compact Al2O3 inclusion cluster led to a much higher fatigue life than found when cracks were initiated by large hafnia inclusion clusters. The tension-tension fatigue limits were shown to decrease with increased testing temperature (from room temperature to 700 °C).

  18. A new method to predict the metadynamic recrystallization behavior in a typical nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chen, Xiao-Min; Chen, Ming-Song; Zhou, Ying; Wen, Dong-Xu; He, Dao-Guang

    2016-06-01

    The metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX) behaviors of a typical nickel-based superalloy are investigated by two-pass hot compression tests and four conventional stress-based conventional approaches (offset stress method, back-extrapolation stress method, peak stress method, and mean stress method). It is found that the conventional stress-based methods are not suitable to evaluate the MDRX softening fractions for the studied superalloy. Therefore, a new approach, `maximum stress method,' is proposed to evaluate the MDRX softening fraction. Based on the proposed method, the effects of deformation temperature, strain rate, initial average grain size, and interpass time on MDRX behaviors are discussed in detail. Results show that MDRX softening fraction is sensitive to deformation parameters. The MDRX softening fraction rapidly increases with the increase of deformation temperature, strain rate, and interpass time. The MDRX softening fraction in the coarse-grain material is lower than that in the fine-grain material. Moreover, the observed microstructures indicate that the initial coarse grains can be effectively refined by MDRX. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations are established and validated to describe the MDRX behaviors of the studied superalloy.

  19. Successful Surface Treatments for Reducing Instabilities in Advanced Nickel-base Superalloys for Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; MacKay, Rebecca A.; Garg, Anita; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2004-01-01

    An optimized carburization treatment has been developed to mitigate instabilities that form in the microstructures of advanced turbine airfoil materials. Current turbine airfoils consist of a single crystal superalloy base that provides the mechanical performance of the airfoil, a thermal barrier coating (TBC) that reduces the temperature of the base superalloy, and a bondcoat between the superalloy and the TBC, that improves the oxidation and corrosion resistance of the base superalloy and the spallation resistance of the TBC. Advanced nickel-base superalloys containing high levels of refractory metals have been observed to develop an instability called secondary reaction zone (SRZ), which can form beneath diffusion aluminide bondcoats. This instability between the superalloy and the bondcoat has the potential of reducing the mechanical properties of thin-wall turbine airfoils. Controlled gas carburization treatments combined with a prior stress relief heat treatment and adequate surface preparation have been utilized effectively to minimize the formation of SRZ. These additional processing steps are employed before the aluminide bondcoat is deposited and are believed to change the local chemistry and local stresses of the surface of the superalloy. This paper presents the detailed processing steps used to reduce SRZ between platinum aluminide bondcoats and advanced single crystal superalloys.

  20. Deformation and fatigue behavior of the nickel-base superalloy KM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Amit

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue threshold behavior, in the high cycle regime, for two microstructures (grain size 6 mum and 55 mum) of the nickel-base superalloy KM4 was studied. The threshold values were found to be a complicated function of temperature, microstructure and frequency. Increasing the load ratio, however, always led to a decrease in the threshold values. Measurements of crack closure could not explain all the observed variations in the threshold value. A physically relevant roughness parameter was defined. This parameter reproduced the complicated trends in the variation of the high temperature threshold values with frequency. Roughness of the fracture surface was found to be merely an indicator of the intrinsic deformation/fracture mechanisms and associated environmental interactions which determine the threshold value, and not the cause of threshold variations. The most important factor determining roughness was found to be the heterogeneity of deformation. The heterogeneity of slip was characterized using atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. A new parameter was developed to quantify slip irreversibility. Microstructural differences in slip irreversibility were determined, and slip heterogeneity was quantified. Based on these observations, a model was developed to predict the roughness of the fracture surface from parameters which determine the heterogeneity of deformation. The quantification of environmental interactions along with the slip irreversibility parameter led to the development of another model in which the fatigue threshold resulted from a summation of the above two contributions.

  1. Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosiewicz, L.; Krause, A. R.; Spis, A.; Raghavan, J.; Putatunda, S. K.

    1992-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)* was investigated. The investigation also examined the influence of heat treatment on resultant microstructures and the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior. In addition, the influence of load ratios (R), material strength, and grain size on fatigue threshold was studied. Compact tension specimens prepared from Incoloy 825 with transverse-longitudinal (TL) orientation in the as-received, as well as two different heat treated conditions, were used. The heat treatment studies revealed a peak hardness condition after solution treatment at 1200 °C for 1/2 hr, followed by aging at 600 °C for 434 hr. Among all the heat treated conditions, the fatigue threshold was the highest and the near-threshold crack growth rate was lowest in this peak aged condition. Fatigue threshold values were observed to decrease with an increase in load ratio, whereas an increased grain diameter resulted in a higher fatigue threshold. An earlier mathematical model was found applicable to characterize the relationship between load ratio and fatigue threshold. Preferential etching of grain boundary suggests formation of a thin film of carbide precipitation along the grain boundary region in the aged specimens. This carbide precipitation facilitated intergranular crack growth in these samples, resulting in higher roughness-induced crack closure. The highest fatigue threshold in the peak aged condition can be attributed to this large roughness-induced crack closure process.

  2. Microstructural evolution and castability prediction in newly designed modern third-generation nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam

    2016-05-01

    The present research aims to establish a quantitative relation between microstructure and chemical composition (i.e., Ti, Al, and Nb) of newly designed nickel-based superalloys. This research attempts to identify an optimum microstructure at which the minimum quantities of γ/γ' and γ/γ″ compounds are achieved and the best castability is predicted. The results demonstrate that the highest quantity of intermetallic eutectics (i.e., 41.5wt%) is formed at 9.8wt% (Ti + Al). A significant quantity of intermetallics formed in superalloy 1 (with a composition of γ - 9.8wt% (Ti + Al)), which can deteriorate its castability. The type and morphology of the eutectics changed and the amount considerably decreased with decreasing Ti + Al content in superalloy 2 (with a composition of γ - 7.6wt% (Ti + Al), 1.5wt% Nb). Thus, it is predicted that the castability would improve for superalloy 2. The same trend was observed for superalloy 4 (with a composition of γ - 3.7wt% (Ti + Al), 4.4wt% Nb). This means that the amount of Laves increases with increasing Nb (to 4.4wt%) and decreasing Ti + Al (to 3.7wt%) in superalloy 4. The best castability was predicted for superalloy 3 (with a composition of γ - 5.7wt% (Ti + Al), 2.8wt% Nb).

  3. Scale formation on Ni-based alloys in simulated solid oxide fuel cell interconnect environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh, P.; Windisch, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Schaeffer, C.

    2004-11-01

    Recent publications suggest that the environment on the fuel side of the bi-polar stainless steel SOFC interconnects changes the oxidation behavior and morphology of the scale formed on the air side. The U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center (ARC), has examined the role of such exposure conditions on advanced nickel base alloys. Alloy formulations developed at ARC and commercial alloys were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of oxide scales formed on selected alloys was determined in terms of areaspecific resistance (ASR). The corrosion behavior of ARC nickel-based alloys exposed to a dual environment of air/ H2 were compared to those of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  4. Development of a hydrogen-based annealing process for desulfurization of single crystalline, nickel-based superalloy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Mickle, T.H.; Frazier, W.E.; Waldman, J.

    1994-11-05

    The presence of minor amounts of sulfur (1-10 ppm) in nickel-based superalloys has been associated with reduced oxidation resistance and premature spallation of protective coatings. A hydrogen annealing process has been developed by NAWCADWAR which effectively reduces the sulfur content of superalloys. The conditions which allow effective desulfurization are delineated. Diffusion of sulfur through the superalloy is found to be the rate controlling step for the process.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hip-consolidated Rene 95 powders. [hot-isostatic pressed nickel-based powder metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimanuki, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Masui, M.; Doi, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of heat-treatments on the microstructure of P/M Rene 95 (a nickel-based powder metal), consolidated by the hot-isostatic pressing (HIP), were examined. The microstructure of as-HIP'd specimen was characterized by highly serrated grain boundaries. Mechanical tests and microstructural observations reveal that the serrated grain boundaries improved ductility at both room and elevated temperatures by retarding crack propagation along grain boundaries.

  6. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  7. The Effects of Stress Triaxiality, Temperature and Strain Rate on the Fracture Characteristics of a Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Guo, Weiguo; Guo, Jin; Wang, Ziang; Lu, Shengli

    2016-05-01

    In this work, to study the effects of stress triaxiality, temperature, and strain rate on the fracture behaviors of a single-crystal Nickel-base superalloy, a series of experiments over a temperature range of 293 to 1373 K, strain rate range of 0.001 to 4000/s, and stress triaxiality range of -0.6 to 1.1 are conducted. Anomalous peak of stress is noticed in the yield stress versus temperature curves, and strain rate effect on the anomalous peak of yield stress is analyzed. The anomalous peak shifts to higher temperature as the strain rate increases. Then the effects of stress triaxiality, temperature, and strain rate on its fracture behaviors, including strain to fracture, path of crack propagation, and fracture surface, are observed and analyzed. A valley of the fracture strain is formed in the fracture strain versus temperature curve over the selected temperature range. The micrograph of fracture surface is largely dependent on the temperature, stress triaxiality, and strain rate. Finally, the original Johnson-Cook (J-C) fracture criterion cannot describe the effect of stress triaxiality and temperature on the fracture behaviors of single-crystal Nickel-base superalloy. A modified J-C fracture criterion is developed, which takes the anomalous stress triaxiality and temperature effects on the fracture behaviors of single-crystal Nickel-base superalloy into account.

  8. Carbon deposition thresholds on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anodes II. Steam:carbon ratio and current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, J.; Kesler, O.

    2015-03-01

    For the second part of a two part publication, coking thresholds with respect to molar steam:carbon ratio (SC) and current density in nickel-based solid oxide fuel cells were determined. Anode-supported button cell samples were exposed to 2-component and 5-component gas mixtures with 1 ≤ SC ≤ 2 and zero fuel utilization for 10 h, followed by measurement of the resulting carbon mass. The effect of current density was explored by measuring carbon mass under conditions known to be prone to coking while increasing the current density until the cell was carbon-free. The SC coking thresholds were measured to be ∼1.04 and ∼1.18 at 600 and 700 °C, respectively. Current density experiments validated the thresholds measured with respect to fuel utilization and steam:carbon ratio. Coking thresholds at 600 °C could be predicted with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations when the Gibbs free energy of carbon was appropriately modified. Here, the Gibbs free energy of carbon on nickel-based anode support cermets was measured to be -6.91 ± 0.08 kJ mol-1. The results of this two part publication show that thermodynamic equilibrium calculations with appropriate modification to the Gibbs free energy of solid-phase carbon can be used to predict coking thresholds on nickel-based anodes at 600-700 °C.

  9. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  10. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  11. High temperature low cycle fatigue mechanisms for nickel base and a copper base alloy. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. I.

    1982-01-01

    Damage mechanisms were studied in Rene' 95 and NARloy Z, using optical, scanning and transmission in microscopy. In necklace Rene' 95, crack initiation was mainly associated with cracking of surface MC carbides, except for hold time tests at higher strain ranges where initiation was associated more with a grain boundary mechanism. A mixed mode of propagation with a faceted fracture morphology was typical for all cycle characters. The dependence of life on maximum tensile stress can be demonstrated by the data falling onto three lines corresponding to the three tensile hold times, in the life against maximum tensile stress plot. In NARloy Z, crack initiation was always at the grain boundaries. The mode of crack propagation depended on the cycle character. The life decreased with decreasing strain rate and with tensile holds. In terms of damage mode, different life prediction laws may be applicable to different cycle characters.

  12. Studies into the Effects of Surface Roughness on Spatial Eddy-Current Data from Nickel-Based Engine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.J.; Nakagawa, N.; Wendt, S.E.; Hentscher, S.R.; Nelson, D.L.; Buhr, K.T.; Kilbugh, B.A.; Raithel, D.C.

    2005-04-09

    Eddy-current scans have been carried out on two Inconel-718 specimens following the application of various levels of shot peening and heat treatments. The conventional analysis of roughened or shot peened surfaces looks at multi-frequency impedance measurements and interprets the data as a change in conductivity or liftoff. An approach involving the statistical analysis of scanned eddy-current impedance data is suggested as an alternative that may provide a more sensitive way of determining the treatment history of a component. It is possible that an analysis of these statistical distributions in spatial eddy-current data could be used to determine the level of remaining residual stress in engine components.

  13. Effect of a supersolvus heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Darryl Slade

    Powder Metallurgy (P/M) processed nickel-base superalloys are used as turbine disk materials in jet engines. The P/M processing results in a homogenous microstructure. Large amounts of strengthening elements can be incorporated into the chemistry of these P/M alloys. In addition, the ability to produce near net-shaped parts with powder consolidation may offer the potential for large cost savings. However, the fatigue properties of P/M superalloys in the as-consolidated form have suffered because of the defect sensitivity of the as-consolidated microstructure. Expensive, thermomechanical steps are necessary to break down defects, so that the P/M parts can be considered defect-tolerant. As a result, the true potential cost savings for using P/M superalloys in turbines have never been realized. This program was undertaken to examine the potential for utilizing an alternate heat treatment with P/M Alloy 720LI to generate a potentially defect-tolerant microstructure. This heat treatment had a soak above the gamma' solvus temperature followed by a controlled cool through the solvus. This produced gamma grains with a regular array of large dendritic-shaped secondary gamma' within the grains. Mechanical testing was carried out to fully evaluate the effect of this alternate heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Alloy 720LI. The standard heat treatment had longer lifetimes at the lower stress range conditions during high cycle fatigue; however, the alternate heat treatment was superior at the highest stress range. Fracture analysis suggests that this is due to the grain size difference. During tensile testing, the standard heat treatment had higher yield and ultimate strengths but lower ductility than the alternate heat treatment. This is thought to be due to the larger amounts of tertiary gamma ' present in the microstructure produced by the standard heat treatment. Finally, the standard heat treatment had longer creep lifetimes at the lowest test temperature. The

  14. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  15. Development of an extra-high strength powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to optimize the composition of NASA IIb-11, an alloy originally developed as a wrought material, for thermal stability and to determine the feasibility for producing the alloy using powder metallurgy techniques. Seven compositions were melted and atomized, hot isostatically pressed, cross rolled to disks and heat treated. Tensile and stress rupture properties from room temperature to 870 C (1600 F) were determined in addition to thermal stability characteristics. Processing variables included hot isostatic pressing parameters and handling, cross rolling procedures and heat treatment cycles. NASA IIb-11E displayed the best combination of overall properties for service as a 760 C (1400 F) disk material. Its composition is 0.06 C, 8.5 Cr, 9.0 Co, 2.0 Mo, 7.1 W, 6.6 Ta, 4.5 Al, 0.75 Ti, 0.5 V, 0.7 Hf, 0.01 B, 0.05 Zr and balance Ni. While the alloy exhibits the highest 760 C (1400 F) rupture strength reported for any powder metallurgy disk alloy to date, additional studies to further evaluate the effects of heat treatment may be required. The alloy is not susceptible to topologically close-packed phase formation during thermal exposure at 870 C (1600 F) for 1,500 hours, but its mechanical property levels are lowered due to grain boundary carbide formation.

  16. Directional solidification processing of alloys using an applied electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKannan, Eugene C. (Inventor); Schmidt, Deborah D. (Inventor); Ahmed, Shaffiq (Inventor); Bond, Robert W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for obtaining an alloy having an ordered microstructure which comprises the steps of heating the central portion of the alloy under uniform temperature so that it enters a liquid phase while the outer portions remain solid, applying a constant electric current through the alloy during the heating step, and solidifying the liquid central portion of the alloy by subjecting it to a temperature-gradient zone so that cooling occurs in a directional manner and at a given rate of speed while maintaining the application of the constant electric current through the alloy. The method is particularly suitable for use with nickel-based superalloys. The method of the present invention produces an alloy having superior characteristics such as reduced segregation. After subsequent precipitation by heat-treatment, the alloys produced by the present invention will have excellent strength and high-temperature resistance.

  17. Laser Clad Nickel Based Superalloys: Microstructure Evolution And High Temperature Oxidation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, S.; Ribaudo, C.; Mazumder, J.

    1988-10-01

    Application of alloy coatings with superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures (1200°C) on superalloy components is of interest at present. There is a general consensus that the addition of rare earths such as hafnium (Hf) to these alloys has a pronounced effect on their performance. An in situ laser cladding technique was used to produce Ni-Al-Cr-Hf alloys on a nickel alloy substrate. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) attached with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyzers were employed for microstructural evolution studies of alloys produced during the laser cladding process. The microstructure of these alloys mainly consists of dendrites of Y' of the Ni3Al type with about 11-14 wt% Hf and an interdendritic eutectic phase. Electron microscopy in the dendritic zones reveals ordered domains whose morphology depends on laser cladding process parameters. Variation in these parameters produced only subtle changes in the composition and cell spacing of the dendritic phase. The eutectic constituent consists of a Hf-rich phase and a Hf-lean phase in an alternating lamellar structure. Convergent beam diffraction and x-ray spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the constituents. A possible phase transformation sequence has been suggested. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) work indicates that the Y' dissolution temperature for the claddings is at least as high as the substrate material (Rene 80). Single cycle oxidation tests of eight hours at 1200°C in slowly flowing air reveal that the claddings have a lower weight gain rate than the substrate itself. Microchemistry and microstructure of the oxidized samples are examined using SEM attached with EDX and Auger Electron Spectroscopic (AES) techniques. The improvement in the oxidation resistance is believed to be at least partially due to the mechanical pegging between alumina coated hafnia protrusions and the

  18. Methodological fundamentals of computer-assisted designing of nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logunov, A. V.; Shmotin, Yu. N.; Danilov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    More than 180 Russian and foreign nickel superalloys are analyzed to develop regression models to find a relation between chemical composition and a number of the most important thermodynamic, structural, and strength parameters, which directly influence the high-temperature strength of the alloys. The high accuracy of constructing the characteristics of distribution of alloying elements between the γ and γ' phases under scarce experimental data conditions is ensured by the application of bunch map analysis of random characteristics, which allowed the reliability of the calculated results to be significantly increased.

  19. Detailed Analysis of the Solution Heat Treatment of a Third-Generation Single-Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy CMSX-10K®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hon Tong; D'Souza, Neil; Dong, Hongbiao; Stone, Howard J.; Rae, Catherine M. F.

    2016-02-01

    A detailed analysis of the response of as-cast third-generation single-crystal nickel-based superalloy CMSX-10K® to solution heat treatment (SHT) has been carried out, alongside an SHT optimization exercise. The analysis was conducted through microstructural characterization, differential scanning calorimetry, and compositional homogeneity measurements, quantifying (i) the dissolution and microstructural evolution of the inter-dendritic constituents, (ii) the shift in thermo-physical characteristics of the material, and (iii) the change in compositional homogeneity across the microstructure, in order to gain further understanding of these phenomena during the progression of the SHT. During the early stages of SHT, the coarse cellular γ'/narrow γ channel inter-dendritic constituents which were the last areas to solidify during casting, progressively dissolve; homogenization between these inter-dendritic areas and adjacent dendritic areas leads to a rapid increase in the incipient melting temperature T IM. The fine γ/γ' morphology which were the first inter-dendritic constituents to solidify after primary γ dendrite solidification were found to progressively coarsen; however, subsequent dissolution of these coarsened γ/γ' inter-dendritic areas did not result in significant increases in the T IM until the near-complete dissolution of these inter-dendritic areas. After the final SHT step, residual compositional micro-segregation could still be detected across the microstructure despite the near-complete dissolution of these remnant inter-dendritic areas; even so the T IM of the material approached the solidus temperature of the alloy.

  20. Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Negri, R. Martín; Perez, Oscar E.; Butera, Alejandro; Jorge, Guillermo; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.

    2013-12-07

    Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400 °C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0 ± 0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by σ = (8.0 ± 0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12 ± 1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360 nm; average length: 3 μm, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio = length/diameter ∼ 10) were obtained at 85 °C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is

  1. Fatigue-crack-propagation thresholds in a nickel-base superalloy at high frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, A.; Milligan, W. W.; Padula, S. A.; Marras, S. I.

    2002-07-01

    Fatigue-crack-propagation (FCP) tests were conducted on the powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy KM4 at temperatures of 20 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C. Two different heat treatments were investigated, one yielding a relatively coarse grain size of 55 µm and another yielding a fine grain size of 6 µm. Tests were conducted at 100 Hz and 1000 Hz and at load ratios between 0.3 and 0.7. In the Paris regime, trends observed at high frequencies for KM4 were identical to those observed by earlier investigators at lower frequencies: coarse grains, low load ratios, low temperatures, and higher frequencies generally resulted in lower crack-propagation rates. However, in contrast to the Paris-regime behavior, thresholds were a complicated function of microstructure, load ratio, temperature, and frequency, and the only variable that resulted in a consistent trend in threshold was the load ratio. For example, thresholds increased from 100 to 1000 Hz for the fine-grained material at 550 °C, but decreased with the same frequency variation at 650 °C. One reason for this complexity was a change to intergranular fracture in the fine-grained microstructure at 650 °C, which was beneficial for high-frequency thresholds. Higher load ratios and lower frequencies promoted intergranular fracture. However, not all of the complexity could be explained by changing fracture mechanisms. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereofractography was utilized to determine quantitative measures of fracture-surface roughness. The most useful quantitative measure was found to be the standard deviation of the fracture-surface height, which is a physically meaningful length parameter and which corresponded to about half the grain size during room-temperature fatigue at near-threshold Δ K levels. The roughness of the fracture surface was found to increase as the load ratio was increased for both microstructures. For the coarse-grained microstructure, there was a direct correlation between fracture

  2. Techniques Optimized for Reducing Instabilities in Advanced Nickel-Base Superalloys for Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Locci, Ivan E.; Garg, anita; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    The High-Speed Research (HSR) Airfoil Alloy program developed fourth-generation single-crystal superalloys with up to an 85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Recent results have been generated at the NASA Glenn Research Center on these fourth-generation alloys, but in coated form, for subsonic turbine blade applications under NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. One goal for UEET is to optimize the airfoil alloy/thermal barrier coating system for 3100 F turbine inlet temperatures. The state-of-the art turbine blade airfoil system consists of a superalloy single crystal that provides the basic mechanical performance of the airfoil. A thermal barrier coating is used to reduce the temperature of the base superalloy, and a bondcoat is deposited between the base material and the thermal barrier coating. The bondcoat improves the oxidation and corrosion resistance of the base superalloy and improves the spallation resistance of the thermal barrier coating. A commercial platinum aluminide bondcoat was applied to the HSR-developed alloys, and a diffusion zone developed as a result of interaction between the bondcoat and the superalloy. Optimized strength is obtained for superalloys when the refractory element content is high and the limits of microstructural stability are approached or exceeded slightly. For fourthgeneration alloys, instability leads to the formation of topologically close packed (TCP) phases, which form internally in the superalloy, and a secondary reaction zone (SRZ), which forms under the diffusion zone. There was a concern that excessive quantities of either TCP or SRZ might decrease the mechanical properties of the superalloy, with SRZ thought to be particularly detrimental and its formation unpredictable. Thus, an SRZreduction effort was initiated in the NASA UEET Program so that methods developed during the HSR project could be optimized further to reduce or eliminate the SRZ. An SRZ

  3. Alloy and structural optimization of a directionally solidified lamellar eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1976-01-01

    Mechanical property characterization tests of a directionally solidified Ni-20 percent Cb-2.5 percent Al-6 percent Cr cellular eutectic turbine blade alloy demonstrated excellent long time creep stability and indicated intermediate temperature transverse tensile ductility and shear strength to be somewhat low for turbine blade applications. Alloy and structural optimization significantly improves these off-axis properties with no loss of longitudinal creep strength or stability. The optimized alloy-structure combination is a carbon modified Ni-20.1 percent Cb-2.5 percent Al-6.0 percent Cr-0.06 percent C composition processed under conditions producing plane front solidification and a fully-lamellar microstructure. With current processing technology, this alloy exhibits a creep-rupture advantage of 39 C over the best available nickel base superalloy, directionally solidified MAR M200+ Hf. While improved by about 20 percent, shear strength of the optimized alloy remains well below typical superalloy values.

  4. Properties and microstructures for dual alloy combinations of three superalloys with alloy 901

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Dual alloy combinations have potential for use in aircraft engine components such as turbine disks where a wide range of stress and temperature regimes exists during operation. Such alloy combinations may directly result in the conservation of elements which are costly or not available domestically. Preferably, a uniform heat treatment yielding good properties for both alloys should be used. Dual alloy combinations of iron rich Alloy 901 with nickel base superalloys Rene 95, Astroloy, or MERL 76 were not isostatically pressed from prealloyed powders. Individual alloys, alloy mixtures, and layered alloy combinations were given the heat treatments specified for their use in turbine disks or appropriate for Alloy 901. Selected specimens were overaged for 1500 hr at 650 C. Metallographic examinations revealed the absence of phases not originally present in either alloy of a combination. Mechanical tests showed adequate properties in combinations of Rene 95 or Astroloy with Alloy 901 when given the Alloy 901 heat treatment. Combinations with MERL 76 had better properties when given the MERL 76 heat treatment. The results indicate that these combinations are promising candidates for use in turbine disks.

  5. Creep and residual mechanical properties of cast superalloys and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and residual tensile properties after creep testing were determined for two typical cast superalloys and four advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The superalloys examined included the nickel-base alloy B-1900 and the cobalt-base alloy MAR-M509. The nickel-base ODS MA-757 (Ni-16CR-4Al-0.6Y2O3 and the iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 (Fe-20Cr-5Al-0.8Y2O3) were extensively studied, while limited testing was conducted on the ODS nickel-base alloys STCA (Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-2Y2O3) with a without Ta and YD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-5Al-2Y2O3). Elevated temperature testing was conducted from 114 to 1477 K except for STCA and YD-NiCrAl alloys, which were only tested at 1366 K. The residual tensile properties of B-1900 and MAR-M509 are not reduced by prior creep testing (strains at least up to 1 percent), while the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by small amounts of prior creep strain (less than 0.5 percent). The iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 does not appear to be susceptible to creep degradation at least up to strains of about 0.25 percent. However, MA-956 exhibits unusual creep behavior which apparently involves crack nucleation and growth.

  6. Modern fiber laser beam welding of the newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Goodarzi, Massoud; Khodabakhshi, Meisam; Mapelli, Carlo; Barella, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    In the present research, the modern fiber laser beam welding of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys using various welding parameters in constant heat input has been investigated. Five nickel-base superalloys with various Ti and Nb contents were designed and produced by Vacuum Induction Melting furnace. The fiber laser beam welding operations were performed in constant heat input (100 J mm-2) and different welding powers (400 and 1000 W) and velocities (40 and 100 mm s-1) using 6-axis anthropomorphic robot. The macro- and micro-structural features, weld defects, chemical composition and mechanical property of 3.2 mm weldments were assessed utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS analysis and microhardness tester. The results showed that welding with higher powers can create higher penetration-to-width ratios. The porosity formation was increased when the welding powers and velocities were increased. None of the welds displayed hot solidification and liquation cracks in 400 and 1000 W welding powers, but liquation phenomenon was observed in all the heat-affected zones. With increasing the Nb content of the superalloys the liquation length was increased. The changing of the welding power and velocity did not alter the hardness property of the welds. The hardness of welds decreased when the Ti content declined in the composition of superalloys. Finally, the 400 and 1000 W fiber laser powers with velocity of 40 and 100 m ms-1 have been offered for hot crack-free welding of the thin sheet of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys.

  7. Study of alumina-trichite reinforcement of a nickel-based matric by means of powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walder, A.; Hivert, A.

    1982-01-01

    Research was conducted on reinforcing nickel based matrices with alumina trichites by using powder metallurgy. Alumina trichites previously coated with nickel are magnetically aligned. The felt obtained is then sintered under a light pressure at a temperature just below the melting point of nickel. The halogenated atmosphere technique makes it possible to incorporate a large number of additive elements such as chromium, titanium, zirconium, tantalum, niobium, aluminum, etc. It does not appear that going from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale in production would create any major problems.

  8. Investigation of the final stages of solidification and eutectic phase formation in Re and Ru containing nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, A.; Rettig, R.; Cenanovic, S.; Göken, M.; Singer, R. F.

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure resulting from the final stages of solidification—commonly referred to as eutectic islands—has been analysed in detail for three nickel-base superalloys containing Re and Ru. Focused ion beam 3-D reconstruction and EBSD-analysis were used to clarify the origin of different eutectic structure types. One common type of parent 3-D eutectic structure was identified. The solidification process of the final solidifying liquid has been further investigated by electron probe microanalysis mappings along with DICTRA simulations. Two models for diffusion controlled phase transformations are shown to present a fair description of the solidification sequence.

  9. Application of Resonant Frequency Eddy Current Technique on a Shot-Peened Nickel-Based Engine-Grade Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Ray T.; Sathish, Shamachary; Boehnlein, Thomas R.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2007-03-21

    The shot peening conditions of a nickel-based engine-grade material were evaluated using a novel eddy current measurement technique. With this technique, the shift of a resonant frequency was found to be dependent on variables which also affect conventional eddy current testing. The cable effect is another important variable, which is often neglected in a routine eddy current testing, is also discussed. Experimental results showed that at high frequencies, the shot peening conditions were easily distinguishable using this frequency shift technique.

  10. Electrochemical characterization of chromia- and alumina-forming nickel-based superalloys in molten silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Tuti Katrina; Petitjean, Carine; Panteix, Pierre-Jean; Mathieu, Stéphane; Rapin, Christophe; Vilasi, Michel; Hussain, Zuhailawati; Rahim, Afidah Abdul

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the corrosion behaviour of simplified chromia- and alumina-forming alloys (Ni-30Cr and Ni-8Al-28Cr) in molten glass is performed via electrochemical methods. A pre-oxidation treatment in air prior to immersion ensured the formation of a 2-μm-thick oxide scale of Cr2O3 or Al2O3. The lifetime of Ni-30Cr depended on the competition between the oxide growth and its dissolution in the melt. For Ni-8Al-28Cr, the high solubility of alumina in the melt studied here led to severe aluminium loss in a few minutes and clearly demonstrated the higher efficiency of chromia-forming alloys for molten glass applications.

  11. The Tensile Properties of Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Superalloys During Quenching Heat Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete T.; Biles, Tiffany; Konkel, William

    2001-01-01

    There is a need to increase the temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine disks. This would allow full utilization of higher temperature combustor and airfoil concepts under development. One approach to meet this goal is to modify the processing and chemistry of advanced alloys, while preserving the ability to use rapid cooling supersolvus heat treatments to achieve coarse grain, fine gamma prime microstructures. An important step in this effort is to understand the key high temperature tensile properties of advanced alloys as they exist during supersolvus heat treatments. This could help in projecting cracking tendencies of disks during quenches from supersolvus heat treatments. The objective of this study was to examine the tensile properties of two advanced disk superalloys during simulated quenching heat treatments. Specimens were cooled from the solution heat treatment temperatures at controlled rates, interrupted, and immediately tensile tested at various temperatures. The responses and failure modes were compared and related to the quench cracking tendencies of disk forgings.

  12. Influence of molybdenum on the creep properties of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Pearson, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Mo content of an alloy series based on Ni-6 wt pct Al-6 wt pct Ta was systematically varied from 9.8 to 14.6 wt pct, in order to ascertain the influence of Mo on the creep properties of single crystals. The optimum initial gamma-gamma prime microstructure for raft development and creep strength was established in each alloy before testing. It was found that, as the Mo content increased from 9.8 to 14.0 percent, the magnitude of the lattice mismatch increased; upon reaching 14.6 percent, a degradation of mechanical properties occurred due to the precipitation of a third phase. These results suggest that small refractory metal content and initial gamma-prime variations can profoundly affect mechanical properties.

  13. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-01

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core. PMID:18258912

  14. Effects of Microstructural Parameters on Creep of Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Microstructure-sensitive creep models have been developed for Ni-base superalloy single crystals. Creep rupture testing was conducted on fourteen single crystal alloys at two applied stress levels at each of two temperatures, 982 and 1093 C. The variation in creep lives among the different alloys could be explained with regression models containing relatively few microstructural parameters. At 982 C, gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch, gamma prime volume fraction, and initial gamma prime size were statistically significant in explaining the creep rupture lives. At 1093 C, only lattice mismatch and gamma prime volume fraction were significant. These models could explain from 84 to 94 percent of the variation in creep lives, depending on test condition. Longer creep lives were associated with alloys having more negative lattice mismatch, lower gamma prime volume fractions, and finer gamma prime sizes. The gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch exhibited the strongest influence of all the microstructural parameters at both temperatures. Although a majority of the alloys in this study were stable with respect to topologically close packed (TCP) phases, it appeared that up to approximately 2 vol% TCP phase did not affect the 1093 C creep lives under applied stresses that produced lives of approximately 200 to 300 h. In contrast, TCP phase contents of approximately 2 vol% were detrimental at lower applied stresses where creep lives were longer. A regression model was also developed for the as-heat treated initial gamma prime size; this model showed that gamma prime solvus temperature, gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch, and bulk Re content were all statistically significant.

  15. Oxidation behavior of several chromia-forming commercial nickel-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Rogers, P.M.; Little, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Several commercially available Ni-base superalloys were exposed isothermally in air at temperatures between 750{degrees} and 1000{degrees}C and also under cyclic conditions at 1000{degrees}C The kinetics of oxidation were determined and the scales were analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Thin adherent chromia-rich scales formed on the alloys at 750{degrees}C after 1000 hr. Although Waspaloy showed the lowest weight gain in this test, it also showed the deepest internal corrosion due to oxidation of the grain-boundary carbides. At temperatures up to 1000{degrees}C the external scales were also chromia-rich but there was greater internal corrosion. Titanium in the alloys oxidized, diffusing through the chromia scale to form faceted rutile (TiO{sub 2}) grains at the surface as well as forming TiO{sub 2} and TiN internally. The amount of rutile at the oxide surface increased with temperature and alloy Ti concentration. Alumina formed as discrete internal oxides below the chromia scale, although Astroloy when oxidized isothermally at 1000{degrees}C developed a semicontinuous internal layer of alumina due to its higher Al content. Under cyclic conditions Astroloy formed a thicker, less-protective scale of transition oxides probably due to its lower Cr content.

  16. Microstructure and Creep Behavior of a Directional Solidification Nickel-based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ning; Tian, Sugui; Yu, Huichen; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianlin

    2015-07-01

    By means of creep property measurement and microstructure observation, an investigation has been made into microstructure and creep behavior of a directional solidification Ni-based superalloy at high temperatures. Results show that after full heat treatment, small cuboidal γ' precipitates distribute in the dendrite regions, while coarser ones distribute in the inter-dendrite regions. In the primary stage of creep, the γ' phase in alloy is transformed into the rafted structure along the direction vertical to stress axis, and then the creep of alloy enters the steady state stage. And dislocations slipping in the g matrix and climbing over the rafted γ' phase are thought to be the deformation mechanism of the alloy during steady creep stage. At the latter stage of creep, the alternate slipping of dislocations may shear and twist the rafted γ'/γ phases, which promotes the initiation and propagation of the micro-cracks along the boundaries near the coarser rafted γ' phase. And the bigger probability of the creep damage occurs in the grain boundaries along 45° angles relative to the stress axis due to them bearing relatively bigger shearing stress.

  17. Equilibrium partition ratios, densities, and transport phenomena in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Pil Kyung

    To simulate transport phenomena, macrosegregation and segregation defects known as "freckles" during directional solidification of Ni-base superalloys, numerical modeling can be used; hence it is essential to have reasonably accurate values of the thermodynamic and transport properties for the alloys. In this research, therefore, the equilibrium partition ratios of the solutes in the Ni-Al-Ta-Cr quaternary system, as a model alloy, were measured, and the solid- and liquid-densities in Ni-base superalloys. were estimated. Also, the importance of these properties on the sensitivity of the results of numerical simulations was studied. The partition ratios apply to equilibria between melts and gamma-phase in the range of 1615 K to 1694 K, and it was found that the equilibrium partition ratio of Ta varies from approximately 0.6 at dilute Ta to 0.85 at 17 wt.% Ta. For the same range of Ta-contents, the partition ratios of Al and Cr vary much less and range from about 0.92 to 0.96. In addition to the partition ratios, the liquidus temperatures of the liquid in equilibrium with gamma in the Ni-Al-Ta-Cr system were estimated with a multidimensional regression analysis. To calculate the densities of solid Ni-base superalloys as functions of temperature and composition, lattice parameters at 20°C and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) were estimated by combining available data. The CTEs calculated from the regressions result in densities that are within 0.5% error or less for seventeen alloys. To estimate the densities of liquid Ni-base superalloys, the densities and temperature coefficients of density of the liquid transition-metals, which are used as alloy elements in Ni-base superalloys, were applied to a simple correlation. By using this approach, the estimates of the liquid densities of five Ni-base superalloys agree with the measured values to +/-2.5%. Finally, the importance of using reasonably accurate estimates of the transport properties was illustrated by

  18. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  19. Mechanically alloyed Ni-base alloys for heat-resistant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.K.; Fischer, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    INCONEL alloys MA 754 and MA 758 are nickel-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys made by mechanical alloying (MA). Commercial use of Ma Ni-base alloys to date has been predominantly in aerospace applications of alloy MA 754 as turbine engine vanes. Both alloys are suitable for industrial heat treating components and other heat resistant alloy applications. Field trials and commercial experience in such applications of MA alloys are being gained while high temperature property characterization and new product form development continue. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the standard consolidation method for billets from which large bar and plate are produced for industrial applications of MA. This paper describes production of standard mill shapes from HIP billets, and it presents information on current and potential uses of MA alloys in applications such as: skid rails for use in high temperature walking beam furnaces, heat treating furnace components, components for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes. The paper includes comparison of the properties obtained in alloy MA 754 (20% Cr) and alloy MA 758 (30% Cr).

  20. Microstructure Evolution and Analysis of A [011] Orientation, Single-Crystal, Nickel-Based Superalloy During Tensile Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sugui; Zhang, Shu; Li, Chenxi; Yu, Huichen; Su, Yong; Yu, Xingfu; Yu, Lili

    2012-10-01

    By means of the elastic-plastic finite-element method (FEM) for calculating the distribution features of the von Mises stress and strain energy density, the influences of the applied stress on the von Mises stress of the γ'/ γ phases and the rafting of the γ' phase for the [011] orientation, single-crystal, nickel-based superalloy are investigated. The results show that, after being fully heat treated, the microstructure of the [011] orientation, single-crystal, nickel-based superalloy consists of the cuboidal γ' phase embedded coherently in the γ matrix, and the cuboidal γ' phase on (100) plane is regularly arranged along a 45 deg angle relative to the [011] orientation. Compared with the matrix channel of [010] orientation, the bigger von Mises stress is produced within the [001] matrix channel when the tensile stress is applied along the [011] orientation. Under the action of the larger principal stress component, the bigger expanding lattice strain occurs on the (001) plane of the cuboidal γ' phase along the [010] direction, which may trap the Al, Ti atoms with a bigger atomic radius for promoting the directional growth of the γ' phase into the stripe-like rafted structure along the [001] orientation. The changes of the interatomic potential energy, misfit stress, and interfacial energy during the tensile creep are thought to be the driving forces of promoting the elements' diffusion and directional growth of the γ' phase.

  1. Fretting of Nickel-Chromium-Aluminum Alloys at Temperatures to 816 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of four nickel-based alloys containing 10 percent and 20 percent chromium in combination with 2 percent and 5 percent aluminum were fretted in dry air at temperatures to 816 C. At all temperatures, the alloys showed far less fretting wear than did high-purity nickel. This was attributed to the formation of protective oxide films on the alloys, the result of the selective oxidation of the alloy constituents. Increasing the aluminum concentration reduced fretting wear at all temperatures. Increasing the chromium concentration from 10 percent to 20 percent resulted in decreased fretting wear at 23 and 540 C, but increased fretting wear at 650 and 816 C.

  2. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  3. Carbon additions and grain defect formation in directionally solidified nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, Sammy

    Over the past fifty years, technological advances leading up to the development of modern high-performance turbine engines for aircraft and power generation applications have coincided with significant engineering accomplishments in the area of Ni-base superalloy metallurgy. As the levels of refractory alloying additions to these Ni-base superalloys increase to enhance high-temperature mechanical properties, grain defect formation, particularly the development of freckle chains, during directional solidification has become an increasingly important problem. In this dissertation, the effect of carbon additions on the solidification characteristics of single crystal Ni-base superalloys has been investigated over a wide range of composition. Using statistically designed experiments, carbon additions of 0.1 to 0.125 wt. % were shown to be beneficial in stabilizing against the formation of grain defects due to thermosolutal convective instabilities. Detailed analyses were performed on the single crystal castings to identify the underlying mechanisms by which the carbon additions improve the solidification characteristics. In addition to forming Ta-rich MC carbides during solidification, the carbon additions were also revealed to influence the segregation behavior of the constituent elements in a manner that was beneficial in suppressing the formation of freckle defects during solidification. Using a segregation mapping technique, less segregation of rhenium, tungsten and tantalum was measured in the carbon containing alloys. Carbide formation during solidification was studied using differential thermal analysis. The influence of carbon additions on the solidification characteristics of the experimental single crystal alloys was assessed using a dimensionless Rayleigh analysis. Based on these analyses, the physical presence of carbides during the initial stages of solidification was also shown to inhibit the formation of freckle defects. In this investigation, carbon

  4. Development of new wear-resistant material: titanium-nickel-based composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haizhi

    In this research, a new type of wear-resistant composite was developed using a TiNi alloy as the matrix reinforced by hard TiC or TiN particles. Due to its pseudoelasticity and good wear resistance, the TiNi alloy is a desirable matrix for high-performance composites. The TiNi-based composite was fabricated using a vacuum sintering process. The effects of powder metallurgy processing and hard particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite were studied. It has been demonstrated that the TiNi alloy matrix composite can be obtained by sintering elemental Ti and Ni powders with the hard TiC or TiN particles. However, high porosity is typical for such a sintered composite. 52 vol% was found to be the best fraction for TiC particles, and 1500°C and 6 hours were the optimum sintering parameters for making such a composite. Even with high-density porosity, the sintered TiNi-based composite showed a wear resistance that is about three orders of magnitude higher than that of 304 stainless steel, one order of magnitude higher than that of a Ti-51at%Ni alloy, and comparable to that of WC/NiCrBSi, a commercial hardfacing material. In order to further improve the composite's wear resistance, the effects of porosity on the composite's mechanical properties and wear resistance were investigated, and accordingly, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used to reduce the porosity of the composite for enhanced wear resistance. Finally, the pseudoelasticity of the TiNi matrix in the composite and corresponding phase transformation were investigated, using nano-indentation, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, respectively. It was demonstrated that a reversible R-phase transformation induced by the wearing stress was mainly responsible for the pseudoelasticity of the composite. The pseudoelasticity of the composite affected its wear performance over a relatively wide temperature

  5. Analysis of Grain Boundary Character in a Fine-Grained Nickel-Based Superalloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, L. S.; dos Santos, D. S.; Godet, S.; Dille, J.; Pinto, A. L.; de Almeida, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    In the current work, sheets of superalloy 718 were processed via thermomechanical route by hot and cold rolling, followed by annealing below the δ phase solvus temperature and precipitation hardening to optimum strength. Grain boundary character distribution throughout the processing was mapped via EBSD and its evolution discussed. The results show that it is possible to process the alloy to a fine grain size obtaining concomitantly a considerably high proportion of special boundaries Σ3, Σ9, and Σ27. The precipitation of δ phase presented a strong grain refining role, without significantly impairing the twinning mechanism and, consequently, the Σ3, Σ9, and Σ27 boundary formations.

  6. Weldability of HAYNES 282 alloy for new fabrications and after service exposure

    SciTech Connect

    White, H; Santella, Michael L; Specht, Eliot D

    2009-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on the mechanical properties and weldability of wrought gamma prime strengthened nickel based superalloys is well known. An understanding of the basic guidelines concerning alloying additions has led to the invention and development of HAYNES 282 alloy for applications in aircraft and land based gas turbines and other high performance high temperature environments. The alloy combines exceptional high temperature properties with good weldability and fabricability. At high temperatures (?900 >C), the alloy is stronger in creep strength than Waspaloy alloy (UNS N07001) and it approaches the creep strength of R-41 alloy (UNS N07041). Because the alloy has better thermal stability, fabricability and weldability than Waspaloy and R-41 alloys, it is currently being considered as a candidate universal consumable for welding/repair welding of gamma prime strengthened nickel based superalloys and it is also being considered as a suitable replacement for applications where R-41, Waspaloy and C263 (UNS N07263) alloys are currently being used. The alloy was designed to have improved resistance to strain age cracking, a problem common to gamma prime strengthened nickel based superalloys. In this paper, the results from time resolved X-ray diffraction studies during a welding thermal cycle; gas metal arc welding of thick and gas tungsten arc welding of thin section annealed material (for new fabrications) and annealed and aged material (welding under the aged/service exposed condition); and the results from heat affected zone physical simulations of the weldment measured 2 mm from the weld centreline of annealed (for new fabrication) and annealed and aged (service exposed) material will be presented. Creep properties (870 C/159 MPa) of the weldment will be discussed as well as mechanisms leading to failure.

  7. New vistas in the determination of hydrogen in aerospace engine metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, were studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it was found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conformed closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, were essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. Finally, it has been found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the 'fast' hydrogen is not due to surface and subsurface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  8. Evidence of multimicrometric coherent γ' precipitates in a hot-forged γ-γ' nickel-based superalloy.

    PubMed

    Charpagne, M-A; Vennéguès, P; Billot, T; Franchet, J-M; Bozzolo, N

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrates the existence of large γ' precipitates (several micrometres in diameter) that are coherent with their surrounding matrix grain in a commercial γ-γ' nickel-based superalloy. The use of combined energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses allowed for revealing that surprising feature, which was then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coherency for such large second-phase particles is supported by a very low crystal lattice misfit between the two phases, which was confirmed thanks to X-ray diffractograms and TEM selected area electron diffraction patterns. Dynamic recrystallization of polycrystalline γ-γ' nickel-based superalloys has been extensively studied in terms of mechanisms and kinetics. As in many materials with low stacking fault energy, under forging conditions, the main softening mechanism is discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. This mechanism occurs with preferential nucleation on the grain boundaries of the deformed matrix. The latter is then being consumed by the growth of the newly formed grains of low energy and by nucleation that keeps generating new grains. In the case of sub-solvus forging, large γ' particles usually pin the migrating boundaries and thus limit grain growth to a size which is determined by the distribution of second-phase particles, in good agreement with the Smith-Zener model. Under particular circumstances, the driving force associated with the difference in stored energy between the growing grains and the matrix can be large enough that the pinning forces can be overcome, and some grains can then reach much larger grain sizes. In the latter exceptional case, some intragranular primary γ' particles can be observed, although they are almost exclusively located on grain boundaries and triple junctions otherwise. In both cases, primary precipitates have no special orientation relationship with the surrounding matrix grain(s). This

  9. Microstructural modeling during multi-pass rolling of a nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kannan

    2009-08-01

    Microstructure present at the end of rolling and cooling operations controls the product properties. Therefore, control of grain size is an important characteristic in any hot-working. The narrow temperature range for hot working of Alloy 718 makes the grain size control more difficult. In the current work, a systematic numerical approach to predict the microstructure of Alloy 718 during multi-pass rolling is developed. This approach takes into account the severe deformation that takes place during each pass and also the possible reheating between passes. In order to predict the grain size at the end of rolling process, microstructural processes such as dynamic recrystallization (DRX), metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX), and static grain growth need to be captured at every deformation step for superalloys. Empirical relationships between the average grain size from various microstructural processes and the macroscopic variables such as temperature (T), effective strain 3¯ and strain rate 3¯˙ form the basis for the current work. The empirical relationships considered in this work are based on Avrami equations and utilize data taken from various forging analyses. The macroscopic variables are calculated using the Finite Element Method (FEM) by modeling the rolling process as a creeping flow problem. FEM incorporates a mesh re-zoning algorithm that enables the analysis to continue for several passes. A two-dimensional transient thermal analysis is carried out between passes that can capture the MDRX and/or static grain growth during the microstructural evolution. The microstructure prediction algorithm continuously updates two families of grains, namely, the recrystallized family and strained family at the start of deformation in any given pass. In addition, the algorithm calculates various subgroups within these two families at every deformation step within a pass. As the material undergoes deformation between the rolls, recrystallization equations are invoked

  10. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, N. K.; Swanson, G.

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single crystal nickel turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines throughout industry because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493, PWA 1484, RENE' N-5 and CMSX-4. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. Single crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. The failure modes of single crystal turbine blades are complicated to predict due to the material orthotropy and variations in crystal orientations. Fatigue life estimation of single crystal turbine blades represents an important aspect of durability assessment. It is therefore of practical interest to develop effective fatigue failure criteria for single crystal nickel alloys and to investigate the effects of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientation on fatigue life. A fatigue failure criterion based on the maximum shear stress amplitude /Delta(sub tau)(sub max))] on the 24 octahedral and 6 cube slip systems, is presented for single crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criterion reduces the scatter in uniaxial LCF test data considerably for PWA 1493 at 1200 F in air. Additionally, single crystal turbine blades used in the alternate advanced high-pressure fuel turbopump (AHPFTP/AT) are modeled using a large-scale three-dimensional finite element model. This finite element model is capable of accounting for material orthotrophy and variation in primary and secondary crystal orientation. Effects of variation in crystal orientation on blade stress response are studied based on 297

  11. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth in a single crystal Inconel 718 nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, A.B.O.; Soboyejo, W.O. )

    1999-07-09

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of an experimental, single crystal alloy, of equivalent nominal chemical composition to Inconel 718 is presented. Fracture modes under cyclic loading were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the fractographic analyses are presented on a fracture mechanism map that shows the dependence of the fatigue fracture mechanisms on the maximum stress intensity factor, K[sub max], and the stress intensity factor range, [Delta]K. Crack-tip deformation mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The relative effects of [Delta]K and K[sub max] on the fatigue crack growth behavior of this material are discussed within the context of a two-parameter crack growth law. The influence of grain boundaries on the fatigue crack growth resistance of materials such as Inconel 718 is also discussed in light of the results of this investigation.

  12. Analyses of Elemental Partitioning in Advanced Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, Robert L.; Thomas, Kimberly J.

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft propulsion engines for the High Speed Civil Transport which may be developed early in the 21st century will require significantly different durability requirements than those which currently power civil aircraft. The durability will be more difficult to achieve because it is expected that the new aircraft engines will have to operate at near maximum power for more than half of each flight compared to 5 to 10 percent for typical current aircraft. To meet this requirement, a team of NASA, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and General Electric personnel have been formed to develop an appropriate alloy for the mission. This report summarizes the work performed by a part of that team up to the retirement of one of its members, R.L. Dreshfield. The prime purpose of the report is to assemble the data obtained in a single document so that it may be more accessible to those who may wish to pursue it at a later date.

  13. Fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue of two nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.; Duquette, D. J.; Choe, S. J.; Golwalkar, S.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue behavior of two P/M superalloys, Rene 95 and Astroloy, in the hot isostatically pressed (HIP) condition, was determined. Test variables included frequency, temperature, environment, and hold times at peak tensile loads (or strains). Crack initiation sites were identified in both alloys. Crack growth rates were shown to increase in argon with decreasing frequency or with the imposition of hold times. This behavior was attributed to the effect of oxygen in the argon. Auger analyses were performed on oxide films formed in argon. Low cycle fatigue lives also were degraded by tensile hold, contrary to previous reports in the literature. The role of environment in low cycle fatigue behavior is discussed.

  14. Quantitative characterization and comparison of precipitate and grain shape in Nickel -base superalloys using moment invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Patrick Gregory

    A fundamental objective of materials science and engineering is to understand the structure-property-processing-performance relationship. We need to know the true 3-D microstructure of a material to understand certain geometric properties of a material, and thus fulfill this objective. Focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning allows us to find the true 3-D microstructure of Ni-base superalloys. Once the true 3-D microstructure is obtained, an accurate quantitative description and characterization of precipitate and/or grain shapes is needed to understand the microstructure and describe it in an unbiased way. In this thesis, second order moment invariants, the shape quotient Q, a convexity measure relating the volume of an object to the volume of its convex hull, V/Vconv, and Gaussian curvature have been used to compare an experimentally observed polycrystalline IN100 microstructure to three synthetic microstructures. The three synthetic microstructures used different shape classes to produce starting grain shapes. The three shape classes are ellipsoids, superellipsoids, and the shapes generated when truncating a cube with an octahedron. The microstructures are compared using a distance measure, the Hellinger distance. The Hellinger distance is used to compare distributions of shape descriptors for the grains in each microstructure. The synthetic microstructure that has the smallest Hellinger distance, and so best matched the experimentally observed microstructure is the microstructure that used superellipsoids as a starting grain shape. While it has the smallest Hellinger distance, and is approaching realistic grain morphologies, the superellipsoidal microstructure is still not realistic. Second order moment invariants, Q, and V/V conv have also been used to characterize the γ' precipitate shapes from four experimental Ru-containing Ni-base superalloys with differences in alloying additions. The superalloys are designated UM-F9, UM-F18, UM-F19, and UM-F22. The

  15. Influence of cubic boron nitride grinding on the fatigue strengths of carbon steels and a nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoishi, N.; Chen, Q.; Kondo, E.; Goto, M.; Nisitani, H.

    1999-04-01

    The influence of cubic boron nitride (CBN) grinding on fatigue strength was investigated on an annealed carbon steel, a quenched and tempered carbon steel at room temperature, and a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 718, at room temperature and 500 C. The results were discussed from several viewpoints, including surface roughness, residual stress, and work hardening or softening due to CBN grinding. The fatigue strength increased upon CBN grinding at room temperature, primarily because of the generation of compressive residual stress in the surface region. However, in the case of Inconel 718, this marked increase in the fatigue strength tended to disappear at the elevated temperature due to the release of compressive residual stress and the decrease of crack growth resistance at an elevated temperature.

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Nickel-base Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, K. A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Hawk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at temperatures of 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 Hz and 0.25 Hz. Increasing the temperature from 550 to 750 °C caused the fatigue crack growth rates to increase from ~20 to 60% depending upon the applied stress intensity level. The effect of reducing the applied loading frequency increased the fatigue crack growth rates from ~20 to 70%, also depending upon the applied stress intensity range. The crack path was observed to be transgranular for the temperatures and frequencies used during fatigue crack growth rate testing. At 750 °C, there were some indications of limited intergranular cracking excursions at both loading frequencies; however, the extent of intergranular crack growth was limited and the cause is not understood at this time.

  17. LCF behavior and life prediction method of a single crystal nickel-based superalloy at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihua; Yu, Huichen; Dong, Chengli

    2015-12-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests were conducted on the single crystal nickel-based superalloy, DD6, with different crystallographic orientations (i.e., [001], [011], and [111]) and strain dwell types (i.e., tensile, compressive, and balanced types) at a certain high temperature. Given the material anisotropy and mean stress, both orientation factor and stress range were introduced to the Smith,Watson, and Topper (SWT) stress model to predict the fatigue life. Experimental results indicated that the fatigue properties of DD6 depend on both crystallographic orientation and loading types. The fatigue life of the tensile, compressive, and balanced strain dwell tests are shorter than those of continuous cycling tests without strain dwell because of the important creep effect. The predicted results of the proposed modified SWT stress method agree well with the experimental data.

  18. A study of fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties of a nickel-base superalloy by instrumented microindentation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Duyi; Cha, Haibo; Xiao, Lei; Xu, Xuandong

    2012-01-01

    In this study the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties of nickel-base superalloy GH4145/SQ were investigated using the instrumented microindentation testing coupled with the analytic calculation. The indentation characteristic parameters of low-cycle fatigue specimens, such as the indentation curvature ( C), the maximum penetration depth ( hmax), the initial unloading slope ( S), the residual depth of penetration ( h r), the recovered elastic work ( W e) and the residual plastic work ( W p), were determined from the experimental load-penetration depth ( P- h) curves, and the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties ( E, σ y and n) were estimated using a well-developed analysis algorithm proposed by Dao et al. The distribution patterns of the fatigue mesoscopic mechanical properties were further verified in a statistical sense. The dependence of the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties upon the imposed strain amplitude was discussed preliminarily in terms of microstructural examinations of fatigue failure specimens.

  19. In situ short fatigue crack characterization of a nickel-base superalloy at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue experiments were performed using a nickel-base superalloy at various temperatures in a load frame attached to a scanning electron microscope. An elevated temperature stage was designed, constructed, and coupled to the apparatus, allowing temperatures in excess of 700 C. Experiments on Waspaloy at 25, 500, and 700 C showed similar crack nucleation characteristics. The dominant mechanism of fatigue crack growth for the short cracks at 25 and 500 C was one of mixed mode 1 and 2 by slip band cracking. At 700 C, crack growth proceeded by a stage II cracking process showing very little signs of crystallographic growth. Discontinuous crack growth rates at 25 and 500 C were attributed to microstructural barriers such as grain boundaries, twin boundaries, and carbides.

  20. Recrystallization and the Development of Abnormally Large Grains After Small Strain Deformation in a Polycrystalline Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Victoria M.; Johnson, Anthony E.; Torbet, Chris J.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of abnormally large grains has been investigated in the polycrystalline nickel-based superalloy René 88DT. Cylindrical specimens with a 15 μm grain size were compressed to plastic strains up to 11.0 pct and subsequently rapidly heated to above the γ' solvus at 1423 K (1150° C) and held for 60 seconds. All deformed samples partially recrystallized during the heat treatment, with the recrystallized grain size varying with the degree of deformation. The largest final grain size occurred in samples deformed to approximately 2 pct strain, with isolated grains as large as 700 μm in diameter observed. It is proposed that abnormally large grains appear due to nucleation-limited recrystallization, not abnormal grain growth, based on the high boundary velocities measured and the observed reduction in grain orientation spread.

  1. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Two Nickel-Based Superalloys Produced by Metal Injection Molding for Aero Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Benedikt; Völkl, Rainer; Glatzel, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    For different high-temperature applications like aero engines or turbochargers, metal injection molding (MIM) of superalloys is an interesting processing alternative. For operation at high temperatures, oxidation behavior of superalloys produced by MIM needs to match the standard of cast or forged material. The oxidation behavior of nickel-based superalloys Inconel 713 and MAR-M247 in the temperature interval from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) is investigated and compared to cast material. Weight gain is measured discontinuously at different oxidation temperatures and times. Analysis of oxidized samples is done via SEM and EDX-measurements. MIM samples exhibit homogeneous oxide layers with a thickness up to 4 µm. After processing by MIM, Inconel 713 exhibits lower weight gain and thinner oxide layers than MAR-M247.

  2. A new approach to the weldability of nickel-base As-cast and power metallurgy superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Haafkens, M.H.; Matthey, J.H.G.

    1982-11-01

    The repair of nickel-base superalloys such as those used in the first and second stages of the rotating sections of a gas turbine is examined. Welding is affected by stress and temperature levels of the blade, wall thickness, and material composition. Steps to achieve crack-free welds include preheating above 600C (1112F) for GTA and plasma arc welding and above 900C (1652F) for EB welding. It is concluded that crack formation can be prevented by controlling the cooling rate during welding; that hardness measurements provide useful results for crack-free welding using GTA, plasma, friction, and electron beams; and that small differences in chemical composition and homogeneity can have a decisive effect on weld behavior.

  3. Twinning Behaviors During Thermomechanical Fatigue Cycling of a Nickel-Base Single-Crystal TMS-82 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, X. Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Harada, H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides further insight into the formation of deformation twins at different stages during the whole thermomechanical fatigue cycling in a nickel-base single-crystal TMS-82 superalloy. In general, it is found that twinning behaviors can always be associated with the applied stress orientation. The preferred twinning direction at the primary stage is <001>-compression since the tangled dislocations which appear after the first plastic deformation provide an opportunity for twinning nucleation in compression. At the intermediate stage, the applied stress required for formation of twins in tension is much larger than that in compression; hence, twinning behaviors show distinct tension/compression asymmetry. A thick twin plate and a great many dislocations can be found after fatigue failure, and one can rationalize the reason for this twinning being associated with the TMF procedure. Twins at the tip of the crack in tension occur owing to the existence of compressive strain field.

  4. Partial Melting in the Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB) is often considered to be permeable to flow, because solid iron could melt as it upwells across the ICB. Such a mechanism has been proposed to accompany inner core convective processes (including translation from a freezing to melting hemisphere), and has also been invoked to explain the formation of a dense Fe-rich liquid F-layer above the ICB. However, the conceptions of ICB melting invoked thus far are extremely simplistic, and neglect the many lessons learned from melting in other geological contexts. Owing to some degree of solid solution in relatively incompatible light alloys in solid iron, the onset of melting in the inner core will likely occur as a partial melt, with the liquid being enriched in these light alloys relative to the co-existing solid. Such a partial melt is then subject to upward migration/percolation out of the solid matrix owing to the buoyancy of melt relative to solid. Removal of melt and viscous compaction of the pore space results in an iron-enriched dense solid, whose negative buoyancy will oppose whatever buoyancy forces initially gave rise to upwelling. Either the negative buoyancy will balance these other forces and cause upwelling to cease, or else the solid will become so depleted in light alloys that it is unable to undergo further melting. Thus a proper accounting of partial melting results in a very different melting regime in the inner core, and suppression of upwelling across the ICB. Any fluid that is able to escape into the outer core from inner core partial melting will likely be buoyant because in order to be a melt it should be enriched in incompatiable alloys relative to whatever is freezing at the ICB. Therefore inner core melting is unlikely to contribute to the formation of an F-layer, but instead will tend to de-stabilize it. I will present models that illustrate these processes, and propose that the F-layer is a relic of incomplete mixing of the core during Earth's final stages of

  5. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  6. Modeling of abnormal mechanical properties of nickel-based single crystal superalloy by three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Zhenhuan; Huang, Minsheng

    2014-12-01

    Unlike common single crystals, the nickel-based single crystal superalloy shows surprisingly anomalous flow strength (i.e. with the increase of temperature, the yield strength first increases to a peak value and then decreases) and tension-compression (TC) asymmetry. A comprehensive three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (3D-DDD) procedure was developed to model these abnormal mechanical properties. For this purpose, a series of complicated dynamic evolution details of Kear-Wilsdorf (KW) locks, which are closely related to the flow strength anomaly and TC asymmetry, were incorporated into this 3D-DDD framework. Moreover, the activation of the cubic slip system, which is the origin of the decrease in yield strength with increasing temperature at relatively high temperatures, was especially taken into account by introducing a competition criterion between the unlocking of the KW locks and the activation of the cubic slip system. To test our framework, a series of 3D-DDD simulations were performed on a representative volume cell model with a cuboidal Ni3Al precipitate phase embedded in a nickel matrix. Results show that the present 3D-DDD procedure can successfully capture the dynamic evolution of KW locks, the flow strength anomaly and TC asymmetry. Then, the underlying dislocation mechanisms leading to these abnormal mechanical responses were investigated and discussed in detail. Finally, a cyclic deformation of the nickel-based single crystal superalloy was modeled by using the present DDD model, with a special focus on the influence of KW locks on the Bauschinger effect and cyclic softening.

  7. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  8. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  9. Microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of nickel-based superalloy 625 made by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Adams, Paul; Albright, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructures of Selective Laser Melted (SLM) alloy 625 procured from different suppliers were compared. The post-SLM process of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) led to a relatively coarse recrystallized gamma matrix phase that was similar in all the suppliers' materials, resulting in nearly identical tensile properties. These similarities obscure significant differences between them with respect to the population of second phase particles, which consisted of carbides or Laves phase. During solidification, the final liquid phase is concentrated in Nb, Mo, Si and C, and leads to L --> γ + carbide/Laves eutectic reactions. Secondary particles are very small prior to HIP and their composition has not been analyzed yet, but are limited to the fine-grained eutectic regions of the material prior to HIP. During HIP the gamma phase recrystallizes to remove the original as-solidified SLM microstructure, but secondary particles nucleate and grow where their elemental constituents first solidified, leading to a non-homogeneous distribution. Quasi-static tensile properties do not appear to be sensitive to these differences, but it is likely that other mechanical properties will be affected, especially fatigue and fracture behavior. Surface roughness, large grain size, and pores and voids left unhealed by the HIP cycle will also influence fatigue and fracture. Surface roughness and porosity in particular are features that could be improved by implementing novel approaches to laser processing in SLM.

  10. Effect of Heating Rate on the Pressureless Sintering Densification of a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Pressureless sintering of Inconel 718 has important technological applications for the densification of metal injection molding or additive manufacturing of parts with powder/binder systems. The effect of heating rates ranging from 15 to 200 K/minute on the sintering behavior of fine (-325 mesh) Inconel 718 powders was studied using the master sintering curve (MSC) concept. A pressureless pulsed electric current sintering setup was used to heat samples. The temperature at the onset of sintering increased as the heating rate increased. The formation of a supersolidus liquid fraction was shifted toward higher temperatures for increased heating rates. The apparent activation energy of sintering was obtained by least squares fitting of the sintering data to the MSC and was in good agreement with the lattice diffusion activation energy of the alloying elements present in Inconel 718. The MSC followed different kinetics for low heating rates (≤50 K/minute) and high heating rates (≥75 K/minute), and these differences were related to liquation kinetics.

  11. Characterization of the Micro-Welding Process for Repair of Nickel Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2007-12-01

    Micro-welding is a low-heat input process whereby a metal or cermet, is deposited by the generation of a low-power arc between a consumable electrode and a substrate. The low-heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. At present, the repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding and these components are susceptible to heat affected zone cracking during the weld repair process; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low-stress components such as stators. In this study, the low-heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been utilized to simulate repair of Inconel (Trade Mark of Special Metals) 625, Inconel 718, and Inconel 722 filler alloys to a cast Inconel 738 substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  12. The effects of seven alloying elements on the microstructure and stress-rupture behavior of nickle-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, D. R.; Miner, R. V.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Seven alloying elements: Al, Cr, Ti, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W were added at two levels of concentration to produce a series of experimental nickel-base superalloys. Fifty alloys, representing a fraction of a 2 to the 7th power factorial design, were cast, tested, and analyzed. Each alloy's microstructure was characterized by phase extractions, X-ray diffraction, metallography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of alloying element content on microstructure and stress-rupture life.

  13. The correlation between swelling and radiation-induced segregation in iron-chromium-nickel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.; Kenik, E. A.; Was, G. S.

    1998-03-05

    The magnitudes of both void swelling and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in iron-chromium-nickel alloys are dependent on bulk alloy composition. Because the diffusivity of nickel via the vacancy flux is slow relative to chromium, nickel enriches and chromium depletes at void surfaces during irradiation. This local composition change reduces the subsequent vacancy flux to the void, thereby reducing void swelling. In this work, the resistance to swelling from major element segregation is estimated using diffusivities derived from grain boundary segregation measurements in irradiated iron-chromium-nickel alloys. The resistance to void swelling in iron- and nickel-base alloys correlates with the segregation and both are functions of bulk alloy composition. Alloys that display the greatest amount of nickel enrichment and chromium depletion are found to be most resistant to void swelling, as predicted. Additionally, swelling is shown to be greater in alloys in which the RIS profiles are slow to develop.

  14. Building Inner Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantieri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The capacity to be in control of one's thoughts, emotions, and physiology can form an internal safety net preparing children to face the challenges and opportunities of life. This is the goal of the Inner Resilience Program in the New York City Schools. Teachers in the Inner Resilience Program's intervention are exposed to calming and focusing…

  15. Effects of chromium and aluminum on mechanical and oxidation properties of iron-nickel-base superalloys based on CG-27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chromium and aluminum on the mechanical and oxidation properties of a series of gamma-prime-strengthened alloys based on CG-27 were studied. Gamma-prime dispersion and solid-solution strengthening were the principal modes of alloy strengthening. The oxidation attack parameter K sub a decreased with increasing Cr and Al contents for each alloy group based on Al content. As a group, alloys with 3 wt % Al had the lowest attack parameters. Therefore, 3 wt % is the optimum level of Al for parabolic oxidation behavior. Spalling, due to diffusion-induced grain growth, was controlled by the overall Cr and Al levels. The alloy with 4 wt % Cr and 3 wt % Al had stress-rupture properties superior to those of the base alloy, CG-27, and maintained parabolic oxidation behavior while the Cr content was reduced by two-thirds of its value in cast CG-27.

  16. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  17. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Takeyama, Masao

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  18. Influence of copper on nickel-based catalysts in the conversion of glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Barbara C.; Chimentao, Ricardo J.; Szanyi, Janos; Braga, Adriano H.; Santos, Joao Batista O.; Gispert-Guirado, Francesc; Llorca, Jordi; Medina, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic transformation of glycerol to value-added compounds was investigated over bimetallic Ni-Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts with Ni/Cu atomic ratios of 8/1, 4/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8. XPS analysis revealed that the surface composition of the catalyst exhibited progressive enrichment of Cu as its content in the catalyst increased. H2-chemisorption indicated that the total number of exposed Ni atoms decreased as the Cu content increased. As a result, deep hydrogenolysis to produce CH4 was inhibited by the addition of Cu to the Ni catalyst, yielding higher selectivity towards the dehydration products of glycerol such as hydroxyacetone. FTIR spectra of adsorbed CO reveals that Cu asserts both geometric and electronic effects on the adsorption properties of Ni. The geometrical effect is visualized by the progressive disappearance of the bridge-bound adsorbed CO on metallic Ni by the incorporation of Cu. This suggests that the deep hydrogenolysis of glycerol to CH4 formation requires an ensemble of adjacent active Ni atoms. The electronic effect of Cu on Ni is indicated by the red shift of the IR peak of adsorbed CO as the Cu content increases. The electronic interaction between Cu and Ni species was also substantiated by XANES results. HTREM revealed metal particles very well distributed on the support with particle size of 1.5 to 5 nm. The Ni-Cu samples were not a total intermetallic alloys. We also gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division for the support of this work. The research related to the FTIR of adsorption of CO (Proposal 48209) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under

  19. The effect of alloy composition on radiation-induced segregation in FeCrNi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Was, G. S.; Kenik, E. A.

    1997-04-01

    The effect of alloy composition on radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was investigated in austenitic iron-base and nickel-base alloys using proton irradiation. Specifically, RIS was studied by irradiation of Ni18Cr, Ni18Cr9Fe, and Fe20Cr9Ni over a dose range of 0 to 1.0 dpa and a temperature range of 200 to 500°C. Grain boundary composition was measured using Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Measurements from this study along with measurements from Fe16Cr24Ni, Fe20Cr24Ni, Fe24Cr24Ni, and Fe24Cr19Ni alloys irradiated with protons confirm that RIS is strongly dependent on the alloy composition. Trends in segregation behavior in Fe-base alloys are consistent with high temperature diffusion measurements, indicating that a vacancy mechanism is the most likely primary driving force for RIS in austenitic steels. The migration energy for Cr is shown to be larger than the migration energy of Fe. Segregation measurements in Ni-base alloys are not consistent with high temperature diffusion measurements, indicating that ordering forces may be significant in the segregation process. Comparison of model calculations to measured RIS data indicate that Fe, Cr, and Ni diffusivities are composition dependent. This dependence on alloy composition limits the predictive ability of simple models because of the need for separate diffusion parameters for every alloy composition.

  20. Structure, properties, and dynamic behavior of Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaman, Daniel Marcus

    Long-standing debate has persisted regarding the nature of the Earth's inner core, from its age and composition to its structure and dynamic high-pressure, high-temperature behavior. The equation of state of the alloy which comprises the inner core, the material transport properties of inner-core materials and the mechanism responsible for its structure are all required to gain further insight into the current and past state of the Earth's deep interior. Experimental work in the diamond-anvil cell (DAC) coupled with theoretical calculations are reported here to constrain these aspects of the Earth's inner core. Use of the DAC has allowed us to determine an equation of state of a planetary-core representative Fe64Ni36 alloy to 95 GP and ˜ 3000 K. Increasing the Ni content in these experiments relative to the estimated abundance in the inner core (˜5--10%) provides a critical investigation on the effects of increasing Ni content on the equation of state of FeNi alloys, thereby providing insight in to the behavior of these alloys at high pressures and temperatures with applications to other planetary cores. The use of micro-fabricated samples in the DAC is a novel new way of measuring material transport properties under high-pressure and temperature conditions. Using micro-fabricated samples in these experiments, with a controlled geometry of Fe and Ni, has allowed the measurement of interdiffusion coefficients in FeNi alloys and extended the previous pressure range of these experiments by a factor of three. The resulting data has been extrapolated to inner-core conditions to place constraints on material transport properties at those conditions while providing insight into some of the other physical properties of inner-core material, such as the solid-state viscosity. The seismically-anisotropic structure of the inner core remains a point of contention amongst geophysicists. Though many viable hypotheses have been put forth regarding the nature of this structure

  1. On the creep deformation mechanisms of an advanced disk nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Raymond R.

    The main objective of this research was aimed at investigating the fundamental relationship between microstructure and creep deformation mechanisms using a variety of electron microscopy characterization techniques. The alloy used in this research, Rene 104, is a newer generation powder metallurgy Ni-base superalloy that was developed specifically for aircraft gas turbine disk applications with extended service durability at temperatures exceeding 650°C. The influence of stress and temperature was studied first and it was found that during creep deformation at temperatures between 677--815°C and stresses between 345--724MPa a variety of distinctly different creep deformation mechanisms were operative. In addition to identifying the creep deformation mechanisms an attempt was made to determine the creep rate limiting process so that an improved understanding of the fundamental processes that control deformation can be better understood. Microtwinning was found to the dominant deformation mechanism following creep at 677°C/690MPa and 704°C/724MPa. Microtwins form by the motion of paired a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear both the gamma matrix and gamma' precipitates. The rate limiting process in this mechanism is diffusion mediated atomic reordering that occurs in the wake of the shearing, twinning partial dislocations in order to maintain the ordered L12 structure of the gamma' precipitates. This reordering process helps to fundamentally explain the temperature and rate dependence of microtwinning under creep conditions within this temperature and stress regime. At a slightly higher temperature but lower stress (760°C and 345MPa), a stacking fault related shearing mechanism, which typically spanned only a few micrometers in length, was the principle deformation mode. The faults left behind in the gamma' precipitates determined to be extrinsic in nature. During creep at the highest temperature and lowest stress (815°C and 345MPa) a thermally

  2. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  3. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  4. NDE detectability of fatigue type cracks in high strength alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, B. K.; Rummel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Specimens suitable for investigating the reliability of production nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to detect tightly closed fatigue cracks in high strength alloys representative of those materials used in spacecraft engine/booster construction were produced. Inconel 718 was selected as representative of nickel base alloys and Haynes 188 was selected as representative of cobalt base alloys used in this application. Cleaning procedures were developed to insure the reusability of the test specimens and a flaw detection reliability assessment of the fluorescent penetrant inspection method was performed using the test specimens produced to characterize their use for future reliability assessments and to provide additional NDE flaw detection reliability data for high strength alloys. The statistical analysis of the fluorescent penetrant inspection data was performed to determine the detection reliabilities for each inspection at a 90% probability/95% confidence level.

  5. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an enlongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15% Cr-2% Mo-2% Ta-4% W-4.5% Al-2.5% Ti-0.15% Zr-0.05% C-0.01% B-1.1% Y2O3. It exhibits strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F, but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high-cycle, low-cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy micro-structure and properties is discussed.

  6. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  7. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, Claudette G.; Liu, Chain T.

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  8. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  9. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an elongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15Cr-2Mo-2Ta-4W-4.5Al-2.5Ti-0.15Zr 0.05C-0.01B-1.1Y2O3. It exhibits the strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high cycle, low cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy microstructure and properties is discussed.

  10. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Walker, Larry R; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  11. Encapsulation of sulfur with thin-layered nickel-based hydroxides for long-cyclic lithium–sulfur cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jian; Zhu, Jianhui; Ai, Wei; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Yanlong; Zou, Chenji; Huang, Wei; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Elemental sulfur cathodes for lithium/sulfur cells are still in the stage of intensive research due to their unsatisfactory capacity retention and cyclability. The undesired capacity degradation upon cycling originates from gradual diffusion of lithium polysulfides out of the cathode region. To prevent losses of certain intermediate soluble species and extend lifespan of cells, the effective encapsulation of sulfur plays a critical role. Here we report an applicable way, by using thin-layered nickel-based hydroxide as a feasible and effective encapsulation material. In addition to being a durable physical barrier, such hydroxide thin films can irreversibly react with lithium to generate protective layers that combine good ionic permeability and abundant functional polar/hydrophilic groups, leading to drastic improvements in cell behaviours (almost 100% coulombic efficiency and negligible capacity decay within total 500 cycles). Our present encapsulation strategy and understanding of hydroxide working mechanisms may advance progress on the development of lithium/sulfur cells for practical use. PMID:26470847

  12. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms for Nickel-based Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, Kyle A.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Sears, John S.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 and 0.25 Hz. The crack path was observed to be primarily transgranular for all temperatures, and the observed effect of increasing temperature was to increase the fatigue crack growth rates. The activation energy associated with the increasing crack growth rates over these three temperatures was calculated less than 60 kJ/mol, which is significantly lower than typical creep or oxidation mechanisms; therefore, creep and oxidation cannot explain the increase in fatigue crack growth rates. Transmission electron microscopy was done on selected samples removed from the cyclic plastic zone, and a trend of decreasing dislocation density was observed with increasing temperature. Accordingly, the trend of increasing crack growth rates with increasing temperature was attributed to softening associated with thermally assisted cross slip and dislocation annihilation.

  13. The Cyclic Stress-Strain Behavior of a Single Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloy. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.

    1988-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and similar deformation structures of the single crystal nickel based superalloy was described under a specific set of conditions. The isothermal low cycle fatigue response and deformation structures were described at a typical intermediate temperature and at high temperature. Specimens oriented near the (001) and (111) crystallographic orientations were tested at 1050 C, where more moderate orientation effects were expected. This enabled the description of the deformation structures at each of the 2 temperatures and their relationship to the observed cyclic stress-strain behavior. The initial yield strength of all specimens tested at 650 C was controlled by the shearing of the gamma prime precipitates by dislocation pairs. Low cycle fatigue tests at 650 C had cyclic hardening, which was associated with dislocation interactions in the gamma matrix. The initial yield strength of specimens tested at 1050 C was associated with dislocation bypassing of the gamma prime precipitates. Low cycle fatigue tests at 1050 C had cyclic softening, associated with extensive dislocation recovery at the gamma-gamma prime interfaces along with some gamma prime precipitate coarsening.

  14. On the Feasibility of Eddy Current Characterization of the Near-Surface Residual Stress Distribution in Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Mark P.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2004-02-01

    In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in shot-peened specimens. This technique is based on the so-called electroelastic effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of the electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, the relatively small (˜1%) change in electrical conductivity caused by the presence of compressive residual stresses is often distorted, or even completely overshadowed, by the accompanying conductivity loss caused by cold work and surface roughness effects. Recently, it was observed that, in contrast with most other materials, shot-peened Waspaloy and IN100 specimens exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies. This observation by itself indicates that in these materials the measured conductivity change is probably dominated by residual stress effects, since both surface roughness and increased dislocation density are known to decrease rather than increase the conductivity and the presence of crystallographic texture does not affect the electrical conductivity of these materials, which crystallize in cubic symmetry. Our preliminary experiments indicate that probably there exists a unique "window of opportunity" for eddy current NDE in nickel-base superalloys. We identified five major effects that contribute to this fortunate constellation of material properties, which will be reviewed in this presentation.

  15. An Investigation of High-Temperature Precipitation in Powder-Metallurgy, Gamma/Gamma-Prime Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Kim, S.-L.; Zhang, F.; Tiley, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    The high-temperature-precipitation behavior of a typical powder-metallurgy, gamma-gamma-prime, nickel-base superalloy (LSHR) was determined and used to develop and validate a quantitative fast-acting model. To this end, a series of experiments comprising supersolvus solution treatment followed by continuous cooling at rates typical of those experienced during the manufacture of full-scale components was conducted for LSHR. The nucleation and growth of secondary-gamma-prime precipitates were deduced via metallography on samples water quenched at various temperatures during the cooling cycle. Further insight on nucleation and the extent of retained supersaturation during cooling was obtained from in situ synchrotron (X-ray diffraction) experiments involving cooling of LSHR samples at identical rates with or without a hold time at an intermediate temperature. The observations were interpreted using a fast-acting (spreadsheet) model which incorporated the important aspects of classical, homogeneous-nucleation theory and growth by bulk diffusion. In this regard, particular attention was paid to the determination of model input parameters such as the composition, free energy of formation, and surface energy of precipitates, and an effective diffusivity; the values so determined contrasted with those from existing thermodynamic and diffusion databases. It was demonstrated that fast-acting-model calculations based on a nickel-chromium pseudo-binary system gave good agreement with measurements of the evolution of precipitate volume fraction, number density, and size during continuous cooling.

  16. Effects of processing and microstructure on the fatigue behaviour of the nickel-base superalloy Rene95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.

    1984-01-01

    Forms of the nickel-base superalloy Rene95 produced by three processing methods were evaluated in tensile, low cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation tests at 540 and 650 C. Two powder-metallurgy (PM) forms, hot-isostatically-pressed and extruded-and-forged, and a conventionally cast-and-wrought form were all given the same heat treatment. The extruded-and-forged form showed superior fatigue life in low strain range tests though the two PM forms exhibited nearly identical mechanical behavior in all other respects. Further, this life difference could not be explained by significant differences in the types, sizes or shapes of the defects initiating failure. The cast-and-wrought Rene95, however, had lower strength, ductility and fatigue life, but higher fatigue crack propagation resistance because of a larger grain size. It did not exhibit the environmentally-assisted intergranular mode of propagation which occurs in PM Rene95 and other fine-grained superalloys at these test temperatures and frequencies.

  17. Effect of B, Zr, and C on Hot Tearing of a Directionally Solidified Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, J.; Hartmann, N.; Rettig, R.; Affeldt, E.; Singer, R. F.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the minor elements B, Zr, and C on the castability of a Nickel-based γ'-strengthened superalloy has been investigated. Tube-like specimens were prepared by directional solidification where the rigid ceramic core leads to hoop stresses and grain boundary cracking. It was found that an important improvement in castability can be achieved by adjusting the minor elemental composition. Too low C (≤0.15 pct) and too high B and Zr contents (≥0.05 pct) lead to material that is very prone to solidification cracking and should be avoided. The results cannot be rationalized on the basis of the current models for solidification cracking. Instead, pronounced hot tearing is observed to occur at high amounts of γ/ γ'-eutectic and high Zr contents. The critical film stage where dendrites at the end of solidification do not touch and are separated by thin liquid films must be avoided. How Zr promotes the film stage will be discussed in the paper.

  18. Microstructural Characterization of a Polycrystalline Nickel-Based Superalloy Processed via Tungsten-Intert-Gas-Shaped Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Bache, Martin R.; Whittaker, Mark T.

    2010-12-01

    Recent trials have produced tungsten-inert-gas (TIG)-welded structures of a suitable scale to allow an evaluation of the technique as an economic and commercial process for the manufacture of complex aeroengine components. The employment of TIG welding is shown to have specific advantages over alternative techniques based on metal inert gas (MIG) systems. Investigations using the nickel-based superalloy 718 have shown that TIG induces a smaller weld pool with less compositional segregation. In addition, because the TIG process involves a pulsed power source, a faster cooling rate is achieved, although this rate, in turn, compromises the deposition rate. The microstructures produced by the two techniques differ significantly, with TIG showing an absence of the detrimental delta and Laves phases typically produced by extended periods at a high temperature using MIG. Instead, an anisotropic dendritic microstructure was evident with a preferred orientation relative to the axis of epitaxy. Niobium was segregated to the interdendritic regions. A fine-scale porosity was evident within the microstructure with a maximum diameter of approximately 5 μm. This porosity often was found in clusters and usually was associated with the interdendritic regions. Subsequent postdeposition heat treatment was shown to have no effect on preexisting porosity and to have a minimal effect on the microstructure.

  19. On the Feasibility of Eddy Current Characterization of the Near-Surface Residual Stress Distribution in Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, Mark P.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2004-02-26

    In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in shot-peened specimens. This technique is based on the so-called electroelastic effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of the electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, the relatively small ({approx}1%) change in electrical conductivity caused by the presence of compressive residual stresses is often distorted, or even completely overshadowed, by the accompanying conductivity loss caused by cold work and surface roughness effects. Recently, it was observed that, in contrast with most other materials, shot-peened Waspaloy and IN100 specimens exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies. This observation by itself indicates that in these materials the measured conductivity change is probably dominated by residual stress effects, since both surface roughness and increased dislocation density are known to decrease rather than increase the conductivity and the presence of crystallographic texture does not affect the electrical conductivity of these materials, which crystallize in cubic symmetry. Our preliminary experiments indicate that probably there exists a unique 'window of opportunity' for eddy current NDE in nickel-base superalloys. We identified five major effects that contribute to this fortunate constellation of material properties, which will be reviewed in this presentation.

  20. Effect of Notches on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of a P/M Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Gabb, Timothy P.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gayda, John, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed to determine and model the effect of high temperature dwells on notched low cycle fatigue (NLCF) and notch stress rupture behavior of a fine grain LSHR powder metallurgy (PM) nickel-based superalloy. It was shown that a 90 second dwell applied at the minimum stress (min dwell) was considerably more detrimental to the NLCF lives than similar dwell applied at the maximum stress (max dwell). The short min dwell NLCF lives were shown to be caused by growth of small oxide blisters which caused preferential cracking when coupled with high concentrated notch root stresses. The cyclic max dwell notch tests failed mostly by a creep accumulation, not by fatigue, with the crack origin shifting internally to a substantial distance away from the notch root. The classical von Mises plastic flow model was unable to match the experimental results while the hydrostatic stress profile generated using the Drucker-Prager plasticity flow model was consistent with the experimental findings. The max dwell NLCF and notch stress rupture tests exhibited substantial creep notch strengthening. The triaxial Bridgman effective stress parameter was able to account for the notch strengthening by collapsing the notched and uniform gage geometry test data into a singular grouping.

  1. Local x-ray diffraction analysis of the structure of dendrites in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, U.; Epishin, A.; Link, T.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of the dendrites in the single-crystal nickel-base superalloys SC16, SRR99 and CMSX4 with different refractory element levels (Mo + Ta + W + Re) has been investigated by local X-ray diffraction. A special technique was used to improve the spatial resolution of the X-ray diffraction and to enable the precise control of the X-ray spot position within the dendritic structure. A significant change of the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime}-lattice misfit was found within the dendrite in the superalloys with higher refractory element levels SRR99 and CMSX4. The observed misfit change is based on the change of the {gamma}-lattice parameter due to segregation of W and Re. The intensity of the X-ray beam reflected from the dendrite periphery was found to be weaker than that from the dendrite centre because of the mosaicity. Therefore misfit measurements without knowledge of the X-ray spot position in the dendritic structure lead to values that correspond more to the dendrite core.

  2. The Role of Cold Work in Eddy Current Residual Stress Measurements in Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P. B.

    2006-03-06

    Recently, it was shown that eddy current methods can be adapted to residual stress measurement in shot-peened nickel-base superalloys. However, experimental evidence indicates that the piezoresistivity effect is simply not high enough to account for the observed apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) increase. At the same time, X-ray diffraction data indicates that 'cold work' lingers even when the residual stress is fully relaxed and the excess AECC is completely gone. It is impossible to account for both observations with a single coherent explanation unless we assume that instead of a single 'cold work' effect, there are two varieties of cold work; type-A and type-B. Type-A cold work (e.g., changes in the microscopic homogeneity of the material) is not detected by X-ray diffraction as it does not significantly affect the beam width, but causes substantial conductivity change and exhibits strong thermal relaxation. Type-B cold work (e.g., dislocations) is detected by X-ray, but causes little or no conductivity change and exhibits weak thermal relaxation. Based on the assumption of two separate cold-work variables and that X-ray diffraction results indicate the presence of type-B, but not type-A, all observed phenomena can be explained. If this working hypothesis is proven right, the separation of residual stress and type-A cold work is less critical because they both relax much earlier and much faster than type-B cold work.

  3. Microstructural Changes of a Creep-Damaged Nickel-Based K002 Superalloy Containing Hf Element under Different HIP Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yu; Dong, Jian; Wang, Tianyou; Zhao, Zihua; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Effects of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) temperature on the microstructural evolution of a nickel-based K002 superalloy containing Hf element after long-term service were investigated using three different soaking temperatures during HIP. The degraded γ' precipitates represented coarse and irregular morphology after long-term service. These γ' precipitates still were of coarse and irregular shape, but the size and volume fraction of γ' precipitates were markedly reduced under HIP condition of 1,190°C/200 MPa/4 h, indicating that the γ' precipitates were experiencing a dissolution process. Meanwhile, the concentrically oriented N-type γ' rafting structure around the cavities was formed. With HIP temperature increase to 1,220°C and 1,250°C, the small-sized, cubic and regular γ' precipitates were re-precipitated, and the concentrically oriented γ' structure vanished. The unstable morphology induced by the nucleation and growth of γ matrix was found near the creep cavities, indicating that the solute atoms diffused inward the creep-induced cavities during HIP. However, at HIP temperature of 1,220°C and 1,250°C, a large number of blocky MC(2)-type carbides containing amounts of Hf elements were precipitated, demonstrating that HIP treatment at higher temperatures can result in the formation of a large number of blocky MC(2)-type carbides.

  4. High-temperature measurements of lattice parameters and internal stresses of a creep-deformed monocrystalline nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Horst; Strehler, Marcus; Mughrabi, Haël

    1996-04-01

    High-temperature X-ray line profile measurements were performed to maximal temperatures of 1050 °C on samples of the nickel-base superalloy SRR 99. The samples with rod axes near the [001] direction were investigated in the initially undeformed state and after creep deformation at different temperatures and stresses. For the measurements of the (002) and (020) line profiles, a special X-ray double crystal diffractometer with negligible line broadening was used which was equipped with a high-temperature vacuum chamber. The line profiles were evaluated for the lattice parameters of the matrix phase γ and the precipitated γ' phase and for values of the lattice mismatch parallel and perpendicular to the stress axis, respectively, which were found to be different. Elastic, tetragonal distortions of the phases γ and γ' could be determined between room temperature and about 900 °C. These distortions are thermally induced due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases and deformation induced due to interfacial dislocation networks which were built up during deformation. At the high temperatures of the X-ray measurements, at least partial recovery of the deformation-induced internal stresses occurred, depending on the temperature of the X-ray measurements. The results are discussed and compared with data obtained by complementary techniques.

  5. Effect of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, J.L.; Roy, P.; Nix, W.D.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base precipitation hardened superalloy was studied in air from 427 to 649 C. The tests were conducted at 100 Hz and at load ratios of 0.1 and 0.5. The threshold values of the alternating stress intensity factor were found to increase with temperature. This behavior is attributed to oxide deposits that form on the freshly created fracture surfaces which enhance crack closure. As determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry, the oxide thickness was uniform over the crack length and was of the order of the maximum crack tip opening displacement at threshold. Oxidation kinetics were important in thickening the oxide on the fracture surfaces at elevated temperatures, whereas at room temperature, the oxide deposits at near threshold fatigue crack growth rates and at low load ratios were thickened by an oxide fretting mechanism. The effect of fracture surface roughness-induced crack closure on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior is also discussed. 27 references.

  6. Effect of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, J. L.; Roy, P.; Nix, W. D.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base precipitation hardened superalloy was studied in air from 427° to 649 °C. The tests were conducted at 100 Hz and at load ratios of 0.1 and 0.5. The threshold ΔK values were found to increase with temperature. This behavior is attributed to oxide deposits that form on the freshly created fracture surfaces which enhance crack closure. As determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry, the oxide thickness was uniform over the crack length and was of the order of the maximum crack tip opening displacement at threshold. Oxidation kinetics were important in thickening the oxide on the fracture surfaces at elevated temperatures, whereas at room temperature, the oxide deposits at near threshold fatigue crack growth rates and at low load ratios were thickened by an oxide fretting mechanism. The effect of fracture surface roughness-induced crack closure on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior is also discussed.

  7. Fechner's "inner psychophysics".

    PubMed

    Robinson, David K

    2010-11-01

    Though psychologists are generally aware that Gustav Fechner introduced psychophysics and set down its essential methodology, most of them only know about the part that Fechner called "outer psychophysics." In his classic publication of 1860, Fechner insisted that "inner psychophysics" was more important, yet this aspect of Fechner's work failed to receive any attention. The article reviews Fechner's presentation of inner psychophysics and suggests reasons why that part of his work was neglected and has been forgotten. PMID:21688735

  8. Morphology of weld heat-affected zone liquation cracking in Ta-modified cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    West, S.L.; Baeslack, W.A. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Kelly, T.J. . Aircraft Engine Business Group)

    1989-11-01

    The authors' discuss some problems involved in the use of alloy 718 which is a precipitation-hardenable, nickel-base superalloy developed in the early 1960s for medium temperature (540-705{sup 0}C) aerospace applications. The use of Nb as a substitute for Al and Ti leads to a susceptibility to liquation cracking in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). This problem is discussed in detail in the article.

  9. Resistance of nitrogen-containing stainless alloys to corrosion in chloride media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1982-01-01

    The pitting resistance of a series of experimental stainless steels with varying amounts of nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese and nitrogen and a number of commercial stainless steels and nickel based alloys has been studied in highly concentrated chloride media. The results show that nitrogen enhances the pitting resistance of stainless steel and exceptional corrosion resistance is achieved with high levels of nitrogen in combination with suitable amounts of molybdenum and chromium.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  11. Modelling of the dynamic behaviour of hard-to-machine alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokka, M.; Leemet, T.; Shrot, A.; Bäker, M.; Kuokkala, V.-T.

    2012-08-01

    Machining of titanium alloys and nickel based superalloys can be difficult due to their excellent mechanical properties combining high strength, ductility, and excellent overall high temperature performance. Machining of these alloys can, however, be improved by simulating the processes and by optimizing the machining parameters. The simulations, however, need accurate material models that predict the material behaviour in the range of strains and strain rates that occur in the machining processes. In this work, the behaviour of titanium 15-3-3-3 alloy and nickel based superalloy 625 were characterized in compression, and Johnson-Cook material model parameters were obtained from the results. For the titanium alloy, the adiabatic Johnson-Cook model predicts softening of the material adequately, but the high strain hardening rate of Alloy 625 in the model prevents the localization of strain and no shear bands were formed when using this model. For Alloy 625, the Johnson-Cook model was therefore modified to decrease the strain hardening rate at large strains. The models were used in the simulations of orthogonal cutting of the material. For both materials, the models are able to predict the serrated chip formation, frequently observed in the machining of these alloys. The machining forces also match relatively well, but some differences can be seen in the details of the experimentally obtained and simulated chip shapes.

  12. Preliminary study of oxide-dispersion-strengthened B-1900 prepared by mechanical alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Quatinetz, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy based on the B-1900 composition was produced by the mechanical alloying process. Without optimization of the processing for the alloy or the alloy for the processing, recrystallization of the extruded product to large elongated grains was achieved. Materials having grain length-width ratios of 3 and 5.5 were tested in tension and stress-rupture. The ODS B-1900 exhibited tensile strength similar to that of cast B-1900. Its stress-rupture life was lower than that of cast B-1900 at 760 C. At 1095 C the ODS B-1900 with the higher grain length-width ratio (5.5) had stress-rupture life superior to that of cast B-1900. It was concluded that, with optimization, oxide dispersion strengthening of B-1900 and other complex cast nickel-base alloys has potential for improving high temperature properties over those of the cast alloy counterparts.

  13. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    SciTech Connect

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  14. Resistivity-Microstructure Relationships in Nickel Base Superalloys Used in Gas Turbine Engines for Power Generation and as Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, Rosario A.

    2012-02-20

    This report summarizes the results accomplished during this 3-year with funds from this grant. The most important new contribution was the development of a microstructural model, based on analysis of the small angle scattering spectra that can relate the measured electrical resistivity to the precipitate population present in a nickel base superalloy in a quantitative way. A total of 24 research articles were published or were in press at the time the final report was written.

  15. Development of Creep-Resistant NiAl(Ti,Hf) Single-Crystal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are the current choice for high-temperature jet engine applications such as turbine blades and vanes. However, after more than five decades of use, nickel-base superalloys have reached their limit, since the operating temperatures in gas turbine engines are now approaching the melting temperature of these alloys. Thus alternative materials, such as lightweight NiAl intermetallic alloys with superior properties, (e.g., high melting temperature, high thermal conductivity, and excellent chemical stability and oxidation resistance) are required for the next generation of high-temperature structural materials for more efficient 21st century civil transport systems. The two major disadvantages that have historically prevented the application of NiAl as a high-temperature structural material are its poor creep resistance and low room-temperature ductility. Alloying strategies similar to those used for nickel-base superalloys are being used to improve the high-temperature strength via solid-solution and precipitate-hardening effects. This study highlights the potent role of Ti and Hf as potential solid-solution strengtheners in NiAl and also the added effect of second-phase particles when Ti and Hf are both used.

  16. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  17. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed. PMID:3403567

  18. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  19. On the thermodynamic efficiency of a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator: From bulk to atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Samuel M. Sepulveda, Abdon E. Keller, Scott M.

    2015-04-28

    A model is developed to correlate the effects of size on the thermodynamic efficiency for a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator device. Three existing models are combined in order to estimate this correlation, they are (1) thermodynamic efficiency relations, (2) a model of ferromagnetic transition behavior, and (3) the bond-order length strength correlation. At the smallest size considered, a monolayer of nickel atoms shows a reduction in Curie temperature from its bulk value of T{sub c,Bulk}=630 K to T{sub c,ML}=240 K. This difference is analytically shown to affect the thermodynamic efficiency values when compared to bulk. Various nickel nanofilms are considered as a working body, such that the combined model predicts relative efficiency values that are comparable to the bulk scale, but operating closer to room-temperature when compared to bulk form. This result is unexpected since the absolute efficiency is shown to increase as a function of decreasing size, this discrepancy is explained as a consequence of Curie point suppression. The combined model is also applied to a hypothetical composite made of separated layers of nickel with distinct thicknesses. This composite material is predicted to spread the ferromagnetic transition across a much larger temperature range as compared to bulk nickel, such that this material may be better suited for different applications; for example, as a sensor or thermal switch. Moreover, this combined model is also shown to give a lower-bound estimate for thermodynamic efficiency, since the actual performance depends on material characterizations that have yet to be determined.

  20. Characterization of Plastic Flow Pertinent to the Evolution of Bulk Residual Stress in Powder-Metallurgy, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Fagin, P. N.; Goetz, R. L.; Furrer, D. U.; Dutton, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    The plastic-flow behavior which controls the formation of bulk residual stresses during final heat treatment of powder-metallurgy (PM), nickel-base superalloys was quantified using conventional (isothermal) stress-relaxation (SR) tests and a novel approach which simulates concurrent temperature and strain transients during cooling following solution treatment. The concurrent cooling/straining test involves characterization of the thermal compliance of the test sample. In turn, this information is used to program the ram-displacement- vs-time profile to impose a constant plastic strain rate during cooling. To demonstrate the efficacy of the new approach, SR tests (in both tension and compression) and concurrent cooling/tension-straining experiments were performed on two PM superalloys, LSHR and IN-100. The isothermal SR experiments were conducted at a series of temperatures between 1144 K and 1436 K (871 °C and 1163 °C) on samples that had been supersolvus solution treated and cooled slowly or rapidly to produce starting microstructures comprising coarse gamma grains and coarse or fine secondary gamma-prime precipitates, respectively. The concurrent cooling/straining tests comprised supersolvus solution treatment and various combinations of subsequent cooling rate and plastic strain rate. Comparison of flow-stress data from the SR and concurrent cooling/straining tests showed some similarities and some differences which were explained in the context of the size of the gamma-prime precipitates and the evolution of dislocation substructure. The magnitude of the effect of concurrent deformation during cooling on gamma-prime precipitation was also quantified experimentally and theoretically.

  1. Evaluation of advanced austenitic alloys relative to alloy design criteria for steam service

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1991-06-01

    The results are summarized for a task within a six-year activity to evaluate advanced austenitic alloys for heat recovery systems. Commercial, near-commercial, and development alloys were evaluated relative to criteria for metallurgical stability, fabricability, weldability, mechanical properties, and corrosion in fireside and steamside environments. Alloys that were given special attention in the study were 800HT{reg sign}, NF709{reg sign}, HR3C{reg sign}, and a group of 20/25% chromium-30% nickel-iron alloys identified as HT- UPS (high-temperature, ultrafine-precipitation strengthened) alloys. Excellent metallurgical stability and creep strength were observed in the NF709 and HR3C steels that contained niobium and nitrogen. One group of HT-UPS alloys was strengthened by solution treating to temperatures above 1150{degrees}C and subsequent cold or warm working. Test data to beyond 35,000 h were collected. The ability to clad some of the alloys for improved fireside corrosion resistance was demonstrated. Weldability of the alloys was a concern. Hot cracking and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) liquation cracking were potential problems in the HR3C stainless steel and HT-UPS alloys, and the use of dissimilar metal filler wire was required. By the reduction of phosphorous content and selection of either a nickel-base filler metal or alloy 556 filler metal, weldments were produced with minimum HAZ cracking. The major issues related to the development of the advanced alloys were identified and methods to resolve the issues suggested. 56 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  3. Development of rapidly quenched nickel-based non-boron filler metals for brazing corrosion resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikov, A.; Kalin, B.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion-resistant steels are stably applied in modern rocket and nuclear technology. Creating of permanent joints of these steels is a difficult task that can be solved by means of welding or brazing. Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing filler metals is perspective. However, the use of such alloys leads to the formation of brittle borides in brazing zone, which degrades the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the compounds. Therefore, the development of non-boron alloys for brazing stainless steels is important task. The study of binary systems Ni-Be and Ni-Si revealed the perspective of replacing boron in Ni-based filler metals by beryllium, so there was the objective of studying of phase equilibrium in the system Ni-Be-Si. The alloys of the Ni-Si-Be with different contents of Si and Be are considered in this paper. The presence of two low-melting components is revealed during of their studying by methods of metallography analysis and DTA. Microhardness is measured and X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted for a number of alloys of Ni-Si-Be. The compositions are developed on the basis of these data. Rapidly quenched brazing alloys can be prepared from these compositions, and they are suitable for high temperature brazing of steels.

  4. Teacher in Inner Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, E. Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the Teacher-in-Inner-Space (TIS) program of the Hawaii Science Teachers Association (HaSTA). Discusses the selection of winners and runners-up. Describes the dive made on June 9, 1986 in cooperation with the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Lists the three goals of the TIS project. (CW)

  5. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  6. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  7. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  8. Oxidation of interconnect alloys in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of an electric field on the oxidation of interconnect alloys was examined with a representative array of materials: an iron-base ferritic chromia former (E-brite), an iron-base ferritic chromia former with Mn and La (Crofer 22APU), a nickel-base chromia former (IN-718), and a nickelbase chromia former with Mn and La (Haynes 230). Environmental variables include temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The resulting scales were examined to determine if applied electrical current induces changes in mechanism or scale growth kinetics.

  9. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutina, Yu. N.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Anisimov, A. G.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2015-10-01

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  10. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutina, Yu. N. Bataev, A. A. Shevtsova, L. I.; Mali, V. I. Anisimov, A. G.

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  11. Survey of physical property data for several alloys. [Nitronic 33; copper C10400; copper C17510

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Williams, R.K.

    1985-08-01

    This report summarizes an examination of physical property data available in the literature for six alloys of potential interest to the Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment in the Fusion Energy Program. The properties of thermal expansion, density, specific heat, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity were compiled for six alloys: Nitronic 33, a low-nickel, high manganese stainless steel; nickel-base Inconnel Alloys 625, 718, and X-750; and copper alloys C10400 and C17510. The temperatures of interest were 4-500 K for the Nitronic 33 and the Inconels, and 250-400 K for the copper alloys. Where data were lacking, estimates were made based on theory or comparisons with similar materials.

  12. Evaluation of Experimental Ni-Base and Fe-Base Alloys Containing Lower Chrome:

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E

    2006-10-01

    Metallic interconnects are one of the key cost enabling technologies for SOFC in temperatures below about 800°C. Further cost advantages may be realized by the use of alloys with lower chromium than the more typical ~22 weight percent found in interconnect candidate alloys such as Crofer 22APU. Lower chrome commercial alloys typically contain silicon or aluminum as aids against oxidation. These elements can form electrically insulating layers within the oxide scale and are thus avoided in this effort. Iron and nickel based alloys with 6-22 weight percent chrome with very low levels of “tramp” elements were melted and fabricated into sheet form. To accommodate the low Cr, surface treatments are explored to provide an engineered solution to the interconnect question. Oxidation tests in moist air were conducted at 800oC to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  13. A weldability study of Haynes Alloy No 242

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Headley, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The weldability of Haynes {reg sign} Alloy No. 242 {trademark}, a new alloy derived from the Ni-Mo-Cr system, was investigated. Susceptibility to fusion zone hot cracking was determined by Varestraint testing, and hot ductility was characterized by Gleeble testing. Solidification phase transformation data was recorded with differential thermal analysis (DTA). Weld microstructures were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results of this study indicate that this alloy has better hot cracking resistance than high strength nickel base superalloy 718; however, it has lower resistance than other alloys derived from the Ni-Cr-Mo ternary such as the Hastelloy alloys B2, C-4, C-22, C-276, and W. Segregation patterns in weld microstructures agree well with established information concerning this family of alloys. Prediction of solidification products with the Ni-Mo-Cr phase diagram based on a chemical equivalence was unsuccessful due to the higher carbon content of this alloy which favors the formation of M{sub 6}C. Solidification in Alloy 242 terminates with the formation of two eutectic-like constituents: (1) a M{sub 6}C/austenite eutectic, and (2) a second eutectic with austenite and an undetermined phase. This latter phase has a composition similar to the M{sub 6}C phase, but with a different crystal structure (cubic, ao = 6.6 {Angstrom}). 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Effect of pressure on the behavior of copper-, iron-, and nickel-based oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Juan Adanez; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayan; Alberto Abad

    2006-02-01

    This work analyzes the main characteristics related to the chemical looping combustion (CLC) process necessary to use the syngas obtained in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. The kinetics of reduction with H{sub 2} and CO and oxidation with O{sub 2} of three high-reactivity oxygen carriers used in the CLC system have been determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer at atmospheric pressure. The iron- and nickel-based oxygen carriers were prepared by freeze-granulation, and the copper-based oxygen carrier was prepared by impregnation. The changing grain size model (CGSM) was used for the kinetic determination, assuming spherical grains for the freeze-granulated particles containing iron and nickel and a platelike geometry for the reacting surface of the copper-based impregnated particles. The dependence of the reaction rates on temperature was low, with the activation energy values varying from 14 to 33 kJ mol{sup -1} for the reduction and 7 to 15 kJ mol{sup -1} for the oxidation. The reaction order depended on the reacting gas and oxygen carrier, with values ranging from 0.25 to 1. However, an increase in the operating pressure for the IGCC + CLC system increases the thermal efficiency of the process, and the CO{sub 2} is recovered as a high pressure gas, decreasing the energy demand for further compression. The effect of pressure on the behavior of the oxygen carriers has been analyzed in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer at 1073 K and pressures up to 30 atm. It has been found that an increase in total pressure has a negative effect on the reaction rates of all the oxygen carriers. Moreover, the use of the CGSM with the kinetic parameters obtained at atmospheric pressure predicted higher reaction rates than those experimentally obtained at higher pressures, and therefore, the kinetic parameters necessary to design pressurized CLC plants must be determined at the operating pressure. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Inner and outer beauty.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Brown, Casey J

    2012-01-01

    Symmetry and pattern are precious forms of beauty that can be appreciated on both the macroscopic and molecular scales. Crystallographers have long appreciated the intimate connections between symmetry and molecular structure, reflected in their appreciation for the artwork of Escher. This admiration has been applied in the design of highly symmetrical coordination compounds. Two classes of materials are discussed: extended coordination arrays and discrete supramolecular assemblies. Extended coordination polymers have been implemented in gas separation and storage due to the remarkably porosity of these materials, aided by the ability to design ever-larger inner spaces within these frameworks. In the case of discrete symmetrical structures, defined inner and outer space present a unique aesthetic and chemical environment. The consequent host-guest chemistry and applications in catalysis are discussed. PMID:22076081

  16. Inner Heliosphere Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sillter, Edward C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The future HELEX mission concept by NASA/ESA to the inner heliosphere (0.22 AU < r < 0.7 AU) and the possibility of a Solar Probe mission to the Sun (9.5 Rs < r < 0.7 AU) will allow for a comprehensive exploration of the inner heliosphere with the prospect for major discoveries and resolution of long standing issues of heliospheric science. The new Solar Probe mission being considered is equatorial and will allow exploration of the streamer belt region from a closeup perspective. We'll be able to look for the suprathermal ion population some think are necessary as the seed population for SEP events, look closeup at CMEs and formation of shock inside the Alfven critical point, probe the outer boundaries of the streamer belts, reconnection within the current sheets, MHD waves and turbulence and the inner source where they are felt to form and may reveal themselves as pickup ions. All will be launched around Solar Minimum with rise in solar activity toward the end of these missions. Extended missions could then occur during Solar Maximum. I'll talk about the complement of instrumentation and mission strategies.

  17. The inner witness.

    PubMed

    Amir, Dana

    2012-08-01

    The inner witness is a mechanism that develops in response to a reasonable experience of infantile helplessness, the resulting maternal impingement and the presence of a sufficient experience of a third. Being crucial to the subject's capacity to shift between the first person and the third person of experience, it also has an essential role in coping with trauma. Three types of testimonial narrative are differentiated in terms of the presence of the inner witness in their syntax. The first mode is one in which the inner witness is accessible, enabling the imaginary shift between the voice of the victim and the voice of the witness. The second mode, which remains a 'first-person' mode of report, preserves and enacts the traumatic memories and the traumatic features. The third, psychotic mode attacks both the first and the third person, separating the subject from both his memories and his sense of selfhood. This mode can evolve as a reaction to an adult massive trauma, but is more likely to emerge as a result of early traumatization. The above ideas and their implications for recovery are illustrated by a case study and through a reading of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. PMID:22900554

  18. Ta effect on oxidation of a nickel-based single-crystal superalloy and its sputtered nanocrystalline coating at 900-1100 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Chen, Minghui; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2015-08-01

    Sputtering nanocrystalline coating was prepared on a nickel-based single-crystal superalloy N5. The oxidation behavior of the superalloy substrate and its nanocrystalline coating was investigated at 900-1100 °C. Results indicated that the nanocrystalline coating enhanced the oxidation and scale spallation resistance of the single-crystal superalloy. Elements interdiffusion has not occurred between the substrate and coating. Refractory element, Ta, inherently contained in N5, had a significant effect on the scale microstructure and oxidation behavior of both the single-crystal superalloy substrate and its sputtering nanocrystalline coating.

  19. Effect of volume fraction and size of fine-gamma prime particles on raising the creep strength of a DS nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. L.; Yao, D. L.; Lin, X. J.; Sun, C. Q.

    1986-01-01

    The creep behavior of a directionally solidifified nickel-base superalloy, DKS3, has been investigated as a function of the volume fraction and size of the gamma-prime phase at 760 and 950 C. The dislocation structure and morphology of gamma-prime was examined by transmission electron microscopy at the primary, secondary and tertiary creep stages at 73.8 kgf/sq mm. Experimental results are described in terms of a high temperature creep model in the range of temperatures and applied stresses where shearing of the gamma-prime phase does not control the straining process.

  20. The Earth's Inner Core: a Black Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's inner core continues to provoke interest and interaction among various disciplines within the deep Earth scientific community for many reasons, including the following: i) The phase diagram of iron and its alloys at high pressures and temperatures is still in a state of investigation, and several crystalographic phases of iron and/or their aggregates have been proposed to be stable at inner core conditions. Seismological datasets have increased in size, but there is a serious trade-off between isotropic and anisotropic velocity structure. This is further exacerbated by the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem in which travel time data are modeled by volumetric changes in isotropic/anisotropic structure. These datasets are nevertheless invaluable, and their further growth through receiver installations in remote regions will further constrain this problem. ii) Radial and lateral variations in inner core structure have been intensively studied and confirmed, both in terms of velocity and attenuation. Studying the latter is complicated since another trade-off exists - that between the viscoelastic and scattering origin of attenuation. There is an ongoing debate about the existence of the innermost inner core and the geodynamical mechanism responsible for the seismologically observed east-west dichotomy in isotropic velocity. The growing travel time and waveform datasets, both from individual stations and arrays, hold the key to solving these problems. iii) The growth mechanism of the inner core is in dispute; its age is still unknown, and it is not completely understood how its growing front crystallizes. The seismological datasets are arguably less potent in providing direct answers to this question. Nonetheless, there is some potential in studying the texture present in the outermost inner core, the velocity gradient at the bottom of the outer core, and the nature of the inner core boundary using waveform simulations and the coda of the seismic phases

  1. Effects of silicon additions on oxidation and mechanical behavior of the nickel-base superalloy B-1900

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Test specimens with nominal additions of Si were tested in oxidation, thermal fatigue, sulfidation, tension, and stress rupture, and were also extensively studied metallographically. Alloy B-1900 modified with 0.6- or 1.2-wt% Si exhibited oxidation resistance equivalent to that of aluminide-coated B-1900 during cyclic, high-gas-velocity oxidation tests. Resistances to thermal fatigue and sulfidation were improved by the Si additions, but were not superior to aluminide-coated B-1900. Stress-rupture tests at 1000 C of specimens given the standard heat treatment to simulate an aluminide coating cycle showed Si to be detrimental. However, application of another heat treatment increased the rupture life of the alloy with 0.6-wt% Si to that of the unmodified B-1900 given the standard heat treatment.

  2. Investigation of the Formation of Topologically Close Packed Phase Instabilities in Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1999-01-01

    Topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability in third generation Ni-base superalloys is understood to hinder component performance when used in high-temperature jet engine applications. The detrimental effects on high temperature performance from these brittle phases includes weakening of the Ni-rich matrix through the depletion of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four compositional variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 were defined from a design-of-experiments approach and then cast, homogenized, and finally aged to promote TCP formation. Our prior work reported on the results of the multiple retression modeling of these alloys in order to predict the volume fraction of TCP. This paper will present further regression modeling results on these alloys in order to predict the occurrence of TCP in third generation Ni-base superalloy microstructures. Kinetic results are also discussed.

  3. Effect of electrode potential on stress corrosion cracking and crack chemistry of a nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, J.A.; Kelly, R.G.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1997-12-01

    The aqueous environment assisted cracking (EAC) resistance of a superalloy, Alloy 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-1Ti-0.6Al), was characterized by a rising displacement fracture mechanics methods. This precipitation-strengthened alloy was susceptible to room-temperature EAC in acidified sodium chloride at cathodic and anodic potentials. The threshold for stable crack growth in chloride (K{sub TH}) was as low as 47 MPa{radical}m, reduced from the laboratory air crack initiation toughness (K{sub ICi}) of 81--85 MPa{radical}m. The fracture morphology changed from ductile microvoids in air to a mixture of voids, transgranular facets, and intergranular facets in acidic chloride. Subcritical crack growth rates were on the order of 5 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s for rising displacement at a stress intensity of 70 MPa{radical}m and were an order of magnitude slower for constant displacement conditions. The degree of reduction in K{sub TH} from K{sub ICi}, the amount and type of fracture surface features, and the crack growth rate depended on the applied electrode potential. Microstructure produced by sub- or super-{delta} solvus heat treatment affected these dependencies. Ion analysis indicated that alloy dissolution occurred at the crack tip even at cathodic polarizations.

  4. Effect of initial gamma prime size on the elevated temperature creep properties of single crystal nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of initial gamma-prime size and shape on the high-temperature creep properties of two single-crystal Ni-base superalloys was investigated. The two alloys were chosen to represent different magnitudes of gamma/gamma-prime lattice mismatch. A range of initial microstructures was produced by various quenching and aging treatments. Creep-rupture testing at 1000 C was performed under stresses where gamma-prime directionally coarsens to form gamma/gamma-prime lamellae in the early portion of the creep life. Both alloys exhibited a peak in creep resistance as a function of initial gamma-prime size. The peak corresponded to an initial microstructure consisting of cuboidal precipitates aligned along 001 line directions. These aligned cuboidal gamma-prime particles directionally coarsened into a relatively perfect lamellar gamma/gamma-prime structure in the early stages of creep, whereas the more irregularly shaped and distributed gamma-prime particles in both under- and overaged material formed more irregular lamellae with more imperfections. The alloy with a lower magnitude of mismatch was less sensitive to initial gamma-prime size and shape.

  5. A Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Study on Nickel-based Binary-Ternary Amorphous and Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibhatla, Anasuya

    Hydrogen is a major role player in current global sustainable energy scenario. Research around the world is carried out to harness hydrogen from all possible sources. One of these sources is water gas shift reaction after the coal gasification process. Sustainable infrastructure can be viable in countries like USA and Australia, making this process viable. Various methods are used to harness this hydrogen from the water gas. One of these methods is the use of inorganic membranes based on Pd, Ag, Ni, Zr and other transition metals. Pd addition to the membranes makes the membranes more expensive for commercial use. Various bulk properties like hydrogen permeation and absorption are studied on Pd and Pd-based alloys. Alternate alloys based on Ni, V, Ta etc are being studied to substitute the use of Pd making this technology more cost efficient. A current balance in research in this area is fund to exist by coating the non-precious metal membranes with Pd to improve the surface interaction with hydrogen. The nature of membranes used for hydrogen separation is important aspect for the overall performance. Crystalline materials provide better bulk properties, however, are not durable under high temperature and hydrogen pressure. In this research, non-Pd coated Ni-based amorphous membranes were made by melt spin technique, which have been studied for their surface properties. Gas phase H2-D2 exchange reaction has been carried out on the membrane surface. This provides a measure of catalytic activity of the above mentioned membranes. More studies included the crystallographic phase change determination, bulk hydrogen solubility measurements, surface conduction measurements and surface morphological studies. During this research, it has been observed that crystalline materials provide more surface activity for hydrogen than their amorphous counterparts. Ni64Zr36 alloy has been shown to exhibit similar kinetic rates as metallic Ni. Also, microkinetic analysis was performed

  6. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys. Progress report, [December 1, 1990--November 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1993-11-01

    Progress focused on (1) determination of the role of C and Cr on deformation and IG cracking behavior of Ni-(5--30)Cr-9Fe, (2) determination of the effect of grain boundary misorientation on IG cracking behavior, (3) construction of an electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) imaging system, (4) determination of effect of the environment on creep and cracking, and (5) characterization of the surface film. Results showed that both C and Cr are potent solid solution strengtheners which can reduce the steady state creep rate at 360{degree}C by several orders of magnitude. Intergranular cracking of 100 {mu}m grain samples of high purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360{degree}C occurs by formation of grain boundary voids and interlinkage, driven by dislocation creep in the matrix. Creep experiments in primary water at 360{degree}C and an applied cathodic potential show that the creep rate is increased by an order of magnitude over that in Ar and the percent IG fracture increases as well. Oxide film composition and thickness is a sensitive function of the C content, increasing in thickness and Ni(OH){sub 2} content with increase in C or decrease in Cr to 5 wt%. Thermomechanical treatments along with electron channeling pattern (ECP) analysis wee used to create and index, samples with enhanced fractions of coincident site lattice boundaries (CSLBs). Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments on samples with a high percentage of CSLBs showed IG cracking compared with general high angle boundaries. However, these experiments were conducted on grain sizes of 300 {mu}m, while commercial material is an order of magnitude smaller. An electron backscattering pattern imaging system has been constructed for an environmental scanning electron microscope which can image grains below {mu}m. The system has been successfully benchmarked against results from ECP analysis.

  7. On The Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms Found in an Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloy at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Hallee Zox

    Polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are used as turbine disks in the hot section in jet engines, placing them in a high temperature and stress environment. As operating temperatures increase in search of better fuel efficiency, it becomes important to understand how these higher temperatures are affecting mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms in the substructure. Not only are operating temperatures increasing, but there is a drive to design next generation alloys in shorter time periods using predictive modeling capabilities. This dissertation focuses on mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms found in two different advanced polycrystalline alloy systems, information which will then be used to build advanced predictive models to design the next generation of alloys. The first part of this dissertation discusses the creep behavior and identifying active deformation mechanisms in an advanced polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (ME3) that is currently in operation, but at higher temperatures and stresses than are experienced in current engines. Monotonic creep tests were run at 700°C and between 655-793MPa at 34MPa increments, on two microstructures (called M1 and M2) produced by different heat treatments. All tests were crept to 0.5% plastic strain. Transient temperature and transient stress tests were used determine activation energy and stress exponents of the M1 microstructure. Constant strain rate tests (at 10-4s-1) were performed on both microstructures as well. Following creep testing, both M1 and M2 microstructures were fully characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for basic microstructure information, and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) to determine active deformation mechanism. It was found that in the M1 microstructure, reorder mediated activity (such as discontinuous faulting and microtwinning) is dominant at low stresses (655-724 MPa). Dislocations in the gamma matrix, and overall planar

  8. Computational thermodynamics, Gaussian processes and genetic algorithms: combined tools to design new alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancret, F.

    2013-06-01

    A new alloy design procedure is proposed, combining in a single computational tool several modelling and predictive techniques that have already been used and assessed in the field of materials science and alloy design: a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the alloy composition for target properties and performance on the basis of the prediction of mechanical properties (estimated by Gaussian process regression of data on existing alloys) and of microstructural constitution, stability and processability (evaluated by computational themodynamics). These tools are integrated in a unique Matlab programme. An example is given in the case of the design of a new nickel-base superalloy for future power plant applications (such as the ultra-supercritical (USC) coal-fired plant, or the high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGCR or HTGR), where the selection criteria include cost, oxidation and creep resistance around 750 °C, long-term stability at service temperature, forgeability, weldability, etc.

  9. Surface modification of ferritic and Ni based alloys for improved oxidation resistance of SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-08-01

    This research is aimed at evaluating a surface modification of ferritic stainless steels (Type-430 and Crofer 22APU) and nickel-base alloys (Haynes 230) for use in the SOFC temperature range of 700 to 800°C. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the stability of the base metal oxide that forms and to reduce the oxidation rate of the materials at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted at 800°C to evaulate the corrosion resistance of the alloys. It was found that the surface treatment improved the oxidation resistance of all the alloys tested. However, the treatment improved the performance of 430SS more than that of the other alloys.

  10. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  11. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  12. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; Tiley, Jamie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.

  13. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; Tiley, Jamie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the additionmore » of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.« less

  14. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Meher, S; Rojhirunsakool, T; Nandwana, P; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-12-01

    The analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered γ' precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr (at%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within γ' precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes. PMID:25952611

  15. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in ’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing ’, typical in intermediate ’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing ’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450˚F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  16. Factors which influence directional coarsening of gamma-prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of the time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep, a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  17. Factors which influence directional coarsening of Gamma prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  18. Origin of the Low Rigidity of the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonoshko, A. B.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Davis, S.; Osiptsov, A. N.; Rosengren, A.; Johansson, B.

    2007-12-01

    The solid iron Earth's inner core has a low rigidity which manifests itself in the anomalously low velocities of shear waves as compared to those in iron alloys. Normally, when estimating elastic properties of a polycrystal one calculates an average over different orientations of a single crystal. This approach does not take into account the grain boundaries and defects likely to be abundant at high temperatures relevant for the inner core conditions. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations that if defects are considered, the calculated shear modulus and shear wave velocity decrease dramatically compared to the averaged single crystal values. Thus, the low shear wave velocity in the inner core receives its explanation (Science 316, 1603 (2007)).

  19. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  20. Growth of the inner core by snowfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasbleis, M.; Labrosse, S.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    In past decades, seismic studies of the Earth's core have tremendously improved our knowledge of its structure. The solid inner core presents heterogeneity at all scales, including both regional and hemispherical variations in degree and possibly orientation of elastic anisotropy, small-scale scattering, and potential indications of internal layering. Seismic observations also reveal subtle changes in seismic velocity gradient at the bottom of the liquid outer core that has been interpreted as a stratified layer, depleted in light alloying elements. Gubbins et al. (GJI, 2008) proposed that such a layer could be at the liquidus throughout, however, the details of the process that gives rise to such a scenario and its dynamical evolution with time have not been elucidated. Here we propose a model of slurry (snowfall) inside the F-layer. We have formulated a binary alloy model for the nucleation, settling and chemical reaction of snow with surrounding fluid in which cooling and crystallization is driven at the top of a compositionally stratified F-layer. Our model reveals a simple dynamical feedback that could drive the system toward a state such that the entire stratified region is maintained at the liquidus. We find that diffusion is the dominant transport phenomenon inside the layer, between the freely convecting outer core and the inner core, for both temperature and composition. Owing to variations in heat flow with time imposed by mantle convection, the equilibrium between the geotherm and liquidus in the F-layer would be perturbed, and we derive time scales for enhanced melting or freezing of snow to return the layer to equilibrium.

  1. Microstructural Evaluations of Baseline HSR/EPM Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Garg, Anita; Ellis, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Six alloys representing two classes of powder metallurgy nickel-based superalloys were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and phase extraction. Alloys KM4, CH98, IN-100 and 456 are based on a Ni-18Co-12Cr composition while alloys Rene' 88 DT and SR 3 have lower Al and Co and higher Cr contents. The lambda size distributions were determined from quantitative image analysis of the TEM images. The volume fraction of lambda and carbides and the composition of the phases were determined by a combination of phase extraction and TEM. The results showed many similarities in lambda size distributions, grain boundary serrations, and grain boundary carbide frequencies between alloys KM4, CH98, 456, Rene' 88 DT and SR 3 when heat treated to give an approximate grain size of ASTM 6. The density of grain boundary carbides in KM4 was shown to substantially increase as the grain size increased. IN-100 and 456 subjected to a serration cooling heat treatment had much more complex lambda size distributions with very large intergranular and intragranular secondary lambda as well as finer than average cooling and aging lambda. The grain boundary carbides in IN-100 were similar to the other alloys, but 456 given the serration cooling heat treatment had a more variable density of grain boundary carbides. Examination of the phases extracted from the matrix showed that there were significant differences in the phase chemistries and elemental partitioning ratios between the various alloys.

  2. Simulated Single Tooth Bending of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert, F.; Burke, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Future unmanned space missions will require mechanisms to operate at extreme conditions in order to be successful. In some of these mechanisms, very high gear reductions will be needed to permit very small motors to drive other components at low rotational speed with high output torque. Therefore gearing components are required that can meet the mission requirements. In mechanisms such as this, bending fatigue strength capacity of the gears is very important. The bending fatigue capacity of a high temperature, nickel-based alloy, typically used for turbine disks in gas turbine engines and two tool steel materials with high vanadium content, were compared to that of a typical aerospace alloy-AISI 9310. Test specimens were fabricated by electro-discharge machining without post machining processing. Tests were run at 24 and at 490 C. As test temperature increased from 24 to 490 C the bending fatigue strength was reduced by a factor of five.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Alloys for Supercritical Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Zillmer, A.; Licht, J.R.; Allen, T.R.; Anderson, M.H.; Tan, L.

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of metallic cladding and other core internal structures is critical to the success of the Generation IV Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWR). The eventual materials selected will be chosen based on the combined corrosion, stress-corrosion, mechanical performance, and radiation stability properties. Among the materials being considered are austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, and nickel-base alloys. This paper reports initial studies on the corrosion performance of the candidate alloys 316 austenitic stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Zircaloy-2, all exposed to supercritical water at 300-500 deg. C in a corrosion loop at the University of Wisconsin. Long-term corrosion performance of AISI 347, also a candidate austenitic steel, has also been examined by sectioning samples from a component that was exposed for a period of about 30 years in supercritical water at the Genoa 3 Supercritical Water fossil power plant located in Genoa, Wisconsin. (authors)

  4. Inner Tooth Number Three: Inner College Catalog and Resource Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiernan, Joseph M., Ed.; Kincaid, Rhonda M., Ed.

    The Inner College of the University of Connecticut was organized to try to make alternative education work--it provides the opportunity for each student to design a personalized education, suited to his or her own aspirations and interests. This catalog and resource magazine describes offerings by the Inner College designed to accomplish this…

  5. Iron-Nickel-Based SuperMagnets: Multiscale Development of L10 Materials for Rare Earth-Free Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Northeastern University will develop bulk quantities of rare-earth-free permanent magnets with an iron-nickel crystal structure for use in the electric motors of renewable power generators and EVs. These materials could offer magnetic properties that are equivalent to today’s best commercial magnets, but with a significant cost reduction and diminished environmental impact. This iron-nickel crystal structure, which is only found naturally in meteorites and developed over billions of years in space, will be artificially synthesized by the Northeastern University team. Its material structure will be replicated with the assistance of alloying elements introduced to help it achieve superior magnetic properties. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate bulk magnetic properties that can be fabricated at the industrial scale.

  6. Creep and stress rupture of oxide dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed Inconel alloy MA 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Stulga, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of the mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy MA 754 was studied at 760, 982 and 1093 C. Tensile specimens with a fine, highly elongated grain structure, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal grain direction were tested at various stresses in air under constant load. It was found that the apparent stress dependence was large, with power law exponents ranging from 19 to 33 over the temperature range studied. The creep activation energy, after correction for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, was close to but slightly larger than the activation energy for self diffusion. Rupture was intergranular and the rupture ductility as measured by percentage elongation was generally low, with values ranging from 0.5 to 16 pct. The creep properties are rationalized by describing the creep rates in terms of an effective stress which is the applied stress minus a resisting stress consistent with the alloy microstructure. Values of the resisting stress obtained through a curve fitting procedure are found to be close to the values of the particle by-pass stress for this oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, as calculated from the measured oxide particle distribution.

  7. AEREX 350 alloy: A 220 ksi minimum tensile strength fastener alloy for service up to 1350{degree}F

    SciTech Connect

    Buzolits, S.R.; Lawler, M.J.; Erickson, G.L.; Maloney, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    AEREX{trademark} 350 Alloy is a new high strength, high temperature, corrosion resistant fastener material which has been developed to service the more demanding requirements typical of newer gas turbine engines. It exhibits the highest creep- and stress-rupture resistance known for any fastener material between 620 and 760 C (1,150 and 1,400 F). Furthermore, its coefficient of thermal expansion is equivalent to conventional nickel base superalloys, such as Waspaloy and Udimet 720. These characteristics combined with its excellent tensile and impact strengths, thermal stability and resistance to stress relaxation suggest that AEREX 350 Alloy is an excellent candidate for high temperature fastener applications, such as those existing in aircraft and land-based gas turbine engines.

  8. A novel unified dislocation density-based model for hot deformation behavior of a nickel-based superalloy under dynamic recrystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Wen, Dong-Xu; Chen, Ming-Song; Chen, Xiao-Min

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel unified dislocation density-based model is presented for characterizing hot deformation behaviors in a nickel-based superalloy under dynamic recrystallization (DRX) conditions. In the Kocks-Mecking model, a new softening item is proposed to represent the impacts of DRX behavior on dislocation density evolution. The grain size evolution and DRX kinetics are incorporated into the developed model. Material parameters of the developed model are calibrated by a derivative-free method of MATLAB software. Comparisons between experimental and predicted results confirm that the developed unified dislocation density-based model can nicely reproduce hot deformation behavior, DRX kinetics, and grain size evolution in wide scope of initial grain size, strain rate, and deformation temperature. Moreover, the developed unified dislocation density-based model is well employed to analyze the time-variant forming processes of the studied superalloy.

  9. Optimization of the Homogenization Heat Treatment of Nickel-Based Superalloys Based on Phase-Field Simulations: Numerical Methods and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, Ralf; Ritter, Nils C.; Müller, Frank; Franke, Martin M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    A method for predicting the fastest possible homogenization treatment of the as-cast microstructure of nickel-based superalloys is presented and compared with experimental results for the single-crystal superalloy ERBO/1. The computational prediction method is based on phase-field simulations. Experimentally determined compositional fields of the as-cast microstructure from microprobe measurements are being used as input data. The software program MICRESS is employed to account for multicomponent diffusion, dissolution of the eutectic phases, nucleation, and growth of liquid phase (incipient melting). The optimization itself is performed using an iterative algorithm that increases the temperature in such a way that the microstructural state is always very close to the incipient melting limit. Maps are derived allowing describing the dissolution of primary γ/ γ'-islands and the elimination of residual segregation with respect to temperature and time.

  10. TEM investigations on the effect of chromium content and of stress relief treatment on precipitation in Alloy 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennour, M.; Chaumun, E.; Crépin, J.; Duhamel, C.; Gaslain, F.; Guerre, C.; de Curières, I.

    2013-11-01

    Nickel-base alloys are widely used in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Most of them have been found susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in nominal PWR primary water. The time to initiation depends on the material and is longer for weld metals than for Alloy 600. This study will focus on Alloy 82, which is used in Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMWs). In service, DMWs are either in the as-welded state or have undergone a stress relief treatment. Previous SCC studies showed that the heat treatment reduces significantly the SCC susceptibility of the weld. In this context, this study focuses on the microstructure characterization of the weld in the as-welded state and in the heat-treated state. As chromium content is also a key factor for the SCC susceptibility, welds with low chromium content and medium chromium content were studied. The lower SCC susceptibility of the heat-treated welds was attributed to intergranular Cr23C6 resulting from a combined effect of heat treatment and chromium and carbon contents. These intergranular carbides could explain the better behavior of Alloy 82, compared to other nickel-base alloys.

  11. Low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel-base superalloys for interconnect application in intermediate high temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2004-09-01

    This paper deals with the fabrication, microstructure and oxidation resistance of Ni-base alloys with CTE on the order of 12.5x10{sup}-6{/sup}/°C. Alloys based on the composition Ni-(18-22wt%) Mo-12Cr-1Ti were readily rolled into 1 mm strip. Modifications to this base composition, such as increasing Cr or Ti content adversely affected the ability to form the alloy. The oxidation resistance at 750°C of several of these alloys was superior to a Fe-base alloy containing significantly more (22wt%) Cr.

  12. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  13. Bolting alloy fills high-temperature gap

    SciTech Connect

    Buzolits, S.R.; Kline, L.A.

    1995-02-01

    A high-strength, high-temperature fastener alloy has been developed by SPS Technologies to meet the requirements of today`s advanced turbine engines. Designated Aerex 350, it is based on the multiphase materials cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum to take advantage of their low notch sensitivity, high strength, and excellent resistance to creep and corrosion. In choosing the chemical composition of Aerex 350 Alloy (25Co, 17Cr, 3Mo, 2Ti, 1Al, 1Nb, 4Ta, 2W, balance Ni), researchers sought to produce physical properties equivalent to those of conventional nickel-base superalloys such as Waspaloy. As a result, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, specific heat, enthalpy, modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and density are all in the ranges common to that class. Perhaps the most important of these is its coefficient of thermal expansion, which ranges from 13.5 {mu}m/m{degree}C at 425 C to 14.8 {mu}m/m{degree}C at 700 C. A bolt with a higher coefficient of expansion than the joint material would be detrimental because clamp load can be reduced significantly as the assembly heats up. Therefore, the expansion characteristics of Aerex 350 Alloy ensure joint integrity up to the highest operating temperatures.

  14. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  15. Influence of the pulsed plasma treatment on the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel plated by Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumaev, P.; Yakushin, V.; Kalin, B.; Polsky, V.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents investigation results of the influence of high temperature pulsed plasma flows (HTPPF) treatment on the corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel 0.2C-Cr-Mn- Ni-Mo cladded by the rapidly quenched nickel-based alloy. A technique that allows obtaining a defect-free clad layer with a good adhesion to the substrate was developed. It is shown that the preliminary treatment of steel samples by nitrogen plasma flows significantly increases their corrosion resistance in the conditions of intergranular corrosion test in a water solution of sulfuric acid. A change of the corrosion mechanism of the clad layer from intergranular to uniform corrosion was observed as a result of sub-microcrystalline structure formation and homogeneous distribution of alloying elements in the plasma treated surface layer thus leading to the significant increase of the corrosion resistance.

  16. Effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry on corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys and welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    Reactor vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 and their welds, such as Alloys 82, 182, 52, and 152, to EAC in simulated light water reactor environments. The existing crack growth rate (CGR) data for these alloys under cyclic and constant loads have been evaluated to establish the effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry. The experimental fatigue CGRs are compared with CGRs that would be expected in air under the same mechanical loading conditions to obtain a qualitative understanding of the degree and range of conditions for significant environmental enhancement in growth rates. The existing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data on Alloys 600 and 690 and Alloy 82, 182, and 52 welds have been compiled and analyzed to determine the influence of key parameters on growth rates in simulated PWR and BWR environments. The SCC data for these alloys have been evaluated with correlations developed by Scott and by Ford and Andresen.

  17. 61Ni synchrotron radiation-based Mössbauer spectroscopy of nickel-based nanoparticles with hexagonal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Shinji; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Saito, Makina; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Mitsui, Takaya; Hosoi, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Seto, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    We measured the synchrotron-radiation (SR)-based Mössbauer spectra of Ni-based nanoparticles with a hexagonal structure that were synthesised by chemical reduction. To obtain Mössbauer spectra of the nanoparticles without 61Ni enrichment, we developed a measurement system for 61Ni SR-based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy without X-ray windows between the 61Ni84V16 standard energy alloy and detector. The counting rate of the 61Ni nuclear resonant scattering in the system was enhanced by the detection of internal conversion electrons and the close proximity between the energy standard and the detector. The spectrum measured at 4 K revealed the internal magnetic field of the nanoparticles was 3.4 ± 0.9 T, corresponding to a Ni atomic magnetic moment of 0.3 Bohr magneton. This differs from the value of Ni3C and the theoretically predicted value of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp)-Ni and suggested the nanoparticle possessed intermediate carbon content between hcp-Ni and Ni3C of approximately 10 atomic % of Ni. The improved 61Ni Mössbauer absorption measurement system is also applicable to various Ni materials without 61Ni enrichment, such as Ni hydride nanoparticles.

  18. Effect of Surface Preparation on the 815°C Oxidation of Single-Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Beckett, Devon L.; MacKay, Rebecca A.

    2015-11-01

    A primary application for single-crystal superalloys has been jet engine turbine blades, where operation temperatures reach well above 1000°C. The NASA Glenn Research Center is considering use of single-crystal alloys for future, lower temperature application in the rims of jet engine turbine disks. Mechanical and environmental properties required for potential disk rim operation at 815°C are being examined, including the oxidation and corrosion behavior, where there is little documentation at intermediate temperatures. In this study, single-crystal superalloys, LDS-1101+Hf and CMSX-4+Y, were prepared with different surface finishes and compared after isothermal and cyclic oxidation exposures. Surface finish has a clear effect on oxide formation at 815°C. Machined low-stress ground surfaces after exposure for 440 h produce thin Al2O3 external scales, which is consistent with higher temperature oxidation, whereas polished surfaces with a mirror finish yield much thicker NiO external scales with subscale of Cr2O3-spinel-Al2O3, which may offer less reliable oxidation resistance. Additional experiments separate the roles of cold-work, localized deformation, and the extent of polishing and surface roughness on oxide formation.

  19. Microstructural Architecture, Microstructures, and Mechanical Properties for a Nickel-Base Superalloy Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Martinez, E.; Gaytan, S. M.; Ramirez, D. A.; Machado, B. I.; Shindo, P. W.; Martinez, J. L.; Medina, F.; Wooten, J.; Ciscel, D.; Ackelid, U.; Wicker, R. B.

    2011-11-01

    Microstructures and a microstructural, columnar architecture as well as mechanical behavior of as-fabricated and processed INCONEL alloy 625 components produced by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) of prealloyed precursor powder are examined in this study. As-fabricated and hot-isostatically pressed ("hipped") [at 1393 K (1120 °C)] cylinders examined by optical metallography (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) exhibited an initial EBM-developed γ″ (bct) Ni3Nb precipitate platelet columnar architecture within columnar [200] textured γ (fcc) Ni-Cr grains aligned in the cylinder axis, parallel to the EBM build direction. Upon annealing at 1393 K (1120 °C) (hot-isostatic press (HIP)), these precipitate columns dissolve and the columnar, γ, grains recrystallized forming generally equiaxed grains (with coherent {111} annealing twins), containing NbCr2 laves precipitates. Microindentation hardnesses decreased from 2.7 to 2.2 GPa following hot-isostatic pressing ("hipping"), and the corresponding engineering (0.2 pct) offset yield stress decreased from 0.41 to 0.33 GPa, while the UTS increased from 0.75 to 0.77 GPa. However, the corresponding elongation increased from 44 to 69 pct for the hipped components.

  20. 61Ni synchrotron radiation-based Mössbauer spectroscopy of nickel-based nanoparticles with hexagonal structure.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Shinji; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Saito, Makina; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Mitsui, Takaya; Hosoi, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Seto, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We measured the synchrotron-radiation (SR)-based Mössbauer spectra of Ni-based nanoparticles with a hexagonal structure that were synthesised by chemical reduction. To obtain Mössbauer spectra of the nanoparticles without (61)Ni enrichment, we developed a measurement system for (61)Ni SR-based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy without X-ray windows between the (61)Ni84V16 standard energy alloy and detector. The counting rate of the (61)Ni nuclear resonant scattering in the system was enhanced by the detection of internal conversion electrons and the close proximity between the energy standard and the detector. The spectrum measured at 4 K revealed the internal magnetic field of the nanoparticles was 3.4 ± 0.9 T, corresponding to a Ni atomic magnetic moment of 0.3 Bohr magneton. This differs from the value of Ni3C and the theoretically predicted value of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp)-Ni and suggested the nanoparticle possessed intermediate carbon content between hcp-Ni and Ni3C of approximately 10 atomic % of Ni. The improved (61)Ni Mössbauer absorption measurement system is also applicable to various Ni materials without (61)Ni enrichment, such as Ni hydride nanoparticles. PMID:26883185