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Sample records for nicolea uspiana polychaeta

  1. Spatial polychaeta habitat potential mapping using probabilistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Kuk; Oh, Hyun-Joo; Koo, Bon Joo; Ryu, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Saro

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply probabilistic models to the mapping of the potential polychaeta habitat area in the Hwangdo tidal flat, Korea. Remote sensing techniques were used to construct spatial datasets of ecological environments and field observations were carried out to determine the distribution of macrobenthos. Habitat potential mapping was achieved for two polychaeta species, Prionospio japonica and Prionospio pulchra, and eight control factors relating to the tidal macrobenthos distribution were selected. These included the intertidal digital elevation model (DEM), slope, aspect, tidal exposure duration, distance from tidal channels, tidal channel density, spectral reflectance of the near infrared (NIR) bands and surface sedimentary facies from satellite imagery. The spatial relationships between the polychaeta species and each control factor were calculated using a frequency ratio and weights-of-evidence combined with geographic information system (GIS) data. The species were randomly divided into a training set (70%) to analyze habitat potential using frequency ratio and weights-of-evidence, and a test set (30%) to verify the predicted habitat potential map. The relationships were overlaid to produce a habitat potential map with a polychaeta habitat potential (PHP) index value. These maps were verified by comparing them to surveyed habitat locations such as the verification data set. For the verification results, the frequency ratio model showed prediction accuracies of 77.71% and 74.87% for P. japonica and P. pulchra, respectively, while those for the weights-of-evidence model were 64.05% and 62.95%. Thus, the frequency ratio model provided a more accurate prediction than the weights-of-evidence model. Our data demonstrate that the frequency ratio and weights-of-evidence models based upon GIS analysis are effective for generating habitat potential maps of polychaeta species in a tidal flat. The results of this study can be applied towards

  2. Parasabella Bush, 1905, replacement name for the polychaete genus Demonax Kinberg, 1867 (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Hernández, María Ana; Harris, Leslie H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Parasabella Bush, 1905 is reintroduced as a replacement name for Demonax Kinberg, 1867 (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellidae) which is a junior homonym of Demonax Thomson, 1860 (Insecta: Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). PMID:21594198

  3. [Syllids (Syllidae: Polychaeta) from Coiba National Park (Pacific of Panama)].

    PubMed

    Aguado, María Teresa; San Martín, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    During a study carried out on soft bottoms from Coiba National Park (Panama), 218 specimens of syllids (Annelida: Polychaeta) belonging to 19 interstitial species have been identified. Two species are new reports for the Pacific Ocean, Exogone (Exogone) arenosa Perkins, 1981 and Streptosyllis websteri Southern, 1914; five are new for Panama, E. (E.) dispar (Webster, 1879); E. (E.) longicornis Westheide, 1974; Salvatoria mediodentata (Westheide, 1974); Pionosyllis heterocirrata (Hartmann-Schröder, 1959) and Syllis glarearia (Westheide, 1974). A characteristic not mentioned in the original description is herein reported for E. (E.) longicornis: the presence of triangular subterminal processes in the spiniger-like compound chaetae of chaetiger one. Specimens of the species Syllis botosaneanui Hartmann-Schröder, 1973 harboring inside embryos of various stages of development have been found; this is the first report for this species as viviparous. Lastly, one specimen of the genus Syllis has been found that is mainly characterized by its long pharynx, two dorsal prostomial lobes, and compound chaetae with short blades and long spinulation. Because we consider that one specimen is not sufficient to describe a new species we refer it as Syllis sp. PMID:18491613

  4. Spionidae (Polychaeta: Canalipalpata: Spionida) from seamounts in the NE Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Meißner, Karin; Bick, Andreas; Guggolz, Theresa; Götting, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Spionidae (Polychaeta) collected from seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean were studied. Altogether six species were found of which two are new to science and one belongs to a new genus. Aonidella cf. dayi Maciolek in López-Jamar, 1989 and Glandulospio orestes gen. et sp. nov. were the most common species and occurred on both the Great and Little Meteor Seamount, the Irving Seamount and the Hyeres Seamount. Laonice norgensis Sikorski, 2003 and Malacoceros jirkovi Sikorski, 1992 have a wider distribution in the North Atlantic, including the Mediterranean Sea in case of L. norgensis. Aonides selvagensis Brito, Núñez and Riera, 2006 is only known from the Macaronesian Region. Dipolydora paracaulleryi sp. nov. has been collected from both the Great and Little Meteor Seamounts. All species are compared with morphological similar species and their taxonomy is discussed. Detailed descriptions are provided for the species new to science and descriptions of the previously known species are amended. Accompanying histological studies revealed the presence of very strong dorsoventral musculature in A. cf. dayi and for G. orestes gen. et sp. nov. the presence of glandular organs in the middle body region. Laonice maciolekae Aguirrezabalaga & Ceberio, 2005 was found to be a junior synonym of L. appellöfi Söderström, 1920 and is formally synonymised. Molecular data suggest gene flow between seamounts and autochthonous as well as allochthonous larval recruitment for different species. The results of previous studies by other authors, that polychaete communities of the North Atlantic Seamounts are characterized by low diversity, low rates of endemism, and the predominance of widely distributed (and cosmopolitan) species is not corroborated by our results.  PMID:24869536

  5. Revision of Sternaspis Otto, 1821 (Polychaeta, Sternaspidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sendall, Kelly; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To the memory of William Ronald Sendall Sternaspid polychaetes are common and often abundant in soft bottoms in the world oceans. Some authors suggest that only one species should be recognized, whereas others regard a few species as widely distributed in many seas and variable depths from the low intertidal to about 4400 m. There are some problems with species delineation and the distinctive ventro-caudal shield has been disregarded or barely used for identifying species. In order to clarify these issues, the ventral shield is evaluated in specimens from the same locality and its diagnostic potential is confirmed. On this basis, a revision of Sternaspis Otto, 1821 (Polychaeta: Sternaspidae) is presented based upon type materials, or material collected from type localities. The sternaspid body, introvert hooks and shield show three distinct patterns, two genera have seven abdominal segments and tapered introvert hooks, and one genus has eight abdominal segments and spatulate introvert hooks. The ventro-caudal shield has three different patterns: stiff with ribs, and sometimes concentric lines, stiff with feebly-defined ribs but no concentric lines, and soft with firmly adhered sediment particles. Sternaspis is restricted to include species with seven abdominal segments, falcate introvert hooks, and stiff shields, often exhibiting radial ribs, concentric lines or both. Sternaspis includes, besides the type species, Sternaspis thalassemoides Otto, 1821 from the Mediterranean Sea, Sternaspis affinis Stimpson, 1864 from the Northeastern Pacific, Sternaspis africana Augener, 1918, stat. n. from Western Africa, Sternaspis andamanensis sp. n. from the Andaman Sea, Sternaspis costata von Marenzeller, 1879 from Japan, Sternaspis fossor Stimpson, 1853 from the Northwestern Atlantic, Sternaspis islandica Malmgren, 1867 from Iceland, Sternaspis maior Chamberlin, 1919 from the Gulf of California, Sternaspis princeps Selenka, 1885 from New Zealand, Sternaspis rietschi

  6. Bathymetric distribution patterns of Southern Ocean macrofaunal taxa: Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Isopoda and Polychaeta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Angelika; Linse, Katrin; Schüller, Myriam

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the depth distributions of four major Southern Ocean macrobenthic epi- and infaunal taxa, the Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Isopoda, and Polychaeta, from subtidal to abyssal depth. All literature data up to summer 2008, as well as the unpublished data from the most recent ANDEEP I-III (Antarctic benthic deep-sea biodiversity: colonisation history and recent community patterns) expeditions to the Southern Ocean deep sea are included in the analysis. Benthic invertebrates in the Southern Ocean are known for their wide bathymetric ranges. We analysed the distributions of four of the most abundant and species-rich taxa from intertidal to abyssal (5200 m) depths in depth zones of 100 m. The depth distributions of three macrofaunal classes (Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Polychaeta) and one order (Isopoda) showed distinct differences. In the case of bivalves, gastropods and polychaetes, the number of species per depth zone decreased from the shelf to the slope at around 1000 m depth and then showed stable low numbers. The isopods showed the opposite trend; they were less species rich in the upper 1000 m but increased in species numbers from the slope to bathyal and abyssal depths. Depth ranges of families of the studied taxa (Bivalvia: 31 families, Gastropoda: 60, Isopoda: 32, and Polychaeta: 46 families) were compiled and illustrated. At present vast areas of the deep sea in the Southern Ocean remain unexplored and species accumulation curves showed that only a fraction of the species have been discovered to date. We anticipate that further investigations will greatly increase the number of species known in the Southern Ocean deep sea.

  7. A new species of Eunice (Polychaeta: Eunicidae) from Hainan Island, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuwen; Sun, Ruiping; Liu, Ruiyu

    2013-01-01

    A taxonomic survey of benthic marine animals from coastal regions of Hainan Island, South China Sea, revealed specimens of a new species of Eunice (Polychaeta: Eunicida: Eunicidae), Eunice uschakovi n. sp., collected from the intertidal zone. The species belongs to the group of Eunice that has yellow tridentate subacicular hooks and branchiae scattered over an extensive region of the body. It resembles E. miurai and E. havaica in having both bidentate and tridentate falcigers, but can be readily distinguished by branchial features. Comparisons between E. uschakovi and the two related species are presented.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm, Ridgeia piscesae (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae).

    PubMed

    Jun, Jumin; Won, Yong-Jin; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Ridgeia piscesae (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae), one of the dominant taxa in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, is reported here for the first time. The R. piscesae mitogenome is 15,002 bp in total length and includes 13 protein-coding gene sequences, small and large rRNA sequences and 22 tRNA sequences. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The mitochondrial genomes of R. piscesae and other six polychaete species have a conserved gene order. PMID:25014334

  9. Acute toxicity and biodegradation of endosulfan by the polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis in an indoor culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Zhang, Litao; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sui, Zhenghong; Hur, Junwook

    2013-01-01

    The polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, a key species in estuarine ecosystems, can improve the culture condition of sediment. Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide used globally to control insects and mites; however, it is a source of pollution in aquaculture as a result of runoff or accidental release. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of endosulfan to polychaeta and its ability to improve polluted sediment. Specifically, the effects of a series of endosulfan concentrations (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/L) were investigated, and the results indicated that the 24-h median lethal concentration (24-h LC50) was 55.57 mg/L, while the 48-h median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) was 15.56 mg/L, and the safe concentration was about 1.556 mg/L. In a 30-d exposure experiment, the animal specimen could decompose endosulfan effectively while improving endosulfan-polluted aquatic sediment.

  10. A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellida) from the Caribbean Sea

    PubMed Central

    PRENTISS, NANCY K.; VASILEIADOU, KATERINA; FAULWETTER, SARAH; ARVANITIDIS, CHRISTOS; TEN HOVE, HARRY A.

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Caribbean Sea. Turbocavus secretus (gen. nov. and sp. nov.) is described from shallow hard substrates (0.5–3 m) in wind-sheltered bays of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and Curaçao, as well as from diving depths (46–49 m) around Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), Caribbean Sea. The new taxon, which has from 7 to 19 thoracic chaetigers and up to 335 abdominal chaetigers, bears a unique type of thoracic chaeta which is multifolded at the base and continues with a groove tapering to the capillary tip. The new serpulid has unique 18S rRNA sequences and genetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene situates the new genus at the basis of the serpulid cla-dogram, well separated from other genera, and close to Filograna/Salmacina and Protula. PMID:25543733

  11. A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellida) from the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Prentiss, Nancy K; Vasileiadou, Katerina; Faulwetter, Sarah; Arvanitidis, Christos; Hove, Harry A Ten

    2014-01-01

    A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Caribbean Sea. Turbocavus secretus (gen. nov. and sp. nov.) is described from shallow hard substrates (0.5-3 m) in wind-sheltered bays of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and Curaçao, as well as from diving depths (46-49 m) around Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), Caribbean Sea. The new taxon, which has from 7 to 19 thoracic chaetigers and up to 335 abdominal chaetigers, bears a unique type of thoracic chaeta which is multifolded at the base and continues with a groove tapering to the capillary tip. The new serpulid has unique 18S rRNA sequences and genetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene situates the new genus at the basis of the serpulid cladogram, well separated from other genera, and close to Filograna/Salmacina and Protula.  PMID:25543733

  12. Polychaetes of the genus Ampharete (Polychaeta: Ampharetidae) collected in Icelandic waters during the BIOICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapar, Julio; Helgason, Gudmundur V.; Jirkov, Igor; Moreira, Juan

    2012-09-01

    Based on material collected during the BIOICE project off Iceland, the taxonomy and distribution of eight species of polychaetous annelids belonging to the genus Ampharete (Polychaeta: Ampharetidae) are reviewed. Five of these species were previously reported in the area: Ampharete acutifrons, Ampharete borealis, Ampharete finmarchica, Ampharete octocirrata and Ampharete petersenae; two are new to Icelandic waters: Ampharete baltica and Ampharete lindstroemi; and one is new to science: Ampharete villenai sp. nov. A. petersenae was found for the first time after the original description and is redescribed. A. villenai sp. nov. is primarily characterized by the size, shape and disposition of the paleae, a special kind of chaetae located on the first body chaetiger. Several body characters of high taxonomic relevance in Ampharetidae are reviewed under the SEM. The distribution of each species off the coast of Iceland and a key to all species recorded in European Boreo-Arctic waters is provided.

  13. First record in the Tropical Eastern Pacific of the exotic species Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Zavala, Rolando; García-Madrigal, Socorro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The exotic Indo-West-Pacific species, Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae) is recorded for the first time in the Tropical Eastern Pacific from two sites in La Encrucijada Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, a coastal lagoon in the Pacific south of Mexico. The means of dispersal of this serpulid species still remains unclear, as the nearest port (Puerto Chiapas) is 70 km to the south, and there are no port installations or shrimp cultures in the lagoon. The record of this serpulid species, apparently widely distributed in this coastal lagoon, has implications regarding possible effects on the brackish-water ecosystem, since the invasion event very well may have occurred several years ago. It is recommended that an exhaustive study be carried out in the coastal lagoons of Chiapas to evaluate the real distribution and the effects of this invasive species on the ecosystem. A complete description, including photographs and drawings, is provided. PMID:23226707

  14. Fauna Europaea: Annelida - Terrestrial Oligochaeta (Enchytraeidae and Megadrili), Aphanoneura and Polychaeta

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. This paper provides updated information on the taxonomic composition and distribution of the Annelida - terrestrial Oligochaeta (Megadrili and Enchytraeidae), Aphanoneura and Polychaeta, recorded in Europe. Data on 18 families, 11 autochthonous and 7 allochthonous, represented in our continent by a total of 800 species, are reviewed, beginning from their distinctness, phylogenetic status, diversity and global distribution, and following with major recent developments in taxonomic and faunistic research in Europe. A rich list of relevant references is appended. The Fauna Europaea Annelida - terrestrial Oligochaeta data-set, as completed in 2004, will be updated accordingly. PMID:26379463

  15. Redescription of Terebellides kerguelensis stat. nov. (Polychaeta: Trichobranchidae) from Antarctic and subantarctic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapar, Julio; Moreira, Juan

    2008-06-01

    During the Spanish Antarctic expeditions “Bentart” 1994, 1995 and 2003, a number of trichobranchid (Annelida: Polychaeta) specimens were collected and identified initially as Terebellides stroemii kerguelensis McIntosh, 1885, the only known species of the genus widely recognised as valid in Antarctic waters. In the framework of a worldwide revision of the genus Terebellides, a reconsideration of the taxonomic status of this subspecies of the boreal Terebellides stroemii Sars, 1835 is done through the examination of the syntypes of T. s. kerguelensis compared with recent descriptions of the nominal species from Norwegian waters and material from Icelandic waters. Thus, T. s. kerguelensis is regarded as a valid species, T. kerguelensis stat. nov., and redescribed designating a lectotype and paralectotypes. The species is mainly characterised by the presence of an anterior branchial extension (fifth lobe), lateral lappets in five anterior thoracic chaetigers, segmental organs in chaetigers 1, 4 and 5, and first thoracic acicular neurochaetae sharply bent with pointed tips. The biological role of the segmental organs, the presence and disposition of cilia in branchial lamellae and the finding of new structures located in dorsal part of thoracic notopodia are discussed.

  16. Response of Nereis diversicolor population (Polychaeta, Nereididae) to the pollution impact - Authie and Seine estuaries (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, P.; Mouloud, M.; Durou, C.; Deutsch, B.

    2008-01-01

    A survey within the French National Programme of Ecotoxicology was carried out in 2002, 2003 and 2004 to study the response of Nereis diversicolor populations (Polychaeta, Nereididae) to the impact of pollution in the Authie estuary (non-contaminated site) and in the Seine estuary (contaminated site). In the period studied, the density varied from 672 ind. m -2 to 3584 ind. m -2 in the Authie estuary and from 80 ind. m -2 to 920 ind. m -2 in the Seine estuary. Biomass varied from 3.94 g m -2 (dry weight) in February 2004 to 38.0 g m -2 in August 2003 in the Authie estuary and from 3.4 g m -2 in February 2002 to 0.6 g m -2 in February 2004 in the Seine estuary. Density and biomass of the populations of N. diversicolor were consistently lower in the Seine estuary than in the Authie estuary. Size frequency histograms permit the analysis of the cohorts as well as the elaboration of the growth curves. For the individuals from the Authie estuary, the relation between dry weight (DW) and length L3 (prostomium, peristomium and chaetiger 1) was DW = 4.2205 L3 2.9832. For those from the Seine estuary, the relation between dry weight and L3 was DW = 0.4697e 1.7209L3. The individuals of N. diversicolor should belong to eight cohorts in Authie estuary (two cohorts each year) instead of six cohorts for those from the Seine estuary. These differences can be attributed to the effect of pollution on the population of N. diversicolor.

  17. Meiobenthic gradients with special reference to Plathelminthes and Polychaeta in an estuarine salt marsh creek—a small-scale model for boreal tidal coasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig-Armonies, Monika; Armonies, Werner

    1987-06-01

    Environmental conditions in salt marsh creeks are intermediate between the open tidal coast and estuaries. A large salt marsh creek at the island of Sylt (North Sea) was studied in order to test whether its fauna is more similar to that of the open tidal coast or to that of estuaries. Because of a sandy bar at the seaward opening, the tidal range is only 10 cm in the creek, and the water level never drops below the level of the sand bar. Zoobenthos in the sandy bottom and on the sandy shores was studied at both ends and in the middle of the creek. Polychaeta and Plathelminthes were determined to species level. On an average, 2115 metazoans were found below 10 cm2 of surface area. At the seaward end of the creek, abundance and taxonomic composition are similar to that of the adjoining Wadden area. Nematoda are the dominant taxon, followed by Copepoda, Plathelminthes and Oligochaeta. Taxonomic composition is different at the landward end. Plathelminthes and Nematoda are most abundant followed by Copepoda. Both Oligochaeta and Polychaeta are scarce at these newly eroded sites. Plathelminth abundance at the landward end of the creek is exceptionally high (770 935·10 cm-2). Contrary to what is generally found in estuaries, the species density of Plathelminthes shows a significant increase toward the land. The species composition of Polychaeta and Plathelminthes indicates that the sites below mean high tide level of the creek correspond to the adjacent eulittoral Wadden area while the fauna of the supralittoral sites of the creek is similar to the fauna of supralittoral tidal coasts. Typical sublittoral species did not occur in the salt marsh creek. Thus, salt marsh creeks may be regarded as a small-scale model for the tidal coast. In context with the results obtained, the definition of estuaries is discussed.

  18. Six new species of the genus Armandia Filippi, 1861 (Polychaeta, Opheliidae) from Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia).

    PubMed

    Parapar, Julio; Moreira, Juan

    2015-01-01

    From the study of the material collected during the Polychaete Workshop held in Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) in August 2013, six species belonging to the genus Armandia (Polychaeta, Opheliidae) are newly described. Armandia bifida n. sp. is characterised by the bifid shape of the prechaetal lobe in CH1-CH3, A. dolio n. sp. by the barrel-shaped anal (=pygidial) tube (=funnel), A. filibranchia n. sp. by the extremely long and thin branchiae, A. laminosa n. sp. by the foliose shape and large size of the prechaetal lobe in CH1-CH3, A. paraintermedia n. sp. by the squared-shaped anal tube and size and shape of anal cirri, and A. tubulata n. sp. by the tubular shape of the anal tube. All species are fully described and illustrated, and compared with similar species. Several body characters of taxonomic relevance (e.g., anal tube and parapodia shape) are studied based on SEM micrographs. A key of the Armandia species hitherto described or reported in South-East Asia and Australasia is provided based on features of the anal tube. PMID:26624079

  19. Genetic population structure of polychaeta Neanthes glandicincta (Nereididae) of the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Neanthes glandicincta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) is the first numerically dominant benthic infauna in the Mai Po international Ramsar site, Hong Kong and also an economically important species for food source of birds and fishes. In present study, highly conserved nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU and LSU rDNA) and mitochondrial COI gene were employed to study the population structure of N. glandicincta in the subtropical mudflat. The specimens were collected from five localities in February 2006, February-August 2007 and preserved at -80 °C, methanol or formalin, respectively. DNA extraction efficiency was the highest in fresh materials and lowest in formalin-fixed samples. The 18S (1774 bp), 28S D1 (383 bp) and COI genes were sequenced and analyzed. Both 18S and 28S D1 rDNA were highly conserved and showed no difference among the populations, whereas COI gene exhibited relatively high-level intraspecific polymorphism (2.2 %). The population from onshore and near mangrove station was phylogenetic different from other sites, indicating restricted gene exchange between the region of river mouth and mangrove forest. The mangrove may form a barrier for the dispersal of pelagic/benthic larvae of the population, which indicates that the population genetic difference is related to different habitats. PMID:25967938

  20. Ellipsomyxa gobii (Myxozoa: Ceratomyxidae) in the common goby Pomatoschistus microps (Teleostei: Gobiidae) uses Nereis spp. (Annelida: Polychaeta) as invertebrate hosts.

    PubMed

    Køie, Marianne; Whipps, Christopher M; Kent, Michael L

    2004-03-01

    Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller and N. succinea Frey et Leuckart (Polychaeta, Nereidae) living in brackish shallow areas in Denmark are naturally infected with tetractinomyxon actinospores. Infected Nereis spp. were experimentally fed to various potential fish hosts, and the actinosporean stages developed into myxosporean stages of Ellipsomyxa gobii Køie, 2003 (Ceratomyxidae) in the gallbladder of the common goby Pomatoschistus microps (Krøyer) (Gobiidae). The European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.), three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus L., small sand eel Ammodytes tobianus L., flounder Platichthys flesus (L.), European plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. and common sole Solea solea (L.) did not become experimentally infected. In Danish shallow brackish areas P. microps is naturally infected with E. gobii, in some areas with a prevalence >90%. We compared small subunit ribosomal DNA sequences of the actinosporean with E. gobii from P. microps. Sequences were identical, which further verifies that both forms belong to the same organism. This is the first myxozoan two-host life cycle in the marine environment. PMID:15139372

  1. High diversity of frenulates (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae) in the Gulf of Cadiz mud volcanoes: A DNA taxonomy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilário, A.; Johnson, S. B.; Cunha, M. R.; Vrijenhoek, R. C.

    2010-01-01

    Frenulates are the most poorly known members of the family Siboglinidae (Polychaeta: Canalipalpata). These thread-like worms occur in reducing marine sediments worldwide, but they are often overlooked in benthic samples or too poorly preserved for adequate taxonomic evaluations. We report on a remarkable diversity of frenulates that were recently sampled from 13 mud volcanoes (350-3902 m deep) in the Gulf of Cadiz, off southern Iberia. Sampled with benthic coring devices, the bodies of these long tubiculous worms were often broken or incomplete, making them difficult to identify morphologically. Consequently, we employed DNA taxonomic methods to assess their diversity. Mitochondrial cytochrome- c-oxidase subunit 1 ( COI) sequences distinguished 15 evolutionary lineages inhabiting the Gulf of Cadiz. Only four of the lineages could be assigned to currently recognized Atlantic species; the remaining 11 may be new to science. This remarkable diversity of frenulates in a small geographical region is unprecedented and is hypothesized to result from environmental heterogeneity associated with the bathymetric and geochemical settings of these mud volcanoes.

  2. The Oweniidae (Annelida; Polychaeta) from Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) with the description of two new species of Owenia Delle Chiaje, 1844.

    PubMed

    Parapar, Julio; Moreira, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Study of the Oweniidae specimens (Annelida; Polychaeta) from Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) stored at the Australian Museum, Sydney and newly collected in August 2013 revealed the presence of three species, namely Galathowenia quelis Capa et al., 2012 and two new species belonging to the genus Owenia Delle Chiaje, 1844. Owenia dichotoma n. sp. is characterised by a very short branchial crown of about 1/3 of thoracic length which bears short, dichotomously-branched tentacles provided with the major division close to the base of the crown. Owenia picta n. sp. is characterised by a long branchial crown of about 4/5 of thoracic length provided with no major divisions, ventral pigmentation on thorax and the presence of deep ventro-lateral groove on the first thoracic chaetiger. A key of Owenia species hitherto described or reported in South East Asia and Australasia regions is provided based on characters of the branchial crown. PMID:26624080

  3. Polychaete composition from the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench with the description of a new species of Sphaerephesia (Polychaeta: Sphaerodoridae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alalykina, Inna L.

    2015-01-01

    During the KuramBio expedition, the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench was sampled in July-August 2012. More than 5200 individuals of Polychaeta belonging to 38 families, 108 genera and about 144 species were found. Six genera have been reported for the Northwest Pacific for the first time. About 50% of the collected polychaete species are considered as new to science. One of these, Sphaerephesia lesliae sp. n., is described herein. The detailed description of the new species is presented and its differences from similar species are shown. This eighth species of the genus is characterized by the presence of macrotubercles with two paired terminal papillae. The genus Sphaerephesia Fauchald, 1972 is newly recorded in the Northwest Pacific. An updated key to the species of the genus Sphaerephesia is provided.

  4. Sabellaria jeramae, a new species (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellariidae) from the shallow waters of Malaysia, with a note on the ecological traits of reefs.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Eijiroh; Matsuo, Kanako; Capa, Maria; Tomioka, Shinri; Kajihara, Hiroshi; Kupriyanova, Elena K; Polgar, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the genus Sabellaria Lamarck, 1818 (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellariidae) is described from the intertidal zone of Jeram, Selangor, Malaysia. Sabellaria jeramae n. sp. is a gregarious species that constructs large reefs several hundreds of meters long and 50-200 m wide. The new species is distinguished from other congeners by the character combination of the presence of a single kind of middle paleae with conspicuous morphology, and outer paleae with long frayed teeth. Morphological features of the species are described and compared to those of all congeneric species. We also compare the reef structure and geographical distribution of the new species to those of the members of the family Sabellariidae around the world, demonstrating the ecological traits of the reefs. PMID:26701452

  5. Metabolic rates, enzyme activities and chemical compositions of some deep-sea pelagic worms, particularly Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuesen, Erik V.; Childress, James J.

    1993-05-01

    Investigations of metabolic rate, enzyme activity and chemical composition were undertaken on two abundant deep-sea pelagic worms: Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta). Six other species of worms ( Pelagonemertes brinkmanni (Nemertea) and the following polychaetes: Pelagobia species A, Tomopteris nisseni, Tomopteris pacifica, Tomopteris species A, and Traviopsis lobifera) were captured in smaller numbers and used for comparison in the physiological and biochemical measurements. Polychaete worms had the highest oxygen consumption rates and, along with N. mirabilis, displayed significant size effects on metabolic rate. Poeobius meseres had the lowest rates of oxygen consumption and displayed no significant relationship of oxygen consumption rate to wet weight. No significant effect of size on the activities of citrate synthase, lactate dehydrogenase or pyruvate kinase was observed in P. meseres or N. mirabilis. Lipid content was higher than protein content for all the worms in this study. Carbohydrate was of little significance in these worms and was usually <0.01% of the total weight. Citrate synthase activities of pelagic worms showed excellent correlation with metabolic rates. It appears that polychaete worms as a group have higher metabolic rates than bathypelagic shrimps, copepods and fishes, and may be the animals with the highest metabolic rates in the bathypelagic regions of the world's oceans.

  6. Toxicity of fullerene and nanosilver nanomaterials against bacteria associated to the body surface of the estuarine worm Laeonereis acuta (Polychaeta, Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Lucas Freitas; Marques, Bianca Fell; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; López, Gerardo; Pagano, Gisela; Külkamp-Guerreiro, Irene Clemes; Monserrat, José Maria

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the growth and biochemical responses of six bacterial colonies isolated from the mucus of the estuarine polychaeta Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae) after exposure to a water suspension of fullerene (nC60) and nanosilver (nAg) separately (0.01; 0.10; and 1.00 mg/L) and together (0.01; 0.10; and 1.00 mg/L of nanosilver and 1.00 mg/L of fullerene added to each nAg concentration). Exposures were performed in darkness during 24 h and then samples were taken from the worms and inoculated on agar during 24 h to analyze colonies growth. After this the material was analyzed biochemically. Colonies growth (tested by wet biomass weight) was inhibited at 0.01 and 0.10 mg/L of nAg and 0.01 and 0.10 mg/L nAg + constant 1.00 mg/L of nC60 (p < 0.05). Lipid peroxidation damage was significant from the control for the concentrations of 0.01 and 0.10 mg/L of nC60 and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was significantly higher for the concentration of 1.00 mg/L mg/L nAg + constant 1.00 mg/L of nC60 (p < 0.05). Although nC60 did not induced growth inhibition, it triggered lipid peroxidation alone and increased GST activity together with nAg.60 Contrary to nC60, nanosilver inhibited bacterial growth, although the biochemical measurements indicate that this response is not due to reactive oxygen species generation. PMID:24984272

  7. Three new species of Dysponetus Levinsen, 1879 (Polychaeta: Chrysopetalidae) from the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean, with a re-description of Dysponetus bulbosus Hartmann-Schröder, 1982.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, Teresa; Brewin, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of Dysponetus (Polychaeta: Chrysopetalidae) are described from the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean: Dysponetus ovalisetosus n. sp. from the Falkland Islands, Dysponetus bricklei n. sp. from South Georgia and Dysponetus antarcticus n. sp. from Antarctica are all characterized by having notochaetae that are oval in cross-section in contrast to the D-shape described for seven of the other species of Dysponetus. Dysponetus antarcticus n. sp. is the most distinct due to the combination of both a ventral cirrus on segment 3 and four eyes. Formerly mis-identified as Dysponetus bulbosus Hartmann-Schröder, 1982, it was discovered while clarifying the contradictory descriptions of that species published by Hartmann-Schröder in 1982 and 1986. Dysponetus bulbosus is re-described and newly figured. Dysponetus bricklei n. sp. and Dysponetus ovalisetosus n. sp. can be determined by comparing several characters including position of the median antenna, shape of the palps and cirri, and the number and shape of both the noto- and neurochaetae. PMID:26624671

  8. Revision of ilyphagus chamberlin, 1919 (polychaeta, flabelligeridae).

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2012-01-01

    Ilyphagus Chamberlin, 1919 includes abyssal, fragile benthic species. Most species have large cephalic cages but chaetae are brittle and easily lost which may explain why the original definition included species with a cephalic cage or without it. The type species, Ilyphagus bythincola Chamberlin, 1919, together with another species (Ilyphagus pluto Chamberlin, 1919) were described as lacking a cephalic cage whereas a third species (Ilyphagus ascendens Chamberlin, 1919) was described with one. To clarify this situation, all available type and non-type materials were studied. Ilyphagus is redefined to include species with digitiform bodies, abundant filiform papillae and a thin body wall; their neurochaetae are thick, anchylosed aristate spines, and all species have a cephalic cage (in the type species the presence of a cage is inferred from the remaining chaetal scars). Ilyphagus pluto, which also lacks a a cephalic cage is determined here to be a holothurian. The redefined genus contains Ilyphagus bythincola (incl. Ilyphagus ascendens), Ilyphagus coronatus Monro, 1939, Ilyphagus hirsutus Monro, 1937, and Ilyphagus wyvillei (McIntosh, 1885). PMID:22639528

  9. Revision of Pherusa Oken, 1807(Polychaeta: Flabelligeridae).

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2014-01-01

    Pherusa Oken, 1807 was the first genus of flabelligerids to be described and was regarded as having over 40 species. Following revision of all available material two morphological patterns are recognized: Pherusa is restricted to those species with eight branchial filaments of similar width, and anchylosed falcate neurohooks, shorter than body width. Species with the same number of branchial filaments but with neurochaetae mostly straight, distally foliose and often as long as body width are transferred to a new genus: Lamispina n. gen. Pherusa contains 14 species, including six newly described: P. plumosa (Müller, 1776), type-species, restricted, from Greenland, P. affinis (Leidy, 1855) from the NW Atlantic, P. andersonorum n. sp. from the NE Pacific (California), P. aspera (Stimpson, 1854) from the NW Atlantic, P. hobsonae n. sp. from the NE Pacific (Washington), P. incrustata Quatrefages, 1866, reinstated from the Mediterranean Sea, P. mikacae n. sp. from the Adriatic Sea, P. moorei n. sp. from the NW Pacific (Japan), P. neopapillata Hartman, 1961 from the NE Pacific (California), P. nipponica n. sp. from the NW Pacific (Japan), P. obscura Quatrefages, 1866 reinstated from the NE Atlantic (France), P. papillata (Johnson, 1901) from the NE Pacific (Washington), P. rullieri n. sp. from the Eastern tropical Atlantic (Benin), and Pherusa sibogae (Caullery, 1944) n. comb. from Western Timor, Indonesia. Lamispina n. gen. has 10 species with five newly described: L. schmidtii (Annenkova-Chlopina, 1924) n. comb., type-species from the Japan Sea (incl. P. negligens (Berkeley & Berkeley, 1950)), L. amoureuxi n. sp. from the NE Atlantic (off SW Ireland), L. carrerai n. sp. from the NE Pacific (Mexico), L. chilensis n. sp. from the SE Pacific (Chile), L. falcata (Støp-Bowitz, 1948) n. comb. from the Norwegian Sea, L. gymnopapillata (Hartmann-Schröder, 1965) n. comb. from the SE Pacific (Chile), L. horsti (Haswell, 1892) n. comb. from Southern Australia, L. keeli n. sp. from the Gulf of Mexico (Florida), L. kerguelarum (Grube, 1877) n. comb. from the Southern Indian Ocean (Kerguelen Islands), and L. milligani n. sp. from the NW Atlantic (Florida). Keys to identify these two genera and all species in each genus are also included.  PMID:25543843

  10. Studies on Ophryotrocha geryonicola (Polychaeta: Dorvilleidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfannenstiel, H.-D.; Grothe, C.; Kegel, B.

    1982-03-01

    Ophryotrocha geryonicola was first described by Esmark (1874) as Eteonopsis geryonicola. Bidenkap (1895) gave another short description. The species was redescribed by Wesenberg-Lund (1938) as Ophryotrocha geryonicola. Desportes et al. (1977) reported O. geryonicola from the western Mediterranean Sea. Recently, Gaston & Benner (1981) gave another redescription and recorded a new host for the most likely symbiotic species. These authors reestablished the original genus Eteonopsis mainly because the species is epizoic and not free-living like other Ophryotrocha species. Since all descriptions, given so far, were obviously based on preserved material a more detailed description of live specimens is provided. The size of the specimens (140 mm recorded by Wesenberg-Lund, 1938), the branched intestine and their epizoic mode of living clearly demonstrate that these animals belong to a species separated from the other known Ophryotrocha species. On the other hand, O. geryonicola shows all the main characters of the genus Ophryotrocha. Therefore it seems justifiable to leave this species within the genus Ophryotrocha.

  11. Genetic Structure of PILEOLARIA PSEUDOMILITARIS (Polychaeta: Spirorbidae)

    PubMed Central

    Beckwitt, Richard

    1980-01-01

    The genetic structure of Pileolaria pseudomilitaris was studied by means of gene-diversity analysis of allozyme frequencies. At an esterase locus, most of the gene diversity was due to subdivision of the population into colonies and subpopulations separated by less than 100 meters. Gene frequencies at a phosphoglucose isomerase locus were similar over many kilometers, but differed between two habitat types. Differences between colonies are attributed to drift and founder effect; similarities over greater distances are attributed to similar selection pressures. A mathematical appendix details the method of gene diversity analysis for a multi-leveled, hierarchically subdivided population. PMID:7262543

  12. Spermatogenesis in Platynereis massiliensis (Polychaeta: Nereidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücht, Joachim; Pfannenstiel, Hans-Dieter

    1989-03-01

    Stage 1 of spermatogenesis in the protandrous polychaete Platynereis massiliensis is represented by clusters of about 60 spermatogonia which appear in the coelomic cavity. There are no testes in P. massiliensis. The origin of the spermatogonial clusters is not known. Subclusters of approximately 20 primary spermatocytes each represent stage 2. The appearance of synaptonemal figures in the spermatocyte nuclei marks the beginning of stage 3. Cells tend to lose their tight packing during stage 3 but interdigitate with cellular processes. Then very small subclusters of 4 to 8 spermatocytes appear. Meiosis is completed during stage 4, giving rise to secondary spermatocytes and then to spermatid tetrads. Spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes are interconnected by structurally specialized fusomes while secondary spermatocytes and spermatids, which are also in cytoplasmic continuity, show rather simple cell bridges. Synthesis of acrosomal material starts during stage 2. During spermiogenesis the proacrosomal vesicles of Golgi origin travel from the posterior part of the cell to its anterior part to form the acrosome proper. Acrosome formation, nuclear condensation, shaping of the long and slender sperm nucleus, and development of the sperm tail are the main events during spermiogenesis. Sperm morphology is briefly discussed wity respect to its phylogenetic bearings.

  13. Lepidasthenia loboi sp. n. from Puerto Madryn, Argentina (Polychaeta, Polynoidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I.; González, Norma Emilia; Salazar-Silva, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Among polychaetes, polynoids have the highest number of symbiotic species found living with a wide variety of marine invertebrates, including other polychaetes. Lepidasthenia Malmgren, 1867 and Lepidametria Webster, 1879 were regarded as synonyms but belong to different subfamilies, although both have species associated with thelepodid or terebellid polychaetes. In this contribution Lepidasthenia loboi sp. n. is described from several specimens associated with the thelepodid Thelepus antarcticus Kinberg, 1867, collected on a rocky shore near Puerto Madryn, Argentina. Lepidasthenia loboi sp. n. can be confused with Lepidasthenia esbelta Amaral & Nonato, 1982 because both live with Thelepus, are of similar sizes with similar pigmentation patterns, and have giant neurochaetae. However, in Lepidasthenia loboi sp. n. all eyes are of the same size, cephalic and parapodial cirri are tapered and mucronate, the second pair of elytra is larger than the third, the ventral cirri arise at the base of parapodia such that they do not reach chaetal lobe tips, and neuraciculae are tapered. On the contrary, in Lepidasthenia esbelta the posterior eyes are larger than anterior ones, cephalic and parapodial appendages are swollen subdistally, the second and third pairs of elytra are of the same size, the ventral cirri arise medially such that their tips reach the neurochaetal lobe tips, and the neuraciculae have falcate tips. Some comments about other genera in the Lepidastheniinae, a simplified key to its genera, and a key to Lepidasthenia species with giant neurochaetae are also included. PMID:26798303

  14. Syllidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Caribbean coast of Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Liñero-Arana, Ildefonso; Díaz Díaz, Oscarn

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Venezuela possesses a great variety of coastal environments allowing for a high diversity of marine species. However, systematic studies on marine invertebrates are scarce, especially on polychaetes. The family Syllidae is poorly known, and only 14 genera and 42 species have been reported from this country. A total of 13 genera and 26 species the Syllidae were identified from benthic samples collected on different substrata of the northeastern coast of Venezuela. Of these, seven genera and 16 species constitute new records for Venezuela: Odontosyllis guillermoi, Syllides floridanus, Salvatoria clavata, Salvatoria limbata, Sphaerosyllis longicauda, Parapionosyllis longicirrata, Trypanosyllis parvidentata, Trypanosyllis vittigera, Opisthosyllis sp., Syllis amica, Syllis armillaris, Syllis gracilis, Syllis pseudoarmillaris, Syllis vittata, Parasphaerosyllis indica and Myrianida convoluta. PMID:21998503

  15. Zur Struktur der Solenocyten (Cyrtocyten) von Anaitides mucosa (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, K.

    1981-12-01

    Based on electron microscopic observations, the structure of the solenocytes of A. mucosa is described. The tube of the solenocyte is made up of 14 15 rods. These rods, which are filled with regularly packed filaments, are interconnected by an amorphous to filamentous substance. A single flagellum, lying in the tube, is surrounded by a sheet of amorphous material. The functional organization of the solenocytes is discussed.

  16. New records to Chile of the Family Paraonidae (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Américo; Hilbig, Brigitte; Rozbaczylo, Nicolás

    2002-06-01

    The Paraonidae are a polychaete family of small body size which have not been reported for Chile until recently. Mainly due to improved sample-processing methods, research campaigns carried out in 1994 and 1996 on three areas off southern Chile have yielded numerous records. Several species proved to be new to the Chilean polychaete fauna, including species that have been known previously only from Antarctic areas. These new records and range extensions are reported in this paper.

  17. CHROMOSOME COMPLEMENT OF THE MARINE WORM 'NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA' (POLYCHAETA: ANNELIDA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromosome complement for the marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata, consists of nine pairs; one pair has a median centromere, seven pairs have submedian centromeres, and one pair is polymorphic with either a subterminal or terminal centromere. A technique for studying polych...

  18. Three new polar species of Sternaspis Otto, 1821 (Polychaeta: Sternaspidae).

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2014-01-01

    Two sternaspid species, Sternaspis fossor Stimpson, 1853 and S. scutata (Ranzani, 1817), have been recorded from many localities including polar or subpolar environments. The study of the collections of five major institutions cannot confirm their presence in high latitudes. On the contrary, the specimens are regarded as different, undescribed species, and are herein described as one from Arctic environments, S. buzhinskajae n. sp., and two others from Antarctic localities: S. monroi n. sp., and S. sendalli n. sp. A key to identify all Sternaspis species is included.  PMID:25283413

  19. Untersuchungen zur Regeneration des Hinterendes bei Anaitides mucosa (Polychaeta, Phyllodocidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrkasten, A.

    1983-06-01

    Caudal regeneration was investigated in decerebrate Anaitides mucosa and in brain-intact individuals. Both groups show an identical capacity to regenerate lost caudal segments. Furthermore there is no difference in males and females. Low temperature (5 °C) inhibits the regeneration of caudal segments, but it is necessary for normal oogenesis. Under conditions of high temperature (15 °C), caudal regeneration is very extensive. At the same time degeneration of most oocytes occurs.

  20. Oxydromus Grube, 1855 reinstated over Ophiodromus Sars, 1862 (Polychaeta, Hesionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Guerrero, Tulio F.; Harris, Leslie H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The hesionid polychaete genera Oxydromus Grube, 1855 and Ophiodromus Sars, 1862 have been regarded as synonyms with the former considered as invalid since it was thought to be a junior homonym of Oxydromus Schlegel, 1854. However, Schlegel’s name is an incorrect subsequent spelling for Ocydromus Wagler, 1830 (Aves, Gruiformes, Rallidae) and is not an available name. Consequently, Oxydromus Grube, 1855 must be reinstated for this hesionid polychaete genus. A check-list of valid species of Oxydromus including 30 new combinations is provided. PMID:23372411

  1. Glyceriformia Fauchald, 1977 (Annelida: "Polychaeta") from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Böggemann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Eight species of Glyceridae (Glycera brevicirris, Glycera cf. lapidum, Glycera onomichiensis, Glycera sagittariae, Glycera tesselata, Glycera tridactyla, Glycerella magellanica, Hemipodia cf. simplex) and six species of Goniadidae (Goniada antipoda, Goniada cf. brunnea, Goniada echinulata, Goniada emerita, Goniada grahami, Goniada paucidens) have been collected during several expeditions to the vicinity of Lizard Island (Australia, Queensland). An identification key to the Glyceriformia that inhabit the region is presented. Detailed and illustrated morphological descriptions are given for all investigated species. PMID:26624067

  2. New and previously known species of Oenonidae (Polychaeta: Annelida) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Zanol, Joana; Ruta, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The family Oenonidae consists of Eunicida species with prionognath jaws. Its Australian fauna had been reported to comprise six species belonging to Arabella, Drilonereis, and Oenone. This study provides descriptions for four new species, redescriptions for three species (two previously recorded and a new record, Drilonereis cf. logani) and diagnoses for the genera recorded from Australia. Currently, eleven species of oenonids, distributed in three genera, are known for the Australian coast. On Lizard Island, this family shows low abundance (19 specimens collected) and high richness (seven species). Our results suggest that despite the increasing accumulation of information, the biodiversity of the family is still poorly estimated. PMID:26624086

  3. Diversity and distributional patterns of Polychaeta in the deep South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, Dieter; Ramey, Patricia A.; Ebbe, Brigitte

    2010-10-01

    This study provides new information about the composition, diversity and zoogeography of abyssal polychaetes in the little-studied South Eastern Atlantic (Angola Basin). During the austral winter of 2000, twenty-five box core samples (total area sampled 6 m 2) were taken along a 500-km transect in five work areas at depths exceeding 5000 m. A total of 1047 individuals representing 86 species belonging to 32 families was collected. Well over half the polychaetes (58 species; 67%) appear to be new to science, with the highest number of new species among the Cirratulidae, Paraonidae, Phyllodocidae, Ampharetidae, Opheliidae, and Spionidae. Eight of these new species were among the 16 dominant species in the deep Angola Basin whereas, 32 species (37%) were considered to be rare with only 1-2 individuals collected. Species accumulation curves did not level off at a fixed number of species, indicating that diversity would increase with additional sampling. Polychaete community assemblages among box core samples were highly variable. Ten of the known species are biogeographically widespread outside the Angola Basin whereas five appear to be restricted to the deep Atlantic. Two species have only been recorded in the Southern Ocean, and one in the southern hemisphere. Twenty (35%) of the species considered to be new to science were also found in samples from the deep Southern Ocean, whereas eight of the known species found in the Angola Basin have not been reported from the Southern Ocean to date. Surface deposit feeders and carnivores were the dominant functional groups both in terms of number of individuals and number of species. Necessary steps to further our knowledge of the little-known abyssal ecosystem are discussed.

  4. Gas transfer system in Alvinella pompejana (Annelida polychaeta, Terebellida): functional properties of intracellular and extracellular hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Hourdez, S; Lallier, F H; De Cian, M C; Green, B N; Weber, R E; Toulmond, A

    2000-01-01

    Alvinella pompejana is a tubicolous polychaete that dwells in the hottest part of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem in a highly variable mixture of vent (350 degrees C, anoxic, CO(2)- and sulfide-rich) and deep-sea (2 degrees C, mildly hypoxic) waters. This species has developed distinct-and specifically respiratory-adaptations to this challenging environment. An internal gas exchange system has recently been described, along with the report of an intracellular coelomic hemoglobin, in addition to the previously known extracellular vascular hemoglobin. This article reports the structure of coelomic hemoglobin and the functional properties of both hemoglobins in order to assess possible oxygen transfer. Coelomocytes contain a unique monomeric hemoglobin with a molecular weight of 14,810+/-1.5 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry. The functional properties of both hemoglobins are unexpectedly very similar under the same conditions of pH (6.1-8.2) and temperature (10 degrees -40 degrees C). The oxygen affinity of both proteins is relatively high (P50=0.66 Torr at 20 degrees C and pH 7), which facilitates oxygen uptake from the hypoxic environment. A strong Bohr effect (Phi ranging from -0.8 to -1.0) allows the release of oxygen to acidic tissues. Such similar properties imply a possible bidirectional transfer of oxygen between the two hemoglobins in the perioesophagal pouch, a mechanism that could moderate environmental variations of oxygen concentration and maintain brain oxygenation. PMID:10893176

  5. Representative benthic bioindicator organisms for use in radiation effects research: Culture of Neanthes arenaceodentata (Polychaeta)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Knezovich, J.P.; Martinelli, R.E. )

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a comprehensive synthesis of information pertaining to the selection and maintenance of bioindicator organisms for use in radiation-effects research. The focus of this report is on the benthic polychaete, Neanthes arenaceodentata, a species that has been used successfully at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and other institutions to define the impacts of radiation and chemical toxicants on aquatic organisms. In this document, the authors provide a rationale for the selection of this organism, a description of its reproductive biology, and a description of the conditions that are required for the maintenance and rearing of the organism for use in toxicological research.

  6. Temporal variation and lack of host specificity among bacterial endosymbionts of Osedax bone worms (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osedax worms use a proliferative root system to extract nutrients from the bones of sunken vertebrate carcasses. The roots contain bacterial endosymbionts that contribute to the nutrition of these mouthless and gutless worms. The worms acquire these essential endosymbionts locally from the environment in which their larvae settle. Here we report on the temporal dynamics of endosymbiont diversity hosted by nine Osedax species sampled during a three-year investigation of an experimental whale fall at 1820-m depth in the Monterey Bay, California. The host species were identified by their unique mitochondrial COI haplotypes. The endosymbionts were identified by ribotyping with PCR primers specifically designed to target Oceanospirillales. Results Thirty-two endosymbiont ribotypes associated with these worms clustered into two distinct bacterial ribospecies that together comprise a monophyletic group, mostly restricted to deep waters (>1000 m). Statistical analyses confirmed significant changes in the relative abundances of host species and the two dominant endosymbiont ribospecies during the three-year sampling period. Bone type (whale vs. cow) also had a significant effect on host species, but not on the two dominant symbiont ribospecies. No statistically significant association existed between the host species and endosymbiont ribospecies. Conclusions Standard PCR and direct sequencing proved to be an efficient method for ribotyping the numerically dominant endosymbiont strains infecting a large sample of host individuals; however, this method did not adequately represent the frequency of mixed infections, which appears to be the rule rather than an exception for Osedax individuals. Through cloning and the use of experimental dilution series, we determined that minority ribotypes constituting less than 30% of a mixture would not likely be detected, leading to underestimates of the frequency of multiple infections in host individuals. PMID:23006795

  7. Life history and seasonal breeding of the deep-sea annelid Ophryotrocha sp. (Polychaeta: Dorvelleidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Annie; Baillon, Sandrine; Hamel, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    Shallow-water annelids of the genus Ophryotrocha have become a popular biological system for exploring ecological, behavioral, developmental, and toxicological questions. Here we report on the successful maintenance in holding tanks, complete life cycle, and reproductive phenology of a first deep-water representative that could be used as a model species. This Ophryotrocha, which has yet to be formally described, is large (12-16 mm long) and exhibits simultaneous hermaphroditism. Specimens collected off northeast Newfoundland (eastern Canada) between 500 and 1500 m depth were monitored under flow-through laboratory conditions for over three years. They consistently exhibited seasonal feeding from April to February, followed by a reproductive season between February and May. Gametogenesis was initiated in early January and completed in early to mid-February, followed by courtship, which mainly involved pairs of individuals attached head to tail for hours to days. Transparent gelatinous masses containing 80-110 eggs were laid from mid-February to late-March. Propagules developed in the mass to the 1-chaetiger stage and, at an ambient temperature of ~1-4 °C, offspring emerged 30-45 days post-laying. Only ~40-45% of the eggs laid developed to the 1-chaetiger stage, with evidence of adelphophagy. After emerging from the gelatinous mass, 1-chaetiger stages remained aggregated and were guarded by adults for a few days before dispersing. All parents died following the dispersal of their offspring. The new generation reached sexual maturity in 8-9 months and was ready to reproduce the following January-February. A few cases of segmenting adult worms were also observed. Three complete generations developed successively to sexual maturity over the course of this study.

  8. EFFECT OF DIET ON COPPER TOXICITY TO 'NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA' (ANNELIDA: POLYCHAETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of Neanthes arenaceodentata were fed different diets for four weeks prior to exposure to copper in seawater to see if nutritional history would affect toxicity. Diets used were: a combination of cultured fresh Ectocarpus siliculosis and Tetra Marin, rehydrated field-collec...

  9. 'NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA' (POLYCHAETA: ANNELIDA), A PROPOSED CYTOGENETIC MODEL FOR MARINE GENETIC TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic toxicants are present in polluted marine environments and may represent a long-term threat to populations of marine organisms. This paper presents details of an in vivo application of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis to a marine polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceode...

  10. Four new species of Polycirrus Grube, 1850 (Polychaeta: Terebellidae) from Campos Basin, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carrerette, Orlemir; Nogueira, João Miguel De Matos

    2013-01-01

    Four new species of Polycirrus were collected at the Campos Basin, state of Rio de Janeiro, during a survey coordinated by CENPES/PETROBRAS under the scope of the project, "Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin". These species are P. nonatoi sp. nov., P. papillosus sp. nov., P. breviuncinatus sp. nov., and P. habitats sp. nov. All these species are herein described and compared with the morphologically most similar congeners. In addition, a key is provided for the identification of the species of Polycirrus which have been originally described for the Brazilian coast. PMID:26176130

  11. Laboratory studies on larval growth of Polydora ligni, Polydora ciliata, and Pygospio elegans (Polychaeta, Spionidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, K.; Anger, V.; Hagmeier, E.

    1986-12-01

    The spionid polychaete species Polydora ligni, P. ciliata, and Pygospio elegans were cultivated in the laboratory over several successive generations. A flow-through cultivation system for Polydora spp. is described. Duration of life cycles (time from hatching of the larva to first reproduction) and life spans (hatching to death) of these species were not significantly influenced by the degree of inbreeding nor by individual age of the parents. Minimum time from metamorphosis (15-setiger stage) to first hatching of offspring larvae (in the 3-setiger stage) at 18°C was 33 days in Polydora spp. and 81 days in Pygospio elegans. Larval growth patterns are described in terms of number of setigers, body length, and biomass (dry weight, carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen), in relation to time after hatching. Regression models are proposed which link these measures of larval growth and, thus, may be used for conversions. Rates of development and growth show a high degree of variability in all three species, not only caused by variation in environmental factors such as temperature or food, but also among and within single hatches of larvae reared under identical conditions. Larvae were reared at constant temperatures (6°, 12°, and 18°C). Temperature affected larval growth in Polydora ligni more than in P. ciliata, and least of all in Pygospio elegans. Only the latter species was able to develop at 6°C from hatching to metamorphosis. This differential response may be explained by differences in the natural spawning season of these species. Eleven phytoplankton species were tested as to their food values. A “relative index of growth” is proposed which compares the slopes of two growth curves (one standard and one test condition). The flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta was used as a standard food in these experiments. Most algal species were less suitable, and only the diatom Thalassiosira rotula was consistently better food for spionid larvae than D. tertiolecta.

  12. Serpula and Spiraserpula (Polychaeta, Serpulidae) from the Tropical Western Atlantic and Gulf of Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Zavala, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Six species of Serpula and Spiraserpula were identified, mainly, from the material of the expeditions of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, including two new species of Serpula. Serpula madrigalae sp. n. from the Turks and Caicos has a tube with five longitudinal ridges, four rows of alveoli and a medium-sized shallow symmetrical opercular funnel with 17 radii, and an inner surface with opercular tubercles. Serpula vossae sp. n. from the Western Caribbean and Bahamas has a tube with 6–8 longitudinal ridges, and a large, deep symmetrical opercular funnel, with 21–33 radii, and a smooth inner surface. Serpula cf. vermicularis, recorded from the Gulf of Guinea (tropical eastern Atlantic), is distinguished from the nominal species in possessing fewer opercular radii (33–39) and the lack of a proximal rasp in the bayonet chaetae; tubes are missing. The distribution range is extended for the three known Spiraserpula species found in the collections, Spiraserpula caribensis, Spiraserpula karpatensis and Spiraserpula ypsilon. PMID:22707904

  13. The Multitentaculate Cirratulidae of the Genera Cirriformia and Timarete (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Shallow Waters of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Wagner F.; Seixas, Victor Corrêa; Paiva, Paulo Cesar; Elias, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    A large number multitentaculate cirratulids have been described worldwide but most are only known through the original descriptions. Type material, voucher and recently collected specimens from Brazil were revisited in order to reveal their true identity and confirm the records of widely distributed species in this region. Six species are described, three of which are new, Cirriformia capixabensis sp. nov., Cirriformia chicoi sp. nov. and Timarete ceciliae sp. nov. COI and 16S sequences were obtained and used for inter-specific comparisons. Timarete caribous is reported from several localities along the Brazilian coast and a new synonym, Cirratulus melanacanthus, is proposed. The species Timarete oculata, originally described from Brazil and lumped into the Timarete filigera species complex, is herein revalidated and redescribed. The occurrence of the species Timarete filigera and Cirriformia tentaculata is not confirmed from the Brazilian coast. Descriptions, illustrations and a key to genera and species are provided. PMID:25393759

  14. Diel variation in metabolism and ammonia excretion of Marphysa sanguinea (Polychaeta: Eunicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dazuo; Chen, Fudi; Zhou, Yibing; Xiu, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Polychaetes provide an excellent food resource for fish and represent the dominant zoobenthos in marine ecosystems. Diel variation in the rates of metabolism and ammonia-N excretion of Marphysa sanguinea were studied. The worms were grouped according to their wet body weight into small (S; 1.24±0.06 g), medium (M; 4.00±0.30 g), and large (L; 8.54±1.08 g) categories. Their weight-specific metabolic rates, based on aerobic respiration (R), were measured at 16°C (±0.2°C) and classed as either routine (R R) or standard (R S) rates. Both respiration types decreased with increasing body weight. Respiration was described by R = a W b, where b was -0.400 9 and -0.532 0 for R R and R S, respectively. Diurnal changes in R S for each group was relatively flat, with a slightly increasing trend with time, but was relatively stable as a whole. R R of the diurnal variation of worms was higher than R S, but both had similar overall trends. The peak values of specific dynamic action (SDA) (R SDA) in the S, M, and L groups were 2.704, 1.149, and 0.682 mg/(g•h), respectively. The durations of SDA were 13, 6, and 6 h, respectively and the energy expenditures of SDA were 377.98, 117.34, and 74.94 J/g, respectively. These data indicate that the metabolic rates were higher in smaller individuals, which is advantageous for their rapid growth.

  15. Global distributional patterns of selected deep-sea Polychaeta (Annelida) from the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, Myriam; Ebbe, Brigitte

    2007-08-01

    Global distribution of selected polychaetes found in epibenthic sledge samples from the expeditions ANDEEP I-III was studied with regard to family-specific patterns. The families represent different feeding types and reproductive biology: Ampharetidae and Terebellidae are tube builders that feed on the sediment surface with their tentacles, Opheliidae and Scalibregmatidae are burrowers feeding below the surface (subsurface deposit feeders), and Syllidae and Sphaerodoridae are motile and omnivorous. Particularly, the Syllidae are known for their plasticity in reproductive features. Family-specific patterns in global distribution could be clearly seen. Ecological and evolutionary explanations for these differences are explored.

  16. Preliminary study on pisionids (Annelida: Polychaeta Pisionidae) from Hainan Island coastal waters, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bao-Ling; Ding, Zhi-Hu; Huang, Feng-Peng

    1998-06-01

    Of the four species of Pisione Grube (1856) collected from the coastal waters of Hainan Island, the South China Sea, and described in this paper, Pisione hainanensis n. sp. is new to science; Pisione oerstedii Grube, 1857; Pisione complexa Alikunhi, 1947, and Pisione levisetosa Zhao, Westheide & Wu, 1991 are reported for the first time from this area.

  17. A new species and new recorded species of Lumbrineridae Schmarda, 1861 (Annelida: Polychaeta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenqian; Li, Xinzheng

    2011-03-01

    Based on material deposited in the Marine Biological Museum of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Qingdao), a new species, Lumbrineris sinensis sp. nov, as well as Augeneria albidentata (Ehlers, 1908), which is recorded for the first time from coastal water of China, are reported in the present paper. The specimens examined were collected during 1958 to 1960 from the Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea at depths of 4 to 182 m.

  18. An ultrastructural study of spermatogenesis and sperm morula breakdown in Arenicola marina (L.) (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacey, A. A.; Bentley, M. G.

    1992-06-01

    Spermatogenesis in the lugworm Arenicola marina, in common with other members of Arenicolidae, occurs in the coelomic fluid and results in the formation of discs of mature spermatozoa known as a morulae. Within a morula, individual spermatozoa are connected by a common mass of cytoplasm called the cytophore and therefore make up a syncitium. Immediately prior to spawning, and in response to an endocrine substance known as “Sperm Maturation Factor” (SMF), the structure of the sperm morulae breaks down and free spermatozoa are liberated. These are subsequently spawned from the body cavity. The investigation described here uses transmission electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructural changes, which accompany spermatogenesis and the breakdown of sperm morulae in response to SMF in vitro. The study demonstrates that the cytophore appears to have a key role both during spermatogenesis and during sperm morula breakdown. The ultrastructure of sperm morulae and of mature spermatozoa is described. The structure of spermatozoa is shown to be primitive with a single flagellum which appears to be coiled at its distal end. The phagocytosis of free spermatozoa by coelomocytes is also described and it is suggested that these may play a role in the resorption of unspawned gametes in vivo.

  19. Ultrastructural observations on feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, V.; Gaill, F.

    1986-09-01

    The feeding appendages of Alvinella pompejana obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment are described. They are characterized by a ciliated groove, the cells of which have a very distinctive ultrastructure, by groups of bipolar receptor cells and by several kinds of gland cells. Among these, one cell type is in an upside down position suggesting a function completely different from other epidermal secretory cells. The gills differ considerably from the feeding appendages on the basis of their ultrastructure. Their epidermis is very irregular in height; basal infoldings give the blood access to a space coming very near to the external medium. The blood vascular system is open. On the other hand, the gills of Amphicteis gunneri are not effective sites of gas exchange, since their columnar epithelium is underlain with muscle cells. The cells composing the feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana are characterized by ultrastructurally very different mitochondria.

  20. A new species of Laonice (Spionidae, Polychaeta, Annelida) from Bellingshausen Sea (West Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    During the Antarctic summers of 2002-2003 and of 2005-2006, the Spanish BENTART cruises were conducted to the Bellingshausen Sea (Western Antarctica), aiming to study its benthic communities, from depths ranging from 100 to 2,000 m. To achieve it, 30 stations were selected; each one was surveyed in such a way that the infaunal, epifaunal and suprabenthic components of the communities were sufficiently characterized. As a part of the study, some spionid individuals were identified as belonging to a new species of the genus Laonice Malmgren, 1867. The new species belongs to a group within the genus that is characterized by the presence of more than two rows of very numerous capillary chaetae in both noto- and neuropodial fascicles of anterior part of the body. However, it can be readily distinguished from the rest of species within the group by the posterior position in which neuropodial pouches appear (chaetiger 16 or 17) and by the caruncle reaching posteriorly chaetiger 19. In addition, other remarkable features of the new species are the short and triangular occipital tentacle, the rudimentary eyes, the hooded neuropodial hooks first appearing in chaetigers 34-37 and the sabre neurochaetae first occurring in chaetigers 20-27.

  1. The uptake and distribution of copper in the lugworm, Arenicola marina (annelida, polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaarts, J. M.

    The uptake and distribution of copper in the polychaetous worm Arenicola marina (L.) have been studied both under experimental conditions and in a natural environmental situation, by analyzing the whole body and three body-compartments; body-wall, intestine and blood. No relationship between the copper concentrations in various fractions of the sediment and any of the body-compartments could be found. Under experimental conditions, the copper concentrations in the blood were higher than in the intestine and the body-wall. Uptake of dissolved copper occurred directly from the water. Copper uptake also occurs via sediment at high copper concentrations of the silt fraction of the habitat sediment. The data obtained from the field showed small differences in copper concentrations between blood, intestine and body-wall. The copper concentrations in the blood varied from 1 to 4 μ·cm -3, in the inetestine from 2 to 6μg·g -1, and in the body-wall from 1 to 3 μg·g -1 wet weight. A significant correlation existed between blood cooper concentration and body weight: small (young) individuals had higher copper concentrations in their blood than larger (older) ones. This means that young animals will encounter more stress at similar environmental copper levels than older animals. The concentration in the different body-compartments appears to be dependent on the season the samples were taken. The copper concentration in the intestine and the body decreased from April to November, whereas the blood copper concentration increased.

  2. Elektronenmikroskopische Untersuchungen an Anaitides mucosa (Annelida, Polychaeta). Cuticula und Cilien, Schleimzellen und Schleimextrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, K.

    1982-03-01

    Two components, a basal cuticle and an epicuticle, make up the cuticle of A. mucosa. The basal cuticle consists of collagen fibrils, which are arranged in about 20 layers. The orientation of the fibrils changes rectangularly from one layer to the next. Fine filaments interweave the basal cuticle. The epicuticle, which is covered by a layer of electron dense material, is composed of irregularly arranged thin filaments. Branched microvilli of the epidermal cells penetrate the cuticle. Bacteria are found in the basal cuticle. Dorsally each segment has a band of densely packed smooth cilia. Laterally and partly ventrally aggregates of cilia are observed. These cilia exhibit apically artificial swellings. At least six different mucous cells are observed in the epidermis, morphologically distinguishable by the structure of the secretion products. Mucus is secreted via exocytosis through cuticular pores. During this process the mucus might expand. The secreted mucus consists of filamentous subunits.

  3. Nephtyidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from the Campos Basin, including two new species and a new record.

    PubMed

    Franco, Natália Bizzo; Rizzo, Alexandra E

    2016-01-01

    Members of the marine polychaete family Nephtyidae are commonly found in soft substrates. Their most distinctive characteristic is the presence of interramal branchiae located between the notopodia and neuropodia. In the present study, five species of Nephtyidae: Aglaophamus fabrun sp. nov., Aglaophamus juvenalis (Kinberg, 1866), Inermonephtys inermis (Ehlers, 1887), Inermonephtys soldius sp. nov. and Nephtys squamosa Ehlers, 1887 were found in the Campos Basin, state of Rio de Janeiro, including two new species and a new record for the Brazilian coast. Aglaophamus fabrun sp. nov. has a proboscis with 10 pairs of distal papillae and approximately 20 subdistal papillae in rows, with 3-5 papillae in each row; and lacks an unpaired median papilla; the prostomium has a pair of eyes and a characteristic pigmentation pattern. Inermonephtys soldius sp. nov. has interramal branchiae starting from parapodium 5, and basal papillae starting on chaetiger 6. Inermonephtys inermis is a new record for the Brazilian coast. Descriptions, comments and a key to species of Nephtyidae recorded from Brazil are provided. PMID:27395131

  4. The influence of cadmium on the antioxidant enzyme activities in polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis Grube (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiutang; Chen, Aihua; Zhou, Yibing; Liu, Haiying; Yang, Dazuo

    2010-07-01

    The infaunal polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis Grube, distributed widely along Asian coasts and estuaries, is considered a useful animal model in ecotoxicological tests and a promising candidate in biomonitoring programs. This paper deals with the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Px) in infaunal polychaete P. aibuhitensis exposed to a series of sublethal water-bound cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0, 0.34, 1.72, 3.44, 6.89, and 17.22 mg L-1) under a short-term exposure (1-8 d). The results indicate that the SOD and GSH-Px activities in P. aibuhitensis are stimulated first and then renewed to the original level. The CAT activity of worms decreases at an earlier exposure time but increases to the control values at a later exposure time. Our study suggests that Cd can interfere with the antioxidant defense system of P. aibuhitensis. However, the changes in antioxidant enzyme activities for this species do not show the best promise as biomarkers in Cd biomonitoring of estuarine and coastal zones because weak or non-dose-effect relationships between the antioxidant enzymes activities and Cd levels are found.

  5. Diversity of Polychaeta (Annelida) and other worm taxa in mangrove habitats of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, K. N.; Glasby, C. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper data on the diversity, distribution and abundance of polychaetes and other worm taxa in the mangroves of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia, are presented and compared with those of other tropical mangrove areas. Aspects of the feeding guild ecology and the effects of disturbance on mangrove worms are also examined. Data were collected over a period of four years, across four mangrove assemblages. Samples were obtained using three sampling techniques: 1 m × 1 m quadrat searches, epifauna searches and a new infaunal sampling technique, the anoxic mat. A total of 76 species (68 polychaetes, 1 oligochaete, 1 echiuran, 3 sipunculans, 2 nemerteans, 1 turbellarian) were recorded from the four main mangrove assemblages. Of these, 30 species are widespread, occurring in mangrove and non-mangrove habitats throughout the Indo-west Pacific. Only seven species (all polychaetes) appear to be restricted to the mangroves of Darwin Harbour and northern Australia. Polychaetes are predominant, comprising 80-96% of all worms sampled, with three families—Nereididae, Capitellidae and Spionidae—accounting for 46% of all species. The highest diversity and abundance was recorded in the soft, unconsolidated substrates of the seaward assemblage, with diversity and abundance decreasing progressively in the landward assemblages. Most of the worm fauna was infaunal (70%), but the intensive sampling regime revealed a hitherto unknown significant percentage of epifaunal species (18%) and species occurring as both infauna and epifauna (12%). Univariate analyses showed annual and seasonal differences in worm species richness and abundance—presumably associated with the intensity of the monsoon and recruitment success. The worm fauna differed between mangrove assemblages but the proportion of species in each feeding guild was relatively consistent across the four assemblages studied. Herbivores were the most species-rich and abundant, followed by carnivores and sub-surface deposit feeders. Multivariate analyses showed that the species composition of urbanised mangroves differed from that of undisturbed sites, with surface deposit feeders more numerous in urbanised habitats. Overall, the findings demonstrate a dynamic spatial and temporal variation in diversity and abundance, and provide insight on the range of microhabitats in which mangrove worms occur and their response to anthropogenic disturbance.

  6. New Prionospio and Aurospio Species from the Deep Sea (Annelida: Polychaeta).

    PubMed

    Paterson, Gordon L J; Neal, Lenka; Altamira, Iris; Soto, Eulogio H; Smith, Craig R; Menot, Lenaick; Billett, David S M; Cunha, Marina R; Marchais-Laguionie, Claire; Glover, Adrian G

    2016-01-01

    The number of records of the genus Prionospio Malmgren, 1867, from the deep sea (>2000 m) are relatively few and do not reflect the actual occurrence of species nor their potential ecological importance. In this paper we describe five new species of this genus (Prionospio amarsupiata sp. nov., P. vallensis sp. nov., P. branchilucida sp. nov., P. hermesia sp. nov. and P. kaplani sp. nov.) all of which are abundant members of the deep-sea community. We also describe two new species of the genus Aurospio Maciolek, 1981 (Aurospio abranchiata sp. nov. and A. tribranchiata sp. nov.) again common elements of the abyssal fauna. Two of the new species have characters which question the generic distinctiveness of Prionospio and Aurospio. The problems in differentiating these two genera are discussed. PMID:27394364

  7. Two new species of Sternaspis Otto, 1821 (Polychaeta: Sternaspidae) from China seas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuwen; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I; Xu, Kuidong

    2015-01-01

    Two species of Sternaspidae, Sternaspis chinensis sp. nov. and S. liui sp. nov., are described based on historic material and recently collected specimens in the sea areas of China. Sternaspis chinensis is abundantly distributed from the Bohai Sea southwards to the East China Sea. It has been frequently misidentified as the nominally cosmopolitan species S. scutata (Ranzani, 1817) in China since the 1950s. However, S. chinensis differs from the latter by possessing concentric bands on the shield (vs. absent) and crenulated posterior margin reaching or slightly expanded beyond the posterolateral corners (vs. posterior margin smooth and markedly expanded beyond the posterolateral corners). Sternaspis chinensis most resembles the NE Pacific species S. affinis Stimpson, 1864, but differs distinctly by its markedly concentric bands decorated from margin to center (vs. mainly restricted in the marginal area). Sternaspis liui is characterized within the genus by its slightly soft shield with firmly adhered sediment particles, which gives it a superficial resemblance to species of Caulleryaspis Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013. However, the shields of the latter are remarkably soft and poorly developed, without ribs and concentric lines, while in Sternaspis liui both the ribs and concentric lines are well defined. Variations of both species with remarks on juvenile shield development are provided. PMID:26701437

  8. Three new records of Lumbrineridae Schmarda, 1861 (Annelida: Polychaeta) species in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenqian; Li, Xinzheng

    2011-11-01

    Three species of Lumbrineridae, Helmutneris flabellicola (Fage, 1936), Lumbrinerides dayi Perkins, 1979, and Ninoe japonica Imajima & Higuchi, 1975, are reported from the material collected between 1959 and 1994 from the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and South China Sea. These species are not previously recorded from Chinese waters. Systematic descriptions and morphological illustrations of the species are provided in this paper.

  9. Ultrastructure and functional morphology of the female reproductive organs in Protodrilus (Polychaeta, Annelida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Nordheim, Henning

    1991-12-01

    The morphology and function of the female reproductive organs in 6 Protodrilus species are investigated by light- and transmission electron microscopy. Possible ways in which spermatozoa may enter the female coelom after leaving the spermatophore are discussed for species with and without special female reception organs. Only female P. rubropharyngeus and P. flavocapitatus have “dorsal organs” for spermatophore reception. The structure and function of these organs are described, as well as those of the oviduct found in 3 of the species investigated. The possible phylogenetic origin of gonoducts and different modes of oviposition within the genus are discussed. Finally, the high taxonomic significance of female traits such as dorsal organs, oviducts, cocoon glands and lateral ciliary rows in this genus is stressed.

  10. Hesionidae Grube, 1850 (Annelida: Polychaeta) from South-Southeastern Brazil, with descriptions of four new species.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alexandra E; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of extensive intertidal and subtidal samplings in South-Southeastern Brazil, five hesionid species were found; four are newly described and Podarkeopsis levisfuscina Perkins, 1984 is redescribed. Micropodarke pleijeli n. sp. differs from the other species because it lacks eyes, and by having a large number of pharynx papillae and by neurochaetal features; this species differs from M. dubia (Hessle, 1925) by lacking eyes, having a pharynx with more papillae, and by the neurochaetal features. Syllidia amaralae n. sp. resembles more closely S. armata sensu Day, 1967 (non S. armata de Quatrefages, 1865) because both have dorsal and tentacular cirri annulated or moniliform, and 10-15 pharyngeal papillae. However, S. amaralae n. sp. specimens differ from Day's ones because they have a quadrangular prostomium, by the relative size and arrangement of eyes, and by a reduced number of chaetae which are disposed in two bundles; these features are consistent and present in juveniles and mature specimens. Neogyptis nonatoi n. sp. is distinguishable from the others by having four types of neurochaetae; this species resembles N. crypta (Pleijel, 1993), and N. plurisetis (Hilbig, 1992). It differs from N. crypta by having a few acicular notochaetae with blunt tip, a small number of compound neurochaetae, simple capillary neurochaetae distally curved, and much slender notopodial and neuropodial lobes. The new species also differs from N. plurisetis by having four types of neurochaetae instead of having only falciger chaetae; there are less pharyngean papillae and they are far apart to each other, conical and shorter in N. plurisetis when compared to those of N. nonatoi n. sp., which are fringed, longer and closer among them, having some other longer lateral papillae. Oxydromus lanai n. sp. resembles O. obscurus (Verrill, 1873) as recorded by Uebelacker (1984), O. pugettensis by Hilbig (1994), O. guanicus by Hoagland (1919), and O. cf. guanicus by Hartman (1951). The pharynx of O. obscurus does not have fringe or papilla on its border, and it has two types of neurochaetae, differing from O. lanai n. sp. which has a single furcate notochaeta, with its shorter tine serrated. Oxydromus pugettensis and O. cf. guanicus also have usually two, instead of one, furcate notochaeta, differing from O. lanai n. sp. Oxydromus guanicus differs from our new species in having a characteristic pigmentation pattern, to be very large, its median antenna is less than one-third as long as lateral antennae, and its cirrophores are distally constricted producing a colorless ring, whereby the cirrostyle is inserted. These species are the first Brazilian records for the genera Podarkeopsis and Syllidia, and for Micropodarke, it is newly recorded from the Atlantic Ocean. Keys are included to identify hesionid genera and the species of Syllidia, Micropodarke, Neogyptis, and Podarkeopsis.  PMID:25284658

  11. Reinstatement of three species of the Marphysa sanguinea complex (Polychaeta: Eunicidae) from the Grand Caribbean Region.

    PubMed

    Molina-Acevedo, Isabel C; Carrera-Parra, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    As part of a study on Marphysa de Quatrefages, 1865 from the Grand Caribbean, three species regarded as junior synonyms of M. sanguinea (Montagu, 1913) were studied to clarify their taxonomic status. The examination of type and additional materials collected in the southern Gulf of Mexico and the Mexican Caribbean regions, allowed us to clarify that M. acicularum Webster, 1884, M. nobilis Treadwell, 1917 and M. viridis Treadwell, 1917 are distinct species. Therefore, the three species were redescribed and some important morphological features such as maxillary apparatus, shape of parapodial lobes, shape of ventral cirri and pectinate chaetae, among others, were described and evaluated. Furthermore, we consider that previous records of M. sanguinea for the Grand Caribbean are doubtful and it is necessary to reassess those specimens to clarify their taxonomic identity. PMID:25781729

  12. Raman spectroscopic study of the mineral composition of cirratulid tubes (Annelida, Polychaeta).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul D; Vinn, Olev; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy; Schopf, J William

    2010-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the mineralogical composition of the calcareous tubes of three species belonging to the family Cirratulidae. In all three cases, the tubes were found to be aragonitic, confirming previous inferences based on EDX and thin section studies, and corroborated by new EDX analyses revealing the presence of Sr but no Mg. Biomineralization in cirratulids is first recorded in the Oligocene epoch, at a time of aragonite seas. Similarly, the mineralogies of the earliest skeletons matched seawater chemistry in three other polychaete groups that independently evolved calcareous skeletons. PMID:20566380

  13. Dispersal and development of Marenzelleria spp. (Polychaeta, Spionidae) populations in NW Europe and The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essink, Karel

    1998-09-01

    The North American spionid polychaete Marenzelleria cf. wireni was first recorded in the North Sea by Scotland in 1982. Marenzelleria cf. viridis was first found in the Baltic Sea in 1985. Tentative routes of dispersal since then are presented in this paper. In the Netherlands, a biological monitoring programme has revealed populations of M. cf. wireni in the Ems estuary, Wadden Sea, and in the SW Netherlands. In the Dollard (Ems estuary) a large population has developed (2000-3000 individuals m-2; 8-16 g ash-free dry weight m-2). Since the introduction, the macrozoobenthic community has changed from being dominated (by biomass) by bivalves, to domination by polychaetes. Recently, a similar population started to develop at Balgzand (western Dutch Wadden Sea).

  14. A new species of Phyllochaetopterus Grube, 1863 (Polychaeta: Chaetopteridae) from Hainan Island, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yueyun; Li, Xinzheng

    2016-04-01

    Phyllochaetopterus species are widely distributed on the coast of China. Here, Phyllochaetopterus hainanensis n. sp., a new species collected from Hainan Island (China), is reported. It is characterized by having a V-shaped peristomium, two eyespots covered by a pair of large curved peristomial notopodia (cirri located beneath the palps), 13-14 chaetigers in the anterior body region, with three enlarged modified chaetae on the fourth notopodium, and more than five chaetigers in the middle body region. The modified chaeta has a slightly inflated head with an obliquely truncate end. The new species resembles Phyllochaetopterus socialis Claparède, 1869, but differs in the shape of peristomial notopodia and peristomium. Twelve species of Phyllochaetopterus have been described from the Pacific Ocean, including the new species described here. An identification key to the known Pacific species is provided together with a brief discussion of the taxonomic value of the eyespots for the genus.

  15. NONATObase: a database for Polychaeta (Annelida) from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pagliosa, Paulo R.; Doria, João G.; Misturini, Dairana; Otegui, Mariana B. P.; Oortman, Mariana S.; Weis, Wilson A.; Faroni-Perez, Larisse; Alves, Alexandre P.; Camargo, Maurício G.; Amaral, A. Cecília Z.; Marques, Antonio C.; Lana, Paulo C.

    2014-01-01

    Networks can greatly advance data sharing attitudes by providing organized and useful data sets on marine biodiversity in a friendly and shared scientific environment. NONATObase, the interactive database on polychaetes presented herein, will provide new macroecological and taxonomic insights of the Southwestern Atlantic region. The database was developed by the NONATO network, a team of South American researchers, who integrated available information on polychaetes from between 5°N and 80°S in the Atlantic Ocean and near the Antarctic. The guiding principle of the database is to keep free and open access to data based on partnerships. Its architecture consists of a relational database integrated in the MySQL and PHP framework. Its web application allows access to the data from three different directions: species (qualitative data), abundance (quantitative data) and data set (reference data). The database has built-in functionality, such as the filter of data on user-defined taxonomic levels, characteristics of site, sample, sampler, and mesh size used. Considering that there are still many taxonomic issues related to poorly known regional fauna, a scientific committee was created to work out consistent solutions to current misidentifications and equivocal taxonomy status of some species. Expertise from this committee will be incorporated by NONATObase continually. The use of quantitative data was possible by standardization of a sample unit. All data, maps of distribution and references from a data set or a specified query can be visualized and exported to a commonly used data format in statistical analysis or reference manager software. The NONATO network has initialized with NONATObase, a valuable resource for marine ecologists and taxonomists. The database is expected to grow in functionality as it comes in useful, particularly regarding the challenges of dealing with molecular genetic data and tools to assess the effects of global environment change. Database URL: http://nonatobase.ufsc.br/ PMID:24573879

  16. Species richness and macronutrient content of wawo worms (Polychaeta, Annelida) from Ambonese waters, Maluku, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this research were to: (1) investigate the species richness of wawo worms, and to (2) analyze macronutrient content of the worms. Wawo worms were sampled using a fishing net on March 18th-19th, 2014, from Ambonese waters, Maluku. As many as 26 wawo species belonging to 5 families were identified. Palola sp. was identified as the most abundant species of wawo, followed by Lysidice oele, Horst 1905, Eunice spp. and nereidids. Results of the proximate analysis reveal that female epitokes of Palola sp. contain 10.78 % ash, 10.71 % moisture, 11.67 % crude fat, 54.72 % crude protein and 12.12 % carbohydrate. PMID:25829856

  17. Glutathione-S-transferase in Nereis succinea (Polychaeta) and its induction by xeno-estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ayoola, James A O; García-Alonso, Javier; Hardege, Jörg D

    2011-10-01

    The need to replace or at least to reduce the use of vertebrates in toxicity tests is a timely major concern in research and industry but to date, efforts made to minimize their use are still far from complete. Increasing demands for toxicity tests put considerable pressures upon the development of future fast and efficient test methods using invertebrates. In fact, to date, few studies provide links between biochemical and cellular effects of xeno-estrogens in aquatic invertebrates. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, as a biomarker of stress exposure, was measured in the population of clamworms (Nereis succinea) from Cardiff Bay. In addition, we examined the effect of single exposure to nonylphenol (NP) on this enzymatic activity. Field study results showed a relationship between the worm's size, reproductive status, and GST activity from the field population. In addition, we show a significant increase in the GST activity at 100 μg/L NP with sex-specific responses. The xeno-estrogens, which could affect reproduction of nereid by interfering in normal endocrinological pathways, are eliminated through GST by conjugation with glutathione. This work shows for the first time that GST activity depends on sex and stage of the clamworms and also that the xeno-estrogen NP induces its activity. This study supports the use of this species as a bioindicator of aquatic pollution and lays the foundation to causally link toxic exposure with reproductive output. PMID:20549611

  18. Ultrastructural aspects of Ellipsomyxa mugilis (Myxozoa: Ceratomyxidae) spores and developmental stages in Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta: Nereidae).

    PubMed

    Rangel, Luis Filipe; Azevedo, Carlos; Casal, Graça; Santos, Maria João

    2012-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the spores and developmental stages of Ellipsomyxa mugilis in Nereis diversicolor were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure features and the developmental stages show many similarities with the general pattern described for other actinospores. However, several new features are definitely worth noting. For example, tetranucleated cells precede the formation of the initial pansporocyst, which preserves the 2 original enveloping cells until the end of sporogony. In the initial stages of sporogony, the future sporoplasm cell acquires the first secondary cell by an engulfment process. In the final stage of sporogony, spores are formed by a sporoplasm with 2 secondary cells and 1 somatic nucleus, and the polar capsule has a polar filament with a helicoidal arrangement possessing 7-8 coils. PMID:22263603

  19. Sperm storage, internal fertilization, and embryonic dispersal in vent and seep tubeworms (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae: Vestimentifera).

    PubMed

    Hilário, Ana; Young, Craig M; Tyler, Paul A

    2005-02-01

    Vestimentiferan tubeworms are ecologically important members of deep-sea chemosynthetic communities, including hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. Some are community dominants and others are primary colonists of new vent sites; they include some of the longest living and fastest growing marine invertebrates. Their mechanisms of propagation, dispersal, and genetic exchange have been widely discussed. Direct sperm transfer from males to females has been documented in one species, Ridgeia piscesae, but others are known to discharge what are apparently primary oocytes. Brooding of embryos has never been observed in any vestimentiferan. These observations have led to the supposition that fertilization might be external in most species. Here we report sperm storage at the posterior end of the oviduct in five species, including tubeworms from both vents and seeps. We show experimentally that most eggs are inseminated internally, that fertilization rate is typically lower than 100%, that meiosis is completed after eggs are released from the female, and that the dispersal phase includes the entire embryonic period. PMID:15713809

  20. Polychaeta of the Kara and Pechora seas: Data of the 2012 trawl survey.

    PubMed

    Frolova, E A; Syomin, V L

    2016-07-01

    The species composition of the polychaetes derived from ichthyological and Sigsbee trawls in the Pechora and Kara seas in 2012 was studied and compared with the grab survey data of 1993-1995. The distribution of the large sabellidae, nektobenthic, and bathypelagic species that are poorly caught by a grab has been determined for the first time. Changes that were observed in the biogeographical polychaete structure in the Kara Sea (a higher proportion of the boreal species and a lower proportion of the Arctic species) may reflect a response of zoobenthos to the Arctic warming in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. PMID:27595826

  1. Shell damage in the Tehuelche scallop Aequipecten tehuelchus caused by Polydora rickettsi (Polychaeta: Spionidae) infestation.

    PubMed

    Diez, M E; Orensanz, J M; Márquez, F; Cremonte, F

    2013-10-01

    The different types of shell damage caused to the commercially valuable Tehuelche scallop (Aequipecten tehuelchus) by the polychaete Polydora rickettsi are described. X-rays, computerized tomography, shell sections, scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), mineralogical analyses and geometric morphometrics were applied to that end. Scallop shells presented three types of damage: (1) spots, (2) calcareous alterations, and (3) mud blisters. Microstructural alterations consisted of a simple conchiolin membranous layer in the case of spots, a series of interleaved layers of different degree of calcifications in calcareous alterations, and two different surface morphologies (muddy and mucous layers) in mud blisters. Damage was localized mainly along concentric growth rings, coincidentally with the location of most burrows, as shown by X-ray. Mineralogical analysis showed that in all cases (including non-infested shells) calcite was the calcium carbonate polymorph present. Geometric morphometrics showed that only 5% of shape variation was explained by infestation with P. rickettsi, irrespective of the type of damage. Number of worms per infested shell varied significantly among four beds. Left shells (upward-oriented) were significantly more affected than right shells, which are in closer contact with the bottom. PMID:23871854

  2. Species boundaries of Gulf of Mexico vestimentiferans (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae) inferred from mitochondrial genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pia Miglietta, Maria; Hourdez, Stephane; Cowart, Dominique A.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Fisher, Charles

    2010-11-01

    At least six morphospecies of vestimentiferan tubeworms are associated with cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The physiology and ecology of the two best-studied species from depths above 1000 m in the upper Louisiana slope (Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi) are relatively well understood. The biology of one rare species from the upper slope (escarpiid sp. nov.) and three morphospecies found at greater depths in the GOM (Lamellibrachia sp. 1, L. sp. 2, and Escarpia laminata) are not as well understood. Here we address species distributions and boundaries of cold-seep tubeworms using phylogenetic hypotheses based on two mitochondrial genes. Fragments of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit rDNA (16S) and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes were sequenced for 167 vestimentiferans collected from the GOM and analyzed in the context of other seep vestimentiferans for which sequence data were available. The analysis supported five monophyletic clades of vestimentiferans in the GOM. Intra-clade variation in both genes was very low, and there was no apparent correlation between the within-clade diversity and collection depth or location. Two of the morphospecies of Lamellibrachia from different depths in the GOM could not be distinguished by either mitochondrial gene. Similarly, E. laminata could not be distinguished from other described species of Escarpia from either the west coast of Africa or the eastern Pacific using COI. We suggest that the mitochondrial COI and 16S genes have little utility as barcoding markers for seep vestimentiferan tubeworms.

  3. NONATObase: a database for Polychaeta (Annelida) from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, Paulo R; Doria, João G; Misturini, Dairana; Otegui, Mariana B P; Oortman, Mariana S; Weis, Wilson A; Faroni-Perez, Larisse; Alves, Alexandre P; Camargo, Maurício G; Amaral, A Cecília Z; Marques, Antonio C; Lana, Paulo C

    2014-01-01

    Networks can greatly advance data sharing attitudes by providing organized and useful data sets on marine biodiversity in a friendly and shared scientific environment. NONATObase, the interactive database on polychaetes presented herein, will provide new macroecological and taxonomic insights of the Southwestern Atlantic region. The database was developed by the NONATO network, a team of South American researchers, who integrated available information on polychaetes from between 5°N and 80°S in the Atlantic Ocean and near the Antarctic. The guiding principle of the database is to keep free and open access to data based on partnerships. Its architecture consists of a relational database integrated in the MySQL and PHP framework. Its web application allows access to the data from three different directions: species (qualitative data), abundance (quantitative data) and data set (reference data). The database has built-in functionality, such as the filter of data on user-defined taxonomic levels, characteristics of site, sample, sampler, and mesh size used. Considering that there are still many taxonomic issues related to poorly known regional fauna, a scientific committee was created to work out consistent solutions to current misidentifications and equivocal taxonomy status of some species. Expertise from this committee will be incorporated by NONATObase continually. The use of quantitative data was possible by standardization of a sample unit. All data, maps of distribution and references from a data set or a specified query can be visualized and exported to a commonly used data format in statistical analysis or reference manager software. The NONATO network has initialized with NONATObase, a valuable resource for marine ecologists and taxonomists. The database is expected to grow in functionality as it comes in useful, particularly regarding the challenges of dealing with molecular genetic data and tools to assess the effects of global environment change. Database URL: http://nonatobase.ufsc.br/. PMID:24573879

  4. Aphelochaeta (Polychaeta: Cirratulidae) from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, with a description of five new species.

    PubMed

    Dean, Harlan K; Blake, James A

    2016-01-01

    Five new species of bitentaculate Cirratulidae belonging to the genus Aphelochaeta are herein described from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, all from shallow subtidal depths. Aphelochaeta antelonga sp. nov. is characterized by a long biannulate peristomium and fibrillated capillary setae and is from 11-18 m in the Gulf of Nicoya. Aphelochaeta guimondi sp. nov., with a wide dorsal trough in the thorax and hirsute capillaries (visible using SEM), is described from 11-26 m in the Gulf of Nicoya. Aphelochaeta praeacuta sp. nov., with its first peristomial annulation extending as a dorsal crest over the second annulation and first setiger, was collected from 11-28 m in Bahia Culebra. Aphelochaeta striata sp. nov., collected from 11-28 m in the Gulf of Nicoya, is recognized by its narrow body and the transverse blue stripes across the venter of setigers 5-8 produced with methyl green stain. Aphelochaeta zebra sp. nov., collected from a coral reef in Golfo Dulce, is characterized by its expanded posterior end and the darkly staining intersegmental regions using methyl green stain. Additionally, A. glandaria Blake, 1996, a species reportedly with a widespread geographic distribution (Blake, 1996), was also encountered subtidally from the Gulf of Nicoya and Golfo Dulce. PMID:27394621

  5. Spionidae (Annelida: 'Polychaeta': Canalipalpata) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia: the genera Malacoceros, Scolelepis, Spio, Microspio, and Spiophanes.

    PubMed

    Meißner, Karin; Götting, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Seven species belonging to the spionid genera Malacoceros, Scolelepis, Spio, Microspio, and Spiophanes were found during the polychaete workshop on Lizard Island in August 2013. One species is new to science and named Scolelepis inversa n. sp., another Scolelepis species is probably also a new species but was represented in our samples by only a single specimen and not formally described. All other species have been reported previously from Australia. Species diagnoses of all species found during the workshop and of Scolelepis balihaiensis Hartmann-Schröder, 1979, Microspio microcera (Dorsey, 1977) and M. minuta (Hartmann-Schröder, 1962) have been critically reviewed and amended based on the study of type material. The potential synonymy of Microspio minuta (Hartmann-Schröder, 1962) and M. microcera (Dorsey, 1977) is discussed. The new combination Spio jirkovi (Sikorski, 1992) proposed by Sikorski (2013) is returned to Malacoceros. We added DNA barcodes for five species collected in the Lizard Island area to public databases which will be useful in future phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. For Microspio we provide the first sequence data for this genus. PMID:26624075

  6. New records of Pectinariidae (Polychaeta) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia and the description of two new species.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eunice; Hutchings, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Five species of Pectinariidae have previously been reported from Australia. This study documents the first records of this family from the Lizard Island region: Pectinaria antipoda is recorded, in addition to its already currently wide Australian distribution; two new species, Amphictene lizardensis n. sp. and Pectinaria carnosus n. sp. were also discovered and described. A key to all Australian species of Pectinariidae is provided. PMID:26624085

  7. [Determination of apparent mean mass of proteins associated with heme in the hemoglobin molecule of Arenicola marina (L.), Annelida, Polychaeta].

    PubMed

    Toulmond, A

    1979-02-12

    Protein and iron concentrations and maximum combined oxygen concentration were measured in the blood of the lugworm Arenicola marina. The calculated mean molecular mass of the heme-associated proteins was higher than that reported for known invertebrate and vertebrate intracellular hemoglobins. The difference is probably due to the presence of polypeptide chains not linked to heme groups in the extracellular annelid hemoglobins. PMID:111865

  8. Eusyllinae, Exogoninae and Autolytinae (Syllidae: Polychaeta) from the Southern Mexican Pacific, with the description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Diana L O; Martín, Guillermo San; Solís-Weiss, Vivianne

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have dealt recently with syllid polychaetes in soft sediments from Acapulco Bay (Southern Mexican Pacific) with new species and new records of the subfamily Syllinae published, but the remaining subfamilies found in the area had not been included. This study deals with syllids belonging to those subfamilies: Eusyllinae, Exogoninae and Autolytinae, since the Anoplosyllinae were not found. Three species are described as new: Odontosyllis septemdentata n. sp., characterized by having bidentate falcigers and a trepan with 7 teeth alternating in size; Sphaerosyllis tetralobata n. sp., which is characterized by having unidentate compound chaetae and segments divided in four annuli, and Prosphaerosyllis sotoi n. sp., characterized by having compound chaetae with short and hooked unidentate blades, and by being the only species of the genus that lacks dorsal cirri in the second parapodia. Additionally, Westheidesyllis gesae (Perkins 1981) is newly recorded for the Pacific Ocean, while Odontosyllis fulgurans (Audouin & Milne Edwards 1834), Erinaceusyllis bidentata (Hartmann-Schröder 1974) and Myrianida dentalia (Imajima 1966) are recorded for the first time from the Mexican Pacific coasts. PMID:27615900

  9. Review of the Capitellidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Eastern Tropical Pacific region, with notes on selected species

    PubMed Central

    García-Garza, María Elena; León-González, Jesús Angel De

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of this work is to contribute to the taxonomic knowledge of the species of Capitellidae reported for the Eastern Tropical Pacific. This catalogue includes the original name of each species, new names, synonymies, type localities, the museum or institution where the type material is deposited, revision of the material reported for the region by different authors, new examined material, previous reports from other regions of the world, and comments on systematics and distributions. The catalogue lists 43 species in 19 genera. Of these, 6 species were erroneously recorded for the region (Decamastus gracilis Hartman, 1963; Decamastus nudus Thomassin, 1970; Mastobranchus variabilis Edwing, 1984; Notomastus aberans Day, 1957; Notomastus americanus Day, 1973; Notomastus latericeus Sars, 1851) and 5 species are found here to be questionable records for the Eastern Tropical Pacific (Capitella capitata (Fabricius, 1780); Dasybranchus glabrus Moore, 1909; Decamastus lumbricoides Grube, 1878; Notomastus lineatus Claparède, 1870 and Notomastus tenuis Moore, 1909). PMID:22368451

  10. Deep-sea serpulids (Annelida: Polychaeta) in tetragonal tubes: on a tube convergence path from the Mesozoic to Recent.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, Elena K; Ippolitov, Alexei P

    2015-01-01

    Serpulids typically build cylindrical calcareous tubes attached to hard substrates. Until now, only three serpulid species inhabiting free-lying polygonal tubes were reported from the deep sea: Spirodiscus grimaldii Fauvel, 1909 with quadrangular spirally coiled tubes, Bathyditrupa hovei Kupriyanova, 1993a with quadrangular tusk-shaped tubes, and Ditrupa groenlandica McIntosh, 1877 with octagonal tusk-shaped tubes. Similar free-lying tubes with tetragonal cross-section, both coiled and tusk-shaped, are described from shallow-water Mesozoic deposits as Nogrobs de Montfort, 1808, Tetraserpula Parsch, 1956, Tetraditrupa Regenhardt, 1961, Glandifera Regenhardt, 1961 and Tubulostium Stoliczka, 1868. We have revised deep-sea serpulids with tetragonal (and secondary octagonal) tubes and compared their tube ultrastructures and mineralogies with those of morphologically similar fossils. Revision of the Recent material has revealed six species in five genera: Spirodiscus grimaldii, S. groenlandicus comb. nov., Bathyditrupa hovei, Bathyvermilia gregrousei sp. nov., Hyalopomatus dieteri sp. nov. and Zibrovermilia zibrowii gen. et sp. nov. Comparisons showed significant ultrastructural and mineralogical differences between Recent and Mesozoic species. Similar tetragonal tube morphology of the Recent forms appears to be a result of convergence due to adaptation to similar soft-sediment habitats of the deep sea. None of Recent genera should be synonymised with any fossil genus, and the genus Spirodiscus Fauvel, 1909, previously synonymised with fossil Nogrobs, should be re-instated. However, a huge stratigraphic gap (66 Myr) between the earliest known fossil tetragonal tubes and their Recent counterparts still allows the possibility that such essentially different structures is a result of ultrastructural evolution, a hypothesis that could be verified by discovery and further study of Caenozoic material. PMID:26624708

  11. Aracia sinaloae sp. n., a new brooding, simultaneous hermaphroditic fan worm from southern Gulf of California (Polychaeta: Sabellidae).

    PubMed

    Tovar-Hernández, María Ana

    2014-01-01

    Currently, only two species are known in the sabellid genus Aracia: A. riwo (Rouse, 1996) and A. heterobranchiata (Nogueira, López & Rossi, 2004). The first was described from the surface of a Teredo-riddled log lying in 1 m of water among mangrove roots, in Papua (New Guinea), whilst the second was found on an organically enriched beach at São Sebastião (Brazil). In this contribution, a third species of Aracia is described from settling panels and red mangrove roots in an estuarine system located in southern Gulf of California (Mexico). The new species is a simultaneous hermaphrodite and brooder, unique in the presence of a rectangular ventral shield on the collar, shorter than those in posterior thoracic segments; and a high number of rows of teeth in thoracic and abdominal uncini, covering from one-half to three-quarters of the main fang length. Information about color patterns in live specimens, glandular patterns, and reproduction is provided. PMID:24872062

  12. Spermatozoa and sperm aggregates in the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia luymesi compared with those of Riftia pachyptila (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae: Vestimentifera).

    PubMed

    Marotta, Roberto; Melone, Giulio; Bright, Monika; Ferraguti, Marco

    2005-12-01

    The spermatozoa and the sperm bundles of the vestimentiferans Riftia pachyptila and Lamellibrachia luymesi (Annelida: Siboglinidae) were studied using several microscopical techniques (transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy) and compared with some other annelid sperm. The spermatozoa and sperm bundles of both species show a similar structure, but they differ in the dimensions of the components of individual cells and in the number of spermatozoa forming each sperm bundle. The spermatozoa of R. pachyptila and L. luymesi are filiform cells composed, in sequence, by an acrosome in the form of a thread-like helical vesicle, an elongated coiled nucleus surrounded by two helical mitochondria, and a long flagellum. In the spermatozoa of both species, the apical portion of the nucleus is completely devoid of chromatin and is delimited by a thickened nuclear envelope with a fibrillar appearance. Both species have sperm bundles that resemble buds, having a calyx-like portion formed by the helical heads, and a stalk-like portion formed by the tightly packed flagella. A parsimony analysis based on spermatozoal characters showed monophyly of the Siboglinidae and the Vestimentifera. We propose a new set of autapomorphies characterizing vestimentiferan spermatozoa. Our analysis suggests that spermatozoal characters are useful to the understanding of the phylogeny of the group. PMID:16382169

  13. Two new species of scale worms (Polychaeta: Aphroditiformia) from deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic).

    PubMed

    Ravara, Ascensão; Cunha, Marina R

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of scale worms are described from the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic), at depths between 1100 and 2230 m. Australaugeneria iberica sp. nov. (Polynoidae) was obtained from an alcyonarian colony collected at the flank of Carlos Ribeiro mud volcano; it is characterized by the presence of neuropodial hooks only on segment two and by having the first parapodia not enlarged. This is the first report of the genus for the deep sea. The diagnosis of Australaugeneria is emended and a table comparing all species of the genus is provided. Pholoe petersenae sp. nov. (Pholoidae) was collected from the crater of three mud volcanoes (Darwin, Captain Arutyunov and Carlos Ribeiro) in areas of active seepage. This species is characterized by the presence of prostomial peaks and parapodia stylodes and the absence of eyes. PMID:27394559

  14. Restriction to large-scale gene flow vs. regional panmixia among cold seep Escarpia spp. (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae).

    PubMed

    Cowart, Dominique A; Huang, Chunya; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Carney, Susan L; Fisher, Charles R; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The history of colonization and dispersal in fauna distributed among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems remains enigmatic and poorly understood because of an inability to mark and track individuals. A combination of molecular, morphological and environmental data improves understanding of spatial and temporal scales at which panmixia, disruption of gene flow or even speciation may occur. Vestimentiferan tubeworms of the genus Escarpia are important components of deep -sea cold seep ecosystems, as they provide long-term habitat for many other taxa. Three species of Escarpia, Escarpia spicata [Gulf of California (GoC)], Escarpia laminata [Gulf of Mexico (GoM)] and Escarpia southwardae (West African Cold Seeps), have been described based on morphology, but are not discriminated through the use of mitochondrial markers (cytochrome oxidase subunit 1; large ribosomal subunit rDNA, 16S; cytochrome b). Here, we also sequenced the exon-primed intron-crossing Haemoglobin subunit B2 intron and genotyped 28 microsatellites to (i) determine the level of genetic differentiation, if any, among the three geographically separated entities and (ii) identify possible population structure at the regional scale within the GoM and West Africa. Results at the global scale support the occurrence of three genetically distinct groups. At the regional scale among eight sampling sites of E. laminata (n = 129) and among three sampling sites of E. southwardae (n = 80), no population structure was detected. These findings suggest that despite the patchiness and isolation of seep habitats, connectivity is high on regional scales. PMID:23879204

  15. The new potential invader Linopherus canariensis (Polychaeta: Amphinomidae) in a Mediterranean coastal lake: colonization dynamics and morphological remarks.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, A; Giacobbe, S

    2011-02-01

    The newly introduced polychaete Linopherus canariensis Langerhans, 1881 was found in the Lake of Faro (NE Sicily), during a study comparing the macrobenthos in artificial modules with a neighboring sandy bottom assemblage. Of a total of 4465 specimens, almost 6% showed morphological variation related to branchial turfs and mean body size. The sandy bottom exhibited an average density of 41.86 ind L⁻¹ and a wet biomass of 30.35 mg L⁻¹, whereas the artificial substratum reached levels of 205.29 ind L⁻¹ and 318.44 mg L⁻¹. The highest estimated immigration rate was 3.7 ind L⁻¹d⁻¹ (5.8 mg L⁻¹ d⁻¹). In the artificial microhabitat, 0.4% of the population showed mid-anterior fragmentation, with anterior- (2%), mid- (< 1%) and posterior- (1%) regenerating lineages, which contributed significantly to the dispersion ability of this species. L. canariensis was a selective micro-deposit feeder, even under conditions of reduced sediments. Linopherus was found to be a new potential invader of stressed environments that is probably tied to the import of oysters. PMID:21109269

  16. Investigation of population structure in Gulf of Mexico Seepiophila jonesi (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae) using cross-amplified microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunya; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vestimentiferan tubeworms are some of the most recognizable fauna found at deep-sea cold seeps, isolated environments where hydrocarbon rich fluids fuel biological communities. Several studies have investigated tubeworm population structure; however, much is still unknown about larval dispersal patterns at Gulf of Mexico (GoM) seeps. As such, researchers have applied microsatellite markers as a measure for documenting the transport of vestimentiferan individuals. In the present study, we investigate the utility of microsatellites to be cross-amplified within the escarpiid clade of seep vestimentiferans, by determining if loci originally developed for Escarpia spp. could be amplified in the GoM seep tubeworm, Seepiophila jonesi. Additionally, we determine if cross-amplified loci can reliably uncover the same signatures of high gene flow seen in a previous investigation of S. jonesi. Methods Seventy-seven S. jonesi individuals were collected from eight seep sites across the upper Louisiana slope (<1,000 m) in the GoM. Forty-eight microsatellite loci that were originally developed for Escarpia laminata (18 loci) and Escarpia southwardae (30 loci) were tested to determine if they were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi. Loci found to be both polymorphic and of high quality were used to test for significant population structuring in S. jonesi. Results Microsatellite pre-screening identified 13 (27%) of the Escarpia loci were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi, revealing that microsatellites can be amplified within the escarpiid clade of vestimentiferans. Our findings uncovered low levels of heterozygosity and a lack of genetic differentiation amongst S. jonesi from various sites and regions, in line with previous investigations that employed species-specific polymorphic loci on S. jonesi individuals retrieved from both the same and different seep sites. The lack of genetic structure identified from these populations supports the presence of significant gene flow via larval dispersal in mixed oceanic currents. Discussion The ability to develop “universal” microsatellites reduces the costs associated with these analyses and allows researchers to track and investigate a wider array of taxa, which is particularly useful for organisms living at inaccessible locations such as the deep sea. Our study highlights that non-species specific microsatellites can be amplified across large evolutionary distances and still yield similar findings as species-specific loci. Further, these results show that S. jonesi collected from various localities in the GoM represents a single panmictic population, suggesting that dispersal of lecithotrophic larvae by deep sea currents is sufficient to homogenize populations. These data are consistent with the high levels of gene flow seen in Escarpia spp., which advocates that differences in microhabitats of seep localities lead to variation in biogeography of separate species.

  17. Macrofaunal involvement in the sublittoral decay of kelp debris: the polychaete Platynereis dumerilii (Audouin and Milne-Edwards) (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, A. P.; Moore, P. G.

    1985-02-01

    Platynereis dumerilii is found in large numbers in parchment-like tubes attached to sublittoral accumulations of detached maroalgae (principally Laminaria saccharina) in Kames Bay, Isle of Cumbrae and Lochranza, Isle of Arran. Its rôle in weed decomposition has been examined by comparing its responses (behavioural choice, growth rates, absorption efficiencies of both carbon and protein, gut retention times and rate of faecal output) to fresh and rotting weed. Worms grew significantly on either diet, with older individuals gaining more weight than small individuals. Animals of a standard size (derived from measurements of maximum bite size) feeding on fresh weed, however, grew significantly faster than those feeding on rotting weed. The former had a significantly higher protein absorption efficiency which was linearly related to protein content of ingested weed. This was not so on rotting weed. Organic carbon absorption efficiencies did not differ significantly between the two groups, neither did gut retention times nor rates of faecal output. Given a choice, Platynereis chooses to build its tube, and to feed, on fresh kelp—a strategem which ensures both maximum scope for occupancy before fronds decay and a superabundance of preferred food. Platynereis feeds around its tube entrance, recropping small areas for 2-3 days, prior to switching to another area nearby. Ciliate population densities on Platynereis faeces are much lower than on either homogenized or intact weed, associated with their lower, nutritional value (at first). Platynereis bubes act to bind kelp fronds together stabilizing the faecal input to infaunal detritivores. Platynereis is an example of a detritivore which exploits the detrital substratum directly.

  18. Symbiotic association between Solanderia secunda (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Solanderiidae) and Medioantenna variopinta sp. nov. (Annelida, Polychaeta, Polynoidae) from North Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Martin, Daniel; Britayev, Temir A.

    2011-12-01

    A mimic scale-worm was found associated with the athecate hydroid Solanderia secunda, commonly found on reefs of the NW coast of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The species resembled Medioantenna clavata Imajima 1997, which was originally described without any reference to a symbiotic mode of life and later reported to be living on a solanderiid hydroid both in Japanese waters. A detailed morphological analysis led us to consider the Indonesian specimens as a new species, namely Medioantenna variopinta sp. nov., which is congeneric with the Japanese species. The new species differs from the type material of M. clavata as it has elytra with one prominent finger-like papilla and all neurochaetae with unidentate tip, instead of an elytral lump and both unidentate and bidentate neurochaetae on segment two. In turn, the Japanese worms associated with Solanderia are here referred to our new species. Two morphological features in M. variopinta sp. nov. are rather unusual among scale-worms. One of them is its extremely high level of bilateral asymmetry and antero-posterior variability in elytral distribution and the other one is its elongated, upwardly directed nephridial papillae. The morphology and geographical distribution of the host together with the known characteristics of the symbiotic association have also been highlighted.

  19. Distribution of Pectinaria koreniLarvae (Annelida : Polychaeta) in Relation to the Seine River Plume Front (Eastern English Channel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaut, E.

    1996-09-01

    The distribution of Pectinaria korenilarvae in the Seine river plume was studied in June 1992 in the course of three inshore-offshore transects. Plume waters were characterized by a higher turbidity and a well-developed phytoplankton biomass. The hydrological structure varied greatly among surveys, principally due to lunar tidal cycle and wind events. Pectinaria korenilarval densities were consistently larger, by at least one order of magnitude, in plume waters than they were in ambient shelf waters. The frontal structure of the plume, acting as a physical boundary, may favour transport along a coastal band which offers rich trophic resources and limits offshore export. Nonetheless, some mixing processes were observed between water masses. Wind events were also able to break up the front and induce a large-scale dispersal of larvae. In frontal zones, larval and phytoplankton aggregation was quite variable and this cannot be explained by a calculated index of potential convergent velocities.

  20. Vergleichende Ultrastrukturuntersuchungen der Eu- und Paraspermien von 13 Protodrilus-Arten (Polychaeta, Annelida) und ihre taxonomische und phylogenetische Bedeutung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Nordheim, Henning

    1989-06-01

    The morphology of the slender, filiform spermatozoa of 13 Protodrilus species of 22 different populations is investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. All species have two types of spermatoza: fertile euspermatozoa, and paraspermatozoa, which are probably infertile and may comprise up to 20% of the total number of mature gametes. This is the first record of sperm dimorphism in polychaetes. The general construction pattern of the euspermatozoa is very complex. It shows a longish tapering acrosomal vesicle with an internal acrosomal rod, a rod-like conical nucleus, and a midpiece with numerous very complex supporting elements and two thin mitochondrial derivatives. Further, it has a ‘peribasal body’ surrounding the basal body of the axoneme, an anulus region with an ‘anchoring apparatus’ and an anulus cuff. Posteriorly, the tail region proper contains in some species 2 to 9 supporting rods. In several species the euspermatozoon shows very distinct and species-specific alternations of this ‘general pattern’ relating to e.g. size of sperm elements, structure of acrosome and nucleus, presence or absence of axial rod, and number, shape and size of supporting elements in midpiece and tail. In a number of species some sections of the euspermatozoon overlap with each other more or less strongly. The paraspermatozoon has a comparatively simple construction pattern and possesses no supporting structures in midpiece and tail region. The midpiece is very short and, in some species, entirely surrounded by its two thin and elongate mitochondrial derivatives. An axial rod is often missing or reduced; different sperm sections never overlap each other. In contrast to the euspermatozoa, the paraspermatozoa of the different species have a very similar ultrastructure. Their possible function in spermatophore transfer and histolytical opening of the female epidermis is discussed. A comparison of the different forms of euspermatozoa in Protodrilus elucidates possible plesiomorphous and apomorphous sperm traits. Very likely, the hypothetical plesiomorphous type of spermatozoa in Protodrilus has a very similar morphology to that of the paraspermatozoa, which for this reason are considered to be a sort of persisting representatives of the ancient Protodrilus sperm type. In Protodrilus, the different traits of the euspermatozoa represent excellent taxonomic characters for distinguishing species (e.g. ‘sibling species’). They can also be used well for phylogenetics within the genus, whereas the relations of Protodrilus to other polychaete groups cannot be clarified solely on the basis of sperm characters, since in all groups the sperm structure is primarily an adaptation to a specific mode of reproduction. Generally, the value of sperm characters in phylogenetic considerations at higher taxonomic levels seems to be very limited due to the surprisingly wide range of different sperm structures within a single genus as is demonstrated in the present paper.

  1. The influence of worm age, duration of exposure and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity for Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, T.S.; Farrar, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The influence of worm age, duration of exposure, and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity were evaluated for Neanthes arenaceodentata. Worms were exposed to contaminated sediment collected from Black Rock Harbor (BRH) near Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA. This sediment was diluted with clean control sediment to result in five experimental treatments: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% BRH. Three exposure scenarios were employed: (1) a 4-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-4w), (2) a 7-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-7w), and (3) a 4-week exposure beginning with 3-week-old juveniles (3WO-4w). Six measures of worm size were recorded at the conclusion of each exposure to evaluate differences among measurement endpoints. Survival was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level for the EJ-7w scenario and at the 100% BRH level for the EJ-4w and 3WO-4w scenarios. Growth was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level in each exposure scenario. Estimates based on the calculated minimum detectable difference indicated that considerably lower concentrations of BRH (6--10%) should be distinguishable by measuring effects on Neanthes growth. Worm size measured in terms of projected area, dry weight, and ash-free dry weight provided the most sensitive measures of effects. Increasing the length of exposure from 4 to 7 weeks and initiating exposures with emergent juveniles rather than 3-week-old worms increased the sensitivity of the bioassay. The results of this study demonstrate that N. arenacedentata is sensitive to the presence of sediment-associated contaminants and that test animal age, duration of exposure, and choice of endpoint can have a large effect on the magnitude of the toxic response observed.

  2. A catalogue of the scaleworm genus Lepidonotus (Polynoidae, Polychaeta) from South America, with two new records for Brazilian waters

    PubMed Central

    De Assis, José Eriberto; de Brito, Rafael Justino; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; de Souza, José Roberto Botelho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genus Lepidonotus is the largest in number of species within the Polynoidae, with more than 70 described species and subspecies. A catalogue of 18 nominal species and subspecies of Lepidonotus from South America is provided, with valid names, synonyms and original citations. Redescriptions and illustrations of two species based on new specimens collected along the littoral of the State of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil are included. Lepidonotus carinulatus and Lepidonotus natalensis are reported for the first time for Brazilian waters. A comparative table of characters for all reported species and subspecies of Lepidonotus from South America is provided. PMID:26668541

  3. A new species of Micromaldane (Polychaeta: Maldanidae) from the Falkland Islands, southwestern Atlantic, with notes on reproduction.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Micromaldane shackletoni n. sp. is described from the Falkland Islands in the southwest Atlantic. It is only the eighth species of Micromaldane to be recognized worldwide and is a new record of the genus for the Falkland Islands. The main characters of the new species are: up to 23 chaetigerous segments; nuchal organs as rounded ciliated pits with small central grooves anteriorly; two kinds ofnotochaetae: lancet-shaped chaetae and fine capillaries; neurochaetae as a single row of strongly curved, avicular uncini; a single pre-anal achaetigerous segment and anal plaque funnel-shaped with a crenated edge. This new species is a simultaneous hermaphrodite, only the second report of this reproductive mode in the genus along with Micromaldane androgyne Rouse, 1990. The stages of larval development from internal gametes to external in-tube development are also discussed. PMID:25250463

  4. Effect of the invader Boccardia proboscidea (Polychaeta: Spionidae) on richness, diversity and structure of SW Atlantic epilithic intertidal community.

    PubMed

    Elías, Rodolfo; Jaubet, María L; Llanos, Elizabeth N; Sanchez, María A; Rivero, María S; Garaffo, Griselda V; Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo

    2015-02-28

    In Mar del Plata (Argentine, SW Atlantic), a large seaside resort, the sewage discharges impact the littoral ecosystem. The invader polychaete Boccardia proboscidea has developed reefs since spring of 2008. The effect of this species on the richness, diversity and structure of epilithic intertidal community was assessed through an MBACI design in both sewage-impacted and reference sites, and Before/After the invasion. The presence of reefs of B. proboscidea since spring 2008 has caused a significant reduction of total individuals, total taxa and diversity in sewage-impacted sites regarding the reference ones. The species analyzed showed a high variable response because patterns were dominated by small-scale variability. Occasional peaks in abundance were observed on a single sampling site and time and a large variation among replicates. The associated fauna, formerly rich and diverse in impacted sites, shows a tendency to disappear as the ecosystem engineer Brachidontes rodriguezii is replaced by monocultures of B. proboscidea. PMID:25455814

  5. Reproduction, population dynamics and production of Nereis falsa (Nereididae: Polychaeta) on the rocky coast of El Kala National Park, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daas, Tarek; Younsi, Mourad; Daas-Maamcha, Ouided; Gillet, Patrick; Scaps, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    The polychaete Nereis falsa Quatrefages, 1866 is present in the area of El Kala National Park on the East coast of Algeria. Field investigations were carried out from January to December 2007 to characterize the populations' reproductive cycle, secondary production and dynamics. Reproduction followed the atokous type, and spawning occured from mid-June to the end of August/early September when sea temperature was highest (20-23°C). The diameter of mature oocytes was approximately 180 μm. Mean lifespan was estimated to about one year. In 2007, the mean density was 11.27 ind. m-2 with a minimum of 7.83 ind. m-2 in April and a maximum of 14.5 ind. m-2 in February. The mean annual biomass was 1.36 g m-2 (fresh weight) with a minimum of 0.86 g m-2 in December and a maximum of 2.00 g m-2 in June. The population consisted of two cohorts distinguishable from size frequency distributions. One cohort corresponded to the recruitment of 2006 and the other appeared during the study period in September 2007. The annual production of N. falsa was 1.45 g m-2 year-1, and the production/biomass ratio was 1.07 year-1.

  6. Accumulation and elimination of14C-γ-HCH (lindane) in Nereis virens (Polychaeta) with consideration of metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerke, H.; Ernst, W.

    1980-03-01

    In two experiments, conducted at 6° and 16 °C, 43 Nereis virens were exposed to14C-labelled γ-HCH (lindane) at a concentration of 1 µg/l, which was maintained by intermittent monitoring and redosing. A closed system with individuals living in glass tubes was used. At equilibrium and during the subsequent phase of elimination, both γ-HCH and metabolites were determined in individual worms as well as in the water and faeces throughout the entire experiment. The bioconcentration factors of γ-HCH were 480 and 440 at 6° and 16 °C, respectively; those based on total radioactivity were 500 and 410. These factors were in the upper range of those known for other aquatic animals. The elimination may be described by an exponential function. The initial 50% decrease of γ-HCH and γ-HCH+metabolites in the worms occurred at both temperatures in 2 and 3 days, respectively. The percentage of γ-HCH metabolites in worms increased considerably during the elimination period. At least four metabolites were detected in worms and water. If pollutants are evaluated by accumulation and elimination kinetics, metabolization has to be taken into account.

  7. Distribution and abundance of freshwater polychaetes, Manayunkia speciosa (Polychaeta), in the Great Lakes with a 70-year case history for western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Manayunkia speciosa has been a taxonomic curiosity for 150 years with little interest until 1977 when it was identified as an intermediate host of a fish parasite (Ceratomyxa shasta) responsible for fish mortalities (e.g., chinook salmon). Manayunkia was first reported in the Great Lakes in 1929. Since its discovery, the taxon has been reported in 50% (20 of 40 studies) of benthos studies published between 1960 and 2007. When found, Manayunkia comprised 2) and Georgian Bay (1790/m2) than in five other areas (mean = 60 to 553/m2) of the lakes. A 70-year history of Manayunkia in western Lake Erie indicates it was not found in 1930, was most abundant in 1961 (mean = 8039, maximum = 67,748/m2), and decreased in successive periods of 1982 (3529, 49,639/m2), 1993 (1876, 25,332/m2), and 2003 (79, 2583/m2). It occurred at 48% of stations in 1961, 58% in 1982, 52% in 1993, and 6% of stations in 2003. In all years, Manayunkia was distributed primarily near the mouth of the Detroit River. Causes for declines in distribution and abundance are unknown, but may be related to pollution-abatement programs that began in the 1970s, and invasion of dreissenid mussels in the late-1980s which contributed to de-eutrophication of western Lake Erie. At present, importance of the long-term decline of Manayunkia in Lake Erie is unknown.

  8. EFFECTS OF A CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS AND POPULATION GROWTH RATE OF NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA (POLYCHAETA:NEREIDAE) IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of a highly contaminated sediment on life history traits and population dynamics of the nereid polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata Moore were assessed in a laboratory experiment. Survival, growth and fecundity were measured for one generation of worms exposed to 40 an...

  9. Redescription of Tharyx killariensis (Southern) from Ireland and description of two new species of Tharyx from the Kattegat, Sweden (Polychaeta, Cirratulidae).

    PubMed

    Blake, James A; Göransson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of the cirratulid genus Tharyx are reported from shallow waters in the Kattegat inshore Sweden. In addition, the lectotype of Tharyx killariensis (Southern, 1914) is redescribed resulting in a revised concept of the noto- and neuropodial acicular spines of posterior parapodia for that species. These spines were originally reported as bidentate crotchets with sharply pointed teeth; in reality the spines have blunt, knob-shaped tips, typical of several other species of Tharyx. Both of the new species are atypical for the genus Tharyx. T. maryae n. sp. has an expanded posterior end more typical of the genus Aphelochaeta, but otherwise shares characters of Tharyx. T. robustus n. sp. has a body shape that is consistently broad and dorsoventrally flattened throughout, rather than elongate and narrow as in other species of the genus. Both of the new species, however, have short, blunt-tipped spines in far posterior parapodia. With the addition of the two new species, the genus Tharyx now includes 11 species that are compared and contrasted. Morphology that defines and characterizes species of Tharyx is reviewed. PMID:26624637

  10. A new species of Perinereis (Polychaeta, Nereididae) from Florida, USA, with a key to all Perinereis from the American continent

    PubMed Central

    de León-González, Jesús Angel; Goethel, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Specimens belonging to a new species of Perinereis Kinberg, 1865 were collected fromnatural oyster reefs in an estuarine environmenton Florida’s southwest coast. The genus Perinereis includes more than 70 species, of which, Perinereis aibuhitensis (Grube, 1878), Perinereis brevicirrata (Treadwell, 1920), Perinereis camiguinoides (Augener, 1922), Perinereis jascooki Gibbs, 1972, Perinereis kuwaitensis Mohammad, 1970, Perinereis singaporiensis (Grube, 1878), Perinereis vancaurica (Ehlers, 1868) and the new species have two short bars on Area VI and notopodial dorsal ligules that are not greatly expanded. The most geographically close species is Perinereis brevicirrata. The new species can be distinguished from Perinereis brevicirrata by the absence of a notopodial prechaetal lobe, Area V with 3 cones in a triangle, and Area VII-VIII with two well-defined rows of 33 paragnaths, the basal row having longer paragnaths in relation to the distal ones. The new species resembles Perinereis singaporiensis based on the absence of notopodial prechaetal lobe; however, the two species differ in some morphological characteristics such as tentacular cirri length, shape of dorsal notopodial ligules, and falciger blades. A key to all American species of Perinereis is included. PMID:23825444

  11. Tetractinomyxon stages genetically consistent with Sphaerospora dicentrarchi (Myxozoa: Sphaerosporidae) found in Capitella sp. (Polychaeta: Capitellidae) suggest potential role of marine polychaetes in parasite's life cycle.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Luis F; Castro, Ricardo; Rocha, Sónia; Severino, Ricardo; Casal, Graça; Azevedo, Carlos; Cavaleiro, Francisca; Santos, Maria J

    2016-07-01

    Known life cycles of myxosporean parasites have two hosts, but very few life cycles have been disclosed, especially in the marine environment. Sphaerospora dicentrarchi Sitjà-Bobadilla and Álvarez-Pellitero, 1992 is a systemic parasite from the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758), a highly valuable commercial fish. It affects its health, leading to aquaculture production losses. During 2013 and 2014, an actinospore survey was conducted in a total of 5942 annelids collected from a fish farm in Algarve and from the Aveiro Estuary, in Portugal. A new tetractinomyxon actinospore was found in a capitellid polychaete, belonging to the genera Capitella collected at the fish farm. The tetractinomyxons were pyriform measuring 11·1 ± 0·7 µm in length and 7·2 ± 0·4 µm in width, and presented three rounded polar capsules measuring 2·4 ± 0·3 µm in diameter. The molecular analysis of the 18S rRNA gene sequences from the tetractinomyxons revealed a similarity of 100% with the DNA sequences deposited in the GenBank from S. dicentrarchi myxospores collected from the European seabass and the spotted seabass in the same fish farm and 99·9% similarity with the DNA sequence obtained from the myxospores found infecting the European seabass in the Aveiro Estuary. Therefore, the new tetractinomyxons are inferred to represent the actinospore phase of the S. dicentrarchi life cycle. PMID:27041279

  12. Revision of Lepidonopsis humilis (Augener, 1922) and description of L. barnichae sp. nov. (Annelida: Polychaeta: Polynoidae) based upon morphological and molecular characters.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Silva, Patricia; Carrera-Parra, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Lepidonopsis humilis (Augener, 1922) has been considered as an amphiamerican species, widely recorded in both the Grand Caribbean region and the Tropical Eastern Pacific. Based on type material and additional materials, L. humilis is redescribed herein and its distribution clarified and restricted. Furthermore, the identity of specimens from the Mexican Pacific is clarified and a new species L. barnichae sp. nov. is described. This species is characterized by conical macrotubercles with slightly curved tips; all elytra with a tuft of papillae on the surface, isolated from the marginal papillae; and the second segment dorsally projecting over the prostomium as a small lobe. Additionally, there is a 17.6% genetic divergence in the nucleotide sequence variation of COI between L. humilis and L. barnichae sp. nov., which supports the morphological differences observed. Thus, L. humilis does not have an amphiamerican distribution but is restricted to the Gran Caribbean region; whereas the specimens from the Tropical Eastern Pacific belong to the newly described species L. barnichae sp. nov. A key to the three known species of Lepidonopsis is included. PMID:24869887

  13. Prionospio (Polychaeta, Spionidae) from the Grand Caribbean Region, with the descriptions of five new species and a key to species recorded in the area.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Blas, Víctor Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Six species of Prionospio are described from the Southern Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. Five of these species, P. austella sp. nov., P. crassumbranchiata sp. nov., P. jonatani sp. nov., P. oligopinnulata sp. nov., and P. rotunda sp. nov. are new to science whereas Prionospio cristata Foster, 1971 has been previously described from the Grand Caribbean region. P. austella sp. nov. has a prostomium with a small medial peak on the anterior margin, low dorsal folds on chaetigers 6-11, rounded and subtriangular neuropodial lamellae on chaetigers 1 and 3, respectively, and all hooks lack a secondary hood. P. crassumbranchiata sp. nov. has a laterally separate peristomium partially fused dorsally with chaetiger 1, digitiform pinnules on the lateral and posterior faces of the first pair of branchiae and rectangular neuropodial lamellae on chaetigers 2-5. Prionospio jonatani sp. nov. has a narrow prostomium, subtriangular notopodial lamellae on chaetigers 6-21, notopodial prechaetal lamellae slightly basally fused with the notopodial postchaetal lamellae and square neuropodial lamellae on chaetiger 3. P. oligopinnulata sp. nov. has a square-shaped prostomium, high dorsal crests on chaetigers 7-8, low dorsal folds on chaetigers 9-14, subtriangular neuropodial lamellae on chaetigers 2-3, and branchial pairs 2 and 3 are triangular. P. rotunda sp. nov. has an anteriorly rounded prostomium, trapezoid neuropodial lamellae on chaetiger 3, high dorsal crests on chaetiger 7, and branchial pairs 2 and 3 are cirriform. A key is provided for all the species known from the Grand Caribbean region in the "steentrupi-group" with four branchial pairs. PMID:25661022

  14. A BETHNIC BIOASSAY USING TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY TO MEASURE THE EFFECT OF TOXICANTS ON THE FEEDING BEHAVIOR OF LUGWORMS (POLYCHAETA:ARENICOLIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A benthic assay was developed utilizing time-lapse photography to measure the feeding activity of a lugworm, Arenicola cristata. Automated 35 mm cameras were used to record formation of feeding funnels at 12-hour intervals. Substrate surface area reworked by lugworms held under i...

  15. The Distribution and Occurrence of Acholoë squamosa(Polychaeta: Polynoidae) a Commensal with the Burrowing Starfish Astropecten irregularis(Echinodermata: Asteroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S. M.; Richardson, C. A.; Seed, R.

    1998-07-01

    The distribution and abundance of Acholoë squamosa, a commensal with the burrowing starfish Astropecten irregularis, at 17 sites off the western and south-western coasts of the British Isles are described. A total of 4329 Astropectenand 3362 Acholoëwere examined. Population density of Astropectenranged from 5 to 592 individuals ha -1with higher densities typically associated with finer-grained sandy or muddy sediments. There was considerable inter-site variability in colonization rates with maximum colonization approaching 90%. The occurrence of Acholoëwas negatively correlated with the modal arm size of the host population and with water depth, factors which were themselves significantly correlated. Most adult worms occurred in the ambulacral grooves, and worms were sometimes observed with their head and anterior body region inside the mouth of the host, presumably feeding on stomach contents. Marked seasonal trends in abundance of the Astropectenpopulation were not accompanied by any comparable changes in the levels of colonization by Acholoë. Never more than one adult worm (i.e. >15 mm in length) occurred on the same starfish, indicating that intra-specific factors may control the distribution of Acholoë; multiple colonization comprised a single adult worm with up to three juveniles (i.e. worms <15 mm). In late autumn and late spring to early summer, newly recruited Acholoëwere found between the inferomarginal plates of the host where they were afforded protection by the over-arching ossicle spines. The sex ratio appeared to be strongly biased (20:1) towards females.

  16. Population Dynamics, Reproductive Biology and Productivity of Streblospio shrubsolii (Polychaeta: Spionidae) in Different Sediments at Low Salinities in a Mediterranean Lagoon (Monolimni Lagoon, Northern Aegean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2005-02-01

    Monthly samples of Streblospio shrubsolii were collected from February 1998 to February 1999 at both parts of Monolimni Lagoon (0.3 psu < Sal. < 6 psu). Streblospio shrubsolii displayed a life cycle of about one year. Reproductive activity occurred from February to October. The worms showed a mean of 14 or 16 gametogenic segments. Reproductive activity, growth and density increased during spring despite the low salinities (0.3 psu). Streblospio shrubsolii showed faster growth, larger body size during autumn-winter, more reproductive peaks, a relatively higher mean annual density, mean anual biomass (B) and annual production (P) at the innermost part of the lagoon, in organically richer very fine sand, than those at the outer part in fine sand. Mean annual density was 1,320 individuals m-2 at the outer part and 1,745 individuals m-2 at the innermost. Production calculated by Hynes's method gave a B of 0.20 g DW m-2 y-1 and P of 0.45 g DW m-2 y-1 at the outer part; the respective values at the innermost part were 0.29 g DW m-2 y-1 and 0.61 g DW m-2 y-1.

  17. New species of Scalibregmatidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the East Antarctic Peninsula including a description of the ecology and post-larval development of species of Scalibregma and Oligobregma.

    PubMed

    Blake, James A

    2015-01-01

    A large collection of scalibregmatid polychaetes from the east Antarctic Peninsula in May 2000 has yielded specimens of three new species of Scalibregma, Pseudoscalibregma, and Oligobregma. The new species of Scalibregma is represented by more than 400 specimens that include post-larval and juvenile forms which, for the first time, provide data on the sequence of development of key characters of a scalibregmatid. These data demonstrate that taxonomic characters including the form of the prostomium and presence of branchiae develop late in ontogeny and that small specimens cannot be reliably referred to a species or genus without a growth sequence. Juvenile morphology is also presented for the new species of Oligobregma. The new species of Scalibregma is compared with five northern hemisphere species and differs in details of the peristomium, upper and lower lips of the mouth, dorsal and ventral cirri, and nature of the short spinous setae of setiger 1. The new species of Pseudoscalibregma is unique in the nature of asymmetrical ventral cirri of posterior setigers. The new species of Oligobregma has large acicular spines in both noto- and neuropodia and these are present in juveniles. However, the final adult configuration of the prostomium is not evident until late in development. The taxonomic significance of the timing of development of post-larval and juvenile morphology elucidated in this study is discussed in relation to the validity of certain taxa and the current system of genera used in the family. PMID:26624392

  18. Habitat selection and adult-recruit interactions in Pectinaria koreni (Malmgren) (Annelida: Polychaeta) post-larval populations: Results of flume experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Frédéric; Desroy, Nicolas; Retière, Christian

    1996-12-01

    The fate of recently settled populations of soft-bottom invertebrates depends not only on dispersal of pelagic larvae by tidal currents but also on other physical ( e. g. resuspension) and biological mechanisms ( e.g. habitat selection and adult-recruit interactions) acting at the water-substratum interface. To assess the relative importance of such processes under megatidal conditions in the Abra alba community of the eastern Baie de Seine (English Channel), flume experiments were conducted on post-larvae of the dominant polychaete species, Pectinaria koreni. Habitat selection by post-larvae of P. koreni was determined in a first set of experiments, where individuals were sowed either on a suitable or on an unsuitable substratum. Once resuspended, post-larvae were given a choice between two highly contrasting treatments with a natural organic-rich muddy sand and a bare flat PVC surface. P. koreni post-larvae were able to leave an unfavourable substratum into which they had initially burrowed and reach a more suitable substrate by drifting (induced by the secretion of mucus) before final settlement. The influence of adults on habitat selection and survival of P. koreni post-larvae was analysed in a second set of experiments, where individuals were sowed onto a suitable sediment with adults (test treatment) or without (control treatment). The presence of conspecific adults induced a high resuspension rate of the post-larvae. Drifting occurred mainly just after the introduction of the current and affected the whole experimental population, regardless of size. Such a response seems to be related to the intense bioturbation caused by the sub-surface deposit-feeding habit of the adults, which alters the boundary-layer flow. In contrast, the presence of adults of Owenia fusiformis, another dominant polychaete of the Abra alba community, led to an enhanced recruitment by a reduction in post-larvae resuspension. In fact, at low shear velocities, dense aggregates of tubes stabilize the sediment and so act as particle traps. Thus, in the megatidal environment of the Baie de Seine, physical conditions and behavioural responses interact and contribute to structuring the benthic community.

  19. First record and establishment of Branchiomma coheni (Polychaeta: Sabellidae) in the Atlantic Ocean and review of non-indigenous species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Keppel, Erica; Tovar-Hernández, Maria Ana; Ruiz, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Sabellidae are among the most visible polychaetes of the hard substrate fouling communities and are colonizing new geographic areas. The fouling community was surveyed in 25 shallow coastal estuaries on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States with the specific goal of detecting non-indigenous species. During surveys in 2012 and 2014, specimens of Branchiomma coheni Tovar-Hernández and Knight-Jones, 2006 were found for the first time in Tampa Bay, Florida, occurring at the same marina site (27°53'7.58"N, 82°32'2.29"W) each year and suggesting it is established here. The species was not detected at other sites surveyed in the United States, and has not been reported from the eastern Atlantic or the Mediterranean basin. Type material of B. coheni, specimens from southern Gulf of California, and specimens from the Pacific coast of Mexico, were used to corroborate identification. The transfer of this species by ships via the Panama Canal is a probable mechanism of introduction, based on the current known distribution and shipping traffic patterns. This represents the first record of the species in the Atlantic Ocean. A worldwide update of the records of this species and a list of valid species of the genus Branchiomma with notes on introduced populations are provided, as well as recommendations for accurate identification and sampling. PMID:26701542

  20. In vivo measurements of the internal pH of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor (Annelida, Polychaeta) exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions using pH microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Stefan; Jahn, Andreas; Funke, Friederike; Brenke, Nils

    The effect of different ambient sulphide concentrations on the internal pH regime of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor was studied under in vivo conditions using liquid membrane pH microelectrodes, a method which is new to marine sciences. As a case study, the hypothesis was tested whether organisms exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions are able to lower their internal pH which, in effect, would reduce sulphide influx into the animals and thus could represent an effective detoxification mechanism. It was shown that a significant lowering of the internal pH occurred within only 20min after adding sulphide. This pH lowering appeared to be dependent on the external sulphide concentration of the ambient medium and showed a saturation beyond a threshold level of about 130μM. It is discussed whether this sulphide-induced pH drop is an active regulatory mechanism and acts as an effective protection mechanism against sulphide during short-term exposures.

  1. On the Dramatic Increase ofDitrupa arietina O.F. Müller (Annelida: Polychaeta) Along Both the French and the Spanish Catalan Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grémare, A.; Sardá, R.; Medernach, L.; Jordana, E.; Pinedo, S.; Amouroux, J. M.; Martin, D.; Nozais, C.; Charles, F.

    1998-10-01

    The distribution and population structure of the serpulid polychaete Ditrupa arietinawere assessed along the section of the Mediterranean coast between Barcelona and Montpellier. The study combined: (1) the analysis of the existing historical data referring to the period before the 1970s; (2) the results of impact assessment surveys carried out in the late 1980s and the 1990s; and (3) the results of two surveys carried out in the Bay of Blanes and along the coast between Cape Cerbère and Port-la-Nouvelle during 1996. The results of the surveys carried out in the 1990s show the occurrence of high densities (i.e. >1000 ind m -2) of Ditrupa arietinaat all the sites sampled. These results can be compared with the few reports of this species before 1970, leading to the conclusion that D. arietinahas recently increased all along the Catalan coast. Ditrupa arietinais preferentially found between 20 and 30 m depth, which mostly corresponds to well-sorted fine sands and muddy sands. Both the results of population monitoring and the heterogeneity of population structure at small spatial scale show that the dynamics of this species is unstable. The observed distribution pattern is therefore interpreted as resulting from a response to both wide-scale environmental parameters (accounting for the dramatic increase of the species at a wide geographical scale), and to local environmental factors (accounting for small-scale heterogeneity in population structure). Analysis of the relationship between sedimentary data and densities of D. arietinasuggests that this species is highly sensitive to the presence of fine sediments. However, because of the regional importance of the phenomenon, it is concluded that the dramatic increase of D. arietinaalong both the Spanish and the French Catalan coast does not result from sediment instability.

  2. Ampharetidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from cold seeps off Pakistan and hydrothermal vents off Taiwan, with the description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Reuscher, Michael G; Fiege, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The new ampharetid species Eclysippe yonaguniensis sp. nov. and Glyphanostomum bilabiatum sp. nov. from the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field off the coast of Taiwan and Pavelius makranensis sp. nov. from the cold seeps in the Makran accretionary prism off the coast of Pakistan are described. Amage cf. ehlersi Reuscher, Fiege & Imajima, 2015 and Anobothrus dayi Imajima, Reuscher & Fiege, 2013 are newly recorded from the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field. PMID:27470798

  3. Redescription of Alitta succinea (Leuckart, 1847) and reinstatement of A. acutifolia (Ehlers, 1901) n. comb. based upon morphological and molecular data (Polychaeta: Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Guerrero, Tulio F; Carrera-Parra, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    The nereidid worm Alitta succinea (Leuckart, 1847), described from Western Germany, has been considered by some authors as a widespread and alien invasive species, or else as a group of morphologically indistinguishable species. Neither idea has yet been supported by critical taxonomic revisions of relevant material. Most characterizations of A. succinea were based upon a mixture of morphological features from specimens from the type locality and from other regions. Moreover, four species described from America are considered junior synonyms of A. succinea, including Nereis acutifolia Ehlers, 1901, described from the eastern tropical Pacific. The type material of the latter species has not been reviewed since its description. We re-examined type and topotype materials of A. succinea and N. acutifolia including atokous and epitokous specimens. In addition, newly collected specimens were used to evaluate genetic divergence between both species using the mitochondrial gene COI. Alitta succinea is redescribed from type material and specimens from Germany. We rejected the recent placement of the species in Neanthes and we transferred it to Alitta. Further, we refuse the synonymy of N. acutifolia with A. succinea due to morphological and molecular differences. Consequently, we regard Alitta acutifolia n. comb. as a valid species, and the supposed introduction and the alien status of A. succinea along the Mexican and Central American Pacific shores are rejected. PMID:25781122

  4. Understanding the life of a sandy beach polychaete of functional importance - Scolelepis squamata (Polychaeta: Spionidae) on Belgian sandy beaches (northeastern Atlantic, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speybroeck, Jeroen; Alsteens, Lotte; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2007-08-01

    The cosmopolitan sandy beach polychaete Scolelepis squamata constitutes an important food resource for juvenile flatfish and wading birds in the northeastern Atlantic, thus playing an important role in sandy beach ecosystem functioning. However, its population dynamics and life history in this part of the world have gone widely uninvestigated. Eight beach transects on Belgian sandy beaches were sampled monthly from October 2003 until October 2004, in order to investigate seasonal trends in the species' abundance, biomass, secondary production, and patterns in reproduction and zonation. Average density, modal density and modal biomass (ash-free dry weight) (mean average density = 169 ± 9 SE ind/m 2; mean modal density = 505 ± 38 SE ind/m 2; mean modal biomass = 0.25 ± 0.02 SE g/m 2) did not exhibit major seasonal changes, whereas average biomass (0.081 ± 0.005 SE g/m 2) and individuals and biomass per strip transect (IST = 16286 ± 1330 SE ind/m; BMST = 7.8 + 0.7 SE g/m) did, peaking in May 2004. Production was calculated at 1.9 g/(m 2*year) (size-frequency method, SFM) and 0.88 g/(m 2*year) (mass specific growth rate method, MSGR) and mean annual biomass was 0.797 g/m 2; resulting in a P/B ratio of 2.40/year (SFM) and 1.11/year (MSGR), which is intermediate to moderately low compared to other polychaete species. Gravid individuals were found from February until August and a single recruitment period was observed from July until September. An average sex ratio of 1.41 ± 0.08 SE was calculated, with a female predominance. Highest densities (>200 ind/m 2) were mostly found above 3 m above MLLWS and at a median grain size from 190 to 320 μm. Average modal or peak density along each transect was situated from 3.95 m up to 4.40 m above MLLWS, in contrast to some other studies where the species was restricted to mid-tidal levels. Significant differences in elevation of peak density were found between non-gravid (411 ± 4 SE cm) and gravid (402 ± 5 SE cm) animals, but none between gravid males and females. The portion of the tidal range that was occupied by the species in the vertical dimension, just failed to differ significantly between non-gravid and gravid individuals, while gravid males (48.2 ± 5.6 SE cm) occupied a significantly wider range than gravid females (36.8 ± 4.7 SE cm), corresponding with a horizontal range difference of 6-9 m cross-shore. The observed zonation pattern, together with a trend in the difference of peak abundance elevation between males and females, are hypothesised to be a result of a strategy of gravid animals to ensure co-occurrence in a narrower zone during reproduction. Observed differences between Brazilian, Moroccan and Belgian populations (e.g. density, biomass, productivity, P/B, life span, body width, period of presence of gravid individuals and recruitment) do not seem to concur with differences in morphodynamics and might be attributed to latitude-associated gradients like climate. Furthermore, the fact that Scolelepis squamata, as defined today, might be a superspecies, cannot be ruled out.

  5. Response of Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta, Nereidae) populations to reduced wastewater discharge in the polluted estuary of Oued Souss, Bay of Agadir, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Alla, A.; Gillet, P.; Deutsch, B.; Moukrim, A.; Bergayou, H.

    2006-12-01

    Field investigations on the population dynamics of Nereis diversicolor were carried out from January 2002 to December 2003 in the estuary of Oued Souss (southwestern Morocco) to determine the changes caused by setting up of a domestic and industrial wastewater purification plant (M'zar) before and after by the end of wastewater discharges in November 2002 on the structure of the ecosystem. Samples of N. diversicolor were collected monthly in the intertidal zone at low tide before (during 2002) and after (during 2003) the end of wastewater discharges. Separation of cohorts using the Algorithm EM method (McLachlan, G.J., Krishnan, T., 1997. The EM algorithm and extensions. Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics. Wiley, New York, 274 pp.) allowed determination of the growth rate (mm day -1) by cohort and the annual production. The data showed significant differences between populations of Nereis diversicolor before and after the end of wastewater discharges. During the wastewater discharge period (2002), the population had a mean annual density of 1992 ind m -2, a mean annual biomass of 75.52 g DW m -2 and an annual secondary production of 141.3 g DW m -2 with a P/ B ratio of 1.87. After the end of discharges (2003), density, biomass and secondary production decreased significantly. The annual averages for these parameters were 740 ind m -2, 14.16 g DW m -2 and 23.83 g DW m -2, respectively, with a P/ B ratio of 1.68. The important decrease observed in density, biomass and secondary production of Nereis diversicolor may be attributed (a) to the environmental changes observed after the end of wastewater discharges in the estuary of Oued Souss, namely the increase of salinity and the decrease of organic matter content, and (b) to the migration of this species towards other areas.

  6. Long-term incubation of adult Nereis virens (Annelida: Polychaeta) in copper-spiked sediment: the effects on adult mortality, gametogenesis, spawning and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Watson, G J; Pini, J; Leach, A; Fones, G

    2013-03-15

    Late gametogenic Nereis virens were incubated for up to 2.5 months in environmentally relevant concentrations of copper-spiked sediment. Sequential extraction confirmed that much more labile copper (in actual and percentage terms) was present as spiked concentrations increased, although the residual fractions contained similar amounts across concentrations. This is also reflected in the tissue concentration of the worms which increased in line with the sediment concentrations. Adult mortality was not dependent on the exposure time, but higher concentrations usually induced greater mortality for both sexes. Oocytes were significantly smaller at higher concentrations although pairwise comparisons did not show specific differences. Spawning of males occurred a number of days earlier in the higher concentrations. Differences in the number of embryos developing normally after in vitro fertilizations of oocytes fertilized with sperm from exposed males and non-exposed males showed that sperm were more susceptible to toxicity, but oocytes were also affected at the highest concentration. These results show that there are direct and indirect reproductive consequences of parental exposure to copper with implications for recruitment and subsequent colonization of polluted sediments for this ecologically and commercially important species. PMID:23261667

  7. Intersite variations of a battery of biomarkers at different levels of biological organisation in the estuarine endobenthic worm Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta, Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Fossi Tankoua, O; Buffet, P E; Amiard, J C; Amiard-Triquet, C; Méléder, V; Gillet, P; Mouneyrac, C; Berthet, B

    2012-06-15

    The ragworm Nereis diversicolor has been proposed as a sentinel species for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality. The aim of this study was to test the responsiveness of the worms using a battery of biomarkers in specimens from a moderately contaminated site (Loire estuary, Fr.) and a comparatively cleaner site (Bay of Bourgneuf, Fr.) as a reference site. Ragworms were collected on 7 occasions from April 2008 to October 2009 for the determination of biochemical (GST, AChE, digestive enzymes), physiological (energy reserves (glycogen, lipids and proteins), relationship between length and weight), and behavioural (feeding and burrowing) biomarkers. The biomarker responses were tentatively interpreted in terms of the concept of cascading events potentially responsible for local depletion/extinction of populations submitted to chemical stress. Impairments of AChE and amylase activities, feeding rate, energy reserve concentrations (glycogen and lipids), and the relationship between length and weight showed up differences between the reference site and the Loire estuary despite the latter being far from the most contaminated estuary in France or internationally. However, no links could be established in the Loire estuary ragworms between effects at infra-individual and individual levels, nor with worm population density, even though a small oil spill had occurred in the Loire estuary only one month before the beginning of sampling. PMID:22417766

  8. First record of a Vestimentifera (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae) from chemosynthetic habitats in the western Mediterranean Sea—Biogeographical implications and future exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilário, A.; Comas, M. C.; Azevedo, L.; Pinheiro, L.; Ivanov, M. K.; Cunha, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    A new population of vestimentiferan tubeworms was discovered during a recent expedition to a mud volcano field in the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean Sea. Morphological data and mitochondrial cytochrome-c-oxidase subunit 1 (COI) sequences show that the Alboran tubeworm is essentially identical to Lamellibrachia sp. found in the eastern Mediterranean. This is the first record of a vestimentiferan species in the western basin of the Mediterranean, an area with direct connection to the Atlantic via the Strait of Gibraltar and therefore of great importance to the study of distributional patterns and evolution of Mediterranean species. We examine the current hypotheses on the biogeographic distribution of vestimentiferan species in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea and conclude that independently of when Lamellibrachia colonized the Mediterranean, neither the present hydrological settings of both Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, nor vestimentiferans reproductive biology are impeditive to the presence of the Mediterranean species of Lamellibrachia in the NE Atlantic. The West African and Lusitanian margins are the most likely places to find living populations of this species in the NE Atlantic.

  9. The unique adaptation of the life cycle of the coelomic gregarine Diplauxis hatti to its host Perinereis cultrifera (Annelida, Polychaeta): an experimental and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Prensier, Gerard; Dubremetz, Jean-Francois; Schrevel, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The coelomic gregarine Diplauxis hatti exhibits a unique adaptation of its life cycle to its polychaete host Perinereis cultrifera. Experimental and ultrastructural observations on natural populations from the English Channel showed that release of parasite spores is concomitant with the polychaete spawning. As the development of P. cultrifera is direct, the notochete larva ingest parts of the jelly coat covered with numerous sporocysts of D. hatti during hatching. Transepithelial migration of the sporozoites takes place in the gut of three- or four-segment notochete larvae and syzygies of about 20 microm are observed in the coelom. Growth of these young syzygies is slow: after 18-24 mo they reach only 60-70 microm. They exhibit active pendular movements. In the English Channel, female and male gametogenesis of P. cultrifera begins at 19 mo and 2 yr, respectively; the somatic transformations (epitoky) in the last 4 mo of their 3-year life. During epitoky, the syzygies undergo an impressive growth and reach 700-800 microm within a few weeks. A shift from pendular to active peristaltic motility is observed when the syzygies reach 200-250 microm. When gamogony occurs, syncytial nuclear divisions are initiated and cellularization produces hundred to thousands of male and female gametes of similar size. The male gametes exhibit a flagellum with 3+0 axoneme. The mixing of the gametes ("danse des gametes") and fertilization are observed during 4-5 h. Zygotes differentiate sporoblasts with eight sporozoites. The sporozoites exhibit the canonical structure of Apicomplexa, a polarized cell with micronemes and rhoptries. PMID:19120801

  10. Clathria (Clathria) Schmidt, 1862 from Brazil with description of a new species and a review of records (Poecilosclerida: Demospongiae: Porifera).

    PubMed

    De Barros, Lydia Vieira; Santos, George Garcia; Pinheiro, Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    We report and describe material of Clathria (Clathria) (Poecilosclerida: Microcionina: Microcionidae) collected from the coast of Brazil: Clathria (C.) nicoleae sp. nov., Clathria (C.) calypso and Clathria (C.) prolifera. Clathria (C.) calypso is also redescribed. Specimens previously recorded from Brazil as Clathria (C.) prolifera were considered to fit better in the taxon Clathria (Wilsonella). The new species was compared with all other (twenty-five) Clathria (C.) species occurring in the Atlantic. The new species differs from the other species by overall morphology and presence of auxiliary tylostrongyle megascleres. PMID:26000418

  11. 'NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA', A CYTOGENETIC MODEL FOR MARINE GENETIC TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic toxicants are present in polluted marine environments and may represent a long-term threat to populations of marine organisms. A cytogenetic model is useful to study the effects of these toxicants. The polychaeta, Neanthes arenaceodentata, was chosen as such a model becau...

  12. Allantoinase in the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouveri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino, Dora R.M.; Brown, G.W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Allantoinase, an enzyme in the purine-urea cycle, was found in Eudistylia vancouveri (Polychaeta). The enzyme had a pH optimum at 7.6. The Km was 0.012 M allantoin, and the Arrhenius energy of activation was 12.6 to 14.6 kcal/mol.

  13. The phylogeny of the Gregarinia (Sporozoa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théodoridès, Jean

    1984-03-01

    The Gregarinia, all parasitic in invertebrates have appeared in marine hosts (Polychaeta). The most primitive are the Archigregarinida (Selenidium) which are intestinal parasites. The Eugreganida (intestinal or coelomic) are found in various marine invertebrates as well as in terrestrial or fresh water arthropods. The Neogregarinida which parasitize only insects have a very reduced number of spores compensated by a schizogony (merogony). The Gregarinia constitute a perfect example of a concomitant evolution between a group of parasites and their hosts.

  14. Two new species of Phrynopus (Anura, Strabomantidae) from high elevations in the Yanachaga-Chemillén National park in Peru (Departamento de Pasco)

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Edgar; Moravec, Jiří; Cusi, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We describe two new species of Phrynopus from a cloud forest of the Cordillera Yanachaga, Yanachaga-Chemillén National Park in Peru and describe and document the first clutch and case of parental care for a species of Phrynopus. One of the new species of Phrynopus is described based on two females (SVL 19.1–21.0 mm) which were found in leaf litter and moss layer in a cloud forest at 2900 m elevation. This new species is most similar to Phrynopus bracki. The second new species of Phrynopus was found in the transitional formation between cloud forest and wet puna at 3000 m elevation. Its description is based on a single female (SVL 20.7 mm) that was observed guarding nine eggs under moss. This new species is most similar to Phrynopus nicoleae. The eggs had a diameter of 5.7–5.8 mm (n = 3) and froglets when hatched a SVL of 6.2–6.5 mm (n = 3). Sympatric anurans include Gastrotheca sp., Pristimantis aniptopalmatus, Pristimantis bromeliaceus, Pristimantis sp., and Rhinella yanachaga. PMID:23226963

  15. Two new species of Phrynopus (Anura, Strabomantidae) from high elevations in the Yanachaga-Chemillén National park in Peru (Departamento de Pasco).

    PubMed

    Lehr, Edgar; Moravec, Jiří; Cusi, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    We describe two new species of Phrynopus from a cloud forest of the Cordillera Yanachaga, Yanachaga-Chemillén National Park in Peru and describe and document the first clutch and case of parental care for a species of Phrynopus. One of the new species of Phrynopus is described based on two females (SVL 19.1-21.0 mm) which were found in leaf litter and moss layer in a cloud forest at 2900 m elevation. This new species is most similar to Phrynopus bracki. The second new species of Phrynopus was found in the transitional formation between cloud forest and wet puna at 3000 m elevation. Its description is based on a single female (SVL 20.7 mm) that was observed guarding nine eggs under moss. This new species is most similar to Phrynopus nicoleae. The eggs had a diameter of 5.7-5.8 mm (n = 3) and froglets when hatched a SVL of 6.2-6.5 mm (n = 3). Sympatric anurans include Gastrotheca sp., Pristimantis aniptopalmatus, Pristimantis bromeliaceus, Pristimantis sp., and Rhinella yanachaga. PMID:23226963

  16. Discovery of intermediate hosts for two species of blood flukes Cardicola orientalis and Cardicola forsteri (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) infecting Pacific bluefin tuna in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Shin, Sang Phil; Honryo, Tomoki; Uchida, Hiro'omi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Fish blood flukes (Aporocotylidae) are important pathogens of farmed finfish around the world. Among them, Cardicola spp. infecting farmed tuna are considered to be serious threats to tuna farming and have received tremendous attention. We conducted periodical samplings at a tuna farming site in Japan between January and May, 2015 to determine the life cycle of Cardicola spp. We collected over 4700 terebellid polychaetes from ropes, floats and frames of tuna culture cages and found nearly 400 infected worms. Sporocysts and cercariae found in Nicolea gracilibranchis were genetically identified as Cardicola orientalis by 28S and ITS2 ribosomal DNA sequences. This was the first discovery of the intermediate host for this parasite species. Infection prevalence and the abundance of N. gracilibranchis significantly varied between sampling points and the highest number of infected terebellids were collected from ropes. We also demonstrated morphologically and molecularly that asexual stages found in a single Amphitrite sp. (Terebellidae) and adult worms isolated from farmed juvenile tuna were Cardicola forsteri. This is the first report of C. forsteri in Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) Thunnus orientalis in Japan. Our results demonstrated that all three species of Cardicola orientalis, C. forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis exist in Japanese farmed PBTs and that they all use terebellid polychaetes as the intermediate hosts. PMID:26571413

  17. Spatial heterogeneity of benthos associated with biogenic structures on the North Carolina continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaff, T. R.; Levin, L. A.

    The objective of this study was to determine if biogenic features such as mounds, pits and tubes produce small-scale (0.1-100 m) spatial heterogeneity in macrofaunal community structure on the continental slope off North Carolina at 850 m. Macrofaunal and microbial communities associated with sediment mounds, pits and level areas were compared off Cape Lookout, North Carolina. No significant differences were found in sediment microbial counts or total macrofaunal distributions. One paraonid polychaete ( Levensenia gracilis) was more abundant in pits than in the other samples, and infaunal anemones exhibited depressed densities in sediment mounds. At a second site, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, infaunal heterogeneity associated with the tube-building foraminiferan Bathysiphon filiformis was examined by comparing an area with high tube densities (93.8 m -2) with an area 100 m away without tubes. No significant differences were found in the distribution and abundances of bacteria between the two areas. The only significant difference found in infaunal densities was the presence of high numbers of reproductive oligochaetes in the 5-10 cm fraction beneath tube beds. Oneterebellid polychaete species ( Nicolea sp.), which lives exclusively on B. filiformis tubes, was absent in the non-tube area. With a few exceptions, the biogenic structures examined at these two sites appeared to exert only minor influence on macrofaunal or microbial community structure. Within each site, slope assemblages examined in this study appeared to be homogeneous on the small scales examined.

  18. [Abundance and biomass of meiobenthos in Lingdingyang Bay of Pearl River Estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-huai; Gao, Yang; Fang, Hong-da

    2011-10-01

    An investigation was conducted on the meiobenthic abundance and biomass in the Lingdingyang Bay of Pearl River Estuary in July-August 2006 (summer), April 2007 (spring), and October 2007 (autumn). A total of 15 meiobenthic groups were recorded, including Nematoda, Copepoda, Polychaeta, Ostracoda, Kinorhyncha, Amphipoda, Cumacea, Tanaidacea, Gnathostomulida, Nemertea, Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Sipuncula, Echiura, and other unidentified taxa. The average abundance of the meiobenthos in spring, summer, and autumn was 272.1 +/- 281.9, 165.1 +/- 147.1 and 246. 4 +/- 369.3 ind 10 cm(-2), and Nematoda was the most dominant group in abundance, accounting for 86.8%, 83.5%, and 93.4% of the total, respectively, followed by Polychaeta, and benthic Copepoda. The meiobenthic abundance had an uneven vertical distribution. 54.1% of the meibenthos were in 0-2 cm sediments, 35.2% were in 2-5 cm sediments, and 10.8% were in 5-10 cm sediments. 87.4% of nematodes were distributed in 0-5 cm sediments. The average biomass of the meiobenthos in spring, summer, and autumn was 374.6 +/- 346.9, 274.1 +/- 352.2, and 270.8 +/- 396.0 microg 10 cm(-2), and Polychaeta was the most dominant group in biomass, accounting for 30.1%, 46.7% and 46.0%, respectively, followed by Nematoda (25.2%, 20.1%, and 34.0%), and Ostracoda (20.6%, 15.3%, and 14.8%). The horizontal distribution of the meiobenthos had a trend of increasing from north to south, and being higher at east than at west. The meiobenthic abundance and biomass had significant positive correlations with water depth. PMID:22263483

  19. Life-history of Nephtys hombergii in Arcachon Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathivat-Lallier, M. H.; Cazaux, C.

    1991-01-01

    Oocyte maturation and emission, planktonic stages and recruitment of juveniles for Nephtys hombergii (Annelida:Polychaeta, Nephtyidae) were studied in several locations of Arcachon Bay, France. At each station, several oocyte emissions could be distinguished, even though they were not synchronized. The decrease in size of oocytes may involve oocyte resorption rather than an actual emission of gametes. Accordingly, two larval cohorts were observed which could be linked to oocyte emission. Post-larvae settled directly in the intertidal area and again two distinct waves of recruitment were observed. It is concluded that in Arcachon Bay Nephtys hombergii, despite a continuous presence of oocytes during breeding, showed a discontinuity of emission.

  20. The Paramyxea Levine 1979: An original example of evolution towards multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desportes, Isabelle

    1984-03-01

    The Paramyxea are parasitic in marine invertebrates. Their development is a sporulation involving the differentiation within a stem cell of several sporonts which produce spores made of cells enclosed inside each other. Three genera are recognized according to the number of spores and sporal cells, and the taxonomic position of the host (Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea). The Paramyxea exhibit both protistan and metazoan characters. Their nine singlets centrioles are observed in different Protoctists whereas the fact that their sporal cells acquire distinctive cytological features may be interpreted as an evolution towards multicellularity.

  1. Trophic ecology and food consumption of fishes in a hypersaline tropical lagoon.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, P H; Tubino, R A; Zambrano, L C; Hunder, D A; Garritano, S R; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the trophic ecology (diet composition, trophic strategy, similarities and overlap between species, feeding period and food consumption) of six benthivorous fish species in Araruama Lagoon, the largest hypersaline tropical lagoon on the east coast of South America, with an area of 210 km(2) and an average salinity of 52. The burrfish Chilomycterus spinosus fed on Anomalocardia flexuosa shell deposits, ingesting associated fauna. The caitipa mojarra Diapterus rhombeus differed from all other species, having not only the highest proportions of algae and Nematoda, but also feeding on polychaete tentacles. The two mojarras Eucinostomus spp. showed similar trophic strategies, feeding mostly on Polychaeta. The corocoro grunt Orthopristis ruber also fed mainly on Polychaeta, but differed from Eucinostomus spp. in secondary items. The whitemouth croacker Micropogonias furnieri fed mainly on small Crustacea at night, showing a high number of secondary prey items with low frequencies and high prey-specific abundance. The daily food consumption (g food g(-1) fish mass) for Eucinostomus argenteus was 0·012 and was 0·031 and 0·027 for M. furnieri in two different sampling events. The diet similarities between Araruama Lagoon and other brackish and marine environments indicate that hypersalinity is not a predominant factor shaping the trophic ecology of fishes in this lagoon. The stability of hypersaline conditions, without a pronounced gradient, may explain the presence of several euryhaline fishes and invertebrates well adapted to this condition, resulting in a complex food web. PMID:26033293

  2. [Abundance and biomass of meiobenthos in Southern Yellow Sea in winter].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-nan; Huang, Yong; Hua, Er

    2007-02-01

    A two cruises investigation on the meiobenthos in the continental shelf of Southern Yellow Sea was made in January 2003 and January 2004. The results showed that the average abundance of meiobenthos was (954.20 +/- 269.47) ind x 10 cm(-2) and ( 1 186.12+/- 486.07) ind x 10 cm(-2), and the biomass was (954.38+/-403.93) microg x10 cm(-2) and (1 120.72+/-487.21 ) mg x 10 cm(-2) in January 2003 and January 2004, respectively, with no significant difference observed. A total of twenty meiobenthic groups were identified. Free-living marine nematodes was the most dominant group in abundance, with a relative dominance of 87% in 2003 and 90% in 2004, followed by benthic harpacticoids copepoda, polychaeta and kinorhyncha. In terms of biomass, the dominant groups were nematoda (34% -38%), polychaeta (25% -33%), ostracoda (9% -22%) and copepoda (8%). 96. 64% of the meiobenthos distributed in the top 0-5 cm of sediment, while 72. 48% of nematode and 89. 46% of copepoda were in the top 0-2 cm of the sediment. Meiobenthos biomass had significant correlation with the sand and silt contents of sediment and the content of Chl-a. The species composition and biodiversity analyses of six representative stations indicated that there were three meiobenthos communities in the study area, i. e. , inshore, cold waters mass, and transitional communities. PMID:17450749

  3. Mortality through ontogeny of soft-bottom marine invertebrates with planktonic larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Troels Møller; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Josefson, Alf B.; Hansen, Benni W.

    2008-09-01

    The present survey covers one spawning season of marine benthic invertebrates in a large geographical area, the inner Danish waters, and includes a wide range of habitats with steep salinity and nutrient load gradients. The loss ratios of soft-bottom marine invertebrates from one development stage to the next is calculated based on average abundances of pelagic larvae, benthic post-larvae and adults of Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Polychaeta and Echinodermata, with planktonic development. This gives a rough estimate of the larval and post-larval mortality. Loss ratios between post-larvae stage and adult stage (post-larval mortality) varies from 3:1 to 7:1 (71.2-84.9%) and loss ratios between larvae and post-larvae (larval mortality) and between larvae and adult, ranging from 7:1 to 42:1 (85.2-97.6%) and from 45:1 to 210:1 (97.8-99.5%), respectively. The results show a remarkable unity in loss ratios (mortality) between the mollusc taxa (Bivalvia and Gastropoda) at the phylum/class level. This similarity in loss ratios among the mollusc taxa exhibiting the same developmental pathways suggests that the mortality is governed by the same biotic and abiotic factors. Larval mortality is estimated to range from 0.10 d - 1 to 0.32 d - 1 for Bivalvia and ranging from 0.09 d - 1 to 0.23 d - 1 for Polychaeta. The species loss ratios combined with specific knowledge of the reproduction cycles give estimated loss ratios (mortality) between the post-larvae and the adult stage of 25:1 and 14:1 for the bivalves Abra spp. and Mysella bidentata. For the polychaete Pygospio elegans the loss ratio (larval mortality) between the larvae and the post-larval stage is 154:1 and between the post-larvae and the adult stage 41:1. For Pholoe inornata the loss ratio between post-larvae and adults is 7:1. The present results confirm that the larval stage, metamorphosis and settlement are the critical phase in terms of mortality in the life cycle for Bivalvia. Assuming steady state based on actual

  4. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  5. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. PMID:16002194

  6. Food habits and seasonal variation of stomach contents of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis (Günther) in the Bohai Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shuozeng

    1993-03-01

    Examination of the food habits and seasonal variation of the stomach contents of adult tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis (Günther) taken in July 1982 July 1983 from Laizhou Bay and the Huanghe River estuary of the Bohai Sea showed crustacea, bivalvia and small fishes comprised the main prey. Invertebrates such as polychaeta, cephalopoda, gastropoda, echinodermata and actiniaria were also intermittently found in them. They intensively fed all the year found (monthly feeding rate of over 80%). The main food items were Alpheus japonica, Alpheus distinguendus. Oratosquilla oratoria, Eucrate crenata and Carcinoplax vestitus, etc. In summer and autumn, the portion of bivalvia such as Cultellus attenuatus and Musculus senhousei increased steadily. From summer to winter, a stable proportion of small fishes such as Rhinogobius pflaumi and Setipinna taty was in the diet.

  7. The macrofauna and macroflora associated with Laminaria digitata and L. hyperborea at the island of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, Kirstin; Janke, Klaus; Krüß, Andreas; Weidemann, Wolfgang

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes the macroflora and macrofauna associated with two bull kelp species, Laminaria hyperborea and L. digitata, at the island of Helgoland, North Sea. During a study period of seven months (March September 1987), 29 macroflora species and 125 macrofauna species were found. The dominant taxonomic groups were Polychaeta (25 species), Bryozoa (17), Amphipoda (14), Hydrozoa (10) and Ascidiae (8). The species maximum was in July. In general, L. hyperborea was preferred as a substrate for settlement to L. digitata. Composition of the communities associated with kelp changed during the season according to exposure to wave action, and according to location on the kelp thallus. The rhizoid community of both kelps bore more species at exposed locations. Wave-exposed L. digitata lacked obvious faunal settlement on both phylloid and cauloid. Phylloid and cauloid of L. hyperborea were chosen as an attractive substrate at both sheltered and wave-exposed locations, showing an association of encrusting bryozoan and hydrozoan colonies.

  8. Description of a new species of Namalycastis (Annelida: Nereididae: Namanereidinae) from the Brazilian coast with a phylogeny of the genus.

    PubMed

    Alves, Paulo Ricardo; Santos, Cinthya Simone Gomes

    2016-01-01

    The subfamily Namanereidinae represents one of the few groups of Polychaeta strongly adapted to low salinity and freshwater. Recently, some new species of the subfamily have been described, but no new phylogenetic analyses for the group have been undertaken since 1999. Here, we describe a new species of Namanereidinae, Namalycastis caetensis sp. nov., and provide a morphology-based phylogenetic analysis of the genus Namalycastis with the aim of assessing the evolutionary relationships for this new species. The designation of this new species is supported by the presence of elongated falcigers (also known as pseudospinigers, an unusual character in the genus), lack of an anterior cleft in the prostomium, slightly indistinct cirrophores, four pairs of tentacular cirri, and subconical acicular ligulae. Our results suggest that Namalycastis caetensis is closely related to N. geayi and N. fauveli. The existence of poorly-characterized species, from a morphological and molecular point of view, still limits our understanding of Namanereidinae relationships. PMID:27470870

  9. Feeding habits of Solea senegalensis in earthen ponds in Sado estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo Branco, Maria Ana; Arruda, Marco A.; Gamito, Sofia

    2010-11-01

    The senegale sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is a commercially valuable fish and it is beginning to be cultured in a semi-intensive way in fish farms in southern European countries. The present study was initiated to investigate the diet of S. senegalensis under semi-extensive conditions. The feeding habits of sole were studied in two earthen ponds of a fish farm in the Sado estuary. In one earthen pond, artificial fish ration was given. S. senegalensis feeds on few prey items, its diet is mainly composed of insect larvae ( Chironomus salinarus) and polychaeta ( Hediste diversicolor). The diet composition of this species suggests feeding specialization, by consuming mainly annelids and insect larvae and by avoiding other items, extremely abundant in the environment, such as gastropods. In the water reservoir where ration was given, some fish consumed simultaneously benthic organism together with ration. However, benthic organisms seem to be the most important component of S. senegalensis diet.

  10. On the taxonomic status of the European Scolelepis (Scolelepis) squamata

    (Polychaeta: Spionidae), with description of a new species from southern Europe

    .

    PubMed

    Surugiu, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify taxonomic problems relating to the identity of Scolelepis (Scolelepis) specimens from the Black Sea, the identified material was compared with specimens of Scolelepis cirratulus (Delle Chiaje, 1829) from the Mediterranean, of S. squamata (Abildgaard, in O.F. Müller, 1806) from the North Sea and the Atlantic coast of Spain, and with the syntypes of S. mesnili (Bellan & Lagardère, 1971) from the Atlantic coast of France. The examination of a large number of specimens (both juveniles and adults) reveals that the currently accepted morphological differences distinguishing all species show size-related patterns, suggesting that they all belong to one species. Therefore, this study supports the view that Scolelepis cirratulus and Scolelepis mesnili are junior synonyms of Scolelepis (Scolelepis) squamata. As a result of the re-assessment of the species limits of Scolelepis (Scolelepis) squamata, a new species, Scolelepis (Scolelepis) neglecta sp. nov., is distinguished and described from the Cantabrian coast of Spain. It inhabits shallow sublittoral fine sands and was earlier misidentified and reported from the Atlantic coast of Europe and the Mediterranean Sea as Scolelepis squamata, Scolelepis mesnili, Scolelepis cantabra (Rioja, 1918), or Dispio uncinata Hartman, 1951. The new species is characterized by having a trilobate prostomium with an acuminate medial portion, a short peristomium with well-developed dorso-lateral wings, short palps with two longitudinal bands of elevated lobes, neuropodial postchaetal lamellae notched from chaetigers 14-41, and strongly curved bidentate neuropodial hooded hooks with a slight constriction on the shaft starting from chaetigers 19-49. The morphology, diagnostic characters and ecology of both Scolelepis (Scolelepis) squamata and Scolelepis (Scolelepis) neglecta sp. nov. are discussed. PMID:27615921

  11. Does a global DNA barcoding gap exist in Annelida?

    PubMed

    Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Accurate identification of unknown specimens by means of DNA barcoding is contingent on the presence of a DNA barcoding gap, among other factors, as its absence may result in dubious specimen identifications - false negatives or positives. Whereas the utility of DNA barcoding would be greatly reduced in the absence of a distinct and sufficiently sized barcoding gap, the limits of intraspecific and interspecific distances are seldom thoroughly inspected across comprehensive sampling. The present study aims to illuminate this aspect of barcoding in a comprehensive manner for the animal phylum Annelida. All cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequences (cox1 gene; the chosen region for zoological DNA barcoding) present in GenBank for Annelida, as well as for "Polychaeta", "Oligochaeta", and Hirudinea separately, were downloaded and curated for length, coverage and potential contaminations. The final datasets consisted of 9782 (Annelida), 5545 ("Polychaeta"), 3639 ("Oligochaeta"), and 598 (Hirudinea) cox1 sequences and these were either (i) used as is in an automated global barcoding gap detection analysis or (ii) further analyzed for genetic distances, separated into bins containing intraspecific and interspecific comparisons and plotted in a graph to visualize any potential global barcoding gap. Over 70 million pairwise genetic comparisons were made and results suggest that although there is a tendency towards separation, no distinct or sufficiently sized global barcoding gap exists in either of the datasets rendering future barcoding efforts at risk of erroneous specimen identifications (but local barcoding gaps may still exist allowing for the identification of specimens at lower taxonomic ranks). This seems to be especially true for earthworm taxa, which account for fully 35% of the total number of interspecific comparisons that show 0% divergence. PMID:25431824

  12. Epifauna of the Sea of Japan collected via a new epibenthic sledge equipped with camera and environmental sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, A.; Elsner, N.; Brenke, N.; Golovan, O.; Malyutina, M. V.; Riehl, T.; Schwabe, E.; Würzberg, L.

    2013-02-01

    Faunistic data from a newly designed camera-epibenthic sledge (C-EBS) are presented. These were collected during the joint Russian-German expedition SoJaBio (Sea of Japan Biodiversity Studies) on board the R.V. Akademik Lavrentyev from four transects (A-D) between 460 and 3660 m depth. In total, 244,531 macro- and megafaunal individuals were sampled with the classes Malacostraca (80,851 individuals), Polychaeta (36,253 ind.) and Ophiuroidea (34,004 ind.) being most abundant. Within the Malacostraca, Peracarida (75,716 ind.) were most abundant and within these, the Isopoda were the dominant taxon (27,931 ind.), followed by Amphipoda (21,403 ind.), Cumacea (13,971 ind.) and Tanaidacea (10,830 ind.). Mysidacea (1581 ind.) were least frequent. Bivalvia, Amphipoda, Cumacea and Mysidacea as well as inbenthic meiofaunal Nematoda occurred in higher numbers at the shallower stations and their numbers decreased with increasing depth. Polychaeta, Isopoda, and Tanaidacea, on the contrary, increased in abundance with increasing depth. Only one isopod species was sampled at abyssal depths in the Sea of Japan but at very high abundance: Eurycope spinifrons Gurjanova, 1933 (Asellota: Munnopsidae). Echinoderms occurred frequently at the shallower slope stations. Ophiuroids were dominating, followed by holothurians, and echinoids and asteroids which occurred in lower numbers and primarily at the shallower stations of transects A and B. Only 2163 individual anthozoans were recorded and these were mostly confined to the lower slope. The technical design of a new C-EBS is described. Next to temperature-insulated epi- and suprabenthic samplers, it is equipped with still and video cameras, which deliver information on seabed topography and megafaunal occurrence. Furthermore, Aanderaa CTD and SEAGUARD RCM allow for collection of physical parameters, such as near bottom oxygen composition, temperature and conductivity.

  13. Distribution, Population Biology, and Trophic Ecology of the Deepwater Demersal Fish Halosauropsis macrochir (Pisces: Halosauridae) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Laura; Hansen, Hege Øverbø; Cousins, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Halosauropsis macrochir ranked amongst the most abundant and widespread demersal fishes on the mid-Atlantic Ridge of the North Atlantic (Iceland-Azores) with greatest abundance at 1700–3500 m. All sizes, ranging from 10–76 cm total length, occurred in the area without any apparent spatial pattern or depth trend. Using otolith sections displaying growth increments assumed to represent annuli, the age range recorded was 2–36 years, but most individuals were <20 years. Length and weight at age data were used to fit growth models. No differences between sexes in length and weight at age were observed. The majority of samples had a surplus of males. Diet analysis showed that H. macrochir feeds on Crustacea, Teleostei, Polychaeta, and Cephalopoda, but few prey could be identified to lower taxonomical levels. The mid-Atlantic Ridge constitutes a major portion of the North Atlantic living space of the abyssal halosaur where it completes its full life cycle, primarily as an actively foraging euryophagous micronekton/epibenthos and infauna feeder, becoming a partial piscivore with increasing size. PMID:22384030

  14. DNA barcoding in Mexico: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Elías-Gutiérrez, M; León-Regagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    DNA barcoding has become an important current scientific trend to the understanding of the world biodiversity. In the case of mega-diverse hot spots like Mexico, this technique represents an important tool for taxonomists, allowing them to concentrate in highlighted species by the barcodes instead of analyzing entire sets of specimens. This tendency resulted in the creation of a national network named Mexican Barcode of Life (MEXBOL) which main goals are to train students, and to promote the interaction and collective work among researchers interested in this topic. As a result, the number of records in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) for some groups, such as the Mammalia, Actinopterygii, Polychaeta, Branchiopoda, Ostracoda, Maxillopoda, Nematoda, Pinophyta, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota place Mexico among the top ten countries in the generation of these data. This special number presents only few of the many interesting findings in this region of the world, after the use of this technique and its integration with other methodologies. PMID:23919390

  15. Polytraits: A database on biological traits of marine polychaetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The study of ecosystem functioning – the role which organisms play in an ecosystem – is becoming increasingly important in marine ecological research. The functional structure of a community can be represented by a set of functional traits assigned to behavioural, reproductive and morphological characteristics. The collection of these traits from the literature is however a laborious and time-consuming process, and gaps of knowledge and restricted availability of literature are a common problem. Trait data are not yet readily being shared by research communities, and even if they are, a lack of trait data repositories and standards for data formats leads to the publication of trait information in forms which cannot be processed by computers. This paper describes Polytraits (http://polytraits.lifewatchgreece.eu), a database on biological traits of marine polychaetes (bristle worms, Polychaeta: Annelida). At present, the database contains almost 20,000 records on morphological, behavioural and reproductive characteristics of more than 1,000 marine polychaete species, all referenced by literature sources. All data can be freely accessed through the project website in different ways and formats, both human-readable and machine-readable, and have been submitted to the Encyclopedia of Life for archival and integration with trait information from other sources. PMID:24855436

  16. Exposure to low pH induces molecular level changes in the marine worm, Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Wäge, Janine; Lerebours, Adelaide; Hardege, Jörg D; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2016-02-01

    Fossil fuel emissions and changes in net land use lead to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and a subsequent decrease of ocean pH. Noticeable effects on organisms' calcification rate, shell structure and energy metabolism have been reported in the literature. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms altered under low pH exposure, especially in non-calcifying organisms. We used a suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) approach to characterise differentially expressed genes isolated from Platynereis dumerilii, a non-calcifying marine polychaeta species, kept at normal and low pH conditions. Several gene sequences have been identified as differentially regulated. These are involved in processes previously considered as indicators of environment change, such as energy metabolism (NADH dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase and ATP synthase subunit F), while others are involved in cytoskeleton function (paramyosin and calponin) and immune defence (fucolectin-1 and paneth cell-specific alpha-defensin) processes. This is the first study of differential gene expression in a non-calcifying, marine polychaete exposed to low pH seawater conditions and suggests that mechanisms of impact may include additional pathways not previously identified as impacted by low pH in other species. PMID:26476878

  17. Effects of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation on Macrobenthos in a Coastal Lagoon of the Southwestern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arocena, R.

    2005-05-01

    The northern, freshwater-dominated, edge of Rocha coastal lagoon in Uruguay, South America, was invaded during recent years by submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). To evaluate the effect of SAV on the composition and abundance of macrozoobenthos, I compared this assemblage between a site that was vegetated in summer-autumn (V) to another one that was always bare (N). Only station V often showed thermal stratification, due to a reduction in water circulation caused by the plants (Potamogeton, Cabomba, Myriophyillum, Ruppia). Both sites had similar water quality and sediment characteristics (70 % sand, 30 % silt). I found a total of 28 benthic taxa: 3 species of Polychaeta, 2 of Mollusca, 3 of Crustacea and 20 genera of Insecta. Taxon richness and total abundance of invertebrates, as well as individual abundance of amphipods, gastropods and chironomids were significantly higher at V compared with N. Conversely, the crustacean Tanais stanfordi, the clam Erodona mactroides and the polychaete Laeonereis culveri were significantly more abundant at the unvegetated site. Moreover, Shannon diversity was higher at N than at V. These results show that the colonization by plants may enhance the variety and the abundance of benthos.

  18. Hemoglobins from deep-sea hydrothermal vent scaleworms of the genus Branchipolynoe: a new type of quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Hourdez, S; Lallier, F H; Green, B N; Toulmond, A

    1999-03-01

    Branchipolynoe symmytilida and B. seepensis are two scaleworms (Polychaeta; Polynoidae) living commensally in the mantle cavity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent and cold-seep mussels. In contrast with littoral members of this family, the two species exhibit a large amount of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) in their coelomic fluid. Gel filtration revealed the existence of four different Hbs: one minor, high molecular mass (3x10(6) Da) Hb, V1-Hb, reminiscent of a vascular hexagonal bilayer annelid Hb; two major coelomic Hbs, C1-Hb, and C2-Hb, with unusual masses for extracellular annelid Hbs of 153 and 124 kDa respectively; and a minor probably coelomic Hb of 23 kDa (C3-Hb). Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, SDS-PAGE after subtilisin treatment, and tandem mass spectrometry, we showed that C1-Hb is a trimer of a 57,996 Da chain and C2-Hb is a dimer of a 57,648 Da chain, each chain being a four-domain/four-heme polypeptide. This multimeric, multidomain arrangement is unique among annelid Hbs and appears different from that of other known multidomain Hbs. PMID:10081955

  19. Contribution to the understanding of the cycle of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens.

    PubMed

    Arzul, I; Chollet, B; Boyer, S; Bonnet, D; Gaillard, J; Baldi, Y; Robert, M; Joly, J P; Garcia, C; Bouchoucha, M

    2014-02-01

    The paramyxean parasite Marteilia refringens infects several bivalve species including European flat oysters Ostrea edulis and Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Sequence polymorphism allowed definition of three parasite types 'M', 'O' and 'C' preferably detected in oysters, mussels and cockles respectively. Transmission of the infection from infected bivalves to copepods Paracartia grani could be experimentally achieved but assays from copepods to bivalves failed. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the M. refringens life cycle, the dynamics of the infection was investigated in O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis and zooplankton over one year in Diana lagoon, Corsica (France). Flat oysters appeared non-infected while mussels were infected part of the year, showing highest prevalence in summertime. The parasite was detected by PCR in zooplankton particularly after the peak of prevalence in mussels. Several zooplanktonic groups including copepods, Cladocera, Appendicularia, Chaetognatha and Polychaeta appeared PCR positive. However, only the copepod species Paracartia latisetosa showed positive signal by in situ hybridization. Small parasite cells were observed in gonadal tissues of female copepods demonstrating for the first time that a copepod species other than P. grani can be infected with M. refringens. Molecular characterization of the parasite infecting mussels and zooplankton allowed the distinguishing of three Marteilia types in the lagoon. PMID:24128728

  20. Mesozooplankton dynamics in relation to food availability during spring and early summer in a high latitude glaciated fjord (Kongsfjorden), with focus on Calanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasniewski, S.; Walkusz, W.; Cottier, F. R.; Leu, E.

    2013-02-01

    The timing of zooplankton reproduction in relation to spring pelagic bloom is essential in determining grazers' recruitment success and the transport of biomass through the system. At high latitudes marine ecosystems are characterized by extreme seasonality with the production of autotrophes concentrated during the spring. In two consecutive years we studied mesozooplankton during spring and early summer in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (79°N), aiming at identifying the main grazers and understanding what affects the timing in zooplankton. The main grazers were females and nauplii of holoplanktonic Calanus, together with meroplanktonic Cirripedia nauplii and Polychaeta larvae. The appearing of offspring and larvae showed a correlation with the spring bloom which occurred earlier in 2004 compared to 2003. The Arctic Calanus glacialis reproduced before its Atlantic counterpart Calanus finmarchicus and prior to the bloom. In the Arctic regions decreasing sea ice cover as a result of climate change is expected to alter the timing of the spring bloom which in turn will pose a need for the zooplankton to adjust their reproduction activities. Subsequently, this adjustment will influence ecosystem functioning mainly by modifying particulate organic matter and energy fluxes.

  1. Evaluation of abyssal meiobenthos in the eastern central Pacific (Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud-Mornant, Jeanne; Gourbault, Nicole

    Meiobenthos were sampled from 17 stations in the abyssal deep-sea system of the central Pacific centered around 14°N, 130°W at depths 4960-5154m, during the Nixo 47 R/V Jean Charcot cruise. Meiofaunal density range from 45-89 ind. 10cm 2. Predominant taxa are nematodes (84-100%) and copepods (0-10%). Rotifera, Polychaeta, and Acarina also occur. Nematodes are uniformly distributed spatially with 45 species or so; Monhysteridae is the dominant taxon, and Syringolaimus sp. (Ironidae) co-occurs faithfully. Low biomass (0.4-70.6μg 10cm 2) are attributed to supposed dwarfism of metazoan meiofauna and very high proportion (60-80%) of juveniles and pre-adult forms. The majority of protozoans and metazoans are detritus- or deposit-feeders; in addition symbiotic associations, coprophagy and gardening activities are frequent. In such an oligotrophic environment, low food supply may limit meiofaunal abundance, biomass and maturation, and to a lesser extent species richness.

  2. Mobile epifauna on Zostera marina, and infauna of its inflorescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1988-06-01

    The faunal colonization of the leaves and inflorescences of intertidal Zostera marina L. and of the ambient water has been studied at the Island of Sylt (North Sea). The abundance of the snail Littorina littorea L. and the isopod Jaera albifrons Leach correlates significantly with leaf surface area. This is not the case with the abundance of meiofaunal Plathelminthes, Nematoda, Copepoda, and Polychaeta. However, they increase significantly with the numbers of generative shoots in the sampled seagrass bunches. Members of these taxa inhabit the Zostera inflorescences, and average abundance increases with the degree of decay of inflorescences. This temporary microhabitat presumably offers food and shelter. Copepods and ostracods dominate in the ambient water. Planktonic calanoid copepods correlate with the amount of sampled seawater, while Ostracoda correlate with the amount of resuspended detritus suggesting that they were resuspended themselves. The study shows that some meiofaunal taxa can rapidly exploit a short-lived habitat such as the Zostera inflorescences. Juvenile polychaetes use inflorescences as a nursery.

  3. Meiobenthos assemblages in the mekong estuarine system with special focus on free-living marine nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Ngo Xuan; Vanreusel, Ann; Smol, Nic; Chau, Nguyen Ngoc

    2010-12-01

    Meiobenthos assemblages in eight estuaries of the Mekong river system were investigated in August 2008 (from the Cua Tieu estuary to the Tran De estuary). In each estuary, one sampling station was established for meiobenthos sampling. Twelve major taxa of meiobenthos were recorded in this estuarine system, including Nematoda, Copepoda, Turbellaria, Polychaeta, Oligochaeta, Tardigrada, Bivalvia, Ostracoda, Amphipoda, Cumacea, Gastrotricha, Gastropoda, and Crustacean Nauplii larvae. The densities of the meiobenthos range from 581 to 3168 inds/10 cm2. Nematodes always occupy the highest numbers with a percentage ranging from 64-99%. There are 135 nematode genera recorded in this study with the following as dominant genera Desmodora, Leptolaimus, Halalaimus, Thalassomonhystera, Theristus, Daptonema, Rhynchonema, Parodontophora, and Oncholaimus. Although the biodiversity of the meiobenthos at higher taxa level is not high compared to other marine environments, the estimates of nematode biodiversity at the genus level indicates high values. The increase in number of genera with increasing sampling intensity illustrate that the diversity is underestimated and would have been higher if the authors had considered a larger number of individuals, more replicates per station, and more sampling stations.

  4. Observation of alive benthos under a sharp hypoxia and high H2S concentrations inside the microbial mats (methane seeps in the shallows of Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulin, M.

    2009-04-01

    In 2008 experimental as well as in situ investigations were implemented for studying of vitality and locomotion activity of the micro- and meiobenthos associated with the gas seeps. Research area: near-shore shallow field with the gas seeps, southern sector of Tarkhankut Cape, NW Crimea Peninsula, Black Sea. Cuvette LDO-oxymeter coupled with other sensors and also life-time diagnostics of the organisms including microscopic video filming were used for this case. Concentrations of dissolved methane in the pore space of microbial mats were varied from 27 to 1076 µL/cm3 (220 on average). Content of organic matter of the uppermost seep mats was approximately in 50 times higher than at the background stations. Probably, such enrichments is attractive for benthic organisms. At the same time, H2S-pollution of seep microbiotope environment is detected as critical (Eh = -400/-460 mV). Near to the gas seeps alive and active Polychaeta, Nematoda, Harpacticoida and Ciliata were found. It is important, that anoxia-adapted organisms of the last two groups were quickly died at contact with air.

  5. On the abundance and activity pattern of zoobenthos inhabiting a tropical reef area, Cebu, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, A.

    1984-12-01

    A benthic faunal study was carried out in the tidal area of Mactan Island (Cebu, Philippines). The area was subdivided along a transect from the beach to the reef according to benthic assemblages. The sediments are largely composed of calcareous skeletal remains of the indigenous biota and surrounding calcareous rocks. The content of protein and carbohydrates of the sediment was estimated, providing an approximation of organic matter in terms of feeding efficiency. Total number of zoobenthos, both as regards the sediment samples and as to the epifaunal communities associated with seaweeds, is rather uniformly distributed justifying the 95% confidence level ( P>0.05). Distinct differences are apparent in abundance values of individual taxa. Although the study area showed the expected distribution pattern, with dominance of Nematoda (39%) living in sediment and Harpacticoida (36 66%) dwelling on Thalassia and algae, Polychaeta reveal a dominant attraction to both these habitats. The reasons for this phenomenon are discussed in relation to the absolute lack of macrofaunal predators The zoobenthos adjust their distribution and activity to fluctuating conditions of the environment. Light is mainly suggested as stimulating diel migration activities of the benthic fauna, moving upwards from the sediment to the algae and Thalassia during daytime. In a field experiment the zoobenthos was investigated for digestion activity over a diurnal cycle. The results reveal that feeding activity of zoobenthos follows a diel cycle showing maximum activity during the morning and evening obviously influenced by changes of light.

  6. Biodiversity of meiofauna in the intertidal khe nhan mudflat, can gio mangrove forest, vietnam with special emphasis on free living nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Quang Ngo; Vanreusel, Ann; Thanh, Nguyen Vu; Smol, Nic

    2007-09-01

    The ecological aspect of meiofaunal communities in Can Gio mangrove forest, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam has not been investigated before. The composition, distribution, density and biodiversity of meiofaunal communities were studied along an intertidal transect at the Khe Nhan mudflat. Each time, three replicate samples were collected in four stations along a transect following the water line from low tide level up to the mangrove forest edge. In total, 18 meiofaunal taxa were found with the dominant taxa belonging to Nematoda, Copepoda, Sarcomastigophora and Polychaeta. The densities of meiofauna ranged from 1156 inds/10 cm2 to 2082 inds/10 cm2. The increase in densities from the mangrove forest edge towards the low water line was significant. Along the mudflat transect, the biodiversity (expressed by different indices) was relatively high at different taxonomic levels but did not vary significantly along the mudflat except for taxa richness. Eighty nematode genera belonging to 24 families with Comesomatidae having the highest abundance 33.8 % were found. Theristus and Neochromadora decreased in densities from the lower water line towards the mangrove forest edge, while Paracomesoma and Hopperia are typical and more abundant at the middle of the mudflat. Halalaimus increased from high on the mudflat to the low water line.

  7. Meiofauna associated with a Pacific coral reef in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Héctor M.; Obando, Vilma L.; Cortés, Jorge

    1987-10-01

    The meiofauna of two coral reef habitats at Isla del Naño, Costa Rica was studied over a one year period. The dominant groups were: Foraminifera (21.2%), Copepoda (19.7%), Nematoda (19.1%), Gastropoda (16.5%), Polychaeta (7.2%) and Bivalvia (6.6%). The highest diversity was found in coarse, heterogeneous sands with the highest percentage of carbonates. The meiofauna showed a high degree of horizontal aggregation, which is a characteristic pattern for macro- and meiofauna in sediments of variable composition. No vertical variation in distribution was evident, probably due to the deep location of the Redox Potential Discontinuity layer. The total densities of organisms found in this study (99 to 575 ind/10 cm2) are low compared with densities in similar non-reefal sands (7 to 6116), and from fine sediments (80 to 17 000), but are comparable to densities found in other reef areas (39 to 609.5 ind/10 cm2). This is the first report on meiofauna from the eastern Pacific, and the first time that foraminiferans are the dominant group.

  8. Are flatfish nursery grounds richer in benthic prey?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Noémie; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2009-08-01

    The density of macrobenthos was evaluated in the nursery grounds for flatfish of six estuarine systems along the coast of Portugal by comparison with adjacent non-nursery areas. The dry weight and density of macrobenthic fauna were significantly higher in the nursery grounds. Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Oligochaeta and Isopoda were found to be significantly more abundant in the nursery than in the non-nursery grounds. For Isopoda and Bivalvia, total dry weight was also significantly higher in the nursery areas. Correspondence analysis based on density showed that the nursery areas of the different estuaries grouped together relative to non-nursery sites, with a relative similarity in the abundance of Oligochaeta, Spionidae, Amage spp., Scrobicularia plana and Cerastoderma edule. Taking into consideration the generally opportunistic feeding ecology and low dietary selectivity of the flatfish species, the results indicated higher prey availability in the nursery grounds of the Portuguese estuaries, an important factor contributing to the quality of these areas. The relatively high macrobenthic productivity in the nursery areas might be linked to physical and biological interactions favouring the recruitment and maintenance of the communities.

  9. Tube epifauna of the Polychaete Phyllochaetopterus socialisClaparède

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalesso, Rosebel Cunha; Duarte, Luíz. Francisco L.; Pierozzi, Ivo, Jr.; Enumo, Eloisa Fiorim

    1995-07-01

    Animals greater than 1 mm, found among tangled tubes of Phyllochaetopterus socialis(Chaetopteridae) from Araçá Beach, São Sebastião district, Brazil, were studied for 1 year, with four samples in each of four seasons. They comprised 10 338 individuals in 1722·7 g dry weight of polychaete tubes, with Echinodermata, Polychaeta (not identified to species) and Crustacea as the dominant taxa. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index did not vary seasonally, only two species (a holothurian and a pycnogonid) showing seasonal variation. Ophiactis savignyiwas the dominant species, providing 45·5% of individuals. Three other ophiuroids, the holothurian Synaptula hidriformis, the crustaceans Leptochelia savignyi, Megalobrachium soriatumand Synalpheus fritzmuelleri, the sipunculan Themiste alutaceaand the bivalve Hiatella arcticawere all abundant, but most of the 68 species recorded occurred sparsely. The assemblage associated with P. socialiswas similar to the endofauna of the sponge Zygomycale parishiiand the bryozoan Schizoporella unicornis, and to the epifauna of seaweed Sargassum cymosum, all of which occurred nearby.

  10. Macrofaunal involvement in the sublittoral decay of kelp debris: the detritivore community and species interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, A. P.; Moore, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The fauna associated with sea-bed accumulations of decomposing Laminaria saccharina has been studied by year-round SCUBA diving at two sites in the Clyde Sea area. Seasonal changes in density of 64 species are reported. In the autumn, large quantities of kelp are detached by storms. This weed carries with it to the sea bed a large part of its normal fauna. Additional species settle onto the weed from the plankton whilst others migrate onto it from the surrounding sea bed. Peak densities of associated species were recorded in autumn. Litter bag experiments in situ showed that, except during the summer, weed is lost from sea-bed accumulations at a faster rate when macrofaunal animals are excluded. The macrofauna therefore inhibits decomposition. The relative importance of interactive cropping by three macrodetritivores, Psammechinus miliaris (Echinodermata), Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta) and Gammarus locusta (Amphipoda) was studied by in situ containment of different species combinations. The presence of Gammarus with Psammechinus resulted in less weed being lost than when Psammechinus was isolated. This is because Gammarus selectively crops rotting weed, retarding frond disintegration by microbes. Platynereis retards microbial colonization of frond tissues ruptured during its feeding by repeated cropping of the same region. Weed would decompose very rapidly were it not for macrofaunal cropping. Macroalgal decay thus differs profoundly from that of vascular plants.

  11. The Sponge Zygomycale parishii(Bowerbank) and its Endobiotic Fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luiz; Nalesso, Rosebel

    1996-02-01

    The endobiotic fauna of the sponge Zygomycale parishii(Bowerbank) was studied for 2·5 years at two sites, Ubatuba and São Sebastião, on the northern coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Ninety-two macrofaunal species (over 1 mm long) were identified among which Cnidaria, Turbellaria, Nemertinea, Sipuncula, Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, Pycnogonida, Echinodermata, Ascidiacea and Pisces were represented. The results obtained on the number of species (species richness), the abundances of different species and faunal composition were related to the physico-biotic characteristics of the study sites. The influence of sample volume and other methodological artifacts on sample characteristics were also examined. The ophiuroid Ophiactis savignyi(Müller & Troschell) was the dominant endobiotic species, comprising 64% of all individuals collected. The São Sebastião endobiotic fauna was more diversified than the Ubatuba endobiotic fauna, possibly due to higher larval recruitment, and to the closeness of Z. parishiito the sea-floor providing a greater possibility for inhabitants of this microhabitat to find and to live inside the sponge.

  12. Food utilization of adult flatfishes co-occurring in the Bohai Sea of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuozeng, Dou

    Stomach contents were examined of 4527 adult individuals of 12 flatfish species collected during the 1982-1983 Bohai Sea Fisheries Resources Investigation. Their food habits, diet diversity, similarity of prey taxa, trophic niche breadth and diet overlap were systematically analysed. Ninety-seven prey species belonging to the Coelenterata, Nemertinea, Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and fish were found and five of them were considered to be principal prey for flatfishes: Alpheus japonicus, Oratosquilla oratoria, Alpheus distinguendus, Loligo japonicus and Crangon affinis. Among the flatfishes, Paralichthys olivaceus was piscivorous, whereas Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae and Pseudopleuronectes herzensteini both had polychaetes and molluscs as their main prey groups. Pleuronichthys cornutus was classified as a polychaete-mollusc eater, with a strong preference for crustaceans. Verasper variegatus, Cynoglossus semilaevis, Eopsetta grigorjewi and Cleisthenes herzensteini ate crustaceans. Kareius bicoloratus was classified as a mollusc-crustacean eater. Cynoglossus abbreviatus, Cynoglossus joyneri and Zebrias zebra were grouped as crustacean-fish eaters. However, Z. zebra also took polychaetes and C. abbreviatus and C. joyneri preyed on some molluscs. Trophic relationships among the flatfishes were complicated, but they occupied distinctive microhabitats in different seasons and selected their specific prey items, which was favourable to the stability of the flatfish community in the Bohai Sea.

  13. Effects of metals and sediment particle size on the species composition of the epifauna of Pinna bicolor near a lead smelter, Spencer Gulf, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Trevor J.; Young, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    Pinna bicolor (Mollusca: Pelecypoda) were transplanted between four sites near a lead smelter. The species composition of their epifauna (sessile and mobile) was examined in relation to characteristics of both sediments and seston at the sites. Seventy-two taxa were distinguished in the epifaunal community. Substantial differences were found in the short-term sensitivity of some of the species to concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn in sediments and to sediment particle size. The short-term sensitivity of many species to metals or sediment particle size explained their long-term distribution pattern. Twenty-three taxa were identified as significantly characterizing the faunal differences. Of these, eleven (four molluscs, four bryozoans, two barnacles and one ascidian) were affected by both sediment metal concentration and particle size, and eight (four molluscs, one bryozoan, one polychaete, one hydroid and one barnacle) were affected by metal contamination but not particle size. Of all fauna examined, the Bryozoa were the most metal-sensitive. Four species, Smittina raigii (Bryozoa), Galeolaria sp. 1 (Polychaeta), Epopella simplex (Cirripedia) and Monia ione (Pelecypoda) were identified by their short- and long-term sensitivity to metal contamination, and absence of sensitivity to sediment particle size, as suitable species for monitoring the effects of metal contamination on the epifauna. The implications of the results for toxicity-testing are discussed.

  14. A seasonal comparison of zooplankton communities in the Kara Sea - With special emphasis on overwintering traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobokova, Ksenia Nikolaevna; Hirche, Hans-Juergen

    2016-06-01

    Siberian marginal seas cover large parts of the marine Arctic and host unique zooplankton communities. Detailed knowledge of their community structure and life history traits is a prerequisite to predict their response to ongoing and future climate and anthropogenic changes although winter data is extremely rare. Here data are presented from winter samples (February and April) in four biogeographic regions of the Kara Sea. Comparison of community composition and zooplankton abundance/biomass with data collected during summer showed lower diversity in winter, mainly due to the absence of freshwater species. In contrast to many other northern regions, seasonal biomass differences were relatively small. Year-round high biomass is maintained through a large share of small copepod species and constantly high share of the chaetognath Parasagitta elegans. An advanced state of gonad maturation and reproduction was observed in winter in herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous species, e.g. the copepods Calanus glacialis, Drepanopus bungei, Limnocalanus macrurus, Oithona similis, Pseudocalanus major, Pseudocalanus minutus/acuspes, Paraeuchaeta glacialis, Microcalanus pygmaeus, and euphausiids, hydromedusae, and pteropods. Meroplanktonic larvae of nudibranchia, polychaeta and bivalvia were also registered. Close to the Yenisei mouth, abundance of eggs and larvae of various taxa exceeded older stages. Our data show that the brackish-water zone of the Kara Sea hosts specific communities with omnivorous species efficiently exploiting local resources during the winter and utilizing them for winter reproduction.

  15. A new Maldane species and a new Maldaninae genus and species (Maldanidae, Annelida) from coastal waters of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueyun; Li, Xinzheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Paramaldane, new genus, with type species Paramaldane glandicincta sp. n., and Maldane adunca sp. n. (Maldanidae, Polychaeta) are described based on material from the coast of south China. The new genus Paramaldane is similar to Maldane Grube, 1860 and Sabaco Kinberg, 1867, but it clearly differs from all genera within the subfamily Maldaninae by a unique combination of characters: the cephalic plate is almost circular with low, entire and smooth cephalic rim, nuchal grooves small and crescentic, lacking a collar on chaetiger 1, short companion notochaetae, a collar-like glandular band on the anterior part of the sixth chaetiger, and a well-developed anal valve. Paramaldane glandicincta sp. n. is characterised by having a glandular band on the anterior part of the sixth chaetiger, an almost circular cephalic plate, an entire and smooth cephalic rim, and small crescentic nuchal grooves. Maldane adunca sp. n. is characterised by a low cephalic rim, nuchal grooves with a strongly curved anterior part and isolated from the cephalic rim. Finally, a taxonomic key to genera of Maldaninae and a comparative table to species of Maldane are provided. PMID:27551194

  16. The impact of fossil data on annelid phylogeny inferred from discrete morphological characters

    PubMed Central

    Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny; Vinther, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    As a result of their plastic body plan, the relationships of the annelid worms and even the taxonomic makeup of the phylum have long been contentious. Morphological cladistic analyses have typically recovered a monophyletic Polychaeta, with the simple-bodied forms assigned to an early-diverging clade or grade. This is in stark contrast to molecular trees, in which polychaetes are paraphyletic and include clitellates, echiurans and sipunculans. Cambrian stem group annelid body fossils are complex-bodied polychaetes that possess well-developed parapodia and paired head appendages (palps), suggesting that the root of annelids is misplaced in morphological trees. We present a reinvestigation of the morphology of key fossil taxa and include them in a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of annelids. Analyses using probabilistic methods and both equal- and implied-weights parsimony recover paraphyletic polychaetes and support the conclusion that echiurans and clitellates are derived polychaetes. Morphological trees including fossils depict two main clades of crown-group annelids that are similar, but not identical, to Errantia and Sedentaria, the fundamental groupings in transcriptomic analyses. Removing fossils yields trees that are often less resolved and/or root the tree in greater conflict with molecular topologies. While there are many topological similarities between the analyses herein and recent phylogenomic hypotheses, differences include the exclusion of Sipuncula from Annelida and the taxa forming the deepest crown-group divergences. PMID:27581880

  17. Bioavailability of PAHs in aluminum smelter affected sediments: evaluation through assessment of pore water concentrations and in vivo bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Bøyum, Olav; Grung, Merete; Næs, Kristoffer

    2010-12-15

    Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coal tar pitch polluted sediments was predicted by (1) a generic approach based on organic carbon-water partitioning and Gibbs linear free energy relationship (between K(OW) and K(OC)), and (2) measurements of freely dissolved concentrations of PAHs in the sediment pore water, using passive samplers and solid phase extraction. Results from these predictions were compared with those from in vivo bioaccumulation experiments using Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta), Hinia reticulata (Gastropoda), and Nuculoma tenuis (Bivalvia). Measured sediment/water partition coefficients were higher than predicted by the generic approach. Furthermore, predicted biota-to-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) derived from measured pore water concentrations were more in agreement with the bioaccumulation observed for two of the three species. Discrepancies associated with the third species (N. tenuis) were likely a result of particles remaining in the intestine (as shown by microscopic evaluation). These results indicate the importance of conducting site-specific evaluations of pore water concentrations and/or bioaccumulation studies by direct measurements to accurately provide a basis for risk assessment and remediation plans. The importance of knowledge regarding specific characteristics of model organisms is emphasized. PMID:21077669

  18. Ultrastructure of Selenidium pendula, the Type Species of Archigregarines, and Phylogenetic Relations to Other Marine Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Schrével, Joseph; Valigurová, Andrea; Prensier, Gérard; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Florent, Isabelle; Guillou, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Archigregarines, an early branching lineage within Apicomplexa, are a poorly-known group of invertebrate parasites. By their phylogenetic position, archigregarines are an important lineage to understand the functional transition that occurred between free-living flagellated predators to obligatory parasites in Apicomplexa. In this study, we provide new ultrastructural data and phylogenies based on SSU rDNA sequences using the type species of archigregarines, the Selenidiidae Selenidium pendulaGiard, 1884. We describe for the first time the syzygy and early gamogony at the ultrastructural level, revealing a characteristic nuclear multiplication with centrocones, cryptomitosis, filamentous network of chromatin, a cyst wall secretion and a 9+0 flagellar axoneme of the male gamete. S. pendula belongs to a monophyletic lineage that includes several other related species, all infecting Sedentaria Polychaeta (Spionidae, Sabellaridae, Sabellidae and Cirratulidae). All of these Selenidium species exhibit similar biological characters: a cell cortex with the plasma membrane - inner membrane complex - subpellicular microtubule sets, an apical complex with the conoid, numerous rhoptries and micronemes, a myzocytosis with large food vacuoles, a nuclear multiplication during syzygy and young gamonts. Two other distantly related Selenidium-like lineages infect Terebellidae and Sipunculida, underlying the ability of archigregarines to parasite a wide range of marine hosts. PMID:27423403

  19. A new Maldane species and a new Maldaninae genus and species (Maldanidae, Annelida) from coastal waters of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueyun; Li, Xinzheng

    2016-01-01

    Paramaldane, new genus, with type species Paramaldane glandicincta sp. n., and Maldane adunca sp. n. (Maldanidae, Polychaeta) are described based on material from the coast of south China. The new genus Paramaldane is similar to Maldane Grube, 1860 and Sabaco Kinberg, 1867, but it clearly differs from all genera within the subfamily Maldaninae by a unique combination of characters: the cephalic plate is almost circular with low, entire and smooth cephalic rim, nuchal grooves small and crescentic, lacking a collar on chaetiger 1, short companion notochaetae, a collar-like glandular band on the anterior part of the sixth chaetiger, and a well-developed anal valve. Paramaldane glandicincta sp. n. is characterised by having a glandular band on the anterior part of the sixth chaetiger, an almost circular cephalic plate, an entire and smooth cephalic rim, and small crescentic nuchal grooves. Maldane adunca sp. n. is characterised by a low cephalic rim, nuchal grooves with a strongly curved anterior part and isolated from the cephalic rim. Finally, a taxonomic key to genera of Maldaninae and a comparative table to species of Maldane are provided. PMID:27551194

  20. Influence of stability and fragmentation of a worm-reef on benthic macrofauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godet, Laurent; Fournier, Jérôme; Jaffré, Mikaël; Desroy, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    In coastal areas, reef-builder worms often are bio-engineers by structuring their physical and biological environment. Many studies showed that this engineering role is determined by the densities of the engineer species itself, the highest densities approximately corresponding to the most stable areas from a sedimentological point of view, and hosting the richest and the most diverse benthic fauna. Here, we tested the potential influence of the spatio-temporal dynamics and the spatial fragmentation of one of the largest European intertidal reefs generated by the marine worm Lanice conchilega (Pallas, 1766) (Annelida, Polychaeta) on the associated benthic macrofauna. We demonstrated that the worm densities do have a significant positive role on the abundance, biomass, species richness and species diversity of the benthic macrofauna and that the reef stability also significantly influences the biomass and species diversity. Moreover, the reef fragmentation has significant negative effects on the abundance, biomass and species richness. In addition to L. conchilega densities, the stability and the spatial fragmentation of the reef also significantly structure the associated benthic assemblages. This study demonstrates the interest of "benthoscape ecology" in understanding the role played by marine engineer species from a spatial point of view.

  1. The impact of fossil data on annelid phylogeny inferred from discrete morphological characters.

    PubMed

    Parry, Luke A; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny; Vinther, Jakob

    2016-08-31

    As a result of their plastic body plan, the relationships of the annelid worms and even the taxonomic makeup of the phylum have long been contentious. Morphological cladistic analyses have typically recovered a monophyletic Polychaeta, with the simple-bodied forms assigned to an early-diverging clade or grade. This is in stark contrast to molecular trees, in which polychaetes are paraphyletic and include clitellates, echiurans and sipunculans. Cambrian stem group annelid body fossils are complex-bodied polychaetes that possess well-developed parapodia and paired head appendages (palps), suggesting that the root of annelids is misplaced in morphological trees. We present a reinvestigation of the morphology of key fossil taxa and include them in a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of annelids. Analyses using probabilistic methods and both equal- and implied-weights parsimony recover paraphyletic polychaetes and support the conclusion that echiurans and clitellates are derived polychaetes. Morphological trees including fossils depict two main clades of crown-group annelids that are similar, but not identical, to Errantia and Sedentaria, the fundamental groupings in transcriptomic analyses. Removing fossils yields trees that are often less resolved and/or root the tree in greater conflict with molecular topologies. While there are many topological similarities between the analyses herein and recent phylogenomic hypotheses, differences include the exclusion of Sipuncula from Annelida and the taxa forming the deepest crown-group divergences. PMID:27581880

  2. Polychaetes and oligochaetes associated with intertidal rocky shores in a semi-enclosed industrial and urban embayment, with the description of two new species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapar, Julio; Martínez-Ansemil, Enrique; Caramelo, Carlos; Collado, Rut; Schmelz, Rüdiger

    2009-12-01

    The species composition and relative abundance of the annelid benthic macrofauna (Polychaeta and Oligochaeta) inhabiting the rocky intertidal zone of the ria of Ferrol (Galicia, NW Spain) were studied during field collections, from 2000 to 2002. A total of 14,619 specimens (11,585 polychaetes belonging to 76 species and 24 families and 3,034 oligochaetes belonging to 18 species and two families) were collected from 98 quantitative samples taken from 13 sampling sites. The general spatial distribution of the annelid fauna reflects an increase of the diversity from the inner to the outer part of the ria. The general patterns found in the annelid composition suggest that the assemblages were dominated by oligochaetes in the inner sheltered sampling sites and polychaetes in the outer more exposed sites. Several faunistical and taxonomical remarks on selected species are presented. Two new species of oligochaetes are described: Coralliodrilus artabrensis sp. n. and Pirodrilus fungithecatus sp. n. (Naididae, Phallodrilinae). A new biological index, based on the oligochaete/polychaete ratio (O/P), is proposed as tool to evaluate environmental quality and to monitor future changes in the environment.

  3. Metagenomics of the Methane Ice Worm, Hesiocaeca methanicola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, K. D.; Edsall, L.; Xin, W.; Head, S. R.; Gelbart, T.; Wood, A. M.; Gaasterland, T.

    2012-12-01

    The methane ice worm (Hesiocaeca methanicola) is a polychaete found on methane hydrate deposits for which there appears to be no publically available genomic or metagenomic data. Methane ice worms were collected in 2009 by the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible (543m depth; N 27:44.7526 W 91:13.3168). Next-generation sequencing (HiSeq2000) was applied to samples of tissue and gut contents. A subset of the assembled data (40M reads, randomly selected) was run through MG-RAST. Preliminary results for the gut content (1,269,153 sequences, average length 202 bp) indicated that 0.1% of the sequences contained ribosomal RNA genes with the majority (67%) classified as Bacteria, a relatively small per cent (1.4%) as Archae, and 31% as Eukaryota. Campylobacterales was the predominant order (14%), with unclassified (7.5%) and Desulfobacterales (4%) being the next dominant. Preliminary results for the worm tissue (2,716,461 sequences, average length 241 bp) indicated that the majority of sequences were Eukaryota (73%), with 256 sequences classified as phylum Annelida and 58% of those belonging to class Polychaeta. For the bacterial sequences obtained from the tissue samples, the predominant order was Actinomycetales (2.7%). For both the tissue and gut content samples, the majority of proteins were classified as clustering-based subsystems. This preliminary analysis will be compared to an assembly consisting of 40M of the highest quality reads.; methane ice worms on methane hydrate

  4. Host-parasite relationships in flatfish (Pleuronectiformes)--the relative importance of host biology, ecology and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Marques, J F; Santos, M J; Teixeira, C M; Batista, M I; Cabral, H N

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which host biology, ecology and phylogeny determine the diversity of macroparasite assemblages has been investigated in recent years in several taxa, including fish. However, consensus has not been reached probably as a result of data being collected from different sources, different temporal scales or host and parasite biogeography and phylogeny having greater influence than expected. The present study evaluates the relative importance of 27 biological, ecological and phylogenetic characteristics of 14 flatfish species on the diversity of their ecto- and endoparasite assemblages, comprising a total of 53 taxa. Redundancy analyses were applied to the mean abundance of each parasite taxa infecting each host and to the richness, taxonomic distinctness and variance in taxonomic distinctness calculated for each assemblage within each host. Only a few host characteristics contributed significantly to the observed patterns: host distribution was more important in determining the type and mean abundance of ectoparasites present in an assemblage, whereas diversity of these assemblages were mainly related to the host's maximum size. Endoparasite mean abundance and diversity were mostly influenced by the number of food items ingested and by the presence of Crustacea and Polychaeta in the diet. However, the sympatric occurrence of related hosts also played an important role in the diversity values found in macroparasite assemblages. Results showed that a host characteristic has different importance according to the host-parasite relationship being examined, suggesting an important role for host-parasite co-evolution on the diversity of extant macroparasite assemblages. PMID:20819241

  5. Distribution, population biology, and trophic ecology of the deepwater demersal fish Halosauropsis macrochir (Pisces: Halosauridae) on the mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Laura; Hansen, Hege Øverbø; Cousins, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Halosauropsis macrochir ranked amongst the most abundant and widespread demersal fishes on the mid-Atlantic Ridge of the North Atlantic (Iceland-Azores) with greatest abundance at 1700-3500 m. All sizes, ranging from 10-76 cm total length, occurred in the area without any apparent spatial pattern or depth trend. Using otolith sections displaying growth increments assumed to represent annuli, the age range recorded was 2-36 years, but most individuals were <20 years. Length and weight at age data were used to fit growth models. No differences between sexes in length and weight at age were observed. The majority of samples had a surplus of males. Diet analysis showed that H. macrochir feeds on Crustacea, Teleostei, Polychaeta, and Cephalopoda, but few prey could be identified to lower taxonomical levels. The mid-Atlantic Ridge constitutes a major portion of the North Atlantic living space of the abyssal halosaur where it completes its full life cycle, primarily as an actively foraging euryophagous micronekton/epibenthos and infauna feeder, becoming a partial piscivore with increasing size. PMID:22384030

  6. Derivation of Ecological Protective Concentration using the Probabilistic Ecological Risk Assessment applicable for Korean Water Environment: (I) Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Woo-Mi

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic ecological risk assessment (PERA) for deriving ecological protective concentration (EPC) was previously suggested in USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Netherland. This study suggested the EPC of cadmium (Cd) based on the PERA to be suitable to Korean aquatic ecosystem. First, we collected reliable ecotoxicity data from reliable data without restriction and reliable data with restrictions. Next, we sorted the ecotoxicity data based on the site-specific locations, exposure duration, and water hardness. To correct toxicity by the water hardness, EU’s hardness corrected algorithm was used with slope factor 0.89 and a benchmark of water hardness 100. EPC was calculated according to statistical extrapolation method (SEM), statistical extrapolation methodAcute to chronic ratio (SEMACR), and assessment factor method (AFM). As a result, aquatic toxicity data of Cd were collected from 43 acute toxicity data (4 Actinopterygill, 29 Branchiopoda, 1 Polychaeta, 2 Bryozoa, 6 Chlorophyceae, 1 Chanophyceae) and 40 chronic toxicity data (2 Actinopterygill, 23 Branchiopoda, 9 Chlorophyceae, 6 Macrophytes). Because toxicity data of Cd belongs to 4 classes in taxonomical classification, acute and chronic EPC (11.07 μg/l and 0.034 μg/l, respectively) was calculated according to SEM technique. These values were included in the range of international EPCs. This study would be useful to establish the ecological standard for the protection of aquatic ecosystem in Korea. PMID:24278601

  7. Polytraits: A database on biological traits of marine polychaetes.

    PubMed

    Faulwetter, Sarah; Markantonatou, Vasiliki; Pavloudi, Christina; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Keklikoglou, Kleoniki; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Pafilis, Evangelos; Chatzigeorgiou, Georgios; Vasileiadou, Katerina; Dailianis, Thanos; Fanini, Lucia; Koulouri, Panayota; Arvanitidis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The study of ecosystem functioning - the role which organisms play in an ecosystem - is becoming increasingly important in marine ecological research. The functional structure of a community can be represented by a set of functional traits assigned to behavioural, reproductive and morphological characteristics. The collection of these traits from the literature is however a laborious and time-consuming process, and gaps of knowledge and restricted availability of literature are a common problem. Trait data are not yet readily being shared by research communities, and even if they are, a lack of trait data repositories and standards for data formats leads to the publication of trait information in forms which cannot be processed by computers. This paper describes Polytraits (http://polytraits.lifewatchgreece.eu), a database on biological traits of marine polychaetes (bristle worms, Polychaeta: Annelida). At present, the database contains almost 20,000 records on morphological, behavioural and reproductive characteristics of more than 1,000 marine polychaete species, all referenced by literature sources. All data can be freely accessed through the project website in different ways and formats, both human-readable and machine-readable, and have been submitted to the Encyclopedia of Life for archival and integration with trait information from other sources. PMID:24855436

  8. Proteomic Changes between Male and Female Worms of the Polychaetous Annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata before and after Spawning

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli H.; Ravasi, Timothy; Reish, Donald; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The Neanthesacuminata species complex (Polychaeta) are cosmopolitan in distribution. Neanthesarenaceodentata, Southern California member of the N. acuminata complex, has been widely used as toxicological test animal in the marine environment. Method of reproduction is unique in this polychaete complex. Same sexes fight and opposite sexes lie side by side until egg laying. Females lose about 75% of their weight and die after laying eggs. The male, capable of reproducing up to nine times, fertilizes the eggs and incubates the embryos for 3-4 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any set of proteins that influences this unique pattern of reproduction. Gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and gel-free quantitative proteomics methods were used to identify differential protein expression patterns before and after spawning in both male and female N. arenaceodentata. Males showed a higher degree of similarity in protein expression patterns but females showed large changes in phosphoproteme before and after spawning. There was a decrease (about 70%) in the number of detected phosphoproteins in spent females. The proteins involved in muscular development, cell signaling, structure and integrity, and translation were differentially expressed. This study provides proteomic insights of the male and female worms that may serve as a foundation for better understanding of unusual reproductive patterns in polychaete worms. PMID:24023665

  9. Environmental impact of bleufin tuna aquaculture on benthic assemblages in the western coast of Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Castaneda, V.

    2013-05-01

    Sea-cage farming results in a constant rain of organic waste onto the surrounding benthos. In Baja California there is growing concern over the effects of sea-cages on the local environment: sediment chemistry and benthic communities. Samples were taken in 18 stations using a Van veen grab (0.1 m2) in Bahía Salsipuedes, Baja California in 2003, 2004, 2006 and 2008. Organisms belonging to 7 Phyla were collected: Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, Echinodermata, Cnidaria, Sipuncula and Bryozoa. Polychaetes were the dominant group followed by crustaceans and mollusks. Polychaetes were represented by 37 families and 157 species. Best represented families were Paraonidae, Cirratulidae, Spionidae, Glyceridae and Maldanidae. This study shows that in the NW area of the bay organic carbon (2.54%) and organic nitrogen (0.95%) are being accumulated (higher concentrations and lower Eh values) and smaller opportunistic species are increasing rapidly near the tuna pens. It is crucial to maintain "healthy" macrofaunal populations in order to enhance decomposition of organic matter and to prevent its excessive accumulation. The most abundant polychaete species were Aphelochaeta multifinis, Mediomastus ambiseta, Prionospio steenstrupi Spiophanes bombyx, Apoprionospio pygnaea, Paraonella sp, Monticellina sp, Aricidea (Allia) ramosa, Spiophanes bombyx and Levinsenia gracilis. The dominant trophic groups were deposit-feeders and carnivores. The buildup of organic matter on the seafloor has attracted scavenger species particularly peracarid crustaceans. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (MDS) separated stations depending of the distance to the tuna pens.

  10. Macrofauna associated with the brown algae Dictyota spp. (Phaeophyceae, Dictyotaceae) in the Sebastião Gomes Reef and Abrolhos Archipelago, Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Tauana Junqueira; Güth, Arthur Ziggiatti; Bromberg, Sandra; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes

    2013-11-01

    The taxonomic richness and distributional patterns of the macrofauna associated with the algae genus Dictyota from the Abrolhos Bank (Eastern Brazilian coast) are analyzed. Macrofauna comprised a total of 9586 specimens; a complete faunal list of the most abundant taxa (Crustacea, Polychaeta and Mollusca, accounting for 95.6%) resulted in 64 families and 120 species. Forty six species are registered for the first time for the Abrolhos Bank, of which 3 are also new for the Brazilian coast. The most abundant families were Ampithoidae amphipods (with Ampithoe ramondi as the main faunal component), Janiridae isopods, Rissoellidae gastropods and Syllidae polychaetes. Comparisons were made between summer and winter periods and among sites from Sebastião Gomes Reef, near the coast, and from Siriba Island, in the Abrolhos Archipelago, away from the mainland. Algae size was lower in the summer, when faunal density was higher, suggesting a possible effect of grazing. Macrofaunal communities were significantly different among sites and periods. Coastal and external communities were markedly different and winter had the greatest effects on the fauna. Environmental conditions related to sediment type and origin and turbidity appear to be a good scenario for our macrofauna distribution results.

  11. Epibiotic relationships on Zygochlamys patagonica (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Pectinidae) increase biodiversity in a submarine canyon in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejter, Laura; López Gappa, Juan; Bremec, Claudia Silvia

    2014-06-01

    The continental slope of the southern SW Atlantic Ocean has many distinguishable deep submarine canyons, varying in depth and extension. The benthic fauna within one of them, detected in April 2005 by means of a multibeam SIMRAD EM1002 sonar, and located at 43°35‧S to 59°33‧W, 325 m depth, was studied to discuss faunal affinities with the neighbouring Patagonian scallop fishing grounds located at upper slope depths. In order to add faunal information to the previous general study, we studied the epibiotic species settled on Patagonian scallops (the dominant species in the area) collected in the reference sampling site using a 2.5-m mouth-opening dredge, 10 mm mesh size. We sampled 103 scallops with shell heights between 22 and 69 mm; epibionts were recorded on both valves. We found 53 epibiotic taxa, which were most conspicuous on the upper valve. Bryozoa was the most diverse group (34 species) while Polychaeta was the most abundant group, recorded on 94% of the scallops. Stylasteridae (2 species) and Clavulariidae (Cnidaria) conform newly recorded epibionts on Z. patagonica and the sponge Tedania (Tedaniopsis) infundibuliformis also represents a new record for the SW Atlantic Ocean.

  12. Macrobenthic community structure and species composition in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in jellyfish bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Songyao; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Hongfa; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-05-01

    To understand the characteristics of macrobenthic structures and the relationship between environment and benthic assemblages in jellyfish bloom, we studied the macrobenthos and related environmental factors in the coastal waters of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Data were collected during two seasonal cruises in April and August of 2011, and analyzed with multivariate statistical methods. Up to 306 macrobenthic species were registered from the research areas, including 115 species of Polychaeta, 78 of Crustacea, 61 of Mollusca, 30 of Echinodermata, and 22 of other groups. Nine polychaete species occurred at frequencies higher than 25% from the sampling stations: Lumbrineris longifolia, Notomastus latericeus, Ninöe palmata, Ophelina acuminata, Nephtys oligobranchia, Onuphis geophiliformis, Glycera chirori, Terebellides stroemii, and Aricidea fragilis. Both the average biomass and abundance of macrobenthos are higher in August (23.8 g/m2 and 237.7 ind./m2) than those in April (11.3 g/m2 and 128 ind./m2); the dissimilarity of macrobenthic structures among stations is as high as 70%. In terms of the dissimilarity values, we divided the stations into four clusters in spring and eight in summer. The ABC curve shows that the macrofauna communities in high jellyfish abundance were not changed. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that depth, temperature, median grain size, total organic carbon of sediment and total nitrogen in sediment were important factors affecting the macrozoobenthic community in the study area.

  13. Natural disturbance shapes benthic intertidal macroinvertebrate communities of high latitude river deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchwell, Roy T.; Kendall, Steve J.; Blanchard, Amy L.; Dunton, Kenneth H.; Powell, Abby N.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike lower latitude coastlines, the estuarine nearshore zones of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea are icebound and frozen up to 9 months annually. This annual freezing event represents a dramatic physical disturbance to fauna living within intertidal sediments. The main objectives of this study were to describe the benthic communities of Beaufort Sea deltas, including temporal changes and trophic structure. Understanding benthic invertebrate communities provided a baseline for concurrent research on shorebird foraging ecology at these sites. We found that despite continuous year-to-year episodes of annual freezing, these estuarine deltas are populated by a range of invertebrates that represent both marine and freshwater assemblages. Freshwater organisms like Diptera and Oligochaeta not only survive this extreme event, but a marine invasion of infaunal organisms such as Amphipoda and Polychaeta rapidly recolonizes the delta mudflats following ice ablation. These delta sediments of sand, silt, and clay are fine in structure compared to sediments of other Beaufort Sea coastal intertidal habitats. The relatively depauperate invertebrate community that ultimately develops is composed of marine and freshwater benthic invertebrates. The composition of the infauna also reflects two strategies that make life on Beaufort Sea deltas possible: a migration of marine organisms from deeper lagoons to the intertidal and freshwater biota that survive the 9-month ice-covered period in frozen sediments. Stable isotopic analyses reveal that both infaunal assemblages assimilate marine and terrestrial sources of organic carbon. These results provide some of the first quantitative information on the infaunal food resources of shallow arctic estuarine systems and the long-term persistence of these invertebrate assemblages. Our data help explain the presence of large numbers of shorebirds in these habitats during the brief summer open-water period and their trophic importance to migrating

  14. Species composition and diversity of macrobenthos in the intertidal zone of Xiangshan bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Haifeng; Zheng, Dan; You, Zhongjie; Xu, Nianjun; Lou, Dan; Huang, Chengwei

    2015-04-01

    Xiangshan bay is a narrow semi-closed bay and situated on the northwestern coast of the East China Sea. Over past decades, it has become to a major bay with intensive human activities, dense urbanized area, and poor water quality. The aim of this paper was to reveal the ecological status through the elucidation of the species composition, abundance, biomass and diversity of macrobenthos in this bay. Six intertidal sections were surveyed from January 2007 to November 2008 quarterly. Sections TG, HD and XH are located in the three inner bays, sections QJ and WS are located near the thermal power plants, and section XX is located at the outer part of Xiangshan Bay. Great variations in macrobenthos community were indentified, and the species composition of the community in the present study showed the dominance in the order of molluscs (bivalves and gastropods), crustaceans and others, and only few Polychaeta were recorded. Only three dominant species, Littorina brevicula, Ilyplax tansuiensis, and Cerithidea cingulata were collected in all the sections, and a total of 19 dominant species were recorded only in one section. Two-way ANOVA analyses of abundance indicated that there were significant differences among sections or seasons. Shannon-Wiener diversity index ( H') had its maximum (2.45) in section QJ, and minimum (1.76) in section TG. Multiple irregular k-dominance plots clearly showed that the study area was polluted and the macrobenthos community was under stress. We conclude that the macrobenthos of Xiangshan Bay have been disturbed by human activities, especially at the interior bay.

  15. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals the Hidden Diversity of Zooplankton Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Rachel A.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Atkinson, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Background Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. Methodology/Principle Findings Plankton net hauls (200 µm) were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. Conclusions Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may become increasingly

  16. Isolation, characterization and oxygen equilibrium of an extracellular haemoglobin from Eunice aphroditois (Passas).

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, J V; Bannister, W H; Anastasi, A

    1976-01-01

    The extracellular haemoglobin from the polychaeta,Eunice aphroditois, existed as a mixture of a heavy major component (so20, w = 56.96 +/- 0.125) and a light minor component (so20, w = 10.00 +/- 0.13S), the latter probably being a dissociation product of the former. The molecular weight of the purified heavier component, as detetermined by sedimentation equilibrium, was 3.44 x 10(6) +/- 0.04x10(6). The molecule had the electron-microscopic appearance typical of annelid haemoglobins, consisting of a stack of two hexagonal plates, with dimensions 26.32 +/- 0.27 nm across the flats of the hexagon, height of stack 17.86 +/- 0.34 nm. The sugar composition is reported, and the isoelectric point was approx. pH7.8. The haem content was 2.31 +/- 0.01%, corresponding to a minimal mol.wt. of 26700. Detergent/gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least four bands with molecular weights in the range 14600-31000. Five N-terminal amino acids were found. In addition to the 10S component, which co-existed with the 57S component at all pH values in the range 4.0-10.6, at low pH values (less than pH.5.0) A 16S and a 1.9 S component were found. The absorption and circular-dichroic spectra are reported, and the alpha-helical content, calculated from the ellipticity at 222 nm, was about 40%. The molecule bound O2 co-operatively with a maximum value of the Hill coefficient, h, of 3.9. Over the pH range 7.0-8.0 there was a positive Bohr effect. Images PLATE 1 PMID:11776

  17. Temporal and spatial distribution of the meiobenthic community in Daya Bay, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Li, H. X.; Yan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial and temporal biodiversity patterns of the meiobenthos were studied for the first time in Daya Bay, which is a tropical semi-enclosed basin located in the South China Sea. The abundance, biomass, and composition of the meiobenthos and the basic environmental factors in the bay were investigated. The following 19 taxonomic groups were represented in the meiofauna: Nematoda, Copepoda, Polychaeta, Oligochaeta, Kinorhyncha, Gastrotricha, Ostracoda, Bivalvia, Turbellaria, Nemertinea, Sipuncula, Hydroida, Amphipoda, Cumacea, Halacaroidea, Priapulida, Echinodermata, Tanaidacea, and Rotifera. Total abundance and biomass of the meiobenthos showed great spatial and temporal variation, with mean values of 993.57 ± 455.36 ind cm-2 and 690.51 ± 210.64 μg 10 cm-2, respectively. Nematodes constituted 95.60 % of the total abundance and thus had the greatest effect on meiofauna quantity and distribution, followed by copepods (1.55 %) and polychaetes (1.39 %). Meiobenthos abundance was significantly negatively correlated with water depth at stations (r=-0.747, P<0.05) and significantly negatively correlated with silt-clay content (r=-0.516, P<0.01) and medium diameter (r=-0.499, P<0.01) of the sediment. Similar results were found for correlations of biomass and abundance of nematodes with environmental parameters. Polychaete abundance was positively correlated with the bottom water temperature (r=0.456, P<0.01). Meiobenthos abundance differed significantly among seasons (P<0.05), although no significant difference among stations and the interaction of station × season was detected by two-way ANOVA. In terms of vertical distribution, most of the meiobenthos was found in the surface layer of sediment. This pattern was apparent for nematodes and copepods, but a vertical distribution pattern for polychaetes was not as obvious. Based on the biotic indices and analyses of their correlations and variance, the diversity of this community was likely to be influenced by

  18. Effects of seawater acidification on a coral reef meiofauna community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, V. C.; Souza, T. P.; Esteves, A. M.; Santos, P. J. P.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing risk that ocean acidification will modify benthic communities, great uncertainty remains about how this impact will affect the lower trophic levels, such as members of the meiofauna. A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of water acidification on a phytal meiofauna community from a coral reef. Community samples collected from the coral reef subtidal zone (Recife de Fora Municipal Marine Park, Porto Seguro, Bahia, Brazil), using artificial substrate units, were exposed to a control pH (ambient seawater) and to three levels of seawater acidification (pH reductions of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 units below ambient) and collected after 15 and 30 d. After 30 d of exposure, major changes in the structure of the meiofauna community were observed in response to reduced pH. The major meiofauna groups showed divergent responses to acidification. Harpacticoida and Polychaeta densities did not show significant differences due to pH. Nematoda, Ostracoda, Turbellaria, and Tardigrada exhibited their highest densities in low-pH treatments (especially at the pH reduction of 0.6 units, pH 7.5), while harpacticoid nauplii were strongly negatively affected by low pH. This community-based mesocosm study supports previous suggestions that ocean acidification induces important changes in the structure of marine benthic communities. Considering the importance of meiofauna in the food web of coral reef ecosystems, the results presented here demonstrate that the trophic functioning of coral reefs is seriously threatened by ocean acidification.

  19. Mussel beds — amensalism or amelioration for intertidal fauna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Sabine

    1990-09-01

    The faunal assemblages of a mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis L.) and ambient sandflat were compared to study how a bioherm of suspension feeding organisms affects benthic communities in a tidal flat. During a survey of mussel beds in the Wadden Sea at the island of Sylt (North Sea), a total of 52 macrofaunal species and 44 meiobenthic plathelminth species were detected. They occupied different microhabitats in the mussel bed. 56% of the macrofauna species were dwelling in the sediment beneath the mussels and 42% were epibenthic or epiphytic. The latter were restricted in their occurrence to the mussel bed. Along a transect from the sandflat to the mussel bed the mean species densities of macrofauna did not differ significantly, while abundances were significantly lower in the mussel bed than in the sandflat. The composition of the assemblages shifted from a dominance of Polychaeta in the sandflat to Oligochaeta in the mussel bed. Surface filter-feeding polychaetes of the sandflat ( Tharyx marioni) were displaced by deposit feeding polychaetes under the mussel cover ( Capitella capitata, Heteromastus filiformis). The total meiobenthic density was lower and single taxa (Ostracoda, Plathelminthes, Nematoda) were significantly less abundant in the mud of the mussel bed. The plathelminth assemblage was dominated by grazing species ( Archaphanostoma agile), and differed in community structure from a sandflat aseemblage. An amensalistic relationship was found between the suspension-feeding mussels and suspension-feeding infauna, while deposit-feeders were enhanced. The presence of epibenthic microhabitats results in a variety of trophic groups co-occurring in a mussel bed. This is hypothesized as trophic group amelioration and described as an attribute of heterotrophic reefs.

  20. Synoptic patterns of meiofaunal and macrofaunal abundances and specific composition in littoral sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armonies, Werner; Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1987-03-01

    During recent years, many investigations on small zoobenthos have been performed at the island of Sylt. As these studies were carried out sporadically over many years and as different extraction methods were used, comparisons of the results have been hampered. Therefore, in August/September 1986, 24 sites were sampled and evaluated using one quantitative method throughout. Sites range from mud to exposed sand and from the sublittoral to the supralittoral. Macrofauna and the taxa Plathelminthes, Polychaeta, and Oligochaeta are determined to species level. Macrofaunal (>0.5 mm) abundance is highest in mud and continuously decreases with increasing exposure to wave action. Meiofaunal (<0.5 mm) abundance is less variable. Nematoda dominate in mud and muddy sand, Copepoda in sheltered and exposed sand, other taxa only intermittently. Related to surface area, no correlation between macro-and meiofaunal abundance is apparent. Plathelminthes and Copepoda reach highest abundance per surface area in sand but their per volume density is higher in mud and muddy sand. Related to sediment volume instead of surface area, the meiofaunal abundance pattern is very similar to the macrofaunal pattern. The faunal composition changes gradually along the tidal gradient without general faunal boundaries. On an averange, the faunal similarity of neighbouring sites is highest in Oligochaeta and lowest in Plathelminthes. Presumably, Oligochaeta tolerate wider ranges of environmental factors. This may explain the low number of oligochaete species. On the other hand, Plathelminthes seem to adapt to relatively narrow ranges of factors and their species richness is highest. Because of macrofaunameiofauna interaction it is suggested that the meiofaunal assemblage will be least stable in mud and muddy sand, and most stable in exposed sand.

  1. Persistent organic pollutants in the Scheldt estuary: environmental distribution and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Van Ael, Evy; Covaci, Adrian; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2012-11-01

    Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in the sediment and several species (European flounder, Platichthys flesus; common sole, Solea solea; Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis; shore crab, Carcinus maenas; brown shrimp, Crangon crangon; blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and bristle worms, Polychaeta) from 7 locations in the Scheldt estuary (SE, the Netherlands-Belgium). Overall POP levels in the sediment were low. The average PCB and PBDE concentrations were respectively 31.5 and 115 ng/g dry weight (dw). Highest sediment loads were measured in the vicinity of Antwerp (368 ng PCBs/g dw), a location with intense harbor and industrial activities. Pollution concentrations in the tissues of biota were species-specific. Blue mussels contained the highest lipid concentrations (2.74±0.55%) and reached the highest contamination levels (from 287 to 1688 ng PCBs/g ww, from 2.09 to 12.4 ng PBDEs/g ww). Lowest tissue loads were measured in brown shrimp (from 3.27 to 39.9 ng PCBs/g ww, from 0.05 to 0.47 ng PBDEs/g ww). The PCB congener profile in most of the species was similar with the pattern found in the sediment. PCB 153 was the most abundant congener (16.5-25.7% in biota, 10.4% in sediment). In the sediment, the total amount of PBDEs consisted for more than 99% of BDE 209. Congener BDE 47 had the highest concentrations in all sampled species (38.5-70.1%). Sediment POP loadings and tissue concentrations were poorly correlated, indicating that a simple linear or non-linear relationship is insufficient to describe this relationship, possible caused by the complexity of the bioaccumulation processes and the variability in exposure. Because of the high PCB levels, regular consumption of fish and seafood, especially mussels, from the Scheldt estuary should be avoided. PMID:22832186

  2. Compound-Specific Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis of Benthic Food Webs in the Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Cooper, L. W.; Biasatti, D. M.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Chukchi Sea is known for locally high standing stocks of benthic macrofauna and strong coupling between pelagic-benthic components of the ecosystem. However, benthic food structure is not fully understood, due to varied sources of particulate organic matter (POM) and the high diversity of benthic invertebrates. We provide the first demonstration of the application of compound-specific amino acid isotope analysis to study the dietary sources and trophic structure for this Arctic marginal sea. About 20 stations in Chukchi Sea were sampled during cruises in August of 2012 and 2013. At each station, phytoplankton, POM and benthic fauna were collected, processed and analyzed using GC-C-IRMS (gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Among benthic fauna, dominant species included the following taxonomic groups: Ophiuroidea, Amphipoda, Polychaeta, Gastropoda, Bivalvia, and Cnidaria. The benthic fauna showed similar patterns of individual amino acid δ13C, with glycine the most enriched in 13C and leucine the most depleted in 13C. Specific amino acids including phenylalanine showed spatial variability in δ13C and δ15N values within the sampled area, indicating contributions of different dietary sources including phytoplankton, sea ice algae, benthic algae and terrestrial organic materials. δ15N values of individual amino acids such as the difference between glutamic acid and phenylalanine, i.e. Δ15Nglu-phe (δ15Nglu - δ15Nphe), were also used to identify trophic levels of benthic invertebrates relative to estimates available from bulk δ15N values. These data will ultimately be used to evaluate the spatial variability of organic carbon sources and trophic level interactions of dominant benthic species in the Chukchi Sea.

  3. Invertebrate bioassays with North Sea water samples. I. Structural effects on embryos and larvae of serpulids, oysters and sea urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöckner, K.; Rosenthal, H.; Willführ, J.

    1985-03-01

    Structural effects of bottom and surface water samples from two dumping grounds in the inner German Bight on the development of three meroplanktonic organisms (Pomatoceros triqueter: Polychaeta, Psammechinus miliaris: Echinodermata and Crassostrea gigas, Mollusca) were investigated. The titaniumdioxide dumping site was sampled immediately after dumping (within the visible waste trail 1 km behind the vessel), and 10 h after dumping. Samples were taken in the sewage sludge deposition area in the intervals between the usual dumping activities, regardless of the exact dumping schedule. The preserved bioassay test organisms were inspected microscopically to count percentages of “normal” larval hatch in test water samples, reference water samples and laboratory aged control water samples (5 to 10 replicates). The relative water quality at various dumping sites was expressed in terms of “net risk”-values (Woelke, 1972) compared to hatching rates observed in the controls. Larval development of P. triqueter was significantly suppressed (up to -22 % “net risk”) in trail water of the titanium dioxide dump site while the development of sea urchin larvae was still affected in the 10 h surface samples. Hatching of all test organisms in bottom-water samples from the centre of the sewage sludge dump site was affected to different degrees when compared to reference areas about 4 km north or 6 km northwest of the dumping area. The general usefulness of standardized bioassay procedures in pollution monitoring programmes is discussed. The results presented here call for further verification to minimize experimental background variability and to enlarge the catalogue of suitable effects criteria.

  4. Integrating Ecosystem Engineering and Food Web Ecology: Testing the Effect of Biogenic Reefs on the Food Web of a Soft-Bottom Intertidal Area

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Bart; Fournier, Jérôme; De Troch, Marleen; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The potential of ecosystem engineers to modify the structure and dynamics of food webs has recently been hypothesised from a conceptual point of view. Empirical data on the integration of ecosystem engineers and food webs is however largely lacking. This paper investigates the hypothesised link based on a field sampling approach of intertidal biogenic aggregations created by the ecosystem engineer Lanice conchilega (Polychaeta, Terebellidae). The aggregations are known to have a considerable impact on the physical and biogeochemical characteristics of their environment and subsequently on the abundance and biomass of primary food sources and the macrofaunal (i.e. the macro-, hyper- and epibenthos) community. Therefore, we hypothesise that L. conchilega aggregations affect the structure, stability and isotopic niche of the consumer assemblage of a soft-bottom intertidal food web. Primary food sources and the bentho-pelagic consumer assemblage of a L. conchilega aggregation and a control area were sampled on two soft-bottom intertidal areas along the French coast and analysed for their stable isotopes. Despite the structural impacts of the ecosystem engineer on the associated macrofaunal community, the presence of L. conchilega aggregations only has a minor effect on the food web structure of soft-bottom intertidal areas. The isotopic niche width of the consumer communities of the L. conchilega aggregations and control areas are highly similar, implying that consumer taxa do not shift their diet when feeding in a L. conchilega aggregation. Besides, species packing and hence trophic redundancy were not affected, pointing to an unaltered stability of the food web in the presence of L. conchilega. PMID:26496349

  5. Setting of and mixed carbonate-siliciclastic facies associated with Holocene nearshore sabellid worm reefs, northern Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Burke, C.D.; Dunn, R.K.; bischoff, W.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Communities of sabellid worms (Polychaeta) in northern Belize (mouth of Northern River Lagoon) occur as areally discontinuous, unlithified patch reefs cresting positive features on an irregular depositional topography of Holocene and older sediments. They are found in nearshore marine, moderate energy, tidally influenced environments (intertidal to 60-cm depths) of normal salinity (36%) adjoining subtidal deposits. These colonies, as much as 30 cm thick, are composed of dense thickets of agglutinating worm tubes (1.0 mm diameter, 3.0 cm long) that trap and bind sand to silt-size bioclastic debris and micrite. Worm population density in these communities averages 30 tubes/cm{sup 2}. The antecedent depositional topography beneath the worm reefs and subjacent to adjoining Holocene deposits is characterized by ridges oriented normal to the present shoreline. These ridges are held up by pre-Holocene (latest Pleistocene ) terrigenous sands of probably fluvial distributary origin, occurring at approximately 2.0 m in the subsurface. The overlying Holocene deposits on these ridges are 2.0 m thick and consist of a general upward-coarsening section of terrigenous sandy, carbonate sandy muds to muddy sands punctuated by mangrove peats and capped by the worm reefs. Low areas on the antecedent topography are presently the sites of deposition of deeper subtidal (1.0 m), muddy carbonate sands with some admixed, reworked terrigenous sand. The Holocene section records drowning due to recent (approximately 6 Ka) transgression of the older, lowstand distributary sands on the northern Belize shelf. This mixed carbonate-siliciclastic section and the worm reefs presently are being reshaped and modified by littoral processes.

  6. Distribution of benthic marine invertebrates at northern latitudes ― An evaluation applying multi-algorithm species distribution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Karin; Fiorentino, Dario; Schnurr, Sarah; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro; Huettmann, Falk; Holst, Sabine; Brix, Saskia; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2014-01-01

    Different techniques of species distribution modeling were applied to evaluate the distribution of eight benthic marine species in Icelandic waters. The species examined were Symplectoscyphus tricuspidatus, Stegopoma plicatile (both Hydrozoa), Prionospio cirrifera, Amphicteis gunneri (both Polychaeta), Desmosoma strombergi, Eurycope producta (both Isopoda), Andaniella pectinata and Harpinia crenulata (both Amphipoda). Information on 13 environmental variables (temperature mean, temperature mean SD, temperature minimum, temperature maximum, salinity mean, salinity mean SD, oxygen content, particulate organic carbon, seasonal variation index, bottom roughness, sediment thickness, acidification) and records of occurrences of these eight species was collated in an ArcGIS project. Modeling methods applied were MARS, TreeNet, and MaxENT. According to area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) model assessment values, models with moderate to outstanding discriminatory power were found for all species. There was a good overlap in the overall pattern of prediction for most species independent on the modeling technique. Among the three applied techniques MARS seemed to generalize most whereas TreeNet predictions very precisely reflected information from the training data set. The distribution of the selected benthic invertebrate species in Icelandic waters could be linked to a variety of environmental factors related to oceanography, seabed topography and human impact. Their multivariate interactions acted as a structuring force of species distribution, instead of just their one by one individual influence. The selected predictors varied between the different models for the same species. They substituted each other in different models. The expected distribution of the examined species was mapped for a seascape of known environmental settings. Such maps will serve as excellent references in future impact studies and enable the detection of changes in the distribution of

  7. Feeding strategies of deep-sea sub-Arctic macrofauna of the Faroe-Shetland Channel: Combining natural stable isotopes and enrichment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontikaki, E.; Mayor, D. J.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Witte, U.

    2011-02-01

    The response of a sub-arctic, deep-sea macrofaunal community to a simulated food sedimentation event was studied by means of a stable isotope "pulse-chase" experiment. A food pulse was simulated by adding 500 mg C m -2 of 13C-labelled diatoms, Chaetoceros radicans, to sediment cores retrieved from 1080 m in the Faroe-Shetland Channel. Carbon uptake by specific macrofaunal groups was quantified after 3 and 6 days of incubation. The carbon uptake of the dominant taxon (Polychaeta) was quantified at the genus-, and where possible, species-level, representing a data resolution that is rare in deep-sea tracer studies. The macrofaunal community reacted rapidly to the diatom addition, with 47% and 70% of the animals illustrating 13C-enrichment after 3 and 6 days, respectively. Approximately 95% of C uptake was located in the upper 2 cm due to the particularly shallow vertical distribution of the macrofaunal community and the nonexistent tracer subduction by burrowing species. Polychaetes of the families Ampharetidae and Cirratulidae were among the most heavily labelled with above background enrichment reaching 1300‰. Approximately 0.8 and 2.0 mg C m -2 were processed by the macrofauna after 3 and 6 days, representing 0.2% and 0.4% of the added carbon, respectively. It was not possible to differentiate sub-surface deposit-feeding polychaetes from predator/scavenger- and omnivorous polychaetes using their natural δ 15N signatures. However, the combination of natural abundance δ 15N data and 13C-labelling experiments proved to be useful for elucidating trophic relations in deep-sea food webs. This study confirms that macrofauna play an active role in the short-term carbon cycling at bathyal depths even at sub-zero temperatures and highlights the need for detailed knowledge of the community structure in understanding carbon processing patterns and early diagenesis of organic matter in marine sediments.

  8. The effect of colliery waste on the feeding of the lugworm Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyslop, Brian T.; Davies, Mark S.

    1999-09-01

    Sandy shores in northeast England that are heavily contaminated by colliery waste (essentially coal particles) have lower species richnesses and diversities than less contaminated shores. Analyses of the sediment utilised putatively as food, the gut contents, and the faecal casts of lugworms Arenicola marina (L.) (Annelida: Polychaeta) from a heavily contaminated site (Newbiggin) and a site lightly contaminated (Seahouses) were performed to determine the effect of colliery waste on the feeding of this deposit-feeder, which has been reported to decline in abundance at contaminated sites. Colliery-waste content of sediment was 10 to 18 times greater at Newbiggin than at Seahouses. At Newbiggin the sediment contained significantly higher levels of colliery waste than did the gut contents or faeces, which were not significantly different from each other. At Seahouses the colliery-waste contents of sediment, gut, and faeces were not significantly different. Particle-size distributions in sediment, gut, and faeces from lugworms at Seahouses were similar, while at Newbiggin the sediment contained a greater proportion of larger particles (>250 μm) than did the gut contents or the faeces. These results suggest that lugworms at heavily contaminated sites are selective feeders, rejecting coal particles perhaps on the basis of particle size. We did not detect selectivity in animals at the less contaminated site. Lugworms from Seahouses, however, avoided burrowing into sediment containing colliery waste both when the waste was on the surface and buried. Lugworms from Newbiggin avoided burrowing into colliery waste only when it was buried. These data suggest a chemosensory response to colliery waste.

  9. Can seamounts provide a good habitat for polychaete annelids? Example of the northeastern Atlantic seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surugiu, Victor; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Gillet, Patrick; Ruellet, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    Two seamount groups in the northeastern Atlantic were investigated during the 1980s and 1990s: the first was located along the Iberian and African coasts (Galicia, to the north of Portugal; and the Ampere, Gorringe, Josephine and Seine banks near the Madeira-Canary Islands) and the second was located offshore of the southern part of the Azores Islands, included the Atlantis, Hyeres, Irving, Meteor and Plato banks. Among the invertebrates, Annelida, specifically Polychaeta, were studied as surrogates for the biogeographical relationship between coastal and mid-oceanic seamounts in the northeastern Atlantic and the fauna in these areas. The dominant families were Onuphidae (27.46%), Syllidae (18.23%), Eunicidae (15.65%), Amphinomidae (11.45%) and Nereididae (5.61%), representing 78.4% of the total fauna. Data analyses clearly distinguished two seamount groups, one for coastal seamounts and the other offshore. Although the species distinguished and the family composition at the sampled sites were different (i.e., most diversified at the Josephine site and most impoverished at the Irving site), no coastal/offshore faunal impoverishment gradient could be identified. Thus, it seems that seamount environments do not favour any relationship between planktotrophic development and the direct development of polychaetes. Though the number of apparent endemic species was low (<7%), it remained in keeping with other invertebrate groups. Still, while seamounts may well encourage oceanic biodiversity in some zoological groups, this was clearly not the case for the polychaetes. We offer two explanations for this paradox: pelagic productivity and local environmental conditions.

  10. Propensity to metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses of two benthic species (Cerastoderma edule and Nephtys hombergii): are tolerance processes limiting their responsiveness?

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana; Piló, David; Araújo, Olinda; Pereira, Fábio; Guilherme, Sofia; Carvalho, Susana; Santos, Maria Ana; Pacheco, Mário; Pereira, Patrícia

    2016-05-01

    The chronic exposure of benthic organisms to metals in sediments can lead to the development of tolerance mechanisms, thus diminishing their responsiveness. This study aims to evaluate the accumulation profiles of V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and antioxidant system responses of two benthic organisms (Cerastoderma edule, Bivalvia; Nephtys hombergii, Polychaeta). This approach will provide clarifications about the ability of each species to signalise metal contamination. Organisms of both species were collected at the Tagus estuary, in two sites with distinct contamination degrees (ALC, slightly contaminated; BAR, highly contaminated). Accordingly, C. edule accumulated higher concentrations of As, Pb and Hg at BAR compared to ALC. However, antioxidant responses of C. edule were almost unaltered at BAR and no peroxidative damage occurred, suggesting adjustment mechanisms to the presence of metals. In contrast, N. hombergii showed a minor propensity to metal accumulation, only signalising spatial differences for As and Pb and accumulating lower concentrations of metals than C. edule. The differences in metal accumulation observed between species might be due to their distinctive foraging behaviour and/or the ability of N. hombergii to minimise the metal uptake. Despite that, the accumulation of As and Pb was on the basis of the polychaete antioxidant defences inhibition at BAR, including CAT, SOD, GR and GPx. The integrated biomarker response index (IBRv2) confirmed that N. hombergii was more affected by metal exposure than C. edule. In the light of current findings, in field-based studies, the information of C. edule as a bioindicator should be complemented by that provided by another benthic species, since tolerance mechanisms to metals can hinder a correct diagnosis of sediment contamination and of the system's health. Overall, the present study contributed to improve the lack of fundamental knowledge of two widespread and common estuarine species, providing

  11. Integrating Ecosystem Engineering and Food Web Ecology: Testing the Effect of Biogenic Reefs on the Food Web of a Soft-Bottom Intertidal Area.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Bart; Fournier, Jérôme; De Troch, Marleen; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The potential of ecosystem engineers to modify the structure and dynamics of food webs has recently been hypothesised from a conceptual point of view. Empirical data on the integration of ecosystem engineers and food webs is however largely lacking. This paper investigates the hypothesised link based on a field sampling approach of intertidal biogenic aggregations created by the ecosystem engineer Lanice conchilega (Polychaeta, Terebellidae). The aggregations are known to have a considerable impact on the physical and biogeochemical characteristics of their environment and subsequently on the abundance and biomass of primary food sources and the macrofaunal (i.e. the macro-, hyper- and epibenthos) community. Therefore, we hypothesise that L. conchilega aggregations affect the structure, stability and isotopic niche of the consumer assemblage of a soft-bottom intertidal food web. Primary food sources and the bentho-pelagic consumer assemblage of a L. conchilega aggregation and a control area were sampled on two soft-bottom intertidal areas along the French coast and analysed for their stable isotopes. Despite the structural impacts of the ecosystem engineer on the associated macrofaunal community, the presence of L. conchilega aggregations only has a minor effect on the food web structure of soft-bottom intertidal areas. The isotopic niche width of the consumer communities of the L. conchilega aggregations and control areas are highly similar, implying that consumer taxa do not shift their diet when feeding in a L. conchilega aggregation. Besides, species packing and hence trophic redundancy were not affected, pointing to an unaltered stability of the food web in the presence of L. conchilega. PMID:26496349

  12. Species boundaries in gregarine apicomplexan parasites: a case study-comparison of morphometric and molecular variability in Lecudina cf. tuzetae (Eugregarinorida, Lecudinidae).

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Villette, Petra M A H; Leander, Brian S

    2011-01-01

    Trophozoites of gregarine apicomplexans are large feeding cells with diverse morphologies that have played a prominent role in gregarine systematics. The range of variability in trophozoite shapes and sizes can be very high even within a single species depending on developmental stages and host environmental conditions; this makes the delimitation of different species of gregarines based on morphological criteria alone very difficult. Accordingly, comparisons of morphological variability and molecular variability in gregarines are necessary to provide a pragmatic framework for establishing species boundaries within this diverse and poorly understood group of parasites. We investigated the morphological and molecular variability present in the gregarine Lecudina cf. tuzetae from the intestines of Nereis vexillosa (Polychaeta) collected in two different locations in Canada. Three distinct morphotypes of trophozoites were identified and the small subunit (SSU) rDNA was sequenced either from multicell isolates of the same morphotype or from single cells. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the different morphotypes and localities reflected phylogenetic relatedness as inferred from the SSU rDNA sequence data. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rDNA demonstrated that the new sequences did not cluster according to morphotype or locality and instead were intermingled within a strongly supported clade. A comparison of 1,657 bp from 45 new sequences demonstrated divergences between 0% and 3.9%. These data suggest that it is necessary to acquire both morphological and molecular data in order to effectively delimit the "clouds" of variation associated with each gregarine species and to unambiguously reidentify these species in the future. PMID:21569160

  13. Mesozooplankton community development at elevated CO2 concentrations: results from a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, B.; Schmithüsen, T.; Knüppel, N.; Daase, M.; Czerny, J.; Boxhammer, T.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere caused by burning fossil fuels leads to increasing pCO2 and decreasing pH in the world ocean. These changes may have severe consequences for marine biota, especially in cold-water ecosystems due to higher solubility of CO2. However, studies on the response of mesozooplankton communities to elevated CO2 are still lacking. In order to test whether abundance and taxonomic composition change with pCO2, we have sampled nine mesocosms, which were deployed in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord at Svalbard, and were adjusted to eight CO2 concentrations, initially ranging from 185 μatm to 1420 μatm. Vertical net hauls were taken weekly over about one month with an Apstein net (55 μm mesh size) in all mesocosms and the surrounding fjord. In addition, sediment trap samples, taken every second day in the mesocosms, were analysed to account for losses due to vertical migration and mortality. The taxonomic analysis revealed that meroplanktonic larvae (Cirripedia, Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, and Decapoda) dominated in the mesocosms while copepods (Calanus spp., Oithona similis, Acartia longiremis and Microsetella norvegica) were found in lower abundances. In the fjord copepods prevailed for most of our study. With time, abundance and taxonomic composition developed similarly in all mesocosms and the pCO2 had no significant effect on the overall community structure. Also, we did not find significant relationships between the pCO2 level and the abundance of single taxa. Changes in heterogeneous communities are, however, difficult to detect, and the exposure to elevated pCO2 was relatively short. We therefore suggest that future mesocosm experiments should be run for longer periods.

  14. Quantification of intensive hybrid coastal reclamation for revealing its impacts on macrozoobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaguo; Cui, Baoshan; Zheng, Jingjing; Xie, Tian; Wang, Qing; Li, Shanze

    2015-01-01

    Managing and identifying the sources of anthropogenic stress in coastal wetlands requires an in-depth understanding of relationships between species diversity and human activities. Empirical and experimental studies provide clear evidence that coastal reclamation can have profound impacts on marine organisms, but the focus of such studies is generally on comparative or laboratory research. We developed a compound intensity index (reclamation intensity index, RI) on hybrid coastal reclamation, to quantify the impacts of reclamation on coastal ecosystems. We also made use of mean annual absolute changes to a number of biotic variables (biodiversity, species richness, biomass of total macrozoobenthos, and species richness and biomass of Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, and Echinodermata) to determine Hedges’d index, which is a measure of the potential effects of coastal reclamation. Our results showed that there was significant difference of coastal reclamation intensity between Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea, the biological changes in effect sizes of the three regions differed greatly over time. Our modelling analyses showed that hybrid coastal reclamation generally had significant negative impacts on species diversity and biomass of macrozoobenthos. These relationships varied among different taxonomic groups and included both linear and nonlinear relationships. The results indicated that a high-intensity of coastal reclamation contributed to a pronounced decline in species diversity and biomass, while lower-intensity reclamation, or reclamation within certain thresholds, resulted in a small increase in species diversity and biomass. These results have important implications for biodiversity conservation and the ecological restoration of coastal wetlands in face of the intensive reclamation activities.

  15. The infauna of three widely distributed sponge species (Hexactinellida and Demospongiae) from the deep Ekström Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersken, Daniel; Göcke, Christian; Brandt, Angelika; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Schwabe, Enrico; Anna Seefeldt, Meike; Veit-Köhler, Gritta; Janussen, Dorte

    2014-10-01

    Due to their high abundance and large body size sponges have a central position in Antarctic zoobenthos, where they form the most extensive sponge grounds of the world. Though research on Antarctic benthos communities is quite established, research on sponge-associated infauna communities is scarce. We analyzed associated infauna of fifteen individuals of the sponge species Mycale (Oxymycale) acerata Kirkpatrick, 1907 (Demospongiae: Mycalina), Rossella antarctica Carter, 1872 and R. racovitzae Topsent, 1901 (both Hexactinellida: Lyssacinosida). Samples were collected from the deep Ekström Shelf at 602 m in the South-Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the ANT XXIV-2 (SYSTCO I) expedition of RV Polarstern. The number of species, α- and β-diversity and the significantly different species composition of infauna communities related to sponge species were calculated, the latter via cluster analysis. The sponge-associated infauna consisted of five phyla: Foraminifera, Nematoda, Polychaeta, Mollusca and Arthropoda. In total 11,463 infaunal specimens were extracted and we found at least 76 associated species. Highest values of α-diversity were calculated for a sample of R. antarctica with a Shannon-Index of 1.84 and Simpson-Index of 0.72 respectively. Our results of the cluster-analysis show significant differences between infauna communities and a unique species composition for single sponge species. Polychaetes of the genus Syllis Lamarck, 1818 were numerous in M. acerata and genera like Pionosyllis Malmgren, 1867 and Cirratulus Lamarck, 1801 were numerous in R. antarctica. Individuals of the amphipod species Seba cf. dubia Schellenberg, 1926 were often found in R. antarctica and R. racovitzae while Colomastix fissilingua Schellenberg, 1926 was frequent in samples of M. acerata. Molluscs were present in M. acerata and R. antarctica but absent in R. racovitzae.

  16. ENSO and sandy beach macrobenthos of the tropical East Pacific: some speculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanagt, T.; Beekman, E.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the ENSO cycle on marine fauna and flora has only recently been given the attention it deserves. The very strong 1997-1998 El Niño and its obvious effects on marine biota was a key point in ENSO research, but unfortunately few quantitative data about the 1997-1998 El Niño itself are available. To gather information about the effect of ENSO on the macrobenthos, we performed a bi-weekly transect monitoring on an Ecuadorian sandy beach in 2000-2001, during the strong La Niña following the 1997-1998 El Niño, and in the normal period of 2002-2004. In this paper, intertidal macrofaunal densities at higher taxonomic level are used to compare a La Niña phase with the 'normal' situation. The few existing documents about El Niño and sandy beach macrobenthos, and scattered data from previous and current research, were used to complete the picture. Total macrobenthos densities were 300% lower during the La Niña phase compared with equal months in the normal phase. Especially Crustacea and Mollusca showed a marked increase in densities towards the normal situation (94% and 341% respectively). Polychaeta and Echinodermata, however, showed higher densities during the La Niña phase (22% and 73% respectively). Two possible explanations are proposed. (1) Low densities during the La Niña could be due to the very strong preceding El Niño, suggesting the populations were still recovering. This hypothesis is supported by previous work done in the south of Peru. This is, however, a cold water system, compared to the Ecuadorian warm water system. (2) The second hypothesis states that a La Niña will have a very severe impact on the intertidal macrofauna of a warm water system like the Ecuadorian coast.

  17. The response of abyssal organisms to low pH conditions during a series of CO2-release experiments simulating deep-sea carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. P.; Buck, K. R.; Lovera, C.; Brewer, P. G.; Seibel, B. A.; Drazen, J. C.; Tamburri, M. N.; Whaling, P. J.; Kuhnz, L.; Pane, E. F.

    2013-08-01

    The effects of low-pH, high-pCO2 conditions on deep-sea organisms were examined during four deep-sea CO2 release experiments simulating deep-ocean C sequestration by the direct injection of CO2 into the deep sea. We examined the survival of common deep-sea, benthic organisms (microbes; macrofauna, dominated by Polychaeta, Nematoda, Crustacea, Mollusca; megafauna, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Pisces) exposed to low-pH waters emanating as a dissolution plume from pools of liquid carbon dioxide released on the seabed during four abyssal CO2-release experiments. Microbial abundance in deep-sea sediments was unchanged in one experiment, but increased under environmental hypercapnia during another, where the microbial assemblage may have benefited indirectly from the negative impact of low-pH conditions on other taxa. Lower abyssal metazoans exhibited low survival rates near CO2 pools. No urchins or holothurians survived during 30-42 days of exposure to episodic, but severe environmental hypercapnia during one experiment (E1; pH reduced by as much as ca. 1.4 units). These large pH reductions also caused 75% mortality for the deep-sea amphipod, Haploops lodo, near CO2 pools. Survival under smaller pH reductions (ΔpH<0.4 units) in other experiments (E2, E3, E5) was higher for all taxa, including echinoderms. Gastropods, cephalopods, and fish were more tolerant than most other taxa. The gastropod Retimohnia sp. and octopus Benthoctopus sp. survived exposure to pH reductions that episodically reached -0.3 pH units. Ninety percent of abyssal zoarcids (Pachycara bulbiceps) survived exposure to pH changes reaching ca. -0.3 pH units during 30-42 day-long experiments.

  18. Large-scale dynamics of sandy beach ecosystems in transitional waters of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Species turnover, stability and spatial synchrony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2015-03-01

    Transitional waters (TW) are interfaces between the terrestrial and freshwater environments and the sea. These ecotones are characterized by highly dynamic physico-chemical and hydro-morphologic conditions, resulting in a mosaic of habitats in which species are particularly well adapted to variability. However, sandy beach ecotones occurring along estuarine gradients are rarely addressed from the TW perspective. We conducted a 2-yr study to assess the seasonal dynamics of environmental and macrofaunal descriptors in 16 sandy beaches of the Uruguayan coast in TW defined by the widest estuary of the world (Rio de la Plata). A strong variability in environmental conditions was found at inner estuarine beaches, reflecting the seasonal dynamics of the estuarine discharge. The greatest abundance and species richness found in dissipative oceanic beaches were also characterized by their lowest temporal variability, indicating that macrofaunal communities were more stable towards oceanic conditions, where environmental variability was also lowest. Spatial synchrony was reflected in changes across seasons in the species richness in the TW system. A high turnover of species along spatio-temporal gradients occurring within the TW ecotone was observed. Mollusca and Polychaeta were absent in highly-variable estuarine beaches, irrespective of the morphodynamic state. A functional equivalence between species was found at the extremes of the salinity gradient. The environmental variables that best explained community patterns differed among seasons: in summer and autumn, salinity, wave period and beach width were the main explanatory factors, whereas temperature had a primary influence in winter and morphodynamic variables exerted a major influence in autumn. We highlight the need to consider concurrent variations in estuarine and morphodynamic variables when assessing the spatial distribution of macrofaunal species richness and abundance in sandy beaches occurring along TW.

  19. Using DNA barcoding and phylogenetics to identify Antarctic invertebrate larvae: Lessons from a large scale study.

    PubMed

    Heimeier, Dorothea; Lavery, Shane; Sewell, Mary A

    2010-01-01

    Ecological studies of the diversity and distribution of marine planktonic larvae are increasingly depending on molecular methods for accurate taxonomic identification. The greater coverage of reference marine species on genetic databases such as GenBank and BoLD (Barcoding of Life Data Systems; www.boldystems.org); together with the decreasing costs for DNA sequencing have made large scale larval identification studies using molecular methods more feasible. Here, we present the development and implementation of a practical molecular approach to identify over 2000 individual marine invertebrate larvae that were collected in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, during the austral summer over five years (2002-2007) as part of the LGP (Latitudinal Gradient Project). Larvae for molecular ID were morphologically identified to belong to the Phyla Mollusca, Echinodermata, Nemertea and Annelida (Class Polychaeta), but also included unidentified early developmental stages which could not be assigned a specific taxon (e.g., eggs, blastulae). The use of a 100μm mesh plankton net makes this one of the first larval identification studies to simultaneously consider both embryos and larvae. Molecular identification methods included amplification of up to three molecular loci for each specimen, a pre-identification step using BLAST with GenBank, phylogenetic reconstructions and cross-validation of assigned Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). This combined approach of morphological and molecular methods assigned about 700 individuals to 53 MOTUs, which were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. During the course of this long-term study we identified several procedural difficulties, including issues with the collection of larvae, locus amplification, contamination, assignment and validation of MOTUs. The practical guidelines that we describe here should greatly assist other researchers to conduct reliable molecular identification studies of larvae in the future. PMID

  20. Abyssal macrofauna of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench area (Northwest Pacific) collected by means of a camera-epibenthic sledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, A.; Elsner, N. O.; Malyutina, M. V.; Brenke, N.; Golovan, O. A.; Lavrenteva, A. V.; Riehl, T.

    2015-01-01

    Abyssal macrofaunal composition of 21 epibenthic sledge hauls from twelve stations taken in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench (KKT) and at the adjacent abyssal plain, Northwest Pacific, is presented. Sampling with the fine meshed epibenthic sledge yielded higher abundances and species richness than was reported from previous expeditions from board of RV Vityaz. In total 84,651 invertebrates were sampled with RV Sonne between July and September of 2012 (31,854 invertebrates if standardised for 1000 m2 trawled distances) from 41 taxa of different taxonomic ranks (15 phyla, 28 classes, 7 orders) were sampled from a trawled area of 53,708 m² and have been analyzed. Few taxa were frequent and most taxa were rare in the samples, twelve taxa occurred with more than 1% frequency. Of these, the Polychaeta were most abundant followed by the benthic Copepoda and Isopoda. Total numbers of individuals varied between stations and were highest with 4238 individuals at station 2-10 close to the KKT in 4865 m depth and lowest with 374 individuals at station 6-11 in 5305 m depth. At this station also the lowest number of taxa occurred (18 taxa) while the highest number occurred with 31 taxa at station 3-9 in 4991 m depth. Numbers of individuals decreased with increasing depth between 4830 and 5780 m. Crustaceans of the superorder Peracarida were one of the dominating taxa with four orders occurring frequently in most samples. In total, Isopoda were most important and occurred with 59% of all peracarid orders sampled, followed by Amphipoda with 21%, Tanaidacea with 11%, Cumacea with 9%, and Mysidacea with <1%. The communities of the stations (and hauls) of the KKT abyssal area differ in terms of taxon composition from each other. A cluster analysis (nMDS) performed for all sampled stations revealed no clear pattern of community similarity between stations or hauls. All hauls close to the trench (2-9 and 2-10 close to the eastern slope of the KKT; and 3-9 and 4-3 at the western slope) were

  1. Biodiversity of the Deep-Sea Benthic Fauna in the Sangihe-Talaud Region, Indonesia: Observations from the INDEX-SATAL 2010 Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, S.; Munro, C.; Nganro, N.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Wirasantosa, S.; Sibert, E.; Hammond, S. R.; Bors, E.; Butterfield, D.; Holden, J. F.; Baker, E. T.; Sherrin, J.; Makarim, S.; Troa, R.; Shank, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    The benthic ecosystems found in the deep-sea promontories of Sangihe Talaud region were explored, between June and August 2010, using the ROV Little Hercules aboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer. The Sangihe-Talaud region is part of the Coral Triangle (CT) an area known for harboring the most biodiverse shallow-water coral reefs in the world. Notwithstanding the significant research efforts that have been undertaken to catalog and protect the biodiversity of the CT prior this expedition, virtually nothing was known about the life inhabiting the deep sea. The high-resolution imagery obtained from the 27 ROV dives revealed remarkably high abundances and diversity of animal species, many of which appear to be novel. On hard bottom substrates, cold-water corals were the dominant sessile macrofauna, in terms of biomass, followed by glass sponges (Hexactinellida) and sea lilies (Crinoidea). The coral taxa observed in this area represent six large orders of cnidarians: antipatharians (black corals), scleractinians (stony corals), zoanthideans (gold corals), alcyonaceans (octocorals), pennatulaceans (sea pens), and anthoathecates (hydrocorals). Most sessile species, independently of their size class or taxonomic affiliation, harbor a wide variety of associated fauna. Brittle stars (Ophiuroidea), squat lobsters (Galatheoidea), shrimp (Caridea), amphipods (Amphipoda), anemones (Actinaria), zanthideans, barnacles (Cirripedia), hydroids (Hydrozoa) and worms (Polychaeta) are the animal groups most commonly found forming these associations. In contrast, soft bottom habitats were dominated by stalked sponges, sea pens, sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea) and brittle stars. Other conspicuous fauna include fish, hermit crabs (Paguridae), urchins (Echinoidea) and octopuses (Cephalopoda). The abundance of habitats generated by the high number of geological and biological features and depth ranges present in the deep coral triangle (e.g., ridges, seamounts, island margins, plains, and rock

  2. Some features of the trace metal biogeochemistry in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields (Menez Gwen, Rainbow, Broken Spur at the MAR and 9°50‧N at the EPR): A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, Ludmila L.; Holm, Nils G.; Galkin, Sergey V.; Lein, Alla Yu.

    2013-10-01

    Along with summarizing the published literature and our own data some new results on properties of the trace metal biogeochemistry in the deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and East Pacific Rise (EPR) are shown. Differences in mean concentrations of big group of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, Co, As, Pb, Cd, Ag, Hg) between the biotope water of the low- and high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields were firstly revealed. The same trace metals were studied in different groups of organisms within different temperature zones at one and the same vent field (9°50‧N EPR), as well as in fauna inhabiting geochemically different vent sites. Distribution patterns of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ag, Ni, Cr, Co, As, Se, Sb, and Hg in different taxa gave an evidence of the influence of environmental and biological parameters on their bioaccumulation in organisms. Among the animals a particular “champion” with respect to the trace metal content was found to be a polychaeta Alvinella pompejana that inhabits the hottest places of the vent sulfide chimneys of the 9°50‧N field, EPR. New data on the trace metal distribution between soft tissues and carbonate shell let us estimate a role of biomineralization in the accumulation of metals in the Bathimodiolus mussels. Contrasting geochemical behavior was revealed for Cu that is enriched in soft tissues of mussels and depleted in shells, on the one hand, and Mn that is accumulated almost totally in mussel shells, on the other hand. Deep-sea hydrothermal biological communities demonstrate a strong concentration function, and bioconcentration factors (BCF) of trace metals estimated for Bathimodiolus mussels collected at the four hydrothermal fields vary within the limits of n102-n105 and are similar to that of the littoral mussels. Due to this and to the high values of biomasses per square meter, the hydrothermal fauna may be considered as a newly discovered biological filter of the oceans.

  3. Post-drilling hydrothermal vent and associated biological activities seen through artificial hydrothermal vents in the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Kawagucci, S.; Miyazaki, J.; Watsuji, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Nozaki, T.; Kashiwabara, T.; Shibuya, T.

    2012-12-01

    newly generated diffusing flows by many short drillings in the seafloor where no apparent hydrothermal fluid discharge was observed (e.g., C0013 and C0014). The new widespread diffusing flows altered the habitat condition, and provided post-drilling propagation and colonization of indigenous hydrothermal chemosynthetic animals. Interestingly, the first colonizers were shrimps and polychaeta, which were identified at C0013 and C0016 in 6 months after the IODP expedition, while the most drastic propagation and colonization were conducted by the most predominant chemosynthetic animal species in the Iheya North field, vent crab Shinkaia crosnieri. It appeared at C0014 site (500 m distant from their large colonies) in a year and dominated the new diffusing flow sites. It seems likely that IODP drilling operation and the post-drilling hydrothermal activities would have an impact on increasing biomass production and widespread propagation of hydrothermal vent ecosystem in the Iheya North field.

  4. Lead pollution in subtropical ecosystems on the SE Gulf of California Coast: a study of concentrations and isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, Martin F; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Scelfo, Genine; Hibdon, Sharon; Franks, Rob; Aggarawl, Jugdeep; Flegal, A Russell

    2008-10-01

    Lead pollution was investigated in environmental matrices and biological indicators collected from two typical subtropical coastal ecosystems in the southeast Gulf of California, Mexico. Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb) were measured using high resolution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), respectively. Lead in surface estuary sediments (10.0-34.2microgg(-1)) and particulate Pb (25.0-128.7microgg(-1), >98% of total Pb) in the water column were significantly higher than levels in natural bedrock soils (15.1+/-8.3microgg(-1)) and river runoff (1.9+/-1.4microgg(-1)). Aquatic plants had Pb concentrations between 2.5 and 7.2microgg(-1), while those in macroalgae ranged from 3 to 5microgg(-1). The ranges of mean Pb concentrations in the aquatic animals studied (ranges in microgg(-1)) were as follows: zooplankton 32+/-3, mussels 2.3-3.9, oysters 1.9-7.9, snail 2.0-7.7, barnacles 0.1-18.5, fish 1.4-8.9, crab 6.3-40.2 and polychaetae 8.5-16.7. Pb values in 20-40% of oyster and fish samples and in all samples of crab exceeded acceptable levels for a food source for human consumption. Pb isotope ratios (206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb in biota ranged from 1.188 to 1.206 and 2.448 to 2.470, respectively. A plot of (206)Pb/(207)Pb versus (208)Pb/(207)Pb for the environmental and biological samples collected from two study areas indicates that they contain lead from ores mined in Mexico and used in the past to produce leaded gasoline in use until 1997, natural Pb weathered from the Sierra Madre Occidental mother rock, and the later influence of inputs from a more radiogenic source related to industrial activity in the United States. Statistical software IsoSource results revealed that the Pb contained in environmental matrices and biomonitors is mostly derived from gasoline (20-90%) and US emissions (10-40%). PMID:18789522

  5. Zonation of benthic communities in a tropical tidal flat of north-east Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, S.

    2000-02-01

    Tropical tidal flats are relatively less well-known marine ecosystems. Therefore, the distribution and abundance of infaunal organisms were surveyed in a tidal flat in the Haughton estuary, north-east Australia, testing several hypotheses on characteristics of intertidal faunal distributions. Using a stratified random sampling design, macrofauna, small macrofauna (mesofauna) and meiofauna were sampled at five sites along a transect from the high to the low intertidal in April and September 1991. In total, 77 macrobenthic species were recorded during this study, with polychaetes and crustaceans richest in species. While this species record was low compared to other tropical tidal flats, the low individual densities confirmed previous findings of lower abundances in tropical than temperate tidal flats. Along the transect, species densities were highest in the mid-intertidal muddy sand and sandflats, with values ranging from 2.9 to 7.6 species 177 cm -2 for macrofauna and from 2.2 to 3.8 species 10 cm -2 for mesofauna. At the Callianassa site in the mid-intertidal 35 species were recorded, while the lower sandflat site had the highest diversity ( H'=2.60). Macro- and mesofauna abundances were highest at the sandflat site (median values for macrofauna: 65 and 69 ind. 177 cm -2 in September and April, respectively, and 37 and 48 ind. 10 cm -2 for mesofauna). There was little variation between the two sampling dates, although single taxa occurred with significantly higher abundances in one of the two months. Polychaeta and Amphipoda were abundant at the sandflat and Callianassa site, juvenile bivalves were most frequent in the sandflat after a spatfall in September. There was no pronounced increase of suspension feeders in the lower intertidal, and deposit feeders dominated the fauna. Meiofauna was abundant throughout the intertidal with median values up to 310 ind. 5 cm -2. Their densities were highest in the lower intertidal and lowest at the transect site with

  6. Effects of estuarine sediment contamination on feeding and on key physiological functions of the polychaete Hediste diversicolor: Laboratory and in situ assays.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Lima, Inês; Ribeiro, Rui; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2006-06-15

    This study aimed at integrating postexposure feeding and some biochemical parameters in the responses of the estuarine polychaeta, Hediste diversicolor, to controlled laboratory exposure conditions and to in situ exposures scenario of sediment contamination. Since H. diversicolor feeding may be considered as a major rate-limiting step in the processing of detritus in European estuaries, a reduction in feeding activity may have implications not only at the individual and population level of the species but also in detritus processing and in organic matter decomposition rates at the ecosystem level. The biochemical parameters were chosen as indicators of four key physiological functions: neurotransmission, metabolic condition, detoxification processes and antioxidant defences. The Mira and Sado estuaries, located in the Southwest coast of Portugal and classified as undisturbed and impacted, respectively, were selected as sites for this study. A significant depression in H. diversicolor postexposure feeding (from 30 to 70%) was consistently detected in all impacted sediments, supporting the sensitivity and responsiveness of feeding as a sublethal toxicity endpoint. Alongside with a reduced energy intake, an increased rate of organisms' anaerobic metabolism, as evidenced by an enhancement of lactate dehydrogenase activity (up to 1.5-fold), suggested a rapid need of additional energy to ameliorate chemical stress. Moreover, oxidative stress was shown to be an important mechanism of toxicity of the impacted sediments in H. diversicolor, as evidenced by a marked reduction in the glutathione redox status (up to 6.5-fold) and an increase in lipid peroxides levels (up to 2.3-fold) in organisms exposed to the most impacted sediments. Results of the in situ assay, conducted to assess the ecological relevance of sediment laboratory toxicity estimates and their application to make valid field extrapolations, revealed a lack of agreement in the response of catalase in organisms

  7. Authigenic carbonate crusts and chimneys along the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Güliz; Namık Çaǧatay, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara is located on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) fault zone that is a major continental transform plate boundary. It has ca. 1250 m-deep Tekirdag, Central and Cinarcik basins that are separated by two NE-SW trending Central and Western Highs. Extensive cold seeps occur along the active fault segments of the NAF in the deep basins and highs, which are associated with authigenic carbonate crusts, carbonate chimneys and mounds, black sulphidic sediments, and local gas hydrates and oil seepage. The cold seep sites were observed and sampled during the Nautile submersible and Victor 6000 Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives carried out during MARNAUT and MARSITE cruises in 2007 and 2014, respectively. Here, we report the mineralogical and stable isotopic composition of the authigenic carbonates and discuss their environmental conditions and mechanisms of formation. The carbonate crusts range up to 5 cm in thickness and the chimneys and mounds are up to 2 m high. Some chimneys are active emitting fresh to brackish water at ambient bottom water temperatures (˜ 14° C). The carbonate crusts occur as a pavements, and are commonly covered with black sulphidic sediments and bacterial mats that accommodate a rich chemosynthetic community of bivalves, sea urchins and marine annelid worms (Polychaeta). The authigenic carbonates commonly consist mainly of aragonite, but in a few instances contain subequal amounts of aragonite and calcite. High Mg-calcite is usually a minor to trace component, except in one sample in which it is present as a cement of mudstone. In the active methane emission zones, the sulphate/methane boundary occurs at or close to the seafloor, whereas elsewhere in the Sea of Marmara, the same boundary is located at 2-5 m below the seafloor. This, together with very light stable carbon isotope values (δ13C=-29.8 to - 46.3 ‰ V-PDB), indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of high methane flux emitted from the active faults is the major process

  8. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of the Neotropical genus Acrochaeta Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Stratiomyidae: Sarginae).

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2015-01-01

    The Neotropical genus Acrochaeta Wiedemann is revised and a cladistics analysis of the genus based on morphological characters is presented. This paper raises the total number of extant Acrochaeta species from 10 to 14 with the description of nine new species, the synonymy of one species, the transfer of five species to other genera and the transfer of one species of Merosargus to Acrochaeta. The new species described (of which eight are from Brazil and one from Bolivia and Peru) are Acrochaeta asapha nov. sp., A. balbii nov. sp., A. dichrostyla nov. sp., A. polychaeta nov. sp., A. pseudofasciata nov. sp., A. pseudopolychaeta nov. sp., A. rhombostyla nov. sp. A. ruschii nov. sp. and A. stigmata nov. sp. The primary types of all Acrochaeta species were studied at least from photos, when possible with the study of dissected male or female terminalia. A. mexicana Lindner is proposed as a junior synonym of A. flaveola Bigot. M. chalconota (Brauer) comb. nov., M. degenerata (Lindner) comb. nov., M. longiventris (Enderlein) comb. nov. and M. picta (Brauer) comb. nov. are herein transferred from Acrochaeta to Merosargus Loew, and Chrysochlorina elegans (Perty) comb. nov. is transferred from Acrochaeta to Chrysochlorina James. A. convexifrons (McFadden) comb. nov. is transferred from Merosargus to Acrochaeta. The limits of the genus and its insertion in the Sarginae are considered, and an updated generic diagnosis is provided. All species of the genus are redescribed and diagnosed, and illustrated with photos of the habitus, thorax, wing, and drawings of the antenna and male and female terminalia. Distribution maps are provided for the species, along with an identification key for adults of all species. Parsimony analyses were carried out under equal and implied weight. Our matrix includes 43 terminal taxa--of which 26 are outgroup species from four different sargine genera--and 59 adult morphological characters. The phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of

  9. Effects of sample preparation on stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in marine invertebrates: implications for food web studies using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Miguel A; Serrano, Oscar; Serrano, Laura; Michener, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    Trophic ecology has benefitted from the use of stable isotopes for the last three decades. However, during the last 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of the isotopic biases associated with some pre-analytical procedures that can seriously hamper the interpretation of food webs. We have assessed the extent of such biases by: (1) reviewing the literature on the topic, and (2) compiling C and N isotopic values of marine invertebrates reported in the literature with the associated sample preparation protocols. The factors considered were: acid-washing, distilled water rinsing (DWR), sample type (whole individuals or pieces of soft tissues), lipid content, and gut contents. Two-level ANOVA revealed overall large and highly significant effects of acidification for both delta(13)C values (up to 0.9 per thousand decrease) and delta(15) N values (up to 2.1 per thousand decrease in whole individual samples, and up to 1.1 per thousand increase in tissue samples). DWR showed a weak overall effect with delta(13)C increments of 0.6 per thousand (for the entire data set) or decrements of 0.7 per thousand in delta(15) N values (for tissue samples). Gut contents showed no overall significant effect, whereas lipid extraction resulted in the greatest biases in both isotopic signatures (delta(13)C, up to -2.0 per thousand in whole individuals; delta(15)N, up to +4.3 per thousand in tissue samples). The study analyzed separately the effects of the various factors in different taxonomic groups and revealed a very high diversity in the extent and direction of the effects. Maxillopoda, Gastropoda, and Polychaeta were the classes that showed the largest isotopic shifts associated with sample preparation. Guidelines for the standardization of sample preparation protocols for isotopic analysis are proposed both for large and small marine invertebrates. Broadly, these guidelines recommend: (1) avoiding both acid washing and DWR, and (2) performing lipid extraction and gut

  10. Late-summer zooplankton community structure, abundance, and distribution in the Hudson Bay system (Canada) and their relationships with environmental conditions, 2003-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Rafael; Harvey, Michel; Gosselin, Michel; Starr, Michel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Straneo, Fiammetta

    2012-08-01

    Zooplankton communities were examined for the first time in three different hydrographic regions of the Hudson Bay system (HBS) in early August to early September from 2003 to 2006. Sampling was conducted at 50 stations distributed along different transects located in Hudson Bay (HB), Hudson Strait (HS), and Foxe Basin (FB). Variations in zooplankton biomass, abundance, taxonomic composition, and diversity in relation to environmental variables were studied using multivariate techniques. During all sampling years, the total zooplankton biomass was on average four times lower in HB than in HS and FB. Clustering samples by their relative species compositions revealed no interannual variation in zooplankton community but showed a marked interregional variability between the three regions. Water column stratification explained the greatest proportion (25%) of this spatial variability. According to redundancy analysis (RDA), the zooplankton taxa that contribute most to the separation of the three regions are Microcalanus spp., Oithona similis, Oncaea borealis, Aeginopsis laurentii, Sagitta elegans, Fritillaria sp., and larvae of cnidaria, chaetognatha, and pteropoda in HB; hyperiid amphipods in FB; and Pseudocalanus spp. CI-CV, Calanus glacialis CI-CVI, Calanus finmarchicus CI-CVI, Calanus hyperboreus CV-CVI, Acartia longiremis CI-CV, Metridia longa N3-N6 CI-CIII CVIf, Eukrohnia hamata, larvae of echinodermata, mollusca, cirripedia, appendicularia, and polychaeta in the northwestern and southeastern HS transects. For the HB transect, the RDA analyzed allowed us to distinguish three regions (HB west, central, and east) with different environmental gradients and zooplankton assemblages, in particular higher concentration of Pseudocalanus spp. nauplii and CI-CVI, as well as benthic macrozooplankton and meroplankton larvae in western HB. In HS, Calanoid species (mainly C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis) were mostly observed at the north shore stations associated with the

  11. Observations on the feeding mechanism, diet and digestive physiology of Histriobdella homari Van Beneden 1858: an aberrant polychaete symbiotic with North American and European lobsters.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J B; Gelder, S R

    1976-12-01

    1. The aberrant annelid Histriobdella homari (Polychaeta:Eunicida) lives in the branchial chambers of the marine lobsters Homarus americanus and H. vulgaris where it feeds on the rich microflora of bacteria, blue-green algae and related organisms which grow on the inner surface of the branchial chamber, the setae fringing the edges of the carapace, the gill filaments and, especially, the surfaces and setae of the epipodite plates between the gills. H. homari, therefore, is to be regarded as an epizoic microphagous cleaning symbiote of the lobsters. 2. The alimentary canal consists of mouth, buccal cavity, oesophagus, proventriculus, stomach, intestine and anus. The much-modified proboscis lies ventrally below the oesophagus and proventriculus, with its anterior portions protruding into the rear of the buccal cavity. 3. The proboscis consists of two fixed parallel mandibles, a transverse carrier which slides upon the mandibles and to which is attached, posteriorly, a median flexible dorsal rod and, anteriorly, four pairs of movable articulated maxillae, paired external and internal retractor muscles and various tensor, flexor and extensor muscles. 4. Contraction of the retractor muscles withdraws the carrier and maxillae posteriorly, causing bowing of the dorsal rod which is fixed at its posterior end. Relaxation of the muscles allows the rod to straighten and, thus, causes protraction of the carrier and protraction and lateral expansion of the maxillae. Contraction and relaxation of the relaxation of the retractor muscles are supplemented by appropriate changes in the other muscular components of the proboscis. 5. During feeding the serrated anterior ends of the mandibles are applied to the food, the maxillae are fully expanded and then dawn ventro-posteriorly toward the mid-line by contraction of the retractor muscles in the effective movement of the feeding mechanism. This draws the food organisms across the anterior ends of the mandibles, detaching them from the

  12. Distribution, abundance, biomass and diversity of benthic infauna in the Northeast Chukchi Sea, Alaska: Relation to environmental variables and marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, Susan V.; Clarke, Janet T.; Dunton, Kenneth H.

    2014-04-01

    In summer 2009 and 2010, as part of Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area - Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA CAB) program, we performed a quantitative assessment of the biomass, abundance, and community structure of benthic infaunal populations of the Northeastern Chukchi Sea. This analysis documented a benthic species inventory of 361 taxa collected from 142 individual van Veen grab samples (0.1 m-2) at 52 stations. Infaunal abundance was dominated by Polychaeta, Mollusca, and Crustacea. Large concentrations of bivalves (up to 1235 m-2; 920.2 gww m-2) were collected south of Hanna Shoal where flow from two water masses converge and deposit labile carbon to the seafloor, as indicated by low surface sediment C:N ratios. Amphipods (up to 1640 m-2; 26.0 gww m-2), and polychaetes (up to 4665 m-2; 114.7 gww m-2) were documented from multiple stations west of and within Barrow Canyon. This high productivity was most likely due to the "canyon effect", where marine and coastal detrital carbon supplies are channeled by the canyon structure, enhancing carbon deposition and flux, which supports rich benthic communities within the canyon and surrounding areas. To examine the relationships between infaunal distributions of all collected taxa with the physical environment, we used a Biota and Environment matching (BIO-ENV) routine. A combination of water depth, bottom-water temperature and salinity, surface sediment total organic nitrogen (TON) and sediment C:N molar ratios correlated closest with infaunal abundance distribution (ρ=0.54), indicating that multiple factors influence the success of benthic communities. BIO-ENV routines produced similar correlation results when performed on targeted walrus prey items (bivalves (ρ=0.50), polychaetes (ρ=0.53), but gray whale prey items (amphipods) were not strongly correlated to any combination of physical environmental factors (ρ=0.24). Distributions of primary prey items for gray whales (amphipods) and walruses (bivalves

  13. Ecological state of North -Western Black Sea macrobenthos on offshore bottoms deeper than 50 m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomoiu, M.-T.; Begun, T.; Teaca, A.

    2009-04-01

    ) populations representing 82% of the total mean density of benthos. As weight, the molluscs only (Modiolus, Mytilus) represented more than 85% of the total mean biomass. The most spectacular development of benthos populations was registered, however, by the polychaeta worms Capitella capitata and Polydora sp.(antennata? quadrilobata?). They are opportunistic species, wildly distributed on the NW Black Sea bottoms, with different types of substrata (both soft and hard). Frequently, these species are the dominant forms, particularly in the zones with high organic loading of sediments or in heavy polluted zones. In the mud community dominated by Modiolus phaseolinus, Polydora population had in its belt-like enclave of sand an average density of 12,000 indvs.m-2 and maxima of 23,000 indvs.m-2. The results of the comparative analysis along the depth gradient showed that the specific diversity decreases with depth. Thus, out of 191 taxa recorded in the zone under study, 186 taxa (approximately 90%) were identified in the depth interval between 50-100 m, 86 taxa identified between 100-150 m and only one species was found below 150 m. The quantitative values decreased gradually with depth. The numerical abundance decreased approximately twice in the interval 100-150 m as compared to the interval 50-100 m (from 5,600 indvs.m-2 to 2,600 indvs.m-2), and the biomass decreased approximately seven times (from 230 g.m-2 to 32 gm-2). The dominant species in the depth interval of 50-100 m, with abundances over 45% of the total density were Modiolus phaseolinus, Polydora antennata(?) and Capitella capitata and over 85% of the total biomass - Modiolus phaseolinus, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Terebelides stroemi. In the depth interval of 100-150 m the quantitative dominants by density were Protodrilus flavocapitatus(?), Modiolus phaseolinus, Capitella capitata, and, respectively, by biomass, Modiolus phaseolinus, Ctenicella appendiculata, Haliclona aquaeductus. Only one Sponge species (Suberites