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Sample records for nicotiana attenuata wrky3

  1. Multiple interactions of NaHER1 protein with abscisic acid signaling in Nicotiana attenuata plants

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T; Gális, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we identified a novel herbivore elicitor-regulated protein in Nicotiana attenuata (NaHER1) that is required to suppress abscisic acid (ABA) catabolism during herbivore attack and activate a full defense response against herbivores. ABA, in addition to its newly defined role in defense activation, mainly controls seed germination and stomatal function of land plants. Here we show that N. attenuata seeds silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) accumulated less ABA during germination, and germinated faster on ABA-containing media compared to WT. Curiously, epidermal cells of irHER1 plants were wrinkled, possibly due to the previously demonstrated increase in transpiration of irHER1 plants that may affect turgor and cause wrinkling of the cells. We conclude that NaHER1 is a highly pleiotropic regulator of ABA responses in N. attenuata plants. PMID:24022276

  2. Natural variation in floral nectar proteins of two Nicotiana attenuata accessions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Floral nectar (FN) contains not only energy-rich compounds to attract pollinators, but also defense chemicals and several proteins. However, proteomic analysis of FN has been hampered by the lack of publically available sequence information from nectar-producing plants. Here we used next-generation sequencing and advanced proteomics to profile FN proteins in the opportunistic outcrossing wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata. Results We constructed a transcriptome database of N. attenuata and characterized its nectar proteome using LC-MS/MS. The FN proteins of N. attenuata included nectarins, sugar-cleaving enzymes (glucosidase, galactosidase, and xylosidase), RNases, pathogen-related proteins, and lipid transfer proteins. Natural variation in FN proteins of eleven N. attenuata accessions revealed a negative relationship between the accumulation of two abundant proteins, nectarin1b and nectarin5. In addition, microarray analysis of nectary tissues revealed that protein accumulation in FN is not simply correlated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding FN proteins and identified a group of genes that were specifically expressed in the nectary. Conclusions Natural variation of identified FN proteins in the ecological model plant N. attenuata suggests that nectar chemistry may have a complex function in plant-pollinator-microbe interactions. PMID:23848992

  3. Identification and characterization of circadian clock genes in a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A plant’s endogenous clock (circadian clock) entrains physiological processes to light/dark and temperature cycles. Forward and reverse genetic approaches in Arabidopsis have revealed the mechanisms of the circadian clock and its components in the genome. Similar approaches have been used to characterize conserved clock elements in several plant species. A wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata has been studied extensively to understand responses to biotic or abiotic stress in the glasshouse and also in their native habitat. During two decades of field experiment, we observed several diurnal rhythmic traits of N. attenuata in nature. To expand our knowledge of circadian clock function into the entrainment of traits important for ecological processes, we here report three core clock components in N. attenuata. Results Protein similarity and transcript accumulation allowed us to isolate orthologous genes of the core circadian clock components, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1/PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (TOC1/PRR1), and ZEITLUPE (ZTL). Transcript accumulation of NaLHY peaked at dawn and NaTOC1 peaked at dusk in plants grown under long day conditions. Ectopic expression of NaLHY and NaZTL in Arabidopsis resulted in elongated hypocotyl and late-flowering phenotypes. Protein interactions between NaTOC1 and NaZTL were confirmed by yeast two-hybrid assays. Finally, when NaTOC1 was silenced in N. attenuata, late-flowering phenotypes under long day conditions were clearly observed. Conclusions We identified three core circadian clock genes in N. attenuata and demonstrated the functional and biochemical conservation of NaLHY, NaTOC1, and NaZTL. PMID:23006446

  4. Priming of anti-herbivore defence in Nicotiana attenuata by insect oviposition: herbivore-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Grichnik, Roland; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes plant defence against its larvae that consequently suffer reduced performance. To reveal whether this is a general response of tobacco to insect oviposition or species-specific, we investigated whether also Manduca sexta oviposition primes N. attenuata's anti-herbivore defence. The plant response to M. sexta and S. exigua oviposition overlapped in the egg-primed feeding-induced production of the phenylpropanoid caffeoylputrescine. While M. sexta larvae were unaffected in their performance, they showed a novel response to the oviposition-mediated plant changes: a reduced antimicrobial activity in their haemolymph. In a cross-resistance experiment, S. exigua larvae suffered reduced performance on M. sexta-oviposited plants like they did on S. exigua-oviposited plants. The M. sexta oviposition-mediated plant effects on the S. exigua larval performance and on M. sexta larval immunity required expression of the NaMyb8 transcription factor that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids such as caffeoylputrescine. Thus, NaMyb8-dependent defence traits mediate the effects that oviposition by both lepidopteran species exerts on the plant's anti-herbivore defence. These results suggest that oviposition by lepidopteran species on N. attenuata leaves may generally prime the feeding-induced production of certain plant defence compounds but that different herbivore species show different susceptibility to egg-primed plant effects. PMID:26566692

  5. Methyl jasmonate as an allelopathic agent: sagebrush inhibits germination of a neighboring tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Preston, Catherine A; Betts, Hazel; Baldwi, Ian T

    2002-11-01

    Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata is the dominant and defining shrub in the Great Basin Desert, with well-documented allelopathic tendencies that have generally been ascribed to its most abundantly released secondary metabolites. However, as a minor component, sagebrush releases a highly biologically active substance, methyljasmonate (MeJA), which is known to function as both a germination inhibitor and promoter in laboratory studies. Nicotiana attenuata is a tobacco species native to the Great Basin Desert and grows in newly burned juniper-sagebrush habitats for 2-3 yr following a fire. With a combination of field and laboratory studies, we examined the role of MeJA release from sagebrush by both air and water transport in inhibiting N. attenuata seed germination. We demonstrated that sagebrush interacts allelopathically with the seed bank of N. attenuata through its release of MeJA. In the field, seeds buried 0-40 cm from sagebrush plants for 4 months in net bags had significantly reduced germination compared to seeds buried similarly but protected in plastic bags. Moreover, germination on soils collected from underneath sagebrush plants was reduced by 60% compared to seeds placed on soils collected between sagebrush plants or outside of the sagebrush population. Exposure to A. tridentata seeds and seedlings did not affect N. attenuata germination, suggesting that established sagebrush plants only influence the tobacco's seed bank. In the laboratory, exposure of seeds to sagebrush emissions resulted in germination delays of up to 6 d. Exposure to volatile and aqueous MeJA also inhibited germination of N. attenuata seeds at quantities that are released naturally by sagebrush: 3.5 microg/hr and 1.12 microg/seed cup (56 ng/seed), respectively. A. tridentata seeds were significantly more resistant to MeJA, being inhibited at 336 microg MeJA (16.8 microg/seed), 300 times greater than the level of aqueous MeJA required to inhibit N. attenuata seeds. MeJA inhibited N

  6. Shifting Nicotiana attenuata's diurnal rhythm does not alter its resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Herden, Jasmin; Meldau, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kunert, Grit; Joo, Youngsung; Baldwin, Ian T; Schuman, Meredith C

    2016-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are less resistant to attack by the generalist lepidopteran herbivore Trichoplusia ni when plants and herbivores are entrained to opposite, versus identical diurnal cycles and tested under constant conditions. This effect is associated with circadian fluctuations in levels of jasmonic acid, the transcription factor MYC2, and glucosinolate contents in leaves. We tested whether a similar effect could be observed in a different plant-herbivore system: the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and its co-evolved specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. We measured larval growth on plants under both constant and diurnal conditions following identical or opposite entrainment, profiled the metabolome of attacked leaf tissue, quantified specific metabolites known to reduce M. sexta growth, and monitored M. sexta feeding activity under all experimental conditions. Entrainment did not consistently affect M. sexta growth or plant defense induction. However, both were reduced under constant dark conditions, as was M. sexta feeding activity. Our data indicate that the response induced by M. sexta in N. attenuata is robust to diurnal cues and independent of plant or herbivore entrainment. We propose that while the patterns of constitutive or general damage-induced defense may undergo circadian fluctuation, the orchestration of specific induced responses is more complex. PMID:26699809

  7. Cytokinin levels and signaling respond to wounding and the perception of herbivore elicitors in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Martin; Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Navarro-Quezada, Aura; Brütting, Christoph; Vanková, Radomira; Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Nearly half a century ago insect herbivores were found to induce the formation of green islands by manipulating cytokinin (CK) levels. However, the response of the CK pathway to attack by chewing insect herbivores remains unclear. Here, we characterize the CK pathway of Nicotiana attenuata (Torr. ex S. Wats.) and its response to wounding and perception of herbivore-associated molecular patterns (HAMPs). We identified 44 genes involved in CK biosynthesis, inactivation, degradation, and signaling. Leaf wounding rapidly induced transcriptional changes in multiple genes throughout the pathway, as well as in the levels of CKs, including isopentenyladenosine and cis-zeatin riboside; perception of HAMPs present in the oral secretions (OS) of the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta amplified these responses. The jasmonate pathway, which triggers many herbivore-induced processes, was not required for these HAMP-triggered changes, but rather suppressed the CK responses. Interestingly CK pathway changes were observed also in systemic leaves in response to wounding and OS application indicating a role of CKs in mediating long distance systemic processes in response to herbivory. Since wounding and grasshopper OS elicited similar accumulations of CKs in Arabidopsis thaliana L., we propose that CKs are integral components of wounding and HAMP-triggered responses in many plant species. PMID:24924599

  8. DICER-like proteins and their role in plant-herbivore interactions in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Bozorov, Tohir Ahmadovich; Pandey, Shree Prakash; Dinh, Son Truong; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Heinrich, Maria; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-03-01

    DICER-like (DCL) proteins produce small RNAs that silence genes involved in development and defenses against viruses and pathogens. Which DCLs participate in plant-herbivore interactions remains unstudied. We identified and stably silenced four distinct DCL genes by RNAi in Nicotiana attenuata (Torrey ex. Watson), a model for the study of plant-herbivore interactions. Silencing DCL1 expression was lethal. Manduca sexta larvae performed significantly better on ir-dcl3 and ir-dcl4 plants, but not on ir-dcl2 plants compared to wild type plants. Phytohormones, defense metabolites and microarray analyses revealed that when DCL3 and DCL4 were silenced separately, herbivore resistance traits were regulated in distinctly different ways. Crossing of the lines revealed complex interactions in the patterns of regulation. Single ir-dcl4 and double ir-dcl2 ir-dcl3 plants were impaired in JA accumulation, while JA-Ile was increased in ir-dcl3 plants. Ir-dcl3 and ir-dcl4 plants were impaired in nicotine accumulation; silencing DCL2 in combination with either DCL3 or DCL4 restored nicotine levels to those of WT. Trypsin proteinase inhibitor activity and transcripts were only silenced in ir-dcl3 plants. We conclude that DCL2/3/4 interact in a complex manner to regulate anti-herbivore defenses and that these interactions significantly complicate the already challenging task of understanding smRNA function in the regulation of biotic interactions. PMID:22313877

  9. Insect herbivory elicits genome-wide alternative splicing responses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) are involved in many responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in eukaryotic organisms. In response to attack and oviposition by insect herbivores, plants elicit rapid changes in gene expression which are essential for the activation of plant defenses; however, the herbivory-induced changes in AS remain unstudied. Using mRNA sequencing, we performed a genome-wide analysis on tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) feeding-induced AS in both leaves and roots of Nicotiana attenuata. Feeding by M. sexta for 5 h reduced total AS events by 7.3% in leaves but increased them in roots by 8.0% and significantly changed AS patterns in leaves and roots of existing AS genes. Feeding by M. sexta also resulted in increased (in roots) and decreased (in leaves) transcript levels of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that are involved in the AS machinery of plants and induced changes in SR gene expression that were jasmonic acid (JA)-independent in leaves but JA-dependent in roots. Changes in AS and gene expression elicited by M. sexta feeding were regulated independently in both tissues. This study provides genome-wide evidence that insect herbivory induces changes not only in the levels of gene expression but also in their splicing, which might contribute to defense against and/or tolerance of herbivory. PMID:26306554

  10. Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes induced plant defence against larval herbivory.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2015-08-01

    Plants exhibit multifarious defence traits against herbivory that are constitutively expressed or induced upon attack. Insect egg deposition often precedes impending larval attack, and several plants can increase their resistance against larvae after experiencing the oviposition by an herbivore. The nature of such oviposition-mediated resistance remains unknown, and here we aim to determine plant traits that explain it. We test whether oviposition on a host plant can induce plant defence responses or enhance (prime) the induction of defence traits in response to larval herbivory. We exposed Nicotiana attenuata plants to oviposition by moths of a generalist herbivore, Spodoptera exigua. Its larvae suffered higher mortality, retarded development and inflicted less feeding damage on oviposition-experienced than on oviposition-unexperienced plants. While oviposition alone did not induce any of the examined defence traits, oviposited plants exhibited a stronger inducibility of known defence traits, i.e. caffeoylputrescine (CP) and trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs). We found no effects of oviposition on phytohormone levels, but on the feeding-inducible accumulation of the transcription factor NaMyb8 that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates, including CP. Comparison of larval performance on wild-type plants, CP-deficient plants (silenced NaMyb8 gene), and TPI-deficient plants (silenced NaPI gene) revealed that priming of plant resistance to larvae by prior oviposition required NaMyb8-mediated defence traits. Our results show that plants can use insect egg deposition as a warning signal to prime their feeding-induced defence. PMID:26096574

  11. Herbivore induction of jasmonic acid and chemical defences reduce photosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Zavala, Jorge A; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Herbivory initiates a shift in plant metabolism from growth to defence that may reduce fitness in the absence of further herbivory. However, the defence-induced changes in carbon assimilation that precede this reallocation in resources remain largely undetermined. This study characterized the response of photosynthesis to herbivore induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-related defences in Nicotiana attenuata to increase understanding of these mechanisms. It was hypothesized that JA-induced defences would immediately reduce the component processes of photosynthesis upon attack and was predicted that wild-type plants would suffer greater reductions in photosynthesis than plants lacking JA-induced defences. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and thermal spatial patterns were measured together with the production of defence-related metabolites after attack and through recovery. Herbivore damage immediately reduced electron transport and gas exchange in wild-type plants, and gas exchange remained suppressed for several days after attack. The sustained reductions in gas exchange occurred concurrently with increased defence metabolites in wild-type plants, whereas plants lacking JA-induced defences suffered minimal suppression in photosynthesis and no increase in defence metabolite production. This suppression in photosynthesis occurred only after sustained defence signalling and defence chemical mobilization, whereas a short bout of feeding damage only transiently altered components of photosynthesis. It was identified that lipoxygenase signalling interacted with photosynthetic electron transport and that the resulting JA-related metabolites reduced photosynthesis. These data represent a metabolic cost to mounting a chemical defence against herbivory and link defence-signalling networks to the differential effects of herbivory on photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues in a time-dependent manner. PMID:23264519

  12. A push-button: Spodoptera exigua oviposition on Nicotiana attenuata dose-independently primes the feeding-induced plant defense.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Insect oviposition on a plant often precedes the attack by herbivorous larvae. We recently discovered that oviposition by Spodoptera exigua moths on the desert tobacco Nicotiana attenuata primes the induction of 2 defense traits, a phenylpropanoid and activity of protease inhibitors, in response to larval feeding. Oviposition-experienced plants suffer a reduced feeding damage by less and smaller larvae than unexperienced control plants. The increased resistance of oviposition-experienced plants requires the plant's ability to activate its biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids via a Myb transcription factor. Oviposition by S. exigua on N. attenuata is highly variable with respect to the amount, distribution and localization of the eggs on the plant. This raises the question, whether the plant's priming of herbivore defense depends on the egg number and localization. S. exigua moths prefer the oldest leaves for oviposition and yet prime defense-induction in the larval attacked young systemic leaves. Neither the levels of the primed defense traits, nor the affected larval mortality correlate with the number of eggs a plant previously received. This suggests that upon S. exigua oviposition, N. attenuata is shifted - independently of the egg-dose - into a primed state that is responding stronger to the feeding larvae than unprimed plants. PMID:26555313

  13. A push-button: Spodoptera exigua oviposition on Nicotiana attenuata dose-independently primes the feeding-induced plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Bandoly, Michele; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-01-01

    abstract Insect oviposition on a plant often precedes the attack by herbivorous larvae. We recently discovered that oviposition by Spodoptera exigua moths on the desert tobacco Nicotiana attenuata primes the induction of 2 defense traits, a phenylpropanoid and activity of protease inhibitors, in response to larval feeding. Oviposition-experienced plants suffer a reduced feeding damage by less and smaller larvae than unexperienced control plants. The increased resistance of oviposition-experienced plants requires the plant's ability to activate its biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids via a Myb transcription factor. Oviposition by S. exigua on N. attenuata is highly variable with respect to the amount, distribution and localization of the eggs on the plant. This raises the question, whether the plant's priming of herbivore defense depends on the egg number and localization. S. exigua moths prefer the oldest leaves for oviposition and yet prime defense-induction in the larval attacked young systemic leaves. Neither the levels of the primed defense traits, nor the affected larval mortality correlate with the number of eggs a plant previously received. This suggests that upon S. exigua oviposition, N. attenuata is shifted – independently of the egg-dose – into a primed state that is responding stronger to the feeding larvae than unprimed plants. PMID:26555313

  14. Silencing of a Germin-Like Gene in Nicotiana attenuata Improves Performance of Native Herbivores1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to function in pathogen resistance, but their involvement in defense against insect herbivores is poorly understood. In the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, attack from the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta or elicitation by adding larval oral secretions (OS) to wounds up-regulates transcripts of a GLP. To understand the function of this gene, which occurs as a single copy, we cloned the full-length NaGLP and silenced its expression in N. attenuata by expressing a 250-bp fragment in an antisense orientation with an Agrobacterium-based transformation system and by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Homozygous lines harboring a single insert and VIGS plants had significantly reduced constitutive (measured in roots) and elicited NaGLP transcript levels (in leaves). Silencing NaGLP improved M. sexta larval performance and Tupiocoris notatus preference, two native herbivores of N. attenuata. Silencing NaGLP also attenuated the OS-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), diterpene glycosides, and trypsin proteinase inhibitor responses, which may explain the observed susceptibility of antisense or VIGS plants to herbivore attack and increased nicotine contents, but did not influence the OS-elicited jasmonate and salicylate bursts, or the release of the volatile organic compounds (limonene, cis-α-bergamotene, and germacrene-A) that function as an indirect defense. This suggests that NaGLP is involved in H2O2 production and might also be related to ethylene production and/or perception, which in turn influences the defense responses of N. attenuata via H2O2 and ethylene-signaling pathways. PMID:16461381

  15. Fitness benefits of trypsin proteinase inhibitor expression in Nicotiana attenuata are greater than their costs when plants are attacked.

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Jorge A; Baldwin, Ian T

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonly invoked cost-benefit paradigm, central to most of functional biology, explains why one phenotype cannot be optimally fit in all environments; yet it is rarely tested. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) expression in Nicotiana attenuata is known to decrease plant fitness when plants compete with unattacked conspecifics that do not produce TPIs and also to decrease the performance of attacking herbivores. Results In order to determine whether the putative benefits of TPI production outweigh its cost, we transformed N. attenuata to silence endogenous TPI production or restore it in a natural mutant that was unable to produce TPIs. We compared the lifetime seed production of N. attenuata genotypes of the same genetic background with low or no TPI to that of genotypes with high TPI levels on which M. sexta larvae were allowed to feed freely. Unattacked low TPI-producing genotypes produced more seed capsules than did plants with high TPI levels. Caterpillar attack reduced seed capsule production in all genotypes and reversed the pattern of seed capsule production among genotypes. M. sexta larvae attacking genotypes with high TPI activity consumed more TPI, less protein, and move later to the young leaves. Larval masses were negatively correlated (R2 = 0.56) with seed capsule production per plant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the fitness benefits of TPI production outweigh their costs in greenhouse conditions, when plants are attacked and that despite the ongoing evolutionary interactions between plant and herbivore, TPI-mediated decreases in M. sexta performance translates into a fitness benefit for the plant. PMID:15304198

  16. Root jasmonic acid synthesis and perception regulate folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increase Nicotiana attenuata resistance.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2014-06-01

    While jasmonic acid (JA) signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the role of root JA in the defense of above-ground parts remains unstudied. To restrict JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wildtype Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling and evaluated ecologically relevant traits in the glasshouse and in nature. Root JA synthesis and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, systemic root JA regulated local leaf JA and abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations, which were associated with differences in nicotine transport from roots to leaves via the transpiration stream. Root JA signaling also regulated the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; together these account for differences in resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata's native habitat, silencing root JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. We conclude that attack from above-ground herbivores recruits root JA signaling to launch the full complement of plant defense responses. PMID:24580101

  17. Jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine coordinates metabolic networks required for anthesis and floral attractant emission in wild tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata).

    PubMed

    Stitz, Michael; Hartl, Markus; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives (jasmonates [JAs]) play central roles in floral development and maturation. The binding of jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the F-box of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) is required for many JA-dependent physiological responses, but its role in anthesis and pollinator attraction traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we used the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, which develops sympetalous flowers with complex pollination biology, to examine the coordinating function of JA homeostasis in the distinct metabolic processes that underlie flower maturation, opening, and advertisement to pollinators. From combined transcriptomic, targeted metabolic, and allometric analyses of transgenic N. attenuata plants for which signaling deficiencies were complemented with methyl jasmonate, JA-Ile, and its functional homolog, coronatine (COR), we demonstrate that (1) JA-Ile/COR-based signaling regulates corolla limb opening and a JA-negative feedback loop; (2) production of floral volatiles (night emissions of benzylacetone) and nectar requires JA-Ile/COR perception through COI1; and (3) limb expansion involves JA-Ile-induced changes in limb fresh mass and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate a master regulatory function of the JA-Ile/COI1 duet for the main function of a sympetalous corolla, that of advertising for and rewarding pollinator services. Flower opening, by contrast, requires JA-Ile signaling-dependent changes in primary metabolism, which are not compromised in the COI1-silenced RNA interference line used in this study. PMID:25326292

  18. Differences in Nicotine Metabolism of Two Nicotiana attenuata Herbivores Render Them Differentially Susceptible to a Common Native Predator

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pavan; Rathi, Preeti; Schöttner, Matthias; Baldwin, Ian T.; Pandit, Sagar

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotiana attenuata is attacked by larvae of both specialist (Manduca sexta) and generalist (Spodoptera exigua) lepidopteran herbivores in its native habitat. Nicotine is one of N. attenuata's important defenses. M. sexta is highly nicotine tolerant; whether cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative detoxification and/or rapid excretion is responsible for its exceptional tolerance remains unknown despite five decades of study. Recently, we demonstrated that M. sexta uses its nicotine-induced CYP6B46 to efflux midgut-nicotine into the hemolymph, facilitating nicotine exhalation that deters predatory wolf spiders (Camptocosa parallela). S. exigua's nicotine metabolism is uninvestigated. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the ability of these two herbivores to metabolize, tolerate and co-opt ingested nicotine for defense against the wolf spider. In addition, we analyzed the spider's excretion to gain insights into its nicotine metabolism. Contrary to previous reports, we found that M. sexta larvae neither accumulate the common nicotine oxides (cotinine, cotinine N-oxide and nicotine N-oxide) nor excrete them faster than nicotine. In M. sexta larvae, ingestion of nicotine as well as its oxides increases the accumulation of CYP6B46 transcripts. In contrast, S. exigua accumulates nicotine oxides and exhales less (66%) nicotine than does M. sexta. Spiders prefer nicotine-fed S. exigua over M. sexta, a preference reversed by topical or headspace nicotine supplementation, but not ingested or topically-coated nicotine oxides, suggesting that externalized nicotine but not the nicotine detoxification products deter spider predation. The spiders also do not accumulate nicotine oxides. Conclusions Nicotine oxidation reduces S. exigua's headspace-nicotine and renders it more susceptible to predation by spiders than M. sexta, which exhales unmetabolized nicotine. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that generalist herbivores incur costs of

  19. Silencing an N-acyltransferase-like involved in lignin biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata dramatically alters herbivory-induced phenolamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Kotkar, Hemlata; Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    In a transcriptomic screen of Manduca sexta-induced N-acyltransferases in leaves of Nicotiana attenuata, we identified an N-acyltransferase gene sharing a high similarity with the tobacco lignin-biosynthetic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) gene whose expression is controlled by MYB8, a transcription factor that regulates the production of phenylpropanoid polyamine conjugates (phenolamides, PAs). To evaluate the involvement of this HCT-like gene in lignin production as well as the resulting crosstalk with PA metabolism during insect herbivory, we transiently silenced (by VIGs) the expression of this gene and performed non-targeted (UHPLC-ESI/TOF-MS) metabolomics analyses. In agreement with a conserved function of N. attenuata HCT-like in lignin biogenesis, HCT-silenced plants developed weak, soft stems with greatly reduced lignin contents. Metabolic profiling demonstrated large shifts (up to 12% deregulation in total extracted ions in insect-attacked leaves) due to a large diversion of activated coumaric acid units into the production of developmentally and herbivory-induced coumaroyl-containing PAs (N',N''-dicoumaroylspermidine, N',N''-coumaroylputrescine, etc) and to minor increases in the most abundant free phenolics (chlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acids), all without altering the production of well characterized herbivory-responsive caffeoyl- and feruloyl-based putrescine and spermidine PAs. These data are consistent with a strong metabolic tension, exacerbated during herbivory, over the allocation of coumaroyl-CoA units among lignin and unusual coumaroyl-containing PAs, and rule out a role for HCT-LIKE in tuning the herbivory-induced accumulation of other PAs. Additionally, these results are consistent with a role for lignification as an induced anti-herbivore defense. PMID:23704878

  20. Silencing an N-Acyltransferase-Like Involved in Lignin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata Dramatically Alters Herbivory-Induced Phenolamide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    In a transcriptomic screen of Manduca sexta-induced N-acyltransferases in leaves of Nicotiana attenuata, we identified an N-acyltransferase gene sharing a high similarity with the tobacco lignin-biosynthetic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) gene whose expression is controlled by MYB8, a transcription factor that regulates the production of phenylpropanoid polyamine conjugates (phenolamides, PAs). To evaluate the involvement of this HCT-like gene in lignin production as well as the resulting crosstalk with PA metabolism during insect herbivory, we transiently silenced (by VIGs) the expression of this gene and performed non-targeted (UHPLC-ESI/TOF-MS) metabolomics analyses. In agreement with a conserved function of N. attenuata HCT-like in lignin biogenesis, HCT-silenced plants developed weak, soft stems with greatly reduced lignin contents. Metabolic profiling demonstrated large shifts (up to 12% deregulation in total extracted ions in insect-attacked leaves) due to a large diversion of activated coumaric acid units into the production of developmentally and herbivory-induced coumaroyl-containing PAs (N′,N′′-dicoumaroylspermidine, N′,N′′-coumaroylputrescine, etc) and to minor increases in the most abundant free phenolics (chlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acids), all without altering the production of well characterized herbivory-responsive caffeoyl- and feruloyl-based putrescine and spermidine PAs. These data are consistent with a strong metabolic tension, exacerbated during herbivory, over the allocation of coumaroyl-CoA units among lignin and unusual coumaroyl-containing PAs, and rule out a role for HCT-LIKE in tuning the herbivory-induced accumulation of other PAs. Additionally, these results are consistent with a role for lignification as an induced anti-herbivore defense. PMID:23704878

  1. The Nicotiana attenuata GLA1 lipase controls the accumulation of Phytophthora parasitica-induced oxylipins and defensive secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stefan; Kallenbach, Mario; Baldwin, Ian T.; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of GLYCEROLIPASE A1 (ir-gla1 plants) are compromised in the herbivore- and wound-induced accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA). However, these plants accumulate wild-type (WT) levels of JA and divinyl-ethers (DVE) during Phytophthora parasitica infection (Bonaventure et al., 2011). By profiling oxylipin-enriched fractions with targeted and untargeted LC-QTOF approaches, we demonstrate that the accumulation of 9-hydroxy-10E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (9-OH-18:2) and additional C18 and C19 oxylipins is reduced by ca. 20-fold in P. parasitica infected ir-gla1 leaves compared to WT. This reduced accumulation of oxylipins was accompanied by a reduced accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids and specific lysolipid species. Untargeted metabolic profiling of total leaf extracts showed that 87 metabolites accumulated differentially in leaves of P. parasitica-infected ir-gla1 plants with glycerolipids, hydroxylated-diterpene glycosides and phenylpropanoid derivatives accounting together for ca. 20% of these 87 metabolites. Thus, P. parasitica-induced oxylipins may participate in the regulation of metabolic changes during infection. Together, the results demonstrate that GLA1 plays a distinct role in the production of oxylipins during biotic stress responses, supplying substrates for 9-OH-18:2 and additional C18 and C19 oxylipin formation during P. parasitica infection whereas supplying substrates for the biogenesis of JA during herbivory and mechanical wounding. PMID:24450863

  2. Isolating Fungal Pathogens from a Dynamic Disease Outbreak in a Native Plant Population to Establish Plant-Pathogen Bioassays for the Ecological Model Plant Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    The wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata has been intensively used as a model plant to study its interaction with insect herbivores and pollinators in nature, however very little is known about its native pathogen community. We describe a fungal disease outbreak in a native N. attenuata population comprising 873 plants growing in an area of about 1500 m2. The population was divided into 14 subpopulations and disease symptom development in the subpopulations was monitored for 16 days, revealing a waxing and waning of visible disease symptoms with some diseased plants recovering fully. Native fungal N. attenuata pathogens were isolated from diseased plants, characterized genetically, chemotaxonomically and morphologically, revealing several isolates of the ascomycete genera Fusarium and Alternaria, that differed in the type and strength of the disease symptoms they caused in bioassays on either detached leaves or intact soil-grown plants. These isolates and the bioassays will empower the study of N. attenuata-pathogen interactions in a realistic ecological context. PMID:25036191

  3. Digestive Duet: Midgut Digestive Proteinases of Manduca sexta Ingesting Nicotiana attenuata with Manipulated Trypsin Proteinase Inhibitor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Jorge A.; Giri, Ashok P.; Jongsma, Maarten A.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    Background The defensive effect of endogenous trypsin proteinase inhibitors (NaTPIs) on the herbivore Manduca sexta was demonstrated by genetically altering NaTPI production in M. sexta's host plant, Nicotiana attenuata. To understand how this defense works, we studied the effects of NaTPI on M. sexta gut proteinase activity levels in different larval instars of caterpillars feeding freely on untransformed and transformed plants. Methodology/ Principal Findings Second and third instars larvae that fed on NaTPI-producing (WT) genotypes were lighter and had less gut proteinase activity compared to those that fed on genotypes with either little or no NaTPI activity. Unexpectedly, NaTPI activity in vitro assays not only inhibited the trypsin sensitive fraction of gut proteinase activity but also halved the NaTPI-insensitive fraction in third-instar larvae. Unable to degrade NaTPI, larvae apparently lacked the means to adapt to NaTPI in their diet. However, caterpillars recovered at least part of their gut proteinase activity when they were transferred from NaTPI-producing host plants to NaTPI-free host plants. In addition extracts of basal leaves inhibited more gut proteinase activity than did extracts of middle stem leaves with the same protein content. Conclusions/ Significance Although larvae can minimize the effects of high NaTPI levels by feeding on leaves with high protein and low NaTPI activity, the host plant's endogenous NaTPIs remain an effective defense against M. sexta, inhibiting gut proteinase and affecting larval performance. PMID:18431489

  4. Nitrogen Supply Influences Herbivore-Induced Direct and Indirect Defenses and Transcriptional Responses in Nicotiana attenuata[w

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2004-01-01

    Although nitrogen (N) availability is known to alter constitutive resistance against herbivores, its influence on herbivore-induced responses, including signaling pathways, transcriptional signatures, and the subsequently elicited chemical defenses is poorly understood. We used the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, which germinates in the postfire environment and copes with large changes in soil N during postfire succession, to compare a suite of Manduca sexta- and elicitor-induced responses in plants grown under high- and low-N (LN) supply rates. LN supply decreased relative growth rates and biomass by 35% at 40 d compared to high-N plants; furthermore, it also attenuated (by 39 and 60%) the elicitor-induced jasmonate and salicylate bursts, two N-intensive direct defenses (nicotine and trypsin proteinase inhibitors, albeit by different mechanisms), and carbon-containing nonvolatile defenses (rutin, chlorogenic acid, and diterpene glycosides), but did not affect the induced release of volatiles (cis-α-bergamotene and germacrene A), which function as indirect defenses. M. sexta and methyl jasmonate-induced transcriptional responses measured with a microarray enriched in herbivore-induced genes were also substantially reduced in plants grown under LN supply rates. In M. sexta-attacked LN plants, only 36 (45%) up-regulated and 46 (58%) down-regulated genes showed the same regulation as those in attacked high-N plants. However, transcriptional responses frequently directly countered the observed metabolic changes. Changes in a leaf's sensitivity to elicitation, an attacked leaf's waning ability to export oxylipin wound signals, and/or resource limitations in LN plants can account for the observed results, underscoring the conclusion that defense activation is a resource-intensive response. PMID:15133153

  5. Silencing the hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor in two accessions of Nicotiana attenuata alters flower morphology and rates of self-pollination.

    PubMed

    Berger, Beatrice; Baldwin, Ian T

    2009-04-01

    Systemins and their hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide systemin (ppHS) subfamily members are known to mediate antiherbivore defenses in some solanaceous taxa but not others; functions other than in defense remain largely unexplored. Nicotiana attenuata's ppHS is known not to function in herbivore defense. NappHS transcripts are abundant in flowers, particularly in pistils, and when two N. attenuata accessions from Utah and Arizona were transformed to silence NappHS by RNAi (IRsys), seed capsule production and seed number per capsule were reduced in both accessions. These reductions in reproductive performance could not be attributed to impaired pollen or ovule viability; hand-pollination of all IRsys lines of both accessions restored seed production per capsule to levels found in wild-type plants. Rather, changes in flower morphology that decreased the efficiency of self-pollination are likely responsible: IRsys plants of both accessions have flowers with pistils that protrude beyond their anthers. Because these changes in flower morphology are reminiscent of CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE1-silenced N. attenuata plants, we measured jasmonates (JAs) and their biosynthetic transcripts in different floral developmental stages, and found levels of JA-isoleucine (Ile)/leucine and threonine deaminase transcripts, which are abundant in wild-type pistils, to be significantly reduced in IRsys buds and flowers. Threonine deaminase supplies Ile for JA-Ile biosynthesis, and we propose that ppHS mediates JA signaling during flower development and thereby changes flower morphology. These results suggest that the function of ppHS family members in N. attenuata may have diversified to modulate flower morphology and thereby outcrossing rates in response to biotic or abiotic stresses. PMID:19211701

  6. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC): identification of early mediators of insect responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS) of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu) and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min). From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags), 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators associated with this

  7. COI1-Regulated Hydroxylation of Jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine Impairs Nicotiana attenuata's Resistance to the Generalist Herbivore Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ji; Wei, Kun; Wang, Shuanghua; Zhao, Weiye; Ma, Canrong; Hettenhausen, Christian; Wu, Jinsong; Cao, Guoyan; Sun, Guiling; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-13

    The phytohormone jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is well-known as the key signaling molecule that elicits plant defense responses after insect herbivory. Oxidation, which is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450s of the CYP94 family, is thought to be one of the main catabolic pathways of JA-Ile. In this study, we identified four CYP94B3 homologues in the wild tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata. Individually silencing the four homologues revealed that NaCYP94B3 like-1 and NaCYP94B3 like-2, but not NaCYP94B3 like-3 and NaCYP94B3 like-4, are involved in the C-12-hydroxylation of JA-Ile. Simultaneously silencing three of the NaCYP94B3 like genes, NaCYP94B3 like-1, -2, and -4, in the VIGS-NaCYP94B3s plants doubled herbivory-induced JA-Ile levels and greatly enhanced plant resistance to the generalist insect herbivore, Spodoptera litura. The poor larval performance was strongly correlated with the high concentrations of several JA-Ile-dependent direct defense metabolites in VIGS-NaCYP94B3s plants. Furthermore, we show that the abundance of 12-hydroxy-JA-Ile was dependent on JA-Ile levels as well as COI1, the receptor of JA-Ile. COI1 appeared to transcriptionally control NaCYP94B3 like-1 and -2 and thus regulates the catabolism of its own ligand molecule, JA-Ile. These results highlight the important role of JA-Ile degradation in jasmonate homeostasis and provide new insight into the feedback regulation of JA-Ile catabolism. Given that silencing these CYP94 genes did not detectably alter plant growth and highly increased plant defense levels, we propose that CYP94B3 genes can be potential targets for genetic improvement of herbivore-resistant crops. PMID:26985773

  8. The HERBIVORE ELICITOR-REGULATED1 Gene Enhances Abscisic Acid Levels and Defenses against Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata Plants1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants can distinguish the damage caused by herbivore feeding from other types of damage by perceiving herbivore-associated elicitors, such as the fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in oral secretions (OS) of Manduca sexta larvae, which are introduced into wounds during feeding. However, the transduction of FAC signals into downstream plant defense responses is still not well established. We identified a novel FAC-regulated protein in N. attenuata (NaHER1; for herbivore elicitor regulated) and show that it is an indispensable part of the OS signal transduction pathway. N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) were unable to amplify their defenses beyond basal, wound-induced levels in response to OS elicitation. M. sexta larvae performed 2-fold better when reared on irHER1 plants, which released less volatile organic compounds (indirect defense) and had strongly reduced levels of several direct defense metabolites, including trypsin proteinase inhibitors, 17-hydroxygeranyllinallool diterpene glycosides, and caffeoylputrescine, after real and/or simulated herbivore attack. In parallel to impaired jasmonate signaling and metabolism, irHER1 plants were more drought sensitive and showed reduced levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in the leaves, suggesting that silencing of NaHER1 interfered with ABA metabolism. Because treatment of irHER1 plants with ABA results in both the accumulation of significantly more ABA catabolites and the complete restoration of normal wild-type levels of OS-induced defense metabolites, we conclude that NaHER1 acts as a natural suppressor of ABA catabolism after herbivore attack, which, in turn, activates the full defense profile and resistance against herbivores. PMID:23784463

  9. Ectopic Terpene Synthase Expression Enhances Sesquiterpene Emission in Nicotiana attenuata without Altering Defense or Development of Transgenic Plants or Neighbors1[W

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C.; Palmer-Young, Evan C.; Schmidt, Axel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoids, with approximately 5,000 structures, are the most diverse class of plant volatiles with manifold hypothesized functions in defense, stress tolerance, and signaling between and within plants. These hypotheses have often been tested by transforming plants with sesquiterpene synthases expressed behind the constitutively active 35S promoter, which may have physiological costs measured as inhibited growth and reduced reproduction or may require augmentation of substrate pools to achieve enhanced emission, complicating the interpretation of data from affected transgenic lines. Here, we expressed maize (Zea mays) terpene synthase10 (ZmTPS10), which produces (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene, or a point mutant ZmTPS10M, which produces primarily (E)-β-farnesene, under control of the 35S promoter in the ecological model plant Nicotiana attenuata. Transgenic N. attenuata plants had specifically enhanced emission of target sesquiterpene(s) with no changes detected in their emission of any other volatiles. Treatment with herbivore or jasmonate elicitors induces emission of (E)-α-bergamotene in wild-type plants and also tended to increase emission of (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene in transgenics. However, transgenics did not differ from the wild type in defense signaling or chemistry and did not alter defense chemistry in neighboring wild-type plants. These data are inconsistent with within-plant and between-plant signaling functions of (E)-β-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene in N. attenuata. Ectopic sesquiterpene emission was apparently not costly for transgenics, which were similar to wild-type plants in their growth and reproduction, even when forced to compete for common resources. These transgenics would be well suited for field experiments to investigate indirect ecological effects of sesquiterpenes for a wild plant in its native habitat. PMID:25187528

  10. Silencing Threonine Deaminase and JAR4 in Nicotiana attenuata Impairs Jasmonic Acid–Isoleucine–Mediated Defenses against Manduca sexta[W

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin-Ho; Wang, Lei; Giri, Ashok; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    Threonine deaminase (TD) catalyzes the conversion of Thr to α-keto butyrate in Ile biosynthesis; however, its dramatic upregulation in leaves after herbivore attack suggests a role in defense. In Nicotiana attenuata, strongly silenced TD transgenic plants were stunted, whereas mildly silenced TD transgenic plants had normal growth but were highly susceptible to Manduca sexta attack. The herbivore susceptibility was associated with the reduced levels of jasmonic acid–isoleucine (JA-Ile), trypsin proteinase inhibitors, and nicotine. Adding [13C4]Thr to wounds treated with oral secretions revealed that TD supplies Ile for JA-Ile synthesis. Applying Ile or JA-Ile to the wounds of TD-silenced plants restored herbivore resistance. Silencing JASMONATE-RESISTANT4 (JAR4), the N. attenuata homolog of the JA-Ile–conjugating enzyme JAR1, by virus-induced gene silencing confirmed that JA-Ile plays important roles in activating plant defenses. TD may also function in the insect gut as an antinutritive defense protein, decreasing the availability of Thr, because continuous supplementation of TD-silenced plants with large amounts (2 mmol) of Thr, but not Ile, increased M. sexta growth. However, the fact that the herbivore resistance of both TD- and JAR-silenced plants was completely restored by signal quantities (0.6 μmol) of JA-Ile treatment suggests that TD's defensive role can be attributed more to signaling than to antinutritive defense. PMID:17085687

  11. Jasmonoyl-l-Isoleucine Coordinates Metabolic Networks Required for Anthesis and Floral Attractant Emission in Wild Tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata)[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stitz, Michael; Hartl, Markus; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives (jasmonates [JAs]) play central roles in floral development and maturation. The binding of jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the F-box of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) is required for many JA-dependent physiological responses, but its role in anthesis and pollinator attraction traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we used the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, which develops sympetalous flowers with complex pollination biology, to examine the coordinating function of JA homeostasis in the distinct metabolic processes that underlie flower maturation, opening, and advertisement to pollinators. From combined transcriptomic, targeted metabolic, and allometric analyses of transgenic N. attenuata plants for which signaling deficiencies were complemented with methyl jasmonate, JA-Ile, and its functional homolog, coronatine (COR), we demonstrate that (1) JA-Ile/COR-based signaling regulates corolla limb opening and a JA-negative feedback loop; (2) production of floral volatiles (night emissions of benzylacetone) and nectar requires JA-Ile/COR perception through COI1; and (3) limb expansion involves JA-Ile-induced changes in limb fresh mass and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate a master regulatory function of the JA-Ile/COI1 duet for the main function of a sympetalous corolla, that of advertising for and rewarding pollinator services. Flower opening, by contrast, requires JA-Ile signaling-dependent changes in primary metabolism, which are not compromised in the COI1-silenced RNA interference line used in this study. PMID:25326292

  12. Up in smoke: I. Smoke-derived germination cues for postfire annual,Nicotiana attenuata torr. Ex. Watson.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Staszak-Kozinski, L; Davidson, R

    1994-09-01

    Some postfire annuals with dormant seeds use heat or chemical cues from charred wood to synchronize their germination with the postfire environment. We report that wood smoke and polar extracts of wood smoke, but not the ash of burned wood, contain potent cue(s) that stimulate germination in the postfire annual plant,Nicotiana attenuata. We examined the responses of seeds from six populations of plants from southwest Utah to extracts of smoke and found the proportion of viable seeds that germinated in the presence of smoke cues to vary between populations but to be consistent between generations. With the most dormant genotypes, we examine three mechanisms by which smoke-derived chemical cues may stimulate germination (chemical scarification of the seed coat and nutritive- and signal-mediated stimulation of germination) and report that the response is consistent with the signal-mediated mechanism. The germination cue(s) found in smoke are produced by the burning of hay, hardwood branches, leaves, and, to a lesser degree, cellulose. Moreover, the cues are found in the common food condiment, "liquid smoke," and we find no significant differences between brands. With a bioassay-driven fractionation of liquid smoke, we identified 71 compounds in active fractions by GC-MS and AA spectrometry. However, when these compounds were tested in pure form or in combinations that mimicked the composition of active fractions over a range of concentrations, they failed to stimulate germination to the same degree that smoke fractions did. Moreover, enzymatic oxidation of some of these compounds also failed to stimulate germination. In addition, we tested 43 additional compounds also reported from smoke, 85 compounds that were structurally similar to those reported from smoke and 34 compounds reported to influence germination in other species. Of the 233 compounds tested, 16 proved to inhibit germination at the concentrations tested, and none reproduced the activity of wood smoke. By

  13. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis

    PubMed Central

    Groten, Karin; Pahari, Nabin T.; Xu, Shuqing; Miloradovic van Doorn, Maja; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata) after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis) by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE) combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35%) matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4%) matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p<0.05, >2-fold change) after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that large

  14. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Groten, Karin; Pahari, Nabin T; Xu, Shuqing; Miloradovic van Doorn, Maja; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata) after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis) by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE) combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35%) matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4%) matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p<0.05, >2-fold change) after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that large

  15. Up in smoke: II. Germination ofNicotiana attenuata in response to smoke-derived cues and nutrients in burned and unburned soils.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Morse, L

    1994-09-01

    Nicotiana attenuata is a native tobacco that is commonly found usually one growing season after fires in the blackbrush, sagebrush and pinyon-juniper forests of the Great Basin desert of North America. This plant also occurs in isolated dry washes and roadsides for many consecutive seasons. Postfire annuals are thought to synchronize their germination from the seed bank with the postfire environment in response to increases in (1) fire-related cues or (2) nutrient supply rates resulting from the mineralization of nutrients by fire, or (3) the removal of allelochemicals produced by the dominant vegetation occupying the sites before the burn or the microbial community associated with the dominant vegetation. We examine the effect of these three changes on the germination ofN. attenuata seed from artificial seed banks made with burned and unburned soil taken in 1993 from under four dominant shrub species (Coleogyne ramosissima, Yucca baccata, Lycium andersonnii, Purshia tridentata) of an area that burned in 1992 and from two dry washes in whichN. attenuata populations have persisted since at least 1988. We utilize our recent discovery that aqueous extracts of wood smoke contain potent germination cue(s) for this species and the established observation that nitrate stimulates germination in manyNicotiana species. In two experiments, we added smoke-derived germination cues and nutrients separately and in combinations to the artificial seed banks, measured germination rates, and inferred the effect of burning by the response of the seed banks to these additions. Germination rates of seed in burned soil were consistently higher than those in unburned soil collected from under all species tested; concentrations of nitrate, P, Mn, and Ca were also higher in burned than unburned soils. Because the addition of more cue and nitrate to burned soil increased germination rates, these soil components may not be at concentrations sufficient to saturate the germination response one

  16. Jasmonate and ppHsystemin Regulate Key Malonylation Steps in the Biosynthesis of 17-Hydroxygeranyllinalool Diterpene Glycosides, an Abundant and Effective Direct Defense against Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata[W

    PubMed Central

    Heiling, Sven; Schuman, Meredith C.; Schoettner, Matthias; Mukerjee, Purba; Berger, Beatrice; Schneider, Bernd; Jassbi, Amir R.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2010-01-01

    We identified 11 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides (HGL-DTGs) that occur in concentrations equivalent to starch (mg/g fresh mass) in aboveground tissues of coyote tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) and differ in their sugar moieties and malonyl sugar esters (0-2). Concentrations of HGL-DTGs, particularly malonylated compounds, are highest in young and reproductive tissues. Within a tissue, herbivore elicitation changes concentrations and biosynthetic kinetics of individual compounds. Using stably transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in jasmonate production and perception, or production of N. attenuata Hyp-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor by RNA interference, we identified malonylation as the key biosynthetic step regulated by herbivory and jasmonate signaling. We stably silenced N. attenuata geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (ggpps) to reduce precursors for the HGL-DTG skeleton, resulting in reduced total HGL-DTGs and greater vulnerability to native herbivores in the field. Larvae of the specialist tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) grew up to 10 times as large on ggpps silenced plants, and silenced plants suffered significantly more damage from herbivores in N. attenuata's native habitat than did wild-type plants. We propose that high concentrations of HGL-DTGs effectively defend valuable tissues against herbivores and that malonylation may play an important role in regulating the distribution and storage of HGL-DTGs in plants. PMID:20081114

  17. Two mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases, MKK1 and MEK2, are involved in wounding- and specialist lepidopteran herbivore Manduca sexta-induced responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Maria; Baldwin, Ian T.; Wu, Jianqiang

    2011-01-01

    In a wild tobacco plant, Nicotiana attenuata, two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), play central roles in modulating herbivory-induced phytohormone and anti-herbivore secondary metabolites. However, the identities of their upstream MAPK kinases (MAPKKs) were elusive. Ectopic overexpression studies in N. benthamiana and N. tabacum suggested that two MAPKKs, MKK1 and MEK2, may activate SIPK and WIPK. The homologues of MKK1 and MEK2 were cloned in N. attenuata (NaMKK1 and NaMEK2) and a virus-induced gene silencing approach was used to knock-down the transcript levels of these MAPKK genes. Plants silenced in NaMKK1 and NaMEK2 were treated with wounding or simulated herbivory by applying the oral secretions of the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta to wounds. MAPK activity assay indicated that after wounding or simulated herbivory NaMKK1 is not required for the phosphorylation of NaSIPK and NaWIPK; in contrast, NaMEK2 and other unknown MAPKKs are important for simulated herbivory-elicited activation of NaSIPK and NaWIPK, and after wounding NaMEK2 probably does not activate NaWIPK but plays a minor role in activating NaSIPK. Consistently, NaMEK2 and certain other MAPKKs, but not NaMKK1, are needed for wounding- and simulated herbivory-elicited accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA), JA–isoleucine, and ethylene. Furthermore, both NaMEK2 and NaMKK1 regulate the levels of trypsin proteinase inhibitors. The findings underscore the complexity of MAPK signalling pathways and highlight the importance of MAPKKs in regulating wounding- and herbivory-induced responses. PMID:21610019

  18. Deciphering Herbivory-Induced Gene-to-Metabolite Dynamics in Nicotiana attenuata Tissues Using a Multifactorial Approach1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Jyotasana; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    In response to biotic stresses, such as herbivore attack, plants reorganize their transcriptomes and reconfigure their physiologies not only in attacked tissues but throughout the plant. These whole-organismic reconfigurations are coordinated by a poorly understood network of signal transduction cascades. To explore tissue-based interdependencies in the resistance of Nicotiana attenuata to insect attack, we conducted time-series transcriptome and metabolome profiling of herbivory-elicited source leaves and unelicited sink leaves and roots. To probe the multidimensionality of these molecular responses, we designed a novel approach of combining an extended self-organizing maps-based dimensionality reduction method with bootstrap-based nonparametric analysis of variance models to identify the onset and context of signaling and metabolic pathway activations. We illustrate the value of this analysis by revisiting dynamic changes in the expression of regulatory and structural genes of the oxylipin pathway and by studying nonlinearities in gene-metabolite associations involved in the acyclic diterpene glucoside pathway after selectively extracting modules based on their dynamic response patterns. This novel dimensionality reduction approach is broadly applicable to capture the dynamic rewiring of gene and metabolite networks in experimental design with multiple factors. PMID:23656894

  19. NaJAZh Regulates a Subset of Defense Responses against Herbivores and Spontaneous Leaf Necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata Plants[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:22496510

  20. The Sesquiterpenes(E)-ß-Farnesene and (E)-α-Bergamotene Quench Ozone but Fail to Protect the Wild Tobacco Nicotiana attenuata from Ozone, UVB, and Drought Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Palmer-Young, Evan C.; Veit, Daniel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schuman, Meredith C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the terpenes, isoprene (C5) and monoterpene hydrocarbons (C10) have been shown to ameliorate abiotic stress in a number of plant species via two proposed mechanisms: membrane stabilization and direct antioxidant effects. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (C15) not only share the structural properties thought to lend protective qualities to isoprene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, but also react rapidly with ozone, suggesting that sesquiterpenes may similarly enhance tolerance of abiotic stresses. To test whether sesquiterpenes protect plants against ozone, UVB light, or drought, we used transgenic lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. The transgenic plants expressed a maize terpene synthase gene (ZmTPS10) which produced a blend of (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, or a point mutant of the same gene (ZmTPS10M) which produced (E)-ß-farnesene alone,. (E)-ß-farnesene exerted a local, external, and transient ozone-quenching effect in ozone-fumigated chambers, but we found no evidence that enhanced sesquiterpene production by the plant inhibited oxidative damage, or maintained photosynthetic function or plant fitness under acute or chronic stress. Although the sesquiterpenes (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene might confer benefits under intermittent heat stress, which was not tested, any roles in relieving abiotic stress may be secondary to their previously demonstrated functions in biotic interactions. PMID:26030663

  1. The Sesquiterpenes(E)-ß-Farnesene and (E)-α-Bergamotene Quench Ozone but Fail to Protect the Wild Tobacco Nicotiana attenuata from Ozone, UVB, and Drought Stresses.

    PubMed

    Palmer-Young, Evan C; Veit, Daniel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schuman, Meredith C

    2015-01-01

    Among the terpenes, isoprene (C5) and monoterpene hydrocarbons (C10) have been shown to ameliorate abiotic stress in a number of plant species via two proposed mechanisms: membrane stabilization and direct antioxidant effects. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (C15) not only share the structural properties thought to lend protective qualities to isoprene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, but also react rapidly with ozone, suggesting that sesquiterpenes may similarly enhance tolerance of abiotic stresses. To test whether sesquiterpenes protect plants against ozone, UVB light, or drought, we used transgenic lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. The transgenic plants expressed a maize terpene synthase gene (ZmTPS10) which produced a blend of (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, or a point mutant of the same gene (ZmTPS10M) which produced (E)-ß-farnesene alone,. (E)-ß-farnesene exerted a local, external, and transient ozone-quenching effect in ozone-fumigated chambers, but we found no evidence that enhanced sesquiterpene production by the plant inhibited oxidative damage, or maintained photosynthetic function or plant fitness under acute or chronic stress. Although the sesquiterpenes (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene might confer benefits under intermittent heat stress, which was not tested, any roles in relieving abiotic stress may be secondary to their previously demonstrated functions in biotic interactions. PMID:26030663

  2. Herbivory-induced volatiles function as defenses increasing fitness of the native plant Nicotiana attenuata in nature

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C; Barthel, Kathleen; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-01-01

    From an herbivore's first bite, plants release herbivory-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) which can attract enemies of herbivores. However, other animals and competing plants can intercept HIPVs for their own use, and it remains unclear whether HIPVs serve as an indirect defense by increasing fitness for the emitting plant. In a 2-year field study, HIPV-emitting N. attenuata plants produced twice as many buds and flowers as HIPV-silenced plants, but only when native Geocoris spp. predators reduced herbivore loads (by 50%) on HIPV-emitters. In concert with HIPVs, plants also employ antidigestive trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs), but TPI-producing plants were not fitter than TPI-silenced plants. TPIs weakened a specialist herbivore's behavioral evasive responses to simulated Geocoris spp. attack, indicating that TPIs function against specialists by enhancing indirect defense. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00007.001 PMID:23066503

  3. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. VII. Changes in the plant's proteome.

    PubMed

    Giri, Ashok P; Wünsche, Hendrik; Mitra, Sirsha; Zavala, Jorge A; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales; Baldwin, Ian T

    2006-12-01

    When Manduca sexta attacks Nicotiana attenuata, fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the larvae's oral secretions (OS) are introduced into feeding wounds. These FACs trigger a transcriptional response that is similar to the response induced by insect damage. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the proteins in phenolic extracts and in a nuclear fraction of leaves elicited by larval attack, and/or in leaves wounded and treated with OS, FAC-free OS, and synthetic FACs. Phenolic extracts yielded approximately 600 protein spots, many of which were altered by elicitation, whereas nuclear protein fractions yielded approximately 100 spots, most of which were unchanged by elicitation. Reproducible elicitor-induced changes in 90 spots were characterized. In general, proteins that increased were involved in primary metabolism, defense, and transcriptional and translational regulation; those that decreased were involved in photosynthesis. Like the transcriptional defense responses, proteomic changes were strongly elicited by the FACs in OS. A semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR approach based on peptide sequences was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation patterns for 17 candidate proteins. In six cases the patterns of elicited transcript accumulation were consistent with those of elicited protein accumulation. Functional analysis of one of the identified proteins involved in photosynthesis, RuBPCase activase, was accomplished by virus-induced gene silencing. Plants with decreased levels of RuBPCase activase protein had reduced photosynthetic rates and RuBPCase activity, and less biomass, responses consistent with those of herbivore-attacked plants. We conclude that the response of the plant's proteome to herbivore elicitation is complex, and integrated transcriptome-proteome-metabolome analysis is required to fully

  4. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  5. The post-pollination ethylene burst and the continuation of floral advertisement are harbingers of non-random mate selection in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Samik; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    The self-compatible plant Nicotiana attenuata grows in genetically diverse populations after fires, and produces flowers that remain open for 3 days and are visited by assorted pollinators. To determine whether and when post-pollination non-random mate selection occurs among self and non-self pollen, seed paternity and semi-in vivo pollen tube growth were determined in controlled single/mixed pollinations. Despite all pollen sources being equally proficient in siring seeds in single-genotype pollinations, self pollen was consistently selected in mixed pollinations, irrespective of maternal genotype. However, clear patterns of mate discrimination occurred amongst non-self pollen when mixed pollinations were performed soon after corollas open, including selection against hygromycin B resistance (transformation selectable marker) in wild-type styles and for it in transformed styles. However, mate choice among pollen genotypes was completely shut down in plants transformed to be unable to produce (irACO) or perceive (ETR1) ethylene. The post-pollination ethylene burst, which originates primarily from the stigma and upper style, was strongly correlated with mate selection in single and mixed hand-pollinations using eight pollen donors in two maternal ecotypes. The post-pollination ethylene burst was also negatively correlated with the continuation of emission of benzylacetone, the most abundant pollinator-attracting corolla-derived floral volatile. We conclude that ethylene signaling plays a pivotal role in mate choice, and the post-pollination ethylene burst and the termination of benzylacetone release are accurate predictors, both qualitatively and quantitatively, of pre-zygotic mate selection and seed paternity. PMID:22458597

  6. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata. VII. Changes in the Plant's Proteome1[W

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ashok P.; Wünsche, Hendrik; Mitra, Sirsha; Zavala, Jorge A.; Muck, Alexander; Svatoš, Aleš; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    When Manduca sexta attacks Nicotiana attenuata, fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the larvae's oral secretions (OS) are introduced into feeding wounds. These FACs trigger a transcriptional response that is similar to the response induced by insect damage. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the proteins in phenolic extracts and in a nuclear fraction of leaves elicited by larval attack, and/or in leaves wounded and treated with OS, FAC-free OS, and synthetic FACs. Phenolic extracts yielded approximately 600 protein spots, many of which were altered by elicitation, whereas nuclear protein fractions yielded approximately 100 spots, most of which were unchanged by elicitation. Reproducible elicitor-induced changes in 90 spots were characterized. In general, proteins that increased were involved in primary metabolism, defense, and transcriptional and translational regulation; those that decreased were involved in photosynthesis. Like the transcriptional defense responses, proteomic changes were strongly elicited by the FACs in OS. A semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR approach based on peptide sequences was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation patterns for 17 candidate proteins. In six cases the patterns of elicited transcript accumulation were consistent with those of elicited protein accumulation. Functional analysis of one of the identified proteins involved in photosynthesis, RuBPCase activase, was accomplished by virus-induced gene silencing. Plants with decreased levels of RuBPCase activase protein had reduced photosynthetic rates and RuBPCase activity, and less biomass, responses consistent with those of herbivore-attacked plants. We conclude that the response of the plant's proteome to herbivore elicitation is complex, and integrated transcriptome-proteome-metabolome analysis is required to fully

  7. Nicotiana attenuata MPK4 suppresses a novel JA signaling-independent defense pathway against the specialist insect Manduca sexta but is not required for the resistance to the generalist Spodoptera littoralis

    PubMed Central

    Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T.; Wu, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    Summary How plants tailor their defense responses to attack from different insects remains largely unknown. Here we studied the role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), MPK4, in the resistance of a wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata to two herbivores, the specialist Manduca sexta and the generalist Spodoptera littoralis. Stably transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in MPK4 (irMPK4) were generated and characterized for traits important for defense against herbivores. Only the oral secretions (OS) from M. sexta, but not the OS from S. littoralis or mechanical wounding, induced elevated levels of jasmonic acid (JA) in irMPK4 plants compared to the wild-type plants. Moreover, silencing MPK4 highly increased the resistance of N. attenuata to M. sexta in a fashion that was independent of COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1)-mediated JA signaling. Untargeted metabolomic screening identified several new MPK4-dependent putative defensive compounds against M. sexta. In contrast, silencing MPK4 did not affect the growth of the generalist insect S. littoralis, and we propose that this was due to the very low levels of fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in S. littoralis OS. Thus, MPK4 is likely to be a key signaling element that enables plants to tailor defense responses to different attackers. PMID:23672856

  8. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (lepidoptera, sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. VI. Microarray analysis reveals that most herbivore-specific transcriptional changes are mediated by fatty acid-amino acid conjugates.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, Rayko; Gase, Klaus; Hui, Dequan; Schmidt, Dominik D; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that insect-specific plant responses are mediated by constituents in the oral secretions and regurgitants (R) of herbivores, however the relative importance of the different potentially active constituents remains unclear. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) are found in the R of many insect herbivores and have been shown to be necessary and sufficient to elicit a set of herbivore-specific responses when the native tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata is attacked by the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Attack by this specialist herbivore results in a large transcriptional reorganization in N. attenuata, and 161 genes have been cloned from previous cDNA differential display-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization with magnetic beads analysis. cDNAs of these genes, in addition to those of 73 new R-responsive genes identified by cDNA-amplified fragment-length polymorphism display of R-elicited plants, were spotted on polyepoxide coated glass slides to create microarrays highly enriched in Manduca spp.- and R-induced genes. With these microarrays, we compare transcriptional responses in N. attenuata treated with R from the two most damaging lepidopteran herbivores of this plant in nature, M. sexta and Manduca quinquemaculata, which have very similar FAC compositions in their R, and with the two most abundant FACs in Manduca spp. R. More than 68% of the genes up- and down-regulated by M. sexta R were similarly regulated by M. quinquemaculata R. A majority of genes up-regulated (64%) and down-regulated (49%) by M. sexta R were similarly regulated by treatment with the two FACs. In contrast, few genes showed similar transcriptional changes after H(2)O(2)- and R-treatment. These results demonstrate that the two most abundant FACs in Manduca spp. R can account for the majority of Manduca spp.-induced alterations of the wound response of N. attenuata. PMID:12692348

  9. R2R3-NaMYB8 Regulates the Accumulation of Phenylpropanoid-Polyamine Conjugates, Which Are Essential for Local and Systemic Defense against Insect Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schöttner, Mathias; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Although phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates (PPCs) occur ubiquitously in plants, their biological roles remain largely unexplored. The two major PPCs of Nicotiana attenuata plants, caffeoylputrescine (CP) and dicaffeoylspermidine, increase dramatically in local and systemic tissues after herbivore attack and simulations thereof. We identified NaMYB8, a homolog of NtMYBJS1, which in BY-2 cells regulates PPC biosynthesis, and silenced its expression by RNA interference in N. attenuata (ir-MYB8), to understand the ecological role(s) of PPCs. The regulatory role of NaMYB8 in PPC biosynthesis was validated by a microarray analysis, which revealed that transcripts of several key biosynthetic genes in shikimate and polyamine metabolism accumulated in a NaMYB8-dependent manner. Wild-type N. attenuata plants typically contain high levels of PPCs in their reproductive tissues; however, NaMYB8-silenced plants that completely lacked CP and dicaffeoylspermidine showed no changes in reproductive parameters of the plants. In contrast, a defensive role for PPCs was clear; both specialist (Manduca sexta) and generalist (Spodoptera littoralis) caterpillars feeding on systemically preinduced young stem leaves performed significantly better on ir-MYB8 plants lacking PPCs compared with wild-type plants expressing high levels of PPCs. Moreover, the growth of M. sexta caterpillars was significantly reduced when neonates were fed ir-MYB8 leaves sprayed with synthetic CP, corroborating the role of PPCs as direct plant defense. The spatiotemporal accumulation and function of PPCs in N. attenuata are consistent with the predictions of the optimal defense theory: plants preferentially protect their most fitness-enhancing and vulnerable parts, young tissues and reproductive organs, to maximize their fitness. PMID:20089770

  10. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. IV. Insect-Induced ethylene reduces jasmonate-induced nicotine accumulation by regulating putrescine N-methyltransferase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Winz, R A; Baldwin, I T

    2001-04-01

    Attack by the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta, on its native host Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats. produces a dramatic ethylene release, a jasmonate burst, and a suppression of the nicotine accumulation that results from careful simulations of the herbivore's damage. Methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) treatment induces nicotine biosynthesis. However, this induction can be suppressed by ethylene as pretreatment of plants with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene receptors, restores the full MeJA-induced nicotine response in herbivore attacked plants (J. Kahl, D.H. Siemens, R.J. Aerts, R. Gäbler, F. Kühnemann, C.A. Preston, I.T. Baldwin [2000] Planta 210: 336-342). To understand whether this herbivore-induced signal cross-talk occurs at the level of transcript accumulation, we cloned the putrescine methyltransferase genes (NaPMT1 and NaPMT2) of N. attenuata, which are thought to represent the rate limiting step in nicotine biosynthesis, and measured transcript accumulations by northern analysis after various jasmonate, 1-MCP, ethephon, and herbivory treatments. Transcripts of both root putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) genes and nicotine accumulation increased dramatically within 10 h of shoot MeJA treatment and immediately after root treatments. Root ethephon treatments suppressed this response, which could be reversed by 1-MCP pretreatment. Moreover, 1-MCP pretreatment dramatically amplified the transcript accumulation resulting from both wounding and M. sexta herbivory. We conclude that attack from this nicotine-tolerant specialist insect causes N. attenuata to produce ethylene, which directly suppresses the nitrogen-intensive biosynthesis of nicotine. PMID:11299398

  11. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. I. Large-scale changes in the accumulation of growth- and defense-related plant mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hermsmeier, D; Schittko, U; Baldwin, I T

    2001-02-01

    Plants respond to herbivore attack with a dramatic functional reorganization that involves the activation of direct and indirect defenses and tolerance, which in turn make large demands on primary metabolism. Here we provide the first characterization of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs after insect attack in a model plant-herbivore system: Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats.-Manduca sexta. We used mRNA differential display to characterize one-twentieth of the insect-responsive transcriptome of N. attenuata and verified differential expression for 27 cDNAs. Northern analyses were used to study the effects of folivory and exposure to airborne methyl jasmonate and for kinetic analyses throughout a 16-h- light/8-h-dark cycle. Sequence similarity searches allowed putative functions to be assigned to 15 transcripts. Genes were related to photosynthesis, electron transport, cytoskeleton, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, signaling, and a group responding to stress, wounding, or invasion of pathogens. Overall, transcripts involved in photosynthesis were strongly down-regulated, whereas those responding to stress, wounding, and pathogens and involved in shifting carbon and nitrogen to defense were strongly up-regulated. The majority of transcripts responded similarly to airborne methyl jasmonate and folivory, and had tissue- and diurnal-specific patterns of expression. Transcripts encoding Thr deaminase (TD) and a putative retrotransposon were absent in control plants, but were strongly induced after herbivory. Full-length sequences were obtained for TD and the pathogen-inducible alpha-dioxygenase, PIOX. Effects of abiotic and biotic stimuli were investigated for transcripts encoding TD, importin alpha, PIOX, and a GAL83-like kinase cofactor. PMID:11161026

  12. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. III. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates in herbivore oral secretions are necessary and sufficient for herbivore-specific plant responses.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, R; Schittko, U; Pohnert, G; Boland, W; Baldwin, I T

    2001-02-01

    Feeding by the tobacco specialist Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and application of larval oral secretions and regurgitant (R) to mechanical wounds are known to elicit: (a) a systemic release of mono- and sesquiterpenes, (b) a jasmonate burst, and (c) R-specific changes in transcript accumulation of putatively growth- and defense-related mRNAs in Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats. We identified several fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the R of M. sexta and the closely related species Manduca quinquemaculata which, when synthesized and applied to mechanical wounds at concentrations comparable with those found in R, elicited all three R-specific responses. Ion-exchange treatment of R, which removed all detectable FACs and free fatty acids (FAs), also removed all detectable activity. The biological activity of ion-exchanged R could be completely restored by the addition of synthetic FACs at R-equivalent concentrations, whereas the addition of FAs did not restore the biological activity of R. We conclude that the biological activity of R is not related to the supply of FAs to the octadecanoid cascade for endogenous jasmonate biosynthesis, but that FACs elicit the herbivore-specific responses by another mechanism and that the insect-produced modification of plant-derived FAs is necessary for the plant's recognition of this specialized herbivore. PMID:11161028

  13. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (lepidoptera, sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata: V. microarray analysis and further characterization of large-scale changes in herbivore-induced mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hui, Dequan; Iqbal, Javeed; Lehmann, Katja; Gase, Klaus; Saluz, Hans Peter; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-04-01

    We extend our analysis of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs when the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is attacked by Manduca sexta larvae by cloning 115 transcripts by mRNA differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization using magnetic beads (SHMB) from the M. sexta-responsive transcriptome. These transcripts were spotted as cDNA with eight others, previously confirmed to be differentially regulated by northern analysis on glass slide microarrays, and hybridized with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes derived from plants after 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of continuous attack. Microarray analysis proved to be a powerful means of verifying differential expression; 73 of the cloned genes (63%) were differentially regulated (in equal proportions from differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and SHMB procedures), and of these, 24 (32%) had similarity to known genes or putative proteins (more from SHMB). The analysis provided insights into the signaling and transcriptional basis of direct and indirect defenses used against herbivores, suggesting simultaneous activation of salicylic acid-, ethylene-, cytokinin-, WRKY-, MYB-, and oxylipin-signaling pathways and implicating terpenoid-, pathogen-, and cell wall-related transcripts in defense responses. These defense responses require resources that could be made available by decreases in four photosynthetic-related transcripts, increases in transcripts associated with protein and nucleotide turnover, and increases in transcripts associated with carbohydrate metabolism. This putative up-regulation of defense-associated and down-regulation of growth-associated transcripts occur against a backdrop of altered transcripts for RNA-binding proteins, putative ATP/ADP translocators, chaperonins, histones, and water channel proteins, responses consistent with a major metabolic reconfiguration that underscores the complexity of response to herbivore attack

  14. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. II. Accumulation of plant mRNAs in response to insect-derived cues.

    PubMed

    Schittko, U; Hermsmeier, D; Baldwin, I T

    2001-02-01

    The transcriptional changes in Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats. elicited by attack from Manduca sexta larvae were previously characterized by mRNA differential display (D. Hermsmeier, U. Schittko, I.T. Baldwin [2001] Plant Physiol 125: 683-700). Because herbivore attack causes wounding, we disentangled wound-induced changes from those elicited by M. sexta oral secretions and regurgitant (R) with a northern analysis of a subset of the differentially expressed transcripts encoding threonine deaminase, pathogen-induced oxygenase, a photosystem II light-harvesting protein, a retrotransposon homolog, and three unknown genes. R extensively modified wound-induced responses by suppressing wound-induced transcripts (type I) or amplifying the wound-induced response (type II) further down-regulating wound-suppressed transcripts (type IIa) or up-regulating wound-induced transcripts (type IIb). It is interesting that although all seven genes displayed their R-specific patterns in the treated tissues largely independently of the leaf or plant developmental stage, only the type I genes displayed strong systemic induction. Ethylene was not responsible for any of the specific patterns of expression. R collected from different tobacco feeding insects, M. sexta, Manduca quinquemaculata, and Heliothis virescens, as well as from different instars of M. sexta were equally active. The active components of M. sexta R were heat stable and active in minute amounts, comparable with real transfer rates during larval feeding. Specific expression patterns may indicate that the plant is adjusting its wound response to efficiently fend off M. sexta, but may also be advantageous to the larvae, especially when R suppress wound-induced plant responses. PMID:11161027

  15. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) mediates the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and ethylene induced by feeding of the insect herbivore Manduca sexta and is important for jasmonate-elicited responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Wünsche, Hendrik; Baldwin, Ian T.; Wu, Jianqiang

    2011-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) reduces the nitric oxide (NO) adduct S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an essential reservoir for NO bioactivity. In plants, GSNOR has been found to be important in resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens, but whether it is also involved in plant–herbivore interactions was not known. Using a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, the activity of GSNOR in a wild tobacco species, Nicotiana attenuata, was knocked down and the function of GSNOR in defence against the insect herbivore Manduca sexta was examined. Silencing GSNOR decreased the herbivory-induced accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene, two important phytohormones regulating plant defence levels, without compromising the activity of two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK). Decreased activity of trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) were detected in GSNOR-silenced plants after simulated M. sexta feeding and bioassays indicated that GSNOR-silenced plants have elevated susceptibility to M. sexta attack. Furthermore, GSNOR is required for methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced accumulation of defence-related secondary metabolites (TPI, caffeoylputrescine, and diterpene glycosides) but is not needed for the transcriptional regulation of JAZ3 (jasmonate ZIM-domain 3) and TD (threonine deaminase), indicating that GSNOR mediates certain but not all jasmonate-inducible responses. This work highlights the important role of GSNOR in plant resistance to herbivory and jasmonate signalling and suggests the potential involvement of NO in plant–herbivore interactions. Our data also suggest that GSNOR could be a target of genetic modification for improving crop resistance to herbivores. PMID:21622839

  16. RuBPCase activase mediates growth-defense tradeoffs: Silencing RCA redirects JA flux from JA-Ile to MeJA to attenuate induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sirsha; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary RuBPCase activase (RCA), an abundant photosynthetic protein is strongly down-regulated in response to Manduca sexta’s oral secretion (OS) in Nicotiana attenuata. RCA-silenced plants are impaired not only in photosynthetic capacity and growth, but also in jasmonic acid (JA)-isoleucine (Ile) signaling, and herbivore resistance mediated by JA-Ile dependent defense traits. These responses are consistent with a resource-based growth-defense trade-off. Since JA+Ile-supplementation of OS restored WT levels of JA-Ile, defenses and resistance to M. sexta, but OS supplemented individually with JA- or Ile did not, the JA-Ile deficiency of RCA-silenced plants could not be attributed to lower JA or Ile pools or JAR4/6 conjugating activity. Similar levels of JA-Ile derivatives after OS elicitation indicated unaltered JA-Ile turnover and lower levels of other JA-conjugates ruled out competition from other conjugation reactions. RCA-silenced plants accumulated more methyl jasmonate (MeJA) after OS elicitation, which corresponded with increased jasmonate methyltransferase (JMT) activity. RCA-silencing phenocopies JMT over-expression, wherein elevated JMT activity redirects OS-elicited JA flux towards inactive MeJA, creating a JA sink which depletes JA-Ile and its associated defense responses. Hence RCA plays an additional non-photosynthetic role in attenuating JA-mediated defenses and their associated costs potentially allowing plants to anticipate resource-based constraints on growth before they actually occur. PMID:24491116

  17. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata: V. Microarray Analysis and Further Characterization of Large-Scale Changes in Herbivore-Induced mRNAs1

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dequan; Iqbal, Javeed; Lehmann, Katja; Gase, Klaus; Saluz, Hans Peter; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2003-01-01

    We extend our analysis of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs when the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is attacked by Manduca sexta larvae by cloning 115 transcripts by mRNA differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization using magnetic beads (SHMB) from the M. sexta-responsive transcriptome. These transcripts were spotted as cDNA with eight others, previously confirmed to be differentially regulated by northern analysis on glass slide microarrays, and hybridized with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes derived from plants after 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of continuous attack. Microarray analysis proved to be a powerful means of verifying differential expression; 73 of the cloned genes (63%) were differentially regulated (in equal proportions from differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and SHMB procedures), and of these, 24 (32%) had similarity to known genes or putative proteins (more from SHMB). The analysis provided insights into the signaling and transcriptional basis of direct and indirect defenses used against herbivores, suggesting simultaneous activation of salicylic acid-, ethylene-, cytokinin-, WRKY-, MYB-, and oxylipin-signaling pathways and implicating terpenoid-, pathogen-, and cell wall-related transcripts in defense responses. These defense responses require resources that could be made available by decreases in four photosynthetic-related transcripts, increases in transcripts associated with protein and nucleotide turnover, and increases in transcripts associated with carbohydrate metabolism. This putative up-regulation of defense-associated and down-regulation of growth-associated transcripts occur against a backdrop of altered transcripts for RNA-binding proteins, putative ATP/ADP translocators, chaperonins, histones, and water channel proteins, responses consistent with a major metabolic reconfiguration that underscores the complexity of response to herbivore attack

  18. Roles of Arabidopsis WRKY3 and WRKY4 Transcription Factors in Plant Responses to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Vinod, KM; Zheng, Zuyu; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant WRKY DNA-binding transcription factors are involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic responses. It has been previously shown that Arabidopsis WRKY3 and WRKY4, which encode two structurally similar WRKY transcription factors, are induced by pathogen infection and salicylic acid (SA). However, the role of the two WRKY transcription factors in plant disease resistance has not been directly analyzed. Results Both WRKY3 and WRKY4 are nuclear-localized and specifically recognize the TTGACC W-box sequences in vitro. Expression of WRKY3 and WRKY4 was induced rapidly by stress conditions generated by liquid infiltration or spraying. Stress-induced expression of WRKY4 was further elevated by pathogen infection and SA treatment. To determine directly their role in plant disease resistance, we have isolated T-DNA insertion mutants and generated transgenic overexpression lines for WRKY3 and WRKY4. Both the loss-of-function mutants and transgenic overexpression lines were examined for responses to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. The wrky3 and wrky4 single and double mutants exhibited more severe disease symptoms and support higher fungal growth than wild-type plants after Botrytis infection. Although disruption of WRKY3 and WRKY4 did not have a major effect on plant response to P. syringae, overexpression of WRKY4 greatly enhanced plant susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen and suppressed pathogen-induced PR1 gene expression. Conclusion The nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA-binding activity support that WRKY3 and WRKY4 function as transcription factors. Functional analysis based on T-DNA insertion mutants and transgenic overexpression lines indicates that WRKY3 and WRKY4 have a positive role in plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens and WRKY4 has a negative effect on plant resistance to biotrophic pathogens. PMID:18570649

  19. Characterization of OfWRKY3, a transcription factor that positively regulates the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene OfCCD4 in Osmanthus fragrans.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuanji; Wu, Miao; Cao, Liya; Yuan, Wangjun; Dong, Meifang; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Weicai; Shang, Fude

    2016-07-01

    The sweet osmanthus carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (OfCCD4) cleaves carotenoids such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin to yield β-ionone. OfCCD4 is a member of the CCD gene family, and its promoter contains a W-box palindrome with two reversely oriented TGAC repeats, which are the proposed binding sites of WRKY transcription factors. We isolated three WRKY cDNAs from the petal of Osmanthus fragrans. One of them, OfWRKY3, encodes a protein containing two WRKY domains and two zinc finger motifs. OfWRKY3 and OfCCD4 had nearly identical expression profile in petals of 'Dangui' and 'Yingui' at different flowering stages and showed similar expression patterns in petals treated by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid. Activation of OfCCD4pro:GUS by OfWRKY3 was detected in coinfiltrated tobacco leaves and very weak GUS activity was detected in control tissues, indicating that OfWRKY3 can interact with the OfCCD4 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that OfWRKY3 was able to bind to the W-box palindrome motif present in the OfCCD4 promoter. These results suggest that OfWRKY3 is a positive regulator of the OfCCD4 gene, and might partly account for the biosynthesis of β-ionone in sweet osmanthus. PMID:27106478

  20. [Hydrodynamic performance of porpoises (Stenella attenuata)].

    PubMed

    Lang, T G; Pryor, K

    1966-04-22

    Two specimens of Stenella attenuata, trained to chase a winchtowed lure, reached a top speed of 11.03 meters per second (21.4 knots) in 2.0 seconds. The maximum power output, occurring 1.5 seconds after the start, was calculated from measured values of acceleration and drag coefficient. The maximum power output per unit body weight was 50 percent greater than for human athletes. The measured drag coefficient, obtained from periods of coasting, was approximately the same as that of an equivalent rigid body with a near-turbulent boundary layer. PMID:5910195

  1. Organophosphate nerve agent toxicity in Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    Lum, Karin T; Huebner, Henry J; Li, Yingchun; Phillips, Timothy D; Raushel, Frank M

    2003-08-01

    The toxicity for analogues of sarin (GB), soman (GD), and VX was evaluated using Hydra attenuata as a model organism. The organophosphate nerve agent analogue simulants used in this investigation included the following: isopropyl p-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (for GB); pinacolyl p-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (for GD); and diisopropyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate, diethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate, and diethyl S-(2-trimethylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate (for VX). The toxicity of each organophosphate nerve agent was assessed quantitatively by measuring the minimal effective concentration within 92 h in H. attenuata. There is a positive correlation between the molecular hydrophobicity of the compound and its ability to cause toxicity. Results from this study indicate the potential for application of this assay in the field of organophosphate chemical warfare agent detection, as well as for the prediction of toxicity of structurally similar organophosphate compounds. The minimal effective concentration for two of the VX analogues was 2 orders of magnitude more toxic than the analogue for GD and 4 orders of magnitude more toxic than the analogue for GB. PMID:12924922

  2. Phytochemical and Biological Studies of Agave attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Komal; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; de Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine various biological activities of a methanol extract of Agave attenuata leaves. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane fraction from the extract revealed the presence of 31 compounds, with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (11.37%), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (6.33%), n-docosane (6.30%) and eicosane (6.02%) as the major components. The leaves contained appreciable levels of total phenolic contents (10.541–39.35 GAE, mg/100 g) and total flavonoid contents (43.35–304.8 CE, mg/100 g). The extract and some of its fractions showed moderate antimicrobial effects. Leaves extract and fractions also exhibited a good antioxidant potential when measured by DPPH radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation assays. The hemolytic effect of the plant was found to be in a range of 1.01%–2.64%. From the present study it is concluded that this plant could be used as a source of natural antioxidants and functional food nutraceutical applications. PMID:22754375

  3. Cutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Exophiala attenuata in a Domestic Cat.

    PubMed

    Overy, David P; Martin, Chelsea; Muckle, Anne; Lund, Lorraine; Wood, Jill; Hanna, Paul

    2015-10-01

    A 7-year-old female-spayed, domestic short-haired cat was presented to her veterinarian with a mass on the hind paw. Histopathologic examination of a tissue biopsy revealed nodular pyogranulomatous panniculitis with intralesional pigmented fungal hyphae. A dematiaceous fungal isolate was isolated with a micromorphological phenotype consistent with the anamorphic genus Exophiala: budding cells, torulose mycelium and annellidic conidiogenesis from simple conidiophores consisting of terminal and lateral cells that tapered to a short beak at the apex. Sequence homology of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA gene confirmed the identification of the isolate as Exophiala attenuata. Reported here is the first confirmed case of feline phaeohyphomycosis caused by E. attenuata in North America. Similar to historical cases of feline phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala spp., there was no history or postmortem evidence to suggest the patient was in an immunocompromised state (e.g., suffering from FeLV or FIV). Although aggressive surgical excision of local lesions is recommended prior to drug treatment when dealing with subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, surgery followed by itraconazole treatment did not resolve the E. attenuata infection in this cat. PMID:26088340

  4. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Results Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. Conclusions The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution. PMID:23773524

  5. Thermal Inactivation of Phytophthora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L; Mitchell, D J; Chellemi, D O

    2000-10-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora nicotianae was added to pasteurized soil at the rate of 500 laboratory-produced chlamydospores per gram of soil and exposed to temperatures ranging from 35 to 53 degrees C for 20 days. The time required to reduce soil populations to residual levels (0.2 propagule per gram of soil or less) decreased with increasing temperatures. Addition of cabbage residue to the soil reduced the time required to inactivate chlamydospores. Temperature regimes were established to simulate daily temperature changes observed in the field, with a high temperature of 47 degrees C for 3 h/day, and were good estimators of the efficacy of soil solarization for the control of P. nicotianae in soil. Cabbage amendment reduced the time required to inactivate chlamydospores of P. nicotianae and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperature regimes. PMID:18944471

  6. Leaf surface chemicals fromNicotiana affecting germination ofPeronospora tabacina (adam) sporangia.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B S; Nielsen, M T; Severson, R F; Sisson, V A; Stephenson, M K; Jackson, D M

    1992-09-01

    A bioassay was used to evaluate the effects of cuticular leaf components, isolated fromN. tabacum, N. glutinosa (accessions 24 and 24a), and 23other Nicotiana species, on germinationof P. tabacina (blue mold). The leaf surface compounds includedα- andβ-4,8,13,-duvatriene-l,3-diols (DVT-diols), (13-E)-labda-13-ene-8α-,15-diol (labdenediol), (12-Z)-labda-12,14-diene-8α-ol (cis-abienol), (13-R)-labda-8,14-diene-13-ol (manool), 2-hydroxymanool, a mixture of (13-R)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (sclareol), and (13-S)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (episclareol), and various glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates. The above in acetone were applied onto leaf disks of the blue moldsusceptibleN. tabacum cv. TI 1406, which was then inoculated with blue mold sporangia. Estimated IC50 values (inhibitory concentration) were 3.0μg/cm(2) forα-DVT-diol, 2.9μ/cm(2) forβ-DVT-diol, 0.4μg/cm(2) for labdenediol and 4.7μg/cm(2) for the sclareol mixture. Manool, 2-hydroxymanool, andcis-abienol at application rates up to 30μg/cm(2) had little or no effect on sporangium germination. Glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates from the cuticular leaf extracts of 23Nicotiana species and three different fractions fromN. bigelovii were also evaluated for antimicrobial activity at a concentration of 30μg/cm(2). Germination was inhibited by >20% when exposed to sugar esters isolated fromN. acuminata, N. benthamiana, N. attenuata, N. clevelandii, andN. miersii, and accessions 10 and 12 ofN. bigelovii. These results imply that a number of compounds may influence resistance to blue mold in tobacco. PMID:24254279

  7. Ecological divergence and evolutionary transition of resprouting types in Banksia attenuata

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianhua

    2014-01-01

    Resprouting is a key functional trait that allows plants to survive diverse disturbances. The fitness benefits associated with resprouting include a rapid return to adult growth, early flowering, and setting seed. The resprouting responses observed following fire are varied, as are the ecological outcomes. Understanding the ecological divergence and evolutionary pathways of different resprouting types and how the environment and genetics interact to drive such morphological evolution represents an important, but under-studied, topic. In the present study, microsatellite markers and microevolutionary approaches were used to better understand: (1) whether genetic differentiation is related to morphological divergence among resprouting types and if so, whether there are any specific genetic variations associated with morphological divergence and (2) the evolutionary pathway of the transitions between two resprouting types in Banksia attenuata (epicormic resprouting from aerial stems or branch; resprouting from a underground lignotuber). The results revealed an association between population genetic differentiation and the morphological divergence of postfire resprouting types in B. attenuata. A microsatellite allele has been shown to be associated with epicormic populations. Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis revealed a likely evolutionary transition from epicormic to lignotuberous resprouting in B. attenuata. It is concluded that the postfire resprouting type in B. attenuata is likely determined by the fire's characteristics. The differentiated expression of postfire resprouting types in different environments is likely a consequence of local genetic adaptation. The capacity to shift the postfire resprouting type to adapt to diverse fire regimes is most likely the key factor explaining why B. attenuata is the most widespread member of the Banksia genus. PMID:25473470

  8. A new benzofuran derivative from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jian-Jun; Li, Yuan-Dong; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Yi-Qin; Qin, Yun-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A new benzofuran derivative, methyl 3-acetyl-7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-methylbenzofuran-4-carboxylate (1), and a known compound pyrrolezanthine (2), were isolated from leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. Compound 1 was elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods, as well as X-ray diffraction. Both compounds 1 and 2 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities on human cancer cell lines. PMID:26982907

  9. [Sighting of Stenella attenuata, the spotted dolphin, in Culebra Bay, Costa Rica, 1999-2000].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Sáenz, Karina; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Javier

    2004-12-01

    Parallel to a zooplankton study (1999-2000) observations were made (from an inflatable boat), on the presence of dolphins along a transect (-8 km long) on the axis of Culebra Bay (24 km2), Gulf of Papagayo, Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Dolphins were found during 20 of the 31 boat surveys conducted. The only species of cetacean found in the bay was Stenella attenuata, the spotted dolphin. These sightings were more frequent during the rainy season, particularly during the month of May of both years. The presence of S. attenuata in Culebra Bay might be associated to the abundances of fish and mollusks (their presumed prey: for example, squids), as evidenced by fishery statistics available for this zone of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. PMID:17465137

  10. Biology and feeding requirements larval hunter flies Coenosia attenuata (Diptera:Muscidae) reared in larvae of the fungus gnat Bradysia impatiens (Diptera:Sciaridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The larval feeding requirements and biology of the generalist predatory muscid fly Coenosia attenuata were investigated at 25 deg C. Larval C. attenuata were fed 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-instar (L2, L3, and L4) larvae of the fungus gnat Bradysia impatiens at variable rates to determine minimum and optimu...

  11. Two new sesquiterpenoid glycosides from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Yan; Geng, Chang-An; Ma, Yun-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Two new sesquiterpenoid glycosides, nicotabalactonecoside (1) and nicotabadiolcoside (2), along with four known terpenoids (3-6) were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined as dihydrodeacetylphytuberin-2-one 11-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and 1,2-dehydro-4-epieremophil-9-ene-11,12-diol 12-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by extensive spectroscopic analyses (HR-ESI-MS, UV, IR, 1D, and 2D NMR) and chemical method. Compound 1 is an unusual phytuberin-type sesquiterpenoid with a 6/5/5 tricyclic system. PMID:24911395

  12. Pithy Protection: Nicotiana attenuata’s Jasmonic Acid-Mediated Defenses Are Required to Resist Stem-Boring Weevil Larvae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Diezel, Celia; Kessler, Danny; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2011-01-01

    Folivory is the best studied plant-herbivore interaction, but it is unclear whether the signaling and resistance traits important for the defense of leaves are also important for other plant parts. Larvae of the tobacco stem weevil, Trichobaris mucorea, burrow into stems of Nicotiana attenuata and feed on the pith. Transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in signaling and foliar defense traits were evaluated in a 2-year field study for resistance against attack by naturally occurring T. mucorea larva. Plants silenced in early jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis (antisense [as]-lipoxygenase3 [lox3]; inverted repeat [ir]-allene oxide cyclase), JA perception (as-coronatine insensitive1), proteinase inhibitors (ir-pi), and nicotine (ir-putrescine methyl-transferase) direct defenses and lignin (ir-cad) biosynthesis were infested more frequently than wild-type plants. Plants unable to emit C6 aldehydes (as-hpl) had lower infestation rates, while plants silenced in late steps in JA biosynthesis (ir-acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, ir-opr) and silenced in diterpene glycoside production (ir-geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase) did not differ from wild type. Pith choice assays revealed that ir-putrescine methyl-transferase, ir-coronatine insensitive1, and ir-lox3 pith, which all had diminished nicotine levels, were preferred by larvae compared to wild-type pith. The lack of preference for ir-lox2 and ir-cad piths, suggest that oviposition attraction and vascular defense, rather than pith palatability accounts for the higher attack rates observed for these plants. We conclude that traits that influence a plant’s apparency, stem hardness, and pith direct defenses all contribute to resistance against this herbivore whose attack can be devastating to N. attenuata’s fitness. PMID:21300916

  13. Ulcer healing potential of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata on experimental diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sunil; Srivastava, Sajal; Singh, Kisanpal; Sharma, Alok; Garg, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Available data indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the vulnerability of the gastric ulcers and the need of the hour is to develop effective agents to treat ulcer with diabetes for better patient compliance and cost effectiveness. The ulcer-healing properties of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata (CAEt) against both chemically- and physically induced gastric ulcers in experimental rats are recently studied. Aim: To assess the ulcer healing potential of Ethanolic Extract of Caralluma attenuata on Experimental Diabetic Rats. Material and Methods: The current study aimed to evaluate ulcer healing properties of CAEt on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer in rats with streptozotocin induced DM. The hypothesis is based on the fact that DM results in compromising the mucosal defensive factors associated with delay in gastric ulcer healing, and if these changes can be corrected by using agents known for their antidiabetic and antiulcer properties. Experimental albino rats were divided into six groups. Except for Group I, other groups contained streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Group I (normal control) and Group II (diabetic control) were administered vehicle, Groups III and IV (diabetic experimental) were administered CAEt in dose of 100 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg, respectively, and Groups V and VI (positive controls) were respectively administered oral standard drugs omeprazole, 20 mg/kg, and tolbutamide 10 mg/kg. Result: The results confirmed that the CAEt significantly decreases the ulcer index (P < 0.05) in the aspirin-induced gastric ulcers and also significantly exhibit antioxidant and glucose lowering activity in the diabetic ulcer rats. The study showed that C. attenuata has the potential to be used as an antiulcer agent in experimental diabetic rats. PMID:27621520

  14. Antiviral sesquiterpenes from leaves of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Shang, Shan-Zhai; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jian-Guo; Xu, Xing-Meng; Sun, Han-Dong; Pu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Miao, Ming-Ming; Chen, Yong-Kuan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Three unreported sesquiterpenes possessing two new skeletons, tabasesquiterpenes A-C (1-3), together with three known sesquiterpenes (3-6) were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. Their structures were determined mainly by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. Compounds 1-6 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compound 2 exhibited high anti-TMV activity with inhibition rate of 35.2%, which were higher than that of positive control (ningnanmycin). The other compounds also showed potential anti-TMV activity with inhibition rates in the range of 20.5-28.6%. PMID:26581121

  15. Terminal airway embryology of the delphinid porpoises, Stenella attenuata and S. longirostris.

    PubMed

    Drabek, C M; Kooyman, G L

    1983-01-01

    A light microscopic investigation of the histological development of the terminal airways of 18 Stenella attenuata and two S. longirostris showed the lungs to be in a glandular stage of development until 3 months postimplantation (p.i.) age. By 3.5 months (p.i.) the lung was at the canalicular stage. At 4 months mesenchymal rings and muscular bands were in a sphincterlike arrangement around terminal bronchioles. At 7 months (p.i.) the alveolar stage occurred. About 8-9 months cartilaginous rings were present and in association with myoelastic sphincters. Their function remains an enigma, even though many hypotheses as to function have been proposed. We suggest that the presence of well-developed sphincters and cartilage in the neonate may give clues to their function as well as offer potential experiments that would not be as suitable in the adult porpoise. PMID:6842612

  16. Development of the skull of the pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

    PubMed

    Moran, Meghan M; Nummela, Sirpa; Thewissen, J G M

    2011-10-01

    We describe the bony and cartilaginous structures of five fetal skulls of Stenella attenuata (pantropical spotted dolphin) specimens. The specimens represent early fetal life as suggested by the presence of rostral tactile hairs and the beginnings of skin pigmentation. These specimens exhibit the developmental order of ossification of the intramembranous and endochondral elements of the cranium as well as the functional and morphological development of specific cetacean anatomical adaptations. Detailed observations are presented on telescoping, nasal anatomy, and middle ear anatomy. The development of the middle ear ossicles, ectotympanic bone, and median nasal cartilage is of interest because in the adult these structures are morphologically different from those in land mammals. We follow specific cetacean morphological characteristics through fetal development to provide insight into the form and function of the cetacean body plan. Combining these data with fossil evidence, it is possible to overlie ontogenetic patterns and discern evolutionary patterns of the cetacean skull. PMID:21901843

  17. Source parameter estimates of echolocation clicks from wild pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Kerr, I.; Payne, R.

    2004-10-01

    Pods of the little known pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) in the northern Indian Ocean were recorded with a vertical hydrophone array connected to a digital recorder sampling at 320 kHz. Recorded clicks were directional, short (25 μs) transients with estimated source levels between 197 and 223 dB re. 1 μPa (pp). Spectra of clicks recorded close to or on the acoustic axis were bimodal with peak frequencies between 45 and 117 kHz, and with centroid frequencies between 70 and 85 kHz. The clicks share characteristics of echolocation clicks from similar sized, whistling delphinids, and have properties suited for the detection and classification of prey targeted by this odontocete. .

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Purification (Nicotiana benthamiana Plants)

    PubMed Central

    Husk, Adam; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems provide an alternative biomanufacturing platform for recombinant proteins (Matoba et al., 2011). In particular, plant virus-based vectors can overexpress proteins within days in the leaf tissue of Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). To overcome the issues of genetic instability and limited infectivity of recombinant viruses, Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of “deconstructed” virus vectors has become the mainstay for the production of large and/or multicomponent proteins, such as immunoglobulin (Ig)G monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Here, we describe a method of producing human IgG mAbs in N. benthamiana using the tobamoviral replicon vector magnICON®. The vector can express up to a few hundred mg of a mAb per kg of leaf material in 7 days. A representative case for the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV and anti-influenza mAbs, VRC01 and CR6261 respectively, is shown (Hamorsky et al., 2013). Leaf tissue is homogenized and the extract is clarified by filtration and centrifugation. The mAb is purified by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) using Protein A affinity and Phenyl HP hydrophobic interection resins.

  19. The effects of pharmaceuticals on the regeneration of the cnidarian, Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian; Gagné, François; Blaise, Christian

    2008-08-25

    The Hydra attenuata regeneration assay was used to identify the teratogenic potential of 10 pharmaceuticals identified in effluent from a large city wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Three types of solvents were used to solubilise the pharmaceuticals (DMSO, acetone and ethanol), at concentrations determined to have no significant effect on measured endpoints. On the one hand, regeneration was significantly inhibited at (nominal) concentrations of 1, 5 and 1 mg/L for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen and naproxen respectively and at the higher concentration of 50 mg/L for bezafibrate and trimethoprim. On the other hand, carbamazepine and the antibiotics sulfapyridine, oxytetracycline and novobiocin significantly increased regeneration at 25, 5, 50 and 50 mg/L respectively. Relatively high IC50 values of 0.9, 3.84, 4.9 and 22.5 mg/L were calculated for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen and bezafibrate, respectively. However when subjected to tier two toxicity assessment under EU regulatory guidance using environmentally relevant concentrations a MEC/PNEC value>1 was calculated for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen and naproxen indicating teratogenic potential and the necessity for further tier three assessment. A toxicity index (TI) was also calculated using three different techniques, with TI values>3 (indicating teratogenic potential) found for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen and bezafibrate and >1 (indicating a weak teratogenic potential) found for carbamazepine. These results are discussed in the context of their environmental relevance and toxic potential. PMID:18538376

  20. Cranial variation in the pantropical spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata , in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chiou-Ju; Yamada, Tadasu K; Chen, Yen-Jean; Chou, Lien-Siang

    2008-12-01

    Cranial variation in 129 pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) from the western and eastern tropical Pacific was investigated morphometrically. This study revealed significant sexual dimorphism in the dolphin skulls. Differences between the genders were mostly recorded in the rostrum and braincase, which are wider and more robust in males. This sexual variation was interpreted in terms of differences in behavioral and life-history strategies between genders. Geographical variation among populations of the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), Japan, and Taiwan was also significant, with different sexual patterns. While no clear trend in geographical variation was detected in males, there was a positive relationship in females between morphological differences and geographical distance. That is, Japanese and Taiwanese female specimens were morphologically more similar than revealed by other pairwise comparisons between them and the ETP specimens. Moreover, two canonical discriminant functions further discriminated the three populations for males and females, respectively. The two functions showed that the rostrum and braincase are the principal elements in discrimination of geographical variation in males, while only the rostrum is the major discriminant morph of geographical variation in females. In addition, tests based on Mahalanobis distance-squares were conducted to assign six specimens from the western tropical Pacific to the above three populations to clarify the similarities among them. PMID:19267651

  1. Role of Crassicauda sp. in natural mortality of pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Juan Antonio; Simpkin, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Evaluating the effect of parasites on population size is essential for designing management and conservation plans of wild animal populations. Although knowledge in this area is scarce in cetaceans, current evidence suggests that species of the nematode genus Crassicauda may play an important regulatory role in some populations. In the present study, a semiparametric regression technique was applied to a previously published dataset to re-examine the role of Crassicauda sp. in natural mortality of pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata. The resulting model indicated parasite-induced mortality at ages between 6.5 and 9 yr and at roughly 12 yr. The maximum mortality estimates obtained could represent 2 to 4% of natural mortality in dolphins 6 to 8 yr old. This estimate is substantially smaller than previously published values, but in contrast with previous research, our model provides clear statistical evidence for parasite-induced mortality because the bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals of the estimated mortality rates excluded the 0 value. We also evaluated, through simulations, how potential sampling biases of infected dolphins could overestimate parasite-induced mortality. Small differences in sampling selectivity between infected and uninfected animals could substantially reduce the mortality estimates. However, the simulated models also supported the notion of statistically significant mortality in juvenile dolphins. Given that dolphins older than 16 yr were poorly represented in the dataset, further research is needed to establish whether Crassicauda sp. causes meaningful mortality for population dynamics among adult individuals. PMID:24492057

  2. On the development of Cetacean extremities: I. Hind limb rudimentation in the Spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

    PubMed

    Sedmera, D; Misek, I; Klima, M

    1997-02-01

    The Cetacea are group of animals which have completely lost their hind limbs during the course of evolution as a result of their entirely aquatic mode of life. It is known, however, that during their embryonal period, the hind limb buds are temporarily present. The control mechanisms of this regression are not yet understood, and vestigial limbs can sometimes be found in adults. The aim of the present study is to describe the course of hind limb rudimentation during prenatal development of Stenella attenuata (Spotted dolphin) at tissue and cell levels and compare the results with other natural or experimentally induced amelias. Hind limb buds of dolphin embryos, CRL 10-30 mm, were examined histologically. Before total disappearance, they show histodifferentiation comparable with other mammals. Initially, they form the apical ectodermal ridge, which soon regresses. The mesenchyme undergoes the process of condensation to form anlagens of prospective skeletal elements. These condensations are surrounded by vascular plexuses. During the course of rudimentation, some mesenchymal cells die, while the others are incorporated into the body wall. Nerve ingrowth into rudimentary limb buds was also detected. The temporary presence of hind limb rudiments in cetacean embryos can be regarded as a good example of recapitulation of phylogenesis in ontogenesis. PMID:9143876

  3. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  4. First record of Pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fuxing; Wang, Xianyan; Zhang, Qiuxia; Miao, Xing; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Qian

    2015-07-01

    On October 1, 2009, sixteen dolphins were obtained from fishermen by incidental catching in the Yellow Sea, China. As the dolphins' skin color was ambiguous, morphological parameters were measured, and mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence was studied to identify the species. Morphological characteristics were consistent with Pantropical spotted dolphins, Stenella attenuata. Furthermore, a partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence as long as 328-bp was studied by extracting genomic DNA from the skins, and six haplotypes were detected in the sixteen dolphins. By comparing homologous sequences available in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), all the six haplotypes had maximal genetic similarity with Pantropical spotted dolphin. Eight species of cetacean (whales and dolphins) are now recognised in the Yellow Sea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first record of Pantropical spotted dolphins from this region. Despite this species being listed as a Grade II National Key Protected Animal since 1988, little is known of its biology in Chinese waters. We recommend remedial research be undertaken to ensure appropriate management.

  5. Application of the Hydra attenuata assay for identifying developmental hazards among natural waters and wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. )

    1991-12-01

    This study concerns application of the Hydra attenuata assay to detect the developmental toxicity potential of various aqueous samples. First, the assay was modified for testing aqueous samples because water quality has a major impact on aquatic toxicity testing and the results thus obtained. Ranges of sample pH, salinity (conductivity), and hardness were examined for their adverse effects upon the hydra. Adult hydra were unaffected morphologically by pH 5.5-9.5, and the artificial embryo ( embryo') developed normally in a pH range of 6.25 to 8.25. For water hardness, the minimal affective concentration was 1000 mg/liter (as CaCO3) in adults and 625 mg/liter in the embryos; the NOAELs for these were 750 mg/liter in the adult and 250 mg/liter CaCO3 in the embryo. Salinity in excess of 5 ppt was lethal to adults and embryos, indicating the assay may not be applicable to marine or highly saline samples. Finally, grab samples were tested from rivers in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, some of which are impacted by industrial and agricultural activities, as well as several samples of industrial wastewaters from one major facility. The assay functioned normally with these diverse samples and yielded results that can be used in assessing the potential developmental hazard of these materials.

  6. Silicon delays tobacco Ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the role of Si in viral infections has been elusive. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco rings...

  7. Toxicity of nonylphenol on the cnidarian Hydra attenuata and environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Pachura-Bouchet, S; Blaise, C; Vasseur, P

    2006-08-01

    Alkylphenols and their derivatives, alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEs), are synthetic chemicals of concern owing to their endocrine properties. Nonylphenol (NP) is a critical APE metabolite because of its recalcitrance to biodegradation, toxicity, and ability to bio-accumulate in aquatic organisms. Studies of NP effects in vertebrates demonstrated estrogenic disrupting properties in fish, birds, reptiles, and mammal cells in which NP displaces the natural estrogen from its receptor. Less is known on its toxicity toward invertebrates. Effects on reproduction have been reported, but toxicity on development has been poorly documented thus far. We investigated NP toxicity on survival and regeneration of the freshwater coelenterate Hydra attenuata. Hydra is known for its regenerative capacity and its sensitivity to chemical pollution. It has been used for over 20 years to screen for teratogenicity of chemicals (Johnson et al. (1982) Teratog Carcinog Mutagen 2:263-276). Our results showed that hydra appeared as one of the most sensitive species to acute and chronic toxicity of NP compared to several freshwater invertebrates. Regeneration was disrupted at NP concentrations lower than those affecting survival. Toxicity thresholds of NP for aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates are also reported and discussed in the context of environmental risk assessment and of water quality objectives recommended for surface waters in industrialized countries. NP levels have decreased during the last decade because of a voluntary agreement of surfactant producers and users. At present, concentrations of NP found in surface waters are far below 1 microg/L in Europe, but can reach several microg/L when wastewater treatment plant inefficiency occurs. PMID:16841324

  8. Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cell Cultures of Nicotiana tabacum1

    PubMed Central

    Delmer, Deborah P.; Mills, S. E.

    1968-01-01

    Some of the general features of the pathway for l-tryptophan biosynthesis in cell cultures of Nicotiana tabccum var. Wisc. 38 have been investigated. The results of both isotope competition and direct-labeling experiments show that shikimic acid, anthranilic acid, indoleglycerol phosphate, and indole can serve as precursors to l-tryptophan in these cells, indicating that, in terms of its biochemical intermediates, the pathway is similar to that described for the bacteria and fungi. PMID:16656741

  9. Jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine hydrolase 1 (JIH1) contributes to a termination of jasmonate signaling in N. attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    The jasmonate signaling pathway is essential for plant development, reproduction, and defense against herbivores and pathogens. When attacked by herbivores, plants elicit defense responses through the rapid accumulation of jasmonates. Although the transduction of the jasmonate burst into downstream responses has been largely resolved in the past decade, how the jasmonate burst is switched off remained unknown. Recently, two mechanisms that involve cytochrome p450-mediated hydroxylation/carboxylation and NaJIH1-mediated hydrolysis of JA-Ile were identified as major termination mechanisms of JA signaling. Due to a lack of hydrolysis, N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of the JIH1 gene accumulated significantly more JA-Ile than did wild type plants and became more resistant to herbivore attack. Although less likely, additional functions of JIH1, such as contributing to the pool of free Ile and thereby increasing JA-Ile accumulation, remained untested. Here we show that increased isoleucine availability does not explain the observed phenotype in JIH1-deficient N. attenuata plants. PMID:24776843

  10. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations from different hosts using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two hundred thirty-one isolates of P. nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa and Ruta) and other plant genera of lesser econo...

  11. Larvicidal activities of Knema attenuata (Hook. f. & Thomson) Warb. (Myristicaceae) extracts against Aedes albopictus Skuse and Anopheles stephensi Liston.

    PubMed

    Vinayachandra; Shwetha, R; Chandrashekar, K R

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, uses of environment friendly and biodegradable natural insecticides of plant origin have received renewed attention as agents for vector control. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aril and kernel extracts of Knema attenuata (Hook. f. & Thomson) Warb. (Myristicaceae) on larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse and Anopheles stephensi Liston under laboratory conditions. The aril was extracted with chloroform and ethanol; the kernel was extracted with ethanol and hexane. The extracts were tested against the 3rd-4th instar larvae collected from Bunder area, Mangalore, India, which is a well-known fishing harbour, where several mosquito-borne diseases were reported. All the graded concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ppm) showed significant larval mortality after 24 h of observation. Chloroform extracts of aril showed 100% mortality against both larval forms of A. albopictus and A. stephensi at the concentration of 500 ppm. Among the extracts tested, chloroform extracts of aril and ethanol extracts of kernel exhibited higher toxicity against both A. albopictus (LC(50), 141 ppm and 159 ppm; LC(90), 290 ppm and 342 ppm) and A. stephensi (LC(50), 160 ppm and 162 ppm; LC90, 445 ppm and 458 ppm). Hexane extracts of kernel exhibited least toxicity against A. albopictus (LC50, 239 ppm; LC(90), 484 ppm), whereas ethanol extracts of aril showed the least toxicity against A. stephensi (LC(50), 290; LC(90), 498). A preliminary phytochemical assay revealed the presence of phenolics, tannins, steroids, terpenes, resins, and glycolipids in all the extracts. Alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins were absent. The lower LC(50) value of the chloroform extracts of K. attenuata aril indicates its potentiality as a larvicide against A. albopictus and A. stephensi mosquito larvae. PMID:21559763

  12. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data. PMID:26214460

  13. A morphological and histological examination of the pan-tropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) and the spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Clark, L S; Cowan, D F; Pfeiffer, D C

    2008-04-01

    The morphology and histology of the cetacean adrenal gland are poorly understood. Therefore, this study examined 32 pairs of adrenal glands from 18 pan-tropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) and 14 spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris). In both species, the cortex was pseudolobulated and contained a typical mammalian zonation. Medullary protrusions (0-3 per section) and a medullary band were identified in both species. For S. attenuata, no statistical differences were found in the cortex to medulla (CM) ratio or the percent cross-sectional area (PCA) of the adrenal glands compared with sex or sexual maturity. The mean CM ratio for S. attenuata was 2.34 and the PCA was 64.4% cortex, 29.4% medulla and 6.2%'other'. 'Other' indicates blood vessels, connective tissue and the gland capsule itself. For S. longirostris, there was no statistical difference in the CM ratio compared with sexual maturity. However, a statistical difference was found between the CM ratio and sex, suggesting sexual dimorphism (female CM ratio = 2.46 and males = 3.21). No statistical differences were found in the PCA of S. longirostris adrenal glands by sexual maturity. However, a statistical difference was found between the PCA by sex. Female S. longirostris adrenal glands consisted of 65.0% cortex, 27.3% medulla and 7.7% 'other', whereas male adrenal glands consisted of 71.7% cortex, 22.7% medulla and 5.6% 'other'. PMID:18070242

  14. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. PMID:27019466

  15. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Abdur R.; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A.; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  16. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  17. Cell Death Processes during Expression of Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific F1 Hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F1 hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26°C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37°C. Seedlings grown at 26°C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37°C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26°C but not at 37°C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant. PMID:12481061

  18. Cytokinin inhibition of senescence and its effect on Nicotiana-Pseudomonas interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Responses of cytokinin overproducing transgenic Nicotiana plants to infections with compatible and incompatible Pseudomonas syringae pathovars were compared. Plants used were transformed with the ipt (isopentenyl transferase) gene that catalyzes the synthesis of cytokinin. In cytokinin overproduci...

  19. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhua; D’Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J.; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime.

  20. On the development of Cetacean extremities: II. Morphogenesis and histogenesis of the flippers in the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

    PubMed

    Sedmera, D; Misek, I; Klima, M

    1997-04-01

    Externally, the flippers of Cetacea resemble fish fins, but their internal structure is entirely mammalian. They show, however, some adaptative deviations from the typical pattern of the mammalian extremities, the most striking of which is an increased number of phalanges. The aim of this study is to describe the course of the development of flippers in the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) and compare its features with other similar species from an evolutionary perspective. Early stages of flipper development were studied histologically. Differentiation of cartilaginous anlagens of the skeleton progresses proximodistally, condensation in digital rays being evident sooner than chondrogenesis in the carpal region. In one specimen, the temporary presence of cartilaginous rudiments of two carpal elements, which are not found in adults, was observed. At all examined stages, phalangeal number progressively increases up to (radial to ulnar) 3, 7, 7, 5, 3 in the most advanced stage. The reason for this condition is the specialised function of these limb-like structures. It is a classical example of convergence, in which mammalian extremities change their form to emulate the fin function. A similar condition is found in another group of originally terrestrial animals secondarily fully adapted to the aquatic mode of life-Ichyosauria (Reptilia). PMID:9253589

  1. Cadmium contamination of tissues and organs of delphinids species (Stenella attenuata)--influence of biological and ecological factors.

    PubMed

    André, J M; Amiard, J C; Amiard-Triquet, C; Boudou, A; Ribeyre, F

    1990-12-01

    Based on a sample of 27 dolphins (Stenella attenuata) captured in the Eastern tropical zone of the Pacific Ocean, this study was carried out to analyze the cadmium accumulation levels and distribution in 12 organs or tissue samples. The average cadmium concentrations were between 0.2 mg Cd.kg-1 in the brain and muscle and 48 mg Cd.kg-1 in the kidneys. For most of organs and tissues the average values were between 1 and 5 mg Cd.kg-1. Kidneys, liver, muscle, and intestine contained almost 85% of the total cadmium burden of all tissues considered in this study. Most of the biological and ecological factors taken into account (age, sex, total weight, and length of the dolphins, weight of the organs, place and date of capture) interacted with the cadmium concentrations and burdens in the collected organs or tissues. Three factors appear to be of prime importance: age, body weight, and geographical location of the area of capture. PMID:2090444

  2. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianhua; D’Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J.; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-01-01

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime. PMID:27210077

  3. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in hydra attenuata and in rat whole-embryo culture. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.C.

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a class of biaryl compounds that have little commercial application, but appear to be widespread in the environment. They have been found in wood preservative waste dumpsites and in fly ash from municipal waste incinerators. They have been detected in bird eggs and tissues, fish, and other edible marine organisms in the United States, Canada, and Europe. There are limited reports in the extant literature on the toxicity of PCDEs. This study was designed to evaluate the toxicity of selected PCDEs in cultures of Hydra attenuata and post-implantation rat whole embryos. The toxicity of several closely related polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was evaluated in both cultures and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was evaluated in whole embryo culture. Embryonic growth and development parameters (yolk sac diameter, crown-rump length, somite count, and DNA and protein content) and gross morphology were determined. Findings indicated that these chemicals were neither embryotoxic nor teratogenic. Thus, the PCDEs, which elicit other diverse toxic and biochemical responses in rodents, are relatively inactive in these bioassays for developmental toxicity.

  4. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    He, Tianhua; D'Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-01-01

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime. PMID:27210077

  5. Live CT imaging of sound reception anatomy and hearing measurements in the pygmy killer whale, Feresa attenuata.

    PubMed

    Montie, Eric W; Manire, Charlie A; Mann, David A

    2011-03-15

    In June 2008, two pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) were stranded alive near Boca Grande, FL, USA, and were taken into rehabilitation. We used this opportunity to learn about the peripheral anatomy of the auditory system and hearing sensitivity of these rare toothed whales. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions of head structures from X-ray computed tomography (CT) images revealed mandibles that were hollow, lacked a bony lamina medial to the pan bone and contained mandibular fat bodies that extended caudally and abutted the tympanoperiotic complex. Using auditory evoked potential (AEP) procedures, the modulation rate transfer function was determined. Maximum evoked potential responses occurred at modulation frequencies of 500 and 1000 Hz. The AEP-derived audiograms were U-shaped. The lowest hearing thresholds occurred between 20 and 60 kHz, with the best hearing sensitivity at 40 kHz. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) was composed of seven waves and resembled the ABR of the bottlenose and common dolphins. By changing electrode locations, creating 3-D reconstructions of the brain from CT images and measuring the amplitude of the ABR waves, we provided evidence that the neuroanatomical sources of ABR waves I, IV and VI were the auditory nerve, inferior colliculus and the medial geniculate body, respectively. The combination of AEP testing and CT imaging provided a new synthesis of methods for studying the auditory system of cetaceans. PMID:21346122

  6. Cadmium contamination of tissues and organs of delphinids species (Stenella attenuata)--influence of biological and ecological factors

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.M.; Amiard, J.C.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Boudou, A.; Ribeyre, F. )

    1990-12-01

    Based on a sample of 27 dolphins (Stenella attenuata) captured in the Eastern tropical zone of the Pacific Ocean, this study was carried out to analyze the cadmium accumulation levels and distribution in 12 organs or tissue samples. The average cadmium concentrations were between 0.2 mg Cd.kg-1 in the brain and muscle and 48 mg Cd.kg-1 in the kidneys. For most of organs and tissues the average values were between 1 and 5 mg Cd.kg-1. Kidneys, liver, muscle, and intestine contained almost 85% of the total cadmium burden of all tissues considered in this study. Most of the biological and ecological factors taken into account (age, sex, total weight, and length of the dolphins, weight of the organs, place and date of capture) interacted with the cadmium concentrations and burdens in the collected organs or tissues. Three factors appear to be of prime importance: age, body weight, and geographical location of the area of capture.

  7. Detection of Nicotiana tabacum Leaf Contamination in Pharmaceutical Products.

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Hiroko; Shimomura, Hiroko; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-08-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (Solanaceae) is the only species whose leaves can be legally marketed as tobacco according to the Japanese Tobacco Business Act. Nicotine, a major alkaloid produced by N. tabacum leaves, is regulated in pharmaceuticals by the Japanese Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. However, the use of N. tabacum stems as an excipient in pharmaceuticals is permitted, because these contained only a small amount of nicotine. Recently, several reports showed that a substantial amount of nicotine was detected in an OTC pharmaceutical product, in which N. tabacum stems were used as an excipient. Therefore, products containing N. tabacum stems could be contaminated with the leaf material. In the present study, we established a method to detect contamination of N. tabacum stem materials with its leaves, using microscopy to obtain standard reference microphotographs for identification. Cultivated N. tabacum stems and leaves, commercial cigarette leaves, and N. tabacum tissue imported as excipient material were used for preparing the microphotographs. The characteristic N. tabacum leaf structures found in the powdered fragments included: epidermal cells with sinuous anticlinal cell walls, hairs, mesophyll parenchyma with crystalized calcium oxalate (calciphytoliths), and branching vascular bundles derived from reticulate net-veins. A comparison of the microscopic characteristics of an OTC powder with those from the standard reference microphotographs was an effective method for N. tabacum stem and leaf identification. Thus, we evaluated the powdered pharmaceutical product containing N. tabacum stem tissue and Hydrangea serrata (Hydrangeaceae) leaf tissue as excipients, and confirmed the presence of N. tabacum leaf material. PMID:27237788

  8. Virus Infection Suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana – potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  9. Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C M; Wang, C T; Wang, C J; Ho, C H; Kao, Y Y; Chen, C C

    1997-12-01

    Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences, NP3R and NP4R, have been isolated from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. The length of a repeating unit for NP3R and NP4R is 165 and 180 nucleotides respectively. The abundance of NP3R, NP4R and telomeric repeats is, respectively, 8.4 x 10(4), 6 x 10(3) and 1.5 x 10(6) copies per haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that NP3R is located at the ends and/or in interstitial regions of all 10 chromosomes and NP4R on the terminal regions of three chromosomes in the haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Sequence homology search revealed that not only are NP3R and NP4R homologous to HRS60 and GRS, respectively, two tandem repeats isolated from N. tabacum, but that NP3R and NP4R are also related to each other, suggesting that they originated from a common ancestral sequence. The role of these repeated sequences in chromosome healing is discussed based on the observation that two to three copies of a telomere-similar sequence were present in each repeating unit of NP3R and NP4R. PMID:9451957

  10. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  11. Piriformospora indica confers cadmium tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Hui, Feiqiong; Liu, Jian; Gao, Qikang; Lou, Binggan

    2015-11-01

    Piriformospora indica, a root-colonizing endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, promotes plant growth and confers resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to confirm the influence of P. indica on growth, proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), chlorophyll, and cadmium (Cd) amounts in Nicotiana tabacum under Cd stress, hydroponics, pot and field trials were conducted. The results showed that P. indica can store Cd in plant roots and reduce leaf Cd content, reduce the concentration of MDA, and increase the proline and chlorophyll content and the activities of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase under hydroponic Cd stress. RT-PCR analysis showed that the relative expression level of genes Gsh2, TaPCS1, oas1, GPX, and Hsp70 in colonized plants was 4.3, 1.4, 2.9, 1.7, and 6.9 fold higher than in un-colonized plants respectively. Cd exposure significantly reduced un-colonized plants' agronomic traits compared to P. indica-colonized ones. Our results suggested that P. indica can sequester Cd in roots, so that much less cadmium was transported to leaves, and the increased concentrations of antioxidant enzymes, pigments and proline contents, as well as the higher expression of stress-related phytochelatin biosynthesis genes in P. indica-inoculated plants, may also serve to protect N. tabacum plants against oxidative damage, enhancing Cd tolerance. PMID:26574103

  12. Spider silk-like proteins derived from transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Peng, Congyue Annie; Russo, Julia; Gravgaard, Charlene; McCartney, Heather; Gaines, William; Marcotte, William R

    2016-08-01

    The high tensile strength and biocompatibility of spider dragline silk makes it a desirable material in many engineering and tissue regeneration applications. Here, we present the feasibility to produce recombinant proteins in transgenic tobacco Nicotiana tabacum with sequences representing spider silk protein building blocks . Recombinant mini-spidroins contain native N- and C-terminal domains of major ampullate spidroin 1 (rMaSp1) or rMaSp2 flanking an abbreviated number (8, 16 or 32) of consensus repeat domains. Two different expression plasmid vectors were tested and a downstream chitin binding domain and self-cleavable intein were included to facilitate protein purification. We confirmed gene insertion and RNA transcription by PCR and reverse-transcriptase PCR, respectively. Mini-spidroin production was detected by N-terminus specific antibodies. Purification of mini-spidroins was performed through chitin affinity chromatography and subsequent intein activation with reducing reagent. Mini-spidroins, when dialyzed and freeze-dried, formed viscous gelatin-like fluids. PMID:27026165

  13. Reactions of Nicotiana species to inoculation with monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some Nicotiana species are widely used as experimental hosts for plant viruses. Nicotiana species differ in ploidy levels, chromosome numbers and have diverse geographical origins. Thus, these species are useful model systems to investigate virus-host interactions, co-evolution of pathogens and hosts and the effects of ploidy level on virus resistance/susceptibility. Results Here we have studied the responses of seven Nicotiana species to inoculation with Cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), a monopartite begomovirus, and Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV), a bipartite begomovirus, both from the Indian subcontinent. All Nicotiana species supported the replication of both begomoviruses in inoculated leaves. However, only three Nicotiana species, namely N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and N. sylvestris showed symptoms when inoculated with ToLCNDV, while N. benthamiana was the only species that developed leaf curl symptoms when inoculated with CLCuMV. CLCuMV accumulated to detectable levels in N. tabacum, but plants remained asymptomatic. A previously identified mutation of RNA dependent RNA polymerase 1 was shown to be present only in N. benthamiana. The finding is in line with earlier results showing that the susceptibility of this species to a diverse range of plant viruses correlates with a defective RNA silencing-mediated host defense. Conclusions The results presented show that individual Nicotiana species respond differently to inoculation with begomoviruses. The inability of begomoviruses to systemically infect several Nicotiana species is likely due to inhibition of virus movement, rather than replication, and thus provides a novel model to study virus-host interactions in resistant/susceptible hosts. PMID:22011413

  14. [Occurrence and behavioral patterns of the spotted coastal dolphin Stenella attenuata (Cetacea: delphinidae) in the Gulf of Papagayo, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    May-Collado, Laura; Ramírez, Alvaro Morales

    2005-01-01

    Dolphins are characterized by a significant behavioral versatility, which allows them to respond to environmental seasonality. Seasonal variation in dolphin behavior in tropical waters is not well known. Stenella attenuata graffmani is a resident dolphin in the clearly defined seasonal Gulf of Papagayo, Costa Rica, and we studied if dolphin group size, occurrence and behavioral patterns were associated with season and time of day in the gulf. Using strip transects we surveyed two locations for three consecutive years. School size ranged from 1 to 50 individuals, mean group size was 10.16 (SD = 9.61) individuals. Overall, foraging activities were the most frequent, followed by social interactions and travel. From 6:00 AM to 9:00 AM we mostly observed social interactions, followed by feeding-socializing (9:00 AM-12:00 PM) and feeding exclusively (12:00 PM-3:00 PM). Social activities intensified afterwards (3:00 PM-6:00 PM). Behavior and gulf seasonality were associated (chi2 = 90.52, gl = 6, p<0.05, n = 99). In the dry season (December-April) feeding predominated over other activities, but socializing was more frequent in the early rainy season (May-July). Larger groups (mean 12 dolphins) forage actively; smaller groups (mean 6 dolphins 6.51 +/- 5.12) foraged more passively. Seasonal variation in dolphin activities are likely to be associated with food availability, as observed in the high number of groups involved in foraging behaviors, and a high investment in foraging activities during the dry season. PMID:17354439

  15. Efficacy of Chaetomium Species as Biological Control Agents against Phytophthora nicotianae Root Rot in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poeaim, Supattra

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is one of the largest citrus producers in Southeast Asia. Pathogenic infection by Phytophthora, however, has become one of major impediments to production. This study identified a pathogenic oomycete isolated from rotted roots of pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand as Phytophthora nicotianae by the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Then, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium lucknowense, Chaetomium cupreum and their crude extracts as biological control agents in controlling this P. nicotianae strain. Represent as antagonists in biculture test, the tested Chaetomium species inhibited mycelial growth by 50~56% and parasitized the hyphae, resulting in degradation of P. nicotianae mycelia after 30 days. The crude extracts of these Chaetomium species exhibited antifungal activities against mycelial growth of P. nicotianae, with effective doses of 2.6~101.4 µg/mL. Under greenhouse conditions, application of spores and methanol extracts of these Chaetomium species to pomelo seedlings inoculated with P. nicotianae reduced root rot by 66~71% and increased plant weight by 72~85% compared to that in the control. The method of application of antagonistic spores to control the disease was simple and economical, and it may thus be applicable for large-scale, highly effective biological control of this pathogen. PMID:26539045

  16. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers.

    PubMed

    Brito, Michael S; Bertolino, Lígia T; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C; DePaoli, Henrique C; Goldman, Gustavo H; Teixeira, Simone P; Goldman, Maria H S

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  17. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  18. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M.; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L.; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Falk, Bryce W.; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Falk, Bryce W; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L; McDonald, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  1. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  2. Spatial and temporal regulation of sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Suza, Walter P; Chappell, Joe

    2016-06-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was used as a model to investigate the spatial and developmental relationship between sterol synthesis rates and sterol content in plants. Stigmasterol levels were approximately twice the level in roots as that found in aerial tissues, while its progenitor sterol sitosterol was the inverse. When incorporation of radiolabeled precursors into sterols was used as measure of in vivo synthesis rates, acetate incorporation was similar across all tissue types, but approximately twofold greater in roots than any other tissue. In contrast, mevalonate incorporation exhibited the greatest differential with the rate of incorporation in roots approximately one-tenth that in apical shoots. Similar to acetate, incorporation of farnesol was higher in roots but remained fairly constant in aerial tissues, suggesting less regulation of the downstream sterol biosynthetic steps. Consistent with the precursor incorporation data, analysis of gene transcript and measurements of putative rate-limiting enzyme activities for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (EC 2.3.3.10) and reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) showed the greatest modulation of levels, while the activity levels for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.3.2) and prenyltransferases (EC 2.5.1.10 and EC 2.5.1.1) also exhibited a strong but moderate correlation with the development age of the aerial tissues of the plants. Overall, the data suggest a multitude of means from transcriptional to posttranslational control affecting sterol biosynthesis and accumulation across an entire plant, and point to some particular control points that might be manipulated using molecular genetic approaches to better probe the role of sterols in plant growth and development. PMID:26671544

  3. Production, partial purification and characterization of xylanase using Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust as substrate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Komal P; Shilpkar, Prateek

    2016-03-01

    Isolated Bacillus sp. was used in the present study for production of xylanase from Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust. The strain was able to give a maximum of 1.77 Uml⁻¹ xylanase activity under optimized fermentation conditions which was further increased upto 2.77 Uml⁻¹ after extraction and partial purification of enzyme. After partial purification, the enzyme was characterized and it gave the highest xylanase activity at pH 7.0, when 0.2 ml enzyme was incubated with 2.0% substrate (Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust) for 60 min at 60°C. Saccharification study of Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust with partially purified enzyme revealed that 18.4% reducing sugar was released in 20 hrs incubation, and TLC and HPTLC analysis showed that xylose and glucose sugars were obtained after hydrolysis of substrate. FTIR analysis confirmed decomposition of substrate. PMID:27097451

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Sua-type cytoplasmic male sterility of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxia; Yang, Aiguo; Lv, Jing; Gong, Daping; Sun, Yuhe

    2016-07-01

    To uncover the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-associated mitochondrial genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of Sua-CMS mitochondrial genome. The Sua-CMS mtDNA sequence is 522,731 bp in length and contains 34 protein-coding genes, 25 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The nucleotide sequence data of 34 protein-coding genes of 14 mitochondrial genomes were used for constructing the phylogenetic tree. The results showed that Nicotiana tabacum Sua-CMS exhibits most close relationship with other solanaceae species. PMID:27158790

  5. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  6. Photorespiratory Properties of Mesophyll Protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Pascal; Peltier, Gilles

    1989-01-01

    The photorespiratory activity of mesophyll protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia has been clearly demonstrated by the presence of a Warburg-effect, the occurrence of an important CO2-sensitive O2 uptake and the effect of some photorespiratory inhibitors on photosynthetic activity. At a nonsaturating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration (0.1 millimolar), we observed that the rate of CO2 fixation was 60% lower at 50% O2 compared to that measured at 2% O2. Using 18O2 and mass spectrometry, we measured O2 exchange as a function of light intensity and of DIC concentration. Oxygen uptake measured at the CO2 compensation point (47.4 micromoles O2 per hour per milligram chlorophyll) was three-fold higher than that measured at a saturating CO2 concentration. Cyanide or iodoacetamide, inhibitors of the Calvin cycle, were found to reduce the O2 uptake to the same extent as CO2 saturation. We conclude from these results that the major part of the CO2-sensitive O2 uptake is due to photorespiration. Further, we investigated the effect on net photosynthesis of some inhibitors of the glycolate pathway. At CO2 saturation (10 millimolar DIC), 5 millimolar aminoacetonitrile (AAN), and 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate (AOA) did not cause any significant decrease in net photosynthesis. However, when these two inhibitors were added under a period of active photorespiration (10 minutes at the CO2 compensation point at 20% O2), we observed a decrease in the rate of net photosynthesis at 10 millimolar DIC measured afterward (respectively, 18 and 29%). This inhibition did not appear at 2% O2, but was stronger at 50% O2 (40% for AAN and 47% for AOA). With 0.05 millimolar butyl 2-hydroxy-3-butynoate (BHB) or 0.5 millimolar l-methionine-dl-sulfoximine (l-MSO), rates of net photosynthesis at 10 millimolar DIC were decreased by 10 to 15%. Additional decreases were observed after a period at the CO2 compensation point at 20% O2 (30% for BHB and 20% for l-MSO). From the sites of action of

  7. Physiological and molecular changes during opening and senescence of Nicotiana mutabilis flowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  8. NICOTIANA MUTABILIS-A NOVEL SYSTEM FOR STUDYING ETHYLENE-MEDIATED FLORAL SENESCENCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As its specific epithet indicates, Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, has flowers that change color during their display life. Opening buds are white, and as the flower ages, the color changes, at first gradually, and then rapidly through light pink to da...

  9. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  10. Genetic Analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae Populations from Different Hosts Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Antonio; Martin, Frank N; Cacciola, Santa O; di San Lio, Gaetano Magnano; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Schena, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    In all, 231 isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa, and Ruta), and other plant genera were characterized using simple-sequence repeat markers. In total, 99 multilocus genotypes (MLG) were identified, revealing a strong association between genetic grouping and host of recovery, with most MLG being associated with a single host genus. Significant differences in the structure of populations were revealed but clonality prevailed in all populations. Isolates from Citrus were found to be genetically related regardless of their geographic origin and were characterized by high genetic uniformity and high inbreeding coefficients. Higher variability was observed for other populations and a significant geographical structuring was determined for isolates from Nicotiana. Detected differences were related to the propagation and cultivation systems of different crops. Isolates obtained from Citrus spp. are more likely to be distributed worldwide with infected plant material whereas Nicotiana and Lycopersicon spp. are propagated by seed, which would not contribute to the spread of the pathogen and result in a greater chance for geographic isolation of lineages. With regard to ornamental species in nurseries, the high genetic variation is likely the result of the admixture of diverse pathogen genotypes through the trade of infected plant material from various geographic origins, the presence of several hosts in the same nursery, and genetic recombination through sexual reproduction of this heterothallic species. PMID:27111805

  11. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR CHANGES DURING OPENING AND SENESCENCE OF NICOTIANA MUTABILIS FLOWERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  13. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  14. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  15. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  16. The rapidly evolving associations among herbivore associated elicitor-induced phytohormones in Nicotiana

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuqing; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    In response to herbivore attack, plants perceive herbivore associated elicitors (HAE) and rapidly accumulate jasmonic acid (JA) and other phytohormones, which interact in complex ways, such as the crosstalk between JA and salicylic acid (SA). Although recent studies have shown that HAE-induced individual phytohormones can be highly specific among closely related species, it remains unclear how conserved and specific the relationships among HAE-induced phytohormones are. Here we analyzed the correlations among 4 different phytohormones, JA, JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile), SA, and abscisic acid (ABA) in 6 closely related Nicotiana species that were induced by 3 different HAEs. Our results showed that while no clear association between ABA and other phytohormones were found, the positive association between JA and JA-Ile is mostly conserved among closely related Nicotiana species. Interestingly, the association between JA and SA are highly variable and can be regulated by different HAEs. PMID:26107988

  17. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community. PMID:26391804

  18. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Stamler, Rio A; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  19. Transgressive phenotypes and generalist pollination in the floral evolution of Nicotiana polyploids.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Chase, Mark W; Knapp, Sandra; Litt, Amy; Leitch, Andrew R; Le Comber, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy is an important driving force in angiosperm evolution, and much research has focused on genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic responses to allopolyploidy. Nicotiana is an excellent system in which to study allopolyploidy because half of the species are allotetraploids of different ages, allowing us to examine the trajectory of floral evolution over time. Here, we study the effects of allopolyploidy on floral morphology in Nicotiana, using corolla tube measurements and geometric morphometrics to quantify petal shape. We show that polyploid morphological divergence from the intermediate phenotype expected (based on progenitor morphology) increases with time for floral limb shape and tube length, and that most polyploids are distinct or transgressive in at least one trait. In addition, we show that polyploids tend to evolve shorter and wider corolla tubes, suggesting that allopolyploidy could provide an escape from specialist pollination via reversion to more generalist pollination strategies. PMID:27501400

  20. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W.; Arnold, Sarah E. J.; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C.; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J.; Chase, Mark W.; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Methods Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Key Results Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Conclusions Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. PMID:25979919

  1. Protection of Citrus Rootstocks Against Phytophthora spp. with a Hypovirulent Isolate of Phytophthora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Colburn, G C; Graham, J H

    2007-08-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora root rot of citrus in Florida is caused by Phytophthora nicotianae and P. palmivora. A naturally occurring isolate of P. nicotianae (Pn117) was characterized as hypovirulent on citrus roots. Pn117 infected and colonized fibrous roots, but caused significantly less disease than the virulent isolates P. nicotianae Pn198 and P. palmivora Pp99. Coincident inoculation of rootstock seedlings of Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reticulata) or Swingle citrumelo (C. paradisi x Poncirus trifoliata) with the hypovirulent Pn117 and the virulent isolates Pn198 and Pp99 did not reduce the severity of disease caused by the virulent Phytophthora spp. When either rootstock was inoculated with the hypovirulent Pn117 for 3 days prior to inoculation with virulent isolates, preinoculated seedlings had significantly less disease and greater root weight compared with seedlings inoculated with the virulent isolates alone. Recovery of the different colony types of Phytophthora spp. from roots of sweet orange (C. sinensis) or Swingle citrumelo was evaluated on semiselective medium after sequential inoculations with the hypovirulent Pn117 and virulent Pp99. Pn117 was isolated from roots at the same level as the Pp99 at 3 days post inoculation. Preinoculation of Pn117 for 3 days followed by inoculation with Pp99 resulted in greater recovery of the hypovirulent isolate and lower recovery of the virulent compared with coincident inoculation. PMID:18943635

  2. Assessing the bioconfinement potential of a Nicotiana hybrid platform for use in plant molecular farming applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The introduction of pharmaceutical traits in tobacco for commercial production could benefit from the utilization of a transgene bioconfinement system. It has been observed that interspecific F1Nicotiana hybrids (Nicotiana tabacum × Nicotiana glauca) are sterile and thus proposed that hybrids could be suitable bioconfined hosts for biomanufacturing. We genetically tagged hybrids with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a visual marker to enable gene flow tracking and quantification for field and greenhouse studies. GFP was used as a useful proxy for pharmaceutical transgenes. Results Analysis of DNA content revealed significant genomic downsizing of the hybrid relative to that of N. tabacum. Hybrid pollen was capable of germination in vitro, albeit with a very low frequency and with significant differences between plants. In two field experiments, one each in Tennessee and Kentucky, we detected outcrossing at only one location (Tennessee) at 1.4%. Additionally, from 50 hybrid plants at each field site, formation of 84 and 16 seed was observed, respectively. Similar conclusions about hybrid fertility were drawn from greenhouse crosses. In terms of above-ground biomass, the hybrid yield was not significantly different than that of N. tabacum in the field. Conclusion N. tabacum × N. glauca hybrids show potential to contribute to a bioconfinement- and biomanufacturing host system. Hybrids exhibit extremely low fertility with no difference of green biomass yields relative to N. tabacum. In addition, hybrids are morphologically distinguishable from tobacco allowing for identity preservation. This hybrid system for biomanufacturing would optimally be used where N. glauca is not present and in physical isolation of N. tabacum production to provide total bioconfinement. PMID:23914736

  3. Influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.; Moore, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted over a four year period to determine the influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Isopropalin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropylcumidine), pebulate (S-propyl butylethylthiocarbamate), and diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) were applied at the recommended rates of 1.7, 4.5, and 4.5 kg/ha (ai), respectively. Treatment of tobacco plants with isopropalin or diphenamid reduced oxidant injury for the first two to four weeks after transplanting, but not later in the season. Pebulate has no consistent affect on the sensitivity of tobacco to ozone. 26 references, 3 tables.

  4. Involvement of Thylakoid Overenergization in Tentoxin-Induced Chlorosis in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, N.; Evron, Y.; Jansen, MAK.; Edelman, M.; Pick, U.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to clarify the mechanism of tentoxin-induced chlorosis in Nicotiana spp. seedlings. We found that chlorosis does not correlate with the inhibition of chloroplast ATP synthesis in vivo, since it occurs at tentoxin concentrations far higher than that required for the inhibition of photophosphorylation measured in the same seedlings. However, tentoxin-induced chlorosis does correlate with in vivo overenergization of thylakoids. We show that tentoxin induces overenergization in intact plants and isolated thylakoids, probably via multiple interactions with ATP synthase. Furthermore, gramicidin D, a protonophore that relieves overenergization, also relieves chlorosis. Two lines of evidence suggest that reactive oxygen species may be involved in the process of chlorosis: ascorbate, a quencher of oxygen radicals, significantly protects against chlorosis, whereas transgenic Nicotiana spp. mutants overexpressing chloroplast superoxide dismutase are partially resistant to tentoxin-induced chlorosis. It is proposed that chlorosis in developing seedlings results from overenergization of thylakoids, which leads to the generation of oxygen radicals. PMID:12223749

  5. Genetic Diversity and Phylogeny of Antagonistic Bacteria against Phytophthora nicotianae Isolated from Tobacco Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fengli; Ding, Yanqin; Ding, Wei; Reddy, M.S.; Fernando, W.G. Dilantha; Du, Binghai

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of antagonistic bacteria from the tobacco rhizosphere was examined by BOXAIR-PCR, 16S-RFLP, 16S rRNA sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis methods. These studies revealed that 4.01% of the 6652 tested had some inhibitory activity against Phytophthora nicotianae. BOXAIR-PCR analysis revealed 35 distinct amplimers aligning at a 91% similarity level, reflecting a high degree of genotypic diversity among the antagonistic bacteria. A total of 25 16S-RFLP patterns were identified representing over 33 species from 17 different genera. Our results also found a significant amount of bacterial diversity among the antagonistic bacteria compared to other published reports. For the first time; Delftia tsuruhatensis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Advenella incenata, Bacillus altitudinis, Kocuria palustris, Bacillus licheniformis, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Myroides odoratimimus are reported to display antagonistic activity towards Phytophthora nicotianae. Furthermore, the majority (75%) of the isolates assayed for antagonistic activity were Gram-positives compared to only 25% that were Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21686169

  6. Some physiological aspects of nitrate reductase-deficient Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.; Lemoine, Y.; Caboche, M.

    1986-04-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv. Viviani) mutants were found to be defective in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild type Nicotiana tabacum. The grafts of NR/sup -/ plants were found to contain less malate but more amino acids, sugars and starch than the wild type. Moreover they were chlorotic, with a slight increase of the proportion of LH Chl a/b protein complexes and they exhibited a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between the light-harvesting complexes and the active centers. After /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse and chase experiments. The total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20% of that of the control. The NR/sup -/ leaves mainly accumulated /sup 14/C in the whole intermediates of the Calvin-cycle and in sucrose. In the most deficient NR leaves, chloroplasts were stuffed with large starch inclusions disorganizing the lamellar system.

  7. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  8. Functional cybrid plants possessing a Nicotiana genome and an Atropa plastome.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, S G; Shlumukov, L R; Pogrebnyak, N J; Berger, S; Gleba, Y

    1987-08-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts of plastome chlorophyll-deficient, streptomycin-resistant Nicotiana tabacum were fused with those of wild type Atropa belladonna using the polyethylene-glycol/high Ca++/dimethylsulfoxide method. Protoplasts were cultured in nutrient media suitable for regeneration of tobacco but not Atropa cells. In two experiments, a total of 41 cell lines have been selected as green colonies. Cytogenetic (chromosomal number and morphology) and biochemical (isozyme analyses of esterase, amylase and peroxidase) studies were used to evaluate the nuclear genetic constitution of regenerated plants. To study plastid genetic constitution, restriction endonuclease analysis of chloroplast DNA was performed. Three groups of regenerants have been identified: (a) nuclear hybrids (4 cell lines); (b) Atropa plants, most probably arising from rare surviving parental protoplasts (4 lines) and (c) Nicotiana/Atropa cybrids possessing a tobacco genome and an Atropa plastome (33 lines). Most of cybrids obtained were diploid, morphogenetically normal plants phenotypically similar to tobacco. Some plants flowered and yielded viable seeds. Part of cybrid regenerants were variegated, variegation being transmitted to sexual progeny. Electron microscopic analysis of the mesophyll cells of variegated leaves revealed the presence of heteroplastidic cells. Analysis of thylakoid membrane polypeptides shows that in the cybrids the content of at least one of the major polypeptides, presumably a chlorophyll a/b binding protein is drastically reduced. PMID:17186622

  9. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  10. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    PubMed Central

    Hehle, Verena K.; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy’s 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently in N. tabacum and demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.—Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  11. Whistle characteristics and daytime dive behavior in pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i measured using digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs).

    PubMed

    Silva, Tammy L; Mooney, T Aran; Sayigh, Laela S; Tyack, Peter L; Baird, Robin W; Oswald, Julie N

    2016-07-01

    This study characterizes daytime acoustic and dive behavior of pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i using 14.58 h of data collected from five deployments of digital acoustic recording tags (DTAG3) in 2013. For each tagged animal, the number of whistles, foraging buzzes, dive profiles, and dive statistics were calculated. Start, end, minimum, and maximum frequencies, number of inflection points and duration were measured from 746 whistles. Whistles ranged in frequency from 9.7 ± 2.8 to 19.8 ± 4.2 kHz, had a mean duration of 0.7 ± 0.5 s and a mean of 1.2 ± 1.2 inflection points. Thirteen foraging buzzes were recorded across all tags. Mean dive depth and duration were 16 ± 9 m and 1.9 ± 1.0 min, respectively. Tagged animals spent the majority of time in the upper 10 m (76.9% ± 16.1%) of the water column. Both whistle frequency characteristics and dive statistics measured here were similar to previously reported values for spotted dolphins in Hawai'i. Shallow, short dive profiles combined with few foraging buzzes provide evidence that little spotted dolphin feeding behavior occurs during daytime hours. This work represents one of the first successful DTAG3 studies of small pelagic delphinids, providing rare insights into baseline bioacoustics and dive behavior. PMID:27475166

  12. [Distribution and environmental conditions related to the behavior in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) (Cetacea: Delphinidae) in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Cubero-Pardo, Priscilla

    2007-06-01

    Habitat characteristics influencing behavior in animal species vary locally. The influence that a particular environmental characteristic can have on a species depends not only on other variables, but on morphological, physiological and social conditions of that species. In this study, developed from June 1996 to July 1997, I studied whether specific behaviors are related to particular distribution areas and environmental factors in the bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) and the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). The study area was covered along oblicuous linear transects, and the behavior of single groups was observed from 15 min to 5 h. Environmental factors such as depth, temperature, salinity and distance from shore, among others, were considered. For the bottlenose dolphin, foraging/feeding activities showed exclusive coincidence with river mouths, coral reef and mangrove areas, while social and milling activities where seen close to feeding areas. Traveling occurred along different points parallel to the coast, with a low percentage of cases across the gulf (16.56 %), suggesting that the bottlenose rarely crosses from one side to the other. In the spotted dolphin, several behaviors were observed simultaneously in the schools and it was not possible to associate areas with particular behaviors. The lack of significant relationships among activities and particular environmental variables (ANOVA tests) is attributed to three aspects: (a) transitions among activities generally occurred into a low variable area, (b) dolphins often traveled along large areas without changing activities and (c) environmental conditions in Golfo Dulce are homogeneous. In the two species the highest average in the number of individuals per group corresponded to the category of active socializing, followed by traveling, passive socializing and feeding. In the case of the bottlenose dolphin, the smallest group size was associated with feeding activities (ANOVA, F= 2.624, p=0.037, n=156

  13. Chloroplast DNA Diversity among Trees, Populations and Species in the California Closed-Cone Pines (Pinus Radiata, Pinus Muricata and Pinus Attenuata)

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y. P.; Hipkins, V. D.; Strauss, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    The amount, distribution and mutational nature of chloroplast DNA polymorphisms were studied via analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in three closely related species of conifers, the California closed-cone pines-knobcone pine: Pinus attenuata Lemm.; bishop pine: Pinus muricata D. Don; and Monterey pine: Pinus radiata D. Don. Genomic DNA from 384 trees representing 19 populations were digested with 9-20 restriction enzymes and probed with cloned cpDNA fragments from Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] that comprise 82% of the chloroplast genome. Up to 313 restriction sites were surveyed, and 25 of these were observed to be polymorphic among or within species. Differences among species accounted for the majority of genetic (haplotypic) diversity observed [G(st) = 84(+/-13)%]; nucleotide diversity among species was estimated to be 0.3(+/-0.1)%. Knobcone pine and Monterey pine displayed almost no genetic variation within or among populations. Bishop pine also showed little variability within populations, but did display strong population differences [G(st) = 87(+/-8)%] that were a result of three distinct geographic groups. Mean nucleotide diversity within populations was 0.003(+/-0.002)%; intrapopulation polymorphisms were found in only five populations. This pattern of genetic variation contrasts strongly with findings from study of nuclear genes (allozymes) in the group, where most genetic diversity resides within populations rather than among populations or species. Regions of the genome subject to frequent length mutations were identified; estimates of subdivision based on length variant frequencies in one region differed strikingly from those based on site mutations or allozymes. Two trees were identified with a major chloroplast DNA inversion that closely resembled one documented between Pinus and Pseudotsuga. PMID:7905846

  14. Chronic ozone exacerbates the reduction in photosynthesis and acceleration of senescence caused by limited N availability in Nicotiana sylvestris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated ozone (O3) and limiting soil nitrogen (N) availability both negatively affect crop performance. However, little is known about how the combination of elevated O3 and limiting N affect crop growth and metabolism. In this study, we grew tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) in ambient and elevated O...

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of Nicotiana gossei leaves, used in the Australian Aboriginal smokeless tobacco known as pituri or mingkulpa.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Cabot, Peter J; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-07-01

    The Aboriginal population of Central Australia use endemic Nicotiana species to make a smokeless tobacco product known usually as pituri or mingkulpa. Nicotiana leaves are masticated with wood ash into a 'quid' that is chewed/sucked for absorption of nicotine. In addition to nicotine, smokeless tobacco products contain a spectrum of biologically active compounds that may contribute to effects on health. The objective of this study was to quantify nicotine, and related alkaloids and tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), in Nicotiana leaves used in pituri, and compare in vitro toxicity of pure nicotine with Nicotiana leaf extract at the same concentration of nicotine. An aqueous extract of dry leaves of Nicotiana gossei and a reference smokeless tobacco (CORESTA CRP2) were quantified for major pyridine alkaloids and TSNAs using HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS. A range of extract concentrations and corresponding concentrations of nicotine standard were tested using an MTS assay to measure human lung epithelium cell (A549) survival. Cells treated for 24h with the maximum concentration of 1.5mg/ml of nicotine resulted in 77% viability. In contrast, extracts from N. gossei leaves and CRP2 containing a similar concentration of nicotine (1.3mg/ml) resulted in remarkably lower viability of 1.5 and 6%, respectively. Comparison of cytotoxicity of pure nicotine with that of the extracts revealed that nicotine was not the source of their cytotoxicity. Other biologically active compounds such as the known carcinogens NNK and NNN, derived from nicotine and nornicotine and found to be present in the smokeless tobacco extracts, may be responsible. PMID:27178269

  16. Production of Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana Using GENEWARE® Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vector.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren; Hamorsky, Krystal; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (CTBp) using the GENEWARE(®) tobacco mosaic virus vector system. Infectious transcripts of the vector RNA are generated in vitro and inoculated on N. benthamiana seedlings. After 11 days, CTBp is extracted in a simple tris buffer at room temperature. No protease inhibitor is required. The leaf homogenate is treated with mild heat and a pH shift to selectively precipitate host-derived proteins. CTBp is purified to >95 % homogeneity by two-step chromatography using immobilized metal affinity and ceramic hydroxyapatite resins. This procedure yields on average 400 mg of low-endotoxin CTBp from 1 kg of fresh leaf material. PMID:26614286

  17. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  18. Identification of a dicer homologue gene (DCL2) in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Udriste, A A; Stan, V; Radu, G L; Tabler, M; Cucu, N

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotes possess a mechanism that generates small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) and use these to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. These small RNAs (21-24nt) are processed from long double-stranded RNA precursors by type III RNase enzymes, referred to as DICER or DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs). In Arabidopsis, there are four DCL genes and their role in small RNA biogenesis and silencing has been the subject of intense study. DCL2 is less well studied than the other DCL proteins although it is known to play a role in formation of natural antisense siRNA and may be involved in transitive silencing of transgene transcripts. This study provides basic genomic information on DCL2 in the Nicotiana tabacum (NtDCL2) gene family and its probable roles in plant growth and development. PMID:22812643

  19. A terpenoid phytoalexin plays a role in basal defense of Nicotiana benthamiana against Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Tee, Chuan-Sia; Jiang, Yu-Lin; Jiang, Xi-Yuan; Venkatesh, Prasanna Nori; Sarojam, Rajani; Ye, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid phytoalexins function as defense compound against a broad spectrum of pathogens and pests in the plant kingdom. However, the role of phytoalexin in antiviral defense is still elusive. In this study, we identified the biosynthesis pathway of a sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin, capsidiol 3-acetate as an antiviral response against RNA virus Potato Virus X (PVX) in Nicotiana benthamiana. NbTPS1 and NbEAH genes were found strongly induced by PVX-infection. Enzymatic activity and genetic evidence indicated that both genes were involved in the PVX-induced biosynthesis of capsidiol 3-acetate. NbTPS1- or NbEAH-silenced plant was more susceptible to PVX. The accumulation of capsidiol 3-acetate in PVX-infected plant was partially regulated by jasmonic acid signaling receptor COI1. These findings provide an insight into a novel mechanism of how plant uses the basal arsenal machinery to mount a fight against virus attack even in susceptible species. PMID:25993114

  20. Early events induced by the toxin deoxynivalenol lead to programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, Amine; Tran, Daniel; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Briand, Joël; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Errakhi, Rafik; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Bouteau, François

    2015-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin affecting animals and plants. This toxin synthesized by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum is currently believed to play a decisive role in the fungal phytopathogenesis as a virulence factor. Using cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY2, we showed that DON-induced programmed cell death (PCD) could require transcription and translation processes, in contrast to what was observed in animal cells. DON could induce different cross-linked pathways involving (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and a transcriptional down-regulation of the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene and (ii) regulation of ion channel activities participating in cell shrinkage, to achieve PCD. PMID:26259183

  1. Identifying Growth Conditions for Nicotiana benthimiana Resulting in Predictable Gene Expression of Promoter-Gus Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, V.; Barton, K.; Longhurst, A.

    2012-12-01

    Revoluta (Rev) is a transcription factor that establishes leaf polarity inArabidopsis thaliana. Through previous work in Dr. Barton's Lab, it is known that Revoluta binds to the ZPR3 promoter, thus activating the ZPR3 gene product inArabidopsis thaliana. Using this knowledge, two separate DNA constructs were made, one carrying revgene and in the other, the ZPR3 promoter fussed with the GUS gene. When inoculated in Nicotiana benthimiana (tobacco), the pMDC32 plasmid produces the Rev protein. Rev binds to the ZPR3 promoter thereby activating the transcription of the GUS gene, which can only be expressed in the presence of Rev. When GUS protein comes in contact with X-Gluc it produce the blue stain seen (See Figure 1). In the past, variability has been seen of GUS expression on tobacco therefore we hypothesized that changing the growing conditions and leaf age might improve how well it's expressed.

  2. Complete genome sequence of tobacco virus 1, a closterovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qi, Shuishui; Gao, Zhengliang; Akinyemi, Ibukun A; Xu, Dafeng; Zhou, Benguo

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 1 (TV1), was determined, and this virus was identified in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic and yellowing symptoms in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV1 consists of 15,395 nucleotides with 61.6 % nucleotide sequence identity to mint virus 1 (MV1). Its genome organization is similar to that of MV1, containing nine open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in virion assembly, cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) placed TV1 alongside members of the genus Closterovirus in the family Closteroviridae. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the complete genome sequence of a closterovirus identified in tobacco. PMID:26795159

  3. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. PMID:27035256

  4. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  5. Metabolomic analysis of wild and transgenic Nicotiana langsdorffii plants exposed to abiotic stresses: unraveling metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Scalabrin, Elisa; Radaelli, Marta; Rizzato, Giovanni; Bogani, Patrizia; Buiatti, Marcello; Gambaro, Andrea; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii plants, wild and transgenic for the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rol C gene and the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, were exposed to different abiotic stresses (high temperature, water deficit, and high chromium concentrations). An untargeted metabolomic analysis was carried out in order to investigate the metabolic effects of the inserted genes in response to the applied stresses and to obtain a comprehensive profiling of metabolites induced during abiotic stresses. High-performance liquid chromatography separation (HPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled the identification of more than 200 metabolites, and statistical analysis highlighted the most relevant compounds for each plant treatment. The plants exposed to heat stress showed a unique set of induced secondary metabolites, some of which were known while others were not previously reported for this kind of stress; significant changes were observed especially in lipid composition. The role of trichome, as a protection against heat stress, is here suggested by the induction of both acylsugars and glykoalkaloids. Water deficit and Cr(VI) stresses resulted mainly in enhanced antioxidant (HCAs, polyamine) levels and in the damage of lipids, probably as a consequence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, the ability of rol C expression to prevent oxidative burst was confirmed. The results highlighted a clear influence of GR modification on plant stress response, especially to water deficiency-a phenomenon whose applications should be further investigated. This study provides new insights into the field of system biology and demonstrates the importance of metabolomics in the study of plant functioning. Graphical Abstract Untargeted metabolomic analysis was applied to wild type, GR and RolC modified Nicotiana Langsdorffii plants exposed to heat, water and Cr(VI) stresses. The key metabolites, highly affected by stress application, were identified

  6. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants. PMID:25862648

  7. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  8. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids

  9. An investigation into the acute and chronic toxicity of eleven pharmaceuticals (and their solvents) found in wastewater effluent on the cnidarian, Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian; Gagné, François; Blaise, Christian

    2008-01-25

    Pharmaceuticals previously identified in the effluent from the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Montreal discharging into the St. Lawrence river, were tested for acute and chronic toxicity using the cnidarian Hydra attenuata. Acute toxicity was based on the established technique looking at morphological changes in the Hydra, while recently developed endpoints of feeding behaviour, attachment and growth (hydranth number) were used to measure chronic effects. The compounds under investigation (ibuprofen, naproxen, gemfibrozil, bezafibrate, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfapyridine, oxytetracycline, novobiocin, trimethoprim and caffeine) were tested individually in controlled laboratory exposures with LC(50) and EC(50) results calculated. All compounds tested had relatively high LC(50) values with gemfibrozil, ibuprofen and naproxen having the lowest at 22.36 mg/L and EC(50) values based on morphology of 1.18 to 2.62 mg/L (all concentrations are nominal). The EC(50) values based on feeding were similar to those based on morphology but with increased sensitivity for carbamazepine, bezafibrate and novobiocin. A trend of a reduction in feeding with deterioration in morphology was observed in the Hydra, with the exception of novobiocin, where a lower than expected EC(50) of 13.53 mg/L was found with no negative effect on morphology. Significant reductions in attachment and hydranth number were seen at concentrations of 1 and 5 mg/L for gemfibrozil and ibuprofen respectively. A toxicity threshold (TT) of 320 microg/L was calculated for ibuprofen, only a factor of 10(2) or 10 higher than the concentration found in the effluent in the present study (1.19 mug/L) and in other Canadian effluents studied (22 microg/L [Brun GL, Bernier M, Losier R, Doe K, Jackman P, Lee HB, Pharmaceutically active compounds in Atlantic Canadian sewage treatment plant effluents and receiving waters and potential for environmental effects as measured by acute and chronic aquatic toxicity

  10. Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum, and Distribution Analyses in Strawberry Greenhouses by Duplex Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhu; Inada, Minoru; Watanabe, Hideki; Suga, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum cause Phytophthora rot of strawberry. A duplex real-time PCR technique for simultaneous detection and quantification of the two pathogens was developed. Species-specific primers for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of rDNA and the ras-related protein gene Ypt1, respectively. TaqMan probes were labeled with FAM for P. nicotianae and HEX for P. cactorum. Specificities were demonstrated using 52 isolates, including various soil-borne pathogens. Sensitivities for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum DNAs were 10 fg and 1 pg, respectively. The technique was applied to naturally infested soil and root samples; the two pathogens were detected and the target DNA concentrations were quantified. Significant correlations of DNA quantities in roots and the surrounding soils were found. The minimum soil DNA concentration predicting the development of disease symptoms was estimated as 20 pg (g soil)−1. In three strawberry greenhouses examined, the target DNA concentrations ranged from 1 to 1,655 pg (g soil)−1 for P. nicotianae and from 13 to 233 pg (g soil)−1 for P. cactorum. The method proved fast and reliable, and provides a useful tool to monitor P. nicotianae and P. cactorum in plants or soils. PMID:23614901

  11. Members of the XB3 Family from Diverse Plant Species Induce Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoen; Liu, Xueying; Chen, Xiuhua; Snyder, Anita; Song, Wen-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death has been associated with plant immunity and senescence. The receptor kinase XA21 confers resistance to bacterial blight disease of rice (Oryza sativa) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Here we show that the XA21 binding protein 3 (XB3) is capable of inducing cell death when overexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. XB3 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been positively implicated in XA21-mediated resistance. Mutation abolishing the XB3 E3 activity also eliminates its ability to induce cell death. Phylogenetic analysis of XB3-related sequences suggests a family of proteins (XB3 family) with members from diverse plant species. We further demonstrate that members of the XB3 family from rice, Arabidopsis and citrus all trigger a similar cell death response in Nicotiana benthamiana, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in regulating programmed cell death in the plant kingdom. PMID:23717500

  12. An Interspecific Nicotiana Hybrid as a Useful and Cost-Effective Platform for Production of Animal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M.; Gantier, Michael P.; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Neale, Alan D.; Hamill, John D.; Walmsley, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs. PMID:22539991

  13. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of fifteen NtabSPL genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao-Yao; Ma, Yan-Qin; Li, Dian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Wen; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen SPL (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE) genes were identified and characterized in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95. The exon-intron structures of these genes were determined according to the coding sequences confirmed by RT-PCR and the genomic DNA sequences downloaded from the databases in Sol Genomics Network, and thirteen of them were found to carry the response element of miR156. To elucidate the origin of the validated NtabSPL genes, multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences encompassing the open reading frames were conducted by using the orthologs in N. tabacum, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, and Nicotiana otophora. The results showed that six NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. sylvestris, and nine NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. tomentosiformis, further corroborating that N. tabacum came from the interspecific hybridization between the ancestors of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. In contrast to previous statements about highly repetitive sequences, the genome of N. tabacum mainly retained the paternal-derived SPL genes in diploidization process. Phylogenetic analyses based on the highly conserved SBP (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN) domains and the full-length amino acid sequences reveal that the SPL proteins of tobacco, tomato, and Arabidopsis can be categorized into eight groups. It is worth noting that N. tabacum contains seven NtabSPL6 genes originated from two parental genomes and NtabSPL6-2 possesses a GC-AG intron. In addition, transgenic tobacco plants harboring Arabidopsis Pri-miR156A were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, and the constitutive expression of miR156 could obviously inhibit the activity of the NtabSPL genes containing its target site, suggesting the function of miR156 is conservative in tobacco and Arabidopsis. PMID:26635304

  14. Phenotypes and functional effects caused by various viral RNA silencing suppressors in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Sarmiento, Cecilia; Truve, Erkki; Lehto, Harry; Lehto, Kirsi

    2008-02-01

    RNA silencing suppressor genes derived from six virus genera were transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum plants. These suppressors were P1 of Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV), P1 of Cocksfoot mottle virus, P19 of Tomato bushy stunt virus, P25 of Potato virus X, HcPro of Potato virus Y (strain N), 2b of Cucumber mosaic virus (strain Kin), and AC2 of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV). HcPro caused the most severe phenotypes in both Nicotiana spp. AC2 also produced severe effects in N. tabacum but a much milder phenotype in N. benthamiana, although both HcPro and AC2 affected the leaf tissues of the two Nicotiana spp. in similar ways, causing hyperplasia and hypoplasia, respectively. P1-RYMV caused high lethality in the N. benthamiana plants but only mild effects in the N. tabacum plants. Phenotypic alterations produced by the other transgenes were minor in both species. Interestingly, the suppressors had very different effects on crucifer-infecting Tobamovirus (crTMV) infections. AC2 enhanced both spread and brightness of the crTMV-green fluorescent protein (GFP) lesions, whereas 2b and both P1 suppressors enhanced spread but not brightness of these lesions. P19 promoted spread of the infection into new foci within the infiltrated leaf, whereas HcPro and P25 suppressed the spread of crTMV-GFP lesions. PMID:18184062

  15. Quantitative Analysis of the Fate of Exogenous DNA in Nicotiana Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Murashige, Toshio

    1977-01-01

    After a 5-hour incubation of protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. `Xanthi' with 3H-DNA (7.26 μg/ml) from N. tabacum L. `Xanthi nc' 3.5% of the initial radioactivity was found in acid-insoluble substances of the protoplasts. The addition of DEAE-dextran and poly-l-lysine to the incubation medium nearly doubled radioactivity adsorption. The absorption was inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, KCN, and low temperature (0 C); this inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous ATP. About 500 tobacco plants established from protoplasts of a normally tobacco-mosaic virus-susceptible cultivar that had been allowed to absorb DNA prepared from a resistant cultivar did not show transfer of the virus-resistant gene. A detailed analysis was performed of the disposition of exogenous DNA in plant protoplasts, by employing Escherichia coli3H-DNA and Nicotiana glutinosa protoplasts. In 5 to 20 hours, about 10% of the 3H-DNA entered the protoplasts. Competition experiments between the 3H-DNA and unlabeled DNA or thymidine showed that the entry occurred as undegraded 3H-DNA. Examination of intraprotoplast fractions revealed that 60 to 80% of the absorbed radioactivity resided in the “soluble” fraction of the cytoplasm and 20% in the nuclear fraction. The mitochondrion fraction also contained measurable radioactivity. Sizing on sucrose density gradients showed that the bulk of the absorbed E. coli DNA had been depolymerized. Of the incorporated radioactivity, 15% was accountable as DNA, exogenous as well as resynthesized, and 15% as RNA, protein, and other cell constituents. DNA/DNA hybridization test indicated that 17.6% of the re-extractable 3H-DNA retained homology with the E. coli DNA; this was equivalent to 2.6% of the absorbed radioactivity. Resynthesized receptor protoplast DNA was represented by a fraction at least 1.7% of the total absorbed radioactivity. The amount of bacterial DNA remaining in protoplasts suggests that each protoplast retained 2.3 × 10−15g donor DNA, or

  16. Agroinfiltration by cytokinin-producing Agrobacterium sp. strain GV3101 primes defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Raghuram, Badmi; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Transient infiltrations in tobacco are commonly used in plant studies, but the host response to different disarmed Agrobacterium strains is not fully understood. The present study shows that pretreatment with disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 primes the defense response to subsequent infection by Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana tabacum. The presence of a trans-zeatin synthase (tzs) gene in strain GV3101 may be partly responsible for the priming response, as the tzs-deficient Agrobacterium sp. strain LBA4404 only weakly imparts such responses. Besides inducing the expression of defense-related genes like PR-1 and NHL10, GV3101 pretreatment increased the expression of tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes like MEK2, WIPK (wound-induced protein kinase), and SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase). Furthermore, the GV3101 strain showed a stronger effect than the LBA4404 strain in activating phosphorylation of the tobacco MAPK, WIPK and SIPK, which presumably prime the plant immune machinery. Lower doses of exogenously applied cytokinins increased the activation of MAPK, while higher doses decreased the activation, suggesting a balanced level of cytokinins is required to generate defense response in planta. The current study serves as a cautionary warning for plant researchers over the choice of Agrobacterium strains and their possible consequences on subsequent pathogen-related studies. PMID:25054409

  17. Salivary proteins of spider mites suppress defenses in Nicotiana benthamiana and promote mite reproduction.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Carlos A; Jonckheere, Wim; Alba, Juan M; Glas, Joris J; Dermauw, Wannes; Haring, Michel A; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Schuurink, Robert C; Kant, Merijn R

    2016-04-01

    Spider mites (Tetranychidae sp.) are widely occurring arthropod pests on cultivated plants. Feeding by the two-spotted spider mite T. urticae, a generalist herbivore, induces a defense response in plants that mainly depends on the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA). On tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), however, certain genotypes of T. urticae and the specialist species T. evansi were found to suppress these defenses. This phenomenon occurs downstream of phytohormone accumulation via an unknown mechanism. We investigated if spider mites possess effector-like proteins in their saliva that can account for this defense suppression. First we performed an in silico prediction of the T. urticae and the T. evansi secretomes, and subsequently generated a short list of candidate effectors based on additional selection criteria such as life stage-specific expression and salivary gland expression via whole mount in situ hybridization. We picked the top five most promising protein families and then expressed representatives in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient expression assays to assess their effect on plant defenses. Four proteins from two families suppressed defenses downstream of the phytohormone SA. Furthermore, T. urticae performance on N. benthamiana improved in response to transient expression of three of these proteins and this improvement was similar to that of mites feeding on the tomato SA accumulation mutant nahG. Our results suggest that both generalist and specialist plant-eating mite species are sensitive to SA defenses but secrete proteins via their saliva to reduce the negative effects of these defenses. PMID:26946468

  18. Only Specific Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Chitinases and [beta]-1,3-Glucanases Exhibit Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Buurlage, M. B.; Ponstein, A. S.; Bres-Vloemans, S. A.; Melchers, L. S.; Van Den Elzen, PJM.; Cornelissen, BJC.

    1993-01-01

    Different isoforms of chitinases and [beta]-1,3-glucanases of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) were tested for their antifungal activities. The class I, vacuolar chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase isoforms were the most active against Fusarium solani germlings, resulting in lysis of the hyphal tips and in growth inhibition. In additon, we observed that the class I chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase acted synergistically. The class II isoforms of the two hydrolases exhibited no antifungal activity. However, the class II chitinases showed limited growth inhibitory activity in combination with higher amounts of class I [beta]-1,3-glucanase. The class II [beta]-1,3-glucanases showed no inhibitory activity in any combination. In transgenic tobacco plants producing modified forms of either a class I chitinase or a class I [beta]-1,3-glucanase, or both, these proteins were targeted extracellularly. Both modified proteins lack their C-terminal propeptide, which functions as a vacuolar targeting signal. Extracellular targeting had no effect on the specific activities of the chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase enzymes. Furthermore, the extracellular washing fluid (EF) from leaves of transgenic plants expressing either of the secreted class I enzymes exhibited antifungal activity on F. solani germlings in vitro comparable to that of the purified vacuolar class I proteins. Mixing EF fractions from these plants revealed synergism in inhibitory activity against F. solani; the mixed fractions exhibited inhibitory activity similar to that of EF from plants expressing both secreted enzymes. PMID:12231736

  19. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Cano, Liliana M.; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus “Las” is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  20. A molecular description of mutations affecting the pollen component of the Nicotiana alata S locus.

    PubMed Central

    Golz, J F; Su, V; Clarke, A E; Newbigin, E

    1999-01-01

    Mutations affecting the self-incompatibility response of Nicotiana alata were generated by irradiation. Mutants in the M1 generation were selected on the basis of pollen tube growth through an otherwise incompatible pistil. Twelve of the 18 M1 plants obtained from the mutagenesis screen were self-compatible. Eleven self-compatible plants had mutations affecting only the pollen function of the S locus (pollen-part mutants). The remaining self-compatible plant had a mutation affecting only the style function of the S locus (style-part mutant). Cytological examination of the pollen-part mutant plants revealed that 8 had an extra chromosome (2n + 1) and 3 did not. The pollen-part mutation in 7 M1 plants was followed in a series of crosses. DNA blot analysis using probes for S-RNase genes (encoding the style function of the S locus) indicated that the pollen-part mutation was associated with an extra S allele in 4 M1 plants. In 3 of these plants, the extra S allele was located on the additional chromosome. There was no evidence of an extra S allele in the 3 remaining M1 plants. The breakdown of self-incompatibility in plants with an extra S allele is discussed with reference to current models of the molecular basis of self-incompatibility. PMID:10388830

  1. Effects of Iron Excess on Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Plants (Implications to Oxidative Stress).

    PubMed Central

    Kampfenkel, K.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.

    1995-01-01

    Fe excess is believed to generate oxidative stress. To contribute to the understanding of Fe metabolism, Fe excess was induced in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia grown in hydroponic culture upon root cutting. Toxicity symptoms leading to brown spots covering the leaf surface became visible after 6 h. Photosynthesis was greatly affected within 12 h; the photosynthetic rate was decreased by 40%. Inhibition of photosynthesis was accompanied by photoinhibition, increased reduction of photosystem II, and higher thylakoid energization. Fe excess seemed to stimulate photorespiration because catalase activity doubled. To cope with cellular damage, respiration rate increased and cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity more than doubled. Simultaneously, the content of free hexoses was reduced. Indicative of generation of oxidative stress was doubling of ascorbate peroxidase activity within 12 h. Contents of the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione were reduced by 30%, resulting in equivalent increases of dehydroascorbate and oxidized glutathione. Taken together, moderate changes in leaf Fe content have a dramatic effect on plant metabolism. This indicates that cellular Fe concentrations must be finely regulated to avoid cellular damage most probably because of oxidative stress induced by Fe. PMID:12228397

  2. PsbN is required for assembly of the photosystem II reaction center in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Salar; Umate, Pavan; Manavski, Nikolay; Plöchinger, Magdalena; Kleinknecht, Laura; Bogireddi, Hanumakumar; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Wanner, Gerhard; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Meurer, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    The chloroplast-encoded low molecular weight protein PsbN is annotated as a photosystem II (PSII) subunit. To elucidate the localization and function of PsbN, encoded on the opposite strand to the psbB gene cluster, we raised antibodies and inserted a resistance cassette into PsbN in both directions. Both homoplastomic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutants psbN-F and psbN-R show essentially the same PSII deficiencies. The mutants are extremely light sensitive and failed to recover from photoinhibition. Although synthesis of PSII proteins was not altered significantly, both mutants accumulated only ∼25% of PSII proteins compared with the wild type. Assembly of PSII precomplexes occurred at normal rates, but heterodimeric PSII reaction centers (RCs) and higher order PSII assemblies were not formed efficiently in the mutants. The psbN-R mutant was complemented by allotopic expression of the PsbN gene fused to the sequence of a chloroplast transit peptide in the nuclear genome. PsbN represents a bitopic trans-membrane peptide localized in stroma lamellae with its highly conserved C terminus exposed to the stroma. Significant amounts of PsbN were already present in dark-grown seedling. Our data prove that PsbN is not a constituent subunit of PSII but is required for repair from photoinhibition and efficient assembly of the PSII RC. PMID:24619613

  3. Improved photosynthetic performance during severe drought in Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing a nonenergy conserving respiratory electron sink.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Martyn, Greg D; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts have means to manage excess reducing power but these mechanisms may become restricted by rates of ATP turnover. Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial terminal oxidase that uncouples the consumption of reducing power from ATP synthesis. Physiological and biochemical analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum wild-type (WT) plants with that of transgenic lines overexpressing AOX, under both well-watered and drought stress conditions. With increasing drought severity, AOX overexpression acted to increase respiration in the light (RL ) relative to WT. CO2 and light response curves indicated that overexpression also improved photosynthetic performance relative to WT, as drought severity increased. This was not due to an effect of AOX amount on leaf water status or the development of the diffusive limitations that occur due to drought. Rather, AOX overexpression dampened photosystem stoichiometry adjustments and losses of key photosynthetic components that occurred in WT. The results indicate that AOX amount influences RL , particularly during severe drought, when cytochrome pathway respiration may become increasingly restricted. This impacts the chloroplast redox state, influencing how the photosynthetic apparatus responds to increasing drought severity. In particular, the development of biochemical limitations to photosynthesis are dampened in plants with increased nonenergy conserving RL . PMID:26032897

  4. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR. PMID:27143320

  5. Growth of nicotiana in response to atmospheric CO sub 2 enrichment and various light regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, S.; Thomas, J.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum NCTG-22, N. tabacum Petite Havana and N. plumbaginifolia were grown in chambers (24 C, 12-h light) under daytime atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels of 340 ppm (ambient) or 1000 ppm (enriched). All 3 types of tobacco grew faster and had open flowers sooner under CO2 enrichment, but patterns of dry weight distribution varied with type of tobacco. In N. plumbaginifolia significant proportions of dry weight were allocated to stems and branches, while in tabacum types, less was allocated to stems and more to leaves and roots. Increases in dry weight due to CO2 enrichment were accompanied by increases in leaf area and thickness. Plants given a far-red low intensity night break exhibited few differences from controls except having thinner leaves under ambient CO2; but under enriched CO2, had greater total dry weight and thicker leaves containing a higher proportion of spongy mesophyll than controls. A 50% reduction in light intensity led to a comparable reduction in dry weight and leaf area across treatments.

  6. An efficient Potato virus X -based microRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Qingtao; Hu, Pu; Jia, Qi; Liu, Na; Yin, Kangquan; Cheng, Ye; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; Liu, Yule

    2016-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in many biological processes. Although many miRNAs have been identified in various plant species, the functions of these miRNAs remain largely unknown due to the shortage of effective genetic tools to block their functional activity. Recently, miRNA target mimic (TM) technologies have been applied to perturb the activity of specific endogenous miRNA or miRNA families. We previously reported that Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based TM expression can successfully mediate virus-based miRNA silencing/suppression (VbMS) in plants. In this study, we show the Potato virus X (PVX)-based TM expression causes strong miRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana. The PVX-based expression of short tandem target mimic (STTMs) against miR165/166 and 159 caused the corresponding phenotype in all infected plants. Thus, a PVX-based VbMS is a powerful method to study miRNA function and may be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in N. benthamiana. PMID:26837708

  7. Roles of extensins in cotyledon primordium formation and shoot apical meristem activity in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XueLian; Ren, YuJun; Zhao, Jie

    2008-01-01

    Extensins are cell wall basic glycoproteins with a polypeptide backbone that is extremely rich in hydroxyproline. In this paper, the function of extensins in embryo development was studied in Nicotiana tabacum. By using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, the extensin JIM20 epitopes were found to express in different developmental stages of embryos, and specifically in the top of the embryo proper (EP) and the suspensor of the late globular embryos. In order to clarify the functions of extensins, a potent hydroxyproline synthesis inhibitor, 3,4-dehydro-L-proline (3,4-DHP), was used in ovule and embryo culture. The results showed that the addition of 3,4-DHP caused abnormal embryos with single, asymmetry and supernumerary cotyledon primordia, and continuous culture led to cotyledon defects in the germinated seedlings. Histological sections showed that the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of the abnormal seedlings was dissimilar from the controls, especially in the seedlings with cup-shaped cotyledons. Furthermore, the vasculature of the abnormal cotyledons was in an out-of-order format and contained at least two main veins. Finally, both the hydroxyproline assay and fluorescent immunolocalization confirmed that 3,4-DHP treatment reduced the level of extensins in the cultured ovules and embryos. These results indicate that extensins may play important roles in the cotyledon primordium formation, SAM activity, and vasculature differentiation during embryo development. PMID:18931351

  8. Optimization of Engineered Production of the Glucoraphanin Precursor Dihomomethionine in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Crocoll, Christoph; Mirza, Nadia; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are natural products characteristic of the Brassicales order, which include vegetables such as cabbages and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucoraphanin is the major glucosinolate in broccoli and associated with the health-promoting effects of broccoli consumption. Toward our goal of creating a rich source of glucoraphanin for dietary supplements, we have previously reported the feasibility of engineering glucoraphanin in Nicotiana benthamiana through transient expression of glucoraphanin biosynthetic genes from A. thaliana (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). As side-products, we obtained fivefold to eightfold higher levels of chain-elongated leucine-derived glucosinolates, not found in the native plant. Here, we investigated two different strategies to improve engineering of the methionine chain elongation part of the glucoraphanin pathway in N. benthamiana: (1) coexpression of the large subunit (LSU1) of the heterodimeric isopropylmalate isomerase and (2) coexpression of BAT5 transporter for efficient transfer of intermediates across the chloroplast membrane. We succeeded in raising dihomomethionine (DHM) levels to a maximum of 432 nmol g−1 fresh weight that is equivalent to a ninefold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate, as previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production in a heterologous host. PMID:26909347

  9. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  10. Novel system for the simultaneous analysis of geminivirus DNA replication and plant interactions in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Stanley, John; van Wezel, Rene

    2003-12-01

    The origin of replication of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and a gene expression vector based on Potato virus X were exploited to devise an in planta system for functional analysis of the geminivirus replication-associated protein (Rep) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana line pOri-2. This line contains an integrated copy of a tandem repeat of the ACMV origin of replication flanking nonviral sequences that can be mobilized and replicated by Rep as an episomal replicon. A Rep-GFP fusion protein can also mobilize and amplify the replicon, facilitating Rep detection in planta. The activity of Rep and its mutants, Rep-mediated host response, and the correlation between Rep intracellular localization and biological functions could be effectively assessed by using this in planta system. Our results indicate that modification of amino acid residues R(2), R(5), R(7) and K(11) or H(56), L(57) and H(58) prevent Rep function in replication. This defect correlates with possible loss of Rep nuclear localization and inability to trigger the host defense mechanism resembling a hypersensitive response. PMID:14645587

  11. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  12. Influence of Iron Chlorosis on Pigment and Protein Metabolism in Leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. S.; Miller, G. W.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on Nicotiana tabacum, L. to study the relation in the grana among chlorophylls, carotenoids, and proteins. The effect of iron chlorosis on protein and pigment synthesis was studied at different stages of chlorosis using glycine-U-C14. Pigments were separated by thin layer chromatography. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and protein contents of chloroplasts from chlorotic tissue were less than those of normal tissues. A 25% decrease in protein labeling and a 45% decrease in chlorophyll labeling was noted in deficient tissue compared to normal tissue even before chlorosis was perceptible. Both normal and iron deficient leaf discs which received iron in the incubation medium incorporated higher amounts of radioactive glycine into chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b at all stages of development than their respective counterparts not supplied with iron in the incubation medium. The presence of iron in the incubation medium reduced the amount of glycine incorporated into carotenes and xanthophylls, except where the tissue was severely chlorotic. This may be attributed to active competition for glycine between the iron-dependent- (chlorophyll) and iron-independent-(carotenoid) biosynthetic pathways. Incorporation of glycine into chloroplast pigments was lowest at severe chlorosis, probably due to a reduction in the overall enzyme activity. PMID:16656270

  13. Optimization of Engineered Production of the Glucoraphanin Precursor Dihomomethionine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Crocoll, Christoph; Mirza, Nadia; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are natural products characteristic of the Brassicales order, which include vegetables such as cabbages and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucoraphanin is the major glucosinolate in broccoli and associated with the health-promoting effects of broccoli consumption. Toward our goal of creating a rich source of glucoraphanin for dietary supplements, we have previously reported the feasibility of engineering glucoraphanin in Nicotiana benthamiana through transient expression of glucoraphanin biosynthetic genes from A. thaliana (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). As side-products, we obtained fivefold to eightfold higher levels of chain-elongated leucine-derived glucosinolates, not found in the native plant. Here, we investigated two different strategies to improve engineering of the methionine chain elongation part of the glucoraphanin pathway in N. benthamiana: (1) coexpression of the large subunit (LSU1) of the heterodimeric isopropylmalate isomerase and (2) coexpression of BAT5 transporter for efficient transfer of intermediates across the chloroplast membrane. We succeeded in raising dihomomethionine (DHM) levels to a maximum of 432 nmol g(-1) fresh weight that is equivalent to a ninefold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate, as previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production in a heterologous host. PMID:26909347

  14. Leucine: tRNA Ligase from Cultured Cells of Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Nigel R.; Wray, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Leucine:tRNA ligase was assayed in extracts from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) XD cells by measuring the initial rate of aminoacylation of transfer RNA with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. Transfer RNA was purified from tobacco XD cells after the method of Vanderhoef et al. (Phytochemistry 9: 2291-2304). The buoyant density of leucine:tRNA ligase from cells grown for 100 generations in 2.5 mm [15N]nitrate and 30% deuterium oxide was 1.3397. After transfer of cells into light medium (2.5 mm [14N]nitrate and 100% H2O) the ligase activity increased and the buoyant density decreased with time to 1.3174 at 72 hours after transfer. It was concluded that leucine:tRNA ligase molecules were synthesized de novo from light amino acids during the period of activity increase. The width at half-peak height of the enzyme distribution profiles following isopycnic equilibrium centrifugation in caesium chloride remained constant at all times after transfer into light medium providing evidence for the loss of preexisting functional ligase molecules. It was concluded that during the period of activity increase the cellular level of enzyme activity was determined by a balance between de novo synthesis and the loss of functional enzyme molecules due to either inactivation or degradation. PMID:16660229

  15. The alternative respiratory pathway is involved in brassinosteroid-induced environmental stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant steroid hormones, play essential roles in modulating cell elongation, vascular differentiation, senescence, and stress responses. However, the mechanisms by which BRs regulate plant mitochondria and resistance to abiotic stress remain largely unclear. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is involved in the plant response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this report, the role of AOX in BR-induced tolerance against cold, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and high-light stresses was investigated. Exogenous applied brassinolide (BL, the most active BR) induced, while brassinazole (BRZ, a BR biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced alternative respiration and AOX1 expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Chemical scavenging of H2O2 and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of NbRBOHB compromised the BR-induced alternative respiratory pathway, and this result was further confirmed by NbAOX1 promoter analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of AOX activity by chemical treatment or a VIGS-based approach decreased plant resistance to environmental stresses and compromised BR-induced stress tolerance. Taken together, our results indicate that BR-induced AOX capability might contribute to the avoidance of superfluous reactive oxygen species accumulation and the protection of photosystems under stress conditions in N. benthamiana. PMID:26175355

  16. Zoospore density-dependent behaviors of Phytophthora nicotianae are autoregulated by extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue

    2010-07-01

    Phytophthora species are destructive fungus-like plant pathogens that use asexual single-celled flagellate zoospores for dispersal and plant infection. Many of the zoospore behaviors are density-dependent although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we use P. nicotianae as a model and demonstrate autoregulation of some zoospore behaviors using signal molecules that zoospores release into the environment. Specifically, zoospore aggregation, plant targeting, and infection required or were enhanced by threshold concentrations of these signal molecules. Below the threshold concentration, zoospores did not aggregate and move toward a cauline leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) and failed to individually attack annual vinca (Catharanthus roseus cv. Little Bright Eye). These processes were reversed when supplemented with zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) prepared from a zoospore suspension above threshold densities but not with calcium chloride at a concentration equivalent to extracellular Ca(2+) in ZFF. These results suggest that Ca(2+) is not a primary signal molecule regulating these communal behaviors. Zoospores coordinated their communal behaviors by releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules. This chemical communication mechanism raises the possibility that Phytophthora plant infection may not depend solely on zoospore number in the real world. Single zoospore infection may take place if it is signaled by a common molecule available in the environment which contributes to the destructiveness of these plant pathogens. PMID:20528180

  17. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  18. In vitro anthelmintic effect of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) extract on parasitic nematode, Marshallagia marshalli.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Fatemeh; Nourollahi-Fard, Saeid R; Foroodi, Hamid R; Sharifi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Because of developing resistance to the existing anthelmintic drugs, there is a need for new anthelmintic agents. Tobacco plant has alkaloid materials that have antiparasitic effect. We investigated the in vitro anthelminthic effect of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) against M. marshalli. For investigating this effect, we prepared three dilutions of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (25, 50 and 75 mg/ml). The worms exposed to extracts for 10 h at 25-30 °C. The buffer PBS used as negative control and 50 mg/ml dilution of Levamisole used as standard reference. In each group, 50 worms were examined. We used an inhibition mobility test for our study. Survival analysis with Cox proportional hazard model was used for data analysis. The result showed that compared with Levamisole 50 mg/ml, dilution of 25 and 50 mg/ml of the aqueous extract had the same anthelminthic effects (P > 0.05), but 75 mg/ml dilution of the aqueous extract and dilution of 25, 50 and 75 mg/ml of alcoholic extract had more anthelminthic effect (P < 0.05). Overall, extracts of Tobacco possess considerable anthelminthic activity and more potent effects were observed with the highest concentrations. Therefore, the in vivo study on Tobocco in animal models is recommended. PMID:27605759

  19. Crystal structure of the PsbP protein of photosystem II from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Nakatsu, Toru; Kato, Hiroaki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2004-04-01

    PsbP is a membrane-extrinsic subunit of the water-oxidizing complex photosystem II (PS II). The evolutionary origin of PsbP has long been a mystery because it specifically exists in higher plants and green algae but not in cyanobacteria. We report here the crystal structure of PsbP from Nicotiana tabacum at a resolution of 1.6 A. Its structure is mainly composed of beta-sheet, and is not similar to any structures in cyanobacterial PS II. However, the electrostatic surface potential of PsbP is similar to that of cyanobacterial PsbV (cyt c(550)), which has a function similar to PsbP. A structural homology search with the DALI algorithm indicated that the folding of PsbP is very similar to that of Mog1p, a regulatory protein for the nuclear transport of Ran GTPase. The structure of PsbP provides insight into its novel function in GTP-regulated metabolism in PS II. PMID:15031714

  20. WRKY Transcription Factors Phosphorylated by MAPK Regulate a Plant Immune NADPH Oxidase in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Nakano, Takaaki; Miyagawa, Noriko; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Katou, Yuri; Yaeno, Takashi; Shirasu, Ken; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    Pathogen attack sequentially confers pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) after sensing of pathogen patterns and effectors by plant immune receptors, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in PTI and ETI as signaling molecules. Nicotiana benthamiana RBOHB, an NADPH oxidase, is responsible for both the transient PTI ROS burst and the robust ETI ROS burst. Here, we show that RBOHB transactivation mediated by MAPK contributes to R3a/AVR3a-triggered ETI (AVR3a-ETI) ROS burst. RBOHB is markedly induced during the ETI and INF1-triggered PTI (INF1-PTI), but not flg22-tiggered PTI (flg22-PTI). We found that the RBOHB promoter contains a functional W-box in the R3a/AVR3a and INF1 signal-responsive cis-element. Ectopic expression of four phospho-mimicking mutants of WRKY transcription factors, which are MAPK substrates, induced RBOHB, and yeast one-hybrid analysis indicated that these mutants bind to the cis-element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated direct binding of the WRKY to the cis-element in plants. Silencing of multiple WRKY genes compromised the upregulation of RBOHB, resulting in impairment of AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts, but not the flg22-PTI ROS burst. These results suggest that the MAPK-WRKY pathway is required for AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts by activation of RBOHB. PMID:26373453

  1. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Cano, Liliana M; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus "Las" is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  2. The genetical basis of hybrid vigour in a highly heterotic cross of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Pooni, H S; Virk, P S; Coombs, D T; Chowdhury, M K

    1994-12-01

    The genetical control of F1 heterosis, observed in a cross of desirable Nicotiana tabacum varieties, was investigated by analysing the data of the basic generations, triple test cross-families and random samples of doubled haploids (DH) and single-seed descent (SSD) lines. Analyses of the first-degree statistics revealed a complex control underlying the genetic variation, including the presence of epistasis, linkage, maternal effects and their interactions, in addition to the additive and dominance effects of the genes segregating in the cross. These analyses identified gene dispersion, directional dominance, and duplicate epistasis, as the main causes of heterosis. The triple test-cross analysis also confirmed the presence of non-allelic interactions and indicated that the dominance ratio, although inflated by epistasis, is consistently partial for all the traits. The extent of transgression in the recombinant inbred lines finally established unequivocally that, as in numerous other crosses, gene dispersion and unidirectional, but partial, dominance are the true causes of heterosis in this cross too. PMID:24178120

  3. Oligomerization status influences subcellular deposition and glycosylation of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jeannine D; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Castilho, Alexandra; Gruber, Clemens; Werner, Stefan; Mach, Lukas; Klimyuk, Victor; Mor, Tsafrir S; Steinkellner, Herta

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a proven track record for the expression of biopharmaceutically interesting proteins. Importantly, plants and mammals share a highly conserved secretory pathway that allows similar folding, assembly and posttranslational modifications of proteins. Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a highly sialylated, tetrameric serum protein, investigated as a bioscavenger for organophosphorous nerve agents. Expression of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana results in accumulation of both monomers as well as assembled oligomers. In particular, we show here that co-expression of BChE with a novel gene-stacking vector, carrying six mammalian genes necessary for in planta protein sialylation, resulted in the generation of rBChE decorated with sialylated N-glycans. The N-glycosylation profile of monomeric rBChE secreted to the apoplast largely resembles the plasma-derived orthologue. In contrast, rBChE purified from total soluble protein extracts was decorated with a significant portion of ER-typical oligomannosidic structures. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging experiments indicated that impaired N-glycan processing is due to aberrant deposition of rBChE oligomers in the endoplasmic reticulum or endoplasmic-reticulum-derived compartments. In summary, we show the assembly of rBChE multimers, however, also points to the need for in-depth studies to explain the unexpected subcellular targeting of oligomeric BChE in plants. PMID:24618259

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Nicotiana tabacum Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus during Systemic Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Chen, Ling-Na; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Gui-Fen; Meng, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Shui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection of plants may induce a variety of disease symptoms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of systemic symptom development in infected plants. Here we performed the first next-generation sequencing study to identify gene expression changes associated with disease development in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc) induced by infection with the M strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (M-CMV). Analysis of the tobacco transcriptome by RNA-Seq identified 95,916 unigenes, 34,408 of which were new transcripts by database searches. Deep sequencing was subsequently used to compare the digital gene expression (DGE) profiles of the healthy plants with the infected plants at six sequential disease development stages, including vein clearing, mosaic, severe chlorosis, partial and complete recovery, and secondary mosaic. Thousands of differentially expressed genes were identified, and KEGG pathway analysis of these genes suggested that many biological processes, such as photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and plant-pathogen interaction, were involved in systemic symptom development. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in virus-infected plants. This information will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to viral infection. PMID:22952684

  5. Purification of monoclonal antibody against Ebola GP1 protein expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Andrew; Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are one of the fastest growing drug molecules targeting the treatment of diseases ranging from arthritis, immune disorders, and infectious diseases to cancer. Due to its unique application principle, antibodies are commonly produced in large quantities. Plants, such as Nicotiana benthamiana, offer a unique production platform for bio-therapeutics due to their ability to produce large amounts of biomolecules in a relatively quick manner. However, purification of a target protein from plant is an arduous task due to the presence of toxic compounds in ground plant tissue and the large quantities of plant tissues to be processed. Here, a process was developed prior to the chromatographic purification of a mAb against Ebola GP1 protein expressed in N. benthamiana. The process includes a diafiltration step and a charged polyelectrolyte precipitation. The diafiltration step significantly improved the precipitation efficiency, reducing the usage of polyelectrolyte by more than 2000 fold while improving the native plant protein removed from 60% to 80%. The mAb can then be purified to near homogeneity judging from SDS-PAGE by either Protein A affinity chromatography or a tandem of hydrophobic interaction chromatography and a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography. The purified mAbs were shown to retain their binding specificity to irradiated Ebola virus. PMID:25746758

  6. Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-Interacting Ferredoxin 1 Affects Biotic and Abiotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, In-Ju; Ham, Byung-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Tsip1, a Zn finger protein that was isolated as a direct interactor with tobacco stress-induced 1 (Tsi1), plays an important role in both biotic and abiotic stress signaling. To further understand Tsip1 function, we searched for more Tsip1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening using a tobacco cDNA library. Screening identified a new Tsip1-interacting protein, Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-interacting ferredoxin 1 (NtTfd1), and binding specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. The four repeats of a cysteine-rich motif (CXXCXGXG) of Tsip1 proved important for binding to NtTfd1. Virus-induced gene silencing of NtTfd1, Tsip1, and NtTfd1/Tsip1 rendered plants more susceptible to salinity stress compared with TRV2 control plants. NtTfd1- and Tsip1-silenced tobacco plants were more susceptible to infection by Cucumber mosaic virus compared with control plants. These results suggest that NtTfd1 might be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stresses in chloroplasts by interaction with Tsip1. PMID:22699755

  7. Drought Stress Acclimation Imparts Tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Kaundal, Amita; Udayakumar, Makarla; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Acclimation of plants with an abiotic stress can impart tolerance to some biotic stresses. Such a priming response has not been widely studied. In particular, little is known about enhanced defense capacity of drought stress acclimated plants to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Here we show that prior drought acclimation in Nicotiana benthamiana plants imparts tolerance to necrotrophic fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and also to hemi-biotrophic bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. S. sclerotiorum inoculation on N. benthamiana plants acclimated with drought stress lead to less disease-induced cell death compared to non-acclimated plants. Furthermore, inoculation of P. syringae pv. tabaci on N. benthamiana plants acclimated to moderate drought stress showed reduced disease symptoms. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in drought acclimated plants were highly correlated with disease resistance. Further, in planta growth of GFPuv expressing P. syringae pv. tabaci on plants pre-treated with methyl viologen showed complete inhibition of bacterial growth. Taken together, these experimental results suggested a role for ROS generated during drought acclimation in imparting tolerance against S. sclerotiorum and P. syringae pv. tabaci. We speculate that the generation of ROS during drought acclimation primed a defense response in plants that subsequently caused the tolerance against the pathogens tested. PMID:23644883

  8. The extremophile Nicotiana benthamiana has traded viral defence for early vigour.

    PubMed

    Bally, Julia; Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jia, Fangzhi; Jung, Hyungtaek; Ho, Simon Y W; Wong, Mei; Paul, Chloe M; Naim, Fatima; Wood, Craig C; Crowhurst, Ross N; Hellens, Roger P; Dale, James L; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    A single lineage of Nicotiana benthamiana is widely used as a model plant(1) and has been instrumental in making revolutionary discoveries about RNA interference (RNAi), viral defence and vaccine production. It is peerless in its susceptibility to viruses and its amenability in transiently expressing transgenes(2,3). These unparalleled characteristics have been associated both positively and negatively with a disruptive insertion in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 gene, Rdr1(4-6). For a plant so routinely used in research, the origin, diversity and evolution of the species, and the basis of its unusual abilities, have been relatively unexplored. Here, by comparison with wild accessions from across the spectrum of the species' natural distribution, we show that the laboratory strain of N. benthamiana is an extremophile originating from a population that has retained a mutation in Rdr1 for ∼0.8 Myr and thereby traded its defence capacity for early vigour and survival in the extreme habitat of central Australia. Reconstituting Rdr1 activity in this isolate provided protection. Silencing the functional allele in a wild strain rendered it hypersusceptible and was associated with a doubling of seed size and enhanced early growth rate. These findings open the way to a deeper understanding of the delicate balance between protection and vigour. PMID:27251536

  9. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species. PMID:26554734

  10. In vivo effects of NbSiR silencing on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Won; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jeon, Young; Cheong, Gang-Won; Kim, Moonil; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2010-04-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) performs dual functions, acting as a sulfur assimilation enzyme and as a chloroplast (cp-) nucleoid binding protein. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of SiR deficiency on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSiR resulted in leaf yellowing and growth retardation phenotypes, which were not rescued by cysteine supplementation. NbSiR:GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplasts and colocalized with cp-nucleoids. Recombinant full-length NbSiR protein and the C-terminal half of NbSiR possessed cp-DNA compaction activities in vitro, and expression of full-length NbSiR in E. coli caused condensation of genomic DNA. NbSiR silencing differentially affected expression of plastid-encoded genes, inhibiting expression of several genes more severely than others. In the later stages, depletion of NbSiR resulted in chloroplast ablation. In NbSiR-silenced plants, enlarged cp-nucleoids containing an increased amount of cp-DNA were observed in the middle of the abnormal chloroplasts, and the cp-DNAs were predominantly of subgenomic sizes based on pulse field gel electrophoresis. The abnormal chloroplasts developed prolamellar body-like cubic lipid structures in the light without accumulating NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase proteins. Our results suggest that NbSiR plays a role in cp-nucleoid metabolism, plastid gene expression, and thylakoid membrane development. PMID:20047069

  11. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a putative sulfite oxidase (SO) ortholog from Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Su, Xinhong; Wu, Jianyu; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Hua

    2012-03-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate and thus has important roles in diverse metabolic processes. However, systematic molecular and functional investigations on the putative SO from tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) have hitherto not been reported. In this work, a full-length cDNA encoding putative sulfite oxidase from N. benthamiana (NbSO) was isolated. The deduced NbSO protein shares high homology and typical structural features with other species SOs. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that NbSO cDNA clone encodes a tobacco SO isoform. Southern blot analysis suggests that NbSO is a single-copy gene in the N. benthamiana genome. The NbSO transcript levels were higher in aerial tissues and were up-regulated in N. benthamiana during sulfite stress. Reducing the SO expression levels through virus-induced gene silencing caused a substantial accumulation in sulfite content and less sulfate accumulation in N. benthamiana leaves when exposed to sulfite stress, and thus resulted in decreased tolerance to sulfite stress. Taken together, this study improves our understanding on the molecular and functional properties of plant SO and provides genetic evidence on the involvement of SO in sulfite detoxification in a sulfite-oxidizing manner in N. benthamiana plants. PMID:21667106

  13. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  14. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  15. Metabolic engineering of medium-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana plant leaf lipids

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kyle B.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Vanhercke, Thomas; Wood, Craig C.; Blanchard, Christopher L.; Singh, Surinder P.; Petrie, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Various research groups are investigating the production of oil in non-seed biomass such as leaves. Recently, high levels of oil accumulation have been achieved in plant biomass using a combination of biotechnological approaches which also resulted in significant changes to the fatty acid composition of the leaf oil. In this study, we were interested to determine whether medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) could be accumulated in leaf oil. MCFA are an ideal feedstock for biodiesel and a range of oleochemical products including lubricants, coatings, and detergents. In this study, we explore the synthesis, accumulation, and glycerolipid head-group distribution of MCFA in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana after transient transgenic expression of C12:0-, C14:0-, and C16:0-ACP thioesterase genes. We demonstrate that the production of these MCFA in leaf is increased by the co-expression of the WRINKLED1 (WRI1) transcription factor, with the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) from Cocos nucifera being required for the assembly of tri-MCFA TAG species. We also demonstrate that the newly-produced MCFA are incorporated into the triacylglycerol of leaves in which WRI1 + diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) genes are co-expressed for increased oil accumulation. PMID:25852716

  16. The Subcellular Localization and Functional Analysis of Fibrillarin2, a Nucleolar Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Luping; Yao, Jinai; Gao, Fangluan; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Lian, Lingli; Xie, Liyan; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar proteins play important roles in plant cytology, growth, and development. Fibrillarin2 is a nucleolar protein of Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). Its cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR and inserted into expression vector pEarley101 labeled with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). The fusion protein was localized in the nucleolus and Cajal body of leaf epidermal cells of N. benthamiana. The N. benthamiana fibrillarin2 (NbFib2) protein has three functional domains (i.e., glycine and arginine rich domain, RNA-binding domain, and α-helical domain) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in C-terminal. The protein 3D structure analysis predicted that NbFib2 is an α/β protein. In addition, the virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach was used to determine the function of NbFib2. Our results showed that symptoms including growth retardation, organ deformation, chlorosis, and necrosis appeared in NbFib2-silenced N. benthamiana. PMID:26885505

  17. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  18. Shading Influence on the Sterol Balance of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Claus

    1978-01-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were grown in the field and the apex was removed at the 42-day stage. Shading screens were set up which produced 0, 26, 67, and 90% shade. Plants were grown an additional 25 days before leaves from top, middle, and bottom stalk positions were harvested. Each leaf group was analyzed for free sterol, steryl ester, steryl glycoside, and acylsteryl glycoside. The free sterol content was lowest in top leaves and highest in bottom leaves; however, the top leaves had more steryl ester than the bottom leaves. Leaf position had no effect on steryl glycosides and acylsteryl glycosides. Shading did not influence the level of any sterol class; but in general, shading increased stigmasterol and decreased sitosterol. This trend was observed for all sterol classes, and the free sterols showed the largest and most consistent change. The younger top leaves showed a greater response than the older bottom leaves, but bottom leaves always had more stigmasterol than sitosterol even without shade. PMID:16660242

  19. The effect of intermittent dosing of Nicotiana glauca on teratogenesis in goats.

    PubMed

    Welch, K D; Panter, K E; Lee, S T; Gardner, D R

    2015-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of fetal movement in livestock species, induced by several poisonous plants, can result in numerous skeletal-contracture malformations. Lupines are responsible for a condition in cattle referred to as "crooked calf syndrome" that occurs when pregnant cattle graze teratogenic lupines. Similar malformations are also seen in animals poisoned by Conium maculatum (coniine) and Nicotiana glauca (anabasine). A proposed management strategy to limit these types of birth defects includes utilizing an intermittent grazing schedule to allow short durations of grazing lupine-infested areas interrupted by movement to a lupine-free pasture. The objective of this study was to use a goat model to determine if an intermittent schedule of five continuous days on treatment followed by two days off treatment would be sufficient to decrease, or prevent, the incidence of anabasine-induced malformations. The data from this study suggest that, for N. glauca in goats, the intermittent grazing program of five days exposure with two days of non-exposure is insufficient to prevent significant skeletal malformations from occurring. However, this study did demonstrate an inverse relationship between the amount of serum anabasine in the dam and the extent of fetal movement. PMID:25451537

  20. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in vitro. PMID:23560714

  1. GhWRKY68 Reduces Resistance to Salt and Drought in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS. PMID:25793865

  2. Larval Helicoverpa zea Transcriptional, Growth and Behavioral Responses to Nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Linus; Vogel, Heiko; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Tuter, Jason; Musser, Richard O.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphagous feeding habits of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), underscore its status as a major agricultural pest with a wide geographic distribution and host plant repertoire. To study the transcriptomic response to toxins in diet, we conducted a microarray analysis of H. zea caterpillars feeding on artificial diet, diet laced with nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum (L.) plants. We supplemented our analysis with growth and aversion bioassays. The transcriptome reflects an abundant expression of proteases, chitin, cytochrome P450 and immune-related genes, many of which are shared between the two experimental treatments. However, the tobacco treatment tended to elicit stronger transcriptional responses than nicotine-laced diet. The salivary factor glucose oxidase, known to suppress nicotine induction in the plant, was upregulated by H. zea in response to tobacco but not to nicotine-laced diet. Reduced caterpillar growth rates accompanied the broad regulation of genes associated with growth, such as juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. The differential expression of chemosensory proteins, such as odorant binding-protein-2 precursor, as well as the neurotransmitter nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor subunit 9, highlights candidate genes regulating aversive behavior towards nicotine. We suggest that an observed coincidental rise in cannibalistic behavior and regulation of proteases and protease inhibitors in H. zea larvae signify a compensatory response to induced plant defenses. PMID:26462833

  3. Flower-bud formation in explants of photoperiodic and day-neutral Nicotiana biotypes and its bearing on the regulation of flower formation.

    PubMed

    Rajeevan, M S; Lang, A

    1993-05-15

    The capacity to form flower buds in thin-layer explants was studied in flowering plants of several species, cultivars, and lines of Nicotiana differing in their response to photoperiod. This capacity was found in all biotypes examined and could extend into sepals and corolla. It varied greatly, depending on genotype, source tissue and its developmental stage, and composition of the culture medium, particularly the levels of glucose, auxin, and cytokinin. It was greatest in the two day-neutral plants examined, Samsun tobacco and Nicotiana rustica, where it extended from the inflorescence region down the vegetative stem, in a basipetally decreasing gradient; it was least in the two qualitative photoperiodic plants studied, the long-day plant Nicotiana silvestris and the short-day plant Maryland Mammoth tobacco, the quantitative long-day plant Nicotiana alata and the quantitative short-day plant Nicotiana otophora line 38-G-81, where it was limited to the pedicels (and, in some cases, the sepals). Regardless of the photoperiodic response of the source plants, the response was the same in explants cultured under long and short days. The finding that capacity to form flower buds in explants is present in all Nicotiana biotypes studied supports the idea that it is regulated by the same mechanism(s), regardless of the plant's photoperiodic character. However, the source plants were all in the flowering stage, and no flower-bud formation can be obtained in explants from strictly vegetative Nicotiana plants. Hence, flower formation in the explants is not identical with de novo flower formation in a hitherto vegetative plant: it is rather the expression of a floral state already established in the plant, although it can vary widely in extent and spatial distribution. Culture conditions that permit flower-bud formation in an explant are conditions that maintain the floral state and encourage its expression; conditions under which no flower buds are formed reduce this state

  4. Isolation of genes predominantly expressed in guard cells and epidermal cells of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Smart, L B; Cameron, K D; Bennett, A B

    2000-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized and metabolically active cells which arise during the differentiation of the epidermis. Using Nicotiana glauca epidermal peels as a source of purified guard cells, we have constructed a cDNA library from guard cell RNA. In order to isolate genes that are predominantly expressed in guard cells, we performed a differential screen of this library, comparing the hybridization of a radiolabeled cDNA probe synthesized from guard cell RNA to that from a mesophyll cell cDNA probe. Sixteen clones were isolated based on their greater level of hybridization with the guard cell probe. Of these, eight had high homology to lipid transfer protein (LTP), two were similar to glycine-rich protein (GRP), and one displayed high homology to proline-rich proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPRP2, AtPRP4) and from potato guard cells (GPP). Northern analysis confirmed that one or more NgLTP genes, NgGRP1, and NgGPP1 are all differentially expressed, with highest levels in guard cells, and low or undetectable levels in mesophyll cells and in roots. In addition, all are induced to some degree in drought-stressed guard cells. NgLTP and NgGRP1 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to the guard cells and pavement cells in the epidermis. NgGRP1 expression was also detected in cells of the vasculature. Genomic Southern analysis indicated that LTP is encoded by a family of highly similar genes in N. glauca. This work has identified members of a subset of epidermis- and guard cell-predominant genes, whose protein products are likely to contribute to the unique properties acquired by guard cells and pavement cells during differentiation. PMID:10890533

  5. High-level transient expression of ER-targeted human interleukin 6 in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Nausch, Henrik; Mikschofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco plants can be used to express recombinant proteins that cannot be produced in a soluble and active form using traditional platforms such as Escherichia coli. We therefore expressed the human glycoprotein interleukin 6 (IL6) in two commercial tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Virginia and cv. Geudertheimer) as well as the model host N. benthamiana to compare different transformation strategies (stable vs. transient expression) and subcellular targeting (apoplast, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vacuole). In T(0) transgenic plants, the highest expression levels were achieved by ER targeting but the overall yields of IL6 were still low in the leaves (0.005% TSP in the ER, 0.0008% in the vacuole and 0.0005% in the apoplast). The apoplast variant accumulated to similar levels in leaves and seeds, whereas the ER-targeted variant was 1.2-fold more abundant in seeds and the vacuolar variant was 6-fold more abundant in seeds. The yields improved in subsequent generations, with the best-performing T(2) plants producing the ER-targeted IL6 at 0.14% TSP in both leaves and seeds. Transient expression of ER-targeted IL6 in leaves using the MagnICON system resulted in yields of up to 7% TSP in N. benthamiana, but only 1% in N. tabacum cv. Virginia and 0.5% in cv. Geudertheimer. Although the commercial tobacco cultivars produced up to threefold more biomass than N. benthamiana, this was not enough to compensate for the lower overall yields. The recombinant IL6 produced by transient and stable expression in plants was biologically active and presented as two alternative bands matching the corresponding native protein. PMID:23152824

  6. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells. PMID:26870061

  7. Increased Salt and Drought Tolerance by D-Ononitol Production in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Sheveleva, E.; Chmara, W.; Bohnert, H. J.; Jensen, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding myo-inositol O-methyltransferase (IMT1) has been transferred into Nicotiana tabacum cultivar SR1. During drought and salt stress, transformants (I5A) accumulated the methylated inositol D-ononitol in amounts exceeding 35 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight In I5A, photosynthetic CO2 fixation was inhibited less during salt stress and drought, and the plants recovered faster than wild type. One day after rewatering drought-stressed plants, I5A photosynthesis had recovered 75% versus 57% recovery with cultivar SR1 plants. After 2.5 weeks of 250 mM NaCl in hydroponic solution, I5A fixed 4.9 [plus or minus] 1.4 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1, whereas SR1 fixed 2.5 [plus or minus] 0.6 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1. myo-Inositol, the substrate for IMT1, increases in tobacco under stress. Preconditioning of I5A plants in 50 mM NaCl increased D-ononitol amounts and resulted in increased protection when the plants were stressed subsequently with 150 mM NaCl. Pro, Suc, Fru, and Glc showed substantial diurnal fluctuations in amounts, but D-ononitol did not. Plant transformation resulting in stress-inducible, stable solute accumulation appears to provide better protection under drought and salt-stress conditions than strategies using osmotic adjustment by metabolites that are constitutively present. PMID:12223867

  8. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products. PMID:26011187

  9. Cytokinins and auxins control the expression of a gene in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells by feedback regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Dominov, J A; Stenzler, L; Lee, S; Schwarz, J J; Leisner, S; Howell, S H

    1992-01-01

    Both cytokinin (N6-benzyladenine [BA]) and auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D]) stimulate the accumulation of an mRNA, represented by the cDNA pLS216, in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia suspension culture cells. The kinetics of RNA accumulation were different for the two hormones; however, the response to both was transient, and the magnitude of the response was dose dependent. Runoff transcription experiments demonstrated that the transient appearance of the RNA could be accounted for by feedback regulation of transcription and not by the induction of an RNA degradation system. The feedback mechanism appeared to desensitize the cells to further exposure of the hormone. In particular, cells became refractory to the subsequent addition of 2,4-D after the initial RNA accumulation response subsided. A very different response was observed when the second hormone was added to cells that had been desensitized to the first hormone. Under such conditions, BA produced a heightened response in cells desensitized to 2,4-D and vice versa. These findings support a model in which cytokinin further enhances the auxin response or prevents its feedback inhibition. The hormone-induced RNA accumulation was blocked by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporin. On the other hand, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid stimulated expression, and, in particular, okadaic acid was able to stimulate RNA accumulation in cells desensitized to auxin. This suggests that hormone activation involves phosphorylation of critical proteins on the hormone signaling pathway, whereas feedback inhibition may involve dephosphorylation of these proteins. The sequence of pLS216 is similar to genes in other plants that are stimulated by multiple agonists such as auxins, elicitors, and heavy metals, and to the gene encoding the stringent starvation protein in Escherichia coli. It is proposed that this gene family in various plants be called multiple stimulus response (msr) genes. PMID:1498603

  10. Manipulation of monoubiquitin improves chilling tolerance in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanan; Zhang, Meng; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Guokun; Gong, Jiangfeng; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a multifunctional protein that mainly functions to tag proteins for selective degradation by the 26S proteasome. We cloned an Ub gene TaUb2 from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) previously. To study the function of TaUB2 in chilling stress, sense and antisense Ub transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.), as well as wild type (WT) and vector control β-glucuronidase (T-GUS) plants, were used. Under stress, leaf wilting in sense plants was significantly less than in controls, but more severe in antisense plants. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in sense plants were greater than controls, but lower in antisense plants during chilling stress and recovery. Less wilting in sense plants resulted from improved water status, which may be related to the accumulation of proline and solute sugar. Furthermore, as indicated by electrolyte leakage, membrane damage under stress was less in sense plants and more severe in antisense plants than controls. Consistent with electrolyte leakage, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was less in sense plants, but more in antisense plants compared to controls. Meanwhile, the less accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the greater antioxidant enzyme activity in sense plants implied the improved antioxidant competence by the overexpression of monoubiquitin gene Ta-Ub2 from wheat. We suggest that overexpressing Ub is a useful strategy to promote chilling tolerance. The improvement of ROS scavenging may be an important mechanism underlying the role of Ub in promoting plants tolerant to chilling stress. PMID:24445300

  11. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil –SO42−– is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  12. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment. PMID:25879373

  13. Characterization and Distribution Analysis of a Densovirus Infecting Myzus persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Tang, Shihao; Song, Xueru; Xue, Lin; Wang, Xinwei; Wang, Xiufang; Xu, Pengjun; Ren, Guangwei

    2016-04-01

    Densoviruses (DVs) are a group of viruses that contain a linear single-stranded DNA genome between 4–6 kb in length. Herein, we report a DV with a 5,480-nt genome, isolated from tobacco aphid (Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman), named MpnDV. Unlike the genome of M. persicae densovirus (MpDV), which possesses five open reading frames (ORFs), the genome of MpnDV contains four putative ORFs—the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) and NS2 from MpnDV are 98- and 52-amino acids longer than those of MpDV, respectively, at the N-terminus, and the capsid proteins (VP) are 102 amino acids longer at the C-terminus than those of MpDV. Mapping of the MpnDV transcripts by RACE method indicated that the ORF of NS2 started at nt 340 and the right two putative ORFs were combined together by deleting two introns, one of 95 bp located at nt 2,932–3,026 and the other of 145 bp located at nt 4,715–4,859, suggesting transcript mapping was necessary for analyzing of genome organization. Alignment analysis indicated that MpnDV shows 97% sequence identity with MpDV, and that the shortened ORFs resulted from nucleotide indels, suggesting MpnDV and MpDV were two isolates of the same virus. Thus, MpnDV and MpDV clustered together in a tree-based analysis. The prevalence of MpnDV infection in wild populations of tobacco aphids differed among 29 locations; 34% of the 622 individuals sampled were positive. The genome organization, transcript strategy, and widespread distribution in wild populations suggest that MpnDV might possess a biological function different from that of MpDV. PMID:26791818

  14. Geographic variation of floral traits in Nicotiana glauca : Relationships with biotic and abiotic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattero, Julieta; Sérsic, Alicia N.; Cocucci, Andrea A.

    2011-09-01

    Geographic pattern of phenotypic variation can appear in a clinal or a mosaic fashion and can evidence adaptive or non-adaptive variation. To shed light on the mechanisms underlying this variation, we studied the relationships between geographic variation of floral traits and both biotic and abiotic factors of the hummingbird-pollinated plant, Nicotiana glauca, across its natural range. We obtained floral measures of 38 populations from an area about 1600 km long and 1050 km wide and an altitude range from 7 to over 3400 m. We used a MANOVA to detect between-population differentiations in flower traits and a DFA to determine the traits that best discriminate between populations. To test for associations between floral traits and climatic variables we used correlation analysis. We explored any possible distance-based pattern of variation (either geographic or altitudinal) in floral traits or bill length of pollinators using Mantel tests. Finally, we used a multiple regression to analyze simultaneously the effects and relative importance of abiotic predictor variables and bill length on corolla length. We found a high variation in flower traits among populations. Morphometric traits were the ones that best discriminated across populations. There was a clinal pattern of floral phenotypic variation explained by climatic factors. Differences in floral phenotypic distances were structured by altitudinal distances but not by geographic distances. Bill length of the hummingbird pollinators was structured both by altitudinal and geographic distances. Differences in bill length of hummingbird pollinators explained differences in corolla length across populations. Our findings support the assumption of flower evolution at a broad geographic scale. Floral traits seem to be structured not only by altitude but also by climatic factors.

  15. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-01-01

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs. PMID:25192284

  16. Engineering a Platform for Photosynthetic Pigment, Hormone and Cembrane-Related Diterpenoid Production in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongying; Niu, Dexin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Songtao; Yang, Yongxia; Jia, Hongfang; Cui, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Plants synthesize a large number of isoprenoids that are of nutritional, medicinal and industrial importance. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) catalyzes the first committed step for plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis. Here, we identified two DXR isogenes, designated NtDXR1 and NtDXR2, from tetraploid common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Southern blotting and genotyping analysis revealed that two NtDXR genes existed in the tetraploid tobacco genome; NtDXR1 and NtDXR2 were separately derived from N. tomentosiformis and N. sylvestris. Both NtDXRs were localized in chloroplasts. Expression patterns indicated that NtDXR1 and NtDXR2 had similar expression profiles. NtDXR genes were highly expressed in leaves with or without trichomes; expression was relatively reduced in flowers and stems, weak in leaf trichomes and marginal in roots and seeds. Overexpressing NtDXR1 under control of the 35S promoter resulted in longer primary roots and enhancement of various photosynthetic pigments and hormones in leaves. In contrast, there were no significant changes in cembrane-related diterpenoids synthesized in glandular trichomes. To elucidate further the function of DXR in the biosynthesis of diterpenoids, overexpression vectors for NtDXR1 under the control of a trichome-specific CYP promoter were transferred to tobacco plants. CYP:NtDXR1 tobacco exhibited larger glandular cells and increased cembrane-related diterpenoids in leaf glandular trichomes. Moreover, transcripts of eight MEP (2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate) pathway genes were significantly up-regulated in NtDXR1-overexpressing tobacco plants, indicating that overexpression of NtDXR could boost the expression of downstream genes in the MEP pathway. Our results suggested that overexpression of NtDXR1 could increase the levels of photosynthetic pigments, leaf surface exudates and hormones though the MEP pathway. PMID:26363359

  17. [Induction of polyploid in hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Tsang, Po Keung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-04-01

    By genetic transformation with Agrobacterum rhizogenes and artificial chromosome doubling techniques, we studied the induction of hairy roots and their polyploidization, and subsequent plant regeneration and nicotine determination to enhance the content of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum. The results show that hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of N. tabacum 8 days after inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was 100% 15 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously on solid or liquid phytohormones-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and paper electrophoresis of opines from N. tabacum hairy roots. The highest rate of polyploidy induction, more than 64.71%, was obtained after treatment of hairy roots with 0.1% colchicine for 36 h. The optimum medium for plant regeneration from polyploid hairy roots was MS+2.0 mg/L 6-BA +0.2 mg/L NAA. Compared with the control diploid plants, the hairy roots-regenerated plants had weak apical dominance, more axillary buds and more narrow leaves; whereas the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants had thicker stems, shorter internodes and the colour, width and thickness of leaves were significantly higher than that of the control. Observation of the number of chromosomes in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 96 (4n = 96) chromosomes. Pot-grown experiments showed compared to the control, the flowering was delayed by 21 days in diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants and polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants. GC-MS detection shows that the content of nicotine in polyploid plants was about 6.90 and 4.57 times the control and the diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants, respectively. PMID:25195248

  18. Structural and Functional Similarities between Osmotin from Nicotiana Tabacum Seeds and Human Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Osmotin, a plant protein, specifically binds a seven transmembrane domain receptor-like protein to exert its biological activity via a RAS2/cAMP signaling pathway. The receptor protein is encoded in the gene ORE20/PHO36 and the mammalian homolog of PHO36 is a receptor for the human hormone adiponectin (ADIPOR1). Moreover it is known that the osmotin domain I can be overlapped to the β-barrel domain of adiponectin. Therefore, these observations and some already existing structural and biological data open a window on a possible use of the osmotin or of its derivative as adiponectin agonist. We have modelled the three-dimensional structure of the adiponectin trimer (ADIPOQ), and two ADIPOR1 and PHO36 receptors. Moreover, we have also modelled the following complexes: ADIPOQ/ADIPOR1, osmotin/PHO36 and osmotin/ADIPOR1. We have then shown the structural determinants of these interactions and their physico-chemical features and analyzed the related interaction residues involved in the formation of the complexes. The stability of the modelled structures and their complexes was always evaluated and controlled by molecular dynamics. On the basis of these results a 9 residues osmotin peptide was selected and its interaction with ADIPOR1 and PHO36 was modelled and analysed in term of energetic stability by molecular dynamics. To confirm in vivo the molecular modelling data, osmotin has been purified from nicotiana tabacum seeds and its nine residues peptide synthesized. We have used cultured human synovial fibroblasts that respond to adiponectin by increasing the expression of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via ADIPOR1. The biological effect on fibroblasts of osmotin and its peptide derivative has been found similar to that of adiponectin confirming the results found in silico. PMID:21311758

  19. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells. PMID:26870061

  20. Ethylene and the Regulation of Senescence Processes in Transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Thomas F.; Gonzalez-Carranza, Zinnia H.; Maunders, Martin J.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Exposure of plants to ethylene can influence a spectrum of developmental processes including organ senescence and abscission. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the gaseous regulator in Nicotiana sylvestris plants exhibiting a silenced or constitutive ethylene response. Methods Transgenic N. sylvestris plants were generated that either ectopically expressed the Arabidopsis mutant ethylene receptor ETR1-1 or the tomato EIN3-like (LeEIL1) gene. Highly expressing homozygous lines were selected and the time-course of development, from germination to organ senescence, was studied. Key Results Fifty percent of the homozygous Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines examined showed a high susceptibility to collapse prior to flowering, with plant death occurring within a few days of leaf wilting. The time-course of leaf senescence in the remaining Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines was visibly arrested compared to wild type (negative segregant) plants and this observation was reaffirmed by chlorophyll and protein analysis. Petal necrosis was also delayed in Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines and corolla abscission did not take place. When senescence of Pro35S:ETR1-1 plants did take place this was accompanied by leaf bleaching, but tissues remained fully turgid and showed no signs of collapse. A single Pro35S:LeEIL1 line was found to exhibit consistently accelerated leaf and flower senescence and precocious flower bud shedding. Conclusions These observations support a role for ethylene in regulating a spectrum of developmental events associated with organ senescence and tissue necrosis. Furthermore, the transgenic lines generated during this study may provide a valuable resource for exploring how senescence processes are regulated in plants. PMID:17901061

  1. The production of human glucocerebrosidase in glyco-engineered Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    PubMed

    Limkul, Juthamard; Iizuka, Sayoko; Sato, Yohei; Misaki, Ryo; Ohashi, Takao; Ohashi, Toya; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2016-08-01

    For the production of therapeutic proteins in plants, the presence of β1,2-xylose and core α1,3-fucose on plants' N-glycan structures has been debated for their antigenic activity. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to down-regulate the endogenous N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GNTI) expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. One glyco-engineered line (NbGNTI-RNAi) showed a strong reduction of plant-specific N-glycans, with the result that as much as 90.9% of the total N-glycans were of high-mannose type. Therefore, this NbGNTI-RNAi would be a promising system for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins in plants. The NbGNTI-RNAi plant was cross-pollinated with transgenic N. benthamiana expressing human glucocerebrosidase (GC). The recombinant GC, which has been used for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher's disease, requires terminal mannose for its therapeutic efficacy. The N-glycan structures that were presented on all of the four occupied N-glycosylation sites of recombinant GC in NbGNTI-RNAi plants (GC(gnt1) ) showed that the majority (ranging from 73.3% up to 85.5%) of the N-glycans had mannose-type structures lacking potential immunogenic β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. Moreover, GC(gnt1) could be taken up into the macrophage cells via mannose receptors, and distributed and taken up into the liver and spleen, the target organs in the treatment of Gaucher's disease. Notably, the NbGNTI-RNAi line, producing GC, was stable and the NbGNTI-RNAi plants were viable and did not show any obvious phenotype. Therefore, it would provide a robust tool for the production of GC with customized N-glycan structures. PMID:26868756

  2. Leaf proteome rebalancing in Nicotiana benthamiana for upstream enrichment of a transiently expressed recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stéphanie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    A key factor influencing the yield of biopharmaceuticals in plants is the ratio of recombinant to host proteins in crude extracts. Postextraction procedures have been devised to enrich recombinant proteins before purification. Here, we assessed the potential of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) as a generic trigger of recombinant protein enrichment in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves before harvesting. Previous studies have reported a significant rebalancing of the leaf proteome via the jasmonate signalling pathway, associated with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) depletion and the up-regulation of stress-related proteins. As expected, leaf proteome alterations were observed 7 days post-MeJA treatment, associated with lowered RuBisCO pools and the induction of stress-inducible proteins such as protease inhibitors, thionins and chitinases. Leaf infiltration with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens bacterial vector 24 h post-MeJA treatment induced a strong accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins after 6 days, along with a near-complete reversal of MeJA-mediated stress protein up-regulation. RuBisCO pools were partly restored upon infiltration, but most of the depletion effect observed in noninfiltrated plants was maintained over six more days, to give crude protein samples with 50% less RuBisCO than untreated tissue. These changes were associated with net levels reaching 425 μg/g leaf tissue for the blood-typing monoclonal antibody C5-1 expressed in MeJA-treated leaves, compared to less than 200 μg/g in untreated leaves. Our data confirm overall the ability of MeJA to trigger RuBisCO depletion and recombinant protein enrichment in N. benthamiana leaves, estimated here for C5-1 at more than 2-fold relative to host proteins. PMID:26286859

  3. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil -SO4(2-)- is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  4. Characterization of membrane-bound small GTP-binding proteins from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Haizel, T; Merkle, T; Turck, F; Nagy, F

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned nine cDNAs encoding small GTP-binding proteins from leaf cDNA libraries of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). These cDNAs encode distinct proteins (22-25 kD) that display different levels of identity with members of the mammalian Rab family: Nt-Rab6 with Rab6 (83%), Nt-Rab7a-c with Rab7 (63-70%), and Nt-Rab11a-e with Rab11 (53-69%). Functionally important regions of these proteins, including the "effector binding" domain, the C-terminal Cys residues for membrane attachment, and the four regions involved in GTP-binding and hydrolysis, are highly conserved. Northern and western blot analyses show that these genes are expressed, although at slightly different levels, in all plant tissues examined. We demonstrate that the plant Rab5, Rab6, and Rab11 proteins, similar to their mammalian and yeast counterparts, are tightly bound to membranes and that they exhibit different solubilization characteristics. Furthermore, we show that the yeast GTPase-activating protein Gyp6, shown to be specifically required to control the GTP hydrolysis of the yeast Ypt6 protein, could interact with tobacco GTP-binding proteins. It increases in vitro the GTP hydrolysis rate of the wild-type Nt-Rab7 protein. In addition, it also increases, at different levels, the GTP hydrolysis rates of a Nt-Rab7m protein with a Rab6 effector domain and of two other chimaeric Nt-Rab6/Nt-Rab7 proteins. However, it does not interact with the wild-type Nt-Rab6 protein, which is most similar to the yeast Ypt6 protein. PMID:7784525

  5. A century of tobamovirus evolution in an Australian population of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, A; Escriu, F; Aranda, M A; Malpica, J M; Gibbs, A J; García-Arenal, F

    1997-01-01

    The evolution over the past century of two tobamoviruses infecting populations of the immigrant plant Nicotiana glauca in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has been studied. This plant species probably entered Australia in the 1870s. Isolates of the viruses were obtained from N. glauca specimens deposited in the NSW Herbarium between 1899 and 1972, and others were obtained from living plants in 1985 and 1993. It was found that the NSW N. glauca population was infected with tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) and tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV) before 1950 but only with TMGMV after that date. Half the pre-1950 infections were mixtures of the two viruses, and one was a recombinant. Remarkably, sequence analyses showed no increase in the genetic diversity among the TMGMV isolates over the period. However, for TMV, the genetic diversity of synonymous (but not of nonsynonymous) differences between isolates varied and was correlated with their time of isolation. TMV accumulated to smaller concentrations than TMGMV in N. glauca plants, and in mixed experimental infections, the accumulation of TMV, but not of TMGMV, was around 1/10 that in single infections. However, no evidence was found of isolate-specific interaction between the viruses. We conclude that although TMV may have colonized N. glauca in NSW earlier or faster than TMGMV, the latter virus caused a decrease of the TMV population below a threshold at which deleterious mutations were eliminated. This phenomenon, called Muller's ratchet, or a "mutational meltdown," probably caused the disappearance of TMV from the niche. PMID:9343184

  6. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  7. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  8. Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a “modified backcross” involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062 cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways. PMID:27236305

  10. Two new benzolactones from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Xu, Xingmeng; Zhang, Fengmei; Xiang, Nengjun; He, Pei; Si, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Ruizhi; Wang, Kunmiao; Liu, Zhihua; Liu, Chunbo; Miao, Mingming

    2016-07-01

    Two new benzolactones, 5-methyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2), together with four known phenolic compounds (3-6), were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-6 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compounds 1-6 exhibited high anti-TMV activities with inhibition rates in the range of 16.9-26.2%, respectively. PMID:26666679