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Sample records for nigral dopaminergic neurons

  1. The Neuroprotective Mechanism of Low-Frequency rTMS on Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons of Parkinson's Disease Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiaoyun; Wang, Yanyong; Gu, Ping; Shao, Rusheng; Zhao, Li; Liu, Xiqi; Wang, Zhanqiang; Wang, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease in elder people, pathophysiologic basis of which is the severe deficiency of dopamine in the striatum. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of low-frequency rTMS on Parkinson's disease in model mice. Methods. The effects of low-frequency rTMS on the motor function, cortex excitability, neurochemistry, and neurohistopathology of MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mice were investigated through behavioral detection, electrophysiologic technique, high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Results. Low-frequency rTMS could improve the motor coordination impairment of Parkinson's disease mice: the resting motor threshold significantly decreased in the Parkinson's disease mice; the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neuron and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase were significantly improved by low-frequency rTMS; moreover, the expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor were also improved by low-frequency rTMS. Conclusions. Low-frequency rTMS had a neuroprotective effect on the nigral dopaminergic neuron which might be due to the improved expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The present study provided a theoretical basis for the application of low-frequency rTMS in the clinical treatment and recovery of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25883828

  2. The Neuroprotective Mechanism of Low-Frequency rTMS on Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons of Parkinson's Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiaoyun; Wang, Yanyong; Gu, Ping; Shao, Rusheng; Zhao, Li; Liu, Xiqi; Wang, Zhanqiang; Wang, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease in elder people, pathophysiologic basis of which is the severe deficiency of dopamine in the striatum. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of low-frequency rTMS on Parkinson's disease in model mice. Methods. The effects of low-frequency rTMS on the motor function, cortex excitability, neurochemistry, and neurohistopathology of MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mice were investigated through behavioral detection, electrophysiologic technique, high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Results. Low-frequency rTMS could improve the motor coordination impairment of Parkinson's disease mice: the resting motor threshold significantly decreased in the Parkinson's disease mice; the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neuron and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase were significantly improved by low-frequency rTMS; moreover, the expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor were also improved by low-frequency rTMS. Conclusions. Low-frequency rTMS had a neuroprotective effect on the nigral dopaminergic neuron which might be due to the improved expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The present study provided a theoretical basis for the application of low-frequency rTMS in the clinical treatment and recovery of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25883828

  3. Oxidative stress regulated genes in nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells: correlation with the known pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Myung S; Chun, Hong S; Son, Jessica J; DeGiorgio, Lorraine A; Kim, Dae J; Peng, Chu; Son, Jin H

    2003-01-31

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a primary pathogenic mechanism of nigral dopaminergic (DA) cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative damage, Lewy body formation and decreased mitochondrial complex I activity are the consistent pathological findings in PD. In nigral DA neurons, however, it is unknown whether any gene expressional changes induced by OS contribute to the typical PD pathology. Here, using microarray analysis, we identified several groups of genes in the nigral DA cell line, SN4741 [J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 10; J. Neurochem. 76 (2001) 1010], that were regulated by OS. Approximately 36 significantly regulated genes that encode functional molecules of nuclear subunits of mitochondrial complex I, exocytosis and membrane trafficking proteins, markers for OS and oxidoreductases, regulatory molecules of apoptosis and unidentified EST clones were further analysed. OS modulated the expression of specific genes, of which physiological dysfunctions have been implicated in PD. For instance, the expression of the nuclear-encoded subunits of mitochondrial complex I, B8 and B17, were significantly down-regulated by OS, possibly contributing to selective defect in mitochondrial complex I activity in PD. Furthermore, syntaxin 8 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are most dramatically up-regulated by OS in DA cells. Syntaxin 8 is a SNARE protein, regulating lipid vesicle docking and fusion as well as early endosome membrane recycling. Lipid membranes are significantly oxidative-damaged in PD. HO-1 is an important cytoplasmic constituent of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of idiopathic PD. Thus, our findings provide novel molecular probes that may be useful in unraveling the molecular mechanism(s) of OS-induced pathogenesis in PD. Further functional characterization of the affected genes including ESTs can help elucidate the underlying molecular pathology as well as develop biomarkers for monitoring degenerating DA neurons in PD. PMID:12573535

  4. Chronic stress enhances microglia activation and exacerbates death of nigral dopaminergic neurons under conditions of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease linked to progressive movement disorders and is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction that is believed to contribute to its pathogenesis. Since sensitivity to inflammation is not the same in all brain structures, the aim of this work was to test whether physiological conditions as stress could enhance susceptibility to inflammation in the substantia nigra, where death of dopaminergic neurons takes place in Parkinson’s disease. Methods To achieve our aim, we induced an inflammatory process in nonstressed and stressed rats (subject to a chronic variate stress) by a single intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide, a potent proinflammogen. The effect of this treatment was evaluated on inflammatory markers as well as on neuronal and glial populations. Results Data showed a synergistic effect between inflammation and stress, thus resulting in higher microglial activation and expression of proinflammatory markers. More important, the higher inflammatory response seen in stressed animals was associated with a higher rate of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, the most characteristic feature seen in Parkinson’s disease. This effect was dependent on glucocorticoids. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that stress sensitises midbrain microglia to further inflammatory stimulus. This suggests that stress may be an important risk factor in the degenerative processes and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24565378

  5. Principal Component Analysis of Multimodal Neuromelanin MRI and Dopamine Transporter PET Data Provides a Specific Metric for the Nigral Dopaminergic Neuronal Density.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Kershaw, Jeff; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakamura, Masaki; Sasai, Taeko; Kobayashi, Mina; Suhara, Tetsuya; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is a major pathophysiological feature of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). As nigral DA neurons contain both neuromelanin (NM) and dopamine transporter (DAT), decreased intensities in both NM-sensitive MRI and DAT PET reflect decreased DA neuronal density. This study demonstrates that a more specific metric for the nigral DA neuronal density can be derived with multimodal MRI and PET. Participants were 11 clinically diagnosed PD patients and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls (HCs). Two quantities, the NM-related index (RNM) and the binding potential of the radiotracer [18F]FE-PE2I to DAT (BPND) in SN, were measured for each subject using MRI and PET, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the multimodal data set to estimate principal components. One of the components, PCP, corresponds to a basis vector oriented in a direction where both BPND and RNM increase. The ability of BPND, RNM and PCP to discriminate between HC and PD groups was compared. Correlation analyses between the motor score of the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and each metric were also performed. PCP, BPND and RNM for PD patients were significantly lower than those for HCs (F = 16.26, P<0.001; F = 6.05, P = 0.008; F = 7.31, P = 0.034, respectively). The differential diagnostic performance between the HC and PD groups as assessed by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was best for PCP (0.94, 95% CI: 0.66-1.00). A significant negative correlation was found between the motor severity score and PCp (R = -0.70, P<0.001) and RNM (R = -0.52, P = 0.015), but not for BPND (R = -0.36, P = 0.110). PCA of multimodal NM-sensitive MRI and DAT PET data provides a metric for nigral DA neuronal density that will help illuminate the pathophysiology of PD in SN. Further studies are required to explore whether PCA is useful for other parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:26954690

  6. Principal Component Analysis of Multimodal Neuromelanin MRI and Dopamine Transporter PET Data Provides a Specific Metric for the Nigral Dopaminergic Neuronal Density

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Kershaw, Jeff; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakamura, Masaki; Sasai, Taeko; Kobayashi, Mina; Suhara, Tetsuya; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is a major pathophysiological feature of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). As nigral DA neurons contain both neuromelanin (NM) and dopamine transporter (DAT), decreased intensities in both NM-sensitive MRI and DAT PET reflect decreased DA neuronal density. This study demonstrates that a more specific metric for the nigral DA neuronal density can be derived with multimodal MRI and PET. Participants were 11 clinically diagnosed PD patients and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls (HCs). Two quantities, the NM-related index (RNM) and the binding potential of the radiotracer [18F]FE-PE2I to DAT (BPND) in SN, were measured for each subject using MRI and PET, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the multimodal data set to estimate principal components. One of the components, PCP, corresponds to a basis vector oriented in a direction where both BPND and RNM increase. The ability of BPND, RNM and PCP to discriminate between HC and PD groups was compared. Correlation analyses between the motor score of the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and each metric were also performed. PCP, BPND and RNM for PD patients were significantly lower than those for HCs (F = 16.26, P<0.001; F = 6.05, P = 0.008; F = 7.31, P = 0.034, respectively). The differential diagnostic performance between the HC and PD groups as assessed by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was best for PCP (0.94, 95% CI: 0.66–1.00). A significant negative correlation was found between the motor severity score and PCp (R = -0.70, P<0.001) and RNM (R = -0.52, P = 0.015), but not for BPND (R = -0.36, P = 0.110). PCA of multimodal NM-sensitive MRI and DAT PET data provides a metric for nigral DA neuronal density that will help illuminate the pathophysiology of PD in SN. Further studies are required to explore whether PCA is useful for other parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:26954690

  7. Identification of dopaminergic neurons of nigral and ventral tegmental area subtypes in grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon based on cell morphology, protein expression, and efferent projections.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan; Barraud, Perrine; Andersson, Elin; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2005-07-01

    Transplants of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue are known to contain a mixture of two major dopamine (DA) neuron types: the A9 neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the A10 neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Previous studies have suggested that these two DA neuron types may differ in their growth characteristics, but, because of technical limitations, it has so far been difficult to identify the two subtypes in fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) grafts and trace their axonal projections. Here, we have made use of a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter. The expression of the GFP reporter allowed for visualization of the grafted DA neurons and their axonal projections within the host brain. We show that the SNpc and VTA neuron subtypes in VM grafts can be identified on the basis of their morphology and location within the graft, and their expression of a G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit (Girk2) and calbindin, respectively, and also that the axonal projections of the two DA neuron types are markedly different. By retrograde axonal tracing, we show that dopaminergic innervation of the striatum is derived almost exclusively from the Girk2-positive SNpc cells, whereas the calbindin-positive VTA neurons project to the frontal cortex and probably also other forebrain areas. The results suggest the presence of axon guidance and target recognition mechanisms in the DA-denervated forebrain that can guide the growing axons to their appropriate targets and indicate that cell preparations used for cell replacement in Parkinson's disease will be therapeutically useful only if they contain cells capable of generating the correct nigral DA neuron phenotype. PMID:16000637

  8. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  9. Effects of 1-cyclohexyl- and 1-cyclohexyl-N-propargyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline on dopaminergic spontaneous discharge in nigral neurons of rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Momoko; Munakata, Hiroko; Abe, Kenji; Saito, Toshiaki; Horiguchi, Yoshie; Nojima, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-03-01

    1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) and some of its derivatives, such as 1-benzyl-TIQ and 1-methyl-TIQ, are endogenously present in human brain and are thought to contribute to induction or prevention of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we estimated the effects of the artificially synthesized TIQ derivatives 1-cyclohexyl-TIQ (1-cHex-TIQ) and 1-cyclohexyl-N-propargyl-TIQ (1-cHex-N-proTIQ) on spontaneous nigral dopaminergic discharge in rats. Low to middle doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced a transient and significant, but not relatively potent, increase in the firing rate, followed by a sustained decrease with higher doses. 1-cHex-TIQ increased the firing frequency at low and high doses. In contrast, 1-cHex-N-proTIQ had no effects on spontaneous firing. Although intraperitoneal pretreatment with 1-cHex-TIQ did not inhibit this MPTP-induced decrease in firing, pretreatment with 1-cHex-N-proTIQ significantly depressed this decreased firing in a dose-dependent and long-lasting manner. Selegiline, a monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor that is used as a therapeutic drug for Parkinson's disease, also significantly inhibited the decrease in dopaminergic spontaneous firing induced by MPTP, but the effect was transient. These results suggest that although the decrease in firing induced by 1-cHex-TIQ is clearly more potent compared to that induced by MPTP, its effect is eliminated by adding an N-propargyl functional group. The antagonizing effect of 1-cHex-N-proTIQ on MPTP-induced firing loss may be exerted by a different mechanism than that of selegiline. PMID:26876935

  10. Discovery of nigral dopaminergic neurogenesis in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brad E.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. As a result, intensive efforts have focused upon mechanisms that facilitate the death of mature dopaminergic neurons. Unfortunately, these efforts have been unsuccessful in providing an effective treatment to address neurodegeneration in this disease. Therefore, alternative theories of pathogenesis are being explored. Adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons is an attractive concept that would provide a possible mechanism of neurodegeneration as well as offer an endogenous means to replenish affected neurons. To determine whether dopaminergic neurons experience neurogenesis in adult mice we developed a novel cell lineage tracing model that permitted detection of neurogenesis without many of the issues associated with popular techniques. Remarkably, we discovered that dopaminergic neurons are replenished in adult mice by Nestin+/Sox2- progenitor cells. What's more, the rate of neurogenesis is similar to the rate of dopaminergic neuron loss reported using a chronic, systemic inflammatory response mouse model. This observation may indicate that neuron loss in Parkinson's disease results from inhibition of neurogenesis. PMID:27482200

  11. Delayed implantation of nigral grafts improves survival of dopamine neurones and rate of functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, S R; Fawcett, J W; Dunnett, S B

    1999-04-26

    In order to test the hypothesis that poor survival of dopaminergic neurones in nigral transplants may be due, at least in part, to acute toxic changes in the host striatum within the first hour after injury, we experimentally evaluated the consequences of imposing a brief delay (20 min, 1 or 3 h) between positioning the injection cannula and extruding the graft tissue. A delay of as little as 1 h resulted in a three-fold increase in survival of dopamine neurones in the grafts and a more rapid abolition of amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the host animals. These results suggest that acute but rapidly resolving changes in the host striatal environment induced by the implantation procedure itself can have a significantly deleterious effect on the survival of embryonic nigral grafts. PMID:10363936

  12. Minocycline enhances MPTP toxicity to dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichuan; Sugama, Shuei; Chirichigno, Jason W; Gregorio, Jason; Lorenzl, Stefan; Shin, Dong H; Browne, Susan E; Shimizu, Yoshinori; Joh, Tong H; Beal, M Flint; Albers, David S

    2003-10-15

    Minocycline has been shown previously to have beneficial effects against ischemia in rats as well as neuroprotective properties against excitotoxic damage in vitro, nigral cell loss via 6-hydroxydopamine, and to prolong the life-span of transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated whether minocycline would protect against toxic effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a toxin that selectively destroys nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons and produces a clinical state similar to Parkinson's disease (PD) in rodents and primates. We found that although minocycline inhibited microglial activation, it significantly exacerbated MPTP-induced damage to DA neurons. We present evidence suggesting that this effect may be due to inhibition of DA and 1-methyl-4-phenylpridium (MPP+) uptake into striatal vesicles. PMID:14515357

  13. The vulnerability of nigral neurons to Parkinson's disease is unrelated to their intrinsic capacity for dopamine synthesis: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, A E; Marsden, C D; Foster, O J

    1999-03-01

    appear to compromise normal function of nigral dopaminergic neurons. PMID:10091611

  14. Parkin Controls Dopamine Utilization in Human Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Houbo; Ren, Yong; Yuen, Eunice Y; Zhong, Ping; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Hu, Zhixing; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is defined by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and can be caused by monogenic mutations of genes such as parkin. The lack of phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests that human nigral DA neurons have unique vulnerabilities. Through the generation and analyses of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from normal subjects and PD patients with parkin mutations, we show here that loss of parkin in human midbrain DA neurons greatly increased the transcription of monoamine oxidases and oxidative stress, significantly reduced DA uptake and increased spontaneous DA release. Lentiviral expression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant, rescued all the phenotypes. The results suggest that parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain DA neurons by enhancing the precision of dopaminergic neurotransmission and suppressing dopamine oxidation. Thus, the study provides novel targets and a physiologically relevant screening platform for disease-modifying therapies of PD. PMID:22314364

  15. Parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain dopaminergic neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Houbo; Ren, Yong; Yuen, Eunice Y; Zhong, Ping; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Hu, Zhixing; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is defined by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and can be caused by monogenic mutations of genes such as parkin. The lack of phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests that human nigral DA neurons have unique vulnerabilities. Here we generate induced pluripotent stem cells from normal subjects and PD patients with parkin mutations. We demonstrate that loss of parkin in human midbrain DA neurons greatly increases the transcription of monoamine oxidases and oxidative stress, significantly reduces DA uptake and increases spontaneous DA release. Lentiviral expression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant, rescues these phenotypes. The results suggest that parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain DA neurons by enhancing the precision of DA neurotransmission and suppressing dopamine oxidation. Thus, the study provides novel targets and a physiologically relevant screening platform for disease-modifying therapies of PD. PMID:22314364

  16. Primary Culture of Mouse Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaven, Florence; Marin, Philippe; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons represent less than 1% of the total number of neurons in the brain. This low amount of neurons regulates important brain functions such as motor control, motivation, and working memory. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). This progressive neuronal loss is unequivocally associated with the motors symptoms of the pathology (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity). The main agent responsible of dopaminergic neuron degeneration is still unknown. However, these neurons appear to be extremely vulnerable in diverse conditions. Primary cultures constitute one of the most relevant models to investigate properties and characteristics of dopaminergic neurons. These cultures can be submitted to various stress agents that mimic PD pathology and to neuroprotective compounds in order to stop or slow down neuronal degeneration. The numerous transgenic mouse models of PD that have been generated during the last decade further increased the interest of researchers for dopaminergic neuron cultures. Here, the video protocol focuses on the delicate dissection of embryonic mouse brains. Precise excision of ventral mesencephalon is crucial to obtain neuronal cultures sufficiently rich in dopaminergic cells to allow subsequent studies. This protocol can be realized with embryonic transgenic mice and is suitable for immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, second messenger quantification, or neuronal death/survival assessment. PMID:25226064

  17. Nigral inhibition of GABAergic neurons in mouse superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Katsuyuki; Isa, Kaoru; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Isa, Tadashi

    2008-10-22

    The current dominant concept for the control of saccadic eye movements by the basal ganglia is that release from tonic GABAergic inhibition by the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) triggers burst firings of intermediate gray layer (SGI) neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) to allow saccade initiation. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that SNr cells inhibit excitatory projection neurons in the SGI. Here we show that nigrotectal fibers are connected to local GABAergic neurons in the SGI with a similar frequency to non-GABAergic neurons. This was accomplished by applying neuroanatomical tracing and slice electrophysiological experiments in GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, in which GABAergic neurons specifically express GFP. We also found that GABA(A), but not GABA(B), receptors subserve nigrotectal transmission. The present results revealed a novel aspect on the role of the basal ganglia in the control of saccades, e.g., the SNr not only regulates burst initiation but also modulates the spatiotemporal properties of premotor neurons via connections to local GABAergic neurons in the SC. PMID:18945914

  18. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood. PMID:27406773

  19. TRPV1 on astrocytes rescues nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease via CNTF.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin H; Park, Eun S; Won, So-Yoon; Lee, Yu A; Kim, Kyoung I; Jeong, Jae Y; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Jin, Minyoung; Chung, Young C; Lee, Byoung D; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Eung-Gook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Sang R; Bok, Eugene; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Ahn, Tae-Beom; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Brahmachari, Saurav; Pletinkova, Olga; Troconso, Juan C; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Jin, Byung K

    2015-12-01

    Currently there is no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapy for Parkinson's disease. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on astrocytes mediates endogenous production of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which prevents the active degeneration of dopamine neurons and leads to behavioural recovery through CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFRα) on nigral dopamine neurons in both the MPP(+)-lesioned or adeno-associated virus α-synuclein rat models of Parkinson's disease. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of human post-mortem substantia nigra from Parkinson's disease suggests that this endogenous neuroprotective system (TRPV1 and CNTF on astrocytes, and CNTFRα on dopamine neurons) might have relevance to human Parkinson's disease. Our results suggest that activation of astrocytic TRPV1 activates endogenous neuroprotective machinery in vivo and that it is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26490328

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside-Rg1 in primary nigral neurons against rotenone toxicity.

    PubMed

    Leung, K W; Yung, K K L; Mak, N K; Chan, Y S; Fan, T P; Wong, R N S

    2007-03-01

    Ginsenoside-Rg1, the pharmacologically active component isolated from ginseng, demonstrated neuroprotective effects on primary cultured rat nigral neurons against rotenone toxicity. Rotenone, a common household pesticide known for its specific and irreversible mitochondria complex I inhibition, has been suggested to be the causal agent of Parkinson's disease (PD) by inducing degeneration of cells in the substantial nigra. The present study demonstrated that co-treatment of rotenone and Rg1 could reduce rotenone-induced cell death by 58% (SEM=+/-5.60; N=3). Rotenone-induced mitochondria membrane potential (MMP, DeltaPsim) depletion was restored and elevated by at least 38% (SEM=+/-2.15; N=3) by Rg1. In addition, Rg1 prevented cytochrome c release from the mitochrondrial membrane and increased the phosphorylation inhibition of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad through activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. The protective effects of Rg1 was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486, indicating that the action of Rg1 is mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In conclusion, Rg1 inhibits the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and increases the survival chance of the primary cultured nigral neurons against rotenone toxicity. Thus, Rg1 and its related compounds may be developed as protective agents against neurodegenerative diseases induced by mitochondrial toxins. PMID:17123556

  1. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions within dopaminergic neurons triggers neuroprotective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Perier, Celine; Bender, Andreas; García-Arumí, Elena; Melià, Ma Jesus; Bové, Jordi; Laub, Christoph; Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Mounsey, Ross B; Teismann, Peter; Prolla, Tomas; Andreu, Antoni L; Vila, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    Acquired alterations in mitochondrial DNA are believed to play a pathogenic role in Parkinson's disease. In particular, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions has been observed in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Also, mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma result in multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions that can be associated with levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and severe substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, whether mitochondrial DNA deletions play a causative role in the demise of dopaminergic neurons remains unknown. Here we assessed the potential pathogenic effects of mitochondrial DNA deletions on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system by using mutant mice possessing a proofreading-deficient form of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLGD257A), which results in a time-dependent accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in several tissues, including the brain. In these animals, we assessed the occurrence of mitochondrial DNA deletions within individual substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and determined the potential deleterious effects of such mitochondrial DNA alterations on mitochondrial function and dopaminergic neuronal integrity, by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry and quantitative morphology. Nigral dopaminergic neurons from POLGD257A mice accumulate mitochondrial DNA deletions to a similar extent (∼40-60%) as patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Despite such high levels of mitochondrial DNA deletions, the majority of substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from these animals did not exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction or degeneration. Only a few individual substantia nigra pars compacta neurons appeared as cytochrome c oxidase-negative, which exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial DNA

  2. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  3. Associated degeneration of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons in the rat nigrostriatal lactacystin model of parkinsonism and their neuroprotection by valproate

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ian F.; Anis, Hiba K.; Dexter, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) manifests clinically as bradykinesia, rigidity, and development of a resting tremor, primarily due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathways in the brain. Intranigral administration of the irreversible ubiquitin proteasome system inhibitor, lactacystin, has been used extensively to model nigrostriatal degeneration in rats, and study the effects of candidate neuroprotective agents on the integrity of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Recently however, adjacent extra-nigral brain regions such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have been noted to also become affected in this model, yet their integrity in studies of candidate neuroprotective agents in the model have largely been overlooked. Here we quantify the extent and distribution of dopaminergic degeneration in the VTA of rats intranigrally lesioned with lactacystin, and quantify the extent of VTA dopaminergic neuroprotection after systemic treatment with an epigenetic therapeutic agent, valproate, shown previously to protect dopaminergic SNpc neurons in this model. We found that unilateral intranigral administration of lactacystin resulted in a 53.81% and 31.72% interhemispheric loss of dopaminergic SNpc and VTA neurons, respectively. Daily systemic treatment of lactacystin lesioned rats with valproate however resulted in dose-dependant neuroprotection of VTA neurons. Our findings demonstrate that not only is the VTA also affected in the intranigral lactacystin rat model of PD, but that this extra-nigral brain region is substrate for neuroprotection by valproate, an agent shown previously to induce neuroprotection and neurorestoration of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in this model. Our results therefore suggest that valproate is a candidate for extra-nigral as well as intra-nigral neuroprotection. PMID:26742637

  4. Associated degeneration of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons in the rat nigrostriatal lactacystin model of parkinsonism and their neuroprotection by valproate.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Anis, Hiba K; Dexter, David T

    2016-02-12

    Parkinson's disease (PD) manifests clinically as bradykinesia, rigidity, and development of a resting tremor, primarily due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathways in the brain. Intranigral administration of the irreversible ubiquitin proteasome system inhibitor, lactacystin, has been used extensively to model nigrostriatal degeneration in rats, and study the effects of candidate neuroprotective agents on the integrity of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Recently however, adjacent extra-nigral brain regions such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have been noted to also become affected in this model, yet their integrity in studies of candidate neuroprotective agents in the model have largely been overlooked. Here we quantify the extent and distribution of dopaminergic degeneration in the VTA of rats intranigrally lesioned with lactacystin, and quantify the extent of VTA dopaminergic neuroprotection after systemic treatment with an epigenetic therapeutic agent, valproate, shown previously to protect dopaminergic SNpc neurons in this model. We found that unilateral intranigral administration of lactacystin resulted in a 53.81% and 31.72% interhemispheric loss of dopaminergic SNpc and VTA neurons, respectively. Daily systemic treatment of lactacystin lesioned rats with valproate however resulted in dose-dependant neuroprotection of VTA neurons. Our findings demonstrate that not only is the VTA also affected in the intranigral lactacystin rat model of PD, but that this extra-nigral brain region is substrate for neuroprotection by valproate, an agent shown previously to induce neuroprotection and neurorestoration of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in this model. Our results therefore suggest that valproate is a candidate for extra-nigral as well as intra-nigral neuroprotection. PMID:26742637

  5. GABAergic Afferents activate both GABAA and GABAB receptors in mouse substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brazhnik, Elena; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Most in vivo electrophysiological studies of substantia nigra have employed rats. With the recent proliferation of the use of mice for in vitro neurophysiological studies due to the availability of various genetically modified strains to identify the roles of various channels and proteins in neuronal function, it is crucial to obtain data on in vivo responses in mice to verify that the in vitro results reflect functioning of systems comparable to those that have been well studied in rat. Inhibitory responses of rat nigral dopaminergic neurons by stimulation of afferents from striatum, globus pallidus or pars reticulata have been shown to be mediated predominantly or exclusively by GABAA receptors. This is puzzling given the substantial expression of GABAB receptors and the ubiquitous appearance of GABAB synaptic responses in rat dopaminergic neurons in vitro. In the present study we studied electrically evoked GABAergic inhibition in nigral dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6J mice. Stimulation of the three major GABAergic inputs elicited stronger and longer lasting inhibitory responses than those seen in rats. The early inhibition was GABAA mediated, whereas the later component, absent in rats, was GABAB mediated and selectively enhanced by GABA uptake inhibition. Striatal-evoked inhibition exhibited a slower onset and a weaker initial component compared to inhibition from globus pallidus or substantia nigra pars reticulata. These results are discussed with respect to differences in the size and neuronal density of the rat and mouse brain, and the different sites of synaptic contact of the synapses from the three GABAergic afferents. PMID:18842898

  6. Neuregulin-1 receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB4 is upregulated in midbrain dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Depboylu, Candan; Höllerhage, Matthias; Schnurrbusch, Stefan; Brundin, Patrik; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Schrattenholz, André; Höglinger, Günter U

    2012-12-01

    Previously we demonstrated that systemically administered neuregulin-1-β1, a nerve growth and differentiation factor, passed the blood-brain barrier and accumulated in brain areas with expression of its receptor ErbB4. In substantia nigra (SN), neuregulin-1-β1 phosphorylated ErbB4 and protected dopaminergic neurons in a toxin-based mouse model of Parkinson disease (PD). We studied ErbB4 in the context of human midbrain dopaminergic degeneration in vivo and in vitro. Post-mortem ventral midbrain tissue sections of neuropsychiatric healthy individuals and PD patients (matched for age, gender and post-mortem delay) were immunostained for ErbB4. Cultured Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) post-mitotic dopaminergic neurons were treated with dopaminergic toxins and analyzed for ErbB4 expression. In control individuals, 85.0±5.0% of dopaminergic neurons, containing cytoplasmic neuromelanin, expressed ErbB4 in the SN. In PD cases, the percentage of ErbB4-positive nigral dopaminergic neurons was increased to 94.9±2.5%. The mean ErbB4 immunoreactivity of melanized neurons was higher in PD than controls. LUHMES neurons upregulated ErbB4 when exposed to toxins 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydroxydopamine. Increased rate of ErbB4-positive dopaminergic neurons in PD may either reflect a better survival of ErbB4-positive neurons or an increased expression of ErbB4 by remaining neurons to seek trophic support. Enhanced ErbB4 expression in human in vitro toxin-based PD models supports the latter interpretation. Thus, dopaminergic neurons in SN might be susceptible to neuregulin-1 treatment in PD. PMID:23123776

  7. How to make a mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Marten P; Burbach, J Peter H

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons located in the ventral mesodiencephalon are essential for the control of voluntary movement and the regulation of emotion, and are severely affected in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Recent advances in molecular biology and mouse genetics have helped to unravel the mechanisms involved in the development of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons, including their specification, migration and differentiation, as well as the processes that govern axonal pathfinding and their specific patterns of connectivity and maintenance. Here, we follow the developmental path of these neurons with the goal of generating a molecular code that could be exploited in cell-replacement strategies to treat diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:17180160

  8. Transcriptional regulation by nicotine in dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Beverley M.; Williams, Brian A.; Srinivasan, Rahul; Cohen, Bruce N.; Xiao, Cheng; Mackey, Elisha D.W.; Wold, Barbara J.; Lester, Henry A.

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. These neurons robustly express several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes. Smoking appears to be neuroprotective for Parkinson’s disease but the mechanism is unknown. To determine whether chronic nicotine-induced changes in gene expression contribute to the neuroprotective effects of smoking, we develop methods to measure the effect of prolonged nicotine exposure on the SNc neuronal transcriptome in an unbiased manner. Twenty neurons were collected using laser-capture microscopy and transcriptional changes were assessed using RNA deep sequencing. These results are the first whole-transcriptome analyses of chronic nicotine treatment in SNc neurons. Overall, 129 genes were significantly regulated: 67 upregulated, 62 downregulated. Nicotine-induced relief of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated as a potential mechanism for the neuroprotective effects of smoking. Chronic nicotine did not significantly affect the expression of ER stress-related genes, nor of dopamine-related or nAChR genes, but it did modulate expression of 129 genes that could be relevant to the neuroprotective effects of smoking, including genes involved in (1) the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, (2) cell cycle regulation, (3) chromatin modification, and (4) DNA binding and RNA regulation. We also report preliminary transcriptome data for single-cell dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons isolated from midbrain cultures. These novel techniques will facilitate advances in understanding the mechanisms taking place at the cellular level and may have applications elsewhere in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology. The results give an emerging picture of the role of nicotine on the SNc and on dopaminergic neurons. PMID:23939186

  9. Human neuromelanin: an endogenous microglial activator for dopaminergic neuron death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zecca, Luigi; Wilson, Belinda; Ren, RW; Wang, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that neuroinflammation caused by over-activation of microglial in the substantia nigra is critical in the pathogenesis of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing data demonstrates that environmental factors such as rotenone, paraquat play pivotal roles in the death of dopaminergic neurons. Here, potential role and mechanism of neuromelanin (NM), a major endogenous component in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, on microglial activation and associated dopaminergic neurotoxicity were investigated. Using multiple well-established primary mesencephalic cultures, we tested whether human NM (HNM) could activate microglia, thereby provoking dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrated that in primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, HNM caused dopaminergic neuronal damage characterized by the decreased dopamine uptake and reduced numbers and shorted dendrites of dopaminergic neurons. HNM-induced degeneration was relatively selective to dopaminergic neurons since the other types of neurons determined by either gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake and total neuronal numbers after staining showed smaller decrease. We demonstrated that HNM produced modest dopaminergic neurotoxicity in neuron-enriched cultures; in contrast, much greater neurotoxicity was observed in the presence of microglia. HNM-induced microglial activation was shown by morphological changes and production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. These results suggest that HNM, once released from damaged dopaminergic neurons, can be an potent endogenous activator involved in the reactivation of microglia, which may mediate disease progression. Thus, inhibition of reactive microglia can be a useful strategy for PD therapy. PMID:23276965

  10. Stimulation of the Rat Subthalamic Nucleus is Neuroprotective Following Significant Nigral Dopamine Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, A. L.; Behbehani, M. M.; Collier, T. J.; Wohlgenant, S. L.; Steece-Collier, K.; Paumier, K.; Daley, B. F.; Gombash, S.; Madhavan, L.; Mandybur, G. T.; Lipton, J.W.; Terpstra, B.T.; Sortwell, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is efficacious in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the impact of STN-DBS on the progression of PD is unknown. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that STN-DBS can attenuate the degeneration of a relatively intact nigrostriatal system from dopamine (DA)-depleting neurotoxins. The present study examined whether STN-DBS can provide neuroprotection in the face of prior significant nigral DA neuron loss similar to PD patients at the time of diagnosis. STN-DBS between two and four weeks after intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) provided significant sparing of DA neurons in the SN of rats. This effect was not due to inadvertent lesioning of the STN and was dependent upon proper electrode placement. Since STN-DBS appears to have significant neuroprotective properties, initiation of STN-DBS earlier in the course of PD may provide added neuroprotective benefits in addition to its ability to provide symptomatic relief. PMID:20307668

  11. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-11-15

    activate mitochondrial cell death signaling in dopaminergic neuron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of PKC{delta} cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce loss of TH{sup +} neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study emphasizes neurotoxic risks of Mn nanoparticles to nigral dopaminergic system.

  12. Postnatal changes in the distribution and morphology of rat substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tepper, J M; Damlama, M; Trent, F

    1994-05-01

    Significant changes in the neurophysiology and neuropharmacology of nigral dopaminergic neurons take place in the first postnatal month. In order to correlate these changes with the postnatal development of dopaminergic neuron morphology and substantia nigra cytoarchitecture, brains from Sprague-Dawley rat pups of age postnatal days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 and adult rats were sectioned and processed for tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemistry. At postnatal day 1, pars compacta and pars reticulata were not clearly delineated; tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons and a dense plexus of fibers were scattered throughout the substantia nigra. By day 7 the density of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons decreased markedly in ventral substantia nigra, and a dopaminergic pars compacta and a non-dopaminergic pars reticulata could be more clearly distinguished. By day 14 the substantia nigra appeared essentially as it does in the adult. Cell counts during development revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons/section in both pars compacta and pars reticulata decreased significantly from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 14, while those in pars lateralis did not change. Tyrosine hydroxylase-positive somatic size increased modestly but significantly from postnatal day 1 to day 14 as did the diameter of the proximal and distal dendrites. However, even at day 1, the morphology of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons appeared essentially the same as in adults. Dendritic arborizations were well developed. The dendrites were non-varicose and modestly branched, with some of the longer ventrally directed dendrites passing through pars reticulata into the crus cerebri.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7915412

  13. Inhibition of prothrombin kringle-2-induced inflammation by minocycline protects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin Han; Leem, Eunju; Jeon, Min-Tae; Kim, Young-Je; Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook; Maeng, Sungho; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2014-05-01

    Prothrombin kringle-2 (pKr-2), a domain of prothrombin, can cause the degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons through microglial activation. However, the chemical products that inhibit pKr-2-induced inflammatory activities in the brain are still not well known. The present study investigated whether minocycline, a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative, could inhibit pKr-2-induced microglial activation and prevent the loss of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vivo. To address this question, rats were administered a unilateral injection of pKr-2 in the substantia nigra in the presence or absence of minocycline. Our results show that pKr-2 induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and inducible nitric oxide synthase from the activated microglia. In parallel, 7 days after pKr-2 injection, tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemical analysis and western blot analysis showed a significant loss of nigral DA neurons. This neurotoxicity was antagonized by minocycline and the observed neuroprotective effects were associated with the ability of minocycline to suppress the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that minocycline may be promising as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of DA neuronal degeneration associated with pKr-2-induced microglial activation. PMID:24488033

  14. Endogenous dynorphin protects against neurotoxin-elicited nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron damage and motor deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The striato-nigral projecting pathway contains the highest concentrations of dynorphin in the brain. The functional role of this opioid peptide in the regulation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is not clear. We reported previously that exogenous dynorphin exerts potent neuroprotective effects against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vitro. The present study was performed to investigate whether endogenous dynorphin has neuroprotective roles in vivo. Methods 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (MA), two commonly used neurotoxins in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease, were administered to wild-type (Dyn+/+) and prodynorphin-deficient mice (Dyn−/−). We examined dopaminergic neurotoxicity by using an automated video tracking system, HPLC, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with MPTP resulted in behavioral impairments in both strains. However, these impairments were more pronounced in Dyn-l- than in Dyn+/+. Dyn−/− showed more severe MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and striatum than Dyn+/+. Similarly, the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum were depleted to a greater extent in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that MPTP treatment caused a higher degree of microglial activation and M1 phenotype differentiation in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Consistent with these observations, prodynorphin deficiency also exacerbated neurotoxic effects induced by MA, although this effect was less pronounced than that of MPTP. Conclusions The in vivo results presented here extend our previous in vitro findings and further indicate that endogenous dynorphin plays a critical role in protecting dopaminergic neurons through its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22695044

  15. Generation of reactive oxygen species in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) treated dopaminergic neurons occurs as an NADPH oxidase-dependent two-wave cascade

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are necessary for appropriate responses to immune challenges. In the brain, excess superoxide production predicts neuronal cell loss, suggesting that Parkinson's disease (PD) with its wholesale death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (nigra) may be a case in point. Although microglial NADPH oxidase-produced superoxide contributes to dopaminergic neuron death in an MPTP mouse model of PD, this is secondary to an initial die off of such neurons, suggesting that the initial MPTP-induced death of neurons may be via activation of NADPH oxidase in neurons themselves, thus providing an early therapeutic target. Methods NADPH oxidase subunits were visualized in adult mouse nigra neurons and in N27 rat dopaminergic cells by immunofluorescence. NADPH oxidase subunits in N27 cell cultures were detected by immunoblots and RT-PCR. Superoxide was measured by flow cytometric detection of H2O2-induced carboxy-H2-DCFDA fluorescence. Cells were treated with MPP+ (MPTP metabolite) following siRNA silencing of the Nox2-stabilizing subunit p22phox, or simultaneously with NADPH oxidase pharmacological inhibitors or with losartan to antagonize angiotensin II type 1 receptor-induced NADPH oxidase activation. Results Nigral dopaminergic neurons in situ expressed three subunits necessary for NADPH oxidase activation, and these as well as several other NADPH oxidase subunits and their encoding mRNAs were detected in unstimulated N27 cells. Overnight MPP+ treatment of N27 cells induced Nox2 protein and superoxide generation, which was counteracted by NADPH oxidase inhibitors, by siRNA silencing of p22phox, or losartan. A two-wave ROS cascade was identified: 1) as a first wave, mitochondrial H2O2 production was first noted at three hours of MPP+ treatment; and 2) as a second wave, H2O2 levels were further increased by 24 hours. This second wave was eliminated by pharmacological inhibitors

  16. Dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal reactivation and spatial memory persistence

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Colin G; Tejero-Cantero, Álvaro; Trouche, Stéphanie; Campo-Urriza, Natalia; Dupret, David

    2014-01-01

    Here we found that optogenetic burst stimulation of hippocampal dopaminergic fibers from midbrain neurons in mice exploring novel environments enhanced the reactivation of pyramidal cell assemblies during subsequent sleep/rest. When applied during spatial learning of new goal locations, dopaminergic photostimulation improved the later recall of neural representations of space and stabilized memory performance. These findings reveal that midbrain dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal network dynamics associated with memory persistence. PMID:25326690

  17. Simvastatin inhibits the activation of p21ras and prevents the loss of dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Matras, Joanna; Brahmachari, Saurav; Gendelman, Howard E.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common devastating human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. We investigated whether simvastatin, an FDA-approved cholesterol-lowering drug, could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication to model PD in mice. First, MPP+ induced the activation of p21ras and NF-κB in mouse microglial cells. Inhibition of MPP+-induced activation of NF-κB by Δp21ras, a dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, supported the involvement of p21ras in MPP+-induced microglial activation of NF-κB. Interestingly, simvastatin attenuated activation of both p21ras and NF-κB in MPP+-stimulated microglial cells. Consistently, we found a very rapid activation of p21ras in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta of MPTP-intoxicated mice. However, after oral administration, simvastatin entered into the nigra, reduced nigral activation of p21ras, attenuated nigral activation of NF-κB, inhibited nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Similarly, pravastatin, another cholesterol-lowering drug, suppressed microglial inflammatory responses and protected dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-intoxicated mice; but at levels less than simvastatin. Furthermore, both the statins administered 2 days after initiation of the disease were still capable of inhibiting the demise of dopaminergic neurons and concomitant loss of neurotransmitters suggesting that statins are capable of slowing down the progression of neuronal loss in the MPTP mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that statins may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:19864567

  18. Myricitrin Ameliorates 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the Substantia Nigra of Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, resulting from the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of DA neuronal loss in PD is still unclear; however, accumulating evidence suggests that treatment with certain flavonoids can induce neuroprotective properties, such as activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models of PD. The bioflavonoid myricitrin is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is unclear whether systemic treatment with myricitrin can protect neurons against neurotoxin-induced DA degeneration in vivo via the preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the induction of mTORC1 activation. Our results found no significant neuroprotective effect of 30 mg/kg myricitrin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. However, myricitrin treatment with 60 mg/kg protected DA neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, myricitrin treatment preserved TH enzyme activity and mTORC1 activation in nigral DA neurons in the SN of 6-OHDA-treated mice, and its treatment suppressed an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α expression in activated microglia. These results suggest that myricitrin may have neuroprotective properties linked to mTORC1 activation, preservation of TH enzyme activity, and anti-neuroinflammation for preventing DA neuronal degeneration in vivo. PMID:26991235

  19. Physiological Characterisation of Human iPS-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J.; Vowles, Jane; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  20. Physiological characterisation of human iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Elizabeth M; Yamasaki-Mann, Michiko; Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J; Vowles, Jane; James, William S; Cowley, Sally A; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  1. CX3CR1 Disruption Differentially Influences Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration in Parkinsonian Mice Depending on the Neurotoxin and Route of Administration.

    PubMed

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Lazzarini, Márcio; Martin, Sabine; Amar, Majid; Stühmer, Walter; Kirchhoff, Frank; Gomes, Lucas Araújo Caldi; Lanfumey, Laurance; Prediger, Rui D; Sepulveda, Julia E; Del-Bel, Elaine A; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons accompanied by an inflammatory reaction. The neuron-derived chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) is an exclusive ligand for the receptor CX3CR1 expressed on microglia. The CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling is important for sustaining microglial activity. Using a recently developed PD model, in which the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxin is delivered intranasally, we hypothesized that CX3CR1 could play a role in neurotoxicity and glial activation. For this, we used CX3CR1 knock-in mice and compared results with those obtained using the classical PD models through intraperitonal MPTP or intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The striatum from all genotypes (CX3CR1(+/+), CX3CR1(+/GFP) and CX3CR1-deficient mice) showed a significant dopaminergic depletion after intranasal MPTP inoculation. In contrast to that, we could not see differences in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of CX3CR1-deficient animals. Similarly, after 6-OHDA infusion, the CX3CR1 deletion decreased the amphetamine-induced turning behavior observed in CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice. After the 6-OHDA inoculation, a minor dopaminergic neuronal loss was observed in the substantia nigra from CX3CR1-deficient mice. Distinctly, a more extensive neuronal cell loss was observed in the substantia nigra after the intraperitoneal MPTP injection in CX3CR1 disrupted animals, corroborating previous results. Intranasal and intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation induced a similar microgliosis in CX3CR1-deficient mice but a dissimilar change in the astrocyte proliferation in the substantia nigra. Nigral astrocyte proliferation was observed only after intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation. In conclusion, intranasal MPTP and 6-OHDA lesion in CX3CR1-deficient mice yield no nigral dopaminergic neuron loss, linked to the absence of astroglial proliferation. PMID:26403659

  2. Direct differentiation of adult ocular progenitors into striatal dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Zhao, Xing; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Destache, Christopher J; Rodriguez-Sierra, Jorge; Thoreson, Wallace B; Ahmad, Hiba; Sorrentino, John; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease, characterized by motor dysfunction due to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, is one of the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Given there is no current cure, the stem cell approach has emerged as a viable therapeutic option to replace the dopaminergic neurons that are progressively lost to the disease. The success of the approach is likely to depend upon accessible, renewable, immune compatible, and non-tumorigenic sources of neural progenitors from which stable dopaminergic neurons can be generated efficaciously. Here, we demonstrate that neural progenitors derived from limbus, a regenerative and accessible ocular tissue, represent a safe source of dopaminergic neurons. When the limbus-derived neural progenitors were subjected to a well-established protocol of directed differentiation under the influence of Shh and FGF8, they acquired the biochemical and functional phenotype of dopaminergic neurons that included the ability to synthesize dopamine. Their intrastriatal transplantation in the rat model of hemi-Parkinsonism was associated with a reduction in the amphetamine-induced rotation. No tumor formation was observed 6 weeks post-transplantation. Together, these observations posit limbus-derived neural progenitors as an accessible and safe source of dopaminergic neurons for a potential autologous ex-vivo stem cell approach to Parkinson's disease. PMID:26019760

  3. Direct Differentiation of Adult Ocular Progenitors into Striatal Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Zhao, Xing; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Destache, Christopher J.; Rodriguez-Sierra, Jorge; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Ahmad, Hiba; Sorrentino, John; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease, characterized by motor dysfunction due to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, is one of the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Given there is no current cure, the stem cell approach has emerged as a viable therapeutic option to replace the dopaminergic neurons that are progressively lost to the disease. The success of the approach is likely to depend upon accessible, renewable, immune compatible, and non-tumorigenic sources of neural progenitors from which stable dopaminergic neurons can be generated efficaciously. Here, we demonstrate that neural progenitors derived from limbus, a regenerative and accessible ocular tissue, represent a safe source of dopaminergic neurons. When the limbus-derived neural progenitors were subjected to a well-established protocol of directed differentiation under the influence of Shh and FGF8, they acquired the biochemical and functional phenotype of dopaminergic neurons that included the ability to synthesize dopamine. Their intrastriatal transplantation in the rat model of hemi-Parkinsonism was associated with a reduction in the amphetamine-induced rotation. No tumor formation was observed 6 weeks post-transplantation. Together, these observations posit limbus-derived neural progenitors as an accessible and safe source of dopaminergic neurons for a potential autologous ex-vivo stem cell approach to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26019760

  4. Neutralization of RANTES and Eotaxin Prevents the Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Goutam; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Roy, Avik; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer disease as the most common human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. Recent studies indicate that both innate and adaptive immune processes are active in PD. Accordingly, we found a rapid increase in RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) and eotaxin, chemokines that are involved in T cell trafficking, in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the serum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. RANTES and eotaxin were also up-regulated in the substantia nigra pars compacta of post-mortem PD brains as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, we investigated whether neutralization of RANTES and eotaxin could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Interestingly, after peripheral administration, functional blocking antibodies against RANTES and eotaxin reduced the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the nigra, attenuated nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Therefore, we conclude that attenuation of the chemokine-dependent adaptive immune response may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:27226559

  5. Intrastriatal GDNF gene transfer by inducible lentivirus vectors protects dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha-Sha; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Li, Chen; Lu, Tao; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, substantial evidence has shown that a long-term overexpression of GDNF gene is often associated with side effects. We previously improved tetracycline (Tet)-On lentivirus system carrying human GDNF (hGDNF) gene, and demonstrated that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated and functional in vitro. Here we further examined the efficiency and neuroprotection of Tet-On lentivirus-mediated hGDNF gene regulation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and a rat model of parkinsonism. The results showed that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated in transduced NPCs. Doxycycline (Dox)-induced hGDNF protected DA neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity in vitro. Intrastriatal injections of Tet-On lentivirus vectors resulted in dramatically increased levels of hGDNF protein in the striatum of rats with Dox-drinking water, when compared to lentivirus-injected and saline-injected rats with normal drinking water, respectively. In addition, hGDNF protected nigral DA neurons and striatal DA fibers, and attenuated d-amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the 6-OHDA lesioned rats. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that hGDNF gene transfer by Tet-On lentivirus vectors is tightly regulated in rat brain, and Dox-induced hGDNF is functional in neuroprotection of nigral DA neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism. PMID:24997241

  6. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  7. Tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus are progestin target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.

    1986-03-01

    To find out a direct relationship between progestin target neurons and tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons colocalization of /sup 3/H ORG 2058 (a synthetic progestin) and tyrosine hydroxylase, TH, antibodies were studied by combined autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. Eight 23 day-old ovariectomized and adrenalectomized rats were injected s.c. 17-beta estradiol, daily for 4 days. On the 5th day each animal was injected i.v. 1.0 ug per 100g b.w. of /sup 3/H ORG 2058. Two animals each received 1mg of unlabeled ORG 2058 15 min prior to the injection of /sup 3/H ORG 2058 to show the specificity of localization. Animals were sacrificed after 15 or 30 min, brains were dissected, frozen and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies to TH. TH-containing cells in the arcuate nucleus and in the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus (Group A12) showed concentration of radioactivity in their nuclei, while TH cells in Group A11, A13, A14, and in the substantia nigra (Group A9), and ventral tegmental area (Group A10) did not show nuclear concentration of /sup 3/H ORG 2058. Competition studies with unlabeled ORG 2058 abolished the nuclear uptake of radioactivity in TH containing neurons. The results suggest a direct affect of progestin on tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons.

  8. Grafting of nigral tissue hibernated with tirilazad mesylate and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A; Hansson, O; Emgård, M; Brundin, P

    2000-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic ventral mesencephalon is a potential therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease. As only around 5-10% of embryonic dopaminergic neurons survive grafting into the adult striatum, it is considered necessary to use multiple donor embryos. To increase the survival of the grafted dopaminergic neurons, the clinical transplantation program in Lund currently employs the lipid peroxidation inhibitor, tirilazad mesylate, in all solutions used during tissue storage, preparation, and transplantation. However, the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of donor embryos still remains an important limiting factor for the clinical application of neural transplantation. In many clinical transplantation programs, it would be a great advantage if human nigral donor tissue could be stored for at least 1 week. This study was performed in order to investigate whether storage of embryonic tissue at 4 degrees C for 8 days can be applied clinically without creating a need to increase the number of donors. We compared the survival of freshly grafted rat nigral tissue, prepared according to the clinical protocol, with tissue transplanted after hibernation. Thus, in all groups tirilazad mesylate was omnipresent. One group of rats was implanted with fresh tissue and three groups with hibernated tissue with or without addition of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the hibernation medium and/or the final cell suspension. Earlier studies have suggested that GDNF improves the survival of hibernated nigral transplants. We found no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding graft survival after 3 weeks. However, there was a nonsignificant trend for fewer surviving dopaminergic neurons in grafts from hibernated tissue compared to fresh controls. Furthermore, we show that the addition of GDNF to the hibernation medium and/or to the final cell suspension does not significantly increase the survival of the dopaminergic

  9. Catalpol protects dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced neurotoxicity in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan-Yuan; An, Li-Jia; Jiang, Lan; Duan, Yan-Long; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Bo

    2006-12-23

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglia, the resident immune cells in the central nervous system, are pivotal in the inflammatory reaction. Activated microglia can induce expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and release significant amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-alpha, which can damage the dopaminergic neurons. Catalpol, an iridoid glycoside, contained richly in the roots of Rehmannia glutinosa, was found to be neuroprotective in gerbils subjected to transient global cerebral ischemia. But the effect of catalpol on inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration has not been examined. In this study, microglia in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the aim of the study was to examine whether catalpol could protect dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that catalpol significantly reduced the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNF-alpha and NO after LPS-induced microglial activation. Further, catalpol attenuated LPS-induced the expression of iNOS. As determined by immunocytochemical analysis, pretreatment by catalpol dose-dependently protected dopaminergic neurons against LPS-induced neurotoxicity. These results suggest that catalpol exerts its protective effect on dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting microglial activation and reducing the production of proinflammatory factors. Thus, catalpol may possess therapeutic potential against inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:17049947

  10. Representation of spontaneous movement by dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective and disrupted in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Paul D; Dreyer, Jakob K; Jennings, Katie A; Syed, Emilie C J; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are essential for appropriate voluntary movement, as epitomized by the cardinal motor impairments arising in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the basis of such motor control requires understanding how the firing of different types of dopaminergic neuron relates to movement and how this activity is deciphered in target structures such as the striatum. By recording and labeling individual neurons in behaving mice, we show that the representation of brief spontaneous movements in the firing of identified midbrain dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective. Most dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), but not in ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra pars lateralis, consistently represented the onset of spontaneous movements with a pause in their firing. Computational modeling revealed that the movement-related firing of these dopaminergic neurons can manifest as rapid and robust fluctuations in striatal dopamine concentration and receptor activity. The exact nature of the movement-related signaling in the striatum depended on the type of dopaminergic neuron providing inputs, the striatal region innervated, and the type of dopamine receptor expressed by striatal neurons. Importantly, in aged mice harboring a genetic burden relevant for human Parkinson's disease, the precise movement-related firing of SNc dopaminergic neurons and the resultant striatal dopamine signaling were lost. These data show that distinct dopaminergic cell types differentially encode spontaneous movement and elucidate how dysregulation of their firing in early Parkinsonism can impair their effector circuits. PMID:27001837

  11. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-05-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification.

  12. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  13. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  14. Involvement of nigral oxytocin in locomotor activity: A behavioral, immunohistochemical and lesion study in male rats.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Laura; Cocco, Cristina; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Sanna, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin is involved in the control of different behaviors, from sexual behavior and food consumption to empathy, social and affective behaviors. An imbalance of central oxytocinergic neurotransmission has been also associated with different mental pathologies, from depression, anxiety and anorexia/bulimia to schizophrenia, autism and drug dependence. This study shows that oxytocin may also play a role in the control of locomotor activity. Accordingly, intraperitoneal oxytocin (0.5-2000μg/kg) reduced locomotor activity of adult male rats. This effect was abolished by d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist, given into the lateral ventricles at the dose of 2μg/rat, which was ineffective on locomotor activity. Oxytocin (50-200ng/site) also reduced and d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2μg/site) increased locomotor activity when injected bilaterally into the substantia nigra, a key area in the control of locomotor activity. Conversely, the destruction of nigral neurons bearing oxytocin receptors by the recently characterized neurotoxin oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra, increased basal locomotor activity. Since oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra caused a marked reduction of neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (e.g., nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons) and for vesicular glutamate transporters VGluT1, VGluT2 and VGluT3 (e.g., glutamatergic neurons), but not for glutamic acid decarboxylase (e.g., GABAergic neurons), together these findings suggest that oxytocin influences locomotor activity by acting on receptors localized presynaptically in nigral glutamatergic nerve terminals (which control the activity of nigral GABAergic efferent neurons projecting to brain stem nuclei controlling locomotor activity), rather than on receptors localized in the cell bodies/dendrites of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. PMID:27189764

  15. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  16. Functional properties and synaptic integration of genetically labelled dopaminergic neurons in intrastriatal grafts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Thompson, Lachlan; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2005-05-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neurons, can reverse symptoms in Parkinson's disease. For development of effective cell replacement therapy, other sources of dopaminergic neurons, e.g. derived from stem cells, are needed. However, the electrophysiological properties grafted cells need to have in order to induce substantial functional recovery are poorly defined. It has not been possible to prospectively identify and record from dopaminergic neurons in fetal transplants. Here we used transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein under control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase promoter for whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of endogenous and grafted dopaminergic neurons. We transplanted ventral mesencephalic tissue from E12.5 transgenic mice into striatum of neonatal rats with or without lesions of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. The transplanted cells exhibited intrinsic electrophysiological properties typical of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, i.e. broad action potentials, inward rectifying currents with characteristic 'sag', and spontaneous action potentials. The grafted dopaminergic neurons also received functional excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from the host brain, as shown by the presence of both spontaneous and stimulation-evoked excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Occurrence of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory currents was lower, and of spontaneous action potentials was higher, in neurons placed in the dopamine-depleted striatum than of those in the intact striatum. Our findings define specific electrophysiological characteristics of transplanted fetal dopaminergic neurons, and we provide the first direct evidence of functional synaptic integration of these neurons into host neural circuitries. PMID:15926926

  17. Perinatal Exposure to Neuregulin-1 Results in Disinhibition of Adult Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons: Implication in Schizophrenia Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Hisaaki; Okubo, Takeshi; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant neuregulin-1 (NRG1) signals are suggested to associate with the neuropathophysiology of schizophrenia. Employing a mouse schizophrenia model established by neonatal neuregulin-1 challenge, we analysed postpubertal consequence of the NRG1 pretreatment for the electrophysiological property of nigral dopamine neurons. In vivo single unit recordings from anaesthetized NRG1-pretreated mice revealed increased spike bursting of nigral dopamine neurons. In slice preparations from NRG1-pretreated mice, spontaneous firing was elevated relative to controls. The relative increase in firing rates was abolished by a GABAA receptor antagonist. Whole-cell recording showed that perinatal NRG1 pretreatment diminished inhibitory miniature synaptic currents as well as GABAA receptor sensitivity. These results collectively suggest that perinatal exposure to neuregulin-1 results in the disinhibition of nigral dopamine neurons to influence their firing properties at the adult stage when the behavioral deficits are evident. PMID:26935991

  18. A microfluidic method for dopamine uptake measurements in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Shamsi, Mohtashim H; Krastev, Dimitar L; Dryden, Michael D M; Leung, Yen; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a classical neurotransmitter and dysfunction in its synaptic handling underlies many neurological disorders, including addiction, depression, and neurodegeneration. A key to understanding DA dysfunction is the accurate measurement of dopamine uptake by dopaminergic neurons. Current methods that allow for the analysis of dopamine uptake rely on standard multiwell-plate based ELISA, or on carbon-fibre microelectrodes used in in vivo recording techniques. The former suffers from challenges associated with automation and analyte degradation, while the latter has low throughput and is not ideal for laboratory screening. In response to these challenges, we introduce a digital microfluidic platform to evaluate dopamine homeostasis in in vitro neuron culture. The method features voltammetric dopamine sensors with limit of detection of 30 nM integrated with cell culture sites for multi-day neuron culture and differentiation. We demonstrate the utility of the new technique for DA uptake assays featuring in-line culture and analysis, with a determination of uptake of approximately ∼32 fmol in 10 min per virtual microwell (each containing ∼200 differentiated SH-SY5Y cells). We propose that future generations of this technique will be useful for drug discovery for neurodegenerative disease as well as for a wide range of applications that would benefit from integrated cell culture and electroanalysis. PMID:26725686

  19. Antioxidants protect PINK1-dependent dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danling; Qian, Li; Xiong, Hui; Liu, Jiandong; Neckameyer, Wendi S.; Oldham, Sean; Xia, Kun; Wang, Jianzhi; Bodmer, Rolf; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Mutations in the PINK1 gene are linked to the autosomal recessive early onset familial form of PD. The physiological function of PINK1 and pathological abnormality of PD-associated PINK1 mutants are largely unknown. We here show that inactivation of Drosophila PINK1 (dPINK1) using RNAi results in progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and in ommatidial degeneration of the compound eye, which is rescued by expression of human PINK1 (hPINK1). Expression of human SOD1 suppresses neurodegeneration induced by dPINK1 inactivation. Moreover, treatment of dPINK1 RNAi flies with the antioxidants SOD and vitamin E significantly inhibits ommatidial degeneration. Thus, dPINK1 plays an essential role in maintaining neuronal survival by preventing neurons from undergoing oxidative stress, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism by which a reduction in PINK1 function leads to PD-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:16938835

  20. Slow oscillations in two pairs of dopaminergic neurons gate long-term memory formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Trannoy, Séverine; Isabel, Guillaume; Aso, Yoshinori; Siwanowicz, Igor; Belliart-Guérin, Ghislain; Vernier, Philippe; Birman, Serge; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Preat, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A fundamental duty of any efficient memory system is to prevent long-lasting storage of poorly relevant information. However, little is known about dedicated mechanisms that appropriately trigger production of long-term memory (LTM). We examined the role of Drosophila dopaminergic neurons in the control of LTM formation and found that they act as a switch between two exclusive consolidation pathways leading to LTM or anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM). Blockade, after aversive olfactory conditioning, of three pairs of dopaminergic neurons projecting on mushroom bodies, the olfactory memory center, enhanced ARM, whereas their overactivation conversely impaired ARM. Notably, blockade of these neurons during the intertrial intervals of a spaced training precluded LTM formation. Two pairs of these dopaminergic neurons displayed sustained calcium oscillations in naive flies. Oscillations were weakened by ARM-inducing massed training and were enhanced during LTM formation. Our results indicate that oscillations of two pairs of dopaminergic neurons control ARM levels and gate LTM. PMID:22366756

  1. α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Tresa M; Patzlaff, Natalie E; Grady, Sharon R; Heinemann, Stephen F; Booker, T K

    2011-07-27

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco, and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the α4β2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal as well as nicotine-induced behaviors. Although α4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addiction, mental illness, and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of α4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the α4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss α4 mRNA and α4β2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of α4β2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. α4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. α4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze, and elimination of α4β2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of α4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression; however, nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine-related behaviors. PMID:21795541

  2. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R.; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addition, mental illness and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of alpha4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the alpha4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss alpha4 mRNA and alpha4beta2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of alpha4beta2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. Alpha4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. Alpha4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze and elimination of alpha4-beta2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of alpha4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression, however nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine behaviors. PMID:21795541

  3. The Transcription Factor Orthodenticle Homeobox 2 Influences Axonal Projections and Vulnerability of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Simeone, Antonio; Lin, Zhicheng; Martin, Eden; Vance, Jeffery; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Two adjacent groups of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, A9 (substantia nigra pars compacta) and A10 (ventral tegmental area), have distinct projections and exhibit differential vulnerability in Parkinson's disease. Little is known about transcription factors that influence midbrain dopaminergic subgroup phenotypes or their potential role in disease.…

  4. Essential Roles of Enteric Neuronal Serotonin in Gastrointestinal Motility and the Development/Survival of Enteric Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhishan; Chalazonitis, Alcmène; Huang, Yung-yu; Mann, J. John; Margolis, Kara Gross; Yang, Qi Melissa; Kim, Dolly O.; Côté, Francine; Mallet, Jacques; Gershon, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The gut contains a large 5-HT pool in enterochromaffin (EC) cells and a smaller 5-HT pool in the enteric nervous system (ENS). During development, enteric neurons are generated asynchronously. We tested hypotheses that serotonergic neurons, which arise early, affect development/survival of later-born dopaminergic, GABAergic, nitrergic, and calcitonin gene-related peptide-expressing neurons and are essential for gastrointestinal motility. 5-HT biosynthesis depends on tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) in EC cells and on TPH2 in neurons; therefore, mice lacking TPH1 and/or TPH2 distinguish EC-derived from neuronal 5-HT. Deletion of TPH2, but not TPH1, decreased myenteric neuronal density and proportions of dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons but did not affect the extrinsic sympathetic innervation of the gut; intestinal transit slowed in mice lacking TPH2 mice, but gastric emptying accelerated. Isolated enteric crest-derived cells (ENCDCs) expressed the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and 15 subtypes of 5-HT receptor. Addition of 5- HT to cultures of isolated ENCDCs promoted total and dopaminergic neuronal development. Rings of SERT-immunoreactive terminal axons surrounded myenteric dopaminergic neurons and SERT knock-out increased intestinal levels of dopamine metabolites, implying that enteric dopaminergic neurons receive a serotonergic innervation. Observations suggest that constitutive gastrointestinal motility depends more on neuronal than EC cell serotonin; moreover, serotonergic neurons promote development/survival of some classes of late-born enteric neurons, including dopaminergic neurons, which appear to innervate and activate in the adult ENS. PMID:21677183

  5. Genetic deletion of Rhes or pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 prevent striato-nigral neurons activation in levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Brugnoli, Alberto; Napolitano, Francesco; Usiello, Alessandro; Morari, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes) is a small GTP-binding protein that modulates signal transduction at dopamine receptors, and also activates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Rhes binding to mTORC1 is hypothesized to play a role in motor disorders such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Here, we investigate the behavioral and in vivo neurocircuitry changes associated with genetic deletion of Rhes or inhibition of mTORC1 signaling in the mouse model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. 6-Hydroxydopamine-hemilesioned Rhes knockout mice and wild-type littermates were chronically treated with levodopa. In parallel, 6-hydroxydopamine-hemilesioned naïve mice were chronically treated with levodopa or levodopa plus rapamycin, to block mTORC1 pathway activation. Dyskinetic movements were monitored during levodopa treatment along with motor activity on the rotarod. Finally, dyskinetic mice underwent microdialysis probe implantation in the dopamine-depleted striatum and ipsilateral substantia nigra reticulata, and GABA and glutamate levels were monitored upon acute challenge with levodopa. Both Rhes knockouts and rapamycin-treated mice developed less dyskinesia than controls, although only rapamycin-treated mice fully preserved rotarod performance on levodopa. Levodopa elevated nigral GABA and glutamate in controls but not in Rhes knockouts or rapamycin-treated mice. Levodopa also stimulated striatal glutamate in controls and Rhes knockouts but not in rapamycin-treated mice. We conclude that both genetic deletion of Rhes and pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 significantly attenuate dyskinesia development by reducing the sensitization of striato-nigral medium-sized spiny neurons to levodopa. However, mTORC1 blockade seems to provide a more favorable behavioral outcome and a wider effect on neurochemical correlates of dyskinesia. PMID:26522958

  6. Striatal vessels receive phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase-rich innervation from midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Javier; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; García-Hernández, Sonia; Lanciego, José L.; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is assumed that besides its roles in neuronal processing, dopamine (DA) is also involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. However, studies on the hemodynamic actions of DA have been mainly focused on the cerebral cortex, but the possibility that vessels in deeper brain structures receive dopaminergic axons and the origin of these axons have not been investigated. Bearing in mind the evidence of changes in the blood flow of basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and the pivotal role of the dopaminergic mesostriatal pathway in the pathophysiology of this disease, here we studied whether striatal vessels receive inputs from midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The injection of an anterograde neuronal tracer in combination with immunohistochemistry for dopaminergic, vascular and astroglial markers, and dopaminergic lesions, revealed that midbrain dopaminergic axons are in close apposition to striatal vessels and perivascular astrocytes. These axons form dense perivascular plexuses restricted to striatal regions in rats and monkeys. Interestingly, they are intensely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylated at Ser19 and Ser40 residues. The presence of phosphorylated TH in vessel terminals indicates they are probably the main source of basal TH activity in the striatum, and that after activation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, DA release onto vessels precedes that onto neurons. Furthermore, the relative weight of this “vascular component” within the mesostriatal pathway suggests that it plays a relevant role in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:25206324

  7. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  8. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. PMID:27233809

  9. Sweet Taste and Nutrient Value Subdivide Rewarding Dopaminergic Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Huetteroth, Wolf; Perisse, Emmanuel; Lin, Suewei; Klappenbach, Martín; Burke, Christopher; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic neurons provide reward learning signals in mammals and insects [1–4]. Recent work in Drosophila has demonstrated that water-reinforcing dopaminergic neurons are different to those for nutritious sugars [5]. Here, we tested whether the sweet taste and nutrient properties of sugar reinforcement further subdivide the fly reward system. We found that dopaminergic neurons expressing the OAMB octopamine receptor [6] specifically convey the short-term reinforcing effects of sweet taste [4]. These dopaminergic neurons project to the β′2 and γ4 regions of the mushroom body lobes. In contrast, nutrient-dependent long-term memory requires different dopaminergic neurons that project to the γ5b regions, and it can be artificially reinforced by those projecting to the β lobe and adjacent α1 region. Surprisingly, whereas artificial implantation and expression of short-term memory occur in satiated flies, formation and expression of artificial long-term memory require flies to be hungry. These studies suggest that short-term and long-term sugar memories have different physiological constraints. They also demonstrate further functional heterogeneity within the rewarding dopaminergic neuron population. PMID:25728694

  10. Sweet taste and nutrient value subdivide rewarding dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Huetteroth, Wolf; Perisse, Emmanuel; Lin, Suewei; Klappenbach, Martín; Burke, Christopher; Waddell, Scott

    2015-03-16

    Dopaminergic neurons provide reward learning signals in mammals and insects [1-4]. Recent work in Drosophila has demonstrated that water-reinforcing dopaminergic neurons are different to those for nutritious sugars [5]. Here, we tested whether the sweet taste and nutrient properties of sugar reinforcement further subdivide the fly reward system. We found that dopaminergic neurons expressing the OAMB octopamine receptor [6] specifically convey the short-term reinforcing effects of sweet taste [4]. These dopaminergic neurons project to the β'2 and γ4 regions of the mushroom body lobes. In contrast, nutrient-dependent long-term memory requires different dopaminergic neurons that project to the γ5b regions, and it can be artificially reinforced by those projecting to the β lobe and adjacent α1 region. Surprisingly, whereas artificial implantation and expression of short-term memory occur in satiated flies, formation and expression of artificial long-term memory require flies to be hungry. These studies suggest that short-term and long-term sugar memories have different physiological constraints. They also demonstrate further functional heterogeneity within the rewarding dopaminergic neuron population. PMID:25728694

  11. The effect of different durations of morphine exposure on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weibo; Ma, Chunling; Qi, Qian; Liu, Lizhe; Bi, Haitao; Cong, Bin; Li, Yingmin

    2015-12-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons are heavily involved in the development of drug dependence. Thyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, plays an important role in the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, this study investigated TH changes in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as the morphine effects on dopaminergic neurons induced by different durations of morphine dependence. Models of morphine dependence were established in rats, and paraffin-embedded sections, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to observe the changes in the expression of TH protein. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to detect degeneration and necrosis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) detected the apoptosis of mesencephalic dopaminergic nerve cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that the number of TH positive cells and the protein levels in the VTA and SN were significantly decreased in the rats with a long period of morphine dependency. With prolonged morphine exposure, the dopaminergic nerve cells in the VTA and SN showed degeneration and necrosis, while apoptotic cells were not observed. The number of VTA and SN dopaminergic nerve cells decreased with increasing periods of morphine dependence, which was most likely attributable to the degeneration and necrosis of nerve cells induced by morphine toxicity. PMID:26386147

  12. Subcellular expression and neuroprotective effects of SK channels in human dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dolga, A M; de Andrade, A; Meissner, L; Knaus, H-G; Höllerhage, M; Christophersen, P; Zischka, H; Plesnila, N; Höglinger, G U; Culmsee, C

    2014-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel activation is an emerging therapeutic approach for treatment of neurological diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and schizophrenia. Our previous studies showed that activation of SK channels exerted neuroprotective effects through inhibition of NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity. In this study, we tested the therapeutic potential of SK channel activation of NS309 (25 μM) in cultured human postmitotic dopaminergic neurons in vitro conditionally immortalized and differentiated from human fetal mesencephalic cells. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting analysis showed that differentiated dopaminergic neurons expressed low levels of SK2 channels and high levels of SK1 and SK3 channels. Further, protein analysis of subcellular fractions revealed expression of SK2 channel subtype in mitochondrial-enriched fraction. Mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (0.5 μM) disrupted the dendritic network of human dopaminergic neurons and induced neuronal death. SK channel activation reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, while it preserved the dendritic network, cell viability and ATP levels after rotenone challenge. Mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed dopaminergic cell death were prevented by increasing and/or stabilizing SK channel activity. Overall, our findings show that activation of SK channels provides protective effects in human dopaminergic neurons, likely via activation of both membrane and mitochondrial SK channels. Thus, SK channels are promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, where dopaminergic cell loss is associated with progression of the disease. PMID:24434522

  13. The atypical homeoprotein Pbx1a participates in the axonal pathfinding of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pre B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1) genes belong to the three amino acid loop extension family of homeodomain proteins that form hetero-oligomeric complexes with other homeodomain transcription factors, thereby modulating target specificity, DNA binding affinity and transcriptional activity of their molecular associates. Results Here, we provide evidence that Pbx1 is expressed in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from embryonic day 11 into adulthood and determines some of the cellular properties of this neuronal population. In Pbx1-deficient mice, the mesencephalic dopaminergic axons stall during mid-gestation at the border between di- and telencephalon before entering the ganglionic eminence, leading to a loose organization of the axonal bundle and partial misrouting. In Pbx1-deficient dopaminergic neurons, the high affinity netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colon cancer (DCC), is down-regulated. Interestingly, we found several conserved Pbx1 binding sites in the first intron of DCC, suggesting a direct regulation of DCC transcription by Pbx1. Conclusions The expression of Pbx1 in dopaminergic neurons and its regulation of DCC expression make it an important player in defining the axonal guidance of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons, with possible implications for the normal physiology of the nigro-striatal system as well as processes related to the degeneration of neurons during the course of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22748019

  14. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  15. Effect of total flavonoids from Scutellaria baicalensis on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Li; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Bu, Qing-Xia; Jin, Wei-Rong; Sun, Qian-Ru; Feng, De-Peng; Zhang, Qing-Jv; Wang, Le-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid (SSTF) on the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mouse model was established by intravenous injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). SSTF (5 mg/kg) was administered to the mice before or after MPTP injection, and the effects of SSTF on the behavior of the mice and the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra were assessed. In addition, the level of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured. Following injection of MPTP, the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was decreased and the neurons appeared atrophic. In addition, the level of serum MDA in the MPTP mice increased. The mean behavioral scores and the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SSTF treatment groups were significantly higher than in the MPTP group (P<0.05), and the mean serum MDA levels were significantly lower (P<0.05). Thus, SSTF improves the behaviors and the numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in MPTP-induced PD in mice. These beneficial effects appear to be associated with the reduction in serum MDA. PMID:27446544

  16. Dopamine-Dependent Compensation Maintains Motor Behavior in Mice with Developmental Ablation of Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DeMaro, Joseph A.; Knoten, Amanda; Hoshi, Masato; Pehek, Elizabeth; Johnson, Eugene M.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consequent depletion of striatal dopamine are known to underlie the motor deficits observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Adaptive changes in dopaminergic terminals and in postsynaptic striatal neurons can compensate for significant losses of striatal dopamine, resulting in preservation of motor behavior. In addition, compensatory changes independent of striatal dopamine have been proposed based on PD therapies that modulate nondopaminergic circuits within the basal ganglia. We used a genetic strategy to selectively destroy dopaminergic neurons in mice during development to determine the necessity of these neurons for the maintenance of normal motor behavior in adult and aged mice. We find that loss of 90% of SNc dopaminergic neurons and consequent depletion of >95% of striatal dopamine does not result in changes in motor behavior in young-adult or aged mice as evaluated by an extensive array of motor behavior tests. Treatment of aged mutant mice with the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol precipitated motor behavior deficits in aged mutant mice, indicating that <5% of striatal dopamine is sufficient to maintain motor function in these mice. We also found that mutant mice exhibit an exaggerated response to l-DOPA compared with control mice, suggesting that preservation of motor function involves sensitization of striatal dopamine receptors. Our results indicate that congenital loss of dopaminergic neurons induces remarkable adaptions in the nigrostriatal system where limited amounts of dopamine in the dorsal striatum can maintain normal motor function. PMID:24155314

  17. Non-dopaminergic neurons in ventral mesencephalic transplants make widespread axonal connections in the host brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan H; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2008-09-01

    Motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be effectively alleviated through intra-striatal transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue. The success of this approach is dependent on the survival, axonal outgrowth and synaptic integration of newly grafted dopamine neurons with the host striatum. The functional outcome of transplantation therapy has, however, been highly variable, particularly in PD patients, but also in animal models of PD, and thus there is a need for a deeper understanding of possible mechanisms underlying this variability such as graft composition and the resulting graft-host connectivity. Here we describe a series of transplantation experiments whereby mouse VM tissue has been grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Six weeks after grafting immunohistochemical analysis using the mouse specific 'M2M6' antibodies revealed both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic components of graft-derived fibre outgrowth into the host brain. We report here that while dopaminergic outgrowth was predominately confined to the striatum, there was also a significant degree of non-dopaminergic outgrowth to extra-striatal structures including the thalamus, cortex and midbrain. Retrograde tracing experiments showed that grafted neurons of GABAergic identity contribute to this non-dopaminergic outgrowth. In line with our recent findings on the function of serotonergic neurons in fetal VM grafts, these results further underscore the potential impact that non-dopaminergic neurons may have on the functional outcome of intrastriatal fetal VM grafts. PMID:18602916

  18. Up-regulation of activating transcription factor 4 induces severe loss of dopamine nigral neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gully, Joseph C; Sergeyev, Valeriy G; Bhootada, Yogesh; Mendez-Gomez, Hector; Meyers, Craig A; Zolotukhin, Sergey; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S

    2016-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a member of the PERK signaling pathway, which directly binds endoplasmic reticulum stress target genes and plays a crucial role in both adaptations to stress and activation of apoptosis. Previous publications demonstrated conflicting evidence on the role of ATF4 in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we used recombinant adeno-associate virus (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer to investigate if the sustained up-regulation of ATF4 launches a pro-survival or pro-death trend in the dopamine (DA) cells of the substantia nigra pars compacta in a rat model of Parkinson-like neurodegeneration induced by human alpha-synuclein (αS) overexpression. We showed that ATF4 does not protect nigral DA neurons against an αS-induced pathology. Moreover, the rAAV-mediated overexpression of ATF4 resulted in severe nigra-striatal degeneration via activation of caspases 3/7. PMID:27233218

  19. The cellular and Genomic response of rat dopaminergic neurons (N27) to coated nanosilver

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined if nanosilver (nanoAg) of different sizes and coatings were differentially toxic to oxidative stress-sensitive neurons. N27 rat dopaminergic neurons were exposed (0.5-5ppm) to a set of nanoAg of different sizes (10nm, 75nm) and coatings (PVP, citrate) and thei...

  20. Progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons through TRP channel-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Archana; Ning, Ye; Reisner, Kaja; Buraei, Zafir; Larsen, Jan Petter; Hobert, Oliver; Doitsidou, Maria

    2014-04-23

    Progressive neurodegenerative diseases are among the most frequently occurring aging-associated human pathologies. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutant animals that lack their normal complement of dopaminergic neurons, we identified two strains with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons during postembryonic life. Through whole-genome sequencing we show that both strains harbor dominant (d), gain-of-function mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) mechanosensory channel trp-4, a member of the invertebrate and vertebrate TRPN-type of the TRP family channels. Gain-of-function mutations in TRP channels have not been previously implicated in dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. We show that trp-4(d) induces cell death in dopamine neurons through a defined, calcium-related downstream pathway. PMID:24760834

  1. The lifelong maintenance of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by Nurr1 and engrailed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Specific vulnerability and degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the midbrain is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. A number of transcription factors regulate the birth and development of this set of neurons and some remain constitutively expressed throughout life. These maintenance transcription factors are closely associated with essential neurophysiological functions and are required ultimately for the long-term survival of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The current review describes the role of two such factors, Nurr1 and engrailed, in differentiation, maturation, and in normal physiological functions including acquisition of neurotransmitter identity. The review will also elucidate the relationship of these factors with life, vulnerability, degeneration and death of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in the context of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24685177

  2. Pleiotrophin over-expression provides trophic support to dopaminergic neurons in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin is known to promote the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in vitro and is up-regulated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To establish whether pleiotrophin has a trophic effect on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing pleiotrophin in the substantia nigra of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Results The viral vector induced pleiotrophin over-expression by astrocytes in the substantia nigra pars compacta, without modifying endogenous neuronal expression. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells as well as the area of their projections in the lesioned striatum was higher in pleiotrophin-treated animals than in controls. Conclusions These results indicate that pleiotrophin over-expression partially rescues tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies and terminals of dopaminergic neurons undergoing 6-hydroxydopamine-induced degeneration. PMID:21649894

  3. Induction of midbrain dopaminergic neurons from primate embryonic stem cells by coculture with sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Cui, Li; Johkura, Kohei; Ogiwara, Naoko; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to produce dopaminergic neurons from primate embryonic stem (ES) cells following coculture with mouse Sertoli cells. After 3 weeks of induction, immunostaining revealed that 90% +/- 9% of the colonies contained tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH(+)) neurons, and 60% +/- 7% of the tubulin beta III-positive (Tuj III(+)) neurons were TH(+). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that Sertoli-induced neurons expressed midbrain dopaminergic neuron markers, including TH, dopamine transporter, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), receptors such as TrkB and TrkC, and transcription factors NurrI and Lmx1b. Neurons that had been differentiated on Sertoli cells were positive for Pax2, En1, and AADC, midbrain-related markers, and negative for dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, a marker of noradrenergic neurons. These Sertoli cell-induced dopaminergic cells can release dopamine when depolarized by high K(+). Sertoli cell-conditioned medium contained glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and supported neuronal differentiation. After pretreatment with anti-GDNF antibody, the percentage of Tuj III(+) colonies was reduced to 14%. Thus, GDNF contributed significantly to inducing primate ES cells into dopaminergic neurons. When transplanted into a 6-hydroxydopamine-treated Parkinson's disease model, primate-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into the mouse striatum. Two weeks after transplantation, surviving TH(+) cells were present. These TH(+) cells survived for 2 months. Therefore, the induction method of coculture ES cells with Sertoli cells provides an unlimited source of primate cells for the study of pathogenesis and transplantation in Parkinson's disease. PMID:16822882

  4. Chemogenetic ablation of dopaminergic neurons leads to transient locomotor impairments in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Rafael; Noble, Sandra; Yoon, Kevin; Anisman, Hymie; Ekker, Marc

    2015-10-01

    To determine the impact of a controlled loss of dopaminergic neurons on locomotor function, we generated transgenic zebrafish, Tg(dat:CFP-NTR), expressing a cyan fluorescent protein-nitroreductase fusion protein (CFP-NTR) under the control of dopamine transporter (dat) cis-regulatory elements. Embryonic and larval zebrafish express the transgene in several groups of dopaminergic neurons, notably in the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, diencephalon and caudal hypothalamus. Administration of the pro-drug metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in activation of caspase 3 in CFP-positive neurons and in a reduction in dat-positive cells by 5 days post-fertilization (dpf). Loss of neurons coincided with impairments in global locomotor parameters such as swimming distance, percentage of time spent moving, as well as changes in tail bend parameters such as time to maximal bend and angular velocity. Dopamine levels were transiently decreased following Mtz administration. Recovery of some of the locomotor parameters was observed by 7 dpf. However, the total numbers of dat-expressing neurons were still decreased at 7, 12, or 14 dpf, even though there was evidence for production of new dat-expressing cells. Tg(dat:CFP-NTR) zebrafish provide a model to correlate altered dopaminergic neuron numbers with locomotor function and to investigate factors influencing regeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26118896

  5. Differentiation and molecular heterogeneity of inhibitory and excitatory neurons associated with midbrain dopaminergic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Laura; Haugas, Maarja; Tikker, Laura; Airavaara, Mikko; Voutilainen, Merja H; Anttila, Jenni; Kumar, Suman; Inkinen, Caisa; Salminen, Marjo; Partanen, Juha

    2016-02-01

    Local inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic neurons are important for midbrain dopaminergic and hindbrain serotonergic pathways controlling motivation, mood, and voluntary movements. Such neurons reside both within the dopaminergic nuclei, and in adjacent brain structures, including the rostromedial and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Compared with the monoaminergic neurons, the development, heterogeneity, and molecular characteristics of these regulatory neurons are poorly understood. We show here that different GABAergic and glutamatergic subgroups associated with the monoaminergic nuclei express specific transcription factors. These neurons share common origins in the ventrolateral rhombomere 1, where the postmitotic selector genes Tal1, Gata2 and Gata3 control the balance between the generation of inhibitory and excitatory neurons. In the absence of Tal1, or both Gata2 and Gata3, the GABAergic precursors adopt glutamatergic fates and populate the glutamatergic nuclei in excessive numbers. Together, our results uncover developmental regulatory mechanisms, molecular characteristics, and heterogeneity of central regulators of monoaminergic circuits. PMID:26718003

  6. Neonatal chlorpyrifos exposure induces loss of dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Dai, Hongmei; Deng, Yuanying; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Hu, Zhiping; Bing, Guoying; Zhao, Lingling

    2015-10-01

    Increasing epidemiological and toxicological evidence suggests that pesticides and other environmental exposures may be associated with the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorous pesticide with developmental neurotoxicity. Its neurotoxicity, notably on the monoamine system, suggests that exposure of CPF may induce dopaminergic neuronal injury. We investigated whether neonatal exposure to CPF contributes to initiation and progression of dopaminergic neurotoxicity and explored the possible underlying mechanisms. The newborn rats were administrated 5 mg/kg CPF subcutaneously from postnatal day (PND) 11 to PND 14 daily. The effect of CPF on dopaminergic neurons, microglia, astrocyte, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p. 65 and p. 38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways was analyzed in the substantia nigra of rats at 12h, 24h, 72 h, 16d and 46 d after exposure. CPF-treated rats exhibited significant reduction of dopaminergic neurons at 16d and 46 d after exposure, and a significant increase in the expression of microglia and astrocytes in the substantia nigra after CPF exposure. Intense activation of NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK inflammatory signaling pathways was observed. Our findings indicate that neonatal exposure to CPF may induce long-term dopaminergic neuronal damage in the substantia nigra mediated by the activation of inflammatory response via NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK pathways in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26215101

  7. Effects of GDF5 overexpression on embryonic rat dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, David B; Harrison, Patrick T; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2010-05-01

    Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurones has shown promise for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but this approach is limited by the poor survival of the transplanted cells. Exogenous dopaminergic neurotrophic factors such as growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) have been found to enhance the survival of transplanted dopaminergic neurones. However, this approach is limited by the rapid degradation of such factors in vivo; thus, methods for long-term delivery of these factors are under investigation. The present study shows, using optimised lipid-mediated transfection procedures, that overexpression of GDF5 significantly improves the survival of dopaminergic neurones in cultures of embryonic day (E) 13 rat ventral mesencephalon (VM) and protects them against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity. In another experiment, E13 VM cells were transfected with GDF5 after 1 day in vitro (DIV), then transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned adult rat striata after 2 DIV. The survival of these E13 VM dopaminergic neurones after transfection and transplantation was as least as high as that of freshly dissected E14 VM dopaminergic neurones, demonstrating that transfection was not detrimental to these cells. Furthermore, GDF5-overexpressing E13 VM transplants significantly reduced amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the lesioned rats. This study shows that lipid-mediated transfection in vitro prior to transplantation is a valid approach for the introduction of neurotrophic proteins such as GDF5, as well as lending further support to the potential use of GDF5 in neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:20349094

  8. Id2 IS REQUIRED FOR SPECIFICATION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS DURING ADULT OLFACTORY NEUROGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Havrda, Matthew C.; Harris, Brent T.; Mantani, Akio; Ward, Nora M.; Paolella, Brenton R.; Cuzon, Verginia C.; Yeh, Hermes H.; Israel, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the biology of adult neural stem cells has important implications for nervous system development and may contribute to our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders and their treatment. We have characterized the process of olfactory neurogenesis in adult mice lacking Inhibitor of DNA Binding 2 (Id2). We found a diminished olfactory bulb containing reduced numbers of granular and periglomerular neurons with a distinct paucity of dopaminergic periglomerular neurons. While no deficiency of the stem cell compartment was detectable, migrating neuroblasts in Id2−/− mutant mice prematurely undergo astroglial differentiation within a disorganized rostral migratory stream. Further, when evaluated in vitro loss of Id2 results in decreased proliferation of neural progenitors and decreased expression of the Hes1 and Mash1 transcription factors, known mediators of neuronal differentiation. These data support a novel role for sustained Id2 expression in migrating neural progenitors mediating olfactory dopaminergic neuronal differentiation in adult animals. PMID:19109490

  9. Degeneration of Dopaminergic Neurons Due to Metabolic Alterations and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Jongpil

    2016-01-01

    The rates of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), markedly increase with age. In recent years, studies have reported an association between metabolic changes and various pathophysiological mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress and hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases lead to adverse neurophysiological phenomena, including neuronal loss, synaptic dysfunction, and improper insulin signaling, resulting in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that alterations of CNS environments by metabolic changes influence the dopamine neuronal loss, eventually affecting the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, we reviewed recent findings relating to degeneration of dopaminergic neurons during metabolic diseases. We highlight the fact that using a metabolic approach to manipulate degeneration of dopaminergic neurons can serve as a therapeutic strategy to attenuate pathology of PD. PMID:27065205

  10. Apoptotic-like changes in Lewy-body-associated disorders and normal aging in substantia nigral neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, M. M.; Basgall, E. J.; Zamrini, E.; Hill, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease and other Lewy-body-associated disorders, the substantia nigra pars compacta undergoes degeneration, but the mechanism of cell death has not been previously described. The substantia nigra of normal and Alzheimer's disease cases were compared with substantia nigra from patients with Lewy-body-associated disorders (Parkinson's disease, concomitant Alzheimer's/Parkinson's disease, and diffuse Lewy body disease) using in situ end labeling to detect fragmented DNA. In situ end-labeled neurons demonstrated changes resembling apoptosis: nuclear condensation, chromatin fragmentation, and formation of apoptotic-like bodies. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed nuclear condensation and formation of apoptotic-like bodies. Apoptotic-like changes were seen in the substantia nigra of both normal and diseased cases; concomitant Alzheimer's/Parkinson's disease and diffuse Lewy body disease cases had significantly higher amounts of apoptotic-like changes than normal controls or Alzheimer patients. The finding of neuronal death by apoptosis may have relevance for the development of new treatment strategies for Parkinson's disease and related disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:9006329

  11. NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION. M.L. Block1,2, X. Wu1, P. Zhong1, G. Li1, T. Wang1, J.S. Hong1 & B.Veronesi.2
    1The Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, RTP, NC and 2 National Health and Envi...

  12. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Preserves Dopaminergic Neurons in Cellular and Rodent Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Redondo, Miriam; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Perez, Concepción; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphodiesterase 7 plays a major role in down-regulation of protein kinase A activity by hydrolyzing cAMP in many cell types. This cyclic nucleotide plays a key role in signal transduction in a wide variety of cellular responses. In the brain, cAMP has been implicated in learning, memory processes and other brain functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show a novel function of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal death. We found that S14, a heterocyclic small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 7, conferred significant neuronal protection against different insults both in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. S14 treatment also reduced microglial activation, protected dopaminergic neurons and improved motor function in the lipopolysaccharide rat model of Parkinson disease. Finally, S14 neuroprotective effects were reversed by blocking the cAMP signaling pathways that operate through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition can protect dopaminergic neurons against different insults, and they provide support for the therapeutic potential of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibitors in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease. PMID:21390306

  13. Autologous mesenchymal stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons function in parkinsonian macaques.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuya; Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Ose, Takayuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Mitsunaga, Kanae; Matsuse, Dai; Shigemoto, Taeko; Ito, Akihito; Ikeda, Hironobu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Onoe, Hirotaka; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based therapy for the replacement of dopaminergic neurons has been a long-term goal in Parkinson's disease research. Here, we show that autologous engraftment of A9 dopaminergic neuron-like cells induced from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) leads to long-term survival of the cells and restoration of motor function in hemiparkinsonian macaques. Differentiated MSCs expressed markers of A9 dopaminergic neurons and released dopamine after depolarization in vitro. The differentiated autologous cells were engrafted in the affected portion of the striatum. Animals that received transplants showed modest and gradual improvements in motor behaviors. Positron emission tomography (PET) using [11C]-CFT, a ligand for the dopamine transporter (DAT), revealed a dramatic increase in DAT expression, with a subsequent exponential decline over a period of 7 months. Kinetic analysis of the PET findings revealed that DAT expression remained above baseline levels for over 7 months. Immunohistochemical evaluations at 9 months consistently demonstrated the existence of cells positive for DAT and other A9 dopaminergic neuron markers in the engrafted striatum. These data suggest that transplantation of differentiated autologous MSCs may represent a safe and effective cell therapy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:23202734

  14. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Paredes, Niurka; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Arzate, Dulce-María; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Fuentes-Hernández, Ayari; Zea-Armenta, Iván; Covarrubias, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs), but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+). These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26912775

  15. Biochanin A protects dopaminergic neurons against lipopolysaccharide-induced damage and oxidative stress in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; He, Can; Wu, Wang-Yang; Chen, Feng; Wu, Yang-Yang; Li, Wei-Zu; Chen, Han-Qing; Yin, Yan-Yan

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Accumulated evidences have suggested that oxidative stress is closely associated with the dopaminergic neurodegeneration of PD that can be protected by antioxidants. Biochanin A that is an O-methylated isoflavone in chickpea is investigated to explore its protective mechanism on dopaminergic neurons of the unilateral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected rat. The results showed that biochanin A significantly improved the animal model's behavioral symptoms, prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited the deleterious microglia activation in the LPS-induced rats. Moreover, biochanin A inhibited nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activation and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the rat brain. These results suggested that biochanin A might be a natural candidate with protective properties on dopaminergic neurons against the PD. PMID:26394281

  16. A natural compound macelignan protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via microglial arginase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kiyofuji, Kana; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Mishima, Satoshi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory events involving activated microglia have been recognized to play an important role in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. Compounds regulating activation profiles of microglia may provide therapeutic benefits for Parkinson disease characterized by degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here we examined the effect of macelignan, a compound derived from nutmeg, on inflammatory degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Treatment of midbrain slice cultures with interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a substantial decrease in viable dopaminergic neurons and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production indicated by extracellular nitrite accumulation. Application of macelignan (10 μM) concomitantly with LPS prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Besides nitrite accumulation, up-regulation of inducible NO synthase protein expression in response to IFN-γ/LPS was confirmed by Western blotting, and immunohistochemical examination revealed expression of inducible NO synthase in a subpopulation of Iba-1-poitive microglia. However, macelignan did not affect any of these NO-related parameters. On the other hand, macelignan promoted expression of arginase-1 in midbrain slice cultures irrespective of the presence or the absence of IFN-γ/LPS treatment. Arginase-1 expression was mainly localized in a subpopulation of Iba-1-positive cells. Importantly, the neuroprotective effect of macelignan was antagonized by N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, a specific arginase inhibitor. The neuroprotective effect of macelignan was also prevented by GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist. Overall, these results indicate that macelignan, a compound with PPARγ agonist activity, can provide neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in an arginase-dependent but NO-independent manner. PMID:25917324

  17. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  18. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts into dopaminergic neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjian; Li, Fang; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Blanchard, Barbara; Richards, Toni L; Larson, Gaynor A; He, Yujun; Huang, Qian; Tan, Aik-Choon; Zhang, Dabing; Benke, Timothy A; Sladek, John R; Zahniser, Nancy R; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of exogenous dopaminergic neuron (DA neurons) is a promising approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a major stumbling block has been the lack of a reliable source of donor DA neurons. Here we show that a combination of five transcriptional factors Mash1, Ngn2, Sox2, Nurr1, and Pitx3 can directly and effectively reprogram human fibroblasts into DA neuron-like cells. The reprogrammed cells stained positive for various markers for DA neurons. They also showed characteristic DA uptake and production properties. Moreover, they exhibited DA neuron-specific electrophysiological profiles. Finally, they provided symptomatic relief in a rat PD model. Therefore, our directly reprogrammed DA neuron-like cells are a promising source of cell-replacement therapy for PD. PMID:22105488

  19. Retinoic acid receptor stimulation protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via BDNF-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Emi; Takemori, Sachiko; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Kume, Toshiaki; Shudo, Koichi; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Functions of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in adult CNS have been poorly characterized. Here we investigated potential neuroprotective action of tamibarotene (Am80), an RARalpha/beta agonist available for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Am80 protected dopaminergic neurons in rat midbrain slice culture from injury mediated by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia, without affecting production of nitric oxide, a key mediator of cell injury. The effect of Am80 was mimicked by another RAR agonist, TAC-101, but not by a retinoid X receptor agonist, HX630, and HX630 did not synergize with Am80. We observed neuronal expression of RARalpha and RARbeta in midbrain slice culture and also found that Am80 increased tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA. Exogenous BDNF prevented dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and the neuroprotective effect of Am80 was suppressed by a TrkB inhibitor, K252a, or by anti-BDNF neutralizing antibody. These results reveal a novel action of RARs mediated by enhancement of BDNF expression. Finally, oral administration of Am80 prevented dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra induced by local injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice, indicating that RARs are a promising target of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19457078

  20. Parkin cooperates with GDNF/RET signaling to prevent dopaminergic neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Durga Praveen; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Nidadavolu, Prakash; Mohammadi, Behnam; Motori, Elisa; Ponna, Srinivas Kumar; Aboutalebi, Helia; Bassal, Mahmoud; Annamneedi, Anil; Finckh, Barbara; Miesbauer, Margit; Rotermund, Natalie; Lohr, Christian; Tatzelt, Jörg; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkin and the glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor RET have both been independently linked to the dopaminergic neuron degeneration that underlies Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that there is genetic crosstalk between parkin and the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in two different mouse models of PD. Mice lacking both parkin and RET exhibited accelerated dopaminergic cell and axonal loss compared with parkin-deficient animals, which showed none, and RET-deficient mice, in which we found moderate degeneration. Transgenic expression of parkin protected the dopaminergic systems of aged RET-deficient mice. Downregulation of either parkin or RET in neuronal cells impaired mitochondrial function and morphology. Parkin expression restored mitochondrial function in GDNF/RET-deficient cells, while GDNF stimulation rescued mitochondrial defects in parkin-deficient cells. In both cases, improved mitochondrial function was the result of activation of the prosurvival NF-κB pathway, which was mediated by RET through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that parkin and the RET signaling cascade converge to control mitochondrial integrity and thereby properly maintain substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons and their innervation in the striatum. The demonstration of crosstalk between parkin and RET highlights the interplay in the protein network that is altered in PD and suggests potential therapeutic targets and strategies to treat PD. PMID:25822020

  1. Dopaminergic neurons inhibit striatal output via non-canonical release of GABA

    PubMed Central

    Tritsch, Nicolas X.; Ding, Jun B.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2012-01-01

    The substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) contain the two largest populations of dopamine (DA)-releasing neurons in the mammalian brain. These neurons extend elaborate projections in striatum, a large subcortical structure implicated in motor planning and reward-based learning. Phasic activation of dopaminergic neurons in response to salient or reward-predicting stimuli is thought to modulate striatal output via the release of DA to promote and reinforce motor action1–4. Here we show that activation of DA neurons in striatal slices rapidly inhibits action potential firing in both direct-and indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons (SPNs) through vesicular release of the inhibitory transmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is released directly from dopaminergic axons but in a manner that is independent of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT. Instead GABA release requires activity of the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2, which is the vesicular transporter for DA. Furthermore, VMAT2 expression in GABAergic neurons lacking VGAT is sufficient to sustain GABA release. Thus, these findings expand the repertoire of synaptic mechanisms employed by DA neurons to influence basal ganglia circuits, reveal a novel substrate whose transport is dependent on VMAT2, and demonstrate that GABA can function as a bona fide co-transmitter in monoaminergic neurons. PMID:23034651

  2. Role of Nurr1 in the Generation and Differentiation of Dopaminergic Neurons from Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Traver, Eva; Solís, Oscar; Díaz-Guerra, Eva; Ortiz, Óscar; Vergaño-Vera, Eva; Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; García-Sanz, Patricia; Moratalla, Rosario; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    NURR1 is an essential transcription factor for the differentiation, maturation, and maintenance of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (DA neurons) as it has been demonstrated using knock-out mice. DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and mutations in the Nurr1 gene have been associated with this human disease. Thus, the study of NURR1 actions in vivo is fundamental to understand the mechanisms of neuron generation and degeneration in the dopaminergic system. Here, we present and discuss findings indicating that NURR1 is a valuable molecular tool for the in vitro generation of DA neurons which could be used for modeling and studying PD in cell culture and in transplantation approaches. Transduction of Nurr1 alone or in combination with other transcription factors such as Foxa2, Ngn2, Ascl1, and Pitx3, induces the generation of DA neurons, which upon transplantation have the capacity to survive and restore motor behavior in animal models of PD. We show that the survival of transplanted neurons is increased when the Nurr1-transduced olfactory bulb stem cells are treated with GDNF. The use of these and other factors with the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based technology or the direct reprogramming of astrocytes or fibroblasts into human DA neurons has produced encouraging results for the study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration in PD and for the search of new treatments for this disease. PMID:26678495

  3. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed patch-clamp electrophysiology and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices to determine the effects of NT on dopamine autoreceptor-mediated neurotransmission. Application of the active peptide fragment NT8–13 produced synaptic depression that exhibited short- and long-term components. Sustained depression of D2 autoreceptor signaling required activation of the type 2 NT receptor and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. NT application increased paired-pulse ratios and decreased extracellular levels of somatodendritic dopamine, consistent with a decrease in presynaptic dopamine release. Surprisingly, we observed that electrically induced long-term depression of dopaminergic neurotransmission that we reported previously was also dependent on type 2 NT receptors and calcineurin. Because electrically induced depression, but not NT-induced depression, was blocked by postsynaptic calcium chelation, our findings suggest that endogenous NT may act through a local circuit to decrease presynaptic dopamine release. The current research provides a mechanism through which augmented NT release can produce a long-lasting increase in membrane excitability of midbrain dopamine neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whereas plasticity of glutamate synapses in the brain has been studied extensively, demonstrations of plasticity at dopaminergic synapses have been more elusive. By quantifying inhibitory neurotransmission between midbrain dopaminergic neurons in brain slices from mice we have

  4. Allopregnanolone enhances the neurogenesis of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in APPswe/PSEN1 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Xie, M Q; Ding, Y-Q; Liao, M; Qi, S S; Chen, S X; Gu, Q Q; Zhou, P; Sun, C Y

    2015-04-01

    An earlier study has demonstrated that exogenous allopregnanolone (APα) can reverse the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of 3-month-old male triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse (3xTgAD). This paper is focused on further clarifying the origin of these new-born TH-positive neurons induced by exogenous APα treatment. We performed a deeper research in another AD mouse model, 4-month-old male APPswe/PSEN1 double transgenic AD mouse (2xTgAD) by measuring APα concentration and counting immunopositive neurons using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and unbiased stereology. It was found that endogenous APα level and the number of TH-positive neurons were reduced in the 2xTgAD mice, and these reductions were present prior to the appearance of β-amyloid (Aβ)-positive plaques. Furthermore, a single 20mg/kg of exogenous APα treatment prevented the decline of total neurons, TH-positive neurons and TH/bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) double-positive neurons in the SNpc of 2xTgAD mice although the decreased intensity of TH-positive fibers was not rescued in the striatum. It was also noted that exogenous APα administration had an apparent increase in the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neurons and DCX/BrdU double-positive neurons of subventricular zone (SVZ), as well as in the percentage of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN)/BrdU double-positive neurons of the SNpc in the 2xTgAD mice. These findings indicate that a lower level of endogenous APα is implicated in the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the 2xTgAD mice, and exogenous APα-induced a significant increase in the new-born dopaminergic neurons might be derived from the proliferating and differentiation of neural stem niche of SVZ. PMID:25637494

  5. Pitx3 is required for development of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Irene; Tovmasian, Lucy T.; Silva, Robert M.; Burke, Robert E.; Goff, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons of substantia nigra in the midbrain control voluntary movement, and their degeneration is the cause of Parkinson's disease. The complete set of genes required to specifically determine the development of midbrain DA subgroups is not known yet. We report here that mice lacking the bicoid-related homeoprotein Pitx3 fail to develop DA neurons of the substantia nigra. Other mesencephalic DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area and retrorubral field are unaltered in their dopamine expression and histological organization. These data suggest that Pitx3-dependent gene expression is specifically required for the differentiation of DA progenitors within the mesencephalic DA system. PMID:12655058

  6. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  7. Neuroprotection with methylaminochroman and lazaroid of embryonic ventral mesencephalic tegmental dopaminergic neurons in cold storage.

    PubMed

    Thajeb, Peterus; Kuo, Jon-Son; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic ventral mesencephalic tegmental (EVMT) neurons die off over time in cold storage at 4 degrees C in hibernation buffers (HB). Manipulation of HB conditions may improve the survival of neurons in cold storage. We examined the effect of lipid peroxidation inhibitors, a methylaminochroman (U83836E) and a lazaroid (U74389G) on the viability and survival of embryonic dopaminergic neurons in the co-culture system of embryonic striatal target (EST) cells and EVMT neurons that had been stored for 3 days at 4 degrees C in HB with or without U83836E or U74389G. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for analysis of data. The density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THIR)-positive neurons was significantly higher in the groups stored in supplemented HB than in the control (HB alone; P < 0.001). The neuroprotective effect was concentration-dependent. We conclude that either U83836E or U74389G-conditioned HB exerted a concentration-dependent neuroprotective effect on embryonic dopaminergic neurons in cold storage for 3 days. Supplementation of U83836E and U74389G or other methylaminochromans and lazaroids in HB may be important for cold storage of donor neuronal cells. PMID:16678726

  8. Adult neurogenesis restores dopaminergic neuronal loss in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, Françoise; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; Moigneu, Carine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-22

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis continuously provides new GABA- and dopamine (DA)-containing interneurons for the olfactory bulb (OB) in most adult mammals. DAergic interneurons are located in the glomerular layer (GL) where they participate in the processing of sensory inputs. To examine whether adult neurogenesis might contribute to regeneration after circuit injury in mice, we induce DAergic neuronal loss by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal GL or in the right substantia nigra pars compacta. We found that a 6-OHDA treatment of the OB produces olfactory deficits and local inflammation and partially decreases the number of neurons expressing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) near the injected site. Blockade of inflammation by minocycline treatment immediately after the 6-OHDA administration rescued neither TH(+) interneuron number nor the olfactory deficits, suggesting that the olfactory impairments are most likely linked to TH(+) cell death and not to microglial activation. TH(+) interneuron number was restored 1 month later. This rescue resulted at least in part from enhanced recruitment of immature neurons targeting the lesioned GL area. Seven days after 6-OHDA lesion in the OB, we found that the integration of lentivirus-labeled adult-born neurons was biased: newly formed neurons were preferentially incorporated into glomerular circuits of the lesioned area. Behavioral rehabilitation occurs 2 months after lesion. This study establishes a new model into which loss of DAergic cells could be compensated by recruiting newly formed neurons. We propose that adult neurogenesis not only replenishes the population of DAergic bulbar neurons but that it also restores olfactory sensory processing. PMID:25339754

  9. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  10. Silibinin prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease via mitochondrial stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Park, Hee Ra; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. The lipophile 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) can cross the blood-brain barrier and is subsequently metabolized into toxic1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP(+) ), which causes mitochondrial dysfunction and the selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons. The present article reports the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in a murine MPTP model of PD. The flavonoid silibinin is the major active constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and is known to have hepatoprotective, anticancer, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, silibinin effectively attenuated motor deficit and dopaminergic neuronal loss caused by MPTP. Furthermore, in vitro study confirmed that silibinin protects primary cultured neurons against MPP(+) -induced cell death and mitochondrial membrane disruption. The findings of the present study indicate that silibinin has neuroprotective effects in MPTP-induced models of PD rather than antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effects and that the neuroprotection afforded might be mediated by the stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, these findings suggest that silibinin protects mitochondria in MPTP-induced PD models and that it offers a starting point for the development of treatments that ameliorate the symptoms of PD. PMID:25677261

  11. Quantification of dopaminergic neuron differentiation and neurotoxicity via a genetic reporter

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Rothstein, Megan; Bennett, Theo; Zhang, Pengbo; Xia, Ninuo; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a powerful human-genome based system for modeling human diseases in vitro and for potentially identifying novel treatments. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells produces many specific cell types including dopaminergic neurons. Here, we generated a genetic reporter assay in pluripotent stem cells using newly-developed genome editing technologies in order to monitor differentiation efficiency and compare dopaminergic neuron survival under different conditions. We show that insertion of a luciferase reporter gene into the endogenous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) locus enables rapid and easy quantification of dopaminergic neurons in cell culture throughout the entire differentiation process. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cellular assay is effective in assessing neuron response to different cytotoxic chemicals and is able to be scaled for high throughput applications. These results suggest that stem cell-derived terminal cell types can provide an alternative to traditional immortal cell lines or primary cells as a quantitative cellular model for toxin evaluation and drug discovery. PMID:27121904

  12. Parkinson's disease candidate gene prioritization based on expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The pathological hallmark of the disease is degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Genetic association studies have linked 13 human chromosomal loci to Parkinson's disease. Identification of gene(s), as part of the etiology of Parkinson's disease, within the large number of genes residing in these loci can be achieved through several approaches, including screening methods, and considering appropriate criteria. Since several of the indentified Parkinson's disease genes are expressed in substantia nigra pars compact of the midbrain, expression within the neurons of this area could be a suitable criterion to limit the number of candidates and identify PD genes. Methods In this work we have used the combination of findings from six rodent transcriptome analysis studies on the gene expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and the PARK loci in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, to identify new candidate genes for Parkinson's disease. Results Merging the two datasets, we identified 20 genes within PARK loci, 7 of which are located in an orphan Parkinson's disease locus and one, which had been identified as a disease gene. In addition to identifying a set of candidates for further genetic association studies, these results show that the criteria of expression in midbrain dopaminergic neurons may be used to narrow down the number of genes in PARK loci for such studies. PMID:20716345

  13. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model.

    PubMed

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE's ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  14. Tetraspanin (TSP-17) Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Neda; Holmes, Alexander; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1) and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling. PMID:25474638

  15. Efficient derivation of functional dopaminergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells on a large scale.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2008-01-01

    Cell-replacement therapy using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) holds great promise in treating Parkinson's disease. We have recently reported a highly efficient method to generate functional dopaminergic (DA) neurons from hESCs. Our method includes a unique step, the formation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), and offers the highest yield of DA neurons ever achieved so far. In this report, we describe our method step by step, covering not only how to differentiate hESCs into DA neurons at a high yield, but also how to amplify, freeze and thaw the SNMs, which are the key structures that make our protocol unique and advantageous. Although the whole process of generation of DA neurons from hESCs takes about 2 months, only 14 d are needed to derive DA neurons from the SNMs. PMID:19008875

  16. Cocaine Increases Dopaminergic Neuron and Motor Activity via Midbrain α1 Adrenergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul EM; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine. PMID:25374094

  17. The Sensory Impact of Nicotine on Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons of the Nicotine Reward - Addiction Neurocircuitry

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jed E; Dehkordi, Ozra; Manaye, Kebreten F; Millis, Richard M; Cianaki, Salman Ameri; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2016-01-01

    The sensory experience of smoking is a key component of nicotine addiction known to result, in part, from stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at peripheral sensory nerve endings. Such stimulation of nAChRs is followed by activation of neurons at multiple sites in the mesocorticolimbic reward pathways. However, the neurochemical profiles of CNS cells that mediate the peripheral sensory impact of nicotine remain unknown. In the present study in mice, we first used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify CNS cells stimulated by nicotine (NIC, 40 μg/kg, IP) and by a peripherally-acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM, 30 μg/kg, IP). Sequential double-labelling was then performed to determine whether noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons of the nicotine reward-addiction circuitry were primary targets of NIC and NIC-PM. Double-labelling of NIC and/or NIC-PM activated c-Fos immunoreactive cells with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed no apparent c-Fos expression by the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). With the exception of sparse numbers of TH immunoreactive D11 cells, dopamine-containing neurons in other areas of the reward-addiction circuitry, namely periaqueductal gray, and dorsal raphe, were also devoid of c-Fos immunoreactivity. Noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus (LC), known to innervate VTA, were activated by both NIC and NIC-PM. These results demonstrate that noradrenergic neurons of LC are among the first structures that are stimulated by single acute IP injection of NIC and NIC-PM. Dopaminergic neurons of VTA and other CNS sites, did not respond to acute IP administration of NIC or NIC-PM by induction of c-Fos. PMID:27347434

  18. Pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons through paraplegin against 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun Ki; Park, Hyeon Soo; Cho, Jea Hyeon; Kim, Gon Sup; Won, Chungkil

    2015-01-21

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates various physiological and psychological functions, such as movement, motivation, behavior, and learning. DA exerts its function through DA receptors and a series of studies have reported the role of DAergic receptors in preventing DAergic neuronal degeneration. Here, we studied the DA receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of the D2-like receptor agonists against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced DAergic neurodegeneration. D2-like receptor agonists were administered in the substantia nigra in vivo and to primary cultured neurons. Treatment of 6-OHDA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and paraplegin (mitochondrial regulation protein) immunoreactivity, whereas pretreatment with quinpirole (a full D2-like receptor agonist) preserved TH and paraplegin reactivity. This led us to test which DA receptors were necessary for the neuroprotective effect and whether paraplegin can be regulated by D2 or D3 receptor agonists. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor selective agonist, sumanirole, did not preserve TH and paraplegin reactivity from 6-OHDA. However, the D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole, protected TH reactivity and restored paraplegin expression to the control level in the presence of 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pretreatment with the D3 receptor antagonist GR103691 reduced TH and paraplegin expression levels. These results suggest that the D3 receptor agonist may protect DA neurons from the effect of 6-OHDA through the modulation of the mitochondrial regulation protein paraplegin. PMID:25514384

  19. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  20. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  1. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  2. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  3. Detailed Analysis of the Genetic and Epigenetic Signatures of iPSC-Derived Mesodiencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Reinhard; Smallwood, Sebastien A.; Veenvliet, Jesse V.; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Peng, Su-Ping; Chakrabarty, Koushik; Groot-Koerkamp, Marian J.A.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Wesseling, Evelyn; Kelsey, Gavin; Boddeke, Erik; Smidt, Marten P.; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for in vitro generation of disease-relevant cell types, such as mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons involved in Parkinson’s disease. Although iPSC-derived midbrain DA neurons have been generated, detailed genetic and epigenetic characterizations of such neurons are lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the authenticity of iPSC-derived DA neurons obtained by established protocols. We FACS purified mdDA (Pitx3Gfp/+) neurons derived from mouse iPSCs and primary mdDA (Pitx3Gfp/+) neurons to analyze and compare their genetic and epigenetic features. Although iPSC-derived DA neurons largely adopted characteristics of their in vivo counterparts, relevant deviations in global gene expression and DNA methylation were found. Hypermethylated genes, mainly involved in neurodevelopment and basic neuronal functions, consequently showed reduced expression levels. Such abnormalities should be addressed because they might affect unambiguous long-term functionality and hamper the potential of iPSC-derived DA neurons for in vitro disease modeling or cell-based therapy. PMID:24749075

  4. Relative contributions of severe dopaminergic neuron ablation and dopamine depletion to cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R Garrett; Gibbs, Jeffrey T; Melief, Erica J; Postupna, Nadia O; Sherfield, Emily E; Wilson, Angela; Keene, C Dirk; Montine, Thomas J; Palmiter, Richard D; Darvas, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and produces a movement disorder and cognitive impairment that becomes more extensive with the duration of the disease. To what extent cognitive impairment in advanced PD can be attributed to severe loss of dopamine (DA) signaling is not well understood. Furthermore, it is unclear if the loss of DA neurons contributes to the cognitive impairment caused by the reduction in DA signaling. We generated genetic mouse models with equally severe chronic loss of DA achieved by either extensive ablation of DA neurons or inactivation of DA synthesis from preserved neurons and compared their motor and cognitive performance. Motor behaviors were equally blunted in both models, but we observed that DA neuron ablation caused more severe cognitive deficits than DA depletion. Both models had marked deficits in cue-discrimination learning. Yet, deficits in cue-discrimination learning were more severe in mice with DA neuron ablation and only mice with DA neuron ablation had drastically impaired performance in spatial learning, spatial memory and object memory tests. These results indicate that while a severe reduction in DA signaling results in motor and cognitive impairments, the loss of DA neurons promotes more extensive cognitive deficits and suggest that a loss of additional factors that depend on DA neurons may participate in the progressive cognitive decline found in patients with PD. PMID:26079646

  5. HIV Subtypes B and C gp120 and Methamphetamine Interaction: Dopaminergic System Implicates Differential Neuronal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Atluri, Venkata S R; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Agudelo, Marisela; Perez, Suray; Yoo, Changwon; Raymond, Andrea D; Ding, Hong; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2015-01-01

    HIV subtypes or clades differentially induce HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and substance abuse is known to accelerate HIV disease progression. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 plays a major role in binding and budding in the central nervous system (CNS) and impacts dopaminergic functions. However, the mechanisms utilized by HIV-1 clades to exert differential effects and the methamphetamine (METH)-associated dopaminergic dysfunction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that clade B and C gp120 structural sequences, modeling based analysis, dopaminergic effect, and METH potentiate neuronal toxicity in astrocytes. We evaluated the effect of clade B and C gp120 and/or METH on the DRD-2, DAT, CaMKs and CREBP transcription. Both the structural sequence and modeling studies demonstrated that clade B gp120 in V1-V4, α -2 and N-glycosylated sites are distinct from clade C gp120. The distinct structure and sequence variation of clade B gp120 differentially impact DRD-2, DAT, CaMK II and CaMK IV mRNA, protein and intracellular expression compared to clade C gp120. However, CREB transcription is upregulated by both clade B and C gp120, and METH co-treatment potentiated these effects. In conclusion, distinct structural sequences of HIV-1 clade B and C gp120 differentially regulate the dopaminergic pathway and METH potentiates neurotoxicity. PMID:26057350

  6. Recent Advances in Imaging of Dopaminergic Neurons for Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lie-Hang; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Tseng, Yu-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine is the most intensely studied monoaminergic neurotransmitter. Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in regulating several aspects of basic brain function, including motor, behavior, motivation, and working memory. To date, there are numerous positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers available for targeting different steps in the process of dopaminergic neurotransmission, which permits us to quantify dopaminergic activity in the living human brain. Degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system causes Parkinson's disease (PD) and related Parkinsonism. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that has been classically associated with the reinforcing effects of drug abuse. Abnormalities within the dopamine system in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dopamine receptors play an important role in schizophrenia and the effect of neuroleptics is through blockage of dopamine D2 receptors. This review will concentrate on the radiotracers that have been developed for imaging dopaminergic neurons, describe the clinical aspects in the assessment of neuropsychiatric disorders, and suggest future directions in the diagnosis and management of such disorders. PMID:22570524

  7. HIV Subtypes B and C gp120 and Methamphetamine Interaction: Dopaminergic System Implicates Differential Neuronal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V. K.; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M.; Agudelo, Marisela; Perez, Suray; Yoo, Changwon; Raymond, Andrea D.; Ding, Hong; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2015-01-01

    HIV subtypes or clades differentially induce HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and substance abuse is known to accelerate HIV disease progression. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 plays a major role in binding and budding in the central nervous system (CNS) and impacts dopaminergic functions. However, the mechanisms utilized by HIV-1 clades to exert differential effects and the methamphetamine (METH)-associated dopaminergic dysfunction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that clade B and C gp120 structural sequences, modeling based analysis, dopaminergic effect, and METH potentiate neuronal toxicity in astrocytes. We evaluated the effect of clade B and C gp120 and/or METH on the DRD-2, DAT, CaMKs and CREBP transcription. Both the structural sequence and modeling studies demonstrated that clade B gp120 in V1-V4, α -2 and N-glycosylated sites are distinct from clade C gp120. The distinct structure and sequence variation of clade B gp120 differentially impact DRD-2, DAT, CaMK II and CaMK IV mRNA, protein and intracellular expression compared to clade C gp120. However, CREB transcription is upregulated by both clade B and C gp120, and METH co-treatment potentiated these effects. In conclusion, distinct structural sequences of HIV-1 clade B and C gp120 differentially regulate the dopaminergic pathway and METH potentiates neurotoxicity. PMID:26057350

  8. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to dopaminergic neurons in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Noggle, Scott A; Palmarini, Gail M; Weiler, Deb A; Lyons, Ian G; Pensa, Kate A; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Davidson, Bruce P; Lambert, Nevin A; Condie, Brian G

    2004-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease cell therapy will require the development of simple and reliable cell differentiation protocols. The use of cell cocultures, added extracellular signaling factors, or transgenic approaches to drive hESC differentiation could lead to additional regulatory as well as cell production delays for these therapies. Because the neuronal cell lineage seems to require limited or no signaling for its formation, we tested the ability of hESCs to differentiate to form dopamine-producing neurons in a simple serum-free suspension culture system. BG01 and BG03 hESCs were differentiated as suspension aggregates, and neural progenitors and neurons were detectable after 2-4 weeks. Plated neurons responded appropriately to electrophysiological cues. This differentiation was inhibited by early exposure to bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4, but a pulse of BMP-4 from days 5 to 9 caused induction of peripheral neuronal differentiation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of multiple markers of the midbrain dopaminergic phenotype in serum-free differentiations. Neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were killed by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic catecholamine. Upon plating, these cells released dopamine and other catecholamines in response to K+ depolarization. Surviving TH+ neurons, derived from the cells differentiated in serum-free suspension cultures, were detected 8 weeks after transplantation into 6-OHDA-lesioned rat brains. This work suggests that hESCs can differentiate in simple serum-free suspension cultures to produce the large number of cells required for transplantation studies. PMID:15579641

  9. Dopaminergic Neurons and Brain Reward Pathways: From Neurogenesis to Circuit Assembly.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sarah X; Huang, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area regulate extrapyramidal movement and important cognitive functions, including motivation, reward associations, and habit learning. Dysfunctions in DA neuron circuitry have been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction and schizophrenia, whereas selective degeneration of DA neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta is a key neuropathological feature in Parkinson disease. Efforts to understand these disorders have focused on dissecting the underlying causes, as well as developing therapeutic strategies to replenish dopamine deficiency. In particular, the promise of cell replacement therapies for clinical intervention has led to extensive research in the identification of mechanisms involved in DA neuron development. It is hoped that a comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms will lead to therapeutic strategies that improve the efficiency of DA neuron production, engraftment, and function. This review provides a comprehensive discussion on how Wnt/β-catenin and sonic hedgehog-Smoothened signaling mechanisms control the specification and expansion of DA progenitors and the differentiation of DA neurons. We also discuss how mechanisms involving transforming growth factor-β and transcriptional cofactor homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 regulate the survival and maturation of DA neurons in early postnatal life. These results not only reveal fundamental mechanisms regulating DA neuron development, but also provide important insights to their potential contributions to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26724386

  10. The fate of striatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Lévesque, Martin; Parent, André

    2007-01-01

    The striatum harbours a population of dopaminergic neurons that is thought to act as a local source of dopamine (DA). This neuronal population increases in size in animal models of Parkinson's disease, where striatal DA levels are low, but its fate in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea is poorly known. In this study, we used antibodies raised against the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a faithful marker of dopaminergic neurons, to compare, by means of stereological counting methods, the number of striatal TH+ neurons on post-mortem brain sections from Parkinson's disease patients, Huntington's disease patients and age-matched controls. Propidium iodide nuclear staining was also performed to avoid counting short TH+ axonal segments that bear a large swollen varicosity and resemble small bipolar neurons. In normal subjects, TH+ neurons were scattered throughout the striatum, but they abounded preferentially in the ventral portion of the structure and were more numerous in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. They displayed a multipolar cell body of medium size (10-20 mum in diameter) that emitted 3-5 smooth dendrites, a typical characteristic of striatal interneurons. These TH+ cells were rarely found in the small TH-poor striosomes, most of them being embedded in the large TH-rich extrastriosomal matrix. The number of striatal TH+ neurons was also found to vary according to an inverse relation with the age of the subjects. In pathological brains, the morphological characteristics of the striatal TH+ neurons were relatively unaltered, but the number of such neurons was markedly reduced compared with controls. The striatum of Parkinson's disease patients was found to contain six times less TH+ neurons than that of controls, whereas the striatum of Huntington's disease patients was largely devoid of such neurons. These findings are at odds with the results obtained in rodent and monkey models of Parkinson's disease, in which the number of

  11. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  12. Neuromelanin activates microglia and induces degeneration of dopaminergic neurons: implications for progression of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Phillips, Kester; Wielgus, Albert R.; Liu, Jie; Albertini, Alberto; Zucca, Fabio A.; Faust, Rudolph; Qian, Steven Y.; Miller, David S.; Chignell, Colin F.; Wilson, Belinda; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Przedborski, Serge; Joset, Danielle; Loike, John; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Sulzer, David; Zecca, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is a progressive loss of neuromelanin (NM)-containing dopamine (DA) neurons in substantia nigra (SN) which is associated with microgliosis and presence of extracellular NM. Herein, we have investigated the interplay between microglia and human NM on the degeneration of SN dopaminergic neurons. Although NM particles are phagocytised and degraded by microglia within minutes in vitro, extracellular NM particles induce microglial activation and ensuing production of superoxide, nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and pro-inflammatory factors. Furthermore, NM produces, in a microglia-depended manner, neurodegeneration in primary ventral midbrain cultures. Neurodegeneration was effectively attenuated with microglia derived from mice deficient in macrophage antigen complex-1 (Mac-1), a microglial integrin receptor involved in the initiation of phagocytosis. Neuronal loss was also attenuated with microglia derived from mice deficient in phagocytic oxidase (PHOX), a subunit of NADPH oxidase, that is responsible for superoxide and H2O2 production, or apocyanin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. In vivo, NM injected into rat SN produces microgliosis and a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons. Thus, these results show that extracellular NM can activate microglia, which in turn, may induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration in PD. Our study may have far-reaching implications, both pathogenic and therapeutic. PMID:19957214

  13. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  14. Functional Interplay between Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Neuronal Systems during Development and Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Dymecki, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The complex integration of neurotransmitter signals in the nervous system contributes to the shaping of behavioral and emotional constitutions throughout development. Imbalance among these signals may result in pathological behaviors and psychiatric illnesses. Therefore, a better understanding of the interplay between neurotransmitter systems holds potential to facilitate therapeutic development. Of particular clinical interest are the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, as both modulate a broad array of behaviors and emotions and have been implicated in a wide range of affective disorders. Here we review evidence speaking to an interaction between the dopaminergic and serotonergic neuronal systems across development. We highlight data stemming from developmental, functional, and clinical studies, reflecting the importance of this transmonoaminergic interplay. PMID:25747116

  15. Histone Hyperacetylation Up-regulates Protein Kinase Cδ in Dopaminergic Neurons to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:25342743

  16. Activity-dependent regulation of NMDA receptors in substantia nigra dopaminergic neurones.

    PubMed

    Wild, Angela R; Jones, Susan; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2014-02-15

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are Ca(2+)-permeable glutamate receptors that play a critical role in synaptic plasticity and promoting cell survival. However, overactive NMDARs can trigger cell death signalling pathways and have been implicated in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) pathology in Parkinson's disease. Calcium ion influx through NMDARs recruits Ca(2+)-dependent proteins that can regulate NMDAR activity. The surface density of NMDARs can also be regulated dynamically in response to receptor activity via Ca(2+)-independent mechanisms. We have investigated the activity-dependent regulation of NMDARs in SNc dopaminergic neurones. Repeated whole-cell agonist applications resulted in a decline in the amplitude of NMDAR currents (current run-down) that was use dependent and not readily reversible. Run-down was reduced by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) buffering or by reducing Ca(2+) influx but did not appear to be mediated by the same regulatory proteins that cause Ca(2+)-dependent run-down in hippocampal neurones. The NMDAR current run-down may be mediated in part by a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism, because intracellular dialysis with a dynamin-inhibitory peptide reduced run-down, suggesting a role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the regulation of the surface density of receptors. Synaptic NMDARs were also subject to current run-down during repeated low-frequency synaptic stimulation in a Ca(2+)-dependent but dynamin-independent manner. Thus, we report, for the first time, regulation of NMDARs in SNc dopaminergic neurones by changes in intracellular Ca(2+) at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites and provide evidence for activity-dependent changes in receptor trafficking. These mechanisms may contribute to intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in dopaminergic neurones by limiting Ca(2+) influx through the NMDAR. PMID:24344168

  17. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  18. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by hRheb(S16H) transduction of dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Nam, Jin Han; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα). It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb), with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H)], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H)-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD. PMID:25799580

  19. Effects of Forskolin on Trefoil factor 1 expression in cultured ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Ducray, A D; Widmer, H R; Meyer, M

    2015-12-01

    Trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) belongs to a family of secreted peptides that are mainly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Notably, TFF1 has been suggested to operate as a neuropeptide, however, its specific cellular expression, regulation and function remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that TFF1 is expressed in developing and adult rat ventral mesencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons. Here, we investigated the expression of TFF1 in rat ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons (embryonic day 14) grown in culture for 5, 7 or 10 days in the absence (controls) or presence of either glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Forskolin or the combination. No TFF1-ir cells were identified at day 5 and only a few at day 7, whereas TH was markedly expressed at both time points. At day 10, several TFF1-ir cells were detected, and their numbers were significantly increased after the addition of GDNF (2.2-fold) or Forskolin (4.1-fold) compared to controls. Furthermore, the combination of GDNF and Forskolin had an additive effect and increased the number of TFF1-ir cells by 5.6-fold compared to controls. TFF1 expression was restricted to neuronal cells, and the percentage of TH/TFF1 co-expressing cells was increased to the same extent in GDNF and Forskolin-treated cultures (4-fold) as compared to controls. Interestingly, the combination of GDNF and Forskolin resulted in a significantly increased co-expression (8-fold) of TH/TFF1, which could indicate that GDNF and Forskolin targeted different subpopulations of TH/TFF1 neurons. Short-term treatment with Forskolin resulted in an increased number of TFF1-ir cells, and this effect was significantly reduced by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 or the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89, suggesting that Forskolin induced TFF1 expression through diverse signaling pathways. In conclusion, distinct populations of cultured dopaminergic neurons express TFF1, and their numbers can be

  20. Assessing neurodegenerative phenotypes in Drosophila dopaminergic neurons by climbing assays and whole brain immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Barone, Maria Cecilia; Bohmann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a valuable model organism to study aging and pathological degenerative processes in the nervous system. The advantages of the fly as an experimental system include its genetic tractability, short life span and the possibility to observe and quantitatively analyze complex behaviors. The expression of disease-linked genes in specific neuronal populations of the Drosophila brain, can be used to model human neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's (5). Dopaminergic (DA) neurons are among the most vulnerable neuronal populations in the aging human brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the accelerated loss of DA neurons leads to a progressive and irreversible decline in locomotor function. In addition to age and exposure to environmental toxins, loss of DA neurons is exacerbated by specific mutations in the coding or promoter regions of several genes. The identification of such PD-associated alleles provides the experimental basis for the use of Drosophila as a model to study neurodegeneration of DA neurons in vivo. For example, the expression of the PD-linked human α-synuclein gene in Drosophila DA neurons recapitulates some features of the human disease, e.g. progressive loss of DA neurons and declining locomotor function (2). Accordingly, this model has been successfully used to identify potential therapeutic targets in PD (8). Here we describe two assays that have commonly been used to study age-dependent neurodegeneration of DA neurons in Drosophila: a climbing assay based on the startle-induced negative geotaxis response and tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining of whole adult brain mounts to monitor the number of DA neurons at different ages. In both cases, in vivo expression of UAS transgenes specifically in DA neurons can be achieved by using a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter-Gal4 driver line (3, 10). PMID:23644755

  1. Differential Neuronal Plasticity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells From Exfoliated Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Towards Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Debanjana; Kanafi, Mohammad; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan; Datta, Indrani

    2016-09-01

    Based on early occurrence in chronological age, stem-cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) has been reported to possess better differentiation-potential toward certain cell-lineage in comparison to stem-cells from adult teeth (DPSCs). Whether this same property between them extends for the yield of functional central nervous system neurons is still not evaluated. Hence, we aim to assess the neuronal plasticity of SHED in comparison to DPSCs toward dopaminergic-neurons and further, if the difference is reflected in a differential expression of sonic-hedgehog (SHH)-receptors and basal-expressions of tyrosine-hydroxylase [TH; through cAMP levels]. Human SHED and DPSCs were exposed to midbrain-cues [SHH, fibroblast growth-factor8, and basic fibroblast growth-factor], and their molecular, immunophenotypical, and functional characterization was performed at different time-points of induction. Though SHED and DPSCs spontaneously expressed early-neuronal and neural-crest marker in their naïve state, only SHED expressed a high basal-expression of TH. The upregulation of dopaminergic transcription-factors Nurr1, Engrailed1, and Pitx3 was more pronounced in DPSCs. The yield of TH-expressing cells decreased from 49.8% to 32.16% in SHED while it increased from 8.09% to 77.47% in DPSCs. Dopamine release and intracellular-Ca(2+) influx upon stimulation (KCl and ATP) was higher in induced DPSCs. Significantly lower-expression of SHH-receptors was noted in naïve SHED than DPSCs, which may explain the differential neuronal plasticity. In addition, unlike DPSCs, SHED showed a down-regulation of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) upon exposure to SHH; possibly another contributor to the lesser differentiation-potential. Our data clearly demonstrates for the first time that DPSCs possess superior neuronal plasticity toward dopaminergic-neurons than SHED; influenced by higher SHH-receptor and lower basal TH expression. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2048-2063, 2016. © 2016

  2. Aquaporin-4 deficiency diminishes the differential degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Yang, Beibei; Sun, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Mengdi; Ding, Jianhua; Fang, Feng; Fan, Yi; Hu, Gang

    2016-02-12

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily due to the progressive, selective and irreversible loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Interestingly, DA neurons in the ventral and lateral SN are much more susceptible than adjacent dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) not only in human PD but in many PD model systems. However, the molecular causes of regional vulnerability in PD remain unknown. In our previous studies, we established acute PD animal models by administration of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine), and found that AQP4 knockout mice were significantly more prone to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we further observe that AQP4 deficiency resulted in the same susceptible to MPTP between SN DA neuron and VTA neurons both in acute and chronic PD model. Moreover, we show that AQP4 deficiency increased the numbers of reactive astrocytes and microglias not only in the SN and but also in the VTA under basal and MPTP-induced situations. Meanwhile, AQP4 deficiency disrupted the balance of the pro-inflammatory cytokine/neurotrophin in midbrain. Taken together, these results demonstrate that glial AQP4 is involved in the susceptibility differences of DA neurons between SN and VTA, although the precise mechanism of AQP4 remains to be explored. Moreover, these findings also suggest that these susceptibility differences are not only due to intrinsic neuronal factors, but also attribute to differences in astrocytes of these regions. PMID:26748031

  3. Aminochrome induces dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction: a new animal model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea; Muñoz, Patricia; Paris, Irmgard; Díaz-Veliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Inzunza, Jose; Hultenby, Kjell; Cardenas, Cesar; Jaña, Fabián; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Gysling, Katia; Abarca, Jorge; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2016-09-01

    L-Dopa continues to be the gold drug in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment from 1967. The failure to translate successful results from preclinical to clinical studies can be explained by the use of preclinical models which do not reflect what happens in the disease since these induce a rapid and extensive degeneration; for example, MPTP induces a severe Parkinsonism in only 3 days in humans contrasting with the slow degeneration and progression of PD. This study presents a new anatomy and develops preclinical model based on aminochrome which induces a slow and progressive dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons. The unilateral injection of aminochrome into rat striatum resulted in (1) contralateral rotation when the animals are stimulated with apomorphine; (2) absence of significant loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuronal elements both in substantia nigra and striatum; (3) cell shrinkage; (4) significant reduction of dopamine release; (5) significant increase in GABA release; (6) significant decrease in the number of monoaminergic presynaptic vesicles; (7) significant increase of dopamine concentration inside of monoaminergic vesicles; (8) significant increase of damaged mitochondria; (9) significant decrease of ATP level in the striatum (10) significant decrease in basal and maximal mitochondrial respiration. These results suggest that aminochrome induces dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons where the contralateral behavior can be explained by aminochrome-induced ATP decrease required both for anterograde transport of synaptic vesicles and dopamine release. Aminochrome could be implemented as a new model neurotoxin to study Parkinson's disease. PMID:27001668

  4. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26839468

  5. Presynaptic dopamine D2-like receptors inhibit excitatory transmission onto rat ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Eiko; Momiyama, Toshihiko

    2000-01-01

    The effects of dopamine (DA) on non-NMDA glutamatergic transmission onto dopaminergic neurones in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were examined in rat midbrain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. EPSCs in dopaminergic neurones evoked by focal stimulation within the VTA were reversibly blocked by 5 μm CNQX in the presence of bicuculline (20 μm), strychnine (0.5 μm) and D-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5, 25 μm). Bath application of DA reduced the amplitude of EPSCs up to 65.1 ± 9.52% in a concentration-dependent manner between 0.3–1000 μm (IC50, 16.0 μm) without affecting the holding current at −60 mV measured using a Cs+-filled electrode. The effect of DA on evoked EPSCs was mimicked by the D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole but not by the D1-like receptor agonist SKF 81297, and was antagonized by the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride (KB, 0.96 μm), but not by the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (KB, 228.6 μm). Dopamine (30 μm) reduced the mean frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) without affecting their mean amplitude, and the DA-induced effect on the mEPSCs was dependent on the external Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that afferent glutamatergic fibres which terminate on VTA dopaminergic neurones possess presynaptic D2-like receptors, activation of which inhibits glutamate release by reducing Ca2+ influx. PMID:10673553

  6. A Conserved Role for p48 Homologs in Protecting Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bou Dib, Peter; Gnägi, Bettina; Daly, Fiona; Sabado, Virginie; Tas, Damla; Glauser, Dominique A.; Meister, Peter; Nagoshi, Emi

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Both environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Although several genes linked to rare familial PD have been identified, endogenous risk factors for sporadic PD, which account for the majority of PD cases, remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with sporadic PD in neurodevelopmental genes including the transcription factor p48/ptf1a. Here we investigate whether p48 plays a role in the survival of DA neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that a Drosophila p48 homolog, 48-related-2 (Fer2), is expressed in and required for the development and survival of DA neurons in the protocerebral anterior medial (PAM) cluster. Loss of Fer2 expression in adulthood causes progressive PAM neuron degeneration in aging flies along with mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to the progressive locomotor deficits. The oxidative stress challenge upregulates Fer2 expression and exacerbates the PAM neuron degeneration in Fer2 loss-of-function mutants. hlh-13, the worm homolog of p48, is also expressed in DA neurons. Unlike the fly counterpart, hlh-13 loss-of-function does not impair development or survival of DA neurons under normal growth conditions. Yet, similar to Fer2, hlh-13 expression is upregulated upon an acute oxidative challenge and is required for the survival of DA neurons under oxidative stress in adult worms. Taken together, our results indicate that p48 homologs share a role in protecting DA neurons from oxidative stress and degeneration, and suggest that loss-of-function of p48 homologs in flies and worms provides novel tools to study gene-environmental interactions affecting DA neuron survival. PMID:25340742

  7. Zdhhc15b Regulates Differentiation of Diencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Chen, Xueran; Shi, Wei; Yao, Linli; Gao, Ming; Yang, Yang; Hao, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    The aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine (DHHC) protein family shares a 50-amino acid cysteine-rich domain with a conserved DHHC signature motif. DHHC proteins play a critical role in several biological processes. Several DHHC family members have been implicated in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity. And disruptions to their function can lead to disease in the nervous system. Here, we investigate the role of Zdhhc15b, a DHHC family member, in neuro development in zebrafish. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed that zdhhc15b, an ortholog to human ZDHHC15, is abundant in zebrafish (Danio rerio) forebrain, especially in the diencephalon. Downregulation of zdhhc15b resulted in a smaller diencephalon and a reduction in mature dopaminergic neurons (DA neurons). In the meanshile, mutant zdhhc15b zebrafish was associated with poor learning behavior as detected by T-maze testing. The expression of zdhhc15b was upregulated during DA neuronal differentiation whereas knock-down of zdhhc15b diminished DA neuronal differentiation. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunofluorescence of cultured DA neurons in vitro also showed that DA neurons were immature following zdhhc15b knock-down. Consistent with the decreased number of DA neurons following knock-down of zdhhc15b, the expression of fate determination-related transcription factors such as nurr1, foxA2, and lmx1a were also reduced in morphant zebrafish. Our results reveal that zdhhc15b controls DA neuronal fate decisions by regulating differentiation but not progenitor cell proliferation or DA neuronal survival. PMID:26095893

  8. Sigma-1 receptor deficiency reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonism and death of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J; Sha, S; Zhou, L; Wang, C; Yin, J; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) has been reported to be decreased in nigrostriatal motor system of Parkinson's disease patients. Using heterozygous and homozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R+/− and σ1R−/−) mice, we investigated the influence of σ1R deficiency on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-impaired nigrostriatal motor system. The injection of MPTP for 5 weeks in wild-type mice (MPTP-WT mice), but not in σ1R+/− or σ1R−/− mice (MPTP-σ1R+/− or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice), caused motor deficits and ~40% death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta with an elevation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) NR2B phosphorylation. The σ1R antagonist NE100 or the NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 could alleviate the motor deficits and the death of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-WT mice. By contrast, MPTP-σ1R+/− mice treated with the σ1R agonist PRE084 or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice treated with the NMDAr agonist NMDA appeared to have similar motor deficits and loss of dopaminergic neurons as MPTP-WT mice. The pharmacological or genetic inactivation of σ1R suppressed the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in substantia nigra, which was corrected by NMDA. The activation of σ1R by PRE084 enhanced the DAT expression in WT mice or σ1R+/− mice. By contrast, the level of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in σ1R+/− mice or σ1R−/− mice had no difference from WT mice. Interestingly, MPTP-WT mice showed the reduction in the levels of DAT and VMAT2, but MPTP-σ1R−/− mice did not. The inactivation of σ1R by NE100 could prevent the reduction of VMAT2 in MPTP-WT mice. In addition, the activation of microglia cells in substantia nigra was equally enhanced in MPTP-WT mice and MPTP-σ1R−/− mice. The number of activated astrocytes in MPTP-σ1R−/− mice was less than that in MPTP-WT mice. The findings indicate that the σ1R deficiency through suppressing NMDAr function and DAT expression can reduce MPTP-induced death of

  9. Maneb-induced dopaminergic neuronal death is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity: Results from primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons cultured from individual Ndufs4+/+ and Ndufs4-/- mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-01-01

    Primary cultures from embryonic mouse ventral mesencephalon are widely used for investigating the mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease models. Specifically, single mouse or embryo cultures from littermates can be very useful for comparative studies involving transgenic mice when the neuron cultures are to be prepared before genotyping. However, preparing single mouse embryo culture is technically challenging because of the small number of cells present in the mesencephalon of each embryo (150,000-300,000), of which only 0.5-5% are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) -positive, dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we optimized the procedure for preparing primary mesencephalic neuron cultures from individual mouse embryos. Mesencephalic neurons that are dissociated delicately, plated on Aclar film coverslips, and incubated in DMEM supplemented with FBS for 5 days and then N2 supplement for 1 day resulted in the best survival of dopaminergic neurons from each embryo. Using this optimized method, we prepared mesencephalic neuron cultures from single Ndufs4+/+ or Ndufs4-/- embryos, and investigated the role of mitochondrial complex I in maneb-induced dopamine neuron death. Our results suggest that maneb toxicity to dopamine neurons is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity in Ndufs4-/- cultures. PMID:25275677

  10. X-ray fluorescence analysis of iron and manganese distribution in primary dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dučić, Tanja; Barski, Elisabeth; Salome, Murielle; Koch, Jan C; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. X-ray microscopy combined with a cryogenic setup is a powerful method for elemental imaging in low concentrations and high resolution in intact cells, eliminating the need for fixation and sectioning of the specimen. Here, we performed an elemental distribution analysis in cultured primary midbrain neurons with a step size in the order of 300 nm and ∼ 0.1 ppm sensitivity under cryo conditions by using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. We report the elemental mappings on the subcellular level in primary mouse dopaminergic (DAergic) and non-DAergic neurons after treatment with transition metals. Application of Fe2+ resulted in largely extracellular accumulation of iron without preference for the neuronal transmitter subtype. A quantification of different Fe oxidation states was performed using X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. After treatment with Mn2+, a cytoplasmic/paranuclear localization of Mn was observed preferentially in DAergic neurons, while no prominent signal was detectable after Mn3+ treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis correlated the preferential Mn uptake to increased expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in DAergic neurons. We discuss the implications of this differential elemental distribution for the selective vulnerability of DAergic neurons and Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23106162

  11. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  12. Induction of A9 dopaminergic neurons from neural stem cells improves motor function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Fiona E; Scott, Sarah A; Tyers, Pam; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Zufferey, Romain; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2008-03-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are widely endorsed as a cell source for replacement strategies in neurodegenerative disease. However, their usefulness is currently limited by the inability to induce specific neurotransmitter phenotypes in these cells. In order to direct dopaminergic neuronal fate, we overexpressed Pitx3 in NSCs that were then exposed to E11 developing ventral mesencephalon (VM) in explant culture. This resulted in a significant potentiation of dopaminergic differentiation of the cells. When transplanted into the 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinsonian rats, these cografts of VM and Pitx3 overexpressing NSCs resulted in a significant restitution of motor function. In addition, there were greater numbers of Girk2 positive A9 neurons in the periphery of the transplants that were NSC derived. This demonstrates that given the correct signals, NSCs can be induced to become dopaminergic neurons that can differentiate into the correct nigrastriatal phenotype required for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:18202103

  13. Opposing Dopaminergic and GABAergic Neurons Control the Duration and Persistence of Copulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Crickmore, Michael A.; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavioral persistence is a major factor in determiningwhen and under which circumstances animals will terminate their current activity and transition into more profitable, appropriate, or urgent behavior. We show that, for the first 5 min of copulation in Drosophila, stressful stimuli do not interrupt mating, whereas 10 min later, even minor perturbations are sufficient to terminate copulation. This decline in persistence occurs as the probability of successful mating increases and is promoted by approximately eight sexually dimorphic, GABAergic interneurons of the male abdominal ganglion. When these interneurons were silenced, persistence increased and males copulated far longer than required for successful mating. When these interneurons were stimulated, persistence decreased and copulations were shortened. In contrast, dopaminergic neurons of the ventral nerve cord promote copulation persistence and extend copulation duration. Thus, copulation duration in Drosophila is a product of gradually declining persistence controlled by opposing neuronal populations using conserved neurotransmission systems. PMID:24209625

  14. Alcohol consumption induces global gene expression changes in VTA dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Marballi, K; Genabai, N K; Blednov, Y A; Harris, R A; Ponomarev, I

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with dysregulation in the neural circuitry that mediates motivated and goal-directed behaviors. The dopaminergic (DA) connection between the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens is viewed as a critical component of the neurocircuitry mediating alcohol's rewarding and behavioral effects. We sought to determine the effects of binge alcohol drinking on global gene expression in VTA DA neurons. Alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J × FVB/NJ F1 hybrid female mice were exposed to a modified drinking in the dark (DID) procedure for 3 weeks, while control animals had access to water only. Global gene expression of laser-captured tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive VTA DA neurons was measured using microarrays. A total of 644 transcripts were differentially expressed between the drinking and nondrinking mice, and 930 transcripts correlated with alcohol intake during the last 2 days of drinking in the alcohol group. Bioinformatics analysis of alcohol-responsive genes identified molecular pathways and networks perturbed in DA neurons by alcohol consumption, which included neuroimmune and epigenetic functions, alcohol metabolism and brain disorders. The majority of genes with high and specific expression in DA neurons were downregulated by or negatively correlated with alcohol consumption, suggesting a decreased activity of DA neurons in high drinking animals. These changes in the DA transcriptome provide a foundation for alcohol-induced neuroadaptations that may play a crucial role in the transition to addiction. PMID:26482798

  15. Non-linear developmental trajectory of electrical phenotype in rat substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Martial A; Woodhouse, Adele; Amendola, Julien; Goaillard, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Neurons have complex electrophysiological properties, however, it is often difficult to determine which properties are the most relevant to neuronal function. By combining current-clamp measurements of electrophysiological properties with multi-variate analysis (hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis), we were able to characterize the postnatal development of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons' electrical phenotype in an unbiased manner, such that subtle changes in phenotype could be analyzed. We show that the intrinsic electrical phenotype of these neurons follows a non-linear trajectory reaching maturity by postnatal day 14, with two developmental transitions occurring between postnatal days 3–5 and 9–11. This approach also predicted which parameters play a critical role in phenotypic variation, enabling us to determine (using pharmacology, dynamic-clamp) that changes in the leak, sodium and calcium-activated potassium currents are central to these two developmental transitions. This analysis enables an unbiased definition of neuronal type/phenotype that is applicable to a range of research questions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04059.001 PMID:25329344

  16. Withania somnifera alleviates parkinsonian phenotypes by inhibiting apoptotic pathways in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jay; Chouhan, Shikha; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Westfall, Susan; Rai, Sachchida Nand; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2014-12-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) are environmental toxins that have been experimentally used to induce selective damage of dopaminergic neurons leading to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the mechanism of this selective neuronal toxicity in not fully understood, oxidative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of PD. The present study investigates the mechanisms of neuroprotection elicited by Withania somnifera (Ws), a herb traditionally recognized by the Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda. An ethanolic root extract of Ws was co-treated with the MB-PQ induced mouse model of PD and was shown to significantly rescue canonical indicators of PD including compromised locomotor activity, reduced dopamine in the substantia nigra and various aspects of oxidative damage. In particular, Ws reduced the expression of iNOS, a measure of oxidative stress. Ws also significantly improved the MB + PQ mediated induction of a pro-apoptotic state by reducing Bax and inducing Bcl-2 protein expression, respectively. Finally, Ws reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory marker of astrocyte activation, GFAP. Altogether, the present study suggests that Ws treatment provides nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuroprotection against MB-PQ induced Parkinsonism by the modulation of oxidative stress and apoptotic machinery possibly accounting for the behavioural effects. PMID:25403619

  17. A critical period of vulnerability to adolescent stress: epigenetic mediators in mesocortical dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Minae; Lee, Richard S; Tanaka, Teppei; Okada, Kinya; Kano, Shin-Ichi; Sawa, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The molecular basis of vulnerability to stress during the adolescent period is largely unknown. To identify potential molecular mediators that may play a role in stress-induced behavioral deficits, we imposed social isolation on a genetically vulnerable mouse model. We report that 3-week (5-8 weeks of age) adolescent stress in combination with disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (Disc1) genetic risk elicits alterations in DNA methylation of a specific set of genes, tyrosine hydroxylase, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and FK506 binding protein 5. The epigenetic changes in the mesocortical dopaminergic neurons were prevented when animals were treated with a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486 during social isolation, which implicates the role for glucocorticoid signaling in this pathological event. We define the critical period of GR intervention as the first 1-week period during the stress regimen, suggesting that this particular week in adolescence may be a specific period of maturation and function of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons and their sensitivity to glucocorticoids. Our study may also imply the clinical significance of early detection and prophylactic intervention against conditions associated with adolescent social stress in individuals with genetic risk. PMID:26908623

  18. Severe dopaminergic neuron loss in rhesus monkey brain impairs morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that dopamine (DA) is critical for reward, but the precise role of DA in reward remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of dopaminergic neurons in the primate brain is required for the expression of conditioned reward by measuring the performance of DA-deficient rhesus monkeys in a morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Animals with mild Parkinsonian symptoms successfully developed and retained a morphine preference that was equivalent to control monkeys. However, these monkeys could not maintain the preference as well as controls when they retained severe Parkinsonian symptoms. On the other hand, monkeys initially in a severe Parkinsonian state developed a preference for morphine, but this preference was weaker than that of the controls. Histological results showed that the loss of dopaminergic neurons in monkeys that had severe Parkinsonian symptoms was about 80% in comparison to the control monkeys. All these data suggest that a severely impaired DA system alters rewarding-seeking behavior in non-human primates. PMID:26528155

  19. Uncoupling of ATP-depletion and cell death in human dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Pöltl, Dominik; Schildknecht, Stefan; Karreman, Christiaan; Leist, Marcel

    2012-08-01

    The mitochondrial inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) is the toxicologically relevant metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyltetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which causes relatively selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopaminergic LUHMES cells were used to investigate whether ATP-depletion can be uncoupled from cell death as a downstream event in these fully post-mitotic human neurons. Biochemical assays indicated that in the homogeneously differentiated cell cultures, MPP(+) was taken up by the dopamine transporter (DAT). MPP(+) then triggered oxidative stress and caspase activation, as well as ATP-depletion followed by cell death. Enhanced survival of the neurons in the presence of agents interfering with mitochondrial pathology, such as the fission inhibitor Mdivi-1 or a Bax channel blocker suggested a pivotal role of mitochondria in this model. However, these compounds did not prevent cellular ATP-depletion. To further investigate whether cells could be rescued despite respiratory chain inhibition by MPP(+), we have chosen a diverse set of pharmacological inhibitors well-known to interfere with MPP(+) toxicity. The antioxidant ascorbate, the iron chelator desferoxamine, the stress kinase inhibitor CEP1347, and different caspase inhibitors reduced cell death, but allowed ATP-depletion in protected cells. None of these compounds interfered with MPP(+) accumulation in the cells. These findings suggest that ATP-depletion, as the initial mitochondrial effect of MPP(+), requires further downstream processes to result in neuronal death. These processes may form self-enhancing signaling loops, that aggravate an initial energetic impairment and eventually determine cell fate. PMID:22206971

  20. Caspase-11 Plays an Essential Role in Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiye; Xie, Wei-Bing; Qiao, Dongfang; Qiu, Pingming; Huang, Enping; Li, Bing; Chen, Chuanxiang; Liu, Chao; Wang, Qi; Lin, Zhoumeng; Wang, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an extremely addictive stimulant drug that is widely used with high potential of abuse. Previous studies have shown that METH exposure damages the nervous system, especially dopaminergic neurons. However, the exact molecular mechanisms of METH-induced neurotoxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that caspase-11 is involved in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. We tested our hypothesis by examining the change of caspase-11 protein expression in dopaminergic neurons (PC12 and SH-SY5Y) and in the midbrain of rats exposed to METH with Western blotting. We also determined the effects of blocking caspase-11 expression with wedelolactone (a specific inhibitor of caspase-11) or siRNA on METH-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and SH-SY5Y cells using Annexin V and TUNEL staining. Furthermore, we observed the protein expression changes of the apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP), after silencing the caspase-11 expression in rat midbrain by injecting LV-shcasp11 lentivirus using a stereotaxic positioning system. Results showed that METH exposure increased caspase-11 expression both in vitro and in vivo, with the effects in vitro being dose- and time-dependent. Inhibition of caspase-11 expression with either wedelolactone or siRNAs reduced the number of METH-induced apoptotic cells. In addition, blocking caspase-11 expression inhibited METH-induced activation of caspase-3 and PARP in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that caspase-11/caspase-3 signal pathway is involved in METH-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that caspase-11 plays an essential role in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis and may be a potential gene target for therapeutics in METH-caused neurotoxicity. PMID:25631491

  1. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  2. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  3. Dopaminergic modulation of axonal potassium channels and action potential waveform in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Mingyu; Tian, Cuiping; Yang, Mingpo; Wang, Yonghong; Shu, Yousheng

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels play critical roles in shaping neuronal signals. KV channels distributed in the perisomatic regions and thick dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons have been extensively studied. However, the properties and regulation of KV channels distributed in the thin axons remain unknown. In this study, by performing somatic and axonal patch-clamp recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortical slices, we showed that the rapidly inactivating A-currents mediated the transient K(+) currents evoked by action potential (AP) waveform command (KAP) at the soma, whereas the rapidly activating but slowly inactivating KV1-mediated D-currents dominated the KAP at the axon. In addition, activation of D1-like receptors for dopamine decreased the axonal K(+) currents, as a result of an increase in the activity of cAMP-PKA pathway. In contrast, activation of D2-like receptors showed an opposite effect on the axonal K(+) currents. Further experiments demonstrated that functional D1-like receptors were expressed at the main axon trunk and their activation could broaden the waveforms of axonal APs. Together, these results show that axonal KV channels were subjected to dopamine modulation, and this modulation could regulate the waveforms of propagating APs at the axon, suggesting an important role of dopaminergic modulation of axonal KV channels in regulating neuronal signalling. PMID:23568892

  4. Kappa Opioid Receptors on Dopaminergic Neurons Are Necessary for Kappa-Mediated Place Aversion

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir I; Bäckman, Cristina M; Gigante, Eduardo D; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2013-01-01

    Kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have dysphoric properties in humans and are aversive in rodents. This has been attributed to the activation of KORs within the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. However, the role of DA in KOR-mediated aversion and stress remains divisive as recent studies have suggested that activation of KORs on serotonergic neurons may be sufficient to mediate aversive behaviors. To address this question, we used conditional knock-out (KO) mice with KORs deleted on DA neurons (DATCre/wt/KORloxp/loxp, or DATCre-KOR KO). In agreement with previous findings, control mice (DATCre/wt/KORwt/wt or WT) showed conditioned place aversion (CPA) to the systemically administered KOR agonist U69,593. In contrast, DATCre-KOR KO mice did not exhibit CPA with this same agonist. In addition, in vivo microdialysis showed that systemic U69,593 decreased overflow of DA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in WT mice, but had no effect in DATCre-KOR KO mice. Intra- ventral tegmental area (VTA) delivery of KORs using an adeno-associated viral gene construct, resulted in phenotypic rescue of the KOR-mediated NAc DA response and aversive behavior in DATCre-KOR KO animals. These results provide evidence that KORs on VTA DA neurons are necessary to mediate KOR-mediated aversive behavior. Therefore, our data, along with recent findings, suggest that the neuronal mechanisms of KOR-mediated aversive behavior may include both dopaminergic and serotonergic components. PMID:23921954

  5. Electrical and Ca2+ signaling in dendritic spines of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Travis A; Sun, Yujie; Khaliq, Zayd M

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the density and function of dendritic spines on midbrain dopamine neurons, or the relative contribution of spine and shaft synapses to excitability. Using Ca2+ imaging, glutamate uncaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and transgenic mice expressing labeled PSD-95, we comparatively analyzed electrical and Ca2+ signaling in spines and shaft synapses of dopamine neurons. Dendritic spines were present on dopaminergic neurons at low densities in live and fixed tissue. Uncaging-evoked potential amplitudes correlated inversely with spine length but positively with the presence of PSD-95. Spine Ca2+ signals were less sensitive to hyperpolarization than shaft synapses, suggesting amplification of spine head voltages. Lastly, activating spines during pacemaking, we observed an unexpected enhancement of spine Ca2+ midway throughout the spike cycle, likely involving recruitment of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated conductances. These results demonstrate functionality of spines in dopamine neurons and reveal a novel modulation of spine Ca2+ signaling during pacemaking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13905.001 PMID:27163179

  6. Vanadium induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase Cdelta dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms: Relevance to etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, Robert; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-10-15

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC{sub 50} was determined to be 37 {mu}M in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (> fourfold) and caspase-3 (> ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKC{delta}, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKC{delta} kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKC{delta} proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKC{delta} cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKC{delta} knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral

  7. Vanadium Induces Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity Via Protein Kinase C-Delta Dependent Oxidative Signaling Mechanisms: Relevance to Etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, R. S.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V2O5). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V2O5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (>fourfold) and caspase-3 (>ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V2O5-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V2O5-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:19646462

  8. Vesicular expression and release of ATP from dopaminergic neurons of the mouse retina and midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tracy; Jobling, Andrew I.; Greferath, Ursula; Chuang, Trinette; Ramesh, Archana; Fletcher, Erica L.; Vessey, Kirstan A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is required for active accumulation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) into vesicles for purinergic neurotransmission, however, the cell types that express VNUT in the central nervous system remain unknown. This study characterized VNUT expression within the mammalian retina and brain and assessed a possible functional role in purinergic signaling. Two native isoforms of VNUT were detected in mouse retina and brain based on RNA transcript and protein analysis. Using immunohistochemistry, VNUT was found to co-localize with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive, dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, however, VNUT expression in extranigral non-DA neurons was also observed. In the retina, VNUT labeling was found to co-localize solely with TH-positive DA-cells. In the outer retina, VNUT-positive interplexiform cell processes were in close contact with horizontal cells and cone photoreceptor terminals, which are known to express P2 purinergic-receptors. In order to assess function, dissociated retinal neurons were loaded with fluorescent ATP markers (Quinacrine or Mant-ATP) and the DA marker FFN102, co-labeled with a VNUT antibody and imaged in real time. Fluorescent ATP markers and FFN102 puncta were found to co-localize in VNUT positive neurons and upon stimulation with high potassium, ATP marker fluorescence at the cell membrane was reduced. This response was blocked in the presence of cadmium. These data suggest DA neurons co-release ATP via calcium dependent exocytosis and in the retina this may modulate the visual response by activating purine receptors on closely associated neurons. PMID:26500494

  9. Vesicular expression and release of ATP from dopaminergic neurons of the mouse retina and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tracy; Jobling, Andrew I; Greferath, Ursula; Chuang, Trinette; Ramesh, Archana; Fletcher, Erica L; Vessey, Kirstan A

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is required for active accumulation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) into vesicles for purinergic neurotransmission, however, the cell types that express VNUT in the central nervous system remain unknown. This study characterized VNUT expression within the mammalian retina and brain and assessed a possible functional role in purinergic signaling. Two native isoforms of VNUT were detected in mouse retina and brain based on RNA transcript and protein analysis. Using immunohistochemistry, VNUT was found to co-localize with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive, dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, however, VNUT expression in extranigral non-DA neurons was also observed. In the retina, VNUT labeling was found to co-localize solely with TH-positive DA-cells. In the outer retina, VNUT-positive interplexiform cell processes were in close contact with horizontal cells and cone photoreceptor terminals, which are known to express P2 purinergic-receptors. In order to assess function, dissociated retinal neurons were loaded with fluorescent ATP markers (Quinacrine or Mant-ATP) and the DA marker FFN102, co-labeled with a VNUT antibody and imaged in real time. Fluorescent ATP markers and FFN102 puncta were found to co-localize in VNUT positive neurons and upon stimulation with high potassium, ATP marker fluorescence at the cell membrane was reduced. This response was blocked in the presence of cadmium. These data suggest DA neurons co-release ATP via calcium dependent exocytosis and in the retina this may modulate the visual response by activating purine receptors on closely associated neurons. PMID:26500494

  10. Postmitotic, postmigrational expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in olfactory bulb dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    McLean, J H; Shipley, M T

    1988-10-01

    The developmental expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TOH) was studied in a large, specific population of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the rat. These DA neurons comprise an anatomically distinctive population that has been well characterized in the adult hamster (Davis and Macrides, 1983) and rat (Halasz et al., 1981; Baker et al., 1983, 1984). We addressed a basic question in developmental neurobiology: What factors regulate the expression of neuronal transmitter phenotype during development? Olfactory bulb DA neurons are born in the ventricular and subependymal zones and migrate through all intervening layers to the most superficial layer in the bulb (Altman, 1969; Bayer, 1983). The time of TOH expression in these neurons was determined using immunohistochemistry and light microscopic image-analysis techniques. The results indicate that TOH phenotype is not expressed when the cells are born in the subependymal zone nor during their migration to the periglomerular region but only after they reached their final destination, the glomerular layer. This suggests that epigenetic factors associated with the glomeruli initiate the expression of the key transmitter synthesizing enzyme in these neurons. Primary olfactory neurons in the nasal epithelium project exclusively to glomeruli of the MOB; removal of this input in adult rats (Kawano and Margolis, 1982; Baker et al., 1983, 1984), mice (Nadi et al., 1981; Baker et al., 1983), dogs (Nadi et al., 1981), and hamsters (Kream et al., 1984) appears to down-regulate the expression of the TOH in periglomerular cells. The present results suggested that the input from the primary olfactory nerve is also necessary for the initial expression of the TOH phenotype. In support of this notion, we found that lesions of the olfactory nerve during the first postnatal week caused a significant reduction in the number of TOH-positive juxtaglomerular neurons in the following weeks. Thus, the olfactory nerve

  11. Nitrosative and cognitive effects of chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA lesion.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-García, G; Palafox-Sánchez, V; Limón, I D

    2015-04-01

    Besides motor disturbances, other symptoms found in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) are deficits in both learning and memory. The nigro-striatal-cortical pathway is affected in this pathology, with this neuronal circuit involved in cognitive processes such as spatial working memory (SWM). However, cognitive dysfunction appears even when the patients are receiving L-DOPA treatment. There is evidence that the dopamine metabolism formed by L-DOPA generates free radicals such as nitric oxide, which may cause damage through the nitrosative stress (NS). The aim of this study was to evaluate both the effects of chronic L-DOPA administration on SWM and the production of NS in rats using an intra-nigral lesion caused by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Post-lesion, the animals were administered orally with L-DOPA/Carbidopa (100-mg/kg) for 20 days. An SWM task in a Morris water maze was conducted post-treatment. Nitrite levels and immunoreactivity of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) were evaluated in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the dorsal striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. Our results show that chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA-lesion caused significant increases in SWM deficit, nitrite levels and the immunoreactivity of 3-NT, iNOS and GFAP in the nigro-striatal-cortical pathway. These facts suggest that as L-DOPA can induce NS in rats with dopaminergic intra-nigral lesion, it could play a key role in the impairment of the SWM, and thus can be considered as a toxic mechanism that induces cognitive deficit in PD patients. PMID:25644418

  12. Effects of the anti-dementia drug hopantenate calcium upon striatal dopaminergic neurons in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Toide, K

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of the anti-dementia drug calcium D-(+)-4-(2,4-dihydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-butyramido) butyrate hemihydrate (hopantenate) on the dopaminergic neurons of rats, and also compared the effects of the drug on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats (4 months old) and aged rats (21 months old). Hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased striatal dopamine (DA) levels, but displayed almost no effect upon the DOPAC and HVA levels. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of hopantenate upon tyrosine hydroxylase activity by examining NSD-1015-induced L-DOPA accumulation and found that hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased the L-DOPA accumulation. In addition, comparing the effect of hopantenate on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats, we found that the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels were decreased as a concomitant of aging, and hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased DA and DOPAC levels in both ages. The above results clearly indicate that hopantenate enhanced DA biosynthesis by stimulating the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Furthermore, the results of hopantenate upon dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats suggest that sensitivity to the drug may not be different with age, though the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels of rats were decreased as a concomitant of aging. PMID:2570556

  13. Neuroprotective effects of tadalafil on gerbil dopaminergic neurons following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Lee, Han Sae; Ko, Il Gyu; Kim, Chang Ju; Na, Yong Gil; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2013-03-15

    Impairment of dopamine function, which is known to have major effects on behaviors and cognition, is one of the main problems associated with cerebral ischemia. Tadalafil, a long-acting phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, is known to ameliorate neurologic impairment induced by brain injury, but not in dopaminergic regions. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of treatment with tadalafil on cyclic guanosine monophosphate level and dopamine function following cerebral ischemia. Forty adult Mongolian gerbils were randomly and evenly divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group): Sham-operation group, cerebral ischemia-induced and 0, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg tadalafil-treated groups, respectively. Tadalafil dissolved in distilled water was administered orally for 7 consecutive days, starting 1 day after surgery. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate assay and immunohistochemistry were performed for thyrosine hydroxylase expression and western blot analysis for dopamine D2 receptor expression. A decrease in cyclic guanosine monophosphate level following cerebral ischemia was found with an increase in thyrosine hydroxylase activity and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region. However, treatment with tadalafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate expression, suppressed thyrosine hydroxylase expression and increased dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region in a dose-dependent manner. Tadalafil might ameliorate cerebral ischemia-induced dopaminergic neuron injury. Therefore, tadalafil has the potential as a new neuroprotective treatment strategy for cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:25206715

  14. Improvement of Neurological Dysfunctions in Aphakia Mice, a Model of Parkinson’s Disease, after Transplantation of ES Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangmi; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by selective death of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, and previously we have shown that aphakia mice, which harbor spontaneous Pitx3 gene mutation, show specific degeneration of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons accompanied by behavioral deficits that is reversed by L-DOPA treatment or transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors. Here, we describe transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors to a mouse model of PD, an aphakia mouse, followed by behavioral analyses of transplanted mice. PMID:25173391

  15. The role of growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) in the induction and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurones: relevance to Parkinson's disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2005-09-01

    Growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily which has potent effects on dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo. GDF5 is under investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease (PD), which is caused by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurones projecting from the substantia nigra (SN) to the striatum. In the rat ventral mesencephalon (VM; the developing SN), GDF5 expression peaks at embryonic day 14, the time at which dopaminergic neurones undergo terminal differentiation. Addition of GDF5 protein to cultures of embryonic rat VM increases the survival and improves the morphology of dopaminergic neurones in these cultures. GDF5 treatment also increases the number of cells which adopt a dopaminergic phenotype in cultures of VM progenitor cells. Intracerebral administration of GDF5 has potent neuroprotective and restorative effects on the nigrostriatal pathway in animal models of PD. Furthermore, addition of GDF5 protein to embryonic rat dopaminergic neuronal transplants improves their survival and function in a rat model of PD. Thus, GDF5 has potential applications to PD therapy as a dopaminergic neuroprotective agent and as a factor that may induce a dopaminergic neuronal fate in unrestricted progenitor cells. PMID:16185246

  16. Mixed-mode oscillations in a three time-scale model for the dopaminergic neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Martin; Popović, Nikola; Kopell, Nancy; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2008-03-01

    Mixed-mode dynamics is a complex type of dynamical behavior that has been observed both numerically and experimentally in numerous prototypical systems in the natural sciences. The compartmental Wilson-Callaway model for the dopaminergic neuron is an example of a system that exhibits a wide variety of mixed-mode patterns upon variation of a control parameter. One characteristic feature of this system is the presence of multiple time scales. In this article, we study the Wilson-Callaway model from a geometric point of view. We show that the observed mixed-mode dynamics is caused by a slowly varying canard structure. By appropriately transforming the model equations, we reduce them to an underlying three-dimensional canonical form that can be analyzed via a slight adaptation of the approach developed by M. Krupa, N. Popović, and N. Kopell (unpublished).

  17. Dopaminergic neurons write and update memories with cell-type-specific rules.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M

    2016-01-01

    Associative learning is thought to involve parallel and distributed mechanisms of memory formation and storage. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is the major site of associative odor memory formation. Previously we described the anatomy of the adult MB and defined 20 types of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that each innervate distinct MB compartments (Aso et al., 2014a, 2014b). Here we compare the properties of memories formed by optogenetic activation of individual DAN cell types. We found extensive differences in training requirements for memory formation, decay dynamics, storage capacity and flexibility to learn new associations. Even a single DAN cell type can either write or reduce an aversive memory, or write an appetitive memory, depending on when it is activated relative to odor delivery. Our results show that different learning rules are executed in seemingly parallel memory systems, providing multiple distinct circuit-based strategies to predict future events from past experiences. PMID:27441388

  18. PINK1 positively regulates HDAC3 to suppress dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo-Kyoung; Choi, Youngsok; Kang, HeeBum; Lim, Eun-Jin; Park, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Seob; Park, Ji-Min; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Choi, Insup; Joe, Eun-Hye; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2015-02-15

    Deciphering the molecular basis of neuronal cell death is a central issue in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Dysregulation of p53 levels has been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. The role of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in suppressing p53-dependent apoptosis has been recently emphasized; however, the molecular basis of modulation of p53 function by HDAC3 remains unclear. Here we show that PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), which is linked to autosomal recessive early-onset familial Parkinson's disease, phosphorylates HDAC3 at Ser-424 to enhance its HDAC activity in a neural cell-specific manner. PINK1 prevents H2O2-induced C-terminal cleavage of HDAC3 via phosphorylation of HDAC3 at Ser-424, which is reversed by protein phosphatase 4c. PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of HDAC3 enhances its direct association with p53 and causes subsequent hypoacetylation of p53. Genetic deletion of PINK1 partly impaired the suppressive role of HDAC3 in regulating p53 acetylation and transcriptional activity. However, depletion of HDAC3 fully abolished the PINK1-mediated p53 inhibitory loop. Finally, ectopic expression of phosphomometic-HDAC3(S424E) substantially overcomes the defective action of PINK1 against oxidative stress in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Together, our results uncovered a mechanism by which PINK1-HDAC3 network mediates p53 inhibitory loop in response to oxidative stress-induced damage. PMID:25305081

  19. Glucose Levels in Culture Medium Determine Cell Death Mode in MPP+-treated Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, So-Young

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) causes caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cells. Here, we specifically examined whether change of glucose concentration in culture medium may play a role for determining cell death modes of DA neurons following MPP+ treatment. By incubating MN9D cells in medium containing varying concentrations of glucose (5~35 mM), we found that cells underwent a distinct cell death as determined by morphological and biochemical criteria. At 5~10 mM glucose concentration (low glucose levels), MPP+ induced typical of the apoptotic dell death accompanied with caspase activation and DNA fragmentation as well as cell shrinkage. In contrast, MN9D cells cultivated in medium containing more than 17.5 mM (high glucose levels) did not demonstrate any of these changes. Subsequently, we observed that MPP+ at low glucose levels but not high glucose levels led to ROS generation and subsequent JNK activation. Therefore, MPP+-induced cell death only at low glucose levels was significantly ameliorated following co-treatment with ROS scavenger, caspase inhibitor or JNK inhibitor. We basically confirmed the quite similar pattern of cell death in primary cultures of DA neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that a biochemically distinct cell death mode is recruited by MPP+ depending on extracellular glucose levels. PMID:26412968

  20. Dopaminergic modulation of motor neuron activity and neuromuscular function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Neckameyer, W S

    1999-02-01

    Dopamine is found in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues in the larval stage of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and functions as a signaling molecule in the nervous system. Although dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) were previously thought solely to be interneurons, recent studies suggest that dopamine may also act as a neuromodulator in humoral pathways. We examined both application of dopamine on intact larval CNS-segmental preparations and isolated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Dopamine rapidly decreased the rhythmicity of the CNS motor activity. Application of dopamine on neuromuscular preparations of the segmental muscles 6 and 7 resulted in a dose-responsive decrease in the excitatory junction potentials (EJPs). With the use of focal, macro-patch synaptic current recordings the quantal evoked transmission showed a depression of vesicular release at concentrations of 10 microM. Higher concentrations (1 mM) produced a rapid decrement in evoked vesicular release. Dopamine did not alter the shape of the spontaneous synaptic currents, suggesting that dopamine does not alter the postsynaptic muscle fiber receptiveness to the glutaminergic motor nerve transmission. The effects are presynaptic in causing a reduction in the number of vesicles that are stimulated to be released due to neural activity. PMID:10327610

  1. Induction of a dopaminergic phenotype in cultured striatal neurons by bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Stull, N D; Jung, J W; Iacovitti, L

    2001-09-23

    In the present study, we examined whether the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are important in the developmental specification of transmitter type in certain classes of neurons, might also play a role in signaling the differentiation of a dopaminergic (DA) phenotype. We found that BMP-2, -4 and -6 were each capable of inducing, in a dose and time dependent manner, moderate levels of the DA enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in cultured neurons from the mouse embryonic striatum. In contradistinction to other TH-inducing agents, BMPs initiated de novo TH expression without the required synergy of exogenous growth factors or co-activating substances and in neurons presumably aged (E16) beyond the critical period for induction. However, the appearance of TH in induced cells was short-lived (24 h) and could not be prolonged by repeated supplementation with the BMPs. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, PD98059 and apigenin, did not prevent TH induction by BMP-4, as they did other TH inducing agents, indicating that the MAPK/ERK pathway does not mediate BMPs effects on TH expression. We conclude that BMP-2, -4 and -6 can be added to the expanding inventory of agents capable of inducing TH, making them potentially important in the specification of a DA phenotype in stem/precursor cells for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:11557097

  2. Ibuprofen or piroxicam protects nigral neurons and delays the development of l-dopa induced dyskinesia in rats with experimental Parkinsonism: Influence on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Teema, Asmaa M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroinflammation and angiogenesis have been involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigated the effect of ibuprofen or piroxicam on the motor response to l-dopa and development of dyskinesia in Parkinsonian rats focusing on the anti-angiogenic role of the two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rats were divided into nine groups as follows: Group I: the vehicle group, Group II: rotenone group, rats were injected with nine doses of rotenone (1 mg/kg/48 h), group III&IV: rats received rotenone + ibuprofen (10 or 30 mg/kg), Group V-VI: rats received rotenone + piroxicam (1 or 3 mg/kg), Group VII: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa (100/10 mg/kg), Group VIII-IX: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa + ibuprofen (30 mg/kg) or piroxicam (3 mg/kg). In general, drugs were administered daily for ten weeks. Rotenone-treated rats showed motor dysfunction, lower striatal dopamine, lower staining for nigral tyrosine hydroxylase but higher level of striatal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared to vehicle-treated rats (P < 0.05). Treatment with l-dopa showed wearing-off over the course of the experiment in addition to development of abnormal involuntary movements and upregulated striatal VEGF level. Treatment with ibuprofen or piroxicam in combination with l-dopa preserved the effect of l-dopa at the end of week 10, delayed the development of dyskinesia and decreased striatal COX-2 and VEGF levels. In conclusion, the current study suggests that ibuprofen and piroxicam are promising candidates for neuroprotection in PD and may have utility in conjunction with l-dopa in order to ensure the longevity of its action and to delay the development of dyskinesia. PMID:27016022

  3. Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) Phosphorylation Promotes Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival during 6-OHDA-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Asaithambi, Arunkumar; Ay, Muhammet; Jin, Huajun; Gosh, Anamitra; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathophysiological mediator of degenerative processes in many neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Aberrant cell signaling governed by protein phosphorylation has been linked to oxidative damage of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Although several studies have associated activation of certain protein kinases with apoptotic cell death in PD, very little is known about protein kinase regulation of cell survival and protection against oxidative damage and degeneration in dopaminergic neurons. Here, we characterized the PKD1-mediated protective pathway against oxidative damage in cell culture models of PD. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) was used to induce oxidative stress in the N27 dopaminergic cell model and in primary mesencephalic neurons. Our results indicated that 6-OHDA induced the PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/S748) phosphorylation during early stages of oxidative stress and that PKD1 activation preceded cell death. We also found that 6-OHDA rapidly increased phosphorylation of the C-terminal S916 in PKD1, which is required for PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/748) phosphorylation. Interestingly, negative modulation of PKD1 activation by RNAi knockdown or by the pharmacological inhibition of PKD1 by kbNB-14270 augmented 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, while positive modulation of PKD1 by the overexpression of full length PKD1 (PKD1WT) or constitutively active PKD1 (PKD1S744E/S748E) attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, suggesting an anti-apoptotic role for PKD1 during oxidative neuronal injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PKD1 signaling plays a cell survival role during early stages of oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons and therefore, positive modulation of the PKD1-mediated signal transduction pathway can provide a novel neuroprotective strategy against PD. PMID:24806360

  4. Multitarget intervention of Fasudil in the neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-fei; Zhang, Qiong; Xi, Jian-ying; Li, Yan-hua; Ma, Cun-gen; Xiao, Bao-guo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that activation of the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway participates in the dopaminergic neuron degeneration and possibly in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we tried to observe the therapeutic potential of ROCK inhibitor Fasudil against dopaminergic neuron injury in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-mouse model of PD, and explore possible molecular mechanisms by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot and immunofluorescent assays. The results showed that MPTP-PD mice presented motor deficits, dopaminergic neuron loss, activation of inflammatory response and oxidative stress as well as ROCK and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) signaling pathways. The administration of Fasudil exhibited neuroprotective effects against the dopaminergic neurons and improved the motor function recovery in the MPTP-PD mice, accompanied by the suppression of inflammatory responses (IL-1β, TNF-α, NF-κB-p65 and TLR-2), and oxidative stress (iNOS and gp91Phox), which might be associated with the inhibition of ROCK and GSK-3β activity. Simultaneously, the administration of Fasudil resulted in the shift from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory/neurorepair M2 microglia. Additionally, Fasudil intervention enhanced the expression of anti-oxidative factors such as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Hmox as well as neurotrophic factor including GDNF. Our observations defined the neuroprotective effects of Fasudil in MPTP-PD mice, and we found a series of novel effector molecules and pathways for explaining the neuroprotective effects against dopaminergic neurons. However, a lot of investigations are warranted to further elucidate the crosstalk among Fasudil, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, GDNF and ROCK/NF-kB/Nrf2 pathways in the therapeutic potential of PD. PMID:25908255

  5. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  6. Lmx1a and Lmx1b regulate mitochondrial functions and survival of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Beaupré, Hélène; Gilbert, Catherine; Profes, Marcos Schaan; Chabrat, Audrey; Pacelli, Consiglia; Giguère, Nicolas; Rioux, Véronique; Charest, Julien; Deng, Qiaolin; Laguna, Ariadna; Ericson, Johan; Perlmann, Thomas; Ang, Siew-Lan; Cicchetti, Francesca; Parent, Martin; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Lévesque, Martin

    2016-07-26

    The LIM-homeodomain transcription factors Lmx1a and Lmx1b play critical roles during the development of midbrain dopaminergic progenitors, but their functions in the adult brain remain poorly understood. We show here that sustained expression of Lmx1a and Lmx1b is required for the survival of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Strikingly, inactivation of Lmx1a and Lmx1b recreates cellular features observed in Parkinson's disease. We found that Lmx1a/b control the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial functions, and their ablation results in impaired respiratory chain activity, increased oxidative stress, and mitochondrial DNA damage. Lmx1a/b deficiency caused axonal pathology characterized by α-synuclein(+) inclusions, followed by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. These results reveal the key role of these transcription factors beyond the early developmental stages and provide mechanistic links between mitochondrial dysfunctions, α-synuclein aggregation, and the survival of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:27407143

  7. ETHANOL ACTION ON DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN THE VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA: INTERACTION WITH INTRINSIC ION CHANNELS AND NEUROTRANSMITTER INPUTS

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hitoshi; Morrisett, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The dopaminergic system originating in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been extensively studied over the past decades as a critical neural substrate involved in the development of alcoholism and addiction to other drugs of abuse. Accumulating evidence indicates that ethanol modulates the functional output of this system by directly affecting the firing activity of VTA dopamine neurons, whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure leads to a reduction in the functional output of these neurons. This chapter will provide an update on the mechanistic investigations of the acute ethanol action on dopamine neuron activity and the neuroadaptations/plasticities in the VTA produced by previous ethanol experience. PMID:20813245

  8. Sex-dependent diversity in ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurons and developmental programing: A molecular, cellular and behavioral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, G.E.; Virdee, K.; McArthur, S.; Dalley, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge that diverse populations of dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) can be distinguished in terms of their molecular, electrophysiological and functional properties, as well as their differential projections to cortical and subcortical regions has significance for key brain functions, such as the regulation of motivation, working memory and sensorimotor control. Almost without exception, this understanding has evolved from landmark studies performed in the male sex. However, converging evidence from both clinical and pre-clinical studies illustrates that the structure and functioning of the VTA dopaminergic systems are intrinsically different in males and females. This may be driven by sex differences in the hormonal environment during adulthood (‘activational’ effects) and development (perinatal and/or pubertal ‘organizational’ effects), as well as genetic factors, especially the SRY gene on the Y chromosome in males, which is expressed in a sub-population of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Stress and stress hormones, especially glucocorticoids, are important factors which interact with the VTA dopaminergic systems in order to achieve behavioral adaptation and enable the individual to cope with environmental change. Here, also, there is male/female diversity not only during adulthood, but also in early life when neurobiological programing by stress or glucocorticoid exposure differentially impacts dopaminergic developmental trajectories in male and female brains. This may have enduring consequences for individual resilience or susceptibility to pathophysiological change induced by stressors in later life, with potential translational significance for sex bias commonly found in disorders involving dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic systems. These findings highlight the urgent need for a better understanding of the sexual dimorphism in the VTA if we are to improve strategies for the prevention and

  9. Transcription factors FOXA1 and FOXA2 maintain dopaminergic neuronal properties and control feeding behavior in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Lin, Wei; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Brimblecombe, Katherine R; Threlfell, Sarah; Dodson, Paul D; Magill, Peter J; Fernandes, Cathy; Cragg, Stephanie J; Ang, Siew-Lan

    2015-09-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons are implicated in cognitive functions, neuropsychiatric disorders, and pathological conditions; hence understanding genes regulating their homeostasis has medical relevance. Transcription factors FOXA1 and FOXA2 (FOXA1/2) are key determinants of mDA neuronal identity during development, but their roles in adult mDA neurons are unknown. We used a conditional knockout strategy to specifically ablate FOXA1/2 in mDA neurons of adult mice. We show that deletion of Foxa1/2 results in down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of dopamine (DA) biosynthesis, specifically in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). In addition, DA synthesis and striatal DA transmission were reduced after Foxa1/2 deletion. Furthermore, the burst-firing activity characteristic of SNc mDA neurons was drastically reduced in the absence of FOXA1/2. These molecular and functional alterations lead to a severe feeding deficit in adult Foxa1/2 mutant mice, independently of motor control, which could be rescued by L-DOPA treatment. FOXA1/2 therefore control the maintenance of molecular and physiological properties of SNc mDA neurons and impact on feeding behavior in adult mice. PMID:26283356

  10. Orexins contribute to restraint stress-induced cocaine relapse by endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Li-Wei; Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Yu, Lung; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Leishman, Emma; Bradshaw, Heather; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Hung, Ming-Shiu; Mackie, Ken; Zimmer, Andreas; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are associated with drug relapse in rodents. Here, we show that acute restraint stress in mice activates lateral hypothalamic (LH) orexin neurons, increases levels of orexin A and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and reinstates extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). This stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP depends on type 1 orexin receptors (OX1Rs), type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) in the VTA. In dopaminergic neurons of VTA slices, orexin A presynaptically inhibits GABAergic transmission. This effect is prevented by internal GDP-β-S or inhibiting OX1Rs, CB1Rs, phospholipase C or DAGL, and potentiated by inhibiting 2-AG degradation. These results suggest that restraint stress activates LH orexin neurons, releasing orexins into the VTA to activate postsynaptic OX1Rs of dopaminergic neurons and generate 2-AG through a Gq-protein-phospholipase C-DAGL cascade. 2-AG retrogradely inhibits GABA release through presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to VTA dopaminergic disinhibition and reinstatement of cocaine CPP. PMID:27448020

  11. Functional Rescue of Dopaminergic Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Disease Mice After Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Altarche-Xifro, Wassim; di Vicino, Umberto; Muñoz-Martin, Maria Isabel; Bortolozzi, Analía; Bové, Jordi; Vila, Miquel; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, which is due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and for which no definitive cure is currently available. Cellular functions in mouse and human tissues can be restored after fusion of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells with a variety of somatic cells. Here, after transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the SNpc of two different mouse models of Parkinson's disease, we significantly ameliorated the dopaminergic neuron loss and function. We show fusion of transplanted HSPCs with neurons and with glial cells in the ventral midbrain of Parkinson's disease mice. Interestingly, the hybrids can undergo reprogramming in vivo and survived up to 4weeks after transplantation, while acquiring features of mature astroglia. These newly generated astroglia produced Wnt1 and were essential for functional rescue of the dopaminergic neurons. Our data suggest that glial-derived hybrids produced upon fusion of transplanted HSPCs in the SNpc can rescue the Parkinson's disease phenotype via a niche-mediated effect, and can be exploited as an efficient cell-therapy approach. PMID:27428421

  12. Orexins contribute to restraint stress-induced cocaine relapse by endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition of dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Li-Wei; Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Yu, Lung; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Leishman, Emma; Bradshaw, Heather; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Hung, Ming-Shiu; Mackie, Ken; Zimmer, Andreas; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are associated with drug relapse in rodents. Here, we show that acute restraint stress in mice activates lateral hypothalamic (LH) orexin neurons, increases levels of orexin A and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and reinstates extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). This stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP depends on type 1 orexin receptors (OX1Rs), type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) in the VTA. In dopaminergic neurons of VTA slices, orexin A presynaptically inhibits GABAergic transmission. This effect is prevented by internal GDP-β-S or inhibiting OX1Rs, CB1Rs, phospholipase C or DAGL, and potentiated by inhibiting 2-AG degradation. These results suggest that restraint stress activates LH orexin neurons, releasing orexins into the VTA to activate postsynaptic OX1Rs of dopaminergic neurons and generate 2-AG through a Gq-protein-phospholipase C-DAGL cascade. 2-AG retrogradely inhibits GABA release through presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to VTA dopaminergic disinhibition and reinstatement of cocaine CPP. PMID:27448020

  13. Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Neurons in an Animal Model of Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Deats, Sean P.; Adidharma, Widya; Yan, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Light has profound effects on mood regulation as exemplified in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and the therapeutic benefits of light therapy. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. Our previous work has developed the diurnal grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus, as an animal model of SAD. Following housing conditions of either 12:12hr Dim Light:Dark (DLD) or 8:16hr Short Photoperiod (SP), which mimic the lower light intensity or short day-length of winter, respectively, grass rats exhibit an increase in depression-like behavior compared to those housed in a 12:12hr Bright Light:Dark (BLD) condition. Furthermore, we revealed that the orexinergic system is involved in mediating the effects of light on mood and anxiety. To explore other potential neural substrates involved in the depressive phenotype, the present study examined hypothalamic dopaminergic (DA) and somatostatin (SST) neurons in the brains of grass rats housed in DLD, SP and BLD. Using immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and SST, we found that the number of TH- and SST-ir cells in the hypothalamus was significantly lower in the DLD and SP groups compared to the BLD group. We also found that treating BLD animals with a selective orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) antagonist SB-334867 significantly reduced the number of hypothalamic TH-ir cells. The present study suggests that the hypothalamic DA neurons are sensitive to daytime light deficiency and are regulated by an orexinergic pathway. The results support the hypothesis that the orexinergic pathways mediate the effects of light on other neuronal systems that collectively contribute to light-dependent changes in the affective state. PMID:26116821

  14. Transfer of host-derived α synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons in rat.

    PubMed

    Kordower, Jeffrey H; Dodiya, Hemraj B; Kordower, Adam M; Terpstra, Brian; Paumier, Katrina; Madhavan, Lalitha; Sortwell, Caryl; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Multiple laboratories have recently demonstrated that long-term dopaminergic transplants form Lewy bodies in patients with Parkinson's disease. Debate has arisen as to whether these Lewy bodies form from the transfer of α synuclein from the host to the graft or whether they form from intrinsic responses of the graft from being placed into what was, or became, an inflammatory focus. To test whether the former hypothesis was possible, we grafted fetal rat ventral mesencephalon into the dopamine depleted striatum of rats that had previously received 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. One month after the transplant, rats received viral over expression of human α synuclein (AAV2/6-α synuclein) or green fluorescent protein (AAV2/6-GFP) into the striatum rostral to the grafts. Care was taken to make sure that the AAV injections were sufficiently distal to the graft so no cells would be directly transfected. All rats were sacrificed five weeks after the virus injections. Double label immunohistochemistry combined with confocal microscopy revealed that a small number of grafted tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons (5.7% ± 1.5% (mean ± SEM) of grafted dopamine cells) expressed host derived α synuclein but none of the grafted cells expressed host-derived GFP. The α synuclein in a few of these cells was misfolded and failed to be digested with proteinase K. These data indicate that it is possible for host derived α synuclein to transfer to grafted neurons supporting the concept that this is one possible mechanism by which grafted dopamine neurons form Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:21600984

  15. Inward rectifier potassium (Kir) current in dopaminergic periglomerular neurons of the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Borin, Mirta; Fogli Iseppe, Alex; Pignatelli, Angela; Belluzzi, Ottorino

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) periglomerular (PG) neurons are critically placed at the entry of the bulbar circuitry, directly in contact with both the terminals of olfactory sensory neurons and the apical dendrites of projection neurons; they are autorhythmic and are the target of numerous terminals releasing a variety of neurotransmitters. Despite the centrality of their position, suggesting a critical role in the sensory processing, their properties -and consequently their function- remain elusive. The current mediated by inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in DA-PG cells was recorded by adopting the perforated-patch configuration in thin slices; IKir could be distinguished from the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) by showing full activation in <10 ms, no inactivation, suppression by Ba2+ in a typical voltage-dependent manner (IC50 208 μM) and reversal potential nearly coincident with EK. Ba2+ (2 mM) induces a large depolarization of DA-PG cells, paralleled by an increase of the input resistance, leading to a block of the spontaneous activity, but the Kir current is not an essential component of the pacemaker machinery. The Kir current is negatively modulated by intracellular cAMP, as shown by a decrease of its amplitude induced by forskolin or 8Br-cAMP. We have also tested the neuromodulatory effects of the activation of several metabotropic receptors known to be present on these cells, showing that the current can be modulated by a multiplicity of pathways, whose activation in some case increases the amplitude of the current, as can be observed with agonists of D2, muscarinic, and GABAA receptors, whereas in other cases has the opposite effect, as it can be observed with agonists of α1 noradrenergic, 5-HT and histamine receptors. These characteristics of the Kir currents provide the basis for an unexpected plasticity of DA-PG cell function, making them potentially capable to reconfigure the bulbar network to allow a better flexibility. PMID:25152712

  16. Dopaminergic neuron-specific deletion of p53 gene is neuroprotective in an experimental Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Davis, Brandon; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Filichia, Emily; Barnett, Austin; Greig, Nigel H; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-09-01

    p53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether the neuronal p53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 knock-out (KO) mice, we examined the effect of DA specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. These DAT-p53KO mice did not exhibit apparent changes in the general structure and neuronal density of DA neurons during late development and in aging. However, in DA-p53KO mice treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that the induction of Bax and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) mRNA and protein levels by MPTP were diminished in both striatum and substantia nigra of these mice. Notably, deletion of the p53 gene in DA neurons significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra, dopaminergic neuronal terminal loss at striatum and, additionally, decreased motor deficits in mice challenged with MPTP. In contrast, there was no difference in astrogliosis between WT and DAT-p53KO mice in response to MPTP treatment. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in DA neuronal cell death by MPTP challenge. Our results further support the role of programmed cell death mediated by p53 in this animal model of PD and identify Bax, BAD and PUMA genes as downstream targets of p53 in modulating DA neuronal death in the in vivo MPTP-induced PD model. We deleted p53 gene in dopaminergic neurons in late developmental stages and found that DA specific p53 deletion is protective in acute MPTP animal model possibly through blocking MPTP-induced BAX and PUMA up-regulation. Astrocyte activation measured by GFAP positive cells and GFAP gene up-regulation in the striatum shows no difference

  17. The effect of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation on the up-regulation of histamine H3-receptors following destruction of the ascending dopaminergic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J. H.; Yanai, K.; Zhao, X. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding of [3H]-(R)alpha-methylhistamine and [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine to histamine H3-receptors, [3H]-SCH23390 to dopamine D1-receptors, and [3H]-YM09151-2 to dopamine D2-receptors was investigated by quantitative receptor autoradiography in the rat brain following 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the substantia nigra. 2. The levels of [3H]-(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites in the denervated striatum and substantia nigra were significantly higher than those in the contralateral side from 1 week to 12 weeks after nigral lesions. The H3-receptor binding was maximal at 3 weeks after nigral lesions and maintained until 12 weeks. 3. The increased number of histamine H3-receptors was decreased to the level of the contralateral side by chronic treatment with a selective dopamine D1 agonist, SKF38393, but not modified by a selective dopamine D2 agonist, quinpirole. 4. Dopamine D1- and D2-receptors in the striatum were similarly up-regulated after unilateral nigral lesion. On the other hand, the number of dopamine D2-receptors in the substantia nigra was markedly decreased after administration of 6-hydroxydopamine. 5. The treatment with (S)alpha-fluoromethylhistidine increased the H3-receptor binding in both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. As a result, the magnitude of the ratio of the H3-receptor binding between ipsilateral and contralateral sides was partially attenuated by treatment with (S)-alpha-fluoromethylhistidine. 6. These results strongly suggest that the expression of histamine H3-receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra is influenced through D1-receptors by tonic nigrostriatal dopaminergic inputs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8762081

  18. The protective effect of lactoferrin on ventral mesencephalon neurons against MPP+ is not connected with its iron binding ability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Bi, Mingxia; Liu, Huiying; Song, Ning; Xie, Junxia

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) can bind to lactoferrin receptor (LfR), leading to iron transport through the plasma membrane. Besides iron transportation, Lf also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the brain, Lf is only synthesized by activated microglia. LfR is present in blood vessels and nigral dopaminergic neurons. Both nigral iron accumulation and microglia activation is believed to be involved in Parkinson’s disease (PD), moreover, increased Lf and LfR in dopaminergic neurons were found in PD cases and MPTP-intoxicated mice. How iron influences microglia to release Lf? Does Lf tend to transport iron to dopaminergic neurons leading to cell death or to protect dopaminergic neuron from neurotoxin? In this study, we observed that iron increased Lf synthesis in activated microglia. In ventral mesencephalon neurons, both iron-free Lf (apo-Lf) and iron-saturated Lf (holo-Lf) exerted neuroprotective effects against MPP+ by mechanisms, believed to enhance the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, improve Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity, increase Bcl-2 expression. Although apo-Lf but not holo-Lf chelated cellular iron, there was no difference between the two types of Lf in the neuroprotection. Our data indicate that iron overload increases the activated microglia releasing Lf. Lf plays protective role on ventral mesencephalon neurons against MPP+, which is iron-chelating independent. PMID:26035688

  19. Abnormal differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae impairs development of the motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Amanda R.; McNeill, Matthew S.; Lambert, Aaron M.; Overton, Jeffrey D.; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lorca, Ramón A.; Johnson, Nicolas A.; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; MacArthur, Heather; Panula, Pertti; Masino, Mark A.; Runnels, Loren W.; Cornell, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential, melastatin-like 7 (Trpm7) is a combined ion channel and kinase implicated in the differentiation or function of many cell types. Early lethality in mice and frogs depleted of the corresponding gene impedes investigation of the functions of this protein particularly during later stages of development. By contrast, zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae undergo early morphogenesis normally and thus do not have this limitation. The mutant larvae are characterized by multiple defects including melanocyte cell death, transient paralysis, and an ion imbalance that leads to the development of kidney stones. Here we report a requirement for Trpm7 in differentiation or function of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. First, trpm7 mutant larvae are hypomotile and fail to make a dopamine-dependent developmental transition in swim-bout length. Both of these deficits are partially rescued by the application of levodopa or dopamine. Second, histological analysis reveals that in trpm7 mutants a significant fraction of dopaminergic neurons lack expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Third, trpm7 mutants are unusually sensitive to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, an oxidative stressor, and their motility is partially rescued by application of the iron chelator deferoxamine, an anti-oxidant. Finally, in SH-SY5Y cells, which model aspects of human dopaminergic neurons, forced expression of a channel-dead variant of TRPM7 causes cell death. In summary, a forward genetic screen in zebrafish has revealed that both melanocytes and dopaminergic neurons depend on the ion channel Trpm7. The mechanistic underpinning of this dependence requires further investigation. PMID:24291744

  20. Dual role for Drosophila lethal of scute in CNS midline precursor formation and dopaminergic neuron and motoneuron cell fate.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Stephanie B; Guardiola, Amaris R; Crews, Stephen T

    2011-06-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important behavioral roles in locomotion, reward and aggression. The Drosophila H-cell is a dopaminergic neuron that resides at the midline of the ventral nerve cord. Both the H-cell and the glutamatergic H-cell sib are the asymmetric progeny of the MP3 midline precursor cell. H-cell sib cell fate is dependent on Notch signaling, whereas H-cell fate is Notch independent. Genetic analysis of genes that could potentially regulate H-cell fate revealed that the lethal of scute [l(1)sc], tailup and SoxNeuro transcription factor genes act together to control H-cell gene expression. The l(1)sc bHLH gene is required for all H-cell-specific gene transcription, whereas tailup acts in parallel to l(1)sc and controls genes involved in dopamine metabolism. SoxNeuro functions downstream of l(1)sc and controls expression of a peptide neurotransmitter receptor gene. The role of l(1)sc may be more widespread, as a l(1)sc mutant shows reductions in gene expression in non-midline dopaminergic neurons. In addition, l(1)sc mutant embryos possess defects in the formation of MP4-6 midline precursor and the median neuroblast stem cell, revealing a proneural role for l(1)sc in midline cells. The Notch-dependent progeny of MP4-6 are the mVUM motoneurons, and these cells also require l(1)sc for mVUM-specific gene expression. Thus, l(1)sc plays an important regulatory role in both neurogenesis and specifying dopaminergic neuron and motoneuron identities. PMID:21558367

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DHA prevents PQ-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss via decreasing of excessive ROS. • DHA increases GR and GCLm derivate GSH pool by enhancement of Nrf2 expression. • Protective mechanism is removal of PQ-induced ROS via DHA-dependent GSH pool. • DHA may be a good preventive strategy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) therapy. - Abstract: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson’s disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson’s disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis.

  2. Cystamine/cysteamine rescues the dopaminergic system and shows neurorestorative properties in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cisbani, G; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Gibrat, C; Saint-Pierre, M; Lagacé, M; Badrinarayanan, S; Lavallée-Bourget, M H; Charest, J; Chabrat, A; Boivin, L; Lebel, M; Bousquet, M; Lévesque, M; Cicchetti, F

    2015-10-01

    The neuroprotective properties of cystamine identified in pre-clinical studies have fast-tracked this compound to clinical trials in Huntington's disease, showing tolerability and benefits on motor symptoms. We tested whether cystamine could have such properties in a Parkinson's disease murine model and now provide evidence that it can not only prevent the neurodegenerative process but also can reverse motor impairments created by a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion 3 weeks post-surgery. Importantly, we report that cystamine has neurorestorative properties 5 weeks post-lesion as seen on the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons which is comparable with treatments of cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine used in the clinic, as well as rasagiline, increasingly prescribed in early parkinsonism. All three compounds induced neurite arborization of the remaining dopaminergic cells which was further confirmed in ex vivo dopaminergic explants derived from Pitx3-GFP mice. The disease-modifying effects displayed by cystamine/cysteamine would encourage clinical testing. PMID:26232588

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson's disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson's disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis. PMID:25545062

  4. Subchronic Polychlorinated Biphenyl (Aroclor 1254) Exposure Produces Oxidative Damage and Neuronal Death of Ventral Midbrain Dopaminergic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donna W.; Notter, Sarah A.; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Dever, Daniel P.; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Kostyniak, Paul J.; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.; Opanashuk, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a link between organochlorine and pesticide exposure to an enhanced risk for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). A common biological phenomenon underlying cell injury associated with both polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and dopaminergic neurodegeneration during aging is oxidative stress (OS). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that oral PCB exposure, via food ingestion, impairs dopamine systems in the adult murine brain. We determined whether PCB exposure was associated with OS in dopaminergic neurons, a population of cells that selectively degenerate in PD. After 4 weeks of oral exposure to the PCB mixture Aroclor 1254, several congeners, mostly ortho substituted, accumulated throughout the brain. Significant increases in locomotor activity were observed within 2 weeks, which persisted after cessation of PCB exposure. Stereologic analyses revealed a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. However, striatal dopamine levels were elevated, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms exist to maintain dopamine homeostasis, which could contribute to the observed increases in locomotor activity following PCB exposure. Biochemical experiments revealed alterations in OS markers, including increases in SOD and HO-1 levels and the presence of oxidatively modified lipids and proteins. These findings were accompanied by elevated iron levels within the striatal and midbrain regions, perhaps due to the observed dysregulation of transferrin receptors and ferritin levels following PCB exposure. In this study, we suggest that both OS and the uncoupling of iron regulation contribute to dopamine neuron degeneration and hyperactivity following PCB exposure. PMID:22094459

  5. Lanosterol induces mitochondrial uncoupling and protects dopaminergic neurons from cell death in a model for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L; Jackson-Lewis, V; Wong, L C; Shui, G H; Goh, A X H; Kesavapany, S; Jenner, A M; Fivaz, M; Przedborski, S; Wenk, M R

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by the selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. Several lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to its etiology. Other studies have suggested that alterations in sterol homeostasis correlate with increased risk for PD. Whether these observations are functionally related is, however, unknown. In this study, we used a toxin-induced mouse model of PD and measured levels of nine sterol intermediates. We found that lanosterol is significantly (∼50%) and specifically reduced in the nigrostriatal regions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice, indicative of altered lanosterol metabolism during PD pathogenesis. Remarkably, exogenous addition of lanosterol rescued dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cell death in culture. Furthermore, we observed a marked redistribution of lanosterol synthase from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria in dopaminergic neurons exposed to MPP+, suggesting that lanosterol might exert its survival effect by regulating mitochondrial function. Consistent with this model, we find that lanosterol induces mild depolarization of mitochondria and promotes autophagy. Collectively, our results highlight a novel sterol-based neuroprotective mechanism with direct relevance to PD. PMID:21818119

  6. S6K Promotes Dopaminergic Neuronal Differentiation Through PI3K/Akt/mTOR-Dependent Signaling Pathways in Human Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Lim, Mi Sun; Park, Jae Hyun; Park, Chang Hwan; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been reported that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway regulates neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from rats or mice and is essential for the self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). However, the roles of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways during proliferation and dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of regulation of these intracellular signaling pathways in hNSCs on the potential to maintain proliferation and induce dopaminergic neuronal differentiation. Dopaminergic neuronal differentiation depended on the concentration of insulin in our culture system. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 reduced proliferation and inhibited dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of these cells. We also found that rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, significantly reduced neuronal differentiation without affecting proliferation. Inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway led to inhibition of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K) signaling, which reduced dopaminergic neuronal differentiation in hNSCs. Inhibition of S6K by a specific chemical inhibitor, PF-4708671 inhibited dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of hNSCs. As expected, transduction with a dominant negative S6K1 (S6K1-DN) construct impaired dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of hNSCs. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active S6K1 (S6K1-CA) promoted dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of these cells. In a survival study, 4 weeks after transplantation, no or very few donor cells were viable in striata grafted with S6K1-DN-transduced hNSCs. In contrast, S6K1-CA-transduced hNSCs survived, integrated into striata to generate tubular masses of grafts and differentiated toward TH-positive cells. Taken together, these data demonstrated that insulin promotes dopaminergic neuronal differentiation through a PI

  7. Dopaminergic neurons write and update memories with cell-type-specific rules

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M

    2016-01-01

    Associative learning is thought to involve parallel and distributed mechanisms of memory formation and storage. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is the major site of associative odor memory formation. Previously we described the anatomy of the adult MB and defined 20 types of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that each innervate distinct MB compartments (Aso et al., 2014a, 2014b). Here we compare the properties of memories formed by optogenetic activation of individual DAN cell types. We found extensive differences in training requirements for memory formation, decay dynamics, storage capacity and flexibility to learn new associations. Even a single DAN cell type can either write or reduce an aversive memory, or write an appetitive memory, depending on when it is activated relative to odor delivery. Our results show that different learning rules are executed in seemingly parallel memory systems, providing multiple distinct circuit-based strategies to predict future events from past experiences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16135.001 PMID:27441388

  8. An Efficient and Versatile System for Visualization and Genetic Modification of Dopaminergic Neurons in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The brain dopaminergic (DA) system is involved in fine tuning many behaviors and several human diseases are associated with pathological alterations of the DA system such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and drug addiction. Because of its complex network integration, detailed analyses of physiological and pathophysiological conditions are only possible in a whole organism with a sophisticated tool box for visualization and functional modification. Methods & Results Here, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the tetracycline-regulated transactivator (tTA) or the reverse tetracycline-regulated transactivator (rtTA) under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, TH-tTA (tet-OFF) and TH-rtTA (tet-ON) mice, to visualize and genetically modify DA neurons. We show their tight regulation and efficient use to overexpress proteins under the control of tet-responsive elements or to delete genes of interest with tet-responsive Cre. In combination with mice encoding tet-responsive luciferase, we visualized the DA system in living mice progressively over time. Conclusion These experiments establish TH-tTA and TH-rtTA mice as a powerful tool to generate and monitor mouse models for DA system diseases. PMID:26291828

  9. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  10. Rapid dopaminergic and GABAergic modulation of calcium and voltage transients in dendrites of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Antic, Srdjan D

    2012-01-01

    The physiological responses of dendrites to dopaminergic inputs are poorly understood and controversial. We applied dopamine on one dendritic branch while simultaneously monitoring action potentials (APs) from multiple dendrites using either calcium-sensitive dye, voltage-sensitive dye or both. Dopaminergic suppression of dendritic calcium transients was rapid (<0.5 s) and restricted to the site of dopamine application. Voltage waveforms of backpropagating APs were minimally altered in the same dendrites where dopamine was confirmed to cause large suppression of calcium signals, as determined by dual voltage and calcium imaging. The dopamine effects on dendritic calcium transients were fully mimicked by D1 agonists, partially reduced by D1 antagonist and completely insensitive to protein kinase blockade; consistent with a membrane delimited mechanism. This dopamine effect was unaltered in the presence of L-, R- and T-type calcium channel blockers. The somatic excitability (i.e. AP firing) was not affected by strong dopaminergic stimulation of dendrites. Dopamine and GABA were then sequentially applied on the same dendrite. In contrast to dopamine, the pulses of GABA prohibited AP backpropagation distally from the application site, even in neurons with natural Cl− concentration (patch pipette removed). Thus, the neocortex employs at least two distinct mechanisms (dopamine and GABA) for rapid modulation of dendritic calcium influx. The spatio-temporal pattern of dendritic calcium suppression described in this paper is expected to occur during phasic dopaminergic signalling, when midbrain dopaminergic neurons generate a transient (0.5 s) burst of APs in response to a salient event. PMID:22641784

  11. In vivo measures of nigrostriatal neuronal response to unilateral MPTP treatment.

    PubMed

    Tian, LinLin; Karimi, Morvarid; Brown, Chris A; Loftin, Susan K; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-07-01

    A single unilateral intracarotid infusion of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) into non-human primates causes injury to the nigrostriatal pathway including nigral cell bodies, axons and striatal terminal fields. In this model, motor parkinsonism correlates well with the loss of nigral dopaminergic cell bodies but only correlates with in vitro measures of nigrostriatal terminal fields when nigral cell loss does not exceed 50%. The goals of this study are to determine the relationship of motor parkinsonism with the degree of injury to nigrostriatal axons, as reflected by in vitro fiber length density measures, and compare in vivo with in vitro measures of striatal terminal fields. We determined axon integrity by measuring fiber length density with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistology and dopamine transporter (DAT) density with DAT immunohistology. We then calculated the terminal arbor size and compared these measures with previously published data of quantified in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) measures of presynaptic dopaminergic neurons, autoradiographic measures of DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2), striatal dopamine, nigral cell counts, and parkinsonian motor ratings in the same animals. Our data demonstrate that in vivo and in vitro measures of striatal terminal fields correlate with each other regardless of the method of measurement. PET-based in vivo striatal measures accurately reflect in vitro measures of DAT and VMAT2. Terminal arbor size and other terminal field measures correlate with nigral TH immunoreactive (TH-ir) cell counts only when nigral TH-ir cell loss does not exceed 50%. Fiber length density was the only striatal measure that linearly correlated with motor ratings (Spearman: r=-0.81, p<0.001, n=16). PMID:24845719

  12. Selenoprotein T Exerts an Essential Oxidoreductase Activity That Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boukhzar, Loubna; Hamieh, Abdallah; Cartier, Dorthe; Tanguy, Yannick; Alsharif, Ifat; Castex, Matthieu; Arabo, Arnaud; Hajji, Sana El; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Errami, Mohammed; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Lihrmann, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms involved in the control of this stress in dopaminergic cells are not fully understood. There is increasing evidence that selenoproteins play a central role in the control of redox homeostasis and cell defense, but the precise contribution of members of this family of proteins during the course of neurodegenerative diseases is still elusive. Results: We demonstrated first that selenoprotein T (SelT) whose gene disruption is lethal during embryogenesis, exerts a potent oxidoreductase activity. In the SH-SY5Y cell model of dopaminergic neurons, both silencing and overexpression of SelT affected oxidative stress and cell survival. Treatment with PD-inducing neurotoxins such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or rotenone triggered SelT expression in the nigrostriatal pathway of wild-type mice, but provoked rapid and severe parkinsonian-like motor defects in conditional brain SelT-deficient mice. This motor impairment was associated with marked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal system. Finally, in PD patients, we report that SelT is tremendously increased in the caudate putamen tissue. Innovation: These results reveal the activity of a novel selenoprotein enzyme that protects dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and prevents early and severe movement impairment in animal models of PD. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that selenoproteins such as SelT play a crucial role in the protection of dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, providing insight into the molecular underpinnings of this stress in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 557–574. PMID:26866473

  13. Progressive Axonal Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2β Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Goichi; Shinzawa, Koei; Hayakawa, Hideki; Baba, Kousuke; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, PLA2G6) is essential for the remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids. Mutations in this gene are responsible for autosomal recessive, young onset, L-dopa-responsive parkinsonism (PARK14), suggesting a neurodegenerative condition in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in patients with PLA2G6 mutations. We previously observed slowly progressive motor deficits in iPLA2β-knockout (KO) mice. To clarify whether a deficiency of iPLA2β leads to the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, we analyzed the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. At all clinical stages, nerve terminals in the striatum were immunopositive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in wild-type (WT) control mice. In iPLA2β-KO mice, focal loss of nerve terminals positive for TH and DAT was found from 56 weeks (early clinical stage), although iPLA2β-KO mice at 56 weeks showed no significant decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra compared with age-matched WT mice, as reported previously. At 100 weeks (late clinical stage), greater decreases in DAT immunoreactivity were observed in the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. Moreover, strongly TH-positive structures, presumed to be deformed axons, were observed in the neuropils of the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice starting at 15 weeks (preclinical stage) and increased with age. These results suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons occurs mainly in the distal region of axons in iPLA2β-KO mice. PMID:27078024

  14. Progressive Axonal Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2β Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Beck, Goichi; Shinzawa, Koei; Hayakawa, Hideki; Baba, Kousuke; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, PLA2G6) is essential for the remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids. Mutations in this gene are responsible for autosomal recessive, young onset, L-dopa-responsive parkinsonism (PARK14), suggesting a neurodegenerative condition in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in patients with PLA2G6 mutations. We previously observed slowly progressive motor deficits in iPLA2β-knockout (KO) mice. To clarify whether a deficiency of iPLA2β leads to the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, we analyzed the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. At all clinical stages, nerve terminals in the striatum were immunopositive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in wild-type (WT) control mice. In iPLA2β-KO mice, focal loss of nerve terminals positive for TH and DAT was found from 56 weeks (early clinical stage), although iPLA2β-KO mice at 56 weeks showed no significant decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra compared with age-matched WT mice, as reported previously. At 100 weeks (late clinical stage), greater decreases in DAT immunoreactivity were observed in the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. Moreover, strongly TH-positive structures, presumed to be deformed axons, were observed in the neuropils of the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice starting at 15 weeks (preclinical stage) and increased with age. These results suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons occurs mainly in the distal region of axons in iPLA2β-KO mice. PMID:27078024

  15. Nato3 integrates with the Shh-Foxa2 transcriptional network regulating the differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nissim-Eliraz, Einat; Zisman, Sophie; Schatz, Omri; Ben-Arie, Nissim

    2013-09-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA) neurons originate from the floor plate of the midbrain, a transient embryonic organizing center located at the ventral-most midline. Since the loss of mesDA leads to Parkinson's disease, the molecular mechanisms controlling the genesis and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors are extensively studied and the identification and characterization of new genes is of interest. Here, we show that the expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nato3 (Ferd3l) increases in parallel to the differentiation of SN4741 dopaminergic cells in vitro. Nato3 transcription is directly regulated by the transcription factor Foxa2, a target and effector of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling cascade. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of Shh signaling downregulated the expression of Nato3, thus defining Nato3 as a novel component of one of the major pathways controlling cell patterning and generation of mesDA. Furthermore, we show that Nato3 regulated Shh and Foxa2 through a novel feed-backward loop. Up- and downregulation of Nato3 further affected the transcription of Nurr1, implicated in the genesis of mesDA, but not of TH. Taken together, these data shed new light on the transcriptional networks controlling the generation of mesDA and may be utilized in the efforts to direct stem cells towards a dopaminergic fate. PMID:23254923

  16. Differential dopaminergic regulation of inwardly rectifying potassium channel mediated subthreshold dynamics in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Zhu, Junling; Dai, Dongqing; Xing, Junling; He, Jiahou; Fu, Zhanyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Zhuyi; Wang, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a key role in motor control and cognitive processes. Proper functioning of the striatum relies on the fine dynamic balance between the direct pathway projection medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express D1 dopamine receptor (D1 MSNs) and indirect pathway projection MSNs that express D2 dopamine receptor (D2 MSNs). The inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (Kir), which express on both D1 and D2 MSNs, participate in the subthreshold dynamics including the membrane resonance and dendritic integration. However, it remains unclear whether dopamine differentially regulates Kir mediated subthreshold dynamics in two subtypes MSNs. Using transgenic mice that express either tdTomato in D1 MSNs or eGFP in D2 MSNs, we explored the Kir mediated subthreshold dynamics in D1 or D2 MSNs with whole cell patch clamp recording in acute brain slices. We found that D1 receptor agonist increased the Kir current while D2 receptor activation decreased the Kir conductance. The dopamine regulation of the Kir enhanced the resonant frequency and reduced the resonant impedance of D1 MSNs. The converse is ture for D2 MSNs. It also caused an opposing effect on dendritic integration between D1 and D2 MSNs, which can promote stability of the two pathways. The D1 receptor activation modulated Kir through cAMP-PKA signaling, whereas the D2 receptor modulated Kir through PLC-PKC signaling. Our findings demonstrated the differential dopaminergic regulation role of Kir, which mediates distinct subthreshold dynamics, and thus, contributes to the role of dopamine in fine tuning the balance of the striatal direct and indirect pathway activities. PMID:27018450

  17. Protection of Primary Dopaminergic Midbrain Neurons by GPR139 Agonists Supports Different Mechanisms of MPP+ and Rotenone Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bayer Andersen, Kirsten; Leander Johansen, Jens; Hentzer, Morten; Smith, Garrick Paul; Dietz, Gunnar P. H.

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 139 (GPR139) is expressed specifically in the brain in areas of relevance for motor control. GPR139 function and signal transduction pathways are elusive, and results in the literature are even contradictory. Here, we examined the potential neuroprotective effect of GPR139 agonism in primary culture models of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal degeneration. We find that in vitro GPR139 agonists protected primary mesencephalic DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-mediated degeneration. Protection was concentration-dependent and could be blocked by a GPR139 antagonist. However, the protection of DA neurons was not found against rotenone or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mediated degeneration. Our results support differential mechanisms of toxicity for those substances commonly used in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models and potential for GPR139 agonists in neuroprotection. PMID:27445691

  18. Estradiol Facilitates Functional Integration of iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons into Striatal Neuronal Circuits via Activation of Integrin α5β1

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Doi, Daisuke; Samata, Bumpei; Murayama, Shigeo; Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Onoe, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Summary For cell transplantation therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) to be realized, the grafted neurons should be integrated into the host neuronal circuit to restore the lost neuronal function. Here, using wheat-germ agglutinin-based transsynaptic tracing, we show that integrin α5 is selectively expressed in striatal neurons that are innervated by midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. In addition, we found that integrin α5β1 was activated by the administration of estradiol-2-benzoate (E2B) in striatal neurons of adult female rats. Importantly, we observed that the systemic administration of E2B into hemi-parkinsonian rat models facilitates the functional integration of grafted DA neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells into the host striatal neuronal circuit via the activation of integrin α5β1. Finally, methamphetamine-induced abnormal rotation was recovered earlier in E2B-administered rats than in rats that received other regimens. Our results suggest that the simultaneous administration of E2B with stem cell-derived DA progenitors can enhance the efficacy of cell transplantation therapy for PD. PMID:26997644

  19. Estradiol Facilitates Functional Integration of iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons into Striatal Neuronal Circuits via Activation of Integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Doi, Daisuke; Samata, Bumpei; Murayama, Shigeo; Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Onoe, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Jun

    2016-04-12

    For cell transplantation therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) to be realized, the grafted neurons should be integrated into the host neuronal circuit to restore the lost neuronal function. Here, using wheat-germ agglutinin-based transsynaptic tracing, we show that integrin α5 is selectively expressed in striatal neurons that are innervated by midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. In addition, we found that integrin α5β1 was activated by the administration of estradiol-2-benzoate (E2B) in striatal neurons of adult female rats. Importantly, we observed that the systemic administration of E2B into hemi-parkinsonian rat models facilitates the functional integration of grafted DA neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells into the host striatal neuronal circuit via the activation of integrin α5β1. Finally, methamphetamine-induced abnormal rotation was recovered earlier in E2B-administered rats than in rats that received other regimens. Our results suggest that the simultaneous administration of E2B with stem cell-derived DA progenitors can enhance the efficacy of cell transplantation therapy for PD. PMID:26997644

  20. Transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins regulate microglial activation and dopaminergic neuronal death in a Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Meeyoung; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Son, Ora; Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kim, Joon; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective dopaminergic neuronal death in the midbrain substantia nigra. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) against oxidation by destroying biologically active phospholipids with potential protective effects against oxidative stress-induced inflammatory disorders. In a previous study, we constructed protein transduction domain (PTD) fusion PEP-1-PON1 protein to transduce PON1 into cells and tissue. In this study, we examined the role of transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein in repressing oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response in microglial BV2 cells after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, we identified the functions of transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins which include, mitigating mitochondrial damage, decreasing reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and protecting against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein reduced MMP-9 expression and protected against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mice model. Taken together, these results suggest a promising therapeutic application of PEP-1-PON1 proteins against PD and other inflammation and oxidative stress-related neuronal diseases. PMID:26117230

  1. Loss of enteric dopaminergic neurons and associated changes in colon motility in an MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Grant; Noorian, Ali Reza; Taylor, Georgia; Anitha, Mallappa; Bernhard, Doug; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Greene, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction is the most common non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Symptoms of GI dysmotility include early satiety and nausea from delayed gastric emptying, bloating from poor small bowel coordination, and constipation and defecatory dysfunction from impaired colonic transit. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of these symptoms in PD patients has been hampered by the lack of investigation into GI symptoms and pathology in PD animal models. We report that the prototypical parkinsonian neurotoxin, MPTP (1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine), is a selective dopamine neuron toxin in the enteric nervous system (ENS). When examined 10 days after treatment, there was a 40% reduction of dopamine neurons in the ENS of C57Bl/6 mice administered MPTP (60 mg/kg). There were no differences in the density of cholinergic or nitric oxide neurons. Electrophysiological recording of neural-mediated muscle contraction in isolated colon from MPTP-treated animals confirmed a relaxation defect associated with dopaminergic degeneration. Behaviorally, MPTP induced a transient increase in colon motility, but no changes in gastric emptying or small intestine transit. These results provide the first comprehensive assessment of gastrointestinal pathophysiology in an animal model of PD. They provide insight into the impact of dopaminergic dysfunction on gastrointestinal motility and a benchmark for assessment of other PD model systems. PMID:17586496

  2. Odour enrichment increases adult-born dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first brain region involved in the processing of olfactory information. In adult mice, the OB is highly plastic, undergoing cellular/molecular dynamic changes that are modulated by sensory experience. Odour deprivation induces down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in OB dopaminergic interneurons located in the glomerular layer (GL), resulting in decreased dopamine in the OB. Although the effect of sensory deprivation is well established, little is known about the influence of odour enrichment on dopaminergic cells. Here we report that prolonged odour enrichment on C57BL/6J strain mice selectively increases TH-immunopositive cells in the GL by nearly 20%. Following odour enrichment on TH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, in which GFP identified both mature TH-positive cells and putative immature dopaminergic cells expressing TH mRNA but not TH protein, we found a similar 20% increase in GFP-expressing cells, with no changes in the ratio between TH-positive and TH-negative cells. These data suggest that enriched conditions induce an expansion in the whole dopaminergic lineage. Accordingly, by using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections to label adult-generated cells in the GL of TH-GFP mice, we found an increase in the percentage of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive dopaminergic cells in enriched compared with control conditions, whereas no differences were found for calretinin- and calbindin-positive subtypes. Strikingly, the fraction of newborn cells among the dopaminergic population doubled in enriched conditions. On the whole, our results demonstrate that odour enrichment drives increased integration of adult-generated dopaminergic cells that could be critical to adapt the OB circuits to the environmental incoming information. PMID:25216299

  3. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Kang, X-y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-l; Li, Y-q; Gao, D-s

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  4. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors containing the α6 subunit contribute to ethanol activation of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liwang; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; McIntosh, J. Michael; Tapper, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine and alcohol are often co-abused suggesting a common mechanism of action may underlie their reinforcing properties. Both drugs acutely increase activity of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons, a phenomenon associated with reward behavior. Recent evidence indicates that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), ligand-gated cation channels activated by ACh and nicotine, may contribute to ethanol-mediated activation of VTA DAergic neurons although the nAChR subtype(s) involved has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that expression and activation of nAChRs containing the α6 subunit contribute to ethanol-induced activation of VTA DAergic neurons. In wild-type (WT) mouse midbrain sections that contain the VTA, ethanol (50 or 100 mM) significantly increased firing frequency of DAergic neurons. In contrast, ethanol did not significantly increase activity of VTA DAergic neurons in mice that do not express CHRNA6, the gene encoding the α6 nAChR subunit (α6 knock-out (KO) mice). Ethanol-induced activity in WT slices was also reduced by pre-application of the α6 subtype-selective nAChR antagonist, α-conotoxin MII[E11A]. When co-applied, ethanol potentiated the response to ACh in WT DAergic neurons; whereas co-application of ACh and ethanol failed to significantly increase activity of DAergic neurons in α6 KO slices. Finally, pre-application of α-conotoxin MII[E11A] in WT slices reduced ethanol potentiation of ACh responses. Together our data indicate that α6-subunit containing nAChRs may contribute to ethanol activation of VTA DAergic neurons. These receptors are predominantly expressed in DAergic neurons and known to be critical for nicotine reinforcement, providing a potential common therapeutic molecular target to reduce nicotine and alcohol co-abuse. PMID:23811312

  5. Inhibitory effect of A10 dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area on the orienting response evoked by acoustic stimulation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Crescimanno, G; Sorbera, F; Emmi, A; Amato, G

    1998-01-01

    The effect of bilateral electric stimulation of A10 dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (80-300 microA, 20-50 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms, 2 s duration) on latency and duration of the orienting response, evoked by acoustic stimuli (4500-8000 Hz, 2 s), was studied in the cat. A10 neuron stimulation, simultaneous with the acoustic one, was performed with threshold parameters inducing minimal behavioral signs (head searching movement, sniffing, increase in alertness). By means of a videoanalysis system, a statistically significant increase, both of latency and duration of the response, was observed. The possible role of dopamine was studied administrating sulpiride (20 mg/kg i.p.), a dopaminergic antagonist prevalently acting on the mesolimbic-mesocortical system. In this condition, the disappearance of A10 neuron effect occurred. Sulpiride injection did not affect the parameters of the orienting response to acoustic stimulus alone, suggesting a direct effect on A10 dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, when saline administration was carried out, no significant modification of the effects, obtained following A10 neuron activation, was observed. The data suggest that A10 dopaminergic neurons, origin of the mesolimbic-mesocortical system, may be involved in the control of the response to sensory stimuli, likely by influencing sensorimotor integration processes. An involvement in the inhibitory regulation of the switching of attention is also discussed. PMID:9434203

  6. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is selectively toxic to primary dopaminergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Amy M; Agim, Zeynep S; Mishra, Vartika R; Tambe, Mitali A; Director-Myska, Alison E; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; McCabe, George P; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Cannon, Jason R

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Much data has linked the etiology of PD to a variety of environmental factors. The majority of cases are thought to arise from a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Chronic exposures to dietary factors, including meat, have been identified as potential risk factors. Although heterocyclic amines that are produced during high-temperature meat cooking are known to be carcinogenic, their effect on the nervous system has yet to be studied in depth. In this study, we investigated neurotoxic effects of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a highly abundant heterocyclic amine in cooked meat, in vitro. We tested toxicity of PhIP and the two major phase I metabolites, N-OH-PhIP and 4'-OH-PhIP, using primary mesencephalic cultures from rat embryos. This culture system contains both dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neurons, which allows specificity of neurotoxicity to be readily examined. We find that exposure to PhIP or N-OH-PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, resulting in a decreased percentage of dopaminergic neurons. Neurite length is decreased in surviving dopaminergic neurons. Exposure to 4'-OH-PhIP did not produce significant neurotoxicity. PhIP treatment also increased formation of oxidative damage markers, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine in dopaminergic neurons. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine was protective. Finally, treatment with blueberry extract, a dietary factor with known antioxidant and other protective mechanisms, prevented PhIP-induced toxicity. Collectively, our study suggests, for the first time, that PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons likely through inducing oxidative stress. PMID:24718704

  7. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) Is Selectively Toxic to Primary Dopaminergic Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Amy M.; Agim, Zeynep S.; Mishra, Vartika R.; Tambe, Mitali A.; Director-Myska, Alison E.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; McCabe, George P.; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Cannon, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Much data has linked the etiology of PD to a variety of environmental factors. The majority of cases are thought to arise from a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Chronic exposures to dietary factors, including meat, have been identified as potential risk factors. Although heterocyclic amines that are produced during high-temperature meat cooking are known to be carcinogenic, their effect on the nervous system has yet to be studied in depth. In this study, we investigated neurotoxic effects of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a highly abundant heterocyclic amine in cooked meat, in vitro. We tested toxicity of PhIP and the two major phase I metabolites, N-OH-PhIP and 4′-OH-PhIP, using primary mesencephalic cultures from rat embryos. This culture system contains both dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neurons, which allows specificity of neurotoxicity to be readily examined. We find that exposure to PhIP or N-OH-PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, resulting in a decreased percentage of dopaminergic neurons. Neurite length is decreased in surviving dopaminergic neurons. Exposure to 4′-OH-PhIP did not produce significant neurotoxicity. PhIP treatment also increased formation of oxidative damage markers, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine in dopaminergic neurons. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine was protective. Finally, treatment with blueberry extract, a dietary factor with known antioxidant and other protective mechanisms, prevented PhIP-induced toxicity. Collectively, our study suggests, for the first time, that PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons likely through inducing oxidative stress. PMID:24718704

  8. Effects of Oxidative Stress and Testosterone on Pro-Inflammatory Signaling in a Female Rat Dopaminergic Neuronal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Shaletha; Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang; Cunningham, Rebecca L

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. These pathological markers can contribute to the loss of dopamine neurons in the midbrain. Interestingly, men have a 2-fold increased incidence for Parkinson's disease than women. Although the mechanisms underlying this sex difference remain elusive, we propose that the primary male sex hormone, testosterone, is involved. Our previous studies show that testosterone, through a putative membrane androgen receptor, can increase oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in dopamine neurons. Based on these results, this study examines the role of nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), and apoptosis in the deleterious effects of androgens in an oxidative stress environment. We hypothesize, under oxidative stress environment, testosterone via a putative membrane androgen receptor will exacerbate oxidative stress-induced NF-κB/COX2 signaling in N27 dopaminergic neurons, leading to apoptosis. Our data show that testosterone increased the expression of COX2 and apoptosis in dopamine neurons. Inhibiting the NF-κB and COX2 pathway with CAPE and ibuprofen, respectively, blocked testosterone's negative effects on cell viability, indicating that NF-κB/COX2 cascade plays a role in the negative interaction between testosterone and oxidative stress on neuroinflammation. These data further support the role of testosterone mediating the loss of dopamine neurons under oxidative stress conditions, which may be a key mechanism contributing to the increased incidence of Parkinson's disease in men compared with women. PMID:27167771

  9. The Role of MAC1 in Diesel Exhaust Particle-induced Microglial Activation and Loss of Dopaminergic Neuron Function

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Shannon; Taetzsch, Thomas; Lull, Melinda E.; Johnson, Jo Anne; McGraw, Constance; Block, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing reports support that air pollution causes neuroinflammation and is linked to central nervous system (CNS) disease/damage. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of urban air pollution, which has been linked to microglial activation and Parkinson’s disease-like pathology. To begin to address how DEP may exert CNS effects, microglia and neuron-glia cultures were treated with either nanometer-sized DEP (<0.22 µM; 50µg/mL), ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 50µg/ml), or DEP extracts (eDEP; from 50 µg/ml DEP) and the effect of microglial activation and dopaminergic (DA) neuron function was assessed. All three treatments showed enhanced amoeboid microglia morphology, increased H2O2 production, and decreased DA uptake. Mechanistic inquiry revealed that the scavenger receptor inhibitor fucoidan blocked DEP internalization in microglia, but failed to alter DEP-induced H2O2 production in microglia. However, pretreatment with the MAC1/CD11b inhibitor antibody blocked microglial H2O2 production in response to DEP. MAC1−/− mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures were protected from DEP-induced loss of DA neuron function, as measured by DA uptake. These findings support that DEP may activate microglia through multiple mechanisms, where scavenger receptors regulate internalization of DEP and the MAC1 receptor is mandatory for both DEP-induced microglial H2O2 production and loss of DA neuron function. PMID:23470120

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist protects dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons from degeneration in MPTP-treated monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bogenpohl, James W.; Alagille, David; Delevich, Kristen; Tamagnan, Gilles; Votaw, John R.; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system and of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus are important pathological features of Parkinson’s disease. There is an urgent need to develop therapies that slow down the progression of neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, we tested whether the highly specific metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist, 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine, reduces dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuronal loss in monkeys rendered parkinsonian by chronic treatment with low doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Weekly intramuscular 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine injections (0.2–0.5 mg/kg body weight), in combination with daily administration of 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine or vehicle, were performed until the development of parkinsonian motor symptoms in either of the two experimental groups (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine versus 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle). After 21 weeks of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine treatment, all 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle-treated animals displayed parkinsonian symptoms, whereas none of the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine-treated monkeys were significantly affected. These behavioural observations were consistent with in vivo positron emission tomography dopamine transporter imaging data, and with post-mortem stereological counts of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, as well as striatal intensity measurements of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, which were all significantly higher in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine-treated animals than in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle-treated monkeys. The 3-[(2-methyl-1

  11. Prothrombin kringle-2 induces death of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in vivo and in vitro via microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Ryong; Chung, Eun Sook; Bok, Eugene; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Chung, Young Cheul; Won, So Yoon; Joe, Eunhye; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Soung Soo; Jin, Min Young; Choi, Sang Ho; Jin, Byung Kwan

    2010-05-15

    We have shown that prothrombin kringle-2 (pKr-2), a domain of human prothrombin distinct from thrombin could activate cultured rat brain microglia in vitro. However, little is known whether pKr-2-induced microglial activation could cause neurotoxicity on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vivo. To address this question, pKr-2 was injected into the rat substantia nigra (SN). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry experiments demonstrate significant loss of DA neurons seven days after injection of pKr-2. In parallel, pKr-2-activated microglia were detected in the SN with OX-42 and OX-6 immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcription PCR and double-label immunohistochemistry revealed that activated microglia in vivo exhibit early and transient expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and several proinflammatory cytokines. The pKr-2-induced loss of SN DA neurons was partially inhibited by the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, and the COX-2 inhibitor DuP-697. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were activated in the SN as early as 1 hr after pKr-2 injection, and localized within microglia. Inhibition of these kinases led to attenuation of mRNA expression of iNOS, COX-2 and several proinflammatory cytokines, and rescue of DA neurons in the SN. Intriguingly, following treatment with pKr-2 in vitro, neurotoxicity was detected exclusively in co-cultures of mesencephalic neurons and microglia, but not microglia-free neuron-enriched mesencephalic cultures, indicating that microglia are required for pKr-2 neurotoxicity. Our results strongly suggest that microglia activated by endogenous compound(s), such as pKr-2, are implicated in the DA neuronal cell death in the SN. PMID:20025058

  12. Delayed effects of methylmercury on the mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons and developmental toxicity in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Huang, Susie S Y; Noble, Sandra; Godoy, Rafael; Ekker, Marc; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a known neurotoxicant affecting the central nervous system but effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons are not well understood. Wild-type zebrafish (Danio rerio) and two transgenic lines: Tg(dat:eGFP) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in DA neuron clusters and Tg(dat:tom20 MLS-mCherry) expressing red fluorescence (mCherry) targeted to mitochondria of DA neurons were used to evaluate the effects of micromolar MeHg exposure on DA neuron and whole animal motor function during early development. Three-day-old larvae were exposed to micromolar concentrations of MeHg (0.03, 0.06, and 0.3μM) in system water. Exposure to 0.3μM MeHg caused mortality and significant morphological abnormalities including edema, curvature of the spine, and hemorrhages in zebrafish larvae after a 48h exposure period. At 0.06μM MeHg, the appearance of morphological abnormalities was delayed for 72h and far less severe, whereas 0.03μM MeHg did not cause any morphological defects or mortalities. A delayed but significant reduction in locomotor ability and mCherry fluorescence in specific brain regions in the 0.06μM MeHg exposed larvae suggests that DA neuron function rather than neuron numbers was compromised. Double immunolabeling with tyrosine hydroxylase and pan neural staining showed no effect of MeHg exposure. We have established Tg(dat:tom20 MLS-mCherry) zebrafish larvae as a model which can be used to assess MeHg neurotoxicity and that exposure to low dose MeHg (0.06μM) during development may predispose DA neurons to impairment caused by changes in mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:26994370

  13. α-Synuclein propagates from mouse brain to grafted dopaminergic neurons and seeds aggregation in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian; Angot, Elodie; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Steiner, Jennifer A; Pieri, Laura; Paul, Gesine; Outeiro, Tiago F; Melki, Ronald; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina; Li, Jia-Yi; Brundin, Patrik

    2011-02-01

    Post-mortem analyses of brains from patients with Parkinson disease who received fetal mesencephalic transplants show that α-synuclein-containing (α-syn-containing) Lewy bodies gradually appear in grafted neurons. Here, we explored whether intercellular transfer of α-syn from host to graft, followed by seeding of α-syn aggregation in recipient neurons, can contribute to this phenomenon. We assessed α-syn cell-to-cell transfer using microscopy, flow cytometry, and high-content screening in several coculture model systems. Coculturing cells engineered to express either GFP- or DsRed-tagged α-syn resulted in a gradual increase in double-labeled cells. Importantly, α-syn-GFP derived from 1 neuroblastoma cell line localized to red fluorescent aggregates in other cells expressing DsRed-α-syn, suggesting a seeding effect of transmitted α-syn. Extracellular α-syn was taken up by cells through endocytosis and interacted with intracellular α-syn. Next, following intracortical injection of recombinant α-syn in rats, we found neuronal uptake was attenuated by coinjection of an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo transfer of α-syn between host cells and grafted dopaminergic neurons in mice overexpressing human α-syn. In summary, intercellularly transferred α-syn interacts with cytoplasmic α-syn and can propagate α-syn pathology. These results suggest that α-syn propagation is a key element in the progression of Parkinson disease pathology. PMID:21245577

  14. α-Synuclein propagates from mouse brain to grafted dopaminergic neurons and seeds aggregation in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian; Angot, Elodie; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Steiner, Jennifer A.; Pieri, Laura; Paul, Gesine; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Melki, Ronald; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina; Li, Jia-Yi; Brundin, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Post-mortem analyses of brains from patients with Parkinson disease who received fetal mesencephalic transplants show that α-synuclein–containing (α-syn–containing) Lewy bodies gradually appear in grafted neurons. Here, we explored whether intercellular transfer of α-syn from host to graft, followed by seeding of α-syn aggregation in recipient neurons, can contribute to this phenomenon. We assessed α-syn cell-to-cell transfer using microscopy, flow cytometry, and high-content screening in several coculture model systems. Coculturing cells engineered to express either GFP– or DsRed-tagged α-syn resulted in a gradual increase in double-labeled cells. Importantly, α-syn–GFP derived from 1 neuroblastoma cell line localized to red fluorescent aggregates in other cells expressing DsRed–α-syn, suggesting a seeding effect of transmitted α-syn. Extracellular α-syn was taken up by cells through endocytosis and interacted with intracellular α-syn. Next, following intracortical injection of recombinant α-syn in rats, we found neuronal uptake was attenuated by coinjection of an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo transfer of α-syn between host cells and grafted dopaminergic neurons in mice overexpressing human α-syn. In summary, intercellularly transferred α-syn interacts with cytoplasmic α-syn and can propagate α-syn pathology. These results suggest that α-syn propagation is a key element in the progression of Parkinson disease pathology. PMID:21245577

  15. Midbrain-like Organoids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Contain Functional Dopaminergic and Neuromelanin-Producing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jo, Junghyun; Xiao, Yixin; Sun, Alfred Xuyang; Cukuroglu, Engin; Tran, Hoang-Dai; Göke, Jonathan; Tan, Zi Ying; Saw, Tzuen Yih; Tan, Cheng-Peow; Lokman, Hidayat; Lee, Younghwan; Kim, Donghoon; Ko, Han Seok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Park, Jae Hyeon; Cho, Nam-Joon; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Shin, Joo Heon; Weinberger, Daniel R; Tan, Eng King; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in 3D culture systems have led to the generation of brain organoids that resemble different human brain regions; however, a 3D organoid model of the midbrain containing functional midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons has not been reported. We developed a method to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into a large multicellular organoid-like structure that contains distinct layers of neuronal cells expressing characteristic markers of human midbrain. Importantly, we detected electrically active and functionally mature mDA neurons and dopamine production in our 3D midbrain-like organoids (MLOs). In contrast to human mDA neurons generated using 2D methods or MLOs generated from mouse embryonic stem cells, our human MLOs produced neuromelanin-like granules that were structurally similar to those isolated from human substantia nigra tissues. Thus our MLOs bearing features of the human midbrain may provide a tractable in vitro system to study the human midbrain and its related diseases. PMID:27476966

  16. Absence of glia maturation factor protects dopaminergic neurons and improves motor behavior in mouse model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zaheer, Smita; Ramasamy, Thangavel; Patel, Margi; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Zaheer, Asgar

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that aberrant expression of glia maturation factor (GMF), a proinflammatory protein, is associated with the neuropathological conditions underlying diseases suggesting an important role for GMF in neurodegeneration. In the present study, we demonstrate that absence of GMF suppresses dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss, glial activation, and expression of proinflammatory mediators in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN) and striatum (STR) of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treated mice. Dopaminergic neuron numbers in the SN and fiber densities in the STR were reduced in wild type (Wt) mice when compared with GMF-deficient (GMF-KO) mice after MPTP treatment. We compared the motor abnormalities caused by MPTP treatment in Wt and GMF-KO mice as measured by Rota rod and grip strength test. Results show that the deficits in motor coordination and decrease in dopamine and its metabolite content were protected significantly in GMF-KO mice after MPTP treatment when compared with control Wt mice under identical experimental conditions. These findings were further supported by the immunohistochemical analysis that showed reduced glial activation in the SN of MPTP-treated GMF-KO mice. Similarly, in MPTP-treated GMF-KO mice, production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) MCP-1 was suppressed, findings consistent with a role for GMF in MPTP neurotoxicity. In conclusion, present investigation provides the first evidence that deficiency of GMF protects the DA neuron loss and reduces the inflammatory load following MPTP administration in mice. Thus depletion of endogenous GMF represents an effective and selective strategy to slow down the MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25754447

  17. Small molecule TrkB agonist deoxygedunin protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA and MPTP induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuke; Xu, Yan; Chen, Guiqin; Ma, Kai; Han, Chao; Guo, Zhenli; Zhang, Zhentao; Ye, Keqiang; Cao, Xuebing

    2015-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and dopamine (DA) content loss in the striatum correlate well with disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophin family and is necessary for the survival and development of DA neurons in the SN. Deficits in BDNF/TrkB receptors signaling contribute to the dysfunction of PD. Deoxygedunin, a derivative of gedunin produced from Indian neem tree, binds TrkB receptor and activates TrkB and its downstream signaling cascades in a BDNF-independent manner, and possesses neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of deoxygedunin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were treated with deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for one month started two weeks before 6-OHDA lesion (pre-treatment), or for two weeks right after lesion (post-treatment), with isovolumetric vehicle as control and normal. Mice were given deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for 2 weeks and administrated with MPTP twice at the dose of 20 mg/kg (i.p.) on day 7. The results revealed that pretreatment with deoxygedunin improved PD models' behavioral performance and reduced dopaminergic neurons loss in SN, associated with the activation of TrkB receptors and its two major signaling cascades involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Thus, our current study indicates that deoxygedunin, as a small molecule TrkB agonist, displays prominent neuroprotective properties, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:26282118

  18. Medium-throughput computer aided micro-island method to assay embryonic dopaminergic neuron cultures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Planken, A; Porokuokka, L L; Hänninen, A-L; Tuominen, R K; Andressoo, J-O

    2010-12-15

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons degenerate and die, causing loss of motor function. Currently no therapies exist to ameliorate neurodegeneration or to restore DA neurons, although neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are promising leads. Prior in vivo studies the NTFs are routinely assessed in vitro by quantifying the survival of DA neurons from embryonic rodent midbrain cultures. Current in vitro methods are limited in terms of assay reliability, arduous workflow, low throughput, low statistical power and may obscure detection of molecules with minor yet critically important therapeutic effects. We have developed a medium-throughput, micro-island culture method. It permits analysis of 10-12 data points from a single embryo - several fold more than any previously published method - and enables comparisons of DA neurons from a single gene knockout (KO) embryo. It is computer-aided, improves statistical power and decreases the number of animals and workload per experiment. This method enhances testing capabilities of NTFs and other factors, and enables small scale screening of chemical drug libraries. We have validated the method by confirming the known effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurturin (NRTN), and demonstrated additive effects via simultaneous addition of GDNF and heparin binding growth associated molecule (HB-GAM). We also show for the first time that DA neurons isolated from GDNF receptor RET-deficient mice are still GDNF responsive, suggesting the presence of an alternative non-RET receptor for GDNF in the DA system. Finally, the method can be adapted for analyses of other low abundance neuronal systems. PMID:20951734

  19. A Novel Combination of Factors, Termed SPIE, which Promotes Dopaminergic Neuron Differentiation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Tandis; Becker, Kevin G.; Chen, Jia; Spivak, Charles E.; Lupica, Carl R.; Zhang, Yongqing; Worden, Lila; Freed, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Stromal-Derived Inducing Activity (SDIA) is one of the most efficient methods of generating dopaminergic (DA) neurons from embryonic stem cells (ESC). DA neuron induction can be achieved by co-culturing ESC with the mouse stromal cell lines PA6 or MS5. The molecular nature of this effect, which has been termed “SDIA” is so far unknown. Recently, we found that factors secreted by PA6 cells provided lineage-specific instructions to induce DA differentiation of human ESC (hESC). Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we compared PA6 cells to various cell lines lacking the SDIA effect, and employed genome expression analysis to identify differentially-expressed signaling molecules. Among the factors highly expressed by PA6 cells, and known to be associated with CNS development, were stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), pleiotrophin (PTN), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), and ephrin B1 (EFNB1). When these four factors, the combination of which was termed SPIE, were applied to hESC, they induced differentiation to TH-positive neurons in vitro. RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed the expression of midbrain specific markers, including engrailed 1, Nurr1, Pitx3, and dopamine transporter (DAT) in cultures influenced by these four molecules. Electrophysiological recordings showed that treatment of hESC with SPIE induced differentiation of neurons that were capable of generating action potentials and forming functional synaptic connections. Conclusions/Significance The combination of SDF-1, PTN, IGF2, and EFNB1 mimics the DA phenotype-inducing property of SDIA and was sufficient to promote differentiation of hESC to functional midbrain DA neurons. These findings provide a method for differentiating hESC to form DA neurons, without a requirement for the use of animal-derived cell lines or products. PMID:19672298

  20. Intracellular Nogo-A facilitates initiation of neurite formation in mouse midbrain neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Z; Brundin, P; Schwab, M E; Li, J-Y

    2014-01-01

    Nogo-A is a transmembrane protein originally discovered in myelin, produced by postnatal CNS oligodendrocytes. Nogo-A induces growth cone collapse and inhibition of axonal growth in the injured adult CNS. In the intact CNS, Nogo-A functions as a negative regulator of growth and plasticity. Nogo-A is also expressed by certain neurons. Neuronal Nogo-A depresses long-term potentiation in the hippocampus and modulates neurite adhesion and fasciculation during development in mice. Here we show that Nogo-A is present in neurons derived from human midbrain (Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) cell line), as well as in embryonic and postnatal mouse midbrain (dopaminergic) neurons. In LUHMES cells, Nogo-A was upregulated threefold upon differentiation and neurite extension. Nogo-A was localized intracellularly in differentiated LUHMES cells. Cultured midbrain (dopaminergic) neurons from Nogo-A knock-out mice exhibited decreased numbers of neurites and branches when compared with neurons from wild-type (WT) mice. However, this phenotype was not observed when the cultures from WT mice were treated with an antibody neutralizing plasma membrane Nogo-A. In vivo, neither the regeneration of nigrostriatal tyrosine hydroxylase fibers, nor the survival of nigral dopaminergic neurons after partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesions was affected by Nogo-A deletion. These results indicate that during maturation of cultured midbrain (dopaminergic) neurons, intracellular Nogo-A supports neurite growth initiation and branch formation. PMID:24157929

  1. The ADHD-susceptibility gene lphn3.1 modulates dopaminergic neuron formation and locomotor activity during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Lange, M; Norton, W; Coolen, M; Chaminade, M; Merker, S; Proft, F; Schmitt, A; Vernier, P; Lesch, K-P; Bally-Cuif, L

    2012-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, increased impulsivity and emotion dysregulation. Linkage analysis followed by fine-mapping identified variation in the gene coding for Latrophilin 3 (LPHN3), a putative adhesion-G protein-coupled receptor, as a risk factor for ADHD. In order to validate the link between LPHN3 and ADHD, and to understand the function of LPHN3 in the etiology of the disease, we examined its ortholog lphn3.1 during zebrafish development. Loss of lphn3.1 function causes a reduction and misplacement of dopamine-positive neurons in the ventral diencephalon and a hyperactive/impulsive motor phenotype. The behavioral phenotype can be rescued by the ADHD treatment drugs methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Together, our results implicate decreased Lphn3 activity in eliciting ADHD-like behavior, and demonstrate its correlated contribution to the development of the brain dopaminergic circuitry. PMID:22508465

  2. Ether-à-go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel expression in dopaminergic neurons of basal ganglia is modulated by 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N R; Mitkovski, M; Stühmer, W; Pardo, L A; Del Bel, E A

    2012-04-01

    The ether à go-go (Eag) gene encodes the voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) ion channel Kv10.1, whose function still remains unknown. As dopamine may directly affect K(+) channels, we evaluated whether a nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion induced by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) would alter Eag1-K(+) channel expression in the rat basal ganglia and related brain regions. Male Wistar rats received a microinjection of either saline or 6-OHDA (unilaterally) into the medial forebrain bundle. The extent of the dopaminergic lesion induced by 6-OHDA was evaluated by apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. The 6-OHDA microinjection caused a partial or complete lesion of dopaminergic cells, as well as a reduction of Eag1+ cells in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. In addition, we observed a decrease in TH immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral striatum. In conclusion, the expression of the Eag1-K(+)-channel throughout the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain, its co-localization with dopaminergic cells and its reduction mirroring the extent of the lesion highlight a physiological circuitry where the functional role of this channel can be investigated. The Eag1-K(+) channel expression in dopaminergic cells suggests that these channels are part of the diversified group of ion channels that generate and maintain the electrophysiological activity pattern of dopaminergic midbrain neurons. PMID:22048886

  3. Dopaminergic-Like Neurons Derived from Oral Mucosa Stem Cells by Developmental Cues Improve Symptoms in the Hemi-Parkinsonian Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Javier; Arie, Ina; Buch, Sigal; Zur, Tali Ben; Barhum, Yael; Pour, Sammy; Araidy, Shareef; Pitaru, Sandu; Offen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Achieving safe and readily accessible sources for cell replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still a challenging unresolved issue. Recently, a primitive neural crest stem cell population (hOMSC) was isolated from the adult human oral mucosa and characterized in vitro and in vivo. In this study we assessed hOMSC ability to differentiate into dopamine-secreting cells with a neuronal-dopaminergic phenotype in vitro in response to dopaminergic developmental cues and tested their therapeutic potential in the hemi-Parkinsonian rat model. We found that hOMSC express constitutively a repertoire of neuronal and dopaminergic markers and pivotal transcription factors. Soluble developmental factors induced a reproducible neuronal-like morphology in the majority of hOMSC, downregulated stem cells markers, upregulated the expression of the neuronal and dopaminergic markers that resulted in dopamine release capabilities. Transplantation of these dopaminergic-induced hOMSC into the striatum of hemi-Parkinsonian rats improved their behavioral deficits as determined by amphetamine-induced rotational behavior, motor asymmetry and motor coordination tests. Human TH expressing cells and increased levels of dopamine in the transplanted hemispheres were observed 10 weeks after transplantation. These results demonstrate for the first time that soluble factors involved in the development of DA neurons, induced a DA phenotype in hOMSC in vitro that significantly improved the motor function of hemiparkinsonian rats. Based on their neural-related origin, their niche accessibility by minimal-invasive procedures and their propensity for DA differentiation, hOMSC emerge as an attractive tool for autologous cell replacement therapy in PD. PMID:24945922

  4. Continuous exposure to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor to mature dopaminergic transplants impairs the graft's ability to improve spontaneous motor behavior in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Winkler, C; Georgievska, B; Carlsson, T; Lacar, B; Kirik, D

    2006-08-11

    Functional recovery following intrastriatal transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease is, at least in part, dependent on the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons and the degree of graft-derived dopaminergic reinnervation of the host striatum. In the present study, we analyzed whether continuous exposure of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to mature dopaminergic grafts could further boost the functional outcome of widespread intrastriatal dopaminergic grafts. Rats with dopamine-denervating lesions received multiple intrastriatal transplants of fetal dopaminergic cells and graft-induced behavioral effects were analyzed in drug-induced and spontaneous motor behaviors. At three months after grafting, animals received intrastriatal injections of recombinant lentiviral vectors encoding for either human GDNF or the green fluorescent protein. Continuous exposure of GDNF to the grafts did not boost the functional recovery beyond what was observed in the control animals. Rather, in some of the spontaneous motor behaviors, animals in the GDNF-group showed deterioration as compared with control animals, and this negative effect of GDNF was associated with a down-regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme. Based on these and our earlier results, we propose that intrastriatal administration of GDNF at the time of or shortly after grafting is highly effective in initially promoting the cell survival and fiber outgrowth from the grafts. However, once the grafts are mature, GDNF's ability to boost dopaminergic neurotransmission follows the same dynamics as for the native nigral dopaminergic neurons, which appears to be dependent on the concentration of GDNF. Since rather low doses of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor at nanogram levels appear to saturate these effects, it may be critical to adjust GDNF levels using tightly regulated gene expression systems. PMID:16697115

  5. n-Butylidenephthalide Protects against Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration and α-Synuclein Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Liu, Shih-Ping; Chen, Chang-Shi; Chang, Wen-Lin; Chen, Yue-Mi; Huang, Jing-En; Li, Rong-Jhu; Tsai, Sung-Yu; Hung, Huey-Shan; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Wang, Yu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that impairs motor skills and cognitive function. To date, the disease has no effective therapies. The identification of new drugs that provide benefit in arresting the decline seen in PD patients is the focus of much recent study. However, the lengthy time frame for the progression of neurodegeneration in PD increases both the time and cost of examining potential therapeutic compounds in mammalian models. An alternative is to first evaluate the efficacy of compounds in Caenorhabditis elegans models, which reduces examination time from months to days. n-Butylidenephthalide is the naturally-occurring component derived from the chloroform extract of Angelica sinensis. It has been shown to have anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory properties, but no reports have yet described the effects of n-butylidenephthalide on PD. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for n-butylidenephthalide to improve PD in C. elegans models. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study, we employed a pharmacological strain that expresses green fluorescent protein specifically in dopaminergic neurons (BZ555) and a transgenic strain that expresses human α-synuclein in muscle cells (OW13) to investigate the antiparkinsonian activities of n-butylidenephthalide. Our results demonstrate that in PD animal models, n-butylidenephthalide significantly attenuates dopaminergic neuron degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine; reduces α-synuclein accumulation; recovers lipid content, food-sensing behavior, and dopamine levels; and prolongs life-span of 6-hydroxydopamine treatment, thus revealing its potential as a possible antiparkinsonian drug. n-Butylidenephthalide may exert its effects by blocking egl-1 expression to inhibit apoptosis pathways and by raising rpn-6 expression to enhance the activity of proteasomes. Conclusions/Significance n-Butylidenephthalide may be one of

  6. Neuromelanin, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location determine the differential vulnerability of catecholaminergic neurons to mitochondrial DNA deletions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deletions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accumulate to high levels in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in normal aging and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Human nigral neurons characteristically contain the pigment neuromelanin (NM), which is believed to alter the cellular redox-status. The impact of neuronal pigmentation, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location on the susceptibility to mtDNA damage remains unclear. We quantified mtDNA deletions (ΔmtDNA) in single pigmented and non-pigmented catecholaminergic, as well as non-catecholaminergic neurons of the human SNc, the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the locus coeruleus (LC), using laser capture microdissection and single-cell real-time PCR. Results In healthy aged individuals, ΔmtDNA levels were highest in pigmented catecholaminergic neurons (25.2 ± 14.9%), followed by non-pigmented catecholamergic (18.0 ± 11.2%) and non-catecholaminergic neurons (12.3 ± 12.3%; p < 0.001). Within the catecholaminergic population, ΔmtDNA levels were highest in dopaminergic neurons of the SNc (33.9 ± 21.6%) followed by dopaminergic neurons of the VTA (21.9 ± 12.3%) and noradrenergic neurons of the LC (11.1 ± 11.4%; p < 0.001). In PD patients, there was a trend to an elevated mutation load in surviving non-pigmented nigral neurons (27.13 ± 16.73) compared to age-matched controls (19.15 ± 11.06; p = 0.052), but levels where similar in pigmented nigral neurons of PD patients (41.62 ± 19.61) and controls (41.80 ± 22.62). Conclusions Catecholaminergic brainstem neurons are differentially susceptible to mtDNA damage. Pigmented dopaminergic neurons of the SNc show the highest ΔmtDNA levels, possibly explaining the exceptional vulnerability of the nigro-striatal system in PD and aging. Although loss of pigmented noradrenergic LC neurons also is an early feature of PD pathology, mtDNA levels are not elevated in this nucleus in healthy controls. Thus, ΔmtDNA are

  7. Estrogen-related receptor gamma regulates dopaminergic neuronal phenotype by activating GSK3β/NFAT signaling in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Juhee; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2015-05-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in adult brains, but its physiological role in neuronal development remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of ERRγ in regulating dopaminergic (DAergic) phenotype and the corresponding signaling pathway. We used retinoic acid (RA) to differentiate human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. RA induced neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells with an increase in DAergic neuron-like properties, including up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. ERRγ, but not ERRα, was up-regulated by RA, and participated in RA effect on SH-SY5Y cells. ERRγ over-expression enhanced mature DAergic neuronal phenotype with neurite outgrowth as with RA treatment; and RA-induced increase in DAergic phenotype was attenuated by silencing ERRγ expression. ERRγ appears to have a crucial role in morphological and functional regulation of cells that is selective for DAergic neurons. Polo-like kinase 2 was up-regulated in ERRγ-over-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, which was involved in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and resulting downstream activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells. The likely involvement of ERRγ in regulating the DAergic neuronal phenotype makes this orphan nuclear receptor a novel target for understanding DAergic neuronal differentiation. We propose the relevance of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) in regulating dopaminergic neuronal phenotype: ERRγ is up-regulated by retinoic acid in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhances dopaminergic phenotypes and induces neurite outgrowth; Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta/nuclear factor of activated T cells (GSK3β/NFAT) signaling are responsible for the ERRγ effect. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of ERRγ in the brain, as a novel approach toward understanding

  8. Embryonic stem cells derived neuron transplantation recovery in models of parkinsonism in relation to severity of the disorder in rats.

    PubMed

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2015-04-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell-derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP(+) responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×10(5) differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  9. Embryonic Stem Cells Derived Neuron Transplantation Recovery in Models of Parkinsonism in Relation to Severity of the Disorder in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell–derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP+ responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×105 differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  10. DYRK1A promotes dopaminergic neuron survival in the developing brain and in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre, M J; Perier, C; Bové, J; Laguna, A; Delabar, J M; Vila, M; Arbonés, M L

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, programmed cell death (PCD) serves to adjust the numbers of the different types of neurons during development, and its pathological reactivation in the adult leads to neurodegeneration. Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a pleiotropic kinase involved in neural proliferation and cell death, and its role during brain growth is evolutionarily conserved. Human DYRK1A lies in the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21, and heterozygous mutations in the gene cause microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. The mouse model for DYRK1A haploinsufficiency (the Dyrk1a+/− mouse) presents neuronal deficits in specific regions of the adult brain, including the substantia nigra (SN), although the mechanisms underlying these pathogenic effects remain unclear. Here we study the effect of DYRK1A copy number variation on dopaminergic cell homeostasis. We show that mesencephalic DA (mDA) neurons are generated in the embryo at normal rates in the Dyrk1a haploinsufficient model and in a model (the mBACtgDyrk1a mouse) that carries three copies of Dyrk1a. We also show that the number of mDA cells diminishes in postnatal Dyrk1a+/− mice and increases in mBACtgDyrk1a mice due to an abnormal activity of the mitochondrial caspase9 (Casp9)-dependent apoptotic pathway during the main wave of PCD that affects these neurons. In addition, we show that the cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a toxin that activates Casp9-dependent apoptosis in mDA neurons, is attenuated in adult mBACtgDyrk1a mice, leading to an increased survival of SN DA neurons 21 days after MPTP intoxication. Finally, we present data indicating that Dyrk1a phosphorylation of Casp9 at the Thr125 residue is the mechanism by which this kinase hinders both physiological and pathological PCD in mDA neurons. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms that control cell death in brain DA neurons and they show that