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  1. NIH Quickfinder

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... information or to contact any of the following NIH institutes, centers, and offices directly, please call or ...

  2. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... work as pathology researchers. They made a tremendous team, providing NIH with outstanding competence, integrity, and vision for over 50 years. She held the most important leadership posts in recent NIH history. Dr. Ruth Kirschstein ...

  3. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents For ... nih.gov (301) 402-1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., Office of Communications ...

  4. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info Recent News Congratulations to 2016 Mitchell Max Awardee, Dr. Ditre Asst. ...

  5. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NIH Loses a Friend Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Donald ... changingthefaceofmedicine/ . Sincerely, Donald West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Let Us ...

  6. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents Connections to Precision Medicine Precision medicine is already saving lives. Read the ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370-2943 National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) www.nidcd.nih.gov 1-800- ...

  8. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... fic.nih.gov National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) www.nccam.nih.gov 1-888-644- ... Institute Chris Thomsen , National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Larry Thompson , National Human Genome Research Institute Anne ...

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541-3345 ... Public Liaison, NIH Christine Bruske , National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Vicky Cahan , National Institute on Aging Kym Collins- ...

  10. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370-2943 National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) www.nidcd.nih.gov 1-800- ...

  11. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. NIDCD-funded researchers from ... An NIDCD-funded research team says it might be possible in the ...

  12. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Testing very young babies ... according to recent research funded by the National Institute of Allergy and ...

  13. NIH Peer Review

    PubMed Central

    Vancea, Adrian; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2015-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. Funding decisions are made largely based on the outcome of a peer review process that is intended to provide a fair, equitable, timely, and unbiased review of the quality, scientific merit, and potential impact of the research. There have been concerns about the criteria reviewers are using, and recent changes in review procedures at the NIH now make it possible to conduct an analysis of how reviewers evaluate applications for funding. This study examined the criteria and overall impact scores recorded by assigned reviewers for R01 grant applications. The results suggest that all the scored review criteria, including innovation, are related to the overall impact score. Further, good scores are necessary on all five scored review criteria, not just the score for research methodology, in order to achieve a good overall impact score. PMID:27239158

  14. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Richard E. Manrow, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute John McGrath, Ph.D., ...

  15. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Joyce Backus, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental ...

  16. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH researchers report promising results in prevention and treatment of Ebola virus disease (from left) NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, and NIH Clinical Center Director Dr. John Gallin exit the Clinical Center ...

  17. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer ... page please turn Javascript on. Scientists at the NIH's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) ...

  18. Doing business with the NIH

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Menachem, Gil; Ferguson, Steven M; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Young biotech startups can benefit hugely from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), not least because of the agency's non-dilutive funding, guidance, and opportunities for collaboration. Increasingly, however, there is a fair bit of misunderstanding about what the NIH can and cannot do for a biotech entrepreneur. PMID:16475248

  19. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541-3345 ... Medicine (ex-officio) Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Vicky Cahan, National Institute on Aging Kym Collins- ...

  20. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301) 46-0357 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) http://obssr.od.nih.gov (301) 402-1146 Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov Genetic and ...

  1. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov (301) 496-0357 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) http://obssr.od.nih.gov (301) 402-1146 Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR) http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center 1-888-205- ...

  2. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Joyce Backus, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Karina Boehm, National Institute of Dental ...

  3. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liaison, NIH Diane Striar, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Chris Thomsen, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Larry Thompson, National Human Genome Research Institute Anne Thurn, Ph.D., Office of Dietary Supplements Summer 2011 Issue: ...

  4. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301) 46-0357 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) http://obssr.od.nih.gov (301) 402- ... officio) Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences ... Research Mary Beth Kester, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging ...

  5. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Beth Kester, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 451-6772 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  8. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 451-6772 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and ...

  9. Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Quit Smoking Latest NIH Research Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Many factors contribute to a person's learning to smoke, continuing to smoke, and having difficulty ...

  10. NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  11. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Chris Thomsen , National Center ...

  12. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Diane Striar , National Heart, ...

  13. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Chris Thomsen , National Center ...

  14. Memory and Forgetfulness: NIH Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  15. Basic Science and The NIH

    PubMed Central

    Varmus, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following is an edited version of the Keynote Speech delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology by Harold Varmus, Director of the National Institutes of Health. The address, entitled Basic Science and the NIH, was given at the opening of the meeting in New Orleans on December 11, 1993. It was Varmus' first public policy talk as NIH Director. PMID:8049519

  16. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  17. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/allergy.html MedlinePlus: Hay Fever www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hayfever.html National ...

  18. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/allergy.html MedlinePlus: Hay Fever www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hayfever.html National ...

  19. NIH Research Radio” Podcasts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. “NIH Research Radio” Podcasts Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents Tune in to NIH for Health! NIH: The World’s Leader in Biomedical ...

  20. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22NIAMS (1-877-226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov ( ... National Cancer Institute Thomas Johnson, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of ...

  1. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Thomas Johnson, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive ...

  2. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Raymond MacDougall, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering John Ohab, National Human Genome Research Institute Stephanie ...

  3. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  4. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov (301) 402-0911 National Institute on Aging (NIA) www.nia.nih.gov Aging information 1-800-222-2225 ... Content Strategist, National Institute of Mental Health Fall 2015 Issue: Volume 10 Number 3 Page 29

  5. Thermal modeling of NiH2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponthus, Agnes-Marie; Alexandre, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The following are discussed: NiH2 battery mission and environment; NiH2 cell heat dissipation; Nodal software; model development general philosophy; NiH2 battery model development; and NiH2 experimental developments.

  6. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... report promising results in prevention and treatment of Ebola virus disease (from left) NIH Director Dr. Francis ... Gallin exit the Clinical Center with recently discharged Ebola patient Nina Pham (next to Dr. Fauci). NIH's ...

  7. Back Cover: NIH MedlinePlus Salud

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH MedlinePlus Salud Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. ¡A su salud! Los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud (NIH, por ...

  8. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... html. Photo courtesy of NIH From DNA to Beer: A Unique Look at the Mighty Microbe A ... consume. The exhibition is called From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry. NIH's National ...

  9. NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Act News & Events News Releases Videos Images Events Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in Health ... with Us Contact Us Bookmark & Share Email Updates Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En ...

  10. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  11. Back Cover: NIH MedlinePlus Salud

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH MedlinePlus Salud Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... su salud! Los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud (NIH, por sus siglas en inglés), la Sociedad de ...

  12. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301) 496-0357 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) obssr.od.nih.gov (301) 402-1146 ... Karina Boehm, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Vicky Cahan, National Institute on Aging Kym Collins- ...

  13. NIH Roadmap & the Common Fund - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Roadmap for Medical Research is a series of high impact, trans-NIH programs supported by the NIH Common Fund. These programs address challenges that are priorities for the NIH and medical research but are issues that require the cooperation of more than one NIH institute to address.

  14. NIH Research on Treating Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIH Clinical Center. The NIH Pain and Palliative Care Service conducts studies in pain and symptom management, quality of life, complementary therapies, and palliative medicine outcomes. Hospice care is end-of-life ...

  15. NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health ... NIH Why is it important to have a research focus on older adults? One reason is that ...

  16. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  17. 10 New NIH Research Highlights | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Research Update 10 New NIH Research Highlights Spring 2016 Table of Contents ... Tumor Test May Help Women Avoid Chemotherapy A new test may help some women diagnosed with early- ...

  18. NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Concussion NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Dr. ... chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). "Boxing, Football and the Brain" One study, funded in part by NIH, is ...

  19. From the NIH Director: The Importance of Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. From the NIH Director: The Importance of Clinical Trials Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents NIH ... early June to attendees of a 2011 conference, “Clinical Trials: New Challenges and Opportunities,” cosponsored by the National ...

  20. NIH Research Radio” Podcasts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. “NIH Research Radio” Podcasts Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents ... Biomedical Research and Information www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Brought to you by the National ...

  1. The Children's Inn at NIH Anniversary Key Messages | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Anniversary Key Messages Playground and Park at The Children's Inn at NIH. Photo courtesy of Mahan ...

  2. NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Concussion NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). "Boxing, Football and the Brain" One study, funded in part by NIH, ...

  3. 10 New NIH Research Highlights | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Research Update 10 New NIH Research Highlights Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table ... Tumor Test May Help Women Avoid Chemotherapy A new test may help some women diagnosed with early- ...

  4. Estimating the NIH Efficient Frontier

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is among the world’s largest investors in biomedical research, with a mandate to: “…lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.” Its funding decisions have been criticized as insufficiently focused on disease burden. We hypothesize that modern portfolio theory can create a closer link between basic research and outcome, and offer insight into basic-science related improvements in public health. We propose portfolio theory as a systematic framework for making biomedical funding allocation decisions–one that is directly tied to the risk/reward trade-off of burden-of-disease outcomes. Methods and Findings Using data from 1965 to 2007, we provide estimates of the NIH “efficient frontier”, the set of funding allocations across 7 groups of disease-oriented NIH institutes that yield the greatest expected return on investment for a given level of risk, where return on investment is measured by subsequent impact on U.S. years of life lost (YLL). The results suggest that NIH may be actively managing its research risk, given that the volatility of its current allocation is 17% less than that of an equal-allocation portfolio with similar expected returns. The estimated efficient frontier suggests that further improvements in expected return (89% to 119% vs. current) or reduction in risk (22% to 35% vs. current) are available holding risk or expected return, respectively, constant, and that 28% to 89% greater decrease in average years-of-life-lost per unit risk may be achievable. However, these results also reflect the imprecision of YLL as a measure of disease burden, the noisy statistical link between basic research and YLL, and other known limitations of portfolio theory itself. Conclusions Our analysis is intended to serve as a proof-of-concept and starting point for applying quantitative methods to allocating biomedical research funding that are objective, systematic, transparent

  5. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Richard E. Manrow, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute John McGrath, Ph.D., ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Richard E. Manrow, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute John McGrath, Ph.D., ...

  7. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH ...

  8. NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000 patients since the hospital opened in 1953. Photo: NIH Clinical Center Home to the NIH Undiagnosed ... basic and clinical science to advance medical knowledge. Photo: NIH Clinical Center History of Medical Milestones At ...

  9. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge Past ... NIH Clinical Center. Photo: NIH Clinical Center Children research volunteers receive care and help advance knowledge I ...

  10. Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table ... D., is director of NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR). The NIH's National Institute ...

  11. The NIH Human Microbiome Project

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jane; Garges, Susan; Giovanni, Maria; McInnes, Pamela; Wang, Lu; Schloss, Jeffery A.; Bonazzi, Vivien; McEwen, Jean E.; Wetterstrand, Kris A.; Deal, Carolyn; Baker, Carl C.; Di Francesco, Valentina; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Karp, Robert W.; Lunsford, R. Dwayne; Wellington, Christopher R.; Belachew, Tsegahiwot; Wright, Michael; Giblin, Christina; David, Hagit; Mills, Melody; Salomon, Rachelle; Mullins, Christopher; Akolkar, Beena; Begg, Lisa; Davis, Cindy; Grandison, Lindsey; Humble, Michael; Khalsa, Jag; Little, A. Roger; Peavy, Hannah; Pontzer, Carol; Portnoy, Matthew; Sayre, Michael H.; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Zakhari, Samir; Read, Jennifer; Watson, Bracie; Guyer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), funded as an initiative of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov), is a multi-component community resource. The goals of the HMP are: (1) to take advantage of new, high-throughput technologies to characterize the human microbiome more fully by studying samples from multiple body sites from each of at least 250 “normal” volunteers; (2) to determine whether there are associations between changes in the microbiome and health/disease by studying several different medical conditions; and (3) to provide both a standardized data resource and new technological approaches to enable such studies to be undertaken broadly in the scientific community. The ethical, legal, and social implications of such research are being systematically studied as well. The ultimate objective of the HMP is to demonstrate that there are opportunities to improve human health through monitoring or manipulation of the human microbiome. The history and implementation of this new program are described here. PMID:19819907

  12. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Spring - Summer 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents For more information ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Spring / Summer 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 2 Page ...

  13. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  14. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  15. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine! Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... Produced by the National Institutes of Health, the magazine and its companion Web site medlineplus.gov are ...

  16. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... better socially," said James Griffin, PhD, of the Child Development and Behavior Branch at NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver ... interaction research program to support studies relevant to child development, health, and the therapeutic use of animals. A ...

  17. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past ... gov . What's New Community-wide treatment of ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The study was conducted in a rural ...

  18. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    PubMed Central

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  19. Health Lines | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nccam.nih.gov/timetotalk . Remember This: Nutrients in Fish May Boost Memory If you want to stay ... That's a type of fat found in most fish, especially fatty fish like salmon and herring. Researchers ...

  20. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... in women, the cause of the majority of cervical cancers. Photo courtesy of Judy Folkenberg, NLM Writer By ...

  1. Health Lines | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... timetotalk . Remember This: Nutrients in Fish May Boost Memory If you want to stay sharp as you ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Two other NIH Institutes funded the ...

  2. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  3. NIH Seeks Reduction in "Indirect Costs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1983-01-01

    The National Institute of Health (NIH) is currently seeking a reduction in indirect costs associated with the awarding of research funds. Various issues related to these costs, which are causing tension between university administrators and academic researchers, are discussed. (JN)

  4. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top genetics researcher led mapping of the human genome. Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., a physician ... who served as Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at NIH from 1993-2008. ...

  5. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fall 2013 Table of Contents A display in "Genome: Unlocking Life's Code" exhibition at the National Museum ... Natural History in Washington, DC. NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute and the Smithsonian Institution developed the ...

  6. Focus on Communication: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... grew new hair cells. Read More "Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the ...

  7. Input on NIH Toolbox inclusion criteria

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Debb, Scott M.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox is intended to be responsive to the needs of investigators evaluating neurologic and behavioral function in diverse settings. Early phases of the project involved gathering information and input from potential end users. Methods: Information was collected through literature and instrument database reviews, requests for information, consensus meetings, and expert interviews and integrated into the NIH Toolbox development process in an iterative manner. Results: Criteria for instrument inclusion, subdomains to be assessed, and preferences regarding instrument cost and length were obtained. Existing measures suitable for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox and areas requiring new measure development were identified. Conclusion: The NIH Toolbox was developed with explicit input from potential end users regarding many of its key features. PMID:23479548

  8. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... their health." Promising Method for Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer Nearly 50,000 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015, according to NIH's National Cancer Institute ( ...

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2011

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Richard E. Manrow, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute John McGrath, Ph.D., ...

  10. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... in the Federal Register (74 FR 9411) to revise the NIH Guidelines in two regards. The first was to..., NIH/OBA revised the proposal and published a notice for comment on April 22, 2010 (75 FR 21008...-1, Experiments Involving the Cloning of Toxin Molecules with LD50 of Less Than 100 Nanograms...

  11. Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Symptoms ... without the monitoring required for warfarin. Latest NIH Research The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) ...

  12. From the NIH Director: A Global Health System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues From the NIH Director: A Global Health System Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... officials the issues of world health and NIH's global outreach. He spoke with MedlinePlus ' Christopher Klose on ...

  13. Help Stop the Flu | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Human Services (HHS). Latest NIH Flu Research Scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and ... research program. NIAID works nationally with academic medical centers ...

  14. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." ...

  15. Mentoring in Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish Tune in: NIH Radio Free podcast audio reports on your computer or personal audio player www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Summer 2013 Issue: Volume 8 Number ...

  16. NIH-Supported Clinical Trial Finds Antidepressant Reduces Alzheimer's Agitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR NIH-supported clinical trial finds antidepressant reduces Alzheimer’s agitation February 25, 2014 NIH-funded researchers are testing interventions to alleviate psychiatric ...

  17. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center than at any other place in the world,” said Dr. John I. Gallin, NIH Clinical Center ... NIH Clinical Center, children are treated to a world-class staff of specialists and support services. A ...

  18. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the magazine NIH MedlinePlus the magazine is published quarterly, in print and on the ... up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please ...

  19. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH Director Dr. Elias Zerhouni, Rep. Ralph Regula (R-OH), Mary Tyler Moore, former Rep. Paul Rogers, and NLM ... issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine. In September, the FNLM was fortunate to have ...

  20. How to Write an NIH R13 Conference Grant Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonis, Jeffrey H.; Triffleman, Elisa; King, Lynda; King, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations for writing a successful R13 conference grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Methods: The authors reviewed successful NIH conference grant proposal abstracts. They also reflect on their own experience in writing an NIH conference grant proposal and…

  1. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  2. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  3. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  4. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  5. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  6. The Children's Inn at NIH Anniversary Key Messages | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... through mutual support including therapeutic, recreational, and educational programming. Establishment of The Inn took hard work, dedication ... 7 million for the expansion project. fast facts 1 The Children's Inn, located on the NIH campus ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Summer 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For an enhanced version ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Summer 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 3 Page 29

  8. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been bringing sick people to its ... Inherited Disorder Researchers for the National Institutes of Health’s Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) have pinpointed a genetic ...

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Beth Kester, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive ...

  10. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2011

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov 1-800-370- ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  11. Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH ... of Contents Symptoms The signs and symptoms of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) may be related to DVT ...

  12. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past ... hearing from you. The Friends of the National Library of Medicine has a warm and mutually appreciative ...

  13. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus ... Dr. Donald West King with the Distinguished Public Service Award at the MLA’s recent national conference. Let ...

  14. The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 Past Issues / ... home …" for all families! What to Expect at The Children's Inn The Children's Inn enhances opportunities for ...

  15. The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Kristal Nemeroff—The Patient Kristal Nemeroff, age 2, at the Children's ...

  16. NIH Research on Treating Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Chronic Pain NIH Research on Treating Pain Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Among ... enhance pain research and promote collaboration among researchers. Pain at End of Life Chronic pain management at ...

  17. Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Zeeshan; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Zill, Nicholas; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Kupst, Mary Jo; Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Bode, Rita K.; Choi, Seung W.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Griffith, James W.; Stoney, Catherine M.; Brouwers, Pim; Knox, Sarah S.; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of the NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function was to identify or develop brief measures of emotion for use in prospective epidemiologic and clinical research. Emotional health has significant links to physical health and exerts a powerful effect on perceptions of life quality. Based on an extensive literature review and expert input, the Emotion team identified 4 central subdomains: Negative Affect, Psychological Well-Being, Stress and Self-Efficacy, and Social Relationships. A subsequent psychometric review identified several existing self-report and proxy measures of these subdomains with measurement characteristics that met the NIH Toolbox criteria. In cases where adequate measures did not exist, robust item banks were developed to assess concepts of interest. A population-weighted sample was recruited by an online survey panel to provide initial item calibration and measure validation data. Participants aged 8 to 85 years completed self-report measures whereas parents/guardians responded for children aged 3 to 12 years. Data were analyzed using a combination of classic test theory and item response theory methods, yielding efficient measures of emotional health concepts. An overview of the development of the NIH Toolbox Emotion battery is presented along with preliminary results. Norming activities led to further refinement of the battery, thus enhancing the robustness of emotional health measurement for researchers using the NIH Toolbox. PMID:23479549

  18. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain activity with a powerful and fast MEG brain imaging scanner. NIH Research Uncovers New Clue to Treating Depression Scientists have made a new discovery in their attempt to find a ... a signal in the brain that may help to identify which patients will ...

  19. Motor assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Magasi, Susan; McCreath, Heather E.; Bohannon, Richard W.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Bubela, Deborah J.; Rymer, William Z.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Rine, Rose Marie; Lai, Jin-Shei; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Motor function involves complex physiologic processes and requires the integration of multiple systems, including neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and cardiopulmonary, and neural motor and sensory-perceptual systems. Motor-functional status is indicative of current physical health status, burden of disease, and long-term health outcomes, and is integrally related to daily functioning and quality of life. Given its importance to overall neurologic health and function, motor function was identified as a key domain for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox). We engaged in a 3-stage developmental process to: 1) identify key subdomains and candidate measures for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox, 2) pretest candidate measures for feasibility across the age span of people aged 3 to 85 years, and 3) validate candidate measures against criterion measures in a sample of healthy individuals aged 3 to 85 years (n = 340). Based on extensive literature review and input from content experts, the 5 subdomains of dexterity, strength, balance, locomotion, and endurance were recommended for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox motor battery. Based on our validation testing, valid and reliable measures that are simultaneously low-cost and portable have been recommended to assess each subdomain, including the 9-hole peg board for dexterity, grip dynamometry for upper-extremity strength, standing balance test, 4-m walk test for gait speed, and a 2-minute walk test for endurance. PMID:23479547

  20. Proposed NIH Budget Includes Mandatory Funding.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    President Obama has proposed an overall budget increase of $825 million for the NIH in fiscal year 2017 compared with 2016. That money would be reserved for three efforts: the NCI's "moonshot" initiative, the Precision Medicine Initiative cohort program, and the BRAIN program. PMID:26984350

  1. Norming plans for the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Richard; Cook, Karon F.; Hays, Ron D.; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Korper, Samuel P.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Nord, Christine; Zill, Nicholas; Choi, Seung; Yost, Kathleen J.; Ustsinovich, Vitali; Brouwers, Pim; Hoffman, Howard J.; Gershon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox) is a comprehensive battery of brief assessment tools. The purpose of this article is to describe plans to establish normative reference values for the NIH Toolbox measures. Methods: A large sample will be obtained from the US population for the purpose of calculating normative values. The sample will be stratified by age (ages 3–85 years), sex, and language preference (English or Spanish) and have a total sample size of at least 4,205. The sample will include a minimum of 25–100 individuals in each targeted demographic and language subgroup. Results: Norming methods will include poststratification adjustment calculated using iterative proportional fitting, also known as raking, so that the weighted sample will have the same distribution on key demographic variables as the US population described in the 2010 Census. Conclusions: As with any set of norms, users should be mindful of the reference population and make conclusions consistent with the limitations of normative sampling, since it is not a probability-based sample. However, the NIH Toolbox norming study has been designed to minimize bias and maximize representativeness and precision of estimates. The availability of a "toolbox" of normed measures will be an important foundation for addressing critical research questions in neurologic and behavioral health. PMID:23479550

  2. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... squamous cell carcinoma is usually not life-threatening. Photo courtesy of NIGMS.NIH.GOV A new exhibit gives people a unique look at life. Life: Magnified is a collection of scientific images of blood, bacteria, viruses, and more, enlarged up to 50,000 times. ...

  3. Committee approves bill to boost NIH funding.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    A U.S. House of Representatives committee approved the 21st Century Cures Act. If passed by Congress, the bill would boost funding for the NIH and FDA and introduce new strategies for accelerating the approval of drugs and devices. PMID:26116105

  4. Using the NIH Toolbox in special populations

    PubMed Central

    Manly, Jennifer; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan; Purnell, Christy; Hendrie, Hugh; Havlik, Richard; Harniss, Mark; Magasi, Susan; Correia, Helena; Gershon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background: In order to develop health outcomes measures that are relevant and applicable to the general population, it is essential to consider the needs and requirements of special subgroups, such as the young, elderly, disabled, and people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, within that population. Methods: The NIH Toolbox project convened several working groups to address assessment issues for the following subgroups: pediatric, geriatric, cultural, non–English-speaking, and disabled. Each group reviewed all NIH Toolbox instruments in their entirety. Results: Each working group provided recommendations to the scientific study teams regarding instrument content, presentation, and administration. When feasible and appropriate, instruments and administration procedures have been modified in accordance with these recommendations. Conclusion: Health outcome measurement can benefit from expert input regarding assessment considerations for special subgroups. PMID:23479537

  5. Politicizing NIH funding: a bridge to nowhere

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    We live in a time of increased spending, mounting debt, and few remedies for balancing the federal budget that have bipartisan support. Unfortunately, one recent target for decreased allocations of the federal budget is the NIH; the discussion of the awarded grants and the grant funding process has been skewed and altered to present medical research in an unfriendly light, and this can have very damaging repercussions. Politicizing this process could ultimately challenge human health, technology, and economic growth. PMID:21881213

  6. Seeking NIH funding: Defining the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekim, Lana

    2003-04-01

    The presentation will provide a brief introduction to the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) with emphasis on the Voice and Speech program in the Division of Extramural Research. The process of seeking NIH funding will be outlined and a number of funding mechanisms will be described. The peer review process and the time course of a grant application will be highlighted.

  7. Cognition assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Tulsky, David S.; Zelazo, Philip D.; Bauer, Patricia J.; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan A.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Dan; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Richler, Jennifer; Deocampo, Joanne A.; Anderson, Jacob E.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Borosh, Beth; Havlik, Richard; Conway, Kevin; Edwards, Emmeline; Freund, Lisa; King, Jonathan W.; Moy, Claudia; Witt, Ellen; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition is 1 of 4 domains measured by the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH-TB), and complements modules testing motor function, sensation, and emotion. On the basis of expert panels, the cognition subdomains identified as most important for health, success in school and work, and independence in daily functioning were Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Language, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Attention. Seven measures were designed to tap constructs within these subdomains. The instruments were validated in English, in a sample of 476 participants ranging in age from 3 to 85 years, with representation from both sexes, 3 racial/ethnic categories, and 3 levels of education. This report describes the development of the Cognition Battery and presents results on test-retest reliability, age effects on performance, and convergent and discriminant construct validity. The NIH-TB Cognition Battery is intended to serve as a brief, convenient set of measures to supplement other outcome measures in epidemiologic and longitudinal research and clinical trials. With a computerized format and national standardization, this battery will provide a “common currency” among researchers for comparisons across a wide range of studies and populations. PMID:23479546

  8. Cognition assessment using the NIH Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Heaton, Robert K; Tulsky, David S; Zelazo, Philip D; Bauer, Patricia J; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan A; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Dan; Nowinski, Cindy J; Richler, Jennifer; Deocampo, Joanne A; Anderson, Jacob E; Manly, Jennifer J; Borosh, Beth; Havlik, Richard; Conway, Kevin; Edwards, Emmeline; Freund, Lisa; King, Jonathan W; Moy, Claudia; Witt, Ellen; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-03-12

    Cognition is 1 of 4 domains measured by the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH-TB), and complements modules testing motor function, sensation, and emotion. On the basis of expert panels, the cognition subdomains identified as most important for health, success in school and work, and independence in daily functioning were Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Language, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Attention. Seven measures were designed to tap constructs within these subdomains. The instruments were validated in English, in a sample of 476 participants ranging in age from 3 to 85 years, with representation from both sexes, 3 racial/ethnic categories, and 3 levels of education. This report describes the development of the Cognition Battery and presents results on test-retest reliability, age effects on performance, and convergent and discriminant construct validity. The NIH-TB Cognition Battery is intended to serve as a brief, convenient set of measures to supplement other outcome measures in epidemiologic and longitudinal research and clinical trials. With a computerized format and national standardization, this battery will provide a "common currency" among researchers for comparisons across a wide range of studies and populations. PMID:23479546

  9. Gustation assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, Julie A.; Duffy, Valerie B.; Pelchat, Marcia L.; Griffith, James W.; Smutzer, Gregory; Cowart, Beverly J.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.; Hastings, Lloyd; Victorson, David; Hoffman, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox) is a set of brief measures for the assessment of cognitive function, emotional health, motor function, and sensory function for use in clinical trials and in epidemiologic and longitudinal studies. Gustatory perception is assessed as 1 of 6 areas of sensory function. A team of 11 scientists with expertise in taste perception selected 2 gustatory measures, 1 of which can be used in young pediatric populations. The measure selected for young pediatric populations assesses sucrose (sweet) taste preference and can also be used across the age span of 5 to 85 years. For adult populations, the selected measure is a regional test, which assesses variability in perceived intensity of quinine hydrochloride (bitter) when applied to the tongue tip as well as perceived with the whole mouth. The team also recommends the regional test for assessing other tastants, such as sodium chloride (salty). Validation studies have demonstrated that the measures modified for the NIH Toolbox correlate with more traditional assessments, and can identify known population differences in gustation. PMID:23479539

  10. Do you have NIH funding? Then read this.

    PubMed

    Neill, Ushma S; Kosht, Karen

    2005-06-01

    In the "Policy on enhancing public access to archived publications resulting from NIH-funded research," the NIH requests that all publications resulting from primary research supported by NIH grants be deposited in PubMed Central (PMC), the online repository of the National Library of Medicine. The NIH requests that all manuscripts accepted for publication after May 2, 2005 be deposited in PMC, and that those manuscripts be made freely available to the public within 12 months of publication. The JCI supports this policy: we will continue to make all content freely available in PMC immediately upon publication, and the entire JCI archive is freely available through PMC. PMID:15931367

  11. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... rare diseases,” says Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Human Genome Research ... approach,” says NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “The disorder had long-evaded conventional diagnosis.” ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... of its research: MedlinePlus . www.medlineplus.gov . Type "Parkinson's disease" in the Search box. NIHSeniorHealth —Parkinson's Disease http:// ...

  13. The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program data resource.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2012-06-01

    The NIH Roadmap Reference Epigenome Mapping Consortium is developing a community resource of genome-wide epigenetic maps in a broad range of human primary cells and tissues. There are large amounts of data already available, and a number of different options for viewing and analyzing the data. This report will describe key features of the websites where users will find data, protocols and analysis tools developed by the consortium, and provide a perspective on how this unique resource will facilitate and inform human disease research, both immediately and in the future. PMID:22690667

  14. Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You Past Issues / Fall 2015 ... NIH researchers and fellow scientists working on precision medicine efforts gather on the NIH campus in Bethesda, ...

  15. Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... at science.education.nih.gov/LifeWorks Darryl Lowery Photo courtesy of NIH Office of Science Education Darryl ... a refresher course and another test.” Vivian Morales Photo courtesy of NIH Office of Science Education Vivian ...

  16. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... initial $230 million invested by NIH through the Foundation for the NIH, and half coming from the ... Idec GlaxoSmithKline Lilly Non-Profit Organizations Alzheimer's Association Foundation for the NIH Geoffrey Beene Foundation USAgainst Alzheimers ...

  17. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  18. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  19. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  20. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  1. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  2. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  3. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  4. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  5. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  6. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  7. Studies Evaluating NIH Training Grant and Fellowship Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmstron, Engin I.

    The study describes current utilization of National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) graduate training support of institutions, departments, and individuals; it also assesses the impact of possible or actual changes in funding mechanisms. Statistical data show that NIH average contributions vary from 8 to…

  8. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  9. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  10. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  11. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  12. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  13. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  14. Publishing Practices of NIH-Funded Faculty at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Courtney; Duranceau, Ellen Finnie; Gabridge, Tracy A.; Green, Remlee S.; Kajosalo, Erja; Noga, Michael M.; Silver, Howard J.; Stout, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Faculty and researchers who receive substantial funding from NIH were interviewed about their publication practices. Qualitative data was collected from interviews of eleven faculty members and one researcher representing six academic departments who received NIH funding. Interview responses were analyzed to identify a representative publication…

  15. Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of NIH's programs for increasing the participation in biomedical science of individuals from underrepresented minority groups. The report examines, using available data and the results of a survey of NIH trainees, the characteristics and outcomes of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and…

  16. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and specifically approved by the NIH Director as...

  17. NIH scientists provide new insight into rare kidney cancer

    Cancer.gov

    NIH scientists have discovered a unique feature of a rare, hereditary form of kidney cancer that may provide a better understanding of its progression and metastasis, possibly laying the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies.

  18. Physical Activity | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/win/Pages/community-groups-organizations.aspx Find Out More School Health: medlineplus.gov/schoolhealth.html Healthy Back to ...

  19. Transforming Discovery into Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Transforming Discovery into Health, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / ... social sciences research initiative. Shortening the Pathway to Health Whatever the disease, be it depression, diabetes, or ...

  20. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Welcome to NIH Medline Plus , the magazine Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... MedlinePlus Web site. Your physician has made this magazine available to you as a free health resource; ...

  1. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  2. We Can! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... child-centered nutrition and physical activity program from four NIH Institutes. "My mom and I work together ... Human Development, and the National Cancer Institute. The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) , sponsored by the National Institute ...

  3. NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... turn Javascript on. Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Fogarty scholar helps Zambians fight cervical ...

  4. Advances in Sleep Studies | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Advances in Sleep Studies Past Issues / Summer 2015 ... is the director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) in the NIH's National Heart, Lung, ...

  5. Precision Medicine In Action | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine In Action Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of ... Dishman "I am totally motivated to support precision medicine because I am one of the early prototype ...

  6. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past ... moment in science in 2000: Cracking of the genetic code raised the prospect of pinpointing the root ...

  7. US bill seeks to overturn NIH research-archiving rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2012-03-01

    A bipartisan bill introduced in the US House of Representatives aims to reverse 2008 legislation that requires recipients of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants to make copies of their peer-reviewed papers freely available online.

  8. What is COPD? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What is COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents COPD ... a walk, even washing and dressing. What Is COPD? Watch an animation at: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ ...

  9. Diabetes Complications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Complications Tailoring Diabetes Treatment to the Patient Past Issues / Fall 2012 ... been reported for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. How was the NIH involved? These are guidelines ...

  10. Treating Cataracts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... her experience recently with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What did you notice about your vision that told you ... how long it would take to recover. Where did you go for information about cataracts and surgery? ...

  11. Progress in Paralysis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIH's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) Photo courtesy of National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Roderic I. Pettigrew, Ph.D., M.D., is ...

  12. Symptoms, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects more than two million Americans," observes Mark Johnson, professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. Johnson led the research, supported by NIH and other ...

  13. Facing Fibromyalgia | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with NIH MedlinePlus magazine about her conditions. When did you start having symptoms of fibromyalgia? I actually ... with my right wrist since the third grade. Did your problems become more severe over time? Yes, ...

  14. NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... on. From childbirth to end-of-life care, nursing research is aimed at helping patients across the ...

  15. The Zika Virus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Infectious Diseases The Zika Virus Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents ... Photo Courtesy of NIH "You could have a Zika virus vaccine in large-scale clinical trials in ...

  16. Protect Yourself Against HPV | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and his NIH colleague Dr. John Schiller. Both HPV vaccines, called Gardasil and Cervarix, protect against the two ... part of the throat (the oropharynx). Thus, the HPV vaccines should protect against all these forms of cancer. ...

  17. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins ... must be a lot going on there. "Over the next 10 years, more and more people will ...

  18. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions Past Issues / ... Drug Abuse during their first Drug Facts Chat Day. Photo courtesy of NIDA The questions poured in… ...

  19. NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 January 2013 (historical) NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus Discovery Is ... the University of Oxford, U.K., have shed light on a long-standing enigma about the structure ...

  20. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine: Health, Medical & Wellness Articles

    MedlinePlus

    ... sponsorship and other charitable donations for NIH MedlinePlus magazine's publication and distribution, many more thousands of Americans will gain valuable, free access to the world's best online medical library, ... 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 500, Bethesda, MD 20814.

  1. [The status of NIHS Information and Computing Infrastructure (NICI)].

    PubMed

    Nakata, K; Nakano, T; Takai, T; Komine, K; Kaminuma, T

    2000-01-01

    From 1999 to 2000, NIHS Information and Computing Infrastructure (NICI) were newly renovated. The purposes of the renovation are (1) the improvement of the communication for business works in NIHS, (2) supporting for the research, (3) supporting for the administration work. The Internet connection speed was upgraded from 256 Kbps to 1.5 Mbps. The high quality network sever machines and database server machines were installed. The large-scale software systems were renewed their versions. Four experimental stations for medical plants at Hokkaido, Izu, Wakayama and Tanegashima connected to NIHS at Tokyo or Osaka branch by ISDN. We describe the providing information on NIHS home page, and how to utilize NICI for our research and official works. PMID:11534109

  2. From the NIH Director: The Value of Medical Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1940s and 1950s, NIH implemented the double-blind, randomized, prospective trial. It remains the gold standard today. ... demonstrate, in a statistically valid way, through a randomized trial, that the mortality rate from heart disease ...

  3. Survey of community engagement in NIH-funded research.

    PubMed

    Hood, Nancy E; Brewer, Tracy; Jackson, Rebecca; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2010-02-01

    Community engagement is an innovative and required component for Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, the extent of community engagement in NIH-funded research has not been previously examined. This study assessed baseline prevalence of community engagement activities among NIH-funded studies at a large Midwestern university with a CTSA. An online survey was e-mailed to principal investigators of recent NIH-funded studies (N = 480). Investigators were asked to identify what types of community engagement activities had occurred for each study. Responses were received for 40.4% (194/480) of studies. Overall, 42.6% reported any community engagement activities. More collaborative types of engagement (e.g., community advisory board) were less common than activities requiring less engagement (e.g., sharing study results with community members). Studies with more collaborative community engagement were less likely to be described as basic or preclinical research compared to all other studies. Given NIH's inclusive call for community engagement in research, relatively few NIH-funded studies reported community engagement activities, although this study used a broad definition of community and a wide range of types of engagement. These findings may be used to inform the goals of CTSA community engagement programs. PMID:20443949

  4. NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center houses 240 inpatient beds, 82 day-hospital stations, and more than 1,600 laboratories that conduct ... steps away from the NIH Clinical Center, providing space for solitude, family meetings, and supportive fellowship. Training ...

  5. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Mobile health, or mHealth for short, uses mobile technologies for ...

  6. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around ... on applying these devices," says Dr. Thomenius. "The new targets are primary care doctors, anesthesiologists, interventionalists, and ...

  7. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  8. Genetic manipulation: NIH concede part of Rifkin suit.

    PubMed

    Budiansky, S

    Officials at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have acceded to a major claim in a lawsuit brought by anti-genetic engineering activist Jeremy Rifkin to halt field trials involving the release of recombinant organisms into the environment. In an appeal filed with the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington, NIH agreed to produce an environmental assessment of individual experiments as demanded by U.S. District Court Judge John Sirica in May, while continuing to appeal Sirica's ruling that an impact statement on the full environmental release program is required. The appeals court is scheduled to hear the case in December. Meanwhile, on another front, the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee has rejected another Rifkin proposal to ban all transfers of genetic materials from one mammalian species to the germline of another. PMID:6594575

  9. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: Implications for Diabetes Research.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Judith E; Hanlon, Mary C; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2016-07-01

    In his January 2015 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced a new Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to personalize approaches toward improving health and treating disease (www.whitehouse.gov/precision-medicine). He stated that the goal of such an initiative was "to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier." Since that time, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has taken a leadership role in implementing the President's vision related to biomedical research (www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine). Here, we discuss the NIH component of the PMI, related ongoing diabetes research, and near-term research that could position the diabetes field to take full advantage of the opportunities that stem from the PMI. PMID:27289128

  10. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Spring 2016

    MedlinePlus

    ... To Your Health: NLM update Transcript NIH MedlinePlus magazine Spring 2016 : 06/06/2016 To use the ... weekly topics. The new edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers fibromyalgia, health disparities, as well as women ...

  11. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  12. Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy is Nutritionally Safe, NIH-funded Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Information OppNet NIDB NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Institutes at NIH List of Institutes, Centers & ... These findings are a secondary result from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) clinical trial, which ...

  13. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research That Benefits Everyone's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefit everyone's health." — NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins Healthcare Reform— We can put science to work to better ... of this? Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, NIH has received $10 billion in stimulus funding, ...

  14. Alcohol Use Disorders, Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/default.asp Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders web page www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/major-initiatives/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorders . Spectrum e-zine story: Underage drinking: One ...

  15. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... transgenic rodents by recombinant DNA technology must be registered with the Institutional...

  16. Coffee to Go: Woman "Thinks" First Cup in 15 Years | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Out More National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov/ NIBIB Rehabilitation Engineering ... of NIH's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), which supports the research. The ultimate goal ...

  17. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  18. 78 FR 50424 - NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and Clinical Research Proposals From NIH Intramural Research Program... organizations); public and private foundations and nonprofit organizations to solicit research proposals...

  19. Alcohol Use Disorders, Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... booklet www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/default.asp Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders web page www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/major-initiatives/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorders . Spectrum e-zine story: Underage drinking: One step ...

  20. FNLM 2013 Events & Programs Announced | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish Tune in: NIH Radio Free podcast audio reports on your computer or personal audio player www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Winter 2013 Issue: Volume 7 Number ...

  1. National Center for Biotechnology Information Celebrates 25th Anniversary | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish Tune in: NIH Radio Free podcast audio reports on your computer or personal audio player www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number ...

  2. Building Paths to Health Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish Tune in: NIH Radio Free podcast audio reports on your computer or personal audio player www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Spring 2012 Issue: Volume 7 Number ...

  3. Go4Life® Making Smart Food Choices | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy Aging Making Smart Food Choices Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Making Smart Food Choices To maintain a healthy weight, balance the ...

  4. NIH Researchers Find Resveratrol Helps Protect Against Diabetes in Animal Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us FAQs Stay Connected You are here Home NIH researchers find resveratrol helps protect against diabetes in ... 10.2337/db13-0266 Share this: ​ Connect with NIH Disclaimer Accessibility Policies Contact Us FOIA Get Acrobat ( ...

  5. Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents NIH researchers and fellow scientists working on precision medicine ...

  6. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH Consensus Development Conference:...

  7. NIH workshop summary: shaping the development of an iodine research initiative for the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at NIH sponsored a workshop May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH Institutes and Centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would infor...

  8. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...). On July 20, 2010 the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published a proposed action (75 FR... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

  9. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.6 How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? An application for participation in an...

  10. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.15 When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? Any...

  11. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.15 When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? Any...

  12. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? (a) Loan repayments: For each year of the applicable service...

  13. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? (a) Loan repayments: For each year of the applicable service...

  14. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.6 How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? An application for participation in an...

  15. NIH Casts Critical Eye on How It Gives Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's methods for reviewing and financing academic research proposals are often praised as the gold standard. Some American scientists, though, have recently offered less flattering descriptions, like "broken" and "arbitrary." NIH officials have heard both arguments, and plenty in between, in recent months. They have…

  16. NIH Turns Blind Eye to Academics' Financial Conflicts, Audit Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of financial conflicts of interest among university researchers have not been investigated by the National Institutes of Health, an agency that should police them, according to a new audit report. The report, by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services--NIH's parent agency--describes a dysfunctional system that…

  17. HealthLines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 100,000 patients covering nearly a decade. Researchers say a clinical trial would be an important next step. NIH's National Library of Medicine helped fund the study. Anti-Smoking Med Shows Promise for Treating Alcohol Dependence A smoking-cessation medicine may be a ...

  18. NIH researchers complete whole-exome sequencing of skin cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A team led by researchers at NIH is the first to systematically survey the landscape of the melanoma genome, the DNA code of the deadliest form of skin cancer. The researchers have made surprising new discoveries using whole-exome sequencing, an approach that decodes the 1-2 percent of the genome that contains protein-coding genes.

  19. I. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): introduction and pediatric data.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sandra; Bauer, Patricia J; Zelazo, Philip David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Heaton, Robert K; Tulsky, David S; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Havlik, Richard J; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J; Borosh, Beth G; Nowinski, Cindy J; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-08-01

    This monograph presents the pediatric portion of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function. The NIH Toolbox is an initiative of the Neuroscience Blueprint, a collaborative framework through which 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices jointly support neuroscience-related research, to accelerate discoveries and reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. The CB is one of four modules that measure cognitive, emotional, sensory, and motor health across the lifespan. The CB is unique in its continuity across childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and old age, and in order to help create a common currency among disparate studies, it is also available at low cost to researchers for use in large-scale longitudinal and epidemiologic studies. This chapter describes the evolution of the CB; methods for selecting cognitive subdomains and instruments; the rationale for test design; and a validation study in children and adolescents, ages 3-15 years. Subsequent chapters feature detailed discussions of each test measure and its psychometric properties (Chapters 2-6), the factor structure of the test battery (Chapter 7), the effects of age and education on composite test scores (Chapter 8), and a final summary and discussion (Chapter 9). As the chapters in this monograph demonstrate, the CB has excellent psychometric properties, and the validation study provided evidence for the increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities with age. PMID:23952199

  20. NIH Peer Review: Scored Review Criteria and Overall Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Mark D.; Vancea, Adrian; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. Funding decisions are made largely based on the outcome of a peer review process that is intended to provide a fair, equitable, timely, and unbiased review of the quality, scientific merit, and potential impact of the research. There have…

  1. Policy Implications of Aging in the NIH-Funded Workforce.

    PubMed

    Heggeness, Misty L; Carter-Johnson, Frances; Schaffer, Walter T; Rockey, Sally J

    2016-07-01

    Because of national interest in the "graying" of the biomedical workforce, we examine aging and funding within the pool of NIH-funded investigators and applicants, particularly in the growing field of stem cell research. We provide evidence of a maturing and more competitive stem cell workforce and discuss policy implications. PMID:27392223

  2. How Is Psoriasis Treated? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis How Is Psoriasis Treated? Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Find Out More MedlinePlus — www.medlineplus.gov National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases — www.niams.nih. ...

  3. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the applicable cost principles prescribed in subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  4. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the applicable cost principles prescribed in subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  5. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the applicable cost principles prescribed in subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  6. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the applicable cost principles prescribed in subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  7. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the applicable cost principles prescribed in subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  8. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... published quarterly, in print and on the Web. Print subscriptions Sign up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please note that print orders are only shipped within the United States. ...

  9. Precision Medicine In Action | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine In Action Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of ... Eric Dishman "I am totally motivated to support precision medicine because I am one of the early prototype ...

  10. Keep Gum Disease Away! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be very careful when it comes to oral surgery. "Remember, it can't be done twice. So get the most experienced team possible." And he's become a stickler for good dental ... NIH Senior Health: http://nihseniorhealth.gov Registry ...

  11. Ni-H2 cell characterization for INTELSAT programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunnet, Andrew F.; Earl, Martin W.

    1994-01-01

    Various Ni/H2 cell designs manufactured for INTELSAT Programs during the past decade have been characterized electrically as a function of temperature. The resulting data for these INTELSAT V, VI, VII and VIIA cells are assembled in a manner which allows ready comparison of performance. Also included is a detailed description of each design.

  12. NIH Health Disparities Strategic Plan, Fiscal Years 2004-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Human Genome Research Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) contribution to the International Human Genome Project, whose primary goal was the sequencing of the human genome. This project was successfully completed in April 2003. Now, the NHGRI's mission is focused on a broad range of studies aimed at…

  13. NIH Mulls Ways to Lure Back Veteran Peer Reviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Not long ago, academic scientists welcomed calls from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) asking them to volunteer as peer reviewers. Many were glad for the opportunity to help distribute billions of dollars in federal biomedical-research grants even though the service required a big time commitment--the equivalent of one month a year to…

  14. A Crowdsourcing Evaluation of the NIH Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Boyer, Scott; Curpan, Ramona F.; Glen, Robert C.; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Lipinski, Christopher A.; Marshall, Garland R.; Martin, Yvonne C.; Ostopovici-Halip, Liliana; Rishton, Gilbert; Ursu, Oleg; Vaz, Roy J.; Waller, Chris; Waldmann, Herbert; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2008, the NIH molecular libraries and imaging initiative (MLI) pilot phase funded ten high-throughput Screening Centers, resulting in the deposition of 691 assays into PubChem and the nomination of 64 chemical probes. We crowdsourced the MLI output to 11 experts, who expressed medium or high levels of confidence in 48 of these 64 probes. PMID:19536101

  15. HealthLines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a statin at two Boston hospitals. Researchers developed software that allowed them to scour more than 5 million notes on more than 100,000 patients covering nearly a decade. Researchers say a clinical trial would be an important next step. NIH's National ...

  16. How Is Psoriasis Treated? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis How Is Psoriasis Treated? Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... nih.gov/ Clinical Trials — www.clinicaltrials.gov National Psoriasis Foundation — www.psoriasis.org American Academy of Dermatology — ...

  17. Clinical research at a crossroads: the NIH roadmap.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, Elias A

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the NIH investment in biomedical research, over the past 30 years we have seen many great advances impacting the health of our nation which have been fostered by the effective translation of scientific advances. However, rising costs for both research and health care mean that the NIH must make strategic decisions that maximize the return on its investment. Because treating end-stage disease is so costly, both personally and financially, learning how to pre-empt illness through molecular knowledge and behavioral interventions is the only viable strategy for maintaining the nation's health in the coming years. In order to speed scientific discovery and its efficient translation to patient care, the NIH developed the Roadmap for Biomedical Research. The Roadmap provides an incubator space for funding innovative programs to address a panoply of scientific challenges and has engendered a new culture of cooperation among researchers seeking new avenues for collaboration. An important feature of the Roadmap is the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). The program's goals are to eliminate growing barriers between clinical and basic research, to address the increasing complexities involved in conducting clinical research, and to help institutions nationwide create an academic home for clinical and translational science. By adopting a strong strategic vision now, the NIH will be able to stand at the ready as future challenges and opportunities emerge. In keeping with our mission, the NIH's current and future actions will be defined by the requirements of the scientific community and the public health needs of the nation. PMID:17152855

  18. Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at NIH Clinical Center | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Therapy Dogs Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at NIH Clinical Center ... She and her friendly beagle, Juno, are trusted animal-assisted therapy volunteers. Accompanied by Parker or other Clinical Center ...

  19. NIH Research: “The public wants diseases cured...” | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Research: “The public wants diseases cured...” Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... steroids to patient-specific action plans.” What are the challenges of research? Dr. Metcalfe: You have to ...

  20. Reliability study of the NiH2 strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Glenn C.; Rash, Donald E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes a joint study by Gates Aerospace Batteries (GAB) and the Reliability Analysis Center (RAC). This study characterizes the reliability and robustness of the temperature compensated strain gages currently specified for sensing of internal pressure of NiH2 cells. These strain gages are characterized as fully encapsulated, metallic foil grids with known resistance that varies with deformation. The measurable deformation, when typically installed on the hemispherical portion of a NiH2 cell, is proportional to the material stresses as generated by internal cell pressures. The internal pressure sensed in this manner is calibrated to indicate the state-of-charge for the cell. This study analyzes and assesses both robustness and reliability for the basic design of the strain gage, the installation of the strain gage, and the circuitry involved.

  1. Writing a Successful NIH Mentored Career Development Grant (K Award)

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Surgery is a labor-intensive, time-consuming profession. Young faculty members in surgery are saddled with many clinical time constraints that often allow precious few moments for academic pursuits. Consequently, K award submissions from surgeons trail nonsurgeons. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), however, is actively trying to encourage participation of surgeons in basic science research, translational research, clinical outcomes research, and even in prevention/control research. But, at the same time, the NIH has newly implemented a policy that has made the grant review process more restrictive by only allowing 2 submissions of any grant application. It is imperative, therefore, for junior faculty surgeons to learn “grantsmanship” and have the ability to construct succinct, competitive K award grants. Although most of this information is public knowledge and made available by the NIH itself, many of the practical points presented here are tailored to the special needs of clinically active surgical researchers. Often, these “hints” are buried on expansive websites that require considerable time to read and navigate. The authors have a long combined experience on a study section dedicated to adjudicating K awards. The goal of this review is to present concise, useful information about common errors, research plan dos and don’ts, template examples of superior mentored letters, and many other suggestions that may assist any first-time candidate for these awards. PMID:20485135

  2. Examining the Predictive Validity of NIH Peer Review Scores

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Mark D.; Nakamura, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    The predictive validity of peer review at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has not yet been demonstrated empirically. It might be assumed that the most efficient and expedient test of the predictive validity of NIH peer review would be an examination of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications produced from funded projects. The present study used a large dataset to examine the rationale for such a study, to determine if it would satisfy the requirements for a test of predictive validity. The results show significant restriction of range in the applications selected for funding. Furthermore, those few applications that are funded with slightly worse peer review scores are not selected at random or representative of other applications in the same range. The funding institutes also negotiate with applicants to address issues identified during peer review. Therefore, the peer review scores assigned to the submitted applications, especially for those few funded applications with slightly worse peer review scores, do not reflect the changed and improved projects that are eventually funded. In addition, citation metrics by themselves are not valid or appropriate measures of scientific impact. The use of bibliometric indices on their own to measure scientific impact would likely increase the inefficiencies and problems with replicability already largely attributed to the current over-emphasis on bibliometric indices. Therefore, retrospective analyses of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications resulting from funded grant applications are not valid tests of the predictive validity of peer review at the NIH. PMID:26039440

  3. The Pilot Phase of the NIH Chemical Genomics Center

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Craig J.; Auld, Douglas S.; Huang, Ruili; Huang, Wenwei; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Leister, William; Maloney, David J.; Marugan, Juan J.; Michael, Sam; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) was the inaugural center of the Molecular Libraries and Screening Center Network (MLSCN). Along with the nine other research centers of the MLSCN, the NCGC was established with a primary goal of bringing industrial technology and experience to empower the scientific community with small molecule compounds for use in their research. We intend this review to serve as 1) an introduction to the NCGC standard operating procedures, 2) an overview of several of the lessons learned during the pilot phase and 3) a review of several of the innovative discoveries reported during the pilot phase of the MLSCN. PMID:19807664

  4. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" ... Washington Post . What's the current state of the AIDS epidemic? The number of people contracting HIV infection ...

  5. Space Station Freedom NiH2 cell testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Bruce; Frate, Dave

    1994-01-01

    Testing for the Space Station Freedom Nickel Hydrogen Cell Test Program began in 1990 at Crave Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The program has included receipt inspection, random vibration, acceptance, characterization, and life cycle testing of Ni-H2 cells in accordance with the NASA LeRC Interagency Order C-31001-J. A total of 400 Ni-H2 cells have been received at NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane from three separate manufacturers; Yardney Technical Products (Yardney), Eagle Picher Industries (Eagle Picher), and Gates Energy Products (Gates). Of those, 308 cells distributed among 39 packs have undergone life cycle testing under a test regime simulating low earth orbit conditions. As of 30 September 1993, there are 252 cells assembled into 32 packs still on life cycle test. Since the beginning of the program, failed cells have been detected in all phases of testing. The failures include the following; seven 65 AmpHr and 81 AmpHr Yardney cells were found to be leaking KOH on receipt, one 65 AmpHr Eagle Picher cell failed the acceptance test, one 65 AmpHr Gates cell failed during the characterization test, and six 65 AmpHr Gates cells failed the random vibration test. Of the 39 life cycle packs, testing on seven packs, 56 cells, has been suspended because of low end of discharge voltages. All of the failed life cycle packs were cycled at 60% depth of discharge.

  6. The NIH-NIAID Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Griffiths, Kathryn G.; Williams, Steven A.; Kaplan, Ray M.; Moorhead, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Filarial worms cause a variety of tropical diseases in humans; however, they are difficult to study because they have complex life cycles that require arthropod intermediate hosts and mammalian definitive hosts. Research efforts in industrialized countries are further complicated by the fact that some filarial nematodes that cause disease in humans are restricted in host specificity to humans alone. This potentially makes the commitment to research difficult, expensive, and restrictive. Over 40 years ago, the United States National Institutes of Health–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH-NIAID) established a resource from which investigators could obtain various filarial parasite species and life cycle stages without having to expend the effort and funds necessary to maintain the entire life cycles in their own laboratories. This centralized resource (The Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center, or FR3) translated into cost savings to both NIH-NIAID and to principal investigators by freeing up personnel costs on grants and allowing investigators to divert more funds to targeted research goals. Many investigators, especially those new to the field of tropical medicine, are unaware of the scope of materials and support provided by the FR3. This review is intended to provide a short history of the contract, brief descriptions of the fiilarial species and molecular resources provided, and an estimate of the impact the resource has had on the research community, and describes some new additions and potential benefits the resource center might have for the ever-changing research interests of investigators. PMID:22140585

  7. Space Station Freedom NiH2 cell testing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Bruce; Frate, Dave

    1994-02-01

    Testing for the Space Station Freedom Nickel Hydrogen Cell Test Program began in 1990 at Crave Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The program has included receipt inspection, random vibration, acceptance, characterization, and life cycle testing of Ni-H2 cells in accordance with the NASA LeRC Interagency Order C-31001-J. A total of 400 Ni-H2 cells have been received at NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane from three separate manufacturers; Yardney Technical Products (Yardney), Eagle Picher Industries (Eagle Picher), and Gates Energy Products (Gates). Of those, 308 cells distributed among 39 packs have undergone life cycle testing under a test regime simulating low earth orbit conditions. As of 30 September 1993, there are 252 cells assembled into 32 packs still on life cycle test. Since the beginning of the program, failed cells have been detected in all phases of testing. The failures include the following; seven 65 AmpHr and 81 AmpHr Yardney cells were found to be leaking KOH on receipt, one 65 AmpHr Eagle Picher cell failed the acceptance test, one 65 AmpHr Gates cell failed during the characterization test, and six 65 AmpHr Gates cells failed the random vibration test. Of the 39 life cycle packs, testing on seven packs, 56 cells, has been suspended because of low end of discharge voltages. All of the failed life cycle packs were cycled at 60% depth of discharge.

  8. NIH Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers: the power of centralized phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Maren R; Lloyd, K C Kent; Cline, Gary W; Wasserman, David H

    2012-10-01

    The Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers (MMPCs) were founded in 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance biomedical research by providing the scientific community with standardized, high-quality phenotyping services for mouse models of diabetes, obesity, and their complications. The intent is to allow researchers to take optimum advantage of the many new mouse models produced in labs and in high-throughput public efforts. The six MMPCs are located at universities around the country and perform complex metabolic tests in intact mice and hormone and analyte assays in tissues on a fee-for-service basis. Testing is subsidized by the NIH in order to reduce the barriers for mouse researchers. Although data derived from these tests belong to the researcher submitting mice or tissues, these data are archived after publication in a public database run by the MMPC Coordinating and Bioinformatics Unit. It is hoped that data from experiments performed in many mouse models of metabolic diseases, using standard protocols, will be useful in understanding the nature of these complex disorders. The current areas of expertise include energy balance and body composition, insulin action and secretion, whole-body and tissue carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular and renal function, and metabolic pathway kinetics. In addition to providing services, the MMPC staff provides expertise and advice to researchers, and works to develop and refine test protocols to best meet the community's needs in light of current scientific developments. Test technology is disseminated by publications and through annual courses. PMID:22940748

  9. Language measures of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C; Cook, Karon F; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J; Slotkin, Jerry; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    Language facilitates communication and efficient encoding of thought and experience. Because of its essential role in early childhood development, in educational achievement and in subsequent life adaptation, language was included as one of the subdomains in the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). There are many different components of language functioning, including syntactic processing (i.e., morphology and grammar) and lexical semantics. For purposes of the NIHTB-CB, two tests of language--a picture vocabulary test and a reading recognition test--were selected by consensus based on literature reviews, iterative expert input, and a desire to assess in English and Spanish. NIHTB-CB's picture vocabulary and reading recognition tests are administered using computer adaptive testing and scored using item response theory. Data are presented from the validation of the English versions in a sample of adults ages 20-85 years (Spanish results will be presented in a future publication). Both tests demonstrated high test-retest reliability and good construct validity compared to corresponding gold-standard measures. Scores on the NIH Toolbox measures were consistent with age-related expectations, namely, growth in language during early development, with relative stabilization into late adulthood. PMID:24960128

  10. The rising cost of NIH-funded biomedical research?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, T J

    1990-02-01

    During the last decade, total appropriations for the NIH have grown in current as well as constant dollars. Constant dollar expenditures for indirect costs and research project grants have increased, as also has the number of the latter, while such expenditures for research centers, training, and research contracts have shrunk. The most impressive redistribution in emphasis has been toward traditional research project grants (R01s). The size of the average R01 award, discounted for inflation, has grown at an annual rate of 1.1% during the last decade and 1.3% since fiscal year (FY) 1970; that of the average research program project (P01) has declined over the same periods, after a slight rise in the early 1970s. Factors contributing to the modest rise in the real (constant-dollar) size of the average R01 are explored. The regularity with which current-services-requirements estimates for the NIH exceed inflation reflects real growth in the program, particularly in the category of research project grants; the artifact of basing calculations on the post-rather than pre-"negotiated" levels of awards in the "current" year; and the extent to which the project periods of awards have been extended. The effect of lengthening project periods is slow to become manifest, but inexorably swells the pool of non-competing awards; decisions in this area undertaken in 1985, and continued at least through FY 1988, could very significantly increase current services requirements in FYs 1991 and 1992. PMID:2302301

  11. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  12. On the Front Lines of Rare Disease Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Translational Science Awards Program. Find Out More National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS): https://ncats.nih.gov/ MedlinePlus: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/rarediseases.html Rare Disease United Foundation: rarediseaseunited.org How important is medical research on ...

  13. 75 FR 15710 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH's Roadmap...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... control number. Proposed Collection: The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Heath requests a two-year clearance for Title: ``Process Evaluation of the NIH... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), NIH. You may reach Dr. Hamann by telephone on...

  14. 76 FR 44339 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... attenuated strains of bacteria and viruses that are frequently used in recombinant DNA research. OBA is...

  15. NIH Study Provides Clarity on Supplements for Protection Against Blinding Eye Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov . NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health ® References AREDS2 Research Group. “Lutein/Zeaxanthin and Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The Age-Related Eye Disease ...

  16. Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Lupus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... box NIH Accelerating Medicines Partnership www.nih.gov/science/amp/index.htm Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) and Julian Lennon www.lupus.org www.lupus.org/lennon American College of Rheumatology www.rheumatology.org Alliance for Lupus Research, Inc www.lupusresearch.org Lupus ...

  17. Beyond Patents and Royalties: Perception and Reality of Doing Business with the NIH

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Menachem, Gil; Ferguson, Steven M.; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Young, and mid size biotech companies can benefit hugely from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), not least because of the agency's non-dilutive funding, guidance, and opportunities for collaboration. Increasingly, however, there is a fair bit of misunderstanding about what the NIH can and cannot do for a biotech entrepreneur. PMID:19779601

  18. Hubris in Grantland: Languor and Laissez-faire Greet Conflict of Interest at the NIH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    New rules are coming for sanitizing conflicts of interest in research financed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dispenser of the government's biggest budget for civilian science, some $31 billion this year. The conflicted need not fear. The draft rules, soon to be made final, continue the NIH's longtime practice of trust but don't…

  19. The Brain Takes Center Stage at 2014 NIH Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 2014 NIH Research Festival, Sept. 22–24, focused on the human brain for two, very specific, reasons: to coincide with the White House BRAIN Initiative and to highlight the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center, which opened earlier this year on the NIH campus.

  20. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish Tune in: NIH Radio Free podcast audio reports on your computer or personal audio player www.nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm Spring 2013 Issue: Volume 8 Number ...

  1. All in the Family: When High Blood Cholesterol Occurs in Families | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program booklet: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/chol/wyntk.pdf What You Need To Know About High Blood Cholesterol www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/chol/cholesterol_atglance.htm Your Guide to Lowering ...

  2. The challenge for NIH ethics policies: preserving public trust and biomedical progress.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Norka Ruiz

    2007-03-01

    Recently updated ethics rules for employees of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aim to prevent inappropriate influences on research decisions while preserving employees' professional and scientific interactions. Specific provisions require NIH employees to report their financial holdings in "substantially affected organizations" and require senior employees to divest all holdings greater than $15,000 in any single such organization. Outside institutions that receive NIH grants are bound by separate disclosure requirements. Public-private partnerships have become more important to NIH efforts to advance biomedical research in light of flat NIH budgets in recent years. Such partnerships open the door, however, to financial conflicts that must be prevented or managed in order to maintain scientific integrity and public trust. PMID:17469471

  3. Lost in Translation: NIH Funding for Family Medicine Research Remains Limited.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Departments of Family Medicine (DFMs) in the United States consistently received around 0.2% of total research funding dollars and 0.3% of all awards awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) across the years 2002 to 2014. We used the NIH Reporter tool to quantify the amount of funding and the number of grants received by DFMs from the NIH from 2002 to 2014, using criteria similar to those applied by previous researchers. NIH funding to DFMs as remained fairly consistent across the time period, at roughly 0.2% of total NIH funding and 0.3% of total grants awarded. Changing these proportions will likely require considerable effort to build research capacity within DFMs and their frontline practice research networks, and to shift policymaker and funder perceptions of the value of the FM research enterprise. PMID:27613784

  4. 78 FR 18613 - Notice of the Implementation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice Program (eVIP) SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to announce the future implementation of the Electronic Vendor Invoice Program (eVIP) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the planned modification of NIH awards to require vendors to use the eVIP...

  5. 75 FR 54640 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon..., at any time, members of the public may file written comments to the following address: NIH...

  6. Behavioral assessment of NIH Swiss mice acutely intoxicated with tetramethylenedisulfotetramine.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; Silverman, Jill L; Bruun, Donald A; Puhger, Kyle R; McCoy, Mark R; Hammock, Bruce D; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison that is thought to trigger seizures by inhibiting the function of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAAR). Acute intoxication with TETS can cause vomiting, convulsions, status epilepticus (SE) and even death. Clinical case reports indicate that individuals who survive poisoning may exhibit long-term neuropsychological issues and cognitive deficits. Therefore, the objective of this research was to determine whether a recently described mouse model of acute TETS intoxication exhibits persistent behavioral deficits. Young adult male NIH Swiss mice received a seizure-inducing dose of TETS (0.15mg/kg, ip) and then were rescued from lethality by administration of diazepam (5mg/kg, ip) approximately 20min post-TETS-exposure. TETS-intoxicated mice typically exhibited 2 clonic seizures prior to administration of diazepam with no subsequent seizures post-diazepam injection as assessed using behavioral criteria. Seizures lasted an average of 72s. Locomotor activity, anxiety-like and depression-relevant behaviors and cognition were assessed at 1week, 1month and 2months post-TETS exposure using open field, elevated-plus maze, light↔dark transitions, tail suspension, forced swim and novel object recognition tasks. Interestingly, preliminary validation tests indicated that NIH Swiss mice do not respond to the shock in fear conditioning tasks. Subsequent evaluation of hot plate and tail flick nociception tasks revealed that this strain exhibits significantly decreased pain sensitivity relative to age- and sex-matched C57BL/6J mice, which displayed normal contextual fear conditioning. NIH Swiss mice acutely intoxicated with TETS exhibited no significant anxiety-related, depression-relevant, learning or memory deficits relative to vehicle controls at any of the time points assessed with the exception of significantly increased locomotor activity at 2months post-TETS intoxication. The general absence

  7. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Tulsky, David S.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test–retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3–85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5–85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  8. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Tulsky, David S; Gershon, Richard C

    2015-08-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test-retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3-85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5-85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  9. Tightening Conflict-of-Interest Policies: The Impact of 2005 Ethics Rules at the NIH

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Darren E.; DesRoches, Catherine M.; Bristol, Steffanie J.; Clarridge, Brian; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine both the intended and unintended effects of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) 2005 ethics rules by examining changes in publishing rates and the frequency of external relationships among NIH scientists. Method After identifying eligible intramural scientists and administrators from institute’s web pages and central directories, a mailed survey was administered to 900 NIH research faculty between October 2008 and January 2009 (response rate 70.1%).A Results Eighty percent of respondents believed the NIH ethics rules were too restrictive. While nearly half (45%) of respondents believed the rules positively impacted the public’s trust in the NIH, over three-quarters (77%) believed the rules hindered the NIH’s ability to complete its mission. Implementation of the ethics rules significantly decreased self-reported GIRs among NIH faculty (from 51.8% to 33.2%, P<.01), including significant drops in consulting (33.1% to 7.8%, P<.01) and scientific advisory board membership (31.5% to 16.0%, P<.01). The policy had limited impact on NIH faculty participation in non-industrial professional service roles and had no detectable change in publishing behavior (5.29 articles per researcher per year from 2002–2005 vs. 5.26 from 2005–2008, P = .88). Conclusions The NIH ethics rules accomplished much of what they were intended to do, limiting relationships with industry while maintaining NIH researchers’ association with external scientific and professional organizations. However, the rules negatively affected personnel morale and the perceived progress of research. PMID:20852402

  10. Off the Roadmap? Family Medicine’s Grant Funding and Committee Representation at NIH

    PubMed Central

    Lucan, Sean C.; Phillips, Robert L.; Bazemore, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Family medicine is challenged to develop its own research infrastructure and to inform and contribute to a national translational-research agenda. Toward these ends, understanding family medicine’s engagement with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is important. METHODS We descriptively analyzed NIH grants to family medicine from 2002 through 2006 and the current NIH advisory committee memberships. RESULTS Grants (and dollars) awarded to departments of family medicine increased from 89 ($25.6 million) in 2002, to 154 ($44.6 million) in 2006. These values represented only 0.20% (0.15% for dollars) and 0.33% (0.22% for dollars), respectively, of total NIH awards. Nearly 75% of family medicine grants came from just 6 of NIH’s grant-funding 24 institutes and centers. Although having disproportionately fewer grant continuations (62% vs 72%) and R awards (68% vs 74%)—particularly R01 awards (53% vs 84%)—relative to NIH grantees overall, family medicine earned proportionately more new (28% vs 21%) and K awards (25% vs 9%) and had more physician principal investigators (52% vs 15%). Ten of the nation’s 132 departments of family medicine (7.6%) earned almost 50% of all family medicine awards. Representatives from family medicine were on 6.4% of NIH advisory committees (0.38% of all members); family physicians were on 2.7% (0.16% of members). CONCLUSIONS Departments of family medicine, and family physicians in particular, receive a miniscule proportion of NIH grant funding and have correspondingly minimal representation on standing NIH advisory committees. Family medicine’s engagement at the NIH remains near well-documented historic lows, undermining family medicine’s potential for translating medical knowledge into community practice, and advancing knowledge to improve health care and health for the US population as a whole. PMID:19001306

  11. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2001-01-01

    Proper handling of Ni-H2 cells/batteries in storage, during I&T, and at launch site is very important to preserve the useful energy and to extend the mission life. Cell reversal test is not a prudent test to verify or quantify the nickel pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells/batteries. The second plateau is due to the formation of Ni(+3) that is electrochemically inactive. Gas analysis of the cell, and chemical analysis of the positive plate are confirmatory tests to determine the nature of pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells.

  12. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  13. LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS OF NiH BY FOURIER TRANSFORM DISPERSED FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Vallon, Raphael; Richard, Cyril; Crozet, Patrick; Wannous, Ghassan; Ross, Amanda

    2009-05-01

    Red and orange bands of laser-induced fluorescence in NiH have been recorded on a Fourier transform interferometer at Doppler resolution. The spectra show strong transitions to low-lying vibronic states which are not thermally populated in a laboratory source, and therefore do not appear in laser excitation spectra, but which would be expected to contribute significantly to any stellar spectrum. The strongest bands belong to the G[{omega}' 5/2]-X {sub 2} {sup 2}{delta}{sub 3/2}, I[{omega}' 3/2]-X {sub 2}, and {sup 2}{delta}{sub 3/2} I[{omega}' 3/2]-W {sub 1} {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2} systems. Measurements are reported for {sup 58}NiH, {sup 60}NiH, and {sup 62}NiH.

  14. Videos from the National Eye Institute: Eye Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Videos from the National Eye Institute: Eye Diseases Past ... the early detection of eye disease. Share these videos with friends, family and colleagues. www.nei.nih. ...

  15. Go4Life:Success Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... routine and a low-fat diet. NIHSenior Health Videos Exercising with the NIH Directors The leadership of ... nihseniorhealth.gov/videolist.html#exercise . Click to play video Richard J. Hodes, M.D., Director, National Institute ...

  16. Exercise Is Key to Healthy Aging | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. NIH Research Exercise Is Key to Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter ... to exercise regularly—at any age! Why is exercise so important? Exercise is perhaps the best demonstrated ...

  17. Diagnosis & Treatment | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... blockage is. Treatment Latest NIH Research Recent gene-mapping research has found the largest set of genes ... the arteries and improves blood flow to the brain, helping prevent a stroke. Fall 2010 Issue: Volume ...

  18. Methods and management: NIH administrators, federal oversight, and the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal S

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the 1965 controversy over the Framingham Heart Study in the midst of growing oversight into the management of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It describes how, beginning in the early 1960s, federal overseers demanded that NIH administrators adopt particular management styles in administering programs and how these growing pressures led administrators to favor investigative pursuits that allowed for easy prospective accounting of program payoffs, especially those based on experimental methods designed to examine discrete interventions or outcomes of interest. In light of this changing managerial culture within the NIH, the Framingham study and other population laboratories-with their bases in observation and in open-ended study designs-became harder for NIH administrators to justify and defend. PMID:22643985

  19. Globetrotting to a Good Night's Sleep | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of the most common and troubling sleep disorders. At least 1 in 10 older adults, and ... have sleep apnea. To Find Out More MedlinePlus Sleep Disorders www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/sleepdisorders.html NHLBI ...

  20. Suicide in the Military: Army-NIH Funded Study Points to Risk and Protective Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office 301-443-4536 NIMHpress@nih.gov More Science News about Basic Research Military Service Members Suicide ... the Field News from the Field NIMH-Funded Science on EurekAlert Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's ...

  1. NIGMS Researcher Explores Skin Cities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... coming to NIH to tackle bacterial genomics. Beneficial Bacteria Bacteria aren't all bad. Many are harmless, and ... protect us by taking up space where harmful bacteria would otherwise live. It might sound unhealthy or ...

  2. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... experts from NIH, CDC, and academia. These proposed changes were published in the Federal Register (76 FR...) classification for several common attenuated strains of bacteria and viruses that are frequently used...

  3. What Research is being done? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation What Research is Being Done? Past Issues / Spring ... of Contents To Find Out More MedlinePlus: Stroke Rehabilitation www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/strokerehabilitation.html National ...

  4. Cancer Survivor Eric Dishman Is On a Precision Medicine Mission | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices can encourage healthy behaviors Lay the scientific foundation for precision medicine for many diseases Find Out More National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) : https://ncats.nih.gov MedlinePlus: (search for ...

  5. HealthLines - Plan to Get Your Flu Shot | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements with an anti-inflammatory drug and a placebo (or dummy pill). Researchers say people who took ... of the treatments was significantly better than the placebo. Two components of NIH funded the study, which ...

  6. ASD: What Are Autism Spectrum Disorders? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the parents/caregivers, teachers, school psychologists, and other child development specialists work together to design an Individualized Education ... search box. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) booklets: www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/ ...

  7. Healthy Aging: What's On Your Plate? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy Aging What's On Your Plate? Past Issues / Winter 2015 ... On Your Plate? Smart Food Choices for Healthy Aging www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/whats-your- ...

  8. NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes That Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-Tissue Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Releases NCI Press Release NIH scientists map genetic changes that drive tumors in a common pediatric ... Office 301-496-6641 Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric ...

  9. More Young Adults at Risk for High Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... young adults have high blood pressure. NIH-funded analysis indicates higher risk for young adults than previously ... 12 ounces of beer or five ounces of wine.) Finally, quit smoking. Among other things, smoking damages ...

  10. What Do We Know About Preventing Alzheimer's? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... read Participating in Alzheimer's Research: For Yourself and Future Generations http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/participating-alzheimers-research/introduction . You can also contact the NIA Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at 1-800- ...

  11. Risk Factors, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Fighting Gum Disease Risk Factors, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Risk ... out whether it offers this service. Latest NIH Research Researchers supported by the National Institute of Dental ...

  12. Developing Safe and Effective Medicines for Children | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). She is also helping to make drugs ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is the lead NIH agency helping to ...

  13. 75 FR 63489 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ..., scientific discipline interests, educational history, standardized examination scores, reference information, resume ] components, employment history, employment interests, dissertation research details, letters of... educational level individuals into the National Institutes of Health Intramural Research Program (NIH-IRP)...

  14. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement Past Issues / ... Groundbreaking NIH study spurs hope for those with spinal cord injury Flex a muscle, any muscle? Certainly, it's ...

  15. Methods and Management: NIH Administrators, Federal Oversight, and the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sejal S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This article explores the 1965 controversy over the Framingham Heart Study in the midst of growing oversight into the management of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It describes how, beginning in the early 1960s, federal overseers demanded that NIH administrators adopt particular management styles in administering programs and how these growing pressures led administrators to favor investigative pursuits that allowed for easy prospective accounting of program payoffs, especially those based on experimental methods designed to examine discrete interventions or outcomes of interest. In light of this changing managerial culture within the NIH, the Framingham study and other population laboratories—with their bases in observation and in open-ended study designs—became harder for NIH administrators to justify and defend. PMID:22643985

  16. NIH Researchers Identify New Gene Mutation Associated with ALS and Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH researchers identify new gene mutation associated with ALS and dementia April 7, 2014 A rare mutation ... cell, has been linked with development of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This finding, from a research team led ...

  17. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Spring 2016

    MedlinePlus

    ... The new edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers fibromyalgia, health disparities, as well as women and heart ... MedlinePlus magazine also provides a special section about fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition that impacts five million ...

  18. The Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Future of Personalized Medicine, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. ... your physician to be sure you are taking advantage of all possible methods for surveillance and early ...

  19. Dr. Lindberg's Legacy : Charting A New Course | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... B. Lindberg, MD Pioneering Leader for Medicine and Computers Retires as Director of the National Library of ... leaders at NIH and a pioneer in applying computer and communications technology to biomedical research, health care, ...

  20. Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents It ... anniversary of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), known to many as NIH's "basic research ...

  1. 78 FR 17935 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management... annual reporting burden is displayed in the following table: Estimated No. Estimated No. of...

  2. Living Well with COPD, Q&A: Grace Anne Koppel | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The NIH's COPD Learn More Breathe Better ® Campaign Network is now in all 50 states and the ... Learn More Breathe Better® program encourages Breathe Better Network members and all those interested in raising COPD ...

  3. Putting A Face On Rare Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of this global observance. Since 2010, the slogan for NIH's event has been "Patients & Researchers—Partners for Life." This slogan aligns with NCATS' philosophy that researchers must work ...

  4. Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Measuring Cholesterol Levels Learn more at MedlinePlus: https://www.nlm.nih. ...

  5. What Do Fats Do in the Body? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on NIH Research What Do Fats Do in the Body? Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... gov/insidelifescience/ When you have your cholesterol checked, the doctor typically gives you your levels of three ...

  6. Turning Discovery Into Health – Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... untargeted research. NIH not only supports these basic advances but also conducts the clinical and translational research that transforms discoveries into medical practice in four areas: chronic diseases, infectious diseases, personalized medicine and new technologies, and health at all ages. ...

  7. More Young Adults at Risk for High Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: High Blood Pressure More Young Adults at Risk for High Blood Pressure Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... high blood pressure. NIH-funded analysis indicates higher risk for young adults than previously believed. With more ...

  8. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... For more info, videos, and other resources on biotechnology and medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov " ... web tool showcasing the latest research advances in biotechnology. It features fourteen technologies being developed by NIBIB- ...

  9. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groundbreaking NIH study spurs hope for those with spinal cord injury Flex a muscle, any muscle? Certainly, it's second ... little realistic hope of any meaningful recovery from spinal cord injury may benefit from this intervention," says NIBIB Director ...

  10. Approaching Health Disparities from a Population Perspective: The NIH Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addressing health disparities has been a national challenge for decades. The NIH-sponsored Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHDs) represent the first federal initiative to support transdisciplinary multilevel research on the determinants of health disparities. Using preliminar...

  11. Healthy Aging: What's On Your Plate? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Table of Contents What's On Your Plate? Smart Food Choices for Healthy Aging www.nia.nih. ... on 2,000 calories a day with these smart food choices. Get more nutrition information online with ...

  12. Sex Differences in Application, Success, and Funding Rates for NIH Extramural Programs

    PubMed Central

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Jiang, Hong; Wagner, Robin M.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Pinn, Vivian W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The authors provide an analysis of sex differences in National Institutes of Health (NIH) award programs to inform potential initiatives for promoting diversity in the research workforce. Method In 2010, the authors retrieved data for NIH extramural grants in the electronic Research Administration Information for Management, Planning, and Coordination II database, and used statistical analysis to determine any sex differences in securing NIH funding, as well as subsequent success of researchers who had already received independent NIH support. Results Success and funding rates for men and women were not significantly different in most award programs. Furthermore, in programs where participation was lower for women than men, the disparity was primarily related to a lower percentage of women applicants compared to men, rather than decreased success rates or funding rates. However, for subsequent grants, both application and funding rates were generally higher for men than for women. Conclusions Cross-sectional analysis showed that women and men were generally equally successful at all career stages, but longitudinal analysis showed that men with previous experience as NIH grantees had higher application and funding rates than women at similar career points. On average, although women received larger R01 awards than men, men had more R01 awards than women at all points in their careers. Therefore, while greater participation of women in NIH programs is underway, further action will be required to eradicate remaining sex differences. PMID:21512358

  13. [Envelope protein of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious expressed in NIH3T3 cells promotes cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    DU, Fangyuan; Chen, Dayong; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Wenqing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the exogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious (exJSRV) envelope protein (Env) on NIH3T3 cell proliferation. Methods A recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env carrying exJSRV- env gene was constructed, and then the correctness of the recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells by Lipofectamine(TM) LTX. After the transfection of the recombinant plasmid, the expression of exJSRV- env was detected by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. The effect of Env on cell proliferation was investigated by CCK-8 assay and plate colony formation assay. Results The recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid containing exJSRV- env was successfully constructed as identified by PCR, restriction enzyme identification and sequencing. After the recombinant plasmid was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells, reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed the expression of exJSRV- env , and Env promoted NIH3T3 cell proliferation significantly. Conclusion JSRV Env was expressed successfully in the NIH3T3 cells and promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. PMID:27609573

  14. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  15. Thermal modeling of a Ni-H2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery has many desirable features which make it attractive for satellite power systems. It can provide a significant improvement over the energy density of present spacecraft nickel-cadnium batteries, combined with longer life, tolerance to overcharge and possibility of state-of-charge indication. However, to realize these advantages, accurate thermal modeling of nickel-hydrogen cells is required in order to properly design the battery pack so that it operates within a specified temperature range during the operation. Maintenance of a low operating temperature and a uniform temperature profile within the cell will yield better reliability, improved cycle life and better charge/discharge efficiencies. This research has the objective of developing and testing a thermal model which can be used to characterize battery operation. Primarily, temperature distribution with the heat generation rates as a function of position and time will be evaluated for a Ni-H2 cell in the three operating modes: (1) charge cycle, (2) discharge cycle, and (3) overcharge condition, if applicable. Variables to be examined include charging current, discharge rates, state of charge, pressure and temperature. Once the thermal model has been developed, this resulting model will predict the actual operating temperature and temperature gradient for the specific cell geometry to be used.

  16. Air Force NiH2 IPV storage testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smellie, S.; Hill, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    USAF Phillips Laboratory Nickel Hydrogen IPV storage test, performed at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) at Crane Indiana, is discussed. The storage tests is just one component of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Nickel Hydrogen IPV Test Program. The plan was to store cells for a defined period and cycle matching cells to determine the effect on cycle life. The storage period was completed in April 95 and the cycling cells have achieved five years of real time LEO cycling. The two main objectives of the storage test are: to investigate various methods on NiH2 cells by using two different manufacturers and two different storage methods or conditions, and to determine the effect of storage method on cycle performance and cycle life by using matching cells cycling at 25% depth of discharge. The comparisons between individual cycle performance as well as cycle life are also reported. During the test the following variables has been considered: constant potential, cell current, open circuit voltage, and temperature. The results of the test are also discussed using charts and tables.

  17. Ni-H2 cell separator matrix engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was initiated to develop alternative separator materials to the previously used asbestos matrices which were removed from the market for health and environmental reasons. The objective of the research was to find a material or combination of materials that had the following characteristics: (1) resistant to the severe conditions encountered in Ni-H2 cells; (2) satisfactory electrical, electrolyte management, and thermal management properties to function properly; (3) environmentally benign; and (4) capable of being manufactured into a separator matrix. During the course of the research it was discovered that separators prepared from wettable polyethylene fibers along and in combination with potassium titanate pigment performed satisfactory in preliminary characterization tests. Further studies lead to the optimization of the separator composition and manufacturing process. Single ply separator sheets were manufactured with 100 percent polyethylene fibers and also with a combination of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment (PKT) in the ratio of 60 percent PKT and 40 percent fibers. A pilot paper machine was used to produce the experimental separator material by a continuous, wet laid process. Both types of matrices were produced at several different area densities (grams/sq m).

  18. Multireference and relativistic effects in NiH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Christel M.; Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    1989-09-01

    Large multireference CI calculations have been performed for the ground state of NiH. The effects of relativity were investigated using both a variational (no pair) theory and perturbation theory. The largest CI calculations included up to 29 reference states and were performed at the contracted CI level. The calculated and experimental results (within parentheses) are for Re 2.76 a0 (2.76 a0), for ωe 1997 cm-1 (2003 cm-1) and for the dipole moment μ 2.32 D (2.4±0.1 D). The effects of relativity are -0.03 a0, +60 cm-1 and -0.3 D, respectively. The effects of going from a reference selection threshold of 0.05 to a selection threshold of 0.02 and a different set of CASSCF orbitals was before applying Davidson's correction +0.07 a0 for Re and about +30 cm-1 for ωe, and after applying this correction +0.06 a0 and -80 cm-1, respectively. The most accurate results for the dipole moment was obtained using the multireference ACPF method.

  19. The INTELSAT Experience with Reconditioning of NiH2 Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalici, Frank; Dunnet, Andrew; Xu, Daphne

    1997-01-01

    INTELSAT has been reconditioning NiH2 batteries since 1983 when the INTELSAT V F-6 geosynchronous communications satellite was launched. This was the first commercial use of NiH2 batteries. INTELSAT has continued this practice on all 46 NiH2 batteries it has operated in-orbit. The batteries are of several types including the classic INTELSAT cell, the HAC re-circulating design, and the Gates Mantech design. Reconditioning is performed twice each year, prior to the Eclipse Season. At this time Water Migration problems, if present, are dealt with. Temperature limits are imposed for the discharge and charge cycles as a safety precaution. In support of in-orbit operations, it is INTELSAT's practice to perform ground based life tests. In-orbit data and ground tests results are presented and the benefits of reconditioning noted.

  20. Calculated electric dipole moment of NiH X2Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    A calculated dipole moment of 2.39 D at R sub e = 2.79 a sub 0 is reported, obtained from complete active space SCF/configuration interaction calculations plus one natural orbital iteration. The calculation is in good agreement with the experimental value of 2.4 + or - 0.1 D measured for the lowest vibrational level. In agreement with Gray et al. (1985), it is found that the dipole moment is strongly correlated with the 3d electron population; the good agreement with experiment thus provides verification of the mixed state model of NiH. It is concluded that the electric dipole moment of NiH is a sensitive test of the quality of the NiH wave function.

  1. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  2. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease. PMID:25466208

  3. NIH Director's Pioneer Awards: could the selection process be biased against women?

    PubMed

    Carnes, Molly; Geller, Stacie; Fine, Eve; Sheridan, Jennifer; Handelsman, Jo

    2005-10-01

    One of the first National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap initiatives to be launched was the Director's Pioneer Award. This award was established to "identify and fund investigators of exceptionally creative abilities and diligence, for a sufficient term (five years) to allow them to develop and test far-ranging ideas." Nine excellent scientists were chosen as NIH Pioneers, but the selection of all men is at odds with the percentage of women receiving doctoral degrees for the past three decades, serving as principal investigators on NIH research grants, and achieving recognition as scientific innovators in non-NIH award competitions. The absence of women Pioneers provokes the following question: In the context of extant research on the impact of gender-based assumptions on evaluation of men and women in traditionally male fields, such as science, were there aspects about the process of nomination, evaluation, and selection that inadvertently favored men? We present evidence to suggest that women scientists would be disadvantaged by the following components of the NIH Director's Pioneer Award initiative: (1) time pressure placed on evaluators, (2) absence of face-to-face discussion about applicants, (3) ambiguity of performance criteria, given the novelty of the award, combined with an emphasis on subjective assessment of leadership, potential achievements rather than actual accomplishments, and risk taking, (4) emphasis on self-promotion, (5) weight given to letters of recommendation, and (6) the need for finalists to make a formal, in-person presentation in which the individual and not his or her science was the focus of evaluation. We offer an analysis of this process to encourage the NIH to embark on self-study and to educate all reviewers regarding an evidence-based approach to gender and evaluation. PMID:16232100

  4. Recent advances in Ni-H2 technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalezsanabria, O. D.; Britton, D. L.; Smithrick, J. J.; Reid, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has concentrated its efforts on advancing the Ni-H2 system technology for low Earth orbit applications. Component technology as well as the design principles were studied in an effort to understand the system behavior and failure mechanisms in order to increase performance and extend cycle life. The design principles were previously addressed. The component development is discussed, in particular the separator and nickel electrode and how these efforts will advance the Ni-H2 system technology.

  5. Characteristics of storage related capacity loss in Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the capacity, voltage and pressure profile of flight configuration Ni/H2 cells when they are stored for extended periods is examined. The Ni/H2 cells exhibit capacity fade phenomenon regardless of their design when they are stored at room temperature. Capacity loss also occurs if old cells (5 years old) are stored in a very low rate trickle charge (C/200 rate) condition. A periodic recharge technique leads to pressure rise in the cells. Conventional trickle charge (C/100 rate) helps in minimizing or eliminating the second plateau which is one of the characteristics of the capacity fade phenomenon.

  6. Evaluating the NIH Library Editing Service: Pilot Study Used to Analyze Service Impact

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Cindy; Sullivan, Brigit

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based librarianship drives initiatives and priorities in today’s research centers. To evaluate the effectiveness of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Library’s Editing Service, librarians conducted a pilot study comparing edited manuscripts with the published versions. Using a random number generator, five published journal articles were chosen for evaluation from a pool of NIH manuscripts (n=147) edited between January 2008 and February 2012. A rubric delineating categories of frequently-checked writing elements was used to facilitate quantitative analysis. Findings showed that 84% of editors’ suggestions were accepted for three of the published papers that were submitted to the originally intended journal. PMID:25530651

  7. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  8. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ..., particularly breast and cervical cancer. Reasons for this disparity are complex. Unlike most other preventive... Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal...

  9. 78 FR 71624 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request; Data Collection To Understand How NIH Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Collection To Understand How NIH Programs Apply Methodologies To Improve Their Research Programs (MIRP... understand how NIH programs apply methodologies to improve their research programs (MIRP), 0925- NEW... for formative research activities relating to the collection of data to assist the Institute...

  10. 76 FR 61719 - Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon..., Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of...

  11. Colleagues Pay Tribute to Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, Retiring After Three Decades of NLM Leadership | NIH MedlinePlus ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outgoing NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. Photo courtesy of Ernie Branson, NIH On March 30, ... of Don's influence and inspiration. Dr. Vivian Pinn Photo courtesy of Ernie Branson, NIH Peter Reinecke Photo ...

  12. Nesting material and number of females per cage: effects on mouse productivity in BALB/c, C57BL/6J, DBA/2 and NIH/S mice.

    PubMed

    Eskola, S; Kaliste-Korhonen, E

    1999-04-01

    Two different materials-aspen wood-wool and paper towel-were compared as nesting material for three inbred mouse strains (BALB/c, C57BL/6J and DBA/2) housed in barrier conditions. In addition, the effect of varying the number of females per cage (one to three per cage) of these three strains and with NIH/S outbred mouse stock was studied. The number of litters, litter size and neonatal mortality were determined, as well as age, sex and weight of weanlings. The type of nesting material did not affect the characteristics monitored. In all strains, the number of weanlings per female was greatest in singly-housed females. In terms of the number of weanlings per cage, two females per cage gave the best result. In DBA/2 mice, neonatal mortality increased when several females were caged together. PMID:10780814

  13. National Institutes of Health, Rodent 4 (NIH.R4); Calcium Metabolism and Vascular Function After Spaceflight: A Collaborative Series with NASA and NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Steele, Marianne; Aquillina, Rudy; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NIH.R4 payload was a collaborative experiment conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This middeck payload was the fourth in a series of experiments focusing on developmental biology and the effects of microgravity on mammalian systems. The NIH.R4 payload was flown onboard STS-80, which launched November 19, 1996, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on December 7, 1996, and was the longest shuttle mission to date. Fourteen male Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR) were flown; seven in each of two Animal Enclosure Modules (AEM) in the shuttle middeck. The flight animals were exposed to 18 days of microgravity. Two synchronous control groups were utilized for this study in addition to an asynchronous post-flight AEM control study conducted at the PI lab. The animals were fed two different calcium diets in the NASA food bar (2.0% and 0.2%) three weeks prior to launch and insight. Blood pressures were taken at pre-determined intervals and were the basis for flight selection. Upon recovery Dwight animals blood pressure was measured and a variety of tissues were collected. Project testing and data will be presented.

  14. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  15. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  16. 42 CFR 68.11 - What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs? 68.11 Section 68.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH... received under the NIH LRPs? Individuals must agree to: (a) Engage in qualified research for the...

  17. 42 CFR 68.11 - What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs? 68.11 Section 68.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH... received under the NIH LRPs? Individuals must agree to: (a) Engage in qualified research for the...

  18. Guidance from an NIH workshop on designing,implementing, and reporting clinical studies of soy interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, “Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies,” July 28–29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population ex...

  19. NIH Courts Younger Researchers, Even as It Debates How Far to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, a gathering held for young research faculty last week at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory was a clear expression of determination by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help them compete for grants. The agency fears that continued Congressional budget cuts, combined with the growing number of scientists who work later into…

  20. DCP Leading NIH Glycoscience Common Fund Program; Funding Opportunities Open | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention is a leading participant for a key initiative in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Glycoscience Common Fund program. This program supports development of accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying the role complex carbohydrates in health and disease. |

  1. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  2. 77 FR 41191 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ...In compliance with the requirements of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the Office of Science Education, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed......

  3. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the effects of handling, storing, and cycling of NiH2 cells, particularly the second plateau phenomenon. Details are given on the criteria for cell selection, cell history, the second plateau capacity at C/2 discharge, and cell reversal test conditions. Tables display a gas analysis and nickel precharge.

  4. ASD: What Are Autism Spectrum Disorders? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... who is trying to play with them Training adolescents and adults with ASD in employment skills, such as writing a resume and interviewing for a job Videos and Audio About ASD from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) www.nimh.nih.gov/news/media/index-autism.shtml At its website, NIMH offers ...

  5. 76 FR 30178 - Submission for OMB review; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the information collection listed below. This proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register in......

  6. 75 FR 63833 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the NIH-American Association for Retired Persons (AARP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of... Respondents: U.S. adults (aged 50 and over). The annual reporting burden is displayed in the table below. The.... ] Table 1--Estimates of Annual Burden Hours Average time per Instrument(s) tested Frequency of...

  7. Life after the NIH: After a Flawed Policy, What's next for Librarians and Open Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2005-01-01

    On January 15, 2005, a standing-room-only crowd of librarians listened as a panel of experts, moderated by Columbia University's Jim Neal, voiced support for the National Institute of Health's (NIH) proposal to mandate free online access to the research it funds. This article briefly discusses some personal accounts where open access would have…

  8. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Summer 2016

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Library of Medicine (NLM). Here is what's new this week in To Your Health, a consumer health oriented podcast from NLM, that helps you use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. The new edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers the Zika ...

  9. Playing Fair?: Minority Research Institutions Call for NIH to Address Funding Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Ph.D. science and health researchers are seeking financial support for their health science studies, more often than not they apply to the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an RO1 research grant, which boosts a project's standing in the research community as well as the career of the applicant. Even before the NIH…

  10. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS researchers that helps extend our overall medical knowledge. Jeremy M. Berg, Ph.D. NIGMS Director Photo courtesy of NIH/ NIGMS True or False One of the valuable aspects of basic research is the discovery of new, previously unimagined scientific connections. For example: ...

  11. Healthy Aging with Go4Life® | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy Aging Healthy Aging with Go4Life ® Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Go4Life from the National Institute on Aging at NIH is a national exercise and physical ...

  12. The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and NIH grant process: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wolbarst, Anthony B; Hendee, William R

    2007-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) comprise the largest single source of funding in the world for the support of biomedical research. Much of the work of the NIH focuses on the elucidation of fundamental biophysical, biochemical, and biologic aspects of the molecular, cellular, and tissue processes underlying both healthy and diseased states of biologic systems and on the development of cures for the latter. In 2000, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) was created with a somewhat different focus: Rather than concentration on a specific organ system or category of disease, the primary objective of the NIBIB is the advancement of technologies and tools that contribute to all aspects of biomedical research and health care delivery, especially in the imaging sciences and bioengineering. This article provides an overview of the ways in which NIH funds research, with an emphasis on NIBIB support of biomedical imaging. It is intended for radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and other readers of this journal, especially those with limited experience in the complex process of obtaining NIH grant support. PMID:17185660

  13. The NIH R03 Award: An Initial Funding Step for Social Work Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhorst, Diane M.; Svikis, Dace S.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers in academic and agency settings have the opportunity to do funded research using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03 small grant mechanism designed for discrete, clearly defined projects that can be completed within a 1- to 2-year time period with limited funding. This article describes the R03 mechanism and provides a guide…

  14. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  15. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Welcome to the NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Donald ... about their efforts to cure disease. Lastly, the magazine's lively graphics, fun quizzes and practical tips have ...

  16. NIH Researchers Find Vitamin D Binding Protein May Help to Assess Vitamin D Deficiency in African and White Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home NIH researchers find vitamin D binding protein may help to assess vitamin D deficiency in ... Americans November 21, 2013 Measuring vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) may be important for accurately determining vitamin ...

  17. The World Leader in Health Information and Innovation Celebrates 175 Years | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... building on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md. Photo courtesy of jessicamarcotte.com By Dr. Donald A. ... Office, Ford's Theatre, and the Army Medical Library Photos: National Library of Medicine Lister Hill researchers use ...

  18. Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" Past Issues / ... is Director of the NIH's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A renowned expert on how ...

  19. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 ... of Medicine To view Medical Movies on the Web, go to: www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/ ...

  20. 77 FR 27785 - Request for Information Regarding the NIH-Industry Program To Discover New Therapeutic Uses for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... program will focus on discovering new therapeutic uses of existing molecules (Therapeutics Discovery). The... be submitted electronically to Therapeutics.Discovery@nih.gov . For additional information, please... (Therapeutics Discovery). Many discontinued compounds and biologics that have already been tested in...

  1. Model for the First NIH-funded Center of Excellence in End-of-Life Research

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Gail M.; Kavanaugh, Karen; Wilkie, Diana J.; Bonner, Gloria; Ryan, Catherine; Fischer, Dena J.; Savage, Teresa; Choi, Heeseung; Burgener, Sandy C.; Foreman, Marquis D.; Yan, Han

    2013-01-01

    Centers of excellence are widely acknowledged as a mechanism to promote scientific advances in a particular field of science, but until recently there have been no end-of-life or palliative care research centers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this article is to describe aims, framework, and organizational structure of the first NIH-funded Center of Excellence on end-of-life research, the Center for End-of-Life Transition Research (CEoLTR), and the advances in end-of-life research that the CEoLTR will facilitate. The teams of researchers involved in the CEoLTR have grown impressively since it was funded in 2007. Collectively, the teams are on target to accomplish all of the original goals for this five year award. PMID:23762014

  2. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce.

    PubMed

    Valantine, Hannah A; Lund, P Kay; Gammie, Alison E

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges. Over the past few decades, the biomedical research workforce has benefited from NIH programs aimed at enhancing diversity. However, there is considerable room for improvement, particularly at the level of independent scientists and within scientific leadership. We provide a rationale and specific opportunities to develop and sustain a diverse biomedical research workforce through interventions that promote the successful transitions to different stages on the path toward completion of training and entry into the biomedical workforce. PMID:27587850

  3. Expression of Nanog gene promotes NIH3T3 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingyu; Wang Xia; Chen Bing; Suo Guangli; Zhao Yanhong; Duan Ziyuan; Dai Jianwu . E-mail: jwdai@genetics.ac.cn

    2005-12-16

    Cells are the functional elements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A large number of cells are usually needed for these purposes. However, there are numbers of limitations for in vitro cell proliferation. Nanog is an important self-renewal determinant in embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether Nanog will influence the cell cycle and cell proliferation of mature cells. In this study, we expressed Nanog in NIH3T3 cells and showed that expression of Nanog in NIH3T3 promoted cells to enter into S phase and enhanced cell proliferation. This suggests that Nanog gene might function in a similar fashion in mature cells as in ES cells. In addition, it may provide an approach for in vitro cell expansion.

  4. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges. Over the past few decades, the biomedical research workforce has benefited from NIH programs aimed at enhancing diversity. However, there is considerable room for improvement, particularly at the level of independent scientists and within scientific leadership. We provide a rationale and specific opportunities to develop and sustain a diverse biomedical research workforce through interventions that promote the successful transitions to different stages on the path toward completion of training and entry into the biomedical workforce. PMID:27587850

  5. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  6. Partnering with the NIH: Now part of the “Value Proposition” for start-ups

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    With its “value proposition” statement a start-up company needs to convince potential investors or pharma partners how it will add more value or solve a problem better than others. High value, low cost assets such as those from the NIH ranging from technology to funding to assistance provide such biomedical firms an excellent jump-start in reaching their goals. PMID:23476116

  7. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...Concerns about the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus have spurred research with influenza viruses that have the potential to cause a pandemic, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. In 2012, two published studies funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) examined genetic changes that would allow HPAI H5N1 viruses to transmit by respiratory droplets among......

  8. Bonding and stability of the hydrogen storage material Mg(2)NiH(4).

    PubMed

    Häussermann, Ulrich; Blomqvist, Helen; Noréus, Dag

    2002-07-15

    Structural stability and bonding properties of the hydrogen storage material Mg(2)NiH(4) (monoclinic, C2/c, Z = 8) were investigated and compared to those of Ba(2)PdH(4) (orthorhombic, Pnma, Z = 8) using ab initio density functional calculations. Both compounds belong to the family of complex transition metal hydrides. Their crystal structures contain discrete tetrahedral 18 electron complexes T(0)H(4)(4-) (T = Ni, Pd). However, the bonding situation in the two systems was found to be quite different. For Ba(2)PdH(4), the electronic density of states mirrors perfectly the molecular states of the complex PdH(4)(4-), whereas for Mg(2)NiH(4) a clear relation between molecular states of TH(4)(4-) and the density of states of the solid-state compound is missing. Differences in bonding of Ba(2)PdH(4) and Mg(2)NiH(4) originate in the different strength of the T-H interactions (Pd[bond]H interactions are considerably stronger than Ni[bond]H ones) and in the different strength of the interaction between the alkaline-earth metal component and H (Ba[bond]H interactions are substantially weaker than Mg[bond]H ones). To lower the hydrogen desorption temperature of Mg(2)NiH(4), it is suggested to destabilize this compound by introducing defects in the counterion matrix surrounding the tetrahedral Ni(0)H(4)(4-) complexes. This might be achieved by substituting Mg for Al. PMID:12099872

  9. Sizing the Problem of Improving Discovery and Access to NIH-Funded Data: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study informs efforts to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical datasets by providing a preliminary estimate of the number and type of datasets generated annually by research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It focuses on those datasets that are “invisible” or not deposited in a known repository. Methods We analyzed NIH-funded journal articles that were published in 2011, cited in PubMed and deposited in PubMed Central (PMC) to identify those that indicate data were submitted to a known repository. After excluding those articles, we analyzed a random sample of the remaining articles to estimate how many and what types of invisible datasets were used in each article. Results About 12% of the articles explicitly mention deposition of datasets in recognized repositories, leaving 88% that are invisible datasets. Among articles with invisible datasets, we found an average of 2.9 to 3.4 datasets, suggesting there were approximately 200,000 to 235,000 invisible datasets generated from NIH-funded research published in 2011. Approximately 87% of the invisible datasets consist of data newly collected for the research reported; 13% reflect reuse of existing data. More than 50% of the datasets were derived from live human or non-human animal subjects. Conclusion In addition to providing a rough estimate of the total number of datasets produced per year by NIH-funded researchers, this study identifies additional issues that must be addressed to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical research data: the definition of a “dataset,” determination of which (if any) data are valuable for archiving and preservation, and better methods for estimating the number of datasets of interest. Lack of consensus amongst annotators about the number of datasets in a given article reinforces the need for a principled way of thinking about how to identify and characterize biomedical datasets. PMID:26207759

  10. Resistance to oncogenic transformation in revertant R1 of human ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzumaki, N.; Ogiso, Y.; Oda, A.; Fujita, H.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, C.; Mullauer, L.

    1989-05-01

    A flat revertant, R1, was isolated from human activated c-Ha-ras-1 (hu-ac-Ha-ras) gene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells (EJ-NIH 3T3) treated with mutagens. R1 contained unchanged transfected hu-ac-Ha-ras DNA and expressed high levels of hu-ac-Ha-ras-specific mRNA and p21 protein. Transfection experiments revealed that NIH 3T3 cells could be transformed by DNA from R1 cells but R1 cells could not be retransformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus, DNA from EJ-NIH 3T3 cells, hu-ac-Ha-ras, v-src, v-mos, simian virus 40 large T antigen, or polyomavirus middle T antigen. Somatic cell hybridization studies showed that R1 was not retransformed by fusion with NIH 3T3 cells and suppressed anchorage independence of EJ-NIH 3T3 and hu-ac-Ha-ras gene-transformed rat W31 cells in soft agar. These results suggest that the reversion and resistance to several oncogenes in R1 is due n not to cellular defects in the production of the transformed phenotype but rather to enhancement of cellular mechanisms that suppress oncogenic transformation.

  11. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Howard H.; Deschamps, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998–2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs.— Garrison, H. H., Deschamps, A. M. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century. PMID:24297696

  12. Global climate change and health: developing a research agenda for the NIH.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joshua P; Jessup, Christine M

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change is receiving worldwide attention because of its anticipated impacts on the Earth's physical and biological systems. Through its effects on natural and human environments, climate change will likely impact economic viability and human health and well-being. The impact of climate change on human health is likely to be complex and significant, including effects on cancers, cardiovascular and respiratory disease, food-, water-, and vector-borne diseases, heat-related illness, mental and social well-being, nutrition, trauma, and vulnerable demographic sectors. Most assessments predict that these effects will disproportionately affect the poor, the elderly and the young, especially those living in Africa and Southeast Asia, where environmental conditions are poor, health infrastructure is weak and the burden of disease is great. Enormous efforts are underway to plan and finance climate change adaptation programs within national governments (including multiple U.S. agencies), United Nations organizations and private philanthropies. However, these endeavors are proceeding with a relatively poor understanding of the nature and magnitude of probable effects of climate change on health. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) already funds a portfolio of projects that are indirectly related to the concerns posed by global climate change. At the NIH, we have recently established an agency-wide planning group to assess the research questions in health and medicine that climate change presents, to link this agenda to parallel activities across other agencies of the U.S. Government (USG), and to advance a NIH research agenda in this area. PMID:19768170

  13. Engineering behaviour change in an epidemic: the epistemology of NIH-funded HIV prevention science.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam; Kolar, Kat

    2015-05-01

    Social scientific and public health literature on National Institutes of Health-funded HIV behavioural prevention science often assumes that this body of work has a strong biomedical epistemological orientation. We explore this assumption by conducting a systematic content analysis of all NIH-funded HIV behavioural prevention grants for men who have sex with men between 1989 and 2012. We find that while intervention research strongly favours a biomedical orientation, research into the antecedents of HIV risk practices favours a sociological, interpretive and structural orientation. Thus, with respect to NIH-funded HIV prevention science, there exists a major disjunct in the guiding epistemological orientations of how scientists understand HIV risk, on the one hand, and how they engineer behaviour change in behavioural interventions, on the other. Building on the extant literature, we suggest that the cause of this disjunct is probably attributable not to an NIH-wide positivist orientation, but to the specific standards of evidence used to adjudicate HIV intervention grant awards, including randomised controlled trials and other quantitative measures of intervention efficacy. PMID:25565009

  14. Prolonged Induction Activates Cebpα Independent Adipogenesis in NIH/3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Wu, Kuan-Sju; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Yeh, Jih-I

    2013-01-01

    Background 3T3-L1 cells are widely used to study adipogenesis and insulin response. Their adipogenic potential decreases with time in the culture. Expressing exogenous genes in 3T3-L1 cells can be challenging. This work tries to establish and characterize an alternative model of cultured adipocytes that is easier to work with than the 3T3-L1 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Induced cells were identified as adipocytes based on the following three characteristics: (1) Accumulation of triglyceride droplets as demonstrated by oil red O stain. (2) Transport rate of 2-deoxyglucose increased after insulin stimulation. (3) Expression of fat specific genes such as Fabp4 (aP2), Slc2a4 (Glut4) and Pparg (PPARγ). Among the cell lines induced under different conditions in this study, only NIH/3T3 cells differentiated into adipocytes after prolonged incubation in 3T3-L1 induction medium containing 20% instead of 10% fetal bovine serum. Rosiglitazone added to the induction medium shortened the incubation period from 14 to 7 days. The PI3K/AKT pathway showed similar changes upon insulin stimulation in these two adipocytes. C/EBPα mRNA was barely detectable in NIH/3T3 adipocytes. NIH/3T3 adipocytes induced in the presence of rosiglitazone showed higher 2-deoxyglucose transport rate after insulin stimulation, expressed less Agt (angiotensinogen) and more PPARγ. Knockdown of C/EBPα using shRNA blocked 3T3-L1 but not NIH/3T3 cell differentiation. Mouse adipose tissues from various anatomical locations showed comparable levels of C/EBPα mRNA. Conclusions/Significance NIH/3T3 cells were capable of differentiating into adipocytes without genetic engineering. They were an adipocyte model that did not require the reciprocal activation between C/EBPα and PPARγ to differentiate. Future studies in the C/EBPα independent pathways leading to insulin responsiveness may reveal new targets to diabetes treatment. PMID:23326314

  15. A relevant in vitro ELISA test in alternative to the in vivo NIH test for human rabies vaccine batch release.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Richard; Alberti, Monique; Poirier, Bertrand; Jallet, Corinne; Tordo, Noël; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2013-12-01

    To assess the quality of vaccine batches before release, international regulation requires the control of potency of each lot of human rabies vaccines by the in vivo NIH challenge test. Meanwhile, the 3Rs strategy for animal testing encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. Consequently, since more than 10 years, an ELISA method has been implemented by ANSM in parallel to the NIH test for rabies vaccines lots. It consists in the evaluation of the glycoprotein content using a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the glycoprotein. This ELISA method is able 1) to monitor the consistency of production with a similar profile than the NIH; 2) to detect a low quantity of glycoprotein in vaccines and 3) to agree with the manufacturer's NIH results by declaring a non compliant batch. This ELISA which characterizes the immunogenic form of the glycoprotein formulated in vaccines seems to be relevant to replace the NIH test and is a promising candidate to be standardized by a collaborative study. PMID:24161572

  16. NiH2 Reliability Impact Upon Hubble Space Telescope Battery Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed to be deployed and later serviced for maintenance and upgrades, as required, by the space shuttle fleet, with a Goodyear mission life for the batteries. HST was deployed 380 miles above the Earth, from Space Shuttle Discovery, on April 25, 1990. Four servicing missions, (SM1, SM2, SM3A, AND SM3B) have been performed. Astronauts have replaced or modified optics, solar arrays, a power control unit, and various science packages. A fifth Servicing Mission, SM4 scheduled for early 2004, is planned to replace the batteries for the first time. The HST is powered by solar array wings and nickel hydrogen (NiH2) Duracell batteries, which are grouped into two parallel battery modules of three parallel batteries each. With a design life of 7 years at launch, these batteries have surpassed 12 years in orbit, which gives HST the highest number of charge/discharge cycles of any NiH2 battery currently in low earth orbit (LEO) application. Being in a LEO orbit, HST has a 45-minute umbra period, during which spacecraft power requirements normally force the batteries into discharge, and a 60-minute sun period, which is available for battery recharge. The intent of this paper is to address the issue of NiH2 battery reliability and how battery capacity degradation can impact scheduling of a Servicing Mission to bring replacement batteries to HST, and extend mission life till deployment of Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for 2008 at the earliest.

  17. Developing Entrepreneurial and Technology Commercialization Policies to Promote Cooperative Ventures Between NIH and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossomando, Edward F.

    2001-03-01

    The NIH has had a great influence in guiding the biological research agenda for the last half of the 20th century. This may change if the increases in research funding from the private sector that occurred in the last ten years continue into the 21st century. Ten years ago, industry supplied 55% of the US R&D funds. In 2000, industry support of R&D had increased to 76%, with industry carrying out 70% of the nations applied and 91% of its development research. Given this shift, one of the biggest challenges that NIH may face in coming years is sharing control of America's research agenda with industry. For this to occur policies that encourage cooperative ventures with industry are needed. In a unique experiment, I was invited to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), one of the 25 NIH Institutes and Centers, to develop programs and policies that would promote interactions with industry. This talk will introduce the strategy and programs developed to commercialize products and technologies from basic science discoveries and introducing an entrepreneurial atmosphere within the Institute. The results of this experiment will be discussed by comparing differences between discovery-driven and customer-driven innovation. One outcome of this experience is a greater appreciation of the obstacles to introducing disruptive technologies into the market place and of the paradigms that serve as barriers to commercialization. One recommendation is that the NIDCR consider a policy that allows for some participation by industry in setting the research and training agenda of the Institute, and that a mechanism for industry input be introduced into its administrative organization.

  18. REPORT OF THE NIH TASK FORCE ON RESEARCH STANDARDS FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:24787228

  19. Oral chronic graft-vs.-host disease characterization using the NIH scale.

    PubMed

    Fassil, H; Bassim, C W; Mays, J; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Williams, K M; Cowen, E W; Mitchell, S A; Hakim, F T; Taylor, T; Avila, D; Zhang, D; Grkovic, L; Datiles, M; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2012-07-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD) is a complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). Oral cGVHD is manifested by mucosal, salivary, and/or sclerotic changes that have been linked to pain and poor quality of life. Our aim was to describe the demographic, clinical, and laboratory markers of oral cGVHD in alloHSCT patients (N = 187) enrolled in a cGVHD cross-sectional study at the NIH (#NCT00331968). We propose a meaningful and reproducible measure of disease defined by a cut-off point reflecting clinical minimally detectable change (0-2 = no oral cGVHD, 3-15 = oral cGVHD) on the 15-point NIH cGVHD clinician assessment scale. Forty-four patients had oral cGVHD. Oral cGVHD was associated with a quiescent or de novo type of cGVHD onset (p = 0.05), higher cGVHD severity (p = 0.033), lower albumin (p = 0.0008), higher total complement (p = 0.012), greater bother from foods or oral ulcers and greater mouth pain, and sensitivity (p < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression modeling with albumin, mouth pain, and total complement was 74.3% predictive of oral cGVHD and 80.2% predictive of non-oral cGVHD. We propose the use of >2 points on the NIH scale as a reproducible definition of clinically significant oral cGVHD, which may be useful in clinical settings or as eligibility criterion or as an endpoint in clinical trials. PMID:22699667

  20. Report of the NIH Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain†

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:26388962

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Ni/H2 and Li-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; White, Ralph E.; Dougal, Roger A.

    2001-01-01

    The modelling effort outlined in this viewgraph presentation encompasses the following topics: 1) Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel Hydroxide; 2) Deposition rates of thin films; 3) Impregnation of porous electrodes; 4) Experimental Characterization of Nickel Hydroxide; 5) Diffusion coefficients of protons; 6) Self-discharge rates (i.e., oxygen-evolution kinetics); 7) Hysteresis between charge and discharge; 8) Capacity loss on cycling; 9) Experimental Verification of the Ni/H2 Battery Model; 10) Mathematical Modeling Li-Ion Batteries; 11) Experimental Verification of the Li-Ion Battery Model; 11) Integrated Power System Models for Satellites; and 12) Experimental Verification of Integrated-Systems Model.

  2. Potentiostatic and ac impedance studies of the hydrogen electrodes used in Ni/H2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Helloco, Jean-Guy; Bojkov, Hristo; Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    In a study of electrode activity for hydrogen evolution and hydrogen ionization, knowledge of the detailed kinetics and of the surface coverage by adsorbed hydrogen is essential. In the Ni/H2 battery, the hydrogen electrode is subjected to high hydrogen pressure; elucidation of the variation of kinetic parameters with hydrogen pressure is therefore of interest. Potentiostatic and ac impedance spectroscopic techniques were used in the present study. The equivalent circuit of the reaction, the kinetic parameters, and their pressure dependence have been determined.

  3. Research Participant-Centered Outcomes at NIH-Supported Clinical Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura N.; Yessis, Jennifer M.; Wesley, Robert; Alfano, Sandra; Alexander, Steven R.; Kassis, Sylvia Baedorf; Cola, Phil; Dozier, Ann; Ford, Dan E.; Harris, Paul; Kim, Emmelyn; Lee, Simon Craddock; O’Riordan, Gerri; Roth, Mary-Tara; Schuff, Kathryn; Wasser, June; Henderson, David K.; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although research participation is essential for clinical investigation, few quantitative outcome measures exist to assess participants’ experiences. To address this, we developed and deployed a survey at 15 NIH-supported clinical research centers to assess participant-centered outcomes; we report responses from 4,961 participants. Methods Survey questions addressed core aspects of the research participants’ experience, including their overall rating, motivation, trust, and informed consent. We describe participant characteristics, responses to individual questions, and correlations among responses. Results Respondents broadly represented the research population in sex, race, and ethnicity. Seventy-three percent awarded top ratings to their overall research experience and 94% reported no pressure to enroll. Top ratings correlated with feeling treated with respect, listened to, and having access to the research team (R2=0.80 - 0.96). White participants trusted researchers (88%) than did non-white participants collectively (80%) (p<0.0001). Many participants felt fully prepared by the informed consent process (67%) and wanted to receive research results (72%). Conclusions Our survey demonstrates that a majority of participants at NIH-supported clinical research centers rate their research experience very positively and that participant-centered outcome measures identify actionable items for improvement of participant’s experiences, research protections, and the conduct of clinical investigation. PMID:24842076

  4. The NIH Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats Program: overview and special challenges.

    PubMed

    Jett, David A

    2016-06-01

    Intentional exposures to toxic chemicals can stem from terrorist attacks, such as the release of sarin in the Tokyo subway system in 1995, as well as from toxic industrial accidents that are much more common. Developing effective medical interventions is a critical component of the overall strategy to overcome the challenges of chemical emergencies. These challenges include the rapid and lethal mode of action of many toxic chemicals that require equally fast-acting therapies, the large number of chemicals that are considered threats, and the diverse demographics and vulnerabilities of those who may be affected. In addition, there may be long-term deleterious effects in survivors of a chemical exposure. Several U.S. federal agencies are invested in efforts to improve preparedness and response capabilities during and after chemical emergencies. For example, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Program supports investigators who are developing therapeutics to reduce mortality and morbidity from chemical exposures. The program awards grants to individual laboratories and includes contract resource facilities and interagency agreements with Department of Defense laboratories. The range of high-quality research within the NIH CounterACT Program network is discussed. PMID:27398820

  5. Recruiting post-doctoral fellows into global health research: selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Douglas C; Warner, Tokesha L; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H

    2014-08-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. PMID:24865678

  6. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): Validation of Executive Function Measures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zelazo, Philip David; Anderson, Jacob E.; Richler, Jennifer; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Conway, Kevin P.; Gershon, Richard; Weintraub, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) executive function measures in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20–85 years), gender, education and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains two computer-based instruments assessing executive function: the Dimensional Change Card Sort (a measure of cognitive flexibility) and a flanker task (a measure of inhibitory control and selective attention). Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard convergent and discriminant measures, and sociodemographic questionnaires. A subset of participants (N = 89) was retested 7 to 21 days later. Results reveal excellent sensitivity to age-related changes during adulthood, excellent test–retest reliability, and adequate to good convergent and discriminant validity. The NIH Toolbox EF measures can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960301

  7. RA induces the neural-like cells generated from epigenetic modified NIH/3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Mei; Li, Qiu-Ming; Su, Dong-Ju; Wang, Ning; Shan, Zhi-Yan; Jin, Lian-Hong; Lei, Lei

    2010-03-01

    Recently, differentiated somatic cells had been reprogrammed to pluripotential state in vitro, and various tissue cells had been elicited from those cells. Epigenetic modifications allow differentiated cells to perpetuate the molecular memory needed for the cells to retain their identity. DNA methylation and histone deacetylation are important patterns involved in epigenetic modification, which take critical roles in regulating DNA expression. In this study, we dedifferentiated NIH/3T3 fibroblasts by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and Trichstatin A (TSA) combination, and detected gene expression pattern, DNA methylation level, and differentiation potential of reprogrammed cells. As the results, embryonic marker Sox2, klf4, c-Myc and Oct4 were expressed in reprogrammed NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Total DNA methylation level was significant decreased after the treatment. Moreover, exposure of the reprogrammed cells to all trans-retinoic acid (RA) medium elicited the generation of neuronal class IIIbeta-tubulin-positive, neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-positive, nestin-positive, and neurofilament light chain (NF-L)-positive neural-like cells. PMID:19263240

  8. Oxidative changes and apoptosis induced by 1800-MHz electromagnetic radiation in NIH/3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qingxia; Wang, Minglian; Wu, Shuicai; Ma, Xuemei; An, Guangzhou; Liu, Huan; Xie, Fei

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the potential adverse effects of mobile phone radiation, we studied reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) after intermittent exposure (5 min on/10 min off, for various durations from 0.5 to 8 h) to an 1800-MHz GSM-talk mode electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at an average specific absorption rate of 2 W/kg. A 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate fluorescence probe was used to detect intracellular ROS levels, immunofluorescence was used to detect γH2AX foci as a marker for DNA damage, and flow cytometry was used to measure apoptosis. Our results showed a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels after EMR exposure and it reached the highest level at an exposure time of 1 h (p < 0.05) followed by a slight decrease when the exposure continued for as long as 8 h. No significant effect on the number of γH2AX was detected after EMR exposure. The percentage of late-apoptotic cells in the EMR-exposed group was significantly higher than that in the sham-exposed groups (p < 0.05). These results indicate that an 1800-MHz EMR enhances ROS formation and promotes apoptosis in NIH/3T3 cells. PMID:24665905

  9. Recruiting Post-Doctoral Fellows into Global Health Research: Selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Heimburger, Douglas C.; Warner, Tokesha L.; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H.

    2014-01-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. PMID:24865678

  10. NIH Portfolio Allocation, Lemmings, and the Silent Spring: A Time-Capsule Commentary & Its Update.

    PubMed

    Boothby, Mark

    2012-01-01

    With the release of the US President's proposed budget for the Federal Fiscal year (FY) 2013, to start October 1, 2012, we've spun yet again into the mad vortex of an appropriation season. Fundamental re-thinks of how biological and medical research are prioritized and funded are urgently needed, but sadly appear to be unlikely unless the research and advocacy communities push harder and in a more unified manner. Early in the Obama presidency and the NIH Directorship of Dr Francis Collins, the FASEB Office of Public Affairs performed an analysis of trends in funding of R01 and other Research Project Grants and shared that with the Director and his office. Using the FASEB analysis, whose numbers drew on NIH data, an independent commentary (below) was submitted to (but not published in) Science. With the analysis a few years old, this older viewpoint is followed by updates that touch on how the trends have fared since early 2010 and comment on other aspects of the ongoing cull in biomedical research. In particular, data on some of the growth areas that continue to prosper at the expense of the ever-declining direct support for R01 science are discussed. PMID:24358813

  11. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Howard H; Deschamps, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998-2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs. PMID:24297696

  12. Investigator feedback about the 2005 NIH diagnostic and scoring criteria for chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Jagasia, M; Wood, W A; Pidala, J; Palmer, J; Khera, N; Weisdorf, D; Carpenter, P A; Flowers, M E D; Jacobsohn, D; Martin, P J; Lee, S J; Pavletic, S Z

    2014-04-01

    The 2005 National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for chronic GVHD have set standards for reporting. Many questions, however, have arisen regarding their implementation and utilization. To identify perceived areas of controversy, we conducted an international survey on diagnosis and scoring of chronic GVHD. Agreement was observed for 50-83% of the 72 questions in 7 topic areas. There was agreement on the need for modifying criteria in six situations: two or more distinctive manifestations should be enough to diagnose chronic GVHD; symptoms that are not due to chronic GVHD should be scored differently; active disease and fixed deficits should be distinguished; a minimum threshold body surface area of hidebound skin involvement should be required for a skin score of 3; asymptomatic oral lichenoid changes should be considered a score 1; and lung biopsy should be unnecessary to diagnose chronic GVHD in a patient with bronchiolitis obliterans as the only manifestation. The survey also identified 26 points of controversy. Whenever possible, studies should be conducted to confirm the appropriateness of any revisions. In cases where data are not available, clarification of the NIH recommendations by consensus is necessary. This survey should inform future research in the field and revisions of the current consensus criteria. PMID:24464142

  13. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to the award of educational loan payments under the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for... Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals from Disadvantaged Backgrounds (CR-LRP)? 68a.1 Section 68a..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  14. Sugars and risk of mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Tasevska, Natasha; Park, Yikyung; Jiao, Li; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F; Potischman, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although previous studies have linked intake of sugars with incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases, its association with mortality remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the association of total sugars, added sugars, total fructose, added fructose, sucrose, and added sucrose with the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other-cause mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Design: The participants (n = 353,751), aged 50–71 y, were followed for up to 13 y. Intake of individual sugars over the previous 12 mo was assessed at baseline by using a 124-item NIH Diet History Questionnaire. Results: In fully adjusted models (fifth quartile compared with first quartile), all-cause mortality was positively associated with the intake of total sugars [HR (95% CI): 1.13 (1.06, 1.20); P-trend < 0.0001], total fructose [1.10 (1.04, 1.17); P-trend < 0.0001], and added fructose [1.07 (1.01, 1.13); P-trend = 0.005) in women and total fructose [1.06 (1.01, 1.10); P-trend = 0.002] in men. In men, a weak inverse association was found between other-cause mortality and dietary added sugars (P-trend = 0.04), sucrose (P-trend = 0.03), and added sucrose (P-trend = 0.006). Investigation of consumption of sugars by source showed that the positive association with mortality risk was confined only to sugars from beverages, whereas the inverse association was confined to sugars from solid foods. Conclusions: In this large prospective study, total fructose intake was weakly positively associated with all-cause mortality in both women and men, whereas added sugar, sucrose, and added sucrose intakes were inversely associated with other-cause mortality in men. In our analyses, intake of added sugars was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. PMID:24552754

  15. Prognostic factors for survival of patients with newly diagnosed chronic GVHD according to NIH criteria.

    PubMed

    Ayuk, Francis; Veit, Ronja; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bussmann, Lara; Christopeit, Maximilian; Alchalby, Haefaa; Wolschke, Christine; Lellek, Heinrich; Bacher, Ulrike; Zander, Axel R; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-10-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) is the most common cause of late morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We retrospectively evaluated the impact of NIH classification on outcome of patients at our center. Primary endpoint was overall survival at 5 years. Two hundred one patients with cGVHD according to NIH were included. Platelets <100,000/μl on day of diagnosis of cGvHD (HR 2.97, 95 % CI 1.7-5.3, p < 0.001), female donor (HR 1.78, 95 % CI 1.0-3.2, p = 0.05), and reduced intensity conditioning (HR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.0-3.8, p = 0.05) impacted overall survival. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) was higher for patients with low vs. high platelets: 26 % (95 % CI 14-40) vs. 6 % (95 % CI 2-10), p < 0.001, and tended to be higher for female vs. male donor: 14 % (95 % CI 7-23) vs. 7 % (95 % CI 3-13), p = 0.08. Relapse tended to be higher for recipients of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) vs. myeloablative conditioning (MAC): 33 % (95 % CI 23-43) vs. 20 % (95 % CI 10-31), p = 0.06. After excluding patients with myeloma and lymphoma, IgG serum levels at diagnosis of cGvHD of 122 patients were correlated with survival. IgG levels above normal were associated with worse 2-year overall survival (OS), p = 0.04, compared to normal or low IgG levels. Platelet count at diagnosis remains the most valid prognostic factor for survival of patients with cGvHD even in the era of NIH grading. High IgG level at diagnosis of cGVHD represents a potential negative prognostic parameter that deserves further investigation. PMID:26204824

  16. Alpha B-crystallin expression in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts: glucocorticoid responsiveness and involvement in thermal protection.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, A; Fröhli, E; Schäfer, R; Klemenz, R

    1993-01-01

    alpha B-crystallin, a major soluble protein of vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein which transiently accumulates in response to heat shock and other kinds of stress in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Ectopic expression of an alpha B-crystallin cDNA clone renders NIH 3T3 cells thermoresistant. alpha B-crystallin accumulates in response to the synthetic glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone. Dexamethasone-treated NIH 3T3 cells become thermoresistant to the same extent as they accumulate alpha B-crystallin. A cell clone in which alpha B-crystallin is superinduced upon heat shock acquires augmented thermotolerance. Expression of the ras oncogene causes a rapid but transient accumulation of alpha B-crystallin within 1 day. Later, sustained ras oncogene expression suppresses the dexamethasone-mediated alpha B-crystallin accumulation. Thus, oncogenic transformation triggered by the ras oncogene interferes with hormone-mediated accumulation of alpha B-crystallin and concomitant acquisition of thermoresistance. Other known heat shock proteins do not accumulate in response to ectopic alpha B-crystallin expression or to dexamethasone treatment. These results indicate that alpha B-crystallin can protect NIH 3T3 fibroblasts from thermal shock. Images PMID:8441415

  17. 78 FR 39741 - Announcement of Agency Decision: Recommendations on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... ( http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-23/pdf/2012-4269.pdf ); obtained advice from external experts... Register, available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-05/html/2013-02507.htm l, and the NIH...

  18. 75 FR 11889 - Request for Comments on Proposed NIH, AHRQ and CDC Process Change for Electronic Submission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    .... SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ... systems on average instead of days. This improvement provides applicants timely feedback on the status of... 9, 2010. Sally J. Rockey, Acting Deputy Director for Extramural Research, National Institutes...

  19. 75 FR 3243 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's... course of their lifetime, with only a gradual and slight decline in short-term memory and reaction times... patient who had experienced memory loss, language problems, and unpredictable behavior: abnormal clumps...

  20. 78 FR 55084 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request; Data Collection To Understand How NIH Programs Apply...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... Collection To Understand How NIH Programs Apply Methodologies To Improve Their Research Programs (MIRP..., including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility... Methodologies to Improve Their Research Programs (MIRP), 0925New, National Institute of Allergy and...

  1. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  2. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  3. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  4. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  5. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  6. Two strikes: limited NIH R55 and R56 retooling funds and abolishment of the A2 grant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Omary, M Bishr; Offhaus, Heather; Kunkel, Steven L

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) are facing significant budgetary challenges as a result of the current economic climate. The recent sunset of investigator-initiated R01-type research grants after one revised submission, coupled with the present lack of an NIH retooling funding mechanism for such grant applicants, creates a concerning risk that talented and well-trained investigators may be forced to give up their research careers. Existing NIH retooling mechanisms include the R55 Shannon Award, which was established in 1991 and was essentially replaced in 2005 by the R56 award. There is an urgent need to either significantly expand the R55/R56 mechanisms and definition of NIH grant bridging/retooling support for unfunded meritorious proposals or introduce a new mechanism that provides specific support to investigators with competitive but unfunded R01 revised grants. An expanded retooling funding mechanism deserves implementation during continuing assessment of whether allowance of only one revision of research proposals has achieved its initial intended goals. PMID:21974930

  7. 78 FR 69426 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... more information on the proposed project contact: CAPT Michael Montello, Pharm. D., MBA, Cancer Therapy... National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health, may not conduct or sponsor, and the.../31/2014, Revision, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Need and...

  8. 75 FR 51827 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Committee to the Director The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue... 3:30 p.m. This meeting is the third in a series of public meetings between the Blue Ribbon Panel and... Fennington, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science...

  9. 75 FR 39954 - Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of a Conference Call of the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of a Conference Call of the NIH Scientific Management Review Board Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended...

  10. Chemicals, the Environment, and You: Explorations in Science and Human Health. Grades 7-8. NIH Curriculum Supplement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Juliane; McQueen, Charlene A.; O'Connell, Josina Romero; Taylor, Shaun; Trush, Mike

    This curriculum supplement aims to bring cutting-edge medical science and basic research discoveries from the laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) into classrooms. The supplement was designed to complement existing life science curricula at both the state and local levels and to be consistent with the National Science Education…

  11. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  12. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB): list sorting test to measure working memory.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, David S; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Kisala, Pamela A; Mungas, Dan; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard

    2014-07-01

    The List Sorting Working Memory Test was designed to assess working memory (WM) as part of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery. List Sorting is a sequencing task requiring children and adults to sort and sequence stimuli that are presented visually and auditorily. Validation data are presented for 268 participants ages 20 to 85 years. A subset of participants (N=89) was retested 7 to 21 days later. As expected, the List Sorting Test had moderately high correlations with other measures of working memory and executive functioning (convergent validity) but a low correlation with a test of receptive vocabulary (discriminant validity). Furthermore, List Sorting demonstrates expected changes over the age span and has excellent test-retest reliability. Collectively, these results provide initial support for the construct validity of the List Sorting Working Memory Measure as a measure of working memory. However, the relationship between the List Sorting Test and general executive function has yet to be determined. PMID:24959983

  13. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in LEO regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH electrolyte were life cycle tested in low Earth orbit. All three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed (3729, 4165, and 11,355 cycles), while those with 26 percent KOH were cycled over 14,000 times in the continuing test. Destructive physical analysis (DPA) of the failed cells included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. The cycling failure was due to a decrease of nickel electrode capacity. As possible causes of the capacity decrease, researchers observed electrode expansion, rupture, and corrosion of the nickel electrode substrate, active material redistribution, and accumulation of electrochemically undischargeable active material with cycling.

  14. Expression of an exogenous eukaryotic DNA methyltransferase gene induces transformation of NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Issa, J P; Herman, J; Bassett, D E; Nelkin, B D; Baylin, S B

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal regional increases in DNA methylation, which have potential for causing gene inactivation and chromosomal instability, are consistently found in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. Increased DNA methyltransferase activity, which is also a characteristic of such cells, is a candidate to mediate these abnormal DNA methylation patterns. We now show that, in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, constitutive overexpression of an exogenous mouse DNA methyltransferase gene results in a marked increase in overall DNA methylation which is accompanied by tumorigenic transformation. These transformation changes can also be elicited by dexamethasone-inducible expression of an exogenous DNA methyltransferase gene. Our findings provide strong evidence that the increase in DNA methyltransferase activity associated with tumor progression could be a key step in carcinogenesis and provide a model system that can be used to further study this possibility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8415627

  15. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS3 transforms NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuro, D; Furukawa, T; Takegami, T

    1995-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that hepatitis C virus (HCV) is etiologically involved in hepatic cancer and liver cirrhosis. To investigate whether the HCV nonstructural protein NS3 has oncogenic activity, NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with an expression vector containing cDNA for the 5'- or 3'-half sequence of the HCV genome segment encoding NS3. Only cells transfected with the 5'-half cDNA rapidly proliferated, lost contact inhibition, grew anchorage independently in soft agar, and formed tumors in nude mice. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of the 5'-half DNA in the transfectants. These results suggest that the 5' region of the HCV genome segment encoding NS3 is involved in cell transformation. PMID:7745741

  16. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13323.001 PMID:26880623

  17. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program. PMID:25707195

  18. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. PMID:26880623

  19. Transformation of human cells by DNAs ineffective in transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.B.; Freeman, A.G.; Moore, S.P.; Strickland, P.T.

    1985-04-01

    Neonatal human foreskin fibroblasts can be transformed to anchorage-independent growth by transfection with DNAs inefficient in transforming NIH 3T3 cells. Human cells transfected with DNA from GM 1312, a multiple myeloma cell line, or MOLT-4, a permanent lymphoblast line, grow without anchorage at a much higher frequency than do the parental cells and their DNAs can transform human cell recipients to anchorage-independent growth; they have extended but not indefinite life spans and are nontumorigenic. Human fibroblasts are also transformed by DNAs from two multiple myeloma lines that also transform 3T3 cells; however, restriction analysis suggests that different transforming genes in this DNA are acting in the human and murine systems. These results indicate that the human cell transfection system allows detection of transforming genes not effective in the 3T3 system and points out the possibility of detection of additional transforming sequences even in DNAs that do transform murine cells.

  20. Hospital Information Systems: Approaches to Screen Definition: Comparative Anatomy of the PROMIS, NIH, and Duke Systems

    PubMed Central

    Esterhay, Robert J.; Foy, John L.; Lewis, Thomas L.; Stead, William W.; Borden, Ruby B.

    1982-01-01

    Screen definition for medical and hospital information systems is a complex process. The structures and processes that have been developed to create, modify and maintain screens can be very different depending on the application. However, externally the video display interactions by a user can appear superficially quite similar. A comparison of the Problem Oriented Medical Information System (PROMIS), the NIH Clinical Center Medical Information System (CCMIS) and the Duke Hospital Information System (DHIS) illustrate some of the differences and similarities between these systems with respect to screen processing. The objectives of the system developers, ranging from the automation of the patient medical record to improved communications between nursing stations and ancillary departments in the hospital, are reflected in screen definition. Given this range of differences it should not be surprising that different approaches to screen definition have evolved. This paper in conjunction with the panel presentations and discussion will attempt to clarify this aspect of medical and hospital information systems.

  1. Regulation of p53 in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts following hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Enghoff, Maria Stine; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to analyze the regulation of p53 expression in NIH3T3 fibroblasts under the influence of increasing hyperosmotic stress. Expression of p53 showed a biphasic response pattern in NIH3T3 cells under increasing osmotic stress (337 mOsm to 737 mOsm) with a maximum at 587 mOsm. Under isotonic conditions p53 expression increased after addition of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicating that cellular p53 levels in unperturbed cells is kept low by proteasomal degradation. However, under hypertonic conditions p53 synthesis as well as p53 degradation were significantly reduced and it is demonstrated that the increase in p53 expression observed when tonicity is increased from 337 to 587 mOsm reflects that degradation is more inhibited than synthesis, whereas the decrease in p53 expression at higher tonicities reflects that synthesis is more inhibited than degradation. The activity of the p53 regulating proteins p38 MAP kinase and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2 were studied as a function of increasing osmolarity. MDM2 protein expression was unchanged at all osmolarities, whereas MDM2 phosphorylation (Ser(166)) increased at osmolarities up to 537 mOsm and remained constant at higher osmolarities. Phosphorylation of p38 increased at osmolarities up to 687 mOsm which correlated with an increased phosphorylation of p53 (Ser(15)) and the decreased p53 degradation. Caspase-3 activity increased gradually with hypertonicity and at 737 mOsm both Caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding are high even though p53 expression and activity are low, indicating that initiation of apoptosis under severe hypertonic conditions is not strictly controlled by p53. PMID:26056062

  2. Reliability and Validity of Composite Scores from the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Robert K.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Tulsky, David; Mungas, Dan; Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya; Beaumont, Jennifer; Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Conway, Kevin; Slotkin, Jerry; Gershon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) Composite Scores in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20–85 years), gender, education, and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains seven computer-based instruments assessing five cognitive sub-domains: Language, Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard validation measures selected to tap the same cognitive abilities, and sociodemographic questionnaires. Three Composite Scores were derived for both the NIHTB-CB and gold standard batteries: “Crystallized Cognition Composite,” “Fluid Cognition Composite,” and “Total Cognition Composite” scores. NIHTB Composite Scores showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alphas = 0.84 Crystallized, 0.83 Fluid, 0.77 Total), excellent test–retest reliability (r: 0.86–0.92), strong convergent (r: 0.78–0.90) and discriminant (r: 0.19–0.39) validities versus gold standard composites, and expected age effects (r = 0.18 crystallized, r = − 0.68 fluid, r = − 0.26 total). Significant relationships with self-reported prior school difficulties and current health status, employment, and presence of a disability provided evidence of external validity. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery Composite Scores have excellent reliability and validity, suggesting they can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960398

  3. Reliability and validity of composite scores from the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery in adults.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Robert K; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Tulsky, David; Mungas, Dan; Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya; Beaumont, Jennifer; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Conway, Kevin; Slotkin, Jerry; Gershon, Richard

    2014-07-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) Composite Scores in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20-85 years), gender, education, and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains seven computer-based instruments assessing five cognitive sub-domains: Language, Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard validation measures selected to tap the same cognitive abilities, and sociodemographic questionnaires. Three Composite Scores were derived for both the NIHTB-CB and gold standard batteries: "Crystallized Cognition Composite," "Fluid Cognition Composite," and "Total Cognition Composite" scores. NIHTB Composite Scores showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alphas=0.84 Crystallized, 0.83 Fluid, 0.77 Total), excellent test-retest reliability (r: 0.86-0.92), strong convergent (r: 0.78-0.90) and discriminant (r: 0.19-0.39) validities versus gold standard composites, and expected age effects (r=0.18 crystallized, r=-0.68 fluid, r=-0.26 total). Significant relationships with self-reported prior school difficulties and current health status, employment, and presence of a disability provided evidence of external validity. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery Composite Scores have excellent reliability and validity, suggesting they can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960398

  4. Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Kimball C.; Woeckner, Elizabeth; Baratz, Robert S.; Sampson, Wallace I.

    2008-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) was begun in 2003 and is expected to be completed in 2009. It is a trial of office-based, intravenous disodium ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (Na2EDTA) as a treatment for coronary artery disease (CAD). A few case series in the 1950s and early 1960s had found Na2EDTA to be ineffective for CAD or peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Nevertheless, a few hundred physicians, almost all of whom advocate other dubious treatments, continued to peddle chelation as an office treatment. They claim that chelation dramatically improves symptoms and prolongs life in 80% to 90% of patients. In response, academics performed 4 controlled trials during the 1990s. None favored chelation, but chelationists repudiated those findings. We have investigated the method and the trial. We present our findings in 4 parts: history, origin and nature of the TACT, state of the evidence, and risks. We present evidence that chelationists and their organization, the American College for Advancement in Medicine, used political connections to pressure the NIH to fund the TACT. The TACT protocols justified the trial by misrepresenting case series and by ignoring evidence of risks. The trial employs nearly 100 unfit co-investigators. It conflates disodium EDTA and another, somewhat safer drug. It lacks precautions necessary to minimize risks. The consent form reflects those shortcomings and fails to disclose apparent proprietary interests. The trial's outcome will be unreliable and almost certainly equivocal, thus defeating its stated purpose. We conclude that the TACT is unethical, dangerous, pointless, and wasteful. It should be abandoned. PMID:18596934

  5. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  6. Regulation of p53 in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts following hyperosmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Enghoff, Maria Stine; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to analyze the regulation of p53 expression in NIH3T3 fibroblasts under the influence of increasing hyperosmotic stress. Expression of p53 showed a biphasic response pattern in NIH3T3 cells under increasing osmotic stress (337 mOsm to 737 mOsm) with a maximum at 587 mOsm. Under isotonic conditions p53 expression increased after addition of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicating that cellular p53 levels in unperturbed cells is kept low by proteasomal degradation. However, under hypertonic conditions p53 synthesis as well as p53 degradation were significantly reduced and it is demonstrated that the increase in p53 expression observed when tonicity is increased from 337 to 587 mOsm reflects that degradation is more inhibited than synthesis, whereas the decrease in p53 expression at higher tonicities reflects that synthesis is more inhibited than degradation. The activity of the p53 regulating proteins p38 MAP kinase and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2 were studied as a function of increasing osmolarity. MDM2 protein expression was unchanged at all osmolarities, whereas MDM2 phosphorylation (Ser166) increased at osmolarities up to 537 mOsm and remained constant at higher osmolarities. Phosphorylation of p38 increased at osmolarities up to 687 mOsm which correlated with an increased phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and the decreased p53 degradation. Caspase-3 activity increased gradually with hypertonicity and at 737 mOsm both Caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding are high even though p53 expression and activity are low, indicating that initiation of apoptosis under severe hypertonic conditions is not strictly controlled by p53. PMID:26056062

  7. Radiation Risk Assessment of the Individual Astronaut: A Complement to Radiation Interests at the NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting human risks following exposure to space radiation is uncertain in part because of unpredictable distribution of high-LET and low-dose-derived damage amongst cells in tissues, unknown synergistic effects of microgravity upon gene- and protein-expression, and inadequately modeled processing of radiation-induced damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant cancers. Furthermore, estimation of risks of radiogenic outcome within small numbers of astronauts is not possible using classic epidemiologic study. It therefore seems useful to develop strategies of risk-assessment based upon large datasets acquired from correlated biological models useful for resolving radiogenic risk-assessment for irradiated individuals. In this regard, it is suggested that sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the biomolecular risk of malignant transformation be developed in order to resolve these NASA-specific challenges. Multiparametric cellular biodosimeters could be developed using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are analyzed for markers predictive for acute response as well as cancer-risk. A new paradigm is accordingly addressed wherein genomic and proteomic datasets are registered and interrogated in order to provide statistically significant dose-dependent risk estimation in individual astronauts. This evaluation of the individual for assessment of radiogenic outcomes connects to NIH program in that such a paradigm also supports assignment of a given patient to a specific therapy, the diagnosis of response of that patient to therapy, and the prediction of risks accumulated by that patient during therapy - such as risks incurred by scatter and neutrons produced during high-energy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

  8. Assessing Social Support, Companionship, and Distress: NIH Toolbox Adult Social Relationship Scales

    PubMed Central

    Cyranowski, Jill M.; Zill, Nicholas; Bode, Rita; Butt, Zeeshan; Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Salsman, John M.; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective The quality of our daily social interactions – including perceptions of support, feelings of loneliness, and distress stemming from negative social exchanges – influence physical health and well-being. Despite the importance of social relationships, brief yet precise, unidimensional scales that assess key aspects of social relationship quality are lacking. As part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed brief self-report scales designed to assess aspects of social support, companionship, and social distress across age cohorts. This report details the development and psychometric testing of the adult NIH Toolbox Social Relationship scales. Methods Social relationship concepts were selected, and item sets were developed and revised based on expert feedback and literature review. Items were then tested across a community-dwelling U.S. internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N=692) using traditional (classic) psychometric methods and item response theory (IRT) approaches to identify items for inclusion in 5–8 item unidimensional scales. Finally, concurrent validity of the newly-developed scales was evaluated with respect to their inter-relationships with classic social relationship validation instruments. Results Results provide support for the internal reliability and concurrent validity of resulting self-report scales assessing Emotional Support, Instrumental Support, Friendship, Loneliness, Perceived Rejection, and Perceived Hostility. Conclusion These brief social relationship scales provide the pragmatic utility and enhanced precision needed to promote future epidemiological and social neuroscience research on the impact of social relationships on physical and emotional health outcomes. PMID:23437856

  9. Demographically Corrected Normative Standards for the Spanish Language Version of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery.

    PubMed

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Umlauf, Anya; Marquine, Maria; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Daniel; Gershon, Richard; Slotkin, Jerry; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Heaton, Robert K

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnicity in the United States, yet there are limited well-validated neuropsychological tools in Spanish, and an even greater paucity of normative standards representing this population. The Spanish NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) is a novel neurocognitive screener; however, the original norms were developed combining Spanish- and English-versions of the battery. We developed normative standards for the Spanish NIHTB-CB, fully adjusting for demographic variables and based entirely on a Spanish-speaking sample. A total of 408 Spanish-speaking neurologically healthy adults (ages 18-85 years) and 496 children (ages 3-7 years) completed the NIH Toolbox norming project. We developed three types of scores: uncorrected based on the entire Spanish-speaking cohort, age-corrected, and fully demographically corrected (age, education, sex) scores for each of the seven NIHTB-CB tests and three composites (Fluid, Crystallized, Total Composites). Corrected scores were developed using polynomial regression models. Demographic factors demonstrated medium-to-large effects on uncorrected NIHTB-CB scores in a pattern that differed from that observed on the English NIHTB-CB. For example, in Spanish-speaking adults, education was more strongly associated with Fluid scores, but showed the strongest association with Crystallized scores among English-speaking adults. Demographic factors were no longer associated with fully corrected scores. The original norms were not successful in eliminating demographic effects, overestimating children's performances, and underestimating adults' performances on the Spanish NIHTB-CB. The disparate pattern of demographic associations on the Spanish versus English NIHTB-CB supports the need for distinct normative standards developed separately for each population. Fully adjusted scores presented here will aid in more accurately characterizing acquired brain dysfunction among U.S. Spanish-speakers. (JINS, 2016, 21

  10. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J.; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers—Principal Investigator (PI) IDs—that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity. PMID:27367860

  11. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists.

    PubMed

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers-Principal Investigator (PI) IDs-that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity. PMID:27367860

  12. The origin of the medical research grant in the United States: the Rockefeller Foundation and the NIH Extramural Funding Program.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of National Institutes of Health (NIH) extramural grants in the second half of the twentieth century marked a signal shift in support for medical research in the United States and created an influential model for the rest of the world. A similar landmark development occurred in the first half of the twentieth century with the creation of the Rockefeller Foundation and its funding programs for medical research. The programs and support of the foundation had a dramatic impact on medical research in the United States and globally. This paper examines early connections between these two developments. The NIH grants have usually been seen as having their roots primarily in the government programs of the Second World War. This article finds direct and indirect influence by the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as parallel developments in these two monumental programs of support for medical research. PMID:25862750

  13. Global gene expression profiling of JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Jie; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests Jumonji domain-containing proteins are epigenetic regulators in diverse biological processes including cellular differentiation and proliferation. RNA interference-based analyses combined with gene expression profiling can effectively characterize the cellular functions of these enzymes. We found that the depletion of Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) and its paralog protein Jumonji domain-containing protein 4 (JMJD4) individually by small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) slowed cell proliferation of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We subsequently performed gene expression profiling on both JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Array. Here we report the gene profiling datasets along with the experimental procedures. The information can be used to further investigate how JMJD6 and JMJD4 affect gene expression and cellular physiology. PMID:27071056

  14. Cloning and Expression of CD19, a Human B-Cell Marker in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Background CD19 is a pan B cell marker that is recognized as an attractive target for antibody-based therapy of B-cell disorders including autoimmune disease and hematological malignancies. The object of this study was to stably express the human CD19 antigen in the murine NIH-3T3 cell line aimed to be used as an immunogen in our future study. Methods Total RNA was extracted from Raji cells in which high expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Synthesized cDNA was used for CD19 gene amplification by conventional PCR method using Pfu DNA polymerase. PCR product was ligated to pGEM-T Easy vector and ligation mixture was transformed to DH5α competent bacteria. After blue/white selection, one positive white colony was subjected to plasmid extraction and direct sequencing. Then, CD19 cDNA was sub-cloned into pCMV6-Neo expression vector by double digestion using KpnI and HindIII enzymes. NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line was subsequently transfected by the construct using Jet-PEI transfection reagent. After 48 hours, surface expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry and stably transfected cells were selected by G418 antibiotic. Results Amplification of CD19 cDNA gave rise to 1701 bp amplicon confirmed by alignment to reference sequence in NCBI database. Flow cytometric analysis showed successful transient and stable expression of CD19 on NIH-3T3 cells (29 and 93%, respectively). Conclusion Stable cell surface expression of human CD19 antigen in a murine NIH-3T3 cell line may develop a proper immunogene which raises specific anti-CD19 antibody production in the mice immunized sera. PMID:25926951

  15. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development (PedsDTI).

    PubMed

    Walker, Lindsay; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nayak, Amritha; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Botteron, Kelly N; McCracken, James; McKinstry, Robert C; Rivkin, Michael J; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Rumsey, Judith; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The NIH MRI Study of normal brain development sought to characterize typical brain development in a population of infants, toddlers, children and adolescents/young adults, covering the socio-economic and ethnic diversity of the population of the United States. The study began in 1999 with data collection commencing in 2001 and concluding in 2007. The study was designed with the final goal of providing a controlled-access database; open to qualified researchers and clinicians, which could serve as a powerful tool for elucidating typical brain development and identifying deviations associated with brain-based disorders and diseases, and as a resource for developing computational methods and image processing tools. This paper focuses on the DTI component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development. In this work, we describe the DTI data acquisition protocols, data processing steps, quality assessment procedures, and data included in the database, along with database access requirements. For more details, visit http://www.pediatricmri.nih.gov. This longitudinal DTI dataset includes raw and processed diffusion data from 498 low resolution (3 mm) DTI datasets from 274 unique subjects, and 193 high resolution (2.5 mm) DTI datasets from 152 unique subjects. Subjects range in age from 10 days (from date of birth) through 22 years. Additionally, a set of age-specific DTI templates are included. This forms one component of the larger NIH MRI study of normal brain development which also includes T1-, T2-, proton density-weighted, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging data, and demographic, clinical and behavioral data. PMID:26048622

  16. Summary of an NIH workshop to identify research needs to improve the monitoring of iodine status in the United States and to inform the DRI.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christine A; Zimmermann, Michael B; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Dwyer, Johanna T; Trumbo, Paula R; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Egan, S Kathleen; Long, Stephen E; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M; Holden, Joanne M; Betz, Joseph M; Phinney, Karen W; Brooks, Stephen P J; Johnson, Clifford L; Haggans, Carol J

    2012-06-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12-13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission. PMID:22551802

  17. Summary of an NIH Workshop to Identify Research Needs to Improve the Monitoring of Iodine Status in the United States and to Inform the DRI123

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine A.; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Trumbo, Paula R.; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W.; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Egan, S. Kathleen; Long, Stephen E.; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Holden, Joanne M.; Betz, Joseph M.; Phinney, Karen W.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Johnson, Clifford L.; Haggans, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission. PMID:22551802

  18. Nickel-Refining Fumes Induced DNA Damage and Apoptosis of NIH/3T3 Cells via Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Jia, Li; Zhang, Lin; Ba, Jing-Chong; Han, Dan; Yu, Cui-Ping; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies examining the toxicity and carcinogenicity of nickel compounds in humans and animals, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In our research, NIH/3T3 cells were exposed to nickel-refining fumes at the concentrations of 0, 6.25, 12.50, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL for 24 h. Cell viability, cell apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, the level of glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were detected. The exposure of NIH/3T3 cells to nickel-refining fumes significantly reduced cell viability and induced cell apoptotic death in a dose-dependent manner. Nickel-refining fumes significantly increased ROS levels and induced DNA damage. Nickel-refining fumes may induce the changes in the state of ROS, which may eventually initiate oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis of NIH/3T3 cells. PMID:27347984

  19. Assessing Psychological Well-Being: Self-Report Instruments for the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Salsman, John M.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Butt, Zeeshan; Zill, Nicholas; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Peterson, Christopher; Stoney, Catherine M.; Brouwers, Pim; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychological well-being (PWB) has a significant relationship with physical and mental health. As part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed self-report item banks and short forms to assess PWB. Study Design and Setting Expert feedback and literature review informed the selection of PWB concepts and the development of item pools for Positive Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Meaning and Purpose. Items were tested with a community-dwelling U.S. internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N=552). Classical and item response theory (IRT) approaches were used to evaluate unidimensionality, fit of items to the overall measure, and calibrations of those items, including differential item function (DIF). Results IRT-calibrated item banks were produced for Positive Affect (34 items), Life Satisfaction (16 items), and Meaning and Purpose (18 items). Their psychometric properties were supported based on results of factor analysis, fit statistics, and DIF evaluation. All banks measured the concepts precisely (reliability ≥0.90) for more than 98% of participants. Conclusion These adult scales and item banks for PWB provide the flexibility, efficiency, and precision necessary to promote future epidemiological, observational, and intervention research on the relationship of PWB with physical and mental health. PMID:23771709

  20. IV. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): measuring language (vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding).

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C; Slotkin, Jerry; Manly, Jennifer J; Blitz, David L; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Schnipke, Deborah; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Gleason, Jean Berko; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Adams, Marilyn Jager; Weintraub, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    Mastery of language skills is an important predictor of daily functioning and health. Vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding are relatively quick and easy to measure and correlate highly with overall cognitive functioning, as well as with success in school and work. New measures of vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding (in both English and Spanish) were developed for the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB). In the Toolbox Picture Vocabulary Test (TPVT), participants hear a spoken word while viewing four pictures, and then must choose the picture that best represents the word. This approach tests receptive vocabulary knowledge without the need to read or write, removing the literacy load for children who are developing literacy and for adults who struggle with reading and writing. In the Toolbox Oral Reading Recognition Test (TORRT), participants see a letter or word onscreen and must pronounce or identify it. The examiner determines whether it was pronounced correctly by comparing the response to the pronunciation guide on a separate computer screen. In this chapter, we discuss the importance of language during childhood and the relation of language and brain function. We also review the development of the TPVT and TORRT, including information about the item calibration process and results from a validation study. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of the measures are discussed. PMID:23952202

  1. Segmenting time-lapse phase contrast images of adjacent NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, J; Kociolek, M; Dima, A; Halter, M; Cardone, A; Peskin, A; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for segmenting phase contrast images of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells that is accurate even when cells are physically in contact with each other. The problem of segmentation, when cells are in contact, poses a challenge to the accurate automation of cell counting, tracking and lineage modelling in cell biology. The segmentation method presented in this paper consists of (1) background reconstruction to obtain noise-free foreground pixels and (2) incorporation of biological insight about dividing and nondividing cells into the segmentation process to achieve reliable separation of foreground pixels defined as pixels associated with individual cells. The segmentation results for a time-lapse image stack were compared against 238 manually segmented images (8219 cells) provided by experts, which we consider as reference data. We chose two metrics to measure the accuracy of segmentation: the 'Adjusted Rand Index' which compares similarities at a pixel level between masks resulting from manual and automated segmentation, and the 'Number of Cells per Field' (NCF) which compares the number of cells identified in the field by manual versus automated analysis. Our results show that the automated segmentation compared to manual segmentation has an average adjusted rand index of 0.96 (1 being a perfect match), with a standard deviation of 0.03, and an average difference of the two numbers of cells per field equal to 5.39% with a standard deviation of 4.6%. PMID:23126432

  2. DoD–NCCAM/NIH Workshop on Acupuncture for Treatment of Acute Pain

    PubMed Central

    Belard, Jean Louis; Glowa, John; Khalsa, Partap; Weber, Wendy; Huntley, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored a workshop that explored the possible benefits of acupuncture treatment for acute pain. One goal of the workshop was to establish a roadmap to building an evidence base on that would indicate whether acupuncture is helpful for treating active-duty military personnel experiencing acute pain. The workshop highlighted brief presentations on the most current research on acupuncture and acute pain mechanisms. The impact of various modifiers (stress, genetics, population, phenotypes, etc.) on acute pain pathways and response to acupuncture treatment was discussed. Additional presentations focused on common neural mechanisms, an overview of real-world experience with using acupuncture to treat traumatic acute pain, and best tools and methods specific for acupuncture studies. Three breakout groups addressed the gaps, opportunities, and barriers to acupuncture use for acute pain in military and trauma settings. Different models of effectiveness research and optimal research designs for conducting trials in acute traumatic pain were also discussed. PMID:23020611

  3. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-02-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  4. Performance Comparison Between NiH2 Dry Sinter and Slurry Electrode Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.; Rao, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical and thermal performance of dry sinter and slurry process electrode cells manufactured for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries have been characterized for a matrix of operating conditions over the temperature range from 14 to 86 F at various charge control levels. The dry sinter process electrode cells tested are similar to the onboard HST NiH2 cells. The slurry process electrode cells were developed to be less susceptible to electrode expansion and impedance changes with life. Both cell types were impregnated by the aqueous electrochemical process. Test conditions included standard capacity tests and electrical cycling using 96-minute cycling regimens incorporating gr depth-of-discharge (DOD) cycles. The dry sinter process electrodes have higher operating capacities to 1.20V/cell, but both electrode types have similar heat dissipation for the conditions tested. The results of the testing included cyclic heat generation during a typical 96-minute cycle, operating capacity data vs. cutoff voltage to generate a temperature-compensated voltage curve, and voltage characteristics suitable to develop a voltage prediction model. Analysis of data shows differences in the discharge voltage plateaus operating conditions evaluated. This is the basis for recommended changes in the battery charge control.

  5. NIH deltanoids meeting on Vitamin D and cancer. Conclusion and strategic options.

    PubMed

    Bouillon, Roger; Moody, Terry; Sporn, Michael; Barrett, J Carl; Norman, Anthony W

    2005-10-01

    A meeting on "Cancer Chemoprevention and Cancer Treatment; role of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-(OH)(2)D(3) and deltanoids" was held on the NIH Congres, Bethesda in November 2004. The following conclusions were presented at the end of this symposium. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are worldwide problems and are associated with several health problems including higher cancer prevalence. There is convincing evidence that the active vitamin D hormone, 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), can decrease cell proliferation, modify cell apoptosis and control malignant cell growth. Therefore academia, public funding agencies and industry should urgently design appropriate studies to better define the causal relationship between vitamin D nutrition and cancer, define the optimal vitamin D nutrition based on accurate 25(OH)D measurement and inform the public and medical profession accordingly. Selective vitamin D receptor modulators are a potentially interesting new class of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents as demonstrated by several first generation analogs have provided a convincing proof of concept. In the mean time, the public should be informed about the risks of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and appropriate steps should be taken to improve the vitamin D nutritional status of large parts of the world population. PMID:16043351

  6. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  7. Effects of Weightlessness on Vestibular Development: Summary of Research on NIH.R1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, L. L.

    1998-01-01

    In our original application we proposed to investigate the effects of gravity on the formation of connections between the gravity receptors of the ear and the brain in rat pups raised in space beginning at an age before these connections are made until near the time of birth, when they are to some extent functional. We used the neuronal tracer, Dil, which could be applied to tissue obtained immediately after landing of the space shuttle, thus minimizing changes due to the earth's gravity. We hoped to determine whether the vestibular system develops in two phases, as do other sensory systems (such as the visual system). In these other systems the first phase of development is controlled genetically and the second phase is controlled by environmental stimulation. Our data collected strongly supports the idea that the vestibular system has these same two phases of development. The tissue obtained from the NIH.R1 experiment was of exceptionally high quality for our analysis. Therefore, we expanded our investigation into the ultrastructural effects of microgravity on vestibular development. For the sake of clarity we will subdivide our summary into two categories: (1) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the gravistatic receptors of the ear in flight and control animals, and (2) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the brain in flight and control animals.

  8. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS(®) Measures.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joan E; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients' symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients' reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  9. Transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by cotransfection with c-src and nuclear oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Shalloway, D; Johnson, P J; Freed, E O; Coulter, D; Flood, W A

    1987-01-01

    pp60c-src, the cellular homolog of the Rous sarcoma virus transforming protein, does not completely transform cells even when present at high levels, but has been shown to be involved in polyomavirus-induced transformation when activated by polyomavirus middle T (pmt)-antigen binding. Here we show that cotransfection, but not solo transfection, of expression plasmids for c-src and either adenovirus E1A, v-myc, c-myc, or the 5' half of polyomavirus large T (pltN) antigen into NIH 3T3 cells induces anchorage-independent growth, enhanced focus formation, and, for pltN cotransfection, tumorigenicity in adult NFS mice. Enhancement of transformation was not observed with polyomavirus small t (pst) antigen. Cotransfection of c-src with pltN induced modification of pp60c-src that altered its electrophoretic mobility and in vivo phosphorylation state and stimulated its in vitro kinase activity. Similar alterations were not seen after c-src-E1A cotransfection, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms of enhancement are involved. Images PMID:2446117

  10. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic GVHD Staging in Severely Affected Patients: Organ and Global Scoring Correlate with Established Indicators of Disease Severity and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Baird, K.; Steinberg, S.M.; Grkovic, L.; Pulanic, D.; Cowen, E.W.; Mitchell, S.A.; Williams, K.M.; Datiles, M.B.; Bishop, R.; Bassim, C.W.; Mays, J.W.; Edwards, D.; Cole, K.; Avila, D.N.; Taylor, T.; Urban, A.; Joe, G.O.; Comis, L.E.; Berger, A.; Stratton, P.; Zhang, D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Gea-Banacloche, J.C.; Sportes, C.; Fowler, D.H.; Gress, R.E.; Pavletic, S.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2010, 189 adult patients were enrolled on the National Cancer Institute (NCI) cross-sectional chronic Graft-versus-Host disease (cGVHD) natural history study. Patients were evaluated by multiple disease scales and outcome measures including the 2005 NIH Consensus Project cGVHD severity score. The purpose of this study is to assess the validity of the NIH scoring variables as determinants of disease severity in severely affected patients in order to standardize clinician evaluation and staging of cGVHD. 125 of 189 patients met criteria for severe cGVHD on the NIH global score and 62 had moderate disease, with a median of 4 (range 1–8) involved organs. Clinician average NIH organ score and the corresponding organ scores performed by subspecialists were highly correlated (r=0.64). NIH global severity scores showed significant associations with nearly all functional and quality of life outcome measures including Lee Scale, SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS), 2 minutes walk, grip strength, range of motion and Human Activity Profile (HAP). Joints/fascia, skin, and lung involvement impacted function and quality of life most significantly and showed highest number of correlations with outcome measures. The final Cox model showing factors jointly predictive for survival contained the time from cGVHD diagnosis (>49 vs. ≤49 months, HR=0.23; p=0.0011), absolute eosinophil count of (0–0.5 vs. >0.5 cells/µL, HR=3.95; p=0.0006) at the time of NIH evaluation, and NIH lung score (3 vs. 0–2, HR=11.02; p <0.0001). These results demonstrate that NIH organs and global severity scores are reliable measures of cGVHD disease burden. Strong association with subspecialist evaluation suggests that NIH organs and global severity scores are appropriate for clinical and research assessments, and may serve as a surrogate for more complex sub-specialist exams. In this population of severely affected patients, NIH lung score is the strongest predictor of poor overall

  11. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery: Results from a Large Normative Developmental Sample (PING)

    PubMed Central

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Thompson, Wesley K.; McCabe, Connor; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Chang, Linda; Amaral, David G.; Casey, B. J.; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N.; Libiger, Ondrej; Mostofsky, Stewart; Murray, Sarah S.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Schork, Nicholas; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NTCB) was designed to provide a brief, efficient computerized test of key neuropsychological functions appropriate for use in children as young as 3 years of age. This report describes the performance of a large group of typically developing children and adolescents and examines the impact of age and sociocultural variables on test performance. Method The NTCB was administered to a sample of 1020 typically developing males and females ranging in age from 3 to 20 years, diverse in terms of socioeconomic status (SES) and race/ethnicity, as part of the new publicly accessible Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics (PING) data resource, at 9 sites across the United States. Results General additive models of nonlinear age-functions were estimated from age-differences in test performance on the 8 NTCB subtests while controlling for family SES and genetic ancestry factors (GAFs). Age accounted for the majority of the variance across all NTCB scores, with additional significant contributions of gender on some measures, and of SES and race/ethnicity (GAFs) on all. After adjusting for age and gender, SES and GAFs explained a substantial proportion of the remaining unexplained variance in Picture Vocabulary scores. Conclusions The results highlight the sensitivity to developmental effects and efficiency of this new computerized assessment battery for neurodevelopmental research. Limitations are observed in the form of some ceiling effects in older children, some floor effects, particularly on executive function tests in the youngest participants, and evidence for variable measurement sensitivity to cultural/socioeconomic factors. PMID:24219608

  12. Lithium differentially affects clock gene expression in serum-shocked NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Osland, Teresa M; Fernø, Johan; Håvik, Bjarte; Heuch, Ivar; Ruoff, Peter; Lærum, Ole Didrik; Steen, Vidar M

    2011-07-01

    Bipolar disorder has been associated with disturbances in circadian rhythms. Lithium is frequently used in the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder, and has been shown to prolong such rhythms in animals and humans. To examine whether lithium affects the expression of genes regulating the circadian clock, cultured NIH-3T3 cells were synchronized by serum-shocking, and the relative expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1), Period2 (Per2), Period3 (Per3), Cryptochrome1 (Cry1), Cryptochrome2 (Cry2), Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator-like 1 (Bmal1), Circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), Rev-Erb-α (Nr1d1), RAR-related orphan receptor α (Ror-α), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (Gsk-3β), Casein kinase 1-ε (CK1-ε; Csnk1ε), E4 binding protein 4 (E4BP4; Nfil-3) and albumin D-binding protein (Dbp) was examined for three consecutive days in the presence of lithium (20 mM) or vehicle (20 mM NaCl). We found that lithium significantly increased the expression of Per2 and Cry1, whereas Per3, Cry2, Bmal1, E4BP4 and Rev-Erb-α expression was reduced. We also found that lithium prolonged the period of Per2. Taken together, these effects on clock gene expression may be relevant for the effects of lithium on biological rhythms and could also give new leads to further explore its mood-stabilizing actions in the treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:20837565

  13. Compartmentalized Ras Proteins Transform NIH 3T3 Cells with Different Efficiencies▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chiang-Min; Li, Huiling; Gasman, Stéphane; Huang, Jian; Schiff, Rachel; Chang, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Ras GTPases were long thought to function exclusively from the plasma membrane (PM). However, a current model suggests that Ras proteins can compartmentalize to regulate different functions, and an oncogenic H-Ras mutant that is restricted to the endomembrane can still transform cells. In this study, we demonstrated that cells transformed by endomembrane-restricted oncogenic H-Ras formed tumors in nude mice. To define downstream targets of endomembrane Ras pathways, we analyzed Cdc42, which concentrates in the endomembrane and has been shown to act downstream of Ras in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our data show that cell transformation induced by endomembrane-restricted oncogenic H-Ras was blocked when Cdc42 activity was inhibited. Moreover, H-Ras formed a complex with Cdc42 on the endomembrane, and this interaction was enhanced when H-Ras was GTP bound or when cells were stimulated by growth factors. H-Ras binding evidently induced Cdc42 activation by recruiting and/or activating Cdc42 exchange factors. In contrast, when constitutively active H-Ras was restricted to the PM by fusing to a PM localization signal from the Rit GTPase, the resulting protein did not detectably activate Cdc42 although it activated Raf-1 and efficiently induced hallmarks of Ras-induced senescence in human BJ foreskin fibroblasts. Surprisingly, PM-restricted oncogenic Ras when expressed alone could only weakly transform NIH 3T3 cells; however, when constitutively active Cdc42 was coexpressed, together they transformed cells much more efficiently than either one alone. These data suggest that efficient cell transformation requires Ras proteins to interact with Cdc42 on the endomembrane and that in order for a given Ras protein to fully transform cells, multiple compartment-specific Ras pathways need to work cooperatively. PMID:21189290

  14. Hubble Space Telescope On-orbit NiH2 Battery Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Krol, Stanley J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery performance from launch to the present time. Over the life of HST vehicle configuration, charge system degradation and failures together with thermal design limitations have had a significant effect on the capacity of the HST batteries. Changes made to the charge system configuration in order to protect against power system failures and to maintain battery thermal stability resulted in undercharging of the batteries. This undercharging resulted in decreased usable battery capacity as well as battery cell voltage/capacity divergence. This cell divergence was made evident during on-orbit battery capacity measurements by a relatively shallow slope of the discharge curve following the discharge knee. Early efforts to improve the battery performance have been successful. On-orbit capacity measurement data indicates increases in the usable battery capacity of all six batteries as well as improvements in the battery cell voltage/capacity divergence. Additional measures have been implemented to improve battery performance, however, failures within the HST Power Control Unit (PCU) have prevented verification of battery status. As this PCU fault prevents the execution of on-orbit capacity testing, the HST Project has based the battery capacity on trends, which utilizes previous on-orbit battery capacity test data, for science mission and servicing mission planning. The Servicing Mission 38 (SM-3B) in March 2002 replaced the faulty PCU. Following the servicing mission, on-orbit capacity test resumed. A summary of battery performance is reviewed since launch in this paper.

  15. Dietary fiber intake and mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yikyung; Subar, Amy F.; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber has been hypothesized to lower risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. However, little is known of the effect of dietary fiber on total death and cause-specific deaths. Methods We examined dietary fiber intake in relation to total mortality and death from specific causes in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a prospective cohort study. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Cause of death was identified using the National Death Index Plus. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results During an average of 9 years of follow-up, we identified 20,126 deaths in men and 11,330 deaths in women. Dietary fiber intake was associated with significantly lowered risk of total death in both men and women (multivariate RR comparing the highest vs. the lowest quintile =0.78, 95% CI:0.73–0.82, p-trend, <0.001 in men; 0.78. 95% CI:0.73–0.85, p-trend, <0.001 in women). Dietary fiber intake also lowered risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious, and respiratory diseases by 24%–56% in men and 34%–59% in women. Inverse association between dietary fiber intake and cancer death was observed in men, but not in women. Dietary fiber from grains, but not from other sources, was significantly inversely related to total and cause-specific death in both men and women. Conclusions Dietary fiber may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases. Making fiber-rich food choices more often may provide significant health benefits. PMID:21321288

  16. NIH grant awards as a metric of clinical and translational research training effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Knapke, Jacqueline M; Haynes, Erin N; Kuhnell, Pierce; Tsevat, Joel

    2015-02-01

    The number of clinical research training programs has increased over the past 5-10 years, but few studies have quantitatively evaluated the effectiveness of these programs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical and translational research training program at the University of Cincinnati by comparing the number of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to pediatric fellows who graduated from the MS degree program between 1995 and 2013 versus fellows who did not pursue an MS degree. Among 394 pediatric fellows, 16 of 81 (20%) MS alumni were awarded at least one NIH grant, as compared with 28 of 313 (9%) fellows who did not obtain an MS degree (p < 0.02). In multivariable analysis, MS alumni were more than three times as likely to have received at least one grant than were non-MS fellows (OR = 3.5, 95% CI [1.7-7.2]; C-statistic = 0.71) and MS alumni were more likely to obtain at least one K-series (OR = 4.1, 95% CI [1.6-10.2]; C-statistic = 0.74), M-series (OR = 11.8, 95% CI [3.4-41.4]; C-statistic = 0.81), or R-series (OR = 10.1, 95% CI [2.4-42.8]; C-statistic = 0.74) grant than were non-MS fellows. These findings suggest that graduate training in clinical and translational research prepares graduates for the highly competitive field of clinical and translational research. PMID:25377275

  17. Cloning and Stable Expression of cDNA Coding For Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule -1 (PECAM-1, CD31) in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Salehi-Lalemarzi, Hamed; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: PECAM-1 (CD31) is a glycoprotein expressed on endothelial and bone marrow precursor cells. It plays important roles in angiogenesis, maintenance and integration of the cytoskeleton and direction of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. We aimed to clone the cDNA coding for human CD31 from KG1a for further subcloning and expression in NIH-3T3 mouse cell line. Methods: CD31 cDNA was cloned from KG1a cell line after total RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Pfu DNA polymerase-amplified specific band was ligated to pGEMT-easy vector and sub-cloned in pCMV6-Neo expression vector. After transfection of NIH-3T3 cells using 3 μg of recombinant construct and 6 μl of JetPEI transfection reagent, stable expression was obtained by selection of cells by G418 antibiotic and confirmed by surface flow cytometry. Results: 2235 bp specific band was aligned completely to human CD31 reference sequence in NCBI database. Transient and stable expression of human CD31 on transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was achieved (23% and 96%, respectively) as shown by flow cytometry. Conclusion: Due to murine origin of NIH-3T3 cell line, CD31-expressing NIH-3T3 cells could be useful as immunogen in production of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies against human CD31, with no need for purification of recombinant proteins. PMID:26236664

  18. Resistance to anticancer drugs in NIH3T3 cells transfected with c-myc and/or c-H-ras genes.

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, S.; Nakagawa, K.; Yokota, J.; Tsunokawa, Y.; Nishio, K.; Terashima, Y.; Shibuya, M.; Terada, M.; Saijo, N.

    1991-01-01

    NIH3T3 cells transfected with c-H-ras and/or c-myc genes were examined for differences in drug sensitivity. The five transfectants used were N8, NIH3T3-nm-1, pT22-3-nm-2, pP1-4 and pT22-3. They were transfected with pKOneo alone, pKOneo and c-myc, pKOneo and c-myc plus activated c-H-ras, normal c-H-ras and activated c-H-ras genes, respectively. The IC50s of cisplatin, 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, adriamycin, melphalan, and CPT-11 were significantly higher for NIH3T3-nm-1 abd pT22-3-nm-2 than for the parental NIH3T3 and N8 cells. Transfection with normal and activated C-H-ras oncogenes only led to increases in the IC50s of alkylating agents. There was no significant difference between the IC50s of N8 and those of NIH3T3 parental cells to any of these anticancer agents. These results strongly suggest that the expression of the c-myc gene plays a role in the acquisition of drug resistance. The c-myc gene may therefore provide us with an important clue in determining the mechanism of drug resistance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1997100

  19. Twenty Years Post-NIH Revitalization Act: Renewing the Case for Enhancing Minority Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Moon S.; Lara, Primo N.; Dang, Julie H.T.; Paterniti, Debora A.; Kelly, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background The NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 mandated the appropriate inclusion of minorities in all National Institutes of Health-funded research. Twenty years after this Act, the proportion of minority patients enrolled in cancer clinical trials remains persistently low. Clinical trials are the vehicles for the development and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive agents under scientifically rigorous conditions. Without representation in trials, disparities in the cancer burden for minorities are projected to increase. Methods In this review paper, authors counted the frequencies in which minorities were the primary focus of National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, examined citations from PubMed focusing on the search terms: “NIH Revitalization Act of 1993” and “enhancing minority accrual to cancer clinical trials”, and supplemented the review with their expertise in NIH-funded research related to minority accrual in cancer clinical trials. Results The reporting and analyses of data based on minorities in clinical trials remain inadequate. Less than two percent of the National Cancer Institute's clinical trials focus on any racial/minority population as their primary emphasis. Our review of the literature indicated that the percentage of authors who reported their study sample by race/ethnicity ranged from 1.5% to 58.0%; only 20% of the randomized controlled studies in a high-impact oncology journal reported analyzing results by race/ethnicity. Proportionately greater population increases in minorities accompanied by their persistent and disproportionate cancer burden reinforce the need for their greater representation in clinical trials. Conclusions Renewing the emphasis for minority participation in clinical trials is warranted. Policy changes are recommended. PMID:24643646

  20. Evidence for an NIH shift in oxidation of naphthalene by the marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. strain JCM.

    PubMed Central

    Narro, M L; Cerniglia, C E; Van Baalen, C; Gibson, D T

    1992-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. strain JCM oxidized naphthalene predominantly to 1-naphthol. Experiments with [1-2H]naphthalene and [2-2H]naphthalene indicated that 1-naphthol was formed with 68 and 74% retention of deuterium, respectively. No significant isotope effect was observed when the organism was incubated with a 1:1 mixture of naphthalene and [2H8]naphthalene. The results indicate that 1-naphthol is formed through a naphthalene 1,2-oxide intermediate, which rearranges spontaneously via an NIH shift mechanism. PMID:1599253

  1. Gene expression in amygdala as a function of differential trait anxiety levels in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morán, Sira; Palència, Marta; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Sabariego, Marta; Donaire, Rocío; Morón, Ignacio; Torres, Carmen; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Tobeña, Adolf; Esteban, Francisco José; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    To identify genes involved in anxiety/fear traits, we analyzed the gene expression profile in the amygdala of genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats. The NIH-HS rat stock has revealed to be a unique genetic resource for the fine mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) to very small genomic regions, due to the high amount of genetic recombinants accumulated along more than 50 breeding generations, and for the same reason it can be expected that those genetically heterogeneous rats should be especially useful for studying differential gene expression as a function of anxiety-(or other)-related traits. We selected high- and low-anxious NIH-HS rats differing in their number of avoidances in a single 50-trial session of the two-way active avoidance task. Rats were also tested in unconditioned anxiety tests (e.g., elevated zero-maze). Three weeks after behavioural testing, the amygdala was dissected and prepared for the microarray study. There appeared 6 significantly down-regulated and 28 up-regulated genes (fold-change >|2|, FDR<0.05) between the low- and high-anxious groups, with central nervous system-related functions. Regression analyses (stepwise) revealed that differential expression of some genes could be predictive of anxiety/fear responses. Among those genes for which the present results suggest a link with individual differences in trait anxiety, six relevant genes were examined with qRT-PCR, four of which (Ucn3, Tacr3, H2-M9 and Arr3) were validated. Remarkably, some of them are characterized by sharing known functions related with hormonal HPA-axis responses to (and/or modulation of) stress, anxiety or fear, and putative involvement in related neurobehavioural functions. The results confirm the usefulness of NIH-HS rats as a good animal model for research on the neurogenetic basis of anxiety and fear, while suggesting the involvement of some neuropeptide/neuroendocrine pathways on the development of differential anxiety profiles. PMID:23777796

  2. Effects of electrode and cell design variables on capacity fading of a Ni/H2 cell on storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    A study is made of the capacity fading behavior on storage of nickel electrodes in a Ni/H2 cell as a function of the electrode and cell design parameters. The design variables included two different types of the nickel sinter substrate of the nickel electrode, two different processes of active material impregnation, and two levels of KOH concentration and hydrogen pressure under which the electrode is stored in a Ni/H2 cell. The results show that the hydrogen pressure and type of active material impregnation processes have strong effects on the rate of capacity fading. The capacity fading was faster under 100 psig of hydrogen pressure than under vacuum. Electrodes made by an aqueous bath impregnation process show slower fading than the one made by an alcoholic bath impregnation process. Variations in substrate structure has a moderate effect on the rate, while the effect of KOH concentration is not pronounced. Migration of cobalt in the active material and change of discharge voltages were observed with the nickel electrodes which had substantial capacity fading. A possible mechanism of the cobalt migration, change of the crystallographic structure of the active material, and a possible capacity fading mechanism are discussed.

  3. The origin and implementation of the Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training programs: an NIH common fund initiative.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Frederick J; Mathur, Ambika; Fuhrmann, Cynthia N; O'Brien, Theresa C; Wefes, Inge; Labosky, Patricia A; Duncan, D'Anne S; August, Avery; Feig, Andrew; Gould, Kathleen L; Friedlander, Michael J; Schaffer, Chris B; Van Wart, Audra; Chalkley, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Recent national reports and commentaries on the current status and needs of the U.S. biomedical research workforce have highlighted the limited career development opportunities for predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees in academia, yet little attention is paid to preparation for career pathways outside of the traditional faculty path. Recognizing this issue, in 2013, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund issued a request for application titled "NIH Director's Biomedical Research Workforce Innovation Award: Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST)." These 5-yr 1-time grants, awarded to 17 single or partnering institutions, were designed to develop sustainable approaches to broaden graduate and postgraduate training, aimed at creating training programs that reflect the range of career options that trainees may ultimately pursue. These institutions have formed a consortium in order to work together to develop, evaluate, share, and disseminate best practices and challenges. This is a first report on the early experiences of the consortium and the scope of participating BEST programs. In this report, we describe the state of the U.S. biomedical workforce and development of the BEST award, variations of programmatic approaches to assist with program design without BEST funding, and novel approaches to engage faculty in career development programs. To test the effectiveness of these BEST programs, external evaluators will assess their outcomes not only over the 5 yr grant period but also for an additional 10 yr beyond award completion. PMID:26432783

  4. Guidance from an NIH Workshop on Designing, Implementing, and Reporting Clinical Studies of Soy Interventions1–4

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marguerite A.; Nahin, Richard L.; Messina, Mark J.; Rader, Jeanne I.; Thompson, Lilian U.; Badger, Thomas M.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Kim, Young S.; Pontzer, Carol H.; Starke-Reed, Pamela E.; Weaver, Connie M.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, “Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies,” July 28–29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population exposure to soy; the variability of the human response to soy; product composition; methods, tools, and resources available to estimate exposure and protocol adherence; and analytical methods to assess soy in foods and supplements and analytes in biologic fluids and other tissues. The intent of the workshop was to address the quality of soy studies, not the efficacy or safety of soy. Prior NIH workshops and an evidence-based review questioned the quality of data from human soy studies. If clinical studies are pursued, investigators need to ensure that the experimental designs are optimal and the studies properly executed. The workshop participants identified methodological issues that may confound study results and interpretation. Scientifically sound and useful options for dealing with these issues were discussed. The resulting guidance is presented in this document with a brief rationale. The guidance is specific to soy clinical research and does not address nonsoy-related factors that should also be considered in designing and reporting clinical studies. This guidance may be used by investigators, journal editors, study sponsors, and protocol reviewers for a variety of purposes, including designing and implementing trials, reporting results, and interpreting published epidemiological and clinical studies. PMID:20392880

  5. NIH response criteria measures are associated with important parameters of disease severity in patients with chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Curtis, L M; Grkovic, L; Mitchell, S A; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Datiles, M B; Mays, J; Bassim, C; Joe, G; Comis, L E; Berger, A; Avila, D; Taylor, T; Pulanic, D; Cole, K; Baruffaldi, J; Fowler, D H; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2014-12-01

    Lack of standardized criteria measuring therapeutic response remains an obstacle to the development of better treatments for chronic GVHD (cGVHD). This cross-sectional prospective study examined the concurrent and predictive validity of 18 clinician-reported ('Form A') and 8 patient-reported ('Form B') response measures proposed by NIH criteria. Concurrent parameters of interest were NIH global score, cGVHD activity, Lee symptom score and SF36 PCS. Patient cohort included 193 adults with moderate-to-severe cGVHD. Measures associated with the highest number of outcomes were lung function score (LFS), 2-min walk, grip strength, 4-point health-care provider (HCP) and patient global scores, 11-point clinician- and patient-reported global symptom severity scores, and Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Measures associated with survival in univariate analyses led to a Cox model containing skin erythema, LFS, KPS, eosinophil count and interval from cGVHD diagnosis to enrollment as jointly associated with survival. In conclusion, 4-point HCP and patient global scores and 11-point clinician- and patient-reported global symptom severity scores are associated with the majority of concurrent outcomes. Skin erythema is a potentially reversible sign of cGVHD that is associated with survival. These results define a subset of measures that should be prioritized for evaluation in future studies. PMID:25153693

  6. The molecular mechanism regulating the autonomous circadian expression of Topoisomerase I in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Megumi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2009-02-27

    To identify whether Topoisomerase I (TopoI) has autonomous circadian rhythms regulated by clock genes, we tested mouse TopoI (mTopoI) promoter oscillation in NIH3T3 cells using a real-time monitoring assay and TopoI mRNA oscillations using real-time RT-PCR. Analysis of the mTopoI promoter region with Matlnspector software revealed two putative E-box (E1 and E2) and one DBP/E4BP4-binding element (D-box). Luciferase assays indicated that mTopoI gene expression was directly regulated by clock genes. The real-time monitoring assay showed that E-box and D-box response elements participate in the regulation of the circadian expression of mTopoI. Furthermore, a gel-shift assay showed that E2 is a direct target of the BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimer and DBP binds to the putative D-site. These results indicate that TopoI is expressed in an autonomous circadian rhythm in NIH3T3 cells. PMID:19138663

  7. Small capacity, low cost (Ni-H2) design concept for commercial, military, and higher-volume aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.; Cook, William D.; Smith, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries have become the technology of choice for both commercial and defense related satellites in geosynchronous orbits. Their use for low earth orbit (LEO) applications is not as advanced, but seems just as inevitable because of their inherent advantages over nickel cadmium batteries. These include superior energy density, longer cycle life, and better tolerance to over-charge and reversal. Ni/H2 cells have the added advantage in both construction and operation of not presenting the environmental possibility of cadmium pollution. Unfortunately, but necessarily, the design of these cells has been driven to high cost by the sophistication of the satellites and their uses. Now, using most of the same concepts but less costly materials and techniques, a low cost, small cell design was developed. Combined with the concept of the common pressure vessel, this new design promises to be ideal for the small-sat and commercial markets which, increasingly, are calling for large numbers of less expensive satellites.

  8. Improvements and Limitations of Humanized Mouse Models for HIV Research: NIH/NIAID "Meet the Experts" 2015 Workshop Summary.

    PubMed

    Akkina, Ramesh; Allam, Atef; Balazs, Alejandro B; Blankson, Joel N; Burnett, John C; Casares, Sofia; Garcia, J Victor; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Kashanchi, Fatah; Kitchen, Scott G; Klein, Florian; Kumar, Priti; Luster, Andrew D; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Rao, Mangala; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Shultz, Leonard D; Zack, Jerome A

    2016-02-01

    The number of humanized mouse models for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other infectious diseases has expanded rapidly over the past 8 years. Highly immunodeficient mouse strains, such as NOD/SCID/gamma chain(null) (NSG, NOG), support better human hematopoietic cell engraftment. Another improvement is the derivation of highly immunodeficient mice, transgenic with human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and cytokines that supported development of HLA-restricted human T cells and heightened human myeloid cell engraftment. Humanized mice are also used to study the HIV reservoir using new imaging techniques. Despite these advances, there are still limitations in HIV immune responses and deficits in lymphoid structures in these models in addition to xenogeneic graft-versus-host responses. To understand and disseminate the improvements and limitations of humanized mouse models to the scientific community, the NIH sponsored and convened a meeting on April 15, 2015 to discuss the state of knowledge concerning these questions and best practices for selecting a humanized mouse model for a particular scientific investigation. This report summarizes the findings of the NIH meeting. PMID:26670361

  9. A Nanodot Array Modulates Cell Adhesion and Induces an Apoptosis-Like Abnormality in NIH-3T3 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Su, Chia-Wei; Tai, Shih-Ming; Chen, Chiun-Hsun; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Steve Huang, G.

    2009-08-01

    Micro-structures that mimic the extracellular substratum promote cell growth and differentiation, while the cellular reaction to a nanostructure is poorly defined. To evaluate the cellular response to a nanoscaled surface, NIH 3T3 cells were grown on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. The nanodot arrays were fabricated by AAO processing on TaN-coated wafers. A thin layer of platinum, 5 nm in thickness, was sputtered onto the structure to improve biocompatibility. The cells grew normally on the 10-nm array and on flat surfaces. However, 50-nm, 100-nm, and 200-nm nanodot arrays induced apoptosis-like events. Abnormality was triggered after as few as 24 h of incubation on a 200-nm dot array. For cells grown on the 50-nm array, the abnormality started after 72 h of incubation. The number of filopodia extended from the cell bodies was lower for the abnormal cells. Immunostaining using antibodies against vinculin and actin filament was performed. Both the number of focal adhesions and the amount of cytoskeleton were decreased in cells grown on the 100-nm and 200-nm arrays. Pre-coatings of fibronectin (FN) or type I collagen promoted cellular anchorage and prevented the nanotopography-induced programed cell death. In summary, nanotopography, in the form of nanodot arrays, induced an apoptosis-like abnormality for cultured NIH 3T3 cells. The occurrence of the abnormality was mediated by the formation of focal adhesions.

  10. Nanofiber Alignment Regulates NIH3T3 Cell Orientation and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression on Electrospun PCL+Gelatin Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Timothy; Surianarayanan, Swetha; Downs, Crawford; Zhou, Yong; Berry, Joel

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of substrate topology on the behavior of fibroblasts, tissue engineering scaffolds were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) and a blend of PCL and gelatin (PCL+Gel) to produce matrices with both random and aligned nanofibrous orientations. The addition of gelatin to the scaffold was shown to increase the hydrophilicity of the PCL matrix and to increase the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells compared to scaffolds of PCL alone. The orientation of nanofibers within the matrix did not have an effect on the proliferation of adherent cells, but cells on aligned substrates were shown to elongate and align parallel to the direction of substrate fiber alignment. A microarray of cyotoskeleton regulators was probed to examine differences in gene expression between cells grown on an aligned and randomly oriented substrates. It was found that transcriptional expression of eight genes was statistically different between the two conditions, with all of them being upregulated in the aligned condition. The proteins encoded by these genes are linked to production and polymerization of actin microfilaments, as well as focal adhesion assembly. Taken together, the data indicates NIH3T3 fibroblasts on aligned substrates align themselves parallel with their substrate and increase production of actin and focal adhesion related genes. PMID:27196306

  11. Downregulation of the taurine transporter TauT during hypo-osmotic stress in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Daniel Bloch; Friis, Martin Barfred; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2012-02-01

    The present work was initiated to investigate regulation of the taurine transporter TauT by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts during acute and long-term (4 h) exposure to low-sodium/hypo-osmotic stress. Taurine influx is reduced following reduction in osmolarity, keeping the extracellular Na(+) concentration constant. TonEBP activity is unaltered, whereas TauT transcription as well as TauT activity are significantly reduced under hypo-osmotic conditions. In contrast, TonEBP activity and TauT transcription are significantly increased following hyperosmotic exposure. Swelling-induced ROS production in NIH3T3 fibroblasts is generated by NOX4 and by increasing total ROS, by either exogenous application of H(2)O(2) or overexpressing NOX4, we demonstrate that TonEBP activity and taurine influx are regulated negatively by ROS under hypo-osmotic, low-sodium conditions, whereas the TauT mRNA level is unaffected. Acute exposure to ROS reduces taurine uptake as a result of modulated TauT transport kinetics. Thus, swelling-induced ROS production could account for the reduced taurine uptake under low-sodium/hypo-osmotic conditions by direct modulation of TauT. PMID:22383044

  12. Nanofiber Alignment Regulates NIH3T3 Cell Orientation and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression on Electrospun PCL+Gelatin Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Fee, Timothy; Surianarayanan, Swetha; Downs, Crawford; Zhou, Yong; Berry, Joel

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of substrate topology on the behavior of fibroblasts, tissue engineering scaffolds were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) and a blend of PCL and gelatin (PCL+Gel) to produce matrices with both random and aligned nanofibrous orientations. The addition of gelatin to the scaffold was shown to increase the hydrophilicity of the PCL matrix and to increase the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells compared to scaffolds of PCL alone. The orientation of nanofibers within the matrix did not have an effect on the proliferation of adherent cells, but cells on aligned substrates were shown to elongate and align parallel to the direction of substrate fiber alignment. A microarray of cyotoskeleton regulators was probed to examine differences in gene expression between cells grown on an aligned and randomly oriented substrates. It was found that transcriptional expression of eight genes was statistically different between the two conditions, with all of them being upregulated in the aligned condition. The proteins encoded by these genes are linked to production and polymerization of actin microfilaments, as well as focal adhesion assembly. Taken together, the data indicates NIH3T3 fibroblasts on aligned substrates align themselves parallel with their substrate and increase production of actin and focal adhesion related genes. PMID:27196306

  13. T24 HRAS transformed NIH/3T3 mouse cells (GhrasT-NIH/3T3) in serial tumorigenic in vitro/in vivo passages give rise to increasingly aggressive tumorigenic cell lines T1-A and T2-A and metastatic cell lines T3-HA and T4-PA.

    PubMed

    Ray, Durwood B; Merrill, Gerald A; Brenner, Frederic J; Lytle, Laurie S; Lam, Tan; McElhinney, Aaron; Anders, Joel; Rock, Tara Tauber; Lyker, Jennifer Kier; Barcus, Scott; Leslie, Kara Hust; Kramer, Jill M; Rubenstein, Eric M; Pryor Schanz, Karen; Parkhurst, Amy J; Peck, Michelle; Good, Kimberly; Granath, Kristi Lemke; Cifra, Nicole; Detweiler, Jessalee Wantz; Stevens, Laura; Albertson, Richard; Deir, Rachael; Stewart, Elisabeth; Wingard, Katherine; Richardson, Micah Rose; Blizard, Sarah B; Gillespie, Lauren E; Kriley, Charles E; Rzewnicki, Daniel I; Jones, David H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often arise progressively from "normal" to "pre-cancer" to "transformed" to "local metastasis" to "metastatic disease" to "aggressive metastatic disease". Recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) of cancer cells and tumorigenic models have shown this progression involves three major types of genome rearrangements: ordered small step-wise changes, more dramatic "punctuated evolution" (chromoplexy), and large catastrophic steps (chromothripsis) which all occur in random combinations to generate near infinite numbers of stochastically rearranged metastatic cancer cell genomes. This paper describes a series of mouse cell lines developed sequentially to mimic this type of progression. This starts with the new GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cell line that was produced from the NIH/3T3 cell line that had been transformed by transfection with HRAS oncogene DNA from the T24 human bladder carcinoma. These GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells were injected s.c. into NIH/Swiss mice to produce primary tumors from which one was used to establish the T1-A cell line. T1-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a NIH/Swiss mouse produced a local metastatic tumor near the base of the tail from which the T2-A cell line was established. T2-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a nude NIH/Swiss mouse produced metastases in the liver and one lung from which the T3-HA (H=hepatic) and T3-PA (P=pulmonary) cell lines were developed, respectively. T3-HA cells injected i.v. into a nude mouse produced a metastasis in the lung from which the T4-PA cell line was established. PCR analysis indicated the human T24 HRAS oncogene was carried along with each in vitro/in vivo transfer step and found in the T2-A and T4-PA cell lines. Light photomicrographs indicate that all transformed cells are morphologically similar. GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 4% of NIH/Swiss mice in 6-10 weeks; T1-A cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 100% of NIH/Swiss mice in 7

  14. Frontiers in glycomics: bioinformatics and biomarkers in disease. An NIH white paper prepared from discussions by the focus groups at a workshop on the NIH campus, Bethesda MD (September 11-13, 2006).

    PubMed

    Packer, Nicolle H; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Paulson, James C; Raman, Rahul; Rudd, Pauline; Sasisekharan, Ram; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; York, William S

    2008-01-01

    Key issues relating to glycomics research were discussed after the workshop entitled "Frontiers in Glycomics: Bioinformatics and Biomarkers in Disease" by two focus groups nominated by the organizers. The groups focused on two themes: (i) glycomics as the new frontier for the discovery of biomarkers of disease and (ii) requirements for the development of informatics for glycomics and glycobiology. The mandate of the focus groups was to build consensus on these issues and develop a summary of findings and recommendations for presentation to the NIH and the greater scientific community. A list of scientific priorities was developed, presented, and discussed at the workshops. Additional suggestions were solicited from workshop participants and collected using the workshop mailing list. The results are summarized in this White Paper, authored by the co-chairs of the focus groups. PMID:18095367

  15. The art and science of integrating Undoing Racism with CBPR: challenges of pursuing NIH funding to investigate cancer care and racial equity.

    PubMed

    Yonas, Michael A; Jones, Nora; Eng, Eugenia; Vines, Anissa I; Aronson, Robert; Griffith, Derek M; White, Brandolyn; DuBose, Melvin

    2006-11-01

    In this nation, the unequal burden of disease among People of Color has been well documented. One starting point to eliminating health disparities is recognizing the existence of inequities in health care delivery and identifying the complexities of how institutional racism may operate within the health care system. In this paper, we explore the integration of community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles with an Undoing Racism process to conceptualize, design, apply for, and secure National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to investigate the complexities of racial equity in the system of breast cancer care. Additionally, we describe the sequence of activities and "necessary conflicts" managed by our Health Disparities Collaborative to design and submit an application for NIH funding. This process of integrating CBPR principles with anti-racist community organizing presented unique challenges that were negotiated only by creating a strong foundation of trusting relationships that viewed conflict as being necessary. The process of developing a successful NIH grant proposal illustrated a variety of important lessons associated with the concepts of cultural humility and cultural safety. For successfully conducting CBPR, major challenges have included: assembling and mobilizing a partnership; the difficulty of establishing a shared vision and purpose for the group; the problem of maintaining trust; and the willingness to address differences in institutional cultures. Expectation, acceptance and negotiation of conflict were essential in the process of developing, preparing and submitting our NIH application. Central to negotiating these and other challenges has been the utilization of a CBPR approach. PMID:17072760

  16. Chemopreventive effect of punicalagin, a novel tannin component isolated from Terminalia catappa, on H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Shern; Li, Jih-Heng

    2006-05-01

    Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, have been characterized to possess antioxidative and anti-genotoxic activities. However, their effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated carcinogenesis are still unclear. In the present study, H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells were used to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of T. catappa water extract (TCE) and punicalagin. In the cell proliferation assay, TCE and punicalagin suppressed the proliferation of H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells with a dose-dependent manner but only partially affected non-transformed NIH3T3 cells proliferation. The differential cytotoxicity of TCE/punicalagin on the H-ras-transformed and non-transformed NIH3T3 cells indicated the selectivity of TCE/punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation. TCE or punicalagin treatment reduced anchorage-independent growth that could be due to a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. The intracellular superoxide level, known to modulate downstream signaling of Ras protein, was decreased by punicalagin treatments. The levels of phosphorylated JNK-1 and p38 were also decreased with punicalagin treatments. Thus, the chemopreventive effect of punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation could result from inhibition of the intracellular redox status and JNK-1/p38 activation. PMID:16242868

  17. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although youth in the United States remain substantially more violent than adolescents and young adults in most industrial countries, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents identified many reasons for optimism about our capacity to…

  18. Effects of AEA Cell-Bypass-Switch Closure on Charged EOS-Aqua NiH2 Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Denney; Sullivan, David J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Harry; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the effects of AEA cell bypass-switch closure on a charged EOS-Aqua NiH2 cell. The objectives of the presentation are to: (1) Verify the Performance of AEA Cell Bypass Protection Device (CBPD) under simulated EOS-Aqua/Aura flight hardware configuration; (2) Assess the safety of the hardware under an inadvertent firing of CBPD switch, as well as the closing of CBPD switch under simulated high cell impedance; and (3) Confirm that the mode of operation of CBPD switch is the formation of a continuous low impedance path-homogeneous low melting point eutectic (Indium alloy). Details are given on the EOS-Aqua flight hardware, AEA hardware tested, AEA bypass switch schematic, and the tests performed, which include images of equipment and results.

  19. ABSL-4 Aerobiology Biosafety and Technology at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick

    PubMed Central

    Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Kindrachuk, Jason; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Kuhn, Jens H.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The overall threat of a viral pathogen to human populations is largely determined by the modus operandi and velocity of the pathogen that is transmitted among humans. Microorganisms that can spread by aerosol are considered a more challenging enemy than those that require direct body-to-body contact for transmission, due to the potential for infection of numerous people rather than a single individual. Additionally, disease containment is much more difficult to achieve for aerosolized viral pathogens than for pathogens that spread solely via direct person-to-person contact. Thus, aerobiology has become an increasingly necessary component for studying viral pathogens that are naturally or intentionally transmitted by aerosol. The goal of studying aerosol viral pathogens is to improve public health preparedness and medical countermeasure development. Here, we provide a brief overview of the animal biosafety level 4 Aerobiology Core at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, Maryland, USA. PMID:24402304

  20. NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries. Volume 1, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, David S.; Lee, Leonine S.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group was chartered within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). The Battery Working Group was tasked to complete tasks and to propose proactive work to address battery related, agency-wide issues on an annual basis. In its first year of operation, this proactive program addressed various aspects of the validation and verification of aerospace battery systems for NASA missions. Studies were performed, issues were discussed and in many cases, test programs were executed to generate recommendations and guidelines to reduce risk associated with various aspects of implementing battery technology in the aerospace industry. This document contains Part 3 - Volume I: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries of the program's operations.

  1. Zeeman spectroscopy of NiH: Landé factors of three Ω = 3/2 excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, H.; Richard, C.; Tourasse, G.; Crozet, P.; Ross, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    We report molecular Landé factors for three Ω‧ = 3/2 vibronic levels of NiH: E[17.8], D[17.6], and I[17.2], lying 17 000-18 000 cm-1 above the ground electronic state. The molecular Landé factors of these three states exhibit unusual variations with J and with parity. Also, molecular Landé factors of the D[17.6] excited electronic state are unexpectedly sensitive to Ni isotope substitution at low J. These observations provide evidence for extensive mixing among electronic states, deviation from Hund's case (a) coupling, and the existence of a local perturbing state. We also report polarization-dependent discrepancies between experimental and theoretical spectral intensities [1] for transitions involving the I[17.2] excited electronic state.

  2. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of von Willebrand disease: a synopsis of the 2008 NHLBI/NIH guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nichols, William L; Rick, Margaret E; Ortel, Thomas L; Montgomery, Robert R; Sadler, J Evan; Yawn, Barbara P; James, Andra H; Hultin, Mae B; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Weinstein, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) mediates blood platelet adhesion and accumulation at sites of blood vessel injury, and also carries coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) that is important for generating procoagulant activity. Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder, affects males and females, and reflects deficiency or defects of VWF that may also cause decreased FVIII. It may also occur less commonly as an acquired disorder (acquired von Willebrand syndrome). This article briefly summarizes selected features of the March 2008 evidence-based clinical and laboratory diagnostic recommendations from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Expert Panel for assessment for VWD or other bleeding disorders or risks. Management of VWD is also addressed in the NHLBI guidelines, but is not summarized here. The VWD guidelines are available at the NHLBI Web site (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/vwd). PMID:19415721

  3. Association between prepulse inhibition of the startle response and latent inhibition of two-way avoidance acquisition: A study with heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Ana; Esnal, Aitor; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Oliveras, Ignasi; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first evaluation of the associations between responses in two paradigms related to schizophrenia in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. NIH-HS rats are a stock of genetically heterogeneous animals that have been derived from eight different inbred strains. A rotational breeding schedule has been followed for more than eighty generations, leading to a high level of genetic recombination that makes the NIH-HS rats a unique tool for studying the genetic basis of (biological, behavioral, disease-related) complex traits. Previous work has dealt with the characterization of coping styles, cognitive and anxiety/fear-related profiles of NIH-HS rats. In the present study we have completed their characterization in two behavioral models, prepulse inhibition (PPI) and latent inhibition (LI) of the two-way active avoidance response, that appear to be related to schizophrenia or to schizophrenia-relevant symptoms. We have found that these rats display PPI for each of the four prepulse intensities tested, allowing their stratification in high, medium and low PPI subgroups. When testing these three subgroups for LI of two-way active avoidance acquisition it has been observed that the LowPPI and MediumPPI subgroups present impaired LI, which, along with the fact that the HighPPI group presents significant LI, allows us to hypothesize that responses in these two paradigms are somehow related and that selection of NIH-HS rats for Low vs HighPPI could make a promising animal model for the study of clusters of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms and their underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:26700617

  4. Sex and the Lab: An Alcohol-Focused Commentary on the NIH Initiative to Balance Sex in Cell and Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, Marina; Davies, Daryl L; Egli, Mark; Finn, Deborah A; Molina, Patricia; Regunathan, Soundar; Robinson, Donita L; Sohrabji, Farida

    2016-06-01

    In May 2014, Dr. Francis Collins, the director of U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Dr. Janine Clayton, the director of the U.S. National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, published a commentary in the journal Nature announcing new policies to ensure that preclinical research funded by the NIH considers both males and females. While these policies are still developing, they have already generated great interest by the scientific community and triggered both criticism and applause. This review provides a description and interpretation of the NIH guidelines, and it traces the history that led to their implementation. As expected, this NIH initiative generated some anxiety in the scientific community. The use of female animals in the investigation of basic mechanisms is perceived to increase variability in the results, and the use of both sexes has been claimed to slow the pace of scientific discoveries and to increase the cost at a time characterized by declining research support. This review discusses issues related to the study of sex as a biological variable (SABV) in alcohol studies and provides examples of how researchers have successfully addressed some of them. A practical strategy is provided to include both sexes in biomedical research while maintaining control of the research direction. The inclusion of sex as an important biological variable in experimental design, analysis, and reporting of preclinical alcohol research is likely to lead to a better understanding of alcohol pharmacology and the development of alcohol use disorder, may promote drug discovery for new pharmacotherapies by increasing scientific rigor, and may provide clinical benefit to women's health. This review aims to promote the understanding of the NIH's SABV guidelines and to provide alcohol researchers with a theoretical and practical framework for working with both sexes in preclinical research. PMID:27154003

  5. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-Ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell-cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  6. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell—cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  7. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH's postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    PubMed

    Herbert, J Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees. On the other hand, lab tech jobs often require fewer commitments outside of a normal 9-to-5 work day and usually have better pay and benefits than the Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship. In addition, working at a specific university often carries the benefit of being closer to one's family, friends, and/or significant others. Someone who does not like cities can choose to work at a university that has ready access to the beach, mountains, or regions of the country that are more personally appealing than the Washington, DC, area. Lab tech jobs also usually require at least a two year commitment, whereas the Postbac IRTA fellowship is generally a one year commitment (possibly two). Regardless of which option you choose, you should be active in searching for a job that lets you fulfill the goals you set for yourself in the years between graduating and starting graduate or medical school. Whether those goals are to publish, get experience, save money, or just enjoy yourself, with careful questioning and circumspection, you should be able to maximize the possibility that you will meet your goals. PMID:23741203

  8. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  9. Profiling the NIH Small Molecule Repository for Compounds That Generate H2O2 by Redox Cycling in Reducing Environments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Small Molecule Repository (SMR) libraries in a horseradish peroxidase–phenol red (HRP-PR) H2O2 detection assay to identify redox cycling compounds (RCCs) capable of generating H2O2 in buffers containing dithiothreitol (DTT). Two RCCs were identified in the LOPAC set, the ortho-naphthoquinone β-lapachone and the para-naphthoquinone NSC 95397. Thirty-seven (0.02%) concentration-dependent RCCs were identified from 195,826 compounds in the NIH SMR library; 3 singleton structures, 9 ortho-quinones, 2 para-quinones, 4 pyrimidotriazinediones, 15 arylsulfonamides, 2 nitrothiophene-2-carboxylates, and 2 tolyl hydrazides. Sixty percent of the ortho-quinones and 80% of the pyrimidotriazinediones in the library were confirmed as RCCs. In contrast, only 3.9% of the para-quinones were confirmed as RCCs. Fifteen of the 251 arylsulfonamides in the library were confirmed as RCCs, and since we screened 17,868 compounds with a sulfonamide functional group we conclude that the redox cycling activity of the arylsulfonamide RCCs is due to peripheral reactive enone, aromatic, or heterocyclic functions. Cross-target queries of the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute (UPDDI) and PubChem databases revealed that the RCCs exhibited promiscuous bioactivity profiles and have populated both screening databases with significantly higher numbers of active flags than non-RCCs. RCCs were promiscuously active against protein targets known to be susceptible to oxidation, but were also active in cell growth inhibition assays, and against other targets thought to be insensitive to oxidation. Profiling compound libraries or the hits from screening campaigns in the HRP-PR H2O2 detection assay significantly reduce the timelines and resources required to identify and eliminate promiscuous nuisance RCCs from the candidates for lead optimization. PMID:20070233

  10. Osmotic shrinkage elicits FAK- and Src phosphorylation and Src-dependent NKCC1 activation in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Müller, Helene Steenkær Holm; Jørgensen, Bente; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-15

    The mechanisms linking cell volume sensing to volume regulation in mammalian cells remain incompletely understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and Janus kinase-2 (Jak2) occurs after osmotic shrinkage of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and contributes to volume regulation by activation of NKCC1. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397, Tyr576/577, and Tyr861 was increased rapidly after exposure to hypertonic (575 mOsm) saline, peaking after 10 (Tyr397, Tyr576/577) and 10-30 min (Tyr861). Shrinkage-induced Src family kinase autophosphorylation (pTyr416-Src) was induced after 2-10 min, and immunoprecipitation indicated that this reflected phosphorylation of Src itself, rather than Fyn and Yes. Phosphorylated Src and FAK partly colocalized with vinculin, a focal adhesion marker, after hypertonic shrinkage. The Src inhibitor pyrazolopyrimidine-2 (PP2, 10 μM) essentially abolished shrinkage-induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr576/577 and Tyr861, yet not at Tyr397, and inhibited shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity by ∼50%. The FAK inhibitor PF-573,228 augmented shrinkage-induced Src phosphorylation, and inhibited shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity by ∼15%. The apparent role of Src in NKCC1 activation did not reflect phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase (MLC), which was unaffected by shrinkage and by PP2, but may involve Jak2, a known target of Src, which was rapidly activated by osmotic shrinkage and inhibited by PP2. Collectively, our findings suggest a major role for Src and possibly the Jak2 axis in shrinkage-activation of NKCC1 in NIH3T3 cells, whereas no evidence was found for major roles for FAK and MLC in this process. PMID:25377086

  11. Impedance studies of Ni/Cd and Ni/H cells using the cell case as reference electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1989-01-01

    Many impedance studies were carried out on Ni electrodes and Ni/Cd and Ni/H batteries. In order for impedance to become a diagnostic tool, accurate and reproducible measurements must be made, and some way of separating the contributions of the individual electrodes must be found. Using the PAR and the Solartron impedance equipment, studies have found that consistent measurements can be made if the cells or electrodes are equilibrated at the voltage of interest. In the charged state, equilibration times required are short, on the order of a few hours or less, but the equilibration time required becomes progessively longer as the voltage is lowered. The cell case can be used as a reference electrode during impedance measurements. The voltage of the case with respect to the electrodes is unimportant provided that it does not change appreciably during the course of the measurement. Measurements were made with several uncycled Ni/Cd cells, one from a lot which was known to have faulty Cd electrodes and another from a lot which showed excellent cycle life and presumably had good Cd electrodes. The impedances of the Ni electrodes vs. the case were similar, while the impedance of the poor Cd electrodes vs. the case. A 50 AH Ni/H cell was also investigated. After subtraction of the ohmic resistances, the sums of the impedances of the individual electrodes were very close to the impedance of the total cell. This indicates that the method is valid for examining the characteristics of the individual electrodes in situ.

  12. Public Access and Use of Health Research: An Exploratory Study of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy Using Interviews and Surveys of Health Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Willinsky, John; Maggio, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy mandated open access for publications resulting from NIH funding (following a 12-month embargo). The large increase in access to research that will take place in the years to come has potential implications for evidence-based practice (EBP) and lifelong learning for health personnel. Objective This study assesses health personnel’s current use of research to establish whether grounds exist for expecting, preparing for, and further measuring the impact of the NIH Public Access Policy on health care quality and outcomes in light of time constraints and existing information resources. Methods In all, 14 interviews and 90 surveys of health personnel were conducted at a community-based clinic and an independent teaching hospital in 2010. Health personnel were asked about the research sources they consulted and the frequency with which they consulted these sources, as well as motivation and search strategies used to locate articles, perceived level of access to research, and knowledge of the NIH Public Access Policy. Results In terms of current access to health information, 65% (57/88) of the health personnel reported being satisfied, while 32% (28/88) reported feeling underserved. Among the sources health personnel reported that they relied upon and consulted weekly, 83% (73/88) reported turning to colleagues, 77% (67/87) reported using synthesized information resources (eg, UpToDate and Cochrane Systematic Reviews), while 32% (28/88) reported that they consulted primary research literature. The dominant resources health personnel consulted when actively searching for health information were Google and Wikipedia, while 27% (24/89) reported using PubMed weekly. The most prevalent reason given for accessing research on a weekly basis, reported by 35% (31/88) of survey respondents, was to help a specific patient, while 31% (26/84) were motivated by general interest in research. Conclusions

  13. Characterization and cloning of a receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B B; Cook, J S; Wolsing, D H; Ting, J; Tiesman, J P; Correa, P E; Olson, C A; Pecquet, A L; Ventura, F; Grant, R A

    1994-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-related factors whose only receptor identified to date is the product of the daf-4 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. Mouse embryonic NIH 3T3 fibroblasts display high-affinity 125I-BMP-4 binding sites. Binding assays are not possible with the isoform 125I-BMP-2 unless the positively charged N-terminal sequence is removed to create a modified BMP-2, 125I-DR-BMP-2. Cross-competition experiments reveal that BMP-2 and BMP-4 interact with the same binding sites. Affinity cross-linking assays show that both BMPs interact with cell surface proteins corresponding in size to the type I (57- to 62-kDa) and type II (75- to 82-kDa) receptor components for TGF-beta and activin. Using a PCR approach, we have cloned a cDNA from NIH 3T3 cells which encodes a novel member of the transmembrane serine/threonine kinase family most closely resembling the cloned type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. Transient expression of this receptor in COS-7 cells leads to an increase in specific 125I-BMP-4 binding and the appearance of a major affinity-labeled product of approximately 64 kDa that can be labeled by either tracer. This receptor has been named BRK-1 in recognition of its ability to bind BMP-2 and BMP-4 and its receptor kinase structure. Although BRK-1 does not require cotransfection of a type II receptor in order to bind ligand in COS cells, complex formation between BRK-1 and the BMP type II receptor DAF-4 can be demonstrated when the two receptors are coexpressed, affinity labeled, and immunoprecipitated with antibodies to either receptor subunit. We conclude that BRK-1 is a putative BMP type I receptor capable of interacting with a known type II receptor for BMPs. Images PMID:8065329

  14. The NIH genetic testing registry: a new, centralized database of genetic tests to enable access to comprehensive information and improve transparency

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Maglott, Donna R.; Lee, Jennifer M.; Kattman, Brandi L.; Malheiro, Adriana J.; Ovetsky, Michael; Hem, Vichet; Gorelenkov, Viatcheslav; Song, Guangfeng; Wallin, Craig; Husain, Nora; Chitipiralla, Shanmuga; Katz, Kenneth S.; Hoffman, Douglas; Jang, Wonhee; Johnson, Mark; Karmanov, Fedor; Ukrainchik, Alexander; Denisenko, Mikhail; Fomous, Cathy; Hudson, Kathy; Ostell, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry (GTR; available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/) maintains comprehensive information about testing offered worldwide for disorders with a genetic basis. Information is voluntarily submitted by test providers. The database provides details of each test (e.g. its purpose, target populations, methods, what it measures, analytical validity, clinical validity, clinical utility, ordering information) and laboratory (e.g. location, contact information, certifications and licenses). Each test is assigned a stable identifier of the format GTR000000000, which is versioned when the submitter updates information. Data submitted by test providers are integrated with basic information maintained in National Center for Biotechnology Information’s databases and presented on the web and through FTP (ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/GTR/_README.html). PMID:23193275

  15. Expression of progesterone receptor B is associated with G0/G1 arrest of the cell cycle and growth inhibition in NIH3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Kato, Kiyoko . E-mail: kkatoh@tsurumi.beppu.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Suga, Shin; Takahashi, Akira; Ueoka, Yousuke; Arima, Takahiro; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Hachisuga, Toru; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Wake, Norio

    2005-05-01

    Previously, we found a significant reduction of progesterone receptor B (PR-B) expression levels in the Ras-mediated NIH3T3 cell transformation, and re-expression of exogenous PR-B eliminated the tumorigenic potential. We hypothesized that this reduction is of biological significance in cell transformation. In the present study, we determined the correlation between PR-B expression and cell cycle progression. In synchronized NIH3T3 cells, we found an increase in PR-B protein and p27 CDK inhibitor levels in the G0/G1 phase and a reduction due to redistribution in the S and G2/M phases. The MEK inhibitor or cAMP stimulation arrested NIH3T3 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The expression of PR-B and p27 CDK inhibitors was up-regulated by treatment with both the MEK inhibitor and cAMP. Treatment of synchronized cells with a PKA inhibitor in the presence of 1% calf serum resulted in a significant reduction in both PR-B and p27 levels. The decrease in the PR-B levels caused by anti-sense oligomers or siRNA corresponded to the reduction in p27 levels. PR-B overexpression by adenovirus infection induced p27 and suppressed cell growth. Finally, we showed that PR-B modulation involved in the regulation of NIH3T3 cell proliferation was independent of nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) activity but dependent on non-genomic ER activity.

  16. Antiproliferative activity of flower hexane extract obtained from Mentha spicata associated with Mentha rotundifolia against the MCF7, KB, and NIH/3T3 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nedel, Fernanda; Begnini, Karine; Carvalho, Pedro Henrique de Azambuja; Lund, Rafael Guerra; Beira, Fátima T A; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto B

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the antiproliferative effect in vitro of the flower hexane extract obtained from Mentha spicata associated with Mentha rotundifolia against the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), human mouth epidermal carcinoma (KB), and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines, using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. A cell density of 2×10(4)/well was seeded in 96-well plates, and samples at different concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 mg/mL were tested. The optical density was determined in an ELISA multiplate reader (Thermo Plate TP-Reader). Results demonstrated that the hexane extract presented antiproliferative activity against both the tumor cell lines KB and MCF-7, presenting a GI(50) (MCF-7=13.09 mg/mL), TGI (KB=37.76 mg/mL), and IL(50) (KB=291.07 mg/mL). Also, the hexane extract presented antiproliferative activity toward NIH 3T3 cells GI(50) (183.65 mg/mL), TGI (280.54 mg/mL), and IL(50) (384.59 mg/mL). The results indicate that the flower hexane extract obtained from M. spicata associated with M. rotundifolia presents an antineoplastic activity against KB and MCF-7, although an antiproliferative effect at a high concentration of the extract was observed toward NIH 3T3. PMID:23066647

  17. NIH working group report—using genomic information to guide weight management: From universal to precision treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Molly S; Loos, Ruth JF; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Ling, Charlotte; Franks, Paul W; Weinstock, George M; Snyder, Michael P; Vassy, Jason L; Agurs-Collins, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Objective Precision medicine utilizes genomic and other data to optimize and personalize treatment. Although more than 2,500 genetic tests are currently available, largely for extreme and/or rare phenotypes, the question remains whether this approach can be used for the treatment of common, complex conditions like obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance, which underlie a host of metabolic diseases. Methods This review, developed from a Trans-NIH Conference titled “Genes, Behaviors, and Response to Weight Loss Interventions,” provides an overview of the state of genetic and genomic research in the area of weight change and identifies key areas for future research. Results Although many loci have been identified that are associated with cross-sectional measures of obesity/body size, relatively little is known regarding the genes/loci that influence dynamic measures of weight change over time. Although successful short-term weight loss has been achieved using many different strategies, sustainable weight loss has proven elusive for many, and there are important gaps in our understanding of energy balance regulation. Conclusions Elucidating the molecular basis of variability in weight change has the potential to improve treatment outcomes and inform innovative approaches that can simultaneously take into account information from genomic and other sources in devising individualized treatment plans. PMID:26692578

  18. Effect of KOH Concentration and Anions on the Performance of a Ni-H2 Battery Positive Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Robbins, Kathleen; Gopalakrishna, M. Rao

    1996-01-01

    The capacity and voltage behavior of electrochemically impregnated sintered nickel positive plates was examined by galvanostatic charging and discharging in a flooded electrolyte cell. Three different concentrations of potassium hydroxide (KOH) (40, 31, and 26 percent) and 31 percent KOH containing dissolved nitrate, sulfate, or silicate were investigated. The end-of-charge voltage at C/10 charge and at 10 degrees C showed the following order: 40 percent KOH greater than 31 percent KOH alone and in the presence of the anions greater than 26 percent KOH. The mid discharge voltage at C/2 discharge was higher in 26 percent KOH, almost the same for 31 percent KOH with and without added contaminants, and much lower for 40 percent KOH. The plate capacity was marginally affected by cycling in all cases except for 40 percent KOH, where the capacity declined after 1,000 cycles at 80 percent depth of discharge (DOD). At the end of cycling, all the plates tested experienced a weight loss, except in the case of 31 percent KOH, as a result of active material extrusion. Cyclic voltammetry of miniature electrodes in 31 percent KOH showed that the cathodic peak potentials are less polarized in the presence and absence of silicate at -5 degrees C compared to 25 degrees C indicating a slightly higher voltage during discharge in a Ni-H2 battery. Futhermore, the features of the current-potential profile were practically unchanged in the presence of silicate.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer and Exposure to Dietary Nitrate and Nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Cross, Amanda J.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of N-nitroso compounds, which induce tumors of the pancreas in animals. The authors evaluated the relation of dietary nitrate and nitrite to pancreatic cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 10 years of follow-up between 1995 and 2006, 1,728 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified. There was no association between total nitrate or nitrite intake and pancreatic cancer in men or women. However, men in the highest quintile of summed nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat had a nonsignificantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.47; P-trend = 0.11). The authors observed a stronger increase in risk among men for nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat at ages 12–13 years (highest quintile vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.76; P-trend = 0.11), though the relation did not achieve statistical significance. The authors found no associations between adult or adolescent nitrate or nitrite intake from processed meats and pancreatic cancer among women. These results provide modest evidence that processed meat sources of dietary nitrate and nitrite may be associated with pancreatic cancer among men and provide no support for the hypothesis in women. PMID:21685410

  20. Mechano-regulatory cellular behaviors of NIH/3T3 in response to the storage modulus of liquid crystalline substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Hao; Tan, Ruizhe; Zhao, Jupeng; Yang, Shenyu; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jiaqing; Yu, Bin; Tu, Mei

    2016-04-01

    The extent of substrate stiffness has been shown to be predominant in regulating cellular behaviors. Previous studies have used matrices such as elastomers or hydrogels to understand cell behavior. Herein, liquid crystalline matrices that resemble movable morphology of biomembrane and viscoelasticity were fabricated with tunable storage modulus for the evaluation of the modulus-driven cell behaviors. Our results demonstrated that NIH/3T3 cells showed a hypersensitive response to the storage modulus of liquid crystalline substrates by the alteration in attachment, spreading, proliferation and viability, polarization, cell cycle and apoptosis, and activity of mechano-transduction-related signal molecules including FAK, paxillin and ERK. The octyl hydroxypropyl cellulose substrates (OPC-1-5) with intermediate storage modulus of 12,312Pa and 7228Pa (OPC-2 and OPC-3 respectively) could provide more beneficial adhesion conditions leading to a larger spreading area, more elongated morphology and higher proliferation rates possibly through paxillin-ERK pathway, whereas the substrates with the highest or lowest storage modulus (16,723Pa, OPC-1; and 41Pa, OPC-5, respectively) appeared unfavorable for cell growth. Our study provides insights into the mechanism of modulus-driven cellular behaviors for better design of bioengineered cell substrates. PMID:26703364