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Sample records for niobium-doped strontium titanates

  1. Ferroelectric properties of niobium-doped strontium bismuth tantalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golosov, D. A.; Zavadski, S. M.; Kolos, V. V.; Turtsevich, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of ferroelectric thin films of strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) and niobium-doped strontium bismuth tantalate (SBTN) deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrates were investigated. For the formation of the structure of the ferroelectric material, the deposited films were subjected to a subsequent annealing at temperatures of 970-1070 K in an O2 atmosphere. The results of the X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that, in contrast to SBT films, in which the Aurivillius phase is formed only at annealing temperatures of 1050-1070 K, the formation of this phase in SBTN films is observed already at a temperature of 970 K. The dependences of the dielectric permittivity, remanent polarization, and coercive force of the SBT and SBTN films on the subsequent annealing conditions were determined. It was found that, upon doping of the SBT films with niobium, the remanent polarization increases by a factor of approximately three, the Curie temperature increases by 50 K, and the dielectric permittivity also increases. It was revealed that, in contrast to the SBT films, the polarization of the SBTN films is observed already at an annealing temperature of approximately 970 K. It was shown that the replacement of SBT films by SBTN films in the manufacture of high-density nonvolatile ferroelectric randomaccess memory (FeRAM) capacitor modules makes it possible to decrease the synthesis temperature from 1070 to 990-1000 K, which improves the compatibility with the planar technology of semiconductor devices. However, it turned out that an increase in the coercive field makes niobium-doped SBT films less attractive for the use in FeRAM.

  2. Electrical properties of niobium doped barium bismuth-titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bobić, J.D.; Vijatović Petrović, M.M.; Banys, J.; Stojanović, B.D.

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Pure and doped BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} were prepared via the solid-state reaction method. ► The grain size was suppressed in Nb-doped samples. ► The diffuseness of the dielectric peak increased with dopant concentration. ► Niobium affected on relaxor behavior of barium bismuth titanate ceramics. ► The conductivity change was noticed in doped samples. -- Abstract: BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4–5/4x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 15} (BBNTx, x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.30) ceramics have been prepared by solid state method. XRD data indicate the formation of single-phase-layered perovskites for all compositions. SEM micrographs suggest that the grain size decreases with Nb doping. The effect of niobium doping on the dielectric and relaxor behavior of BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} ceramics was investigated in a wide range of temperatures (20–777 °C) and frequencies (1.21 kHz to 1 MHz). Nb doping influences T{sub c} decrease as well as the decrease of dielectric permittivity at Curie temperature. At room temperature, undoped BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} exhibits dielectric constant of ∼204 at 100 kHz, that slightly increases with Nb doping. The conductivity of BBNT5 ceramics is found to be lower than that of other investigated compositions. The value of activation energy of σ{sub DC} was found to be 0.89 eV, 1.01 eV, 0.93 eV and 0.71 eV for BBT, BBNT5, BBNT15 and BBNT30, respectively.

  3. Investigation of modified strontium titanate photoanodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisyan, A.G.; Arutyunyan, V.M.; Melikyan, V.V.; Putnyn', E.V.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies semiconducting phases on the basis of single-crystal and polycrystalline strontium titanate. An attempt is made to correlate the photoelectrochemical behavior of SrTiO/sub 3/ photoanodes with their electrophysical properties. It is shown that the photoelectrochemical properties of the photoanodes studied largely depend on the electrophysical parameters of the semiconducting strontium titanate. Ceramic electrodes doped with lanthanum display high photosensitivity.

  4. Thermodynamic restrictions on mechanosynthesis of strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, J.F.; Ferreira, A.A.L.; Antunes, I.; Fagg, D.P.; Frade, J.R.

    2012-01-15

    Chemical potential phase stability diagrams were calculated from relevant thermodynamic properties and used to predict the thermodynamic driving force under prospective conditions of room temperature mechanosynthesis. One analysed the dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure of evolving gases such as oxygen or carbon dioxide, as expected on using strontium peroxide or strontium carbonate as precursor reactants for the alkali earth component. Thermodynamic calculations were also obtained for changes in titania precursor reactants, including thermodynamic predictions for reactivity of strontium carbonate with amorphous titania. Experimental evidence showed that strontium titanate can be obtained by mechanosynthesis of strontium carbonate+anatase mixtures, due to previous amorphization under high energy milling. Ability to perform mechanosynthesis with less energetic milling depends on the suitable choice of alternative precursor reactants, which meet the thermodynamic requirements without previous amorphization; this was demonstrated by mechanosynthesis from anatase+strontium peroxide mixtures. - Graphical abstract: X-Ray diffractograms of the starting TiO{sub 2} (anatase)+SrCO{sub 3} mixture and after mechanical activation at 650 rpm, for 1, 2, and 7 h. Different symbols are used to identify reflections ascribed to anatase (diamonds), SrCO{sub 3} (squares) and SrTiO{sub 3} (triangles). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction of thermodynamic driving force for room temperature mechanosynthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic calculations for changes in titania precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental support for thermodynamic predictions.

  5. Electrocaloric properties of epitaxial strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Misirlioglu, I. B.; Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The electrocaloric (EC) response of strontium titanate thin films is computed as a function of misfit strain, temperature, electric field strength, and electrode configuration using a nonlinear thermodynamic theory. For films in a capacitor configuration on compressive substrates, the transition between paraelectric and strain-induced ferroelectric tetragonal phases produces a large adiabatic temperature change, ΔT = 5 K, at room temperature for electric field changes ΔE = 1200 kV/cm. For films on tensile substrates, the transition between the paraelectric and strain-induced ferroelectric orthorhombic phases can also be accessed using inter-digitated electrodes (IDEs). The maximum EC response occurs for IDEs with a [110] orientation.

  6. Electric field and temperature dependence of dielectric permittivity in strontium titanate investigated by a photoemission study on Pt/SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Sakyo; Okushi, Hideyo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohsawa, Takeo; Haneda, Hajime; Ueda, Shigenori; Ando, Akira; Ohashi, Naoki

    2015-05-11

    Schottky junctions made from platinum and niobium-doped strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb) were investigated by hard X-ray photoemission (HXPES) and through a band bending behavior simulation using a phenomenological model, which assumes a decrease in dielectric constant due to an electric field. Thus, we confirmed that the observed HXPES spectra at relatively high temperatures, e.g., >250 K, were well simulated using this phenomenological model. In contrast, it was inferred that the model was not appropriate for junction behavior at lower temperatures, e.g., <150 K. Therefore, a reconstruction of the phenomenological model is necessary to adequately explain the dielectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3}.

  7. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, Trevor A. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov Yu, Tian; Croft, Mark; Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Wong, Stanislaus S. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov

    2014-09-01

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ∼10 nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10 nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300 K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  8. Oxygen octahedral rotation mapping in calcium titanate/strontium titanate superlattices by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Greg; Ciston, Jim; Haislmaier, Ryan; Vanleeuwen, Brian; Alem, Nasim; Schlom, Darrell; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2014-03-01

    We report the investigation of oxygen octahedral rotation mapping in calcium titanate/barium titanate superlattices epitaxially grown on LSAT (001) with transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of the images shows induced antiphase rotations of the oxygen octahedral the strontium titanate layers that is absent in the bulk material at room temperature. These rotations play a key role in breaking the centrosymmetry of the material leading to polar properties as seen by second harmonic generation. We also map the local position of the cations to provide a complete picture of any relative local displacements and the oxygen-cation-oxygen bond angles.

  9. Physical Character and Morphology of Platinum Nanocrystals on Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gild, Joshua; Pierce, Michael; Komanicky, Vladimir; Barbour, Andi; You, Hoydoo

    2015-03-01

    The physical characteristics of platinum nanocrystals on single crystal strontium titanate, SrTiO3 , can effect the chemical properties of this important model catalyst. The morphology, epitaxy, distribution, and size of the Pt nano-crystals can all be controlled through different growth and processing mechanisms. Nanometer scale platinum thin films are deposited on strontium titanate at ambient temperatures then annealed at range of temperatures and in various oxidizing environments. The process of how these conditions influence the formation of uniformly epitaxial platinum crystals on the sample surface has been investigated using basic materials characterization techniques. Single crystal x-ray diffraction is the primary tool for these experiments, coupled with atomic force microscopy for morphology and x-ray and electron spectroscopy to determine chemical bonding between the particles and gases introduced into the system. These substrate supported nanoparticle samples will then be utilized in experiments to test their catalytic activity compared to an amorphous platinum film.

  10. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-17

    In this study, Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room temperature mobilities above 100 cm2/Vs were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm2/Vs). Average hole densities were in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  11. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-17

    In this study, Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room temperature mobilities above 100 cm2/Vs were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm2/Vs). Average hole densities were in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  12. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-15

    Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room-temperature mobilities above 100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm{sup 2}/V s). Average hole densities were in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  13. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  14. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  15. Redox-reversible niobium-doped strontium titanate decorated with in situ grown nickel nanocatalyst for high-temperature direct steam electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Xie, Kui; Xu, Shanshan; Wu, Tingshuai; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Ting; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-10-01

    Composite cathodes based on Sr0.94Ti0.9Nb0.1O3 (STNO) can be utilized for direct steam electrolysis; however, the insufficient electrocatalytic activity limits electrode performance and current efficiency. In this work, redox-reversible (Sr0.94)0.9(Ti0.9Nb0.1)0.9Ni0.1O3 (STNNO) with A-site deficiency and B-site excess has been designed as a cathode material in an oxide-ion-conducting solid oxide electrolyzer for direct steam electrolysis. The XRD, TEM, SEM, EDS, TGA and XPS results together confirm that the exsolution or dissolution of Ni nanoparticles anchored on the STNO surface is completely reversible in the redox cycles. The electrical properties of STNO and STNNO are investigated and correlated to electrode performances. The current efficiency with an STNNO cathode is enhanced by about 20% compared to the values with a bare STNO cathode in 5% H2O/H2/Ar or 5% H2O/Ar at 800 °C. The synergetic effect of catalytically active nickel nanoparticles and the redox-stable STNO skeleton contributes to the improved performance and excellent stability of the cathode for steam electrolysis. PMID:25134937

  16. Nonlinear transport in ionic liquid gated strontium titanate nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence M.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-09-14

    Measurements of the current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of ionic liquid gated nanometer scale channels of strontium titanate have been carried out. At low gate voltages, the I–V characteristics exhibit a large voltage threshold for conduction and a nonlinear power law behavior at all temperatures measured. The source-drain current of these nanowires scales as a power law of the difference between the source-drain voltage and the threshold voltage. The scaling behavior of the I–V characteristic is reminiscent of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots. At large gate voltages, the narrow channel acts as a quasi-1D wire whose conductance follows Landauer's formula for multichannel transport.

  17. Exploring strontium titanate as a reforming catalyst for dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hbaieb, K.

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium-doped strontium titanate (YST)-based perovskite has been explored as catalyst for reforming dodecane. Active metal elements such as ruthenium, nickel and cobalt were doped on the B-site of the perovskite to boost the catalyst activity. Commercial Ni-alumina catalyst has been used for benchmarking. Both steam and autothermal reforming schemes have been used at 800 and 850 °C. Irrespective of the doping elements, all catalysts performed well and had comparable activity and conversion as the commercial catalyst with slight advantage for ruthenium followed by nickel-based catalysts. Hydrogen and syngas yields fall into the range of 65-75 and 83-91 %, respectively. Conversion was consistently between 84 and 90 %. As such, the YST-based perovskite is a promising catalyst for reforming of heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

  18. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. R.; Huang, W. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Jiang, X. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications.

  19. Visible-light-accelerated oxygen vacancy migration in strontium titanate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Lei, Y.; Shen, B. G.; Sun, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Strontium titanate is a model transition metal oxide that exhibits versatile properties of special interest for both fundamental and applied researches. There is evidence that most of the attractive properties of SrTiO3 are closely associated with oxygen vacancies. Tuning the kinetics of oxygen vacancies is then highly desired. Here we reported on a dramatic tuning of the electro-migration of oxygen vacancies by visible light illumination. It is found that, through depressing activation energy for vacancy diffusion, light illumination remarkably accelerates oxygen vacancies even at room temperature. This effect provides a feasible approach towards the modulation of the anionic processes. The principle proved here can be extended to other perovskite oxides, finding a wide application in oxide electronics. PMID:26420376

  20. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-24

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1−xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba{sup 2+} ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba{sup 2+} ion in SBT lattice.

  1. Persistent Optically Induced Magnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Crooker, S. A.; Bombeck, M.; Ambwani, P.; Leighton, C.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. While its electronic, optical, and lattice properties have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research owing to the discovery of magnetism and superconductivity at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other oxides. The formation and distribution of oxygen vacancies may play an essential but as-yet-incompletely understood role. Here we observe an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The optically induced magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable via the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects, which only occur in oxygen-deficient samples, reveal a detailed interplay between defects, magnetism, and light in oxide materials. W. D. Rice et al. submitted. See article on arXiv.

  2. XANES study of Fe-implanted strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Lobacheva, O.; Goncharova, L. V.; Chavarha, M.; Sham, T. K.

    2014-03-31

    Properties of strontium titanate SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) depend to a great extent on the substitutional dopants and defects of crystal structure. The ion beam implantation method was used for doping STO (001) crystals with Fe at different doses. Implanted samples were then annealed at 350°C in oxygen to induce recrystallization and remove oxygen vacancies produced during ion implantation process. The effect of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing was studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) method and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). XANES allowed to monitor the change in structure of STO crystals and in the local environment of Fe following the implantation and annealing steps. SQUID measurements revealed correlation between magnetic moment and Fe implantation dose. Ferromagnetic hysteresis was observed on selected Fe-implanted STO at 5 K. The observed magnetic properties can be correlated with the several Fe oxide phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies.

  3. Properties of barium strontium titanate at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Nurul; Free, Charles

    2015-04-24

    The trend towards using higher millimetre-wave frequencies for communication systems has created a need for accurate characterization of materials to be used at these frequencies. Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material whose permittivity is known to change as a function of applied electric field and have found varieties of application in electronic and communication field. In this work, new data on the properties of BST characterize using the free space technique at frequencies between 145 GHz and 155 GHz for both thick film and bulk samples are presented. The measurement data provided useful information on effective permittivity and loss tangent for all the BST samples. Data on the material transmission, reflection properties as well as loss will also be presented. The outcome of the work shows through practical measurement, that BST has a high permittivity with moderate losses and the results also shows that BST has suitable properties to be used as RAM for high frequency application.

  4. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanates at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were the following: to understand the phase transformations in barium and strontium titanates as the crystals go from one temperature to the other; and to study the dielectric behavior of barium and strontium titanate crystals at a microwave frequency of 9.12 GHz and as a function of temperature. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanate are conducted using a cylindrical microwave resonant cavity as a probe. The cavity technique is quite successful in establishing the phase changes in these crystals. It appears that dipole relaxation plays an important role in the behavior of the dielectric response of the medium loading the cavity as phase change takes place within the sample. The method of a loaded resonant microwave cavity as applied in this work has proven to be sensitive enough to monitor small phase changes of the cavity medium.

  5. In vitro dissolution of strontium titanate to estimate clearance rates in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeri Lynn

    At the In-Tank Precipitation facility (ITP) of the Savannah River Site, strontium and other radionuclides are removed from high-level radioactive waste and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Strontium removal is accomplished by ion-exchange using monosodium titanate slurry which creates a form of strontium titanate with unknown solubility characteristics. In the case of accidental inhalation of a compound containing radioactive strontium, the ICRP, in Publication 66, recommends using default values for rates of absorption into body fluids at the lungs in the absence of reliable human or animal data. The default value depends on whether the absorption is considered to be fast, moderate, or slow (Type F, M, or S). Current dose assessment for an individual upon inadvertent exposure to airborne radioactive strontium assumes that all strontium compounds are Type F (soluble) or Type S (insoluble). Pure high-fired strontium titanate (SrTiOsb3) is considered Type S. The purpose of this project was to determine the solubility of strontium titanate in the form created at the ITP facility. An in vitro dissolution study was done with a precipitate simulant and with several types of strontium titanate and the results were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with high-fired SrTiOsb3 in rats. The data from both studies were used independently to assign the compounds to absorption type based on criteria specified in ICRP 71. Results of the in vitro studies showed that the DWPF simulant should be assigned to Type M and the strontium titanate should be assigned to Type S. It is possible the difference in the DWPF simulant is due to the other chemicals present. Results of the in vivo study verified that SrTiOsb3 should be assigned to Type S. Lung clearance data of SrTiOsb3 from rats showed that 85% cleared within the first 24 hours and the remaining 15% with a half-time of 130 days. The initial rapid clearance is attributed to deposition in airways as

  6. Low-resistance and high-resistance states in strontium titanate films formed by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Anaraki, H.; Gaponenko, N. V.; Litvinov, V. G.; Ermachikhin, A. V.; Kolos, V. V.; Pyatlitski, A. N.; Ivanov, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    A change in the resistance of strontium titanate structures formed by the sol-gel method has been demonstrated. The transition of a strontium titanate film with a thickness of about 300 nm from the highresistance to low-resistance state occurs when the bias voltage on the silicon/titanium dioxide/platinum/strontium titanate/nickel capacitor structure reaches the values of about 10 V. The resistance changes from several ohms to several tens of kiloohms. For a thicker film (~400 nm), the switching voltage increases while the resistance of the structure in the high-resistance state reaches several hundreds of kiloohms. Supposedly, the main role in changing the resistance is played by deep levels whose population changes by the applied voltage. The prospects for the application of strontium titanate films in memory memristor elements have been discussed.

  7. Composite solid oxide fuel cell anode based on ceria and strontium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2008-12-23

    An anode and method of making the same wherein the anode consists of two separate phases, one consisting of a doped strontium titanate phase and one consisting of a doped cerium oxide phase. The strontium titanate phase consists of Sr.sub.1-xM.sub.xTiO.sub.3-.delta., where M is either yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc), or lanthanum (La), where "x" may vary typically from about 0.01 to about 0.5, and where .delta. is indicative of some degree of oxygen non-stoichiometry. A small quantity of cerium may also substitute for titanium in the strontium titanate lattice. The cerium oxide consists of N.sub.yCe.sub.1-yO.sub.2-.delta., where N is either niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), antimony (Sb) or tantalum (Ta) and where "y" may vary typically from about 0.001 to about 0.1 and wherein the ratio of Ti in said first phase to the sum of Ce and N in the second phase is between about 0.2 to about 0.75. Small quantities of strontium, yttrium, and/or lanthanum may additionally substitute into the cerium oxide lattice. The combination of these two phases results in better performance than either phase used separately as an anode for solid oxide fuel cell or other electrochemical device.

  8. Modeling of compositionally graded barium strontium titanate from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walizer, Laura Elizabeth

    Barium Strontium Titanate (BaxSr1-xTiO 3 or BST) is a Perovskite alloy of interest for both technological and intellectual reasons. Its ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties make it useful in a variety of electric components such as transducers and actuators, and BST in particular is a material of interest for the development of a ferroelectric RAM for computers.(1) The inclusion of SrTiO3, an incipient ferroelectric, and the fact that the properties of a BST system depend strongly on its relative composition of BaTiO3 (BT) and SrTiO3 (ST), make also this a material of high interest. (2) Compositionally graded systems are of further interest (see e.g., Refs. (3), (4), (5) and references therein), partly because their compositional grading leads to a built-in polarization gradient. Due to this, these systems could act as transcapacitors, devices which act as charge amplifiers in much the same way that transistors act as current amplifiers.(3), (4) Here, compositionally graded BST systems were modeled using a first-principles derived effective Hamiltonian method within Monte-Carlo simulation. (6) The graded systems under consideration had an average Ba composition of 70%. These systems were modeled under stress-free conditions, as well as, under epitaxial strain due to a SrTiO3 substrate. Both the degree of grading and the thickness of the layers were varied. The investigation revealed that graded BST systems behaved differently from bulk BST systems in several ways. First, some graded BST systems possessed both monodomain states qualitatively similar to those found in bulk systems (except that the polarization exhibited a "wave" behavior inside the graded systems), and also states with domain striping. Where this occurred, the monodomain state was lower in energy, and was therefore the ground-state, but the striped domain state was found to be metastable, representing a local energy minimum. Analyzing unstrained compositionally graded systems layer by layer

  9. Electronic structure of barium strontium titanate by soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Underwood, J.H.; Gullikson, E.M.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Perovskite-type titanates, such as Strontium Titanate (STO), Barium Titanate (BTO), and Lead Titanate (PTO) have been widely studied because they show good electric and optical properties. In recent years, thin films of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) have been paid much attention as dielectrics of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) capacitors. BST is a better insulator with a higher dielectric constant than STO and can be controlled in a paraelectric phase with an appropriate ratio of Ba/Sr composition, however, few studies have been done on the electronic structure of the material. Studies of the electronic structure of such materials can be beneficial, both for fundamental physics research and for improving technological applications. BTO is a famous ferroelectric material with a tetragonal structure, in which Ti and Ba atoms are slightly displaced from the lattice points. On the other hand, BST keeps a paraelectric phase, which means that the atoms are still at the cubic lattice points. It should be of great interest to see how this difference of the local structure around Ti atoms between BTO and BST effects the electronic structure of these two materials. In this report, the authors present the Ti L{sub 2,3} absorption spectra of STO, BTO, and BST measured with very high accuracy in energy of the absorption features.

  10. Sub-10 nm strontium titanate nanocubes highly dispersed in non-polar organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Kyoichi; Katagiri, Kiyofumi; Kamiya, Jumpei; Hamanaka, Tadashi; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2010-10-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO(3)) nanoparticles with well defined cubic shape and sub-10 nm size that are highly dispersible in non-polar organic solvents were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal (HT) processing. Water-soluble titanium complexes and strontium hydroxide were employed as precursors. When the HT process was carried out without oleic acid, the SrTiO(3) particles obtained were relatively large and aggregated. However, SrTiO(3) nanocubes that are highly dispersible in hexane were obtained via the HT process using oleic acid and hydrazine. PMID:20844789

  11. Frequency and temperature dependence of complex strontium titanate electrorheological fluids under an alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Yuling; Lu, Kunquan

    1998-05-01

    The electrorheological (ER) behavior of suspensions of water-free complex strontium titanate particles, synthesized by means of a modified sol-gel technique, in silicone oil have been investigated under an ac electric field. The frequency and temperature dependence of the shear stress show that the shear stress decreases monotonically with frequency and reaches a maximum value when the temperature is around 70 °C. The ER behavior has been explained on the basis of dielectric measurements.

  12. A FAMILY OF PEROXO-TITANATE MATERIALS TAILORED FOR OPTIMAL STRONTIUM ANDACTINIDE SORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-07

    Achieving global optimization of inorganic sorbent efficacy, as well as tailoring sorbent specificity for target sorbates would facilitate increased wide-spread use of these materials in applications such as producing potable water or nuclear waste treatment. Sodium titanates have long been known as sorbents for radionuclides; {sup 90}Sr and transuranic elements in particular. We have developed a related class of materials, which we refer to as peroxo-titanates: these are sodium titanates or hydrous titanates synthesized in the presence of or treated post-synthesis with hydrogen peroxide. Peroxo-titanates show remarkable and universal improved sorption behavior with respect to separation of actinides and strontium from Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear waste simulants. Enhancement in sorption kinetics can potentially result in as much as an order of magnitude increase in batch processing throughput. Peroxo-titanates have been produced by three different synthetic routes: post-synthesis peroxide-treatment of a commercially produced monosodium titanate, an aqueous-peroxide synthetic route, and an isopropanol-peroxide synthetic route. The peroxo-titanate materials are characteristically yellow to orange, indicating the presence of protonated or hydrated Ti-peroxo species; and the chemical formula can be generally written as H{sub v}Na{sub w}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(xH{sub 2}O)[yH{sub z}O{sub 2}] where (v+w) = 2, z = 0-2, and total volatile species accounts for 25-50 wt % of the solid. Further enhancement of sorption performance is achieved by processing, storing and utilizing the peroxo-titanate as an aqueous slurry rather than a dry powder, and post-synthesis acidification. All three synthesis modifications; addition of hydrogen peroxide, use of a slurry form and acidification can be applied more broadly to the optimization of other metal oxide sorbents and other ion separations processes.

  13. Strontium and Actinide Separations from High Level Nuclear Waste Solutions using Monosodium Titanate - Actual Waste Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs,D.T.; Walker, D.D.; Fondeur, F.F.; Norato, M.A.; Pulmano, R.L.; Fink, S.D.

    2005-11-01

    Pretreatment processes at the Savannah River Site will separate {sup 90}Sr, alpha-emitting and radionuclides (i.e., actinides) and {sup 137}Cs prior to disposal of the high-level nuclear waste. Separation of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides occurs by ion exchange/adsorption using an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). Previously reported testing with simulants indicates that the MST exhibits high selectivity for strontium and actinides in high ionic strength and strongly alkaline salt solutions. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from actual waste solutions. These tests evaluated the effects of ionic strength, mixing, elevated alpha activities, and multiple contacts of the waste with MST. Tests also provided confirmation that MST performs well at much larger laboratory scales (300-700 times larger) and exhibits little affinity for desorption of strontium and plutonium during washing.

  14. Impact of vacancy clusters on characteristic resistance change of nonstoichiometric strontium titanate nano-film

    SciTech Connect

    Su Kim, Yong Jee Yoon, Moon; Hee Sohn, Chang; Buhm Lee, Shin; Lee, Daesu; Chul Jeon, Byung; Keun Yoo, Hyang; Won Noh, Tae; Kim, Jiyeon; Yu, Jaejun; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Don Bu, Sang; Simon Mun, Bongjin

    2014-01-06

    In practical applications to bipolar resistance switching (BRS) memory devices with enhanced performance and high-scalability, oxide materials are commonly fabricated to highly nonstoichiometric and nanometer scale films. In this study, we fabricated ultrathin strontium titanate film, which shows two types of BRS behavior. By using micro-beam X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, the changes of core-level spectra depending on the resistance states are spatially resolved. Experimental and calculated results demonstrated that the fundamental switching mechanism in the two types of BRS is originated from the migration of anion and cation vacancies and the formation of insulating vacancy clusters near vicinity of the interface.

  15. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Yap, Yoke K.

    2013-01-22

    PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coating of strontium titanate and Poly(methyl methacrylate). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about five-fold lower than that of the as-grown VAMWCNTs. Theoretical simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs’ repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolong emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices.

  16. Formation of quasi-ordered structures on the surface of strontium titanate in a plasma field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, N. A.; Levin, A. A.; Langer, E.; Meyer, D. C.; Doicinovic, I.; Puric, J.

    2008-11-15

    The X-ray diffraction and X-ray spectroscopic properties of strontium titanate single crystals and their surface exposed to plasma have been investigated. Both undoped SrTiO{sub 3} crystals and crystals containing impurity ions of the iron or lanthanum groups have been analyzed. Data on the plasma-induced formation of ordered crystallites on the sample surface were obtained by electron and atomic force microscopy. The crystallites are from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -9} m in size and their hypothetical orientation [321] is independent of the sample orientation and irradiation dose.

  17. Charge Density Wave Behavior of Ionic Liquid Gated Strontium Titanate Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the current-voltage characteristics of ionic liquid gated nanometer scale channels of strontium titanate have been carried out. These characteristics exhibit a large voltage threshold for conduction and a nonlinear power law behavior at all temperatures measured. The source-drain current of these nanowires scales as a power law of the difference between the source-drain voltage and the threshold voltage. The temperature dependence of the threshold voltage appears to be related to the inverse of the temperature dependent dielectric constant of strontium titanate in qualitative agreement with a simple model of charge density wave depinning. These observations, when taken together, are evidence that a gate induced charge density wave has been induced, and is depinned by strong electric fields. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  18. Concurrent atomistic and continuum simulation of bi-crystal strontium titanate with tilt grain boundary

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengfeng; Chen, Youping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a concurrent atomistic–continuum (CAC) methodology for simulation of the grain boundary (GB) structures and their interaction with other defects in ionic materials. Simulation results show that the CAC simulation allows a smooth passage of cracks through the atomistic–continuum interface without the need for additional constitutive rules or special numerical treatment; both the atomic-scale structures and the energies of the four different [001] tilt GBs in bi-crystal strontium titanate obtained by CAC compare well with those obtained by existing experiments and density function theory calculations. Although 98.4% of the degrees of freedom of the simulated atomistic system have been eliminated in a coarsely meshed finite-element region, the CAC results, including the stress–strain responses, the GB–crack interaction mechanisms and the effect of the interaction on the fracture strength, are comparable with that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation results. In addition, CAC simulation results show that the GB–crack interaction has a significant effect on the fracture behaviour of bi-crystal strontium titanate; not only the misorientation angle but also the atomic-level details of the GB structure influence the effect of the GB on impeding crack propagation. PMID:25792957

  19. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-03

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both strontium-85 and cesium-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor for strontium-85 with monosodium titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% strontium-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the strontium-85 instantaneous decontamination factor with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the monosodium titanate impregnated membrane cartridges and crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges and co-sintered active crystalline silicotitanate cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of cesium-137 with co-sintered crystalline silicotitanate cartridges. Tests results with crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges for cesium-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semicontinuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  20. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y3+ and Mn2+ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin

    2014-10-01

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y3+ and Mn2+ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450 K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  1. Plasticity and an Inverse Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Strontium Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gumbsch, P.; Taeri-Baghbadrani, S.; Brunner, D.; Sigle, W.; Ruehle, M.

    2001-08-20

    The use of ceramic materials is often restricted by a transition from ductile behavior to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. For example, strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3} ) is known to be extremely fragile and brittle below 1300 K. It is therefore surprising to find that SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals can be deformed in compression below 1050 K again. Extensive plastic deformation up to 7% strain at low yield stresses of the order of only 120 MPa is possible at room temperature. Low temperature plasticity is carried by the same <110>{l_brace}1{bar 1} 0{r_brace} dislocations as the high temperature deformation along the <001> axis. From this we conclude that these dislocations must exist in two different core configurations.

  2. Effect of thermal stresses on the dielectric properties of strontium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Weiss, C. V.; Alpay, S. P.

    2011-07-01

    We develop a quantitative thermodynamic model to understand the role of thermal stresses on the dielectric permittivity and tunability of (001)-textured polycrystalline monodomain strontium titanate (SrTiO3) films. This methodology is used to compute the dielectric constant and tunability of SrTiO3 films on Si, c-sapphire, LaAlO3, and MgO substrates. Results show that dielectric properties of SrTiO3 depend strongly on the growth/processing temperature TG. For substrates such as MgO that induce compressive in-plane thermal stresses, the dielectric response of SrTiO3 is enhanced. However, for SrTiO3 films on IC-compatible substrates (Si and c-sapphire), thermal stresses can significantly degrade the dielectric permittivity and tunability.

  3. Microstructural, dielectric and magnetic properties of multiferroic composite system barium strontium titanate – nickel cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, Poonam Tandon, R. P.

    2015-05-15

    Multiferroic composites (1-x) Ba{sub 0.95}Sr{sub 0.05}TiO{sub 3} + (x) Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) has been prepared by solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis of the composite samples confirmed the presence of both barium strontium titanate (BST) and nickel cobalt ferrite (NCF) phases. FESEM images indicated the well dispersion of NCF grains among BST grains. Dielectric constant and loss of the composite samples decreases with increase in frequency following Maxwell-Wagner relaxation mechanism. Composite sample with highest ferrite content possesses highest values of remanent and saturation magnetization.

  4. Lowering of ground state induced by core-shell structure in strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiat, J. M.; Hehlen, B.; Anoufa, M.; Bogicevic, C.; Curfs, C.; Boyer, B.; Al-Sabbagh, M.; Porcher, F.; Al-Zein, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new ground state of textbook compound strontium titanate (SrTi O3) is obtained by inducing a specific core-shell structure of the particles. Using a combination of high energy synchrotron and neutron diffraction, we demonstrate a lowering of the ferroelastic ground state towards a new antiferrodistortive phase, accompanied with strong shifts of the critical temperature. This new phase is discussed within the Landau theory and compared with the situation in thin films and during pressure experiments. The crucial competition between particle shape anisotropy, surface tension, and shear strain is analyzed. Inducing a specific core-shell structure is therefore an easy way to tailor structural properties and to stabilize new phases that cannot exist in bulk material, just like film deposition on a substrate.

  5. The Effect of Mg Doping on Structural and Luminescent Properties of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, A.; Chauhan, N.

    Pure and Mg doped barium strontium titanate (BST) phosphor samples are prepared by solid state reaction (SSR) method at 1300 °c. The prepared samples are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. The optical properties are studied in terms of mechanoluminescence (ML) and thermoluminescence (TL). The XRD results reveal perovskite structure of samples with XRD peaks corresponding to planes (100), (110), (111), (200) and (211). The SEM micrographs exhibit agglomeration of particles of different shapes. The particle size calculated using SEM and XRD data is found to lie in nano range. The ML intensity is found to depend on applied load while the TL intensity increases with increasing irradiation time.

  6. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.; Pinto, R.; Pai, S. P.; Dsousa, D. P.; Apte, P. R.; Kumar, D.; Purandare, S. C.; Bhatnagar, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si (100), Sapphire and LaAlO3 (100) substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures up to 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  7. Study of a Flexible Low Profile Tunable Dipole Antenna Using Barium Strontium Titanate Varactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cure, David; Weller, Thomas; Miranda, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a flexible low profile dipole antenna using a frequency selective surface (FSS) with interdigital barium strontium titanate (BST) varactor-tuned unit cells is presented. The varactor chips were placed only along one dimension of the FSS to avoid the use of vias and simplify the DC bias network. The antenna uses overlapping metallic plates that resemble fish scales as a ground plane to improve the flexibility of the multi-material stack structure. The measured data of the antenna demonstrate tunability from 2.42 GHz to 2.66 GHz and 1.3 dB gain drop when using overlapping metallic plates instead of continuous ground plane. The total antenna thickness is approximately lambda/24.

  8. Blocking effect of crystal–glass interface in lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yong; Baturin, Ivan; Liang, Tongxiang

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The blocking effect of the crystal–glass interface on the carrier transport behavior in the lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics: preparation and characterization. - Highlights: • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition promotes the crystallization of the major crystalline phase. • The Z″ and M″ peaks exist a significant mismatch for 0.5 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • The Z″ and M″ peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • Crystallite impedance decreases while crystal–glass interface impedance increases. • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface. - Abstract: The microstructures and dielectric properties in La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. SEM analysis indicated that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive decreases the average crystallite size. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the positions of Z″ and M″ peaks are close for undoped samples. When La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration is 0.5 mol%, the Z″ and M″ peaks show a significant mismatch. Furthermore, these peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. With increasing La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration, the contribution of the crystallite impedance becomes smaller, while the contribution of the crystal–glass interface impedance becomes larger. More interestingly, it was found that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface in the temperature range of 250–450 °C. This may be attributed to a decrease of activation energy of the crystallite and an increase of the crystal–glass interface area.

  9. Effect of alkaline earth oxides on the formation of surface microphases that protect strontium titanate from reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, L.A.; Kostikov, Yu.P.; Leonov, A.I.; Rotenberg, B.A.; Strykanov, V.S.

    1986-08-20

    The authors studied the effect of addition of strontium oxide, barium oxide, and calcium oxide on the formation of surface microphases and the reduction of strontium titanate. The materials were strontium carbonate, barium carbonate, and calcium carbonate (analytical grade) and titanium dioxide (pure grade). X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out on a DRON-2.0 diffractometer (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../, Ni filter). The surface layers were studies in an electron spectrometer by ESCA (exciting irradiation Al/sub K..cap alpha../; bond energy in standard gold sample Au/sub 4/f/sub 1/2/ = 84.1 eV; depth of layer 8 nm). Samplers were prepared according to the usual ceramic technology. It was found that protection from reduction of strontium titanate that is doped with calcium, strontium, or barium oxide is related to the formation of surface microphases that are close to M/sub 2/TiO/sub 4/ in composition and do not undergo reduction when calcined in a medium at low partial pressure of oxygen.

  10. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  11. Studies on Synthesis, Structural and Electrical Properties of Complex Oxide Thin Films: Barium Strontium Titanate and Lanthanum Strontium Nickelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podpirka, Adrian A.

    High performance miniaturized passives are of great importance for advanced nanoelectronic packages for several applications including efficient power delivery. Low cost thin film capacitors fabricated directly on package (and/or on-chip) are an attractive approach towards realizing such devices. This thesis aims to explore fundamental frequency dependent dielectric and insulating properties of thin film high-k dielectric constant in the perovskite and perovskite-related complex oxides. Throughout this thesis, we have successfully observed the role of structure, strain and oxygen stoichiometry on the dielectric properties of thin film complex oxides, allowing a greater understanding of processing conditions and polarization mechanisms. In the first section of the thesis, we explore novel processing methods in the conventional ferroelectric, barium strontium titanate, Ba1-xSr xTiO3 (BST), using ultraviolet enhanced oxidation techniques in order to achieve improvements in the dielectric properties. Using this method, we also explore the growth of BST on inexpensive non-noble metals such as Ni which presents technical challenges due to the ability to oxidize at high temperatures. We observe a significant lowering of the dielectric loss while also lowering the process temperature which allows us to maintain an intimate interface between the dielectric layer and the metal electrode. The second section of this thesis explores the novel dielectric material, Lanthanum Strontium Nickelate, La2-xSrxNiO4 (LSNO), which exhibits a colossal dielectric response. For the first time, we report on the colossal dielectric properties of polycrystalline and epitaxial thin film LSNO. We observe a significant polarization dependence on the microstructure due to the grain/grain boundary interaction with charged carriers. We next grew epitaxial films on various insulating oxide substrates in order to decouple the grain boundary interaction. Here we observed substrate dependent dielectric

  12. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of strontium are reviewed. Consumption for the year is estimated to have been about 35 kt for strontium contained in celestite, strontium carbonate, and strontium nitrate. Exports of strontium totaled only about 1.1 kt for the year. U.S. strontium imports and consumption increased about 30 percent in 1994 due to increased domestic production of color television picture tube glass. The average customs value of celestite coming into the U.S. was about $75/t, strontium carbonate was valued at $661/t, and strontium nitrate was valued at about $1,069/t.

  13. On the sol-gel synthesis of strontium-titanate thin films and the prospects of their use in electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sohrabi Anaraki, H.; Gaponenko, N. V. Rudenko, M. V.; Guk, A. F.; Zavadskij, S. M.; Golosov, D. A.; Kolosnitsyn, B. S.; Kolos, V. V.; Pyatlitskij, A. N.; Turtsevich, A. S.

    2014-12-15

    Strontium-titanate films obtained by the sol-gel technique are deposited onto silicon and silicon/oxide titanium/platinum substrates. The strontium-titanate phase is detected by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis after heat treatment at temperatures of 750 and 800°C. The thickness of the films obtained by the spin-on method increases from 50 to 250 nm as the number of deposited layers is increased and is accompanied with an increase in the grain size in the films. Prospects of the development of the sol-gel technique for the formation of film components of electronic devices based on SrTiO{sub 3} xerogels are discussed.

  14. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. In 1995, U.S. strontium imports and consumption increased nearly 30 percent due to increased domestic production of color television picture tube glass. However, strontium compound exports fell during 1995. Strontium is also used in the production of permanent ceramic ferrite magnets. Strontium nitrate, strontium chromate, and strontium chloride are also commonly used materials. Although the development of an affordable flatscreen display could eliminate the need for strontium in television production, this technology is not expected to be perfected in the immediate future.

  15. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  16. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-23

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-30

    We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

  18. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Mexico is the leading producer of celestite, the most common strontium ore. Chemical Products is the only major US maker of strontium compounds. It produces all of its strontium carbonate from imported Mexican celestite. Mexico is also a large producer of strontium carbonate, as are China, Germany, Japan and the Republic of Korea. There has been no celestite production in the United States since 1959.

  19. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    China, Mexico, Spain and Turkey are the world's leading producers of celestite (strontium sulphate). These countries accounted for 98% of the total world production in 2005. For the same period, US apparent consumption of strontium decreased to 12.3 kt. Imports were 21.2 kt, of which 84% came from Mexico. Imports of celestite and strontium carbonate decreased 71% and 24% respectively.

  20. Metal-insulator transition at lanthanum aluminate-strontium titanate interface induced by oxygen plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Weitao; Cen, Cheng

    The formation of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at lanthanum aluminate (LAO)-strontium titanate (STO) interface, as well as the 2DEG's unique characters in metal-insulator transition, have evoked widespread interest. Highly insulating interfaces are obtained for the structures with LAO thickness below 3 unit cell (uc) and abrupt transition from an insulating to conducting interface was observed for samples with thicker LAO layers. For 3uc LAO/STO samples, reversible nanoscale control of the metal-insulator transition was implemented by a conductive AFM writing. Our research furtherly discovered a very stable metal-insulator transition can be achieved by oxygen plasma (OP) treatment for samples with thicker LAO layers. AFM imaging and XPS measurement demonstrated the low energy OP treatment altered only the surface bonds, which confirmed the importance of surface properties in the heterostructures. Then microscale Hall bars were patterned at the interface and imaged by electrostatic force microscope. Their transport and magnetic properties were measured. This research will promote deeper understanding about the interfacial metal-insulator transition mechanism and open new device opportunities. This work is supported by the Department of Energy Grant No. DE-SC-0010399 and National Science Foundation Grant No. NSF-1454950.

  1. Colossal Room-Temperature Electrocaloric Effect in Ferroelectric Polymer Nanocomposites Using Nanostructured Barium Strontium Titanates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Tiannan; Li, Qi; Chen, Long-Qing; Jiang, Shenglin; Wang, Qing

    2015-07-28

    The electrocaloric effect (ECE) refers to conversion of thermal to electrical energy of polarizable materials and could form the basis for the next-generation refrigeration and power technologies that are highly efficient and environmentally friendly. Ferroelectric materials such as ceramic and polymer films exhibit large ECEs, but each of these monolithic materials has its own limitations for practical cooling applications. In this work, nanosized barium strontium titanates with systematically varied morphologies have been prepared to form polymer nanocomposites with the ferroelectric polymer matrix. The solution-processed polymer nanocomposites exhibit an extraordinary room-temperature ECE via the synergistic combination of the high breakdown strength of a ferroelectric polymer matrix and the large change of polarization with temperature of ceramic nanofillers. It is found that a sizable ECE can be generated under both modest and high electric fields, and further enhanced greatly by tailoring the morphology of the ferroelectric nanofillers such as increasing the aspect ratio of the nanoinclusions. The effect of the geometry of the nanofillers on the dielectric permittivity, polarization, breakdown strength, ECE and crystallinity of the ferroelectric polymer has been systematically investigated. Simulations based on the phase-field model have been carried out to substantiate the experimental results. With the remarkable cooling energy density and refrigerant capacity, the polymer nanocomposites are promising for solid-state cooling applications. PMID:26132841

  2. Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsman, Colin; Li, Gang; Su, Caroline; Asaba, Tomoya; Lawson, Benjamin; Yu, Fan; Li, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The thermal Hall effect is the thermal analog of the electrical Hall effect. Rarely observed in normal metals, thermal Hall signals have been argued to be a key property for a number of strongly correlated materials, such as high temperature superconductors, correlated topological insulators, and quantum magnets. The observation of the thermal Hall effect requires precise measurement of temperature in intense magnetic fields. Particularly at low temperature, resistive thermometers have a strong dependence on field, which makes them unsuitable for this purpose. We have created capacitive thermometers which instead measure the dielectric constant of strontium titanate (SrTiO3). SrTiO3 approaches a ferroelectric transition, causing its dielectric constant to increase by a few orders of magnitude at low temperature. As a result, these thermometers are very sensitive at low temperature while having very little dependence on the applied magnetic field, making them ideal for thermal Hall measurements. We demonstrate this method by making measurements of the thermal Hall effect in Bismuth in magnetic fields of up to 10 T.

  3. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, S.; Bhatnagar, A.K.; Pinto, R.

    1994-12-31

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si<100>, Sapphire and LaAlO{sub 3} <100> substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures upto 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar structure with variation growth conditions. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed orientation. The tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 9}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  4. Crystallization dynamics and interface stability of strontium titanate thin films on silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hanzig, Florian; Hanzig, Juliane; Mehner, Erik; Richter, Carsten; Veselý, Jozef; Stöcker, Hartmut; Abendroth, Barbara; Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Klemm, Volker; Novikov, Dmitri; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Different physical vapor deposition methods have been used to fabricate strontium titanate thin films. Within the binary phase diagram of SrO and TiO2 the stoichiometry ranges from Ti rich to Sr rich, respectively. The crystallization of these amorphous SrTiO3 layers is investigated by in situ grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The crystallization dynamics and evolution of the lattice constants as well as crystallite sizes of the SrTiO3 layers were determined for temperatures up to 1223 K under atmospheric conditions applying different heating rates. At approximately 473 K, crystallization of perovskite-type SrTiO3 is initiated for Sr-rich electron beam evaporated layers, whereas Sr-depleted sputter-deposited thin films crystallize at 739 K. During annealing, a significant diffusion of Si from the substrate into the SrTiO3 layers occurs in the case of Sr-rich composition. This leads to the formation of secondary silicate phases which are observed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. PMID:25844077

  5. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Production figures are not published for stronium carbonate because there is only one company producing strontium carbonate domestically. Strontium carbonate is produced in the U.S. from imported celestite. Consumption can be estimated from trade data published by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Consumption is estimated at approximately 24.5 kt of strontium. The largest end-use of strontium carbonate is in the production of faceplate glass for color television picturetubes. Other applications and markets for strontium are discussed.

  6. Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Gautier, Daniel; Raulin, Francois; Scattergood, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The following topics are discussed with respect to Titan: observations of the atmosphere; laboratory simulations and theoretical models of Titan's atmosphere; endpoints of atmospheric chemistry - aerosols and oceans; exobiology; and the next steps in understanding Titan.

  7. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method

  8. Uncovering Two Competing Switching Mechanisms for Epitaxial and Ultrathin Strontium Titanate-Based Resistive Switching Bits.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Markus; Schmitt, Rafael; Messerschmitt, Felix; Rupp, Jennifer L M

    2015-11-24

    Resistive switches based on anionic electronic conducting oxides are promising devices to replace transistor-based memories due to their excellent scalability and low power consumption. In this study, we create a model switching system by manufacturing resistive switches based on ultrathin 5 nm, epitaxial, and grain boundary-free strontium titanate thin films with subnanometer surface roughness. For our model devices, we unveil two competing nonvolatile resistive switching processes being of different polarities: one switching in clockwise and the other in counterclockwise direction. They can be activated selectively with respect to the effective switching voltage and time applied to the device. Combined analysis of both processes with electrical DC-methods and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the first resistive switching process is filament-based and exhibits counterclockwise bipolar resistive switching. The R(OFF)/R(ON) resistance ratio of this process is extremely stable and can be tuned in the range 5-25 depending on the switching voltage and time. Excitingly, at high electric field strength a second bipolar resistive switching process was found. This process is clockwise and, therefore, reveals the opposite polarity switching direction when compared to the first one. Both processes do not obstruct each other, consequently, stable 1, 2, or even 3 crossover current-voltage (I-V) characteristics can be addressed for the memory bits. Equivalent circuit model analysis and fitting of impedance characteristics unequivocally show for the created grain boundary free switches that the oxide's defects and its carrier distribution close to the electrode interface contribute to the resistive switching mechanism. The addressability of two sets of resistive ON and OFF states in one device through electric field strength and switching time offers exciting new operation schemes for memory devices. PMID:26448096

  9. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) decreased to 16.7 kt (18,400 st) from 17.3 kt (19,100 st) in 2011. Gross weight of imports was 34.3 kt (37,800 st), 86 percent of which originated in Mexico.

  10. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angulo, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) decreased by 11 percent to 10.4 kt (11,460 st) from 11.8 kt (13,000 st) in 2009. Gross weight of imports totaled 20.9 kt (23,000 st), of which 65 percent originated from Mexico.

  11. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) increased markedly to 18.4 kt (20,300 st) from 10.4 kt (11,500 st) in 2010. Gross weight of imports was 34.4 kt (38,000 st), of which 76 percent originated from Mexico.

  12. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angulo, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) increased to 16 kt (17,600 st) from 10.6 kt (11,700 st) in 2008, an increase of 52 percent. This increase was attributed primarily to an increase in imported celestite. Gross weight of imports totaled 25.3 kt (27,900 st), of which 91 percent came from Mexico. Imports in 2009 were 18 percent more than in 2008. Exports of strontium compounds in 2009 decreased 15 percent to 9.3 kt (10,250 st) from 10.9 kt (12,000 st) in 2008. In 2009, the U.S. Customs value of imported strontium carbonate was 65 cents/kg (29 cents/lb); for strontium nitrate, the unit value was $ 1/kg (45 cents/lb). The unit value of imported celestite, all of which was from Mexico, was about $47/t ($43/st).

  13. The influence of the local oxygen vacancy concentration on the piezoresponse of strontium titanate thin films.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Michael; Gunkel, Felix; Bäumer, Christoph; Xu, Chencheng; Dittmann, Regina; Waser, Rainer

    2015-09-14

    In this study, the influence of the local oxygen vacancy concentration on piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements was investigated. Ultra-thin single-crystalline SrTiO3 thin films were deposited on niobium doped SrTiO3 substrates and analyzed using a combined PFM and local conductive atomic force microscopy (LC-AFM) measurement setup. After applying different polarization voltages between ±2 V and ±5 V to the thin films, we simultaneously observed an anomalous contrast in the piezoresponse amplitude and phase signal as well as a changed local conductivity in the exact same region. Since classic ferroelectricity can be excluded as the reason for the observed contrast, an influence of the local oxygen vacancy concentration on the piezoresponse is considered. Additionally, the surface potential was measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) revealing a change in surface potential in the regions of the applied voltage. The observed relaxation of the surface potential over time was fitted to a local oxidation reaction of the previously reduced regions of the ultra-thin SrTiO3 film. We propose a model that relates the local oxygen vacancy concentration to the surface potential. The influence of the oxygen vacancy concentration on the PFM measurements is explained. PMID:26246071

  14. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section reviewing the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Imports of celestite (strontium ore) reached nearly 45 kt, which represents an increase of 35 percent over 1991. Mexico supplied almost all of the celestite. Nearly 70 percent of the strontium consumed in the U.S. is used in television picture tube faceplate glass to block X-ray emissions.

  15. Multicomponent doped barium strontium titanate thin films for tunable microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alema, Fikadu Legesse

    In recent years there has been enormous progress in the development of barium strontium titanate (BST) films for tunable microwave applications. However, the properties of BST films still remain inferior compared to bulk materials, limiting their use for microwave technology. Understanding the film/substrate mismatch, microstructure, and stoichiometry of BST films and finding the necessary remedies are vital. In this work, BST films were deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and characterized both analytically and electrically with the aim of optimizing their properties. The stoichiometry, crystal structure, and phase purity of the films were studied by varying the oxygen partial pressure (OPP) and total gas pressure (TGP) in the chamber. A better stoichiometric match between film and target was achieved when the TGP is high (> 30 mTorr). However, the O2/Ar ratio should be adjusted as exceeding a threshold of 2 mTorr in OPP facilitates the formation of secondary phases. The growth of crystalline film on platinized substrates was achieved only with a lower temperature grown buffer layer, which acts as a seed layer by crystallizing when the temperature increases. Concurrent Mg/Nb doping has significantly improved the properties of BST thin films. The doped film has shown an average tunability of 53%, which is only ˜8 % lower than the value for the undoped film. This drop is associated with the Mg ions whose detrimental effects are partially compensated by Nb ions. Conversely, the doping has reduced the dielectric loss by ˜40 % leading to a higher figure of merit. Moreover, the two dopants ensure a charge neutrality condition which resulted in significant leakage current reduction. The presence of large amounts of empty shallow traps related to Nb Ti localize the free carriers injected from the contacts; thus increase the device control voltage substantially (>10 V). A combinatorial thin film synthesis method based on co-sputtering of two BST

  16. Dielectric and tunable behavior of lead strontium titanate ceramics and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somiya, Yoshitaka

    The needs of materials for microwave applications have been increasing due to the demands of mobile communication systems and it is preferable for most applications to be manufactured inexpensively using the least amount of space possible. One of the ideas presented to achieve this goal is to reduce the number of components. By changing certain properties under a specific electric and/or magnetic field condition, a component is able to have more than one function, which decreases the number of components necessary. Although microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), semiconductors, and ferrite based devices are available for tuning applications, ferroelectrics in the paraelectric regions and incipient ferroelectric materials are the most promising for low cost and miniaturized products over a wide frequency range of 1-10 GHz and higher frequencies. Barium strontium titanate ((Ba, Sr)TiO3 (BST)) is a considerably studied field dependent ferroelectric material. However, BST requires special techniques to prepare samples which show good reproducibility because the conventional mixed oxide method is not expected to offer high homogeneity due to low reactivity among the raw oxide chemicals of BST. On the contrary, lead strontium titanate ((Sr, Pb)TiO3 (SPT)) permits much simpler processing due to the high reactivity of lead oxide, a raw oxide chemical, towards the other component oxides. Therefore, the SPT system has been selected as a potential candidate for the frequency agile ferroelectrics for electronics (FAME) applications. Selected compositions, for example, Sr-Pb (0.7:0.3 by mole and 0.8:0.2 by mole) in the pure SPT system show the following properties: i) high relative permittivity, epsilonr, ii) low tangent delta in the paraelectric states, iii) moderate DC bias dependence of epsilonr far above the transition temperatures, and iv) high DC bias dependence of epsilon r close to the transition temperatures. In addition, the SPT system does not show a significant

  17. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mexico and Spain are the leading producers of celestite, the most common strontium ore. Those countries produced nearly 80 percent of the estimated 360 kt (397,000 st) of celestite produced worldwide during 2002. China and Turkey are other significant celestite producers.

  18. Strontium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Strontium ; CASRN 7440 - 24 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  19. Wafer-to-wafer transfer process of barium strontium titanate for frequency tuning applications using laser pre-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoto, Tetuo; Hirano, Hideki; Somekawa, Toshihiro; Hikichi, Kousuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes laser-assisted film transfer technology for barium strontium titanate (BST) deposited on a sapphire substrate. BST is a promising ferroelectric material for varactors, which are required for frequency-tunable RF applications. However, the deposition temperature of BST (600 ~ 700 °C) is too high for surface acoustic wave (SAW) substrates. In this study, BST grown on a sapphire substrate at 650 °C was transferred at low temperature (140 °C) to a borosilicate glass substrate as well as a LiTaO3 substrate. The transferred BST films were characterized as tunable capacitors. A key process in the BST film transfer technology is the laser pre-irradiation of a buffer Pt layer beneath BST from the backside of the sapphire substrate to weaken the BST-to-Pt adhesion. The mechanism of delamination at the BST/Pt interface is discussed using a simple 1D heat transfer model.

  20. Brillouin light scattering study of transverse mode coupling in confined yttrium iron garnet/barium strontium titanate multiferroic

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnikov, A. V. Nikitov, S. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Bublikov, K. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-11-28

    Using the space-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy we study the transformation of dynamic magnetization patterns in a bilayer multiferroic structure. We show that in the comparison with a single yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film magnetization distribution is transformed in the bilayer structure due to the coupling of waves propagating both in an YIG film (magnetic layer) and in a barium strontium titanate slab (ferroelectric layer). We present a simple electrodynamic model using the numerical finite element method to show the transformation of eigenmode spectrum of confined multiferroic. In particular, we demonstrate that the control over the dynamic magnetization and the transformation of spatial profiles of transverse modes in magnetic film of the bilayer structure can be performed by the tuning of the wavevectors of transverse modes. The studied confined multiferroic stripe can be utilized for fabrication of integrated dual tunable functional devices for magnonic applications.

  1. Tuned sensitivity towards H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} with Cu doped barium strontium titanate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simion, C. E. Teodorescu, V. S.; Stănoiu, A.; Sackmann, A.; Ruşti, C. F.; Piticescu, R. M.

    2014-11-05

    The different amount of Cu-doped Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) thick film materials have been tested for their gas-sensing performances towards NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S under dry and 50% relative humidity (RH) background conditions. The optimum NH{sub 3} sensitivity was attained with 0.1mol% Cu-doped BST whereas the selective detection of H{sub 2}S was highlighted using 5mol% Cu-doped BST material. No cross-sensitivity effects to CO, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and SO{sub 2} were observed for all tested materials operated at their optimum temperature (200°C) under humid conditions (50% RH). The presence of humidity clearly enhances the gas sensitivity to NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S detection.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of epitaxial layers of anatase on strontium titanate single crystals: Morphological and photoelectrochemical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Theodore J.; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Parkinson, B. A.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow epitaxial layers of anatase (001) TiO{sub 2} on the surface of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) crystals with a 3% lattice mismatch. The epilayers grow as anatase (001) as confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic force microscope images of deposited films showed epitaxial layer-by-layer growth up to about 10 nm, whereas thicker films, of up to 32 nm, revealed the formation of 2–5 nm anatase nanocrystallites oriented in the (001) direction. The anatase epilayers were used as substrates for dye sensitization. The as received strontium titanate crystal was not sensitized with a ruthenium-based dye (N3) or a thiacyanine dye (G15); however, photocurrent from excited state electron injection from these dyes was observed when adsorbed on the anatase epilayers. These results show that highly ordered anatase surfaces can be grown on an easily obtained substrate crystal.

  3. Dielectric relaxation of barium strontium titanate and application to thin films for DRAM capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniecki, John David

    This thesis examines the issues associated with incorporating the high dielectric constant material Barium Strontium Titanate (BSTO) in to the storage capacitor of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The research is focused on two areas: characterizing and understanding the factors that control charge retention in BSTO thin films and modifying the electrical properties using ion implantation. The dielectric relaxation of BSTO thin films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is investigated in the time and frequency domains. It is shown that the frequency dispersion of the complex capacitance of BSTO thin films can be understood in terms of a power-law frequency dependence from 1mHz to 20GHz. From the correspondence between the time and frequency domain measurements, it is concluded that the power-law relaxation currents extend back to the nano second regime of DRAM operation. The temperature, field, and annealing dependence of the dielectric relaxation currents are also investigated and mechanisms for the observed power law relaxation are explored. An equivalent circuit model of a high dielectric constant thin film capacitor is developed based on the electrical measurements and implemented in PSPICE. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and simulated electrical characteristics showing the utility of the equivalent circuit model in simulating the electrical properties of high dielectric constant thin films. Using the equivalent circuit model, it is shown that the greatest charge loss due to dielectric relaxation occurs during the first read after a refresh time following a write to the opposite logic state for a capacitor that has been written to the same logic state for a long time (opposite state write charge loss). A theoretical closed form expression that is a function of three material parameters is developed which estimates the opposite state write charge loss due to dielectric relaxation. Using the closed form

  4. Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena

    Titan, Saturn's biggest satellite (second in size among the satellites in our solar system), has attracted the eye of astronomers preferentially ever since its discovery by Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens on March 25, 1655. Titan orbits around Saturn at a distance of 1,222,000 km (759,478 mi) in a synchronous rotation, taking 15.9 days to complete. As Titan follows Saturn on its trek around the Sun, one Titanian year equals about 30 Earth years. The sunlight that reaches such distances is only 1/100th of that received by the Earth. Titan is therefore a cold and dark place, but a fascinating one.

  5. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  6. Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction I. C. F. Müller-Wodarg, C. A. Griffith, E. Lellouch and T. E. Cravens; Prologue 1: the genesis of Cassini-Huygens W.-H. Ip, T. Owen and D. Gautier; Prologue 2: building a space flight instrument: a P.I.'s perspective M. Tomasko; 1. The origin and evolution of Titan G. Tobie, J. I. Lunine, J. Monteux, O. Mousis and F. Nimmo; 2. Titan's surface geology O. Aharonson, A. G. Hayes, P. O. Hayne, R. M. Lopes, A. Lucas and J. T. Perron; 3. Thermal structure of Titan's troposphere and middle atmosphere F. M. Flasar, R. K. Achterberg and P. J. Schinder; 4. The general circulation of Titan's lower and middle atmosphere S. Lebonnois, F. M. Flasar, T. Tokano and C. E. Newman; 5. The composition of Titan's atmosphere B. Bézard, R. V. Yelle and C. A. Nixon; 6. Storms, clouds, and weather C. A. Griffith, S. Rafkin, P. Rannou and C. P. McKay; 7. Chemistry of Titan's atmosphere V. Vuitton, O. Dutuit, M. A. Smith and N. Balucani; 8. Titan's haze R. West, P. Lavvas, C. Anderson and H. Imanaka; 9. Titan's upper atmosphere: thermal structure, dynamics, and energetics R. V. Yelle and I. C. F. Müller-Wodarg; 10. Titan's upper atmosphere/exosphere, escape processes, and rates D. F. Strobel and J. Cui; 11. Titan's ionosphere M. Galand, A. J. Coates, T. E. Cravens and J.-E. Wahlund; 12. Titan's magnetospheric and plasma environment J.-E. Wahlund, R. Modolo, C. Bertucci and A. J. Coates.

  7. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-11-10

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with MST impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% Sr-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with co-sintered active MST cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the MST impregnated membrane cartridges and CST impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active MST cartridges and co-sintered active CST cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of Cs-137 with co-sintered CST cartridges. Tests results with CST impregnated membrane cartridges for Cs-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  8. Titan!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.

    2010-05-01

    Cassini-Huygens achieved Saturnian orbit on July 1, 2004. The first order of business was the safe delivery of the Huygens atmospheric probe to Titan that took place on January 14, 2005. Huygens descended under parachute obtaining observations all the way down to a safe landing. It revealed Titan for the first time. Stunning are the similarities between Titan and the Earth. Viewing the lakes and seas, the fluvial terrain, the sand dunes and other features through the hazy, nitrogen atmosphere, brings to mind the geological processes that created analogous features on the Earth. On Titan frozen water plays the geological role of rock; liquid methane takes the role of terrestrial water. The atmospheres of both Earth and Titan are predominately nitrogen gas. Titan's atmosphere contains 1.5% methane and no oxygen. The surface pressure on Titan is 1.5 times the Earth's. There are aerosol layers and clouds that come and go. Now, as Saturn proceeds along its solar orbit, the seasons are changing. The effects upon the transport of methane are starting to be seen. A large lake in the South Polar Region seems to be filling more as winter onsets. Will the size and number of the lakes in the South grow during winter? Will the northern lakes and seas diminish or dry up as northern summer progresses? How will the atmospheric circulation change? Much work remains not only for Cassini but also for future missions. Titan has many different environments to explore. These require more capable instruments and in situ probes. This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Electrochromic characteristics of niobium-doped titanium oxide film on indium tin oxide/glass by liquid phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Kwei; Lee, Chia-Jung

    2015-10-01

    Ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid aqueous solutions were used as precursors for the growth of titanium oxide films on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrate. For as-grown titanium oxide film used in an electrochromic device, Li+ ions from electrolyte will be trapped to hydroxyl groups and degrade the electrochromic durability during the cyclic voltammogram characterization. For niobium doped titanium oxide film, lower growth rate from more HF incorporation from the niobium doped solution and rougher surface morphology from the formation of nanocrystals were obtained. However, niobium doping reduces hydroxyl groups and the electrochromic durability is enhanced from 5 × 103 to 1 × 104 times. The transmittance is enhanced from 37 to 51% at the wavelength of 550 nm.

  10. Electrically and magnetically tunable phase shifters based on a barium strontium titanate-yttrium iron garnet layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. H.; Liu, H.; Avrutin, V.; Rowe, E.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Song, Y.-Y.; Wu, M.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the tuning of permittivity and permeability of a ferroelectric/ferromagnetic bilayer structure which can be used as a microwave phase shifter with two degrees of tuning freedom. The structure was prepared by the growth of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate by liquid phase epitaxy, the growth of a barium strontium titanate (BST) layer on the YIG layer through pulsed laser deposition, and then the fabrication of a coplanar waveguide on the top of BST through e-beam evaporation and trilayer liftoff techniques. The phase shifters exhibit a differential phase shift of 38°/cm at 6 GHz through permittivity tuning under an applied electric field of ˜75 kV/cm and a static magnetic field of 1700 Oe. By tuning the permeability through the applied magnetic field we increase the differential phase shift to 52°/cm and simultaneously obtain a better match to the zero applied electric field condition, resulting in an improvement in the return loss from 22.4 to 24.9 dB. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of a lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) layer to tune the permeability of the YIG layer. This tuning relies on the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive effects of PMN-PT and YIG, respectively. Tuning of the ferromagnetic response through strain and magnetostriction as opposed to applied magnetic field can potentially pave the way for low power consumption, continuously and rapidly tunable, impedance matched phase shifters.

  11. Improved performance of cylindrical hybrid supercapacitor using activated carbon/ niobium doped hydrogen titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Hong-Ki; Baek, Esther; Pecht, Michael; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Young-Hie

    2016-01-01

    A cylindrical hybrid supercapacitor is fabricated using activated carbon positive electrode and H2Ti12-xNbxO25 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) negative electrode materials. The hybrid supercapacitor using H2Ti11.85Nb0.15O25 exhibits the best electrochemical performance. It has a capacitance of 78.4 F g-1, charge transfer resistance (Rct) of 0.03 Ω, capacitance retention of 91.4% after 1000 cycles at 3.0 A g-1 and energy density of 24.3 W h kg-1 at a power density of 1794.6 W kg-1. Therefore, the Nb doped HTO negative electrode material is a promising candidate as an energy storage system for electric vehicles (EVs).

  12. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-05-26

    This report describes experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions using monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST)-laden filter cartridges. Four types of ion exchange cartridge media (CST and MST designed by both 3M and POROX{reg_sign}) were evaluated. In these proof-of-principle tests effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 was observed. However, the experiments were not performed long enough to determine the saturation levels or breakthrough curve for each filter cartridge. POREX{reg_sign} MST cartridges, which by design were based on co-sintering of the active titanates with polyethylene particles, seem to perform as well as the 3M-designed MST cartridges (impregnated filter membrane design) in the uptake of strontium. At low salt simulant conditions (0.29 M Na{sup +}), the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with the 3M-design MST cartridge measured 26, representing the removal of 96% of the Sr-85. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with the POREX{reg_sign} design MST cartridge measured 40 or 98% removal of the Sr-85. Strontium removal with the 3M-design MST and CST cartridges placed in series filter arrangement produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 or 97.6% removal compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 or 99.7% removal of the strontium with the POREX{reg_sign} MST and CST cartridge design placed in series. At high salt simulant conditions (5.6 M Na{sup +}), strontium removal with 3M-designed MST cartridge only and with 3M-designed MST and CST cartridges operated in a series configuration were identical. The instantaneous decontamination factor and the strontium removal efficiency, under the above configuration, averaged 8.6 and 88%, respectively. There were no POREX{reg_sign} cartridge experiments using the higher ionic strength simulant solution. At low salt simulant conditions, the uptake of Cs-137 with

  13. Growth temperature-dependent metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide epitaxial films on perovskite strontium titanate (111) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangxin; Yang, Yuanjun; Zhao, Jiangtao; Hong, Bin; Hu, Kai; Peng, Jinlan; Zhang, Haibin; Wen, Xiaolei; Luo, Zhenlin; Li, Xiaoguang; Gao, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) epitaxial films were grown on perovskite single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The growth temperature-dependent metal-insulator transition (MIT) behavior of the VO2 epitaxial films was then investigated. We found that the order of magnitude of resistance change across the MIT increased from 102 to 104 with increasing growth temperature. In contrast, the temperature of the MIT does not strongly depend on the growth temperature and is fairly stable at about 345 K. On one hand, the increasing magnitude of the MIT is attributed to the better crystallinity and thus larger grain size in the (010)-VO2/(111)-SrTiO3 epitaxial films at elevated temperature. On the other hand, the strain states do not change in the VO2 films deposited at various temperatures, resulting in stable V-V chains and V-O bonds in the VO2 epitaxial films. The accompanied orbital occupancy near the Fermi level is also constant and thus the MIT temperatures of VO2 films deposited at various temperatures are nearly the same. This work demonstrates that high-quality VO2 can be grown on perovskite substrates, showing potential for integration into oxide heterostructures and superlattices.

  14. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-09-06

    SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  15. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-09-01

    SrTiO3 powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl2 and Ti(OC3H7)4 in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO3 structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNOx ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE - AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Missimer, D.

    2010-12-21

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. An inorganic sorbent, monosodium titanate (MST), is currently used to remove {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides, while a caustic-side solvent extraction process is used for removing {sup 134,137}Cs. A new peroxotitanate material, modified MST, or mMST, has recently been developed and has shown increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST. This paper describes recent results focused on further characterization of this material.

  17. Epitaxial strontium titanate films grown by atomic layer deposition on SrTiO{sub 3}-buffered Si(001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Posadas, Agham; Ngo, Thong Q.; Dhamdhere, Ajit; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2013-01-15

    Epitaxial strontium titanate (STO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(001) substrates with a thin STO buffer layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four unit cells of STO grown by MBE serve as the surface template for ALD growth. The STO films grown by ALD are crystalline as-deposited with minimal, if any, amorphous SiO{sub x} layer at the STO-Si interface. The growth of STO was achieved using bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl)-strontium, titanium tetraisopropoxide, and water as the coreactants at a substrate temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the ALD process did not induce additional Si-O bonding at the STO-Si interface. Postdeposition XPS analysis also revealed sporadic carbon incorporation in the as-deposited films. However, annealing at a temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C for 30 min in moderate to high vacuum (10{sup -6}-10{sup -9} Torr) removed the carbon species. Higher annealing temperatures (>275 Degree-Sign C) gave rise to a small increase in Si-O bonding, as indicated by XPS, but no reduced Ti species were observed. X-ray diffraction revealed that the as-deposited STO films were c-axis oriented and fully crystalline. A rocking curve around the STO(002) reflection gave a full width at half maximum of 0.30 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.06 Degree-Sign for film thicknesses ranging from 5 to 25 nm. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the STO films were continuous with conformal growth to the substrate and smooth interfaces between the ALD- and MBE-grown STO. Overall, the results indicate that thick, crystalline STO can be grown on Si(001) substrates by ALD with minimal formation of an amorphous SiO{sub x} layer using a four-unit-cell STO buffer layer grown by MBE to serve as the surface template.

  18. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb-doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D-EBSD experiments by FIB serial sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality of STN samples compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical. Reducing the FIB probe current from 5000 to 100 pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB milling. For 3D-EBSD experiments of a material such as STN, it is recommended to combine a high kV FIB milling and low kV polishing for each slice in order to optimize the data quality and acquisition time. PMID:22582798

  19. Transition from Reconstruction toward Thin Film on the (110) Surface of Strontium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Loon, A; Subramanian, A; Gerhold, S; McDermott, E; Enterkin, J A; Hieckel, M; Russell, B C; Green, R J; Moewes, A; Guo, J; Blaha, P; Castell, M R; Diebold, U; Marks, L D

    2016-04-13

    The surfaces of metal oxides often are reconstructed with a geometry and composition that is considerably different from a simple termination of the bulk. Such structures can also be viewed as ultrathin films, epitaxed on a substrate. Here, the reconstructions of the SrTiO3 (110) surface are studied combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and analyzed with density functional theory calculations. Whereas SrTiO3 (110) invariably terminates with an overlayer of titania, with increasing density its structure switches from n × 1 to 2 × n. At the same time the coordination of the Ti atoms changes from a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra to a double layer of edge-shared octahedra with bridging units of octahedrally coordinated strontium. This transition from the n × 1 to 2 × n reconstructions is a transition from a pseudomorphically stabilized tetrahedral network toward an octahedral titania thin film with stress-relief from octahedral strontia units at the surface. PMID:26954064

  20. Transition from Reconstruction toward Thin Film on the (110) Surface of Strontium Titanate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The surfaces of metal oxides often are reconstructed with a geometry and composition that is considerably different from a simple termination of the bulk. Such structures can also be viewed as ultrathin films, epitaxed on a substrate. Here, the reconstructions of the SrTiO3 (110) surface are studied combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and analyzed with density functional theory calculations. Whereas SrTiO3 (110) invariably terminates with an overlayer of titania, with increasing density its structure switches from n × 1 to 2 × n. At the same time the coordination of the Ti atoms changes from a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra to a double layer of edge-shared octahedra with bridging units of octahedrally coordinated strontium. This transition from the n × 1 to 2 × n reconstructions is a transition from a pseudomorphically stabilized tetrahedral network toward an octahedral titania thin film with stress-relief from octahedral strontia units at the surface. PMID:26954064

  1. Probing structural variation and multifunctionality in niobium doped bismuth vanadate materials.

    PubMed

    Saithathul Fathimah, Sameera; Prabhakar Rao, Padala; James, Vineetha; Raj, Athira K V; Chitradevi, G R; Leela, Sandhyakumari

    2014-11-14

    Multifunctional materials are developed in BiV1-xNbxO4 solid solutions via structural variations. A citrate gel route has been employed to synthesize these materials followed by calcination at various temperatures leading to fine particles. The effects of niobium doping over the structural variation and its influence on the optical properties are assessed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. These solid solutions exhibit superior coloristic properties which are comparable to commercially available yellow pigments. These materials also show remarkable reflectance in the NIR region which makes them potential candidates for cool roof applications. A notable methylene blue dye degradation property is observed in Nb(5+) doped BiVO4 under sunlight irradiation. PMID:25223954

  2. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Meenakshi; Pan, Xueliang; Holloway, Julie A.; Denry, Isabelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to characterize the response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a niobium-doped fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (FAp). Methods The glass was prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h, and cast into cylindrical ingots later sectioned into discs and heat-treated to promote crystallization of fluorapatite submicrometer crystals. Tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) was used as control. The surface of the FAp discs was either left as-heat treated, ground or etched. Initial cell attachment was assessed at 3h. Proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression data was collected at days 1, 4, and 8. Cell morphology was examined using SEM, at days 2 and 4. Mineralization was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and SEM. Results Initial cell attachment on as heat-treated, etched, or ground surfaces was similar to that of the positive control group (p>0.05). The percentage of area covered by living cells increased significantly on as heat-treated, etched, or ground surfaces between days 1 and 8 (p<0.05). There was no significant difference amongst groups in cell coverage at day 8, compared to TCP control. SEM revealed well spread polygonal cells with numerous filopodia, either attached to the ceramic surface or connected to neighboring cells. ALP expression at day 8 was significantly higher in osteogenic media compared to growth media on both FAp and control. FAp discs stained positively with alizarin red and calcium-rich mineralized granules associated with fibrils were observed by SEM at day 35. Significance hMSCs displayed excellent attachment, proliferation, and differentiation on niobium-doped FAp glass-ceramic. PMID:22078764

  3. Reduced thermal conductivity in niobium-doped calcium-manganate compounds for thermoelectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, Ayelet; Amouyal, Yaron

    2014-11-03

    Reduction of thermal conductivity is essential for obtaining high energy conversion efficiency in thermoelectric materials. We report on significant reduction of thermal conductivity in niobium-doped CaO(CaMnO{sub 3}){sub m} compounds for thermoelectric energy harvesting due to introduction of extra CaO-planes in the CaMnO{sub 3}-base material. We measure the thermal conductivities of the different compounds applying the laser flash analysis at temperatures between 300 and 1000 K, and observe a remarkable reduction in thermal conductivity with increasing CaO-planar density, from a value of 3.7 W·m{sup −1}K{sup −1} for m = ∞ down to 1.5 W·m{sup −1}K{sup −1} for m = 1 at 400 K. This apparent correlation between thermal conductivity and CaO-planar density is elucidated in terms of boundary phonon scattering, providing us with a practical way to manipulate lattice thermal conductivity via microstructural modifications.

  4. Effect of crystallization heat treatment on the microstructure of niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Denry, I.; Holloway, J.A.; Gupta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to study the effect of heat treatment temperature and heating rate on the microstructure and crystalline phases and assess the domain of existence of sub-micrometer fluorapatite crystals in niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics for biomedical applications. Glass-ceramic specimens were prepared by casting and heat treatment between 700 and 1200°C using a fast or a slow heating rate. The microstructure was characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline phases were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. AFM of the as-cast glass revealed that amorphous phase separation occurred in this system. XRD confirmed the presence of fluorapatite in all specimens, together with forsterite and enstatite at higher temperatures. Both heating rate and heat treatment temperature strongly influenced microstructure and crystallinity. A dual microstructure with sub-micrometer fluorapatite crystals and polygonal forsterite crystals was obtained when slow heating rates and crystallization temperatures between 950 and 1100°C were used. Needle-shaped fluorapatite crystals appeared after heat treatment above 1100°C. Fast heating rates led to an increase in crystal size. Heat treatment temperatures should remain below 1100°C, together with slow heating rates, to prevent crystal dissolution, and preserve a dual microstructure of finely dispersed sub-micrometer crystals without growth of needle-shaped crystals. PMID:22454333

  5. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2011-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  6. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20 nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovici, M.; Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M.

    2014-02-01

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20 nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (Jg) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO2/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  7. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20 nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, M. Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M.

    2014-02-24

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20 nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  8. Hydrogen generation from water/methanol under visible light using aerogel prepared strontium titanate (SrTiO3) nanomaterials doped with ruthenium and rhodium metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yenting; Klabunde, Kenneth J.

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured strontium titanate visible-light-driven photocatalysts containing rhodium and ruthenium were synthesized by a modified aerogel synthesis using ruthenium chloride and rhodium nitrate as dopant precursors, and titanium isopropoxide and strontium metal as the metal sources. The well-defined crystalline SrTiO3 structure was confirmed by means of x-ray diffraction. After calcination at 500 °C, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy shows an increase in light absorption at 370 nm due to the presence of Rh3 + ; however an increase of the calcination temperature to 600 °C led to a decrease in intensity, probably due to a loss of surface area. An increase in the rhodium doping level also led to an increase in absorption at 370 nm however, the higher amounts of dopant lowered the photocatalytic activity. The modified aerogel synthesis allows greatly enhanced H2 production performance from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation compared with lower surface area conventional materials. We believe that this enhanced activity is due to the higher surface areas while high quality nanocrystalline materials are still obtained. Furthermore, the surface properties of these nanocrystalline aerogel materials are different, as exhibited by the higher activities in alkaline solutions, while conventional materials (obtained via high temperature solid-state synthesis methods) only exhibit reasonable hydrogen production in acidic solutions. Moreover, an aerogel synthesis approach gives the possibility of thin-film formation and ease of incorporation into practical solar devices.

  9. Structural Properties of Ferroelectric Lead(Zirconium0.5,Titanium0.5)Oxygen3 Nanotube Array and Electronic Structure of Lao delta-doped strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Rajendra P.

    In this Dissertation we begin with two introductions on: 1) ferroelectricity and related phenomena, and 2) novel properties of Oxide electronics and the generation of two dimensional electron gas. We then give theoretical background of density functional theory (including LDA+U) and pseudopotentials. The first part of research work is about structural, polarization, and dielectric properties of ferroelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) solid solution in the form of a nanotube array, embedded in a matrix medium of different ferroelectric strengths. We use the effective Hamiltonian derived from first-principles and finite-temperature Monte Carlo methods to determine the various properties. We revealed different polarization phases of the system in the absence of an external electric field and explained these properties in microscopic detail. In the second part, we study the effects of compressive biaxial inplane strains on the electronic and structural properties of Lanthanum Oxide delta-doped Strontium Titanate supercell. We use first-principles density functional calculations within the local density approximation including also on-site Coulomb interaction energy. We approached the problem by comparing the band structures, localization of electronic states, and cation-anion displacements of unstrained and strained systems. We found a critical strain above which there are abrupt changes in conduction band dispersions and cation-anion displacements, indicating that inplane biaxial strain can drastically tune the properties of this system, which may have potential technological applications.

  10. Microstructural variations and their influence on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells based on yttrium-substituted strontium titanate ceramic anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Iwanschitz, Boris; Dashjav, Enkhtsetseg; Baumann, Stefan; Sebold, Doris; Arul Raj, Irudayam; Mai, Andreas; Tietz, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Donor-substituted strontium titanates have been widely recognised as alternative anode materials to the state-of-the-art Ni/YSZ cermets in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Electrolyte-supported SOFCs based on Y0.07Sr0.895TiO3 ceramic anodes with different microstructural designs were prepared. Ni or Ni with Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (CGO) was infiltrated onto the pore walls within the ceramic anode framework as an electrocatalyst for anode reactions. Performances and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of the cells were analysed in detail to observe the influence of low ionic conductivity of Y0.07Sr0.895TiO3 to cell performance, to understand how to control the degradation of the cells, and to obtain a possible mechanism for the anode processes. The anode design containing both functional and current collecting layers with sufficient Ni-CGO infiltration is favourable for high power output and low performance degradation.

  11. Amorphous Strontium Titanate Film as Gate Dielectric for Higher Performance and Low Voltage Operation of Transparent and Flexible Organic Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sarita; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-04-27

    We report that the pervoskite material, strontium titanate (STO) can be used as a gate dielectric layer of flexible and low voltage organic field effect transistor (OFET). The crystallinity, dielectric constant, and surface morphology of STO films can be controlled by the engineering of the growth condition. Under optimized growth condition, amorphous films of STO show a much better gate dielectric compared to other gate dielectrics used to date, with very small leakage current density for flexible and low voltage (<5 V) OFETs. The amorphous STO film decreases the interface trap density at organic/dielectric interface substantially. Pentacene transistors with amorphous STO gate dielectric show high mobility of 2 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratio of 10(6), subthreshold swing of 0.3 V/dec and low interface trap density. Similarly excellent performance has been obtained in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based OFETs with on/off ratio ∼10(5) and carrier mobility ∼5.9 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s). Moreover, the operating voltage (∼5 V) has been reduced by more than one order of magnitude. It has been demonstrated that the low processing temperature of amorphous STO makes it the most suitable gate dielectric for flexible and transparent organic devices to operate under low voltage. PMID:27029419

  12. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y³⁺ and Mn²⁺ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn

    2014-10-14

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y³⁺ and Mn²⁺ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450 K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TITANATE-BASED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS UNDER STRONGLY ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Peters, T.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fink, S.

    2010-02-18

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes at SRS include the sorption of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST) and caustic side solvent extraction of {sup 137}Cs. The MST and separated {sup 137}Cs is encapsulated along with the sludge fraction of high-level waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass waste form for eventual entombment at a federal repository. The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu; {sup 237}Np; and uranium isotopes, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. This paper describes recent results evaluating the performance of an improved sodium titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST.

  14. Influence of niobium doping in hierarchically organized titania nanostructure on performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Noh, Jun Hong; Han, Byung Suh; Shin, Seong Sik; Park, Ik Jae; Kim, Dong Hoe; Hong, Kug Sun

    2012-06-01

    Niobium doped hierarchically organized TiO2 nanostructures composed of 20 nm size anatase nanocrystals were synthesized using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Nb doping concentration could be facilely controlled by adjusting the concentration of Nb in target materials. We could investigate the influence of Nb doping in the TiO2 photoelectrode on the cell performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by the exclusion of morphological effects using the prepared Nb-doped TiO2 anostructures. We found no significant change in short circuit current density (Jsc) as a function of Nb doping concentration. However, open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) monotonously decrease with increasing Nb concentration. Dark current characteristics of the DSSCs reveal that the decrease in Voc and FF is attributed to the decrease in shunt resistance due to the increase in conductivity TiO2 by Nb doping. However, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) analysis at open circuit condition under illumination showed that the resistance at the TiO2/dye/electrolyte interface increases with Nb concentration, revealing that Nb doping suppress the charge recombination at the interface. In addition, electron life time obtained using characteristic frequency in Bode plot increases from 14 msec to 56 msec with increasing Nb concentration from 0 to 1.2 at%. This implies that the improved light harvesting can be achieved by increasing diffusion length through Nb-doping in the conventional TiO2 photoelectrode. PMID:22905583

  15. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and niobium doped titanium dioxide composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Subodh K.; Chettah, Abdelhak; Singh, R. G.; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Study reports the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and Niobium doped anatase TiO2 composite thin films. Investigations were carried out at different densities of electronic excitations (EEs) using 120 MeV Ag and 130 MeV Ni ions irradiations. Films were initially annealed at 900 °C and results revealed that undoped films were highly stable in anatase phase, while the Nb doped films showed the composite nature with the weak presence of Niobium penta-oxide (Nb2O5) phase. The effect at low density of EEs in undoped film show partial anatase to rutile phase transformation; however doped film shows only further growth of Nb2O5 phase beside the anatase to rutile phase transformation. At higher density of EEs induced by Ag ions, registered continuous ion track of ∼3 nm in lattice which leads to nano-crystallization followed by decomposition/amorphization of rutile TiO2 and Nb2O5 phases in undoped and doped films, respectively. However, Ni ions are only induced discontinuous sequence of ion tracks with creation of damage and disorder and do not show amorphization in the lattice. The in-elastic thermal spike calculations were carried out for anatase TiO2 phase to understand the effect of EEs on anatase to rutile phase transformation followed by amorphization in NTO films in terms of continuous and discontinuous track formation by SHI irradiation.

  16. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, N.; Longo, V.; Rodenbücher, C.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.

    2014-08-01

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr1+xTi1+yO3+(x+2y), STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm2 to 0.01 μm2. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm2 size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with voltages of about ±1.0 V between resistance states of about

  17. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2014-08-14

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm{sup 2} to 0.01 μm{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm{sup 2} size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with

  18. Structure of thin barium strontium titanate films over strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Fatima Zohra

    Ferroelectric thin films have numerous applications: they are being used as sensors and actuators; they feature large electro-optic effects and a high dielectric constant, making them ideal as large integrated capacitors. A crucial aspect of all their applications is the depth dependence of both the strain and the polarization. These two parameters modify their optical and electronic properties. A series of experiments using synchrotron x-ray radiation have been performed to investigate the strain profile of Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO 3 (BST) ferroelectric thin films grown on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates doped with 0.5% Nb by pulsed laser ablation; the samples were grown in Pennsylvania State University. The experiments have been carried out at the beamline X22C of the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two different techniques were used to study the effects at the interface and the surface: Crystal Truncation Rod Diffraction and Grazing Incidence Diffraction. By a detailed analysis of the strong asymmetry of the finite-thickness oscillations close to the main Bragg peak, together with grazing incidence data, we find evidence for a vertical lattice expansion at the surface together with a distorted region at the interface to the substrate. For two films with different thickness (10 nm and 50 nm) we obtain a similar strain profile. The 10-nm thick film shows a beating in the 001 reflection together with the asymmetry at room temperature. Upon annealing the sample to 725 K over several days, the beating in the Laue oscillations disappears, and the experiment was not reversible. The corresponding model for the strain shows that the enhancement of the lattice parameter at the surface disappeared. The electric field dependence of the surface lattice parameter enhancement was probed by applying a voltage between the surface of the 50nm thick film and the conducting substrate; in addition, switching the voltage from -400 mV to 400 mV reverses 6% of the polarization domains as deduced from our model.

  19. The Role of Nanoscale Seed Layers on the Enhanced Performance of Niobium doped TiO2 Thin Films on Glass

    PubMed Central

    Nikodemski, Stefan; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Perkins, John D.; O’Hayre, Ryan P.; Ginley, David S.; Berry, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings with decreased cost and greater process or performance versatility are needed for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Among potential new TCO candidates, doped titanium dioxide is receiving particular interest. In this study, niobium-doped titania bilayer structures consisting of a nanoscale seed layer (deposited by atomic layer deposition or RF magnetron sputtering) followed by a thick bulk-like layer were grown directly on glass in order to examine the effects of the seed layer processing on the subsequent crystallization and electrical properties of these heterostructures. Observations from Raman spectroscopy suggest that higher oxygen content in the seed layer suppresses the formation of detrimental titania polymorph phases, found in films produced by annealing directly after synthesis without any exposure to oxygen. Furthermore, our results indicate that the generation of excellent Nb:TiO2 conductors on glass (without breaking vacuum) only occurs within a narrow processing range and that the sequential deposition of oxygen-poor layers on oxygen-rich layers is a critical step towards achieving films with low resistivity. PMID:27610922

  20. The Role of Nanoscale Seed Layers on the Enhanced Performance of Niobium doped TiO2 Thin Films on Glass.

    PubMed

    Nikodemski, Stefan; Dameron, Arrelaine A; Perkins, John D; O'Hayre, Ryan P; Ginley, David S; Berry, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings with decreased cost and greater process or performance versatility are needed for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Among potential new TCO candidates, doped titanium dioxide is receiving particular interest. In this study, niobium-doped titania bilayer structures consisting of a nanoscale seed layer (deposited by atomic layer deposition or RF magnetron sputtering) followed by a thick bulk-like layer were grown directly on glass in order to examine the effects of the seed layer processing on the subsequent crystallization and electrical properties of these heterostructures. Observations from Raman spectroscopy suggest that higher oxygen content in the seed layer suppresses the formation of detrimental titania polymorph phases, found in films produced by annealing directly after synthesis without any exposure to oxygen. Furthermore, our results indicate that the generation of excellent Nb:TiO2 conductors on glass (without breaking vacuum) only occurs within a narrow processing range and that the sequential deposition of oxygen-poor layers on oxygen-rich layers is a critical step towards achieving films with low resistivity. PMID:27610922

  1. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  2. Electronic structure modification and Fermi level shifting in niobium-doped anatase titanium dioxide thin films: a comparative study of NEXAFS, work function and stiffening of phonons.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Subodh K; Das, Arkaprava; Ojha, S; Shukla, D K; Phase, D M; Singh, Fouran

    2016-02-01

    The electronic structure and tuning of work function (WF) by electronic excitations (EEs) induced by swift heavy ions (SHIs) in anatase niobium-doped titanium dioxide (NTO) thin films is reported. The densities of EEs were varied using 80 MeV O, 130 MeV Ni and 120 MeV Ag ions for irradiation. The EE-induced modifications in electronic structure were studied by O K-edge and Ti L3,2 edge absorption spectra using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The reduction of hybridized O 2p and Ti 3d unoccupied states in the conduction band with a decrease in energy of the crystal field strength of ∼ 480 meV and the correlated effect on the decrease in the WF value of ∼ 520 meV upon increasing the total energy deposition in the lattice are evident from the study of NEXAFS and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), respectively. The observed stiffening in the low frequency Raman mode (LFRM) of ∼ 9 cm(-1) further validates the electronic structure modification under the influence of EE-induced strain in TiO6 octahedra. The reduction of hybridized valence states, stiffening behavior of LFRM and decrease in WF by nano-crystallization followed by amorphization and defects in NTO lattice are explained in terms of continuous, discontinuous amorphous ion tracks containing intestinally created defects and non-stoichiometry in the lattice. These studies are very appropriate for better insights of electronic structure modification during phase transformation and controlled Fermi level shifting, which plays a crucial role in controlling the charge carrier injection efficiency in opto-electronic applications and also provides a deeper understanding of the involved physical processes. PMID:26752253

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of sodium bismuth titanate and titanate nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Animesh

    A hydrothermal processing method was developed for the synthesis of sodium bismuth titanate powders and thin films from suitable precursors at 150°C. Oxide precursors were best suited for preparing pure phase materials. The sodium bismuth titanate powders consisted of cube shaped crystals. A modified solution-reprecitation model involving partial dissolution of the precursors was proposed to explain the growth of these particles. The thin films were prepared on strontium titanate (100) substrate. A sample holder was specially designed and fabricated to secure the substrates in the reaction vessel. The result was a relatively smooth film of thickness ≤550 nm. The films were essentially single crystalline and had strong epitaxial relationship with the substrate. Titanate nanofibers (NaxH yTinO2n+1° zH2O) were known to form under similar hydrothermal conditions as sodium bismuth titanate powders. Detail research revealed that the pure hydroxide and oxide precursors tend to form sodium bismuth titanate powders or thin films. Titanate nanofibers were the predominant product when any other ions or organics were present in the precursor. Much faster reaction kinetics for the formation of nanofibers was observed when certain organic compounds were added deliberately with the precursors. Accordingly, a hydrothermal process was developed for converting the precursors to titanate nanofibers in a significantly shorter time than reported in the literature. A thin film consisting of vertically aligned nanofibers was prepared on titanium substrate at 150°C in as little as 30 minutes. Complete conversion of starting precursors to free standing nanofibers was achieved in ˜8 hours at 150°C. The as-prepared nanofibers were some form of sodium titanate. They were converted to hydrogen titanate by ion exchange. Differential Scanning calorimetric experiments were performed to understand the thermal evolution of the fibers. The hydrogen titanate fibers underwent structural

  4. Transport properties of strontium titanate niobates

    SciTech Connect

    Podkorytov, A.L.; Pantyukhina, M.I.; Zhukovskii, V.M.

    1995-08-01

    In this work the authors studied transport properties of Sr{sub 3}NiNb{sub 2}O{sub 10} and Sr{sub 6-x}Ti{sub x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 11+x} in order to develop views concerning their high-temperature behavior and mechanisms of disordering in their structures. The authors measured the electrical conductivity (f+1 kHz, RLC meter, 500-1300{degrees}C) and the effective self-diffusion coefficients of radionuclides {sup 90}Sr, {sup 44}Ti, and {sup 95}Nb using radiometric depth profiling (RKB-4IeM {beta}-radiometer) of ceramic samples (porosity no greater than 10%), as described. The samples with radionuclides applied to their faces were annealed in the range 1270-1470 K for 24-100 h. The error in the diffusion coefficients thus measured did not exceed 20%.

  5. Flexoelectricity in barium strontium titanate thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Seol Ryung; Huang, Wenbin; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Jiang, Xiaoning; Shu, Longlong; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-10-06

    Flexoelectricity, the linear coupling between the strain gradient and the induced electric polarization, has been intensively studied as an alternative to piezoelectricity. Especially, it is of interest to develop flexoelectric devices on micro/nano scales due to the inherent scaling effect of flexoelectric effect. Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} thin film with a thickness of 130 nm was fabricated on a silicon wafer using a RF magnetron sputtering process. The flexoelectric coefficients of the prepared thin films were determined experimentally. It was revealed that the thin films possessed a transverse flexoelectric coefficient of 24.5 μC/m at Curie temperature (∼28 °C) and 17.44 μC/m at 41 °C. The measured flexoelectric coefficients are comparable to that of bulk BST ceramics, which are reported to be 10–100 μC/m. This result suggests that the flexoelectric thin film structures can be effectively used for micro/nano-sensing devices.

  6. The Critical Effect of Niobium Doping on the Formation of Mesostructured TiO2 : Single-Crystalline Ordered Mesoporous Nb-TiO2 and Plate-like Nb-TiO2 with Ordered Mesoscale Dimples.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Masaki; Shimasaki, Yuta; Matsuno, Takamichi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Wada, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous niobium-doped TiO2 with a single-crystalline framework was prepared by using silica colloidal crystals with ca. 30 nm in diameter as templates. The preparation of colloidal crystals composed of uniform silica nanoparticles is a key to obtain highly ordered mesoporous Nb-doped TiO2 . The XPS measurements of Nb-doped TiO2 showed the presence of Nb(5+) and correspondingly Ti(3+) . With the increase in the amount of doped Nb, the crystalline phase of the product was converted from rutile into anatase, and the lattice spacings of both rutile and anatase phases increased. Surprisingly, the increase in the amount of Nb led to the formation of plate-like TiO2 with dimpled surfaces on one side, which was directly replicated from the surfaces of the colloidal silica crystals. PMID:26216465

  7. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  8. Characterization of sputtered barium strontium titanate and strontium titanate-thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, B.A.; Chang, L.; Matsuda, A.T.; Tsai, T.; Tracy, C.J.; Gregory, R.B.; Fejes, P.L.; Cave, N.G.; Chen, W.; Taylor, D.J.; Otsuki, T.; Fujii, E.; Hayashi, S.; Suu, K.

    1997-09-01

    Sputtered Ba{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) films and capacitors made with these dielectrics have been characterized with respect to physical and electrical properties. Specific capacitance values included a high of 96fF/{mu}m{sup 2} for BST films deposited of 600{degree}C and a high of 26fF/{mu}m{sup 2} for STO films deposited at 400{degree}C. Leakage current densities at 3.3 V for the most part varied from mid 10{sup {minus}8} to mid 10{sup {minus}6}A/cm{sup 2}. All of the dielectrics are polycrystalline, although the lowest temperature STO films have a nearly amorphous layer which impacts their capacitance. Grain size increases with deposition temperature, which correlates to higher dielectric constants. The lattice parameter of the BST films is larger than that of bulk samples. Capacitance, leakage, breakdown, and lifetime results are reported. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. A novel method for local administration of strontium from implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, Johan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2010-05-01

    This study proves that a film of Strontianite (SrCO(3)) successfully can be formed on a bioactive surface of sodium titanate when exposed to a strontium acetate solution. This Strontianite film is believed to enable local release of strontium ions from implant surfaces and thus stimulate bone formation in vivo. Depending on the method, different types of films were achieved with different release rates of strontium ions, and the results points at the possibility to tailor the rate and amount of strontium that is to be released from the surface. Strontium has earlier been shown to be highly involved in the formation of new bone as it stimulates the replication of osteoblasts and decreases the activity of osteoclasts. The benefit of strontium has for example been proved in studies where the number of vertebral compression fractures in osteoporotic persons was drastically reduced in patients receiving therapeutical doses of strontium. Therefore, it is here suggested that the bone healing process around an implant may be improved if strontium is administered locally at the site of the implant. The films described in this paper were produced by a simple immersion process where alkali treated titanium was exposed to an aqueous solution containing strontium acetate. By heating the samples at different times during the process, different release rates of strontium ions were achieved when the samples were exposed to simulated body fluid. The strontium containing films also promoted precipitation of bone like apatite when exposed to a simulated body fluid. PMID:20162327

  10. Methane Clouds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    Following the Voyager encounter with Titan in 1981 Saturn's largest moon was hypothesized sport a liquid cycle similar that on Earth with clouds rain and seas. On Titan methane is the condensible playing the role that water plays on Earth. Although the presence of seas is difficult to establish from ground methane clouds have been detected on Titan. Ground-based observations reveal that Titan's clouds differ remarkedly from their terrestrial counterparts. Titan's clouds are sparse reside primarily at particular altitude and concentrate presently in the south pole. That Titan's clouds are exotic is not surprising. Titan receives ~100 times less sunlight than Earth to drive weather. In addition Titan's radiative time constant is 180 years large compared to the 3 month terrestrial value. With little power and sluggish conditions it is not clear how clouds form on Titan. This talk will compare Titan to Earth to explore the nature of clouds under Titan's foreign conditions.

  11. Tuning the charge state of Ag and Au atoms and clusters deposited on oxide surfaces by doping: a DFT study of the adsorption properties of nitrogen- and niobium-doped TiO2 and ZrO2.

    PubMed

    Schlexer, Philomena; Ruiz Puigdollers, Antonio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2015-09-14

    The charge state of Ag and Au atoms and clusters (Ag4 and Au4, Ag5 and Au5) adsorbed on defective TiO2 anatase(101) and tetragonal ZrO2(101) has been systematically investigated as a function of oxide doping and defectivity using a DFT+U approach. As intrinsic defects, we have considered the presence of oxygen vacancies. As extrinsic defects, substitutional nitrogen- and niobium-doping have been investigated, respectively. Both surface and sub-surface defects and dopants have been considered. Whereas on surfaces with oxygen vacancies or Nb-doping, atoms and clusters may become negatively charged, N-doping always leads to the formation of positively charged adsorbates, independently of the supporting material (TiO2 or ZrO2). This suggests the possibility to tune the electronic properties of supported metal clusters by selective doping of the oxide support, an effect that may result in complete changes in chemical reactivity. PMID:26248205

  12. Titan Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s methane clouds have received much attention since they were first discovered spectroscopically (Griffith et al. 1998). Titan's seasons evolve slowly, and there is growing evidence of a seasonal response in the regions of methane cloud formation (e.g. Rodriguez et al. 2009). A complete, three-dimensional view of Titan’s clouds is possible through the determination of cloud-top heights from Cassini images (e.g., Ádámkovics et al. 2010). Even though Titan’s surface is warmed by very little sunlight, we now know Titan’s methane clouds are convective, evolving through tens of kilometers of altitude on timescales of hours to days with dynamics similar to clouds that appear on Earth (Porco et al. 2005). Cassini ISS has also shown evidence of rain storms on Titan that produce surface accumulation of methane (Turtle et al. 2009). Most recently, Cassini has revealed a 1000-km-scale, arrow-shaped cloud at the equator followed by changes that appear to be evidence of surface precipitation (Turtle et al. 2011b). Individual convective towers simulated with high fidelity indicate that surface convergence of methane humidity and dynamic lifting are required to trigger deep, precipitating convection (e.g. Barth & Rafkin 2010). The global expanses of these cloud outbursts, the evidence for surface precipitation, and the requirement of dynamic convergence and lifting at the surface to trigger deep convection motivate an analysis of storm formation in the context of Titan’s global circulation. I will review our current understanding of Titan’s methane meteorology using Cassini and ground-based observations and, in particular, global circulation model simulations of Titan’s methane cycle. When compared with cloud observations, our simulations indicate an essential role for planetary-scale atmospheric waves in organizing convective storms on large scales (Mitchell et al. 2011). I will end with predictions of Titan’s weather during the upcoming northern

  13. Processing science of barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Seymen Murat

    Barium titanate and barium strontium titanate thin films were deposited on base metal foils via chemical solution deposition and radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The films were processed at elevated temperatures for densification and crystallization. Two unifying research goals underpin all experiments: (1) To improve our fundamental understanding of complex oxide processing science, and (2) to translate those improvements into materials with superior structural and electrical properties. The relationships linking dielectric response, grain size, and thermal budget for sputtered barium strontium titanate were illustrated. (Ba 0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 films were sputtered on nickel foils at temperatures ranging between 100-400°C. After the top electrode deposition, the films were co-fired at 900°C for densification and crystallization. The dielectric properties were observed to improve with increasing sputter temperature reaching a permittivity of 1800, a tunability of 10:1, and a loss tangent of less than 0.015 for the sample sputtered at 400°C. The data can be understood using a brick wall model incorporating a high permittivity grain interior with low permittivity grain boundary. However, this high permittivity value was achieved at a grain size of 80 nm, which is typically associated with strong suppression of the dielectric response. These results clearly show that conventional models that parameterize permittivity with crystal diameter or film thickness alone are insufficiently sophisticated. Better models are needed that incorporate the influence of microstructure and crystal structure. This thesis next explores the ability to tune microstructure and properties of chemically solution deposited BaTiO3 thin films by modulation of heat treatment thermal profiles and firing atmosphere composition. Barium titanate films were deposited on copper foils using hybrid-chelate chemistries. An in-situ gas analysis process was developed to probe the organic removal and the

  14. Titanic: A Statistical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takis, Sandra L.

    1999-01-01

    Uses the available data about the Titanic's passengers to interest students in exploring categorical data and the chi-square distribution. Describes activities incorporated into a statistics class and gives additional resources for collecting information about the Titanic. (ASK)

  15. Titan Haze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; West, Robert; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2011-01-01

    The Titan haze exerts a dominating influence on surface visibility and atmospheric radiative heating at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and our desire to understand surface composition and atmospheric dynamics provides a strong motivation to study the properties of the haze. Prior to the Cassini/Huygens missions the haze was known to be global in extent, with a hemispheric contrast asymmetry, with a complicated structure in the polar vortex region poleward of about 55 deg latitude, and with a distinct layer near 370 km altitude outside of the polar vortex at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby. The haze particles measured by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft were both highly polarizing and strongly forward scattering, a combination that seems to require an aggregation of small (several tens of nm radius) primary particles. These same properties were seen in the Cassini orbiter and Huygens Probe data. The most extensive set of optical measurements were made inside the atmosphere by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument on the Huygens Probe. At the probe location as determined by the DISR measurements the average haze particle contained about 3000 primary particles whose radius is about 40 nm. Three distinct vertical regions were seen in the DISR data with differing particle properties. Refractive indices of the particles in the main haze layer resemble those reported by Khare et al. between O.3S and about 0.7 micron but are more absorbing than the Khare et al. results between 0.7 micron and the long-wavelength limit of the DISR spectra at 1.6 micron. These and other results are described by Tomasko et al., and a broader summary of results was given by Tomasko and West,. New data continue to stream in from the Cassini spacecraft. New data analyses and new laboratory and model results continue to move the field forward. Titan's 'detached' haze layer suffered a dramatic drop in altitude near equinox in 2009 with implications for the circulation

  16. The Climate of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Lora, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturn system has revolutionized our understanding of Titan and its climate. Veiled in a thick organic haze, Titan's visible appearance belies an active, seasonal weather cycle operating in the lower atmosphere. Here we review the climate of Titan, as gleaned from observations and models. Titan's cold surface temperatures (˜90 K) allow methane to form clouds and precipitation analogously to Earth's hydrologic cycle. Because of Titan's slow rotation and small size, its atmospheric circulation falls into a regime resembling Earth's tropics, with weak horizontal temperature gradients. A general overview of how Titan's atmosphere responds to seasonal forcing is provided by estimating a number of climate-related timescales. Titan lacks a global ocean, but methane is cold-trapped at the poles in large seas, and models indicate that weak baroclinic storms form at the boundary of Titan's wet and dry regions. Titan's saturated troposphere is a substantial reservoir of methane, supplied by deep convection from the summer poles. A significant seasonal cycle, first revealed by observations of clouds, causes Titan's convergence zone to migrate deep into the summer hemispheres, but its connection to polar convection remains undetermined. Models suggest that downwelling of air at the winter pole communicates upper-level radiative cooling, reducing the stability of the middle troposphere and priming the atmosphere for spring and summer storms when sunlight returns to Titan's lakes. Despite great gains in our understanding of Titan, many challenges remain. The greatest mystery is how Titan is able to retain an abundance of atmospheric methane with only limited surface liquids, while methane is being irreversibly destroyed by photochemistry. A related mystery is how Titan is able to hide all the ethane that is produced in this process. Future studies will need to consider the interactions between Titan's atmosphere, surface

  17. Does Titan have oceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1994-04-01

    Titan is one of the few worlds in the solar system whose essential nature remains hidden. Satellite data from Voyager are examined. Remote sensing investigations from Earth are explored. Possible models of Titan's surface are reviewed. A closer look at Titan would provide useful information. The data to be gathered by the planetary mission Cassini is discussed.

  18. Tides in Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Nicole J.

    1997-01-01

    Tides raised in Titan by Saturn give rise to a static and a periodic deformation; both will be measured with Doppler tracking during the CASSINI Tour of the Saturnian System. The latter deformation is due to the significant eccentricity of Titan's orbit and has a frequency equal to the orbital angular velocity of Titan.

  19. Screening Evaluation of Sodium Nonatitanate for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    2001-02-13

    This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of a sodium titanate material developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. Sodium nonatitanate may exhibit improved actinide removal kinetics and filtration characteristics compared to MST and thus merit testing.

  20. Intensive Titan exploration begins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Orbiter spacecraft first skimmed through the tenuous upper atmosphere of Titan on 26 October 2004. This moon of Saturn is unique in our solar system, with a dense nitrogen atmosphere that is cold enough in places to rain methane, the feedstock for the atmospheric chemistry that produces hydrocarbons, nitrile compounds, and Titan's orange haze. The data returned from this flyby supply new information on the magnetic field and plasma environment around Titan, expose new facets of the dynamics and chemistry of Titan's atmosphere, and provide the first glimpses of what appears to be a complex, fluid-processed, geologically young Titan surface.

  1. Lead zirconate titanate-based thick films for high-frequency focused ultrasound transducers prepared by electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Abellard, André-Pierre; Kuscer, Danjela; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Lethiecq, Marc; Malic, Barbara; Levassort, Franck

    2014-03-01

    An electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process with high deposition rate was used to fabricate a curved piezoelectric thick film devoted to high-frequency transducers for medical imaging. Niobium-doped lead zirconate titanate (PZTNb) powder was stabilized in ethanol to prepare a suspension with high zeta potential and low conductivity. A gold layer, pad-printed and fired on a curved porous PZT substrate, was used as the working electrode for the deposition of the PZTNb thick film. This substrate was chosen because it has the required properties (acoustic impedance and attenuation) to be used directly as a backing for the high-frequency transducer, leading to a simplified process for transducer assembly with this integrated structure. PZT-Nb thick films were also deposited by EPD on flat gold-coated alumina substrates as a reference. The thickness of the films was between 20 and 35 μm, and their electromechanical performance was comparable to standard PZT bulk ceramics with a thickness coupling factor of 48%. For the curved thick film, the thickness coupling factor was slightly lower. The corresponding integrated structure was used to fabricate a transducer with a center frequency of 40 MHz and an f-number of 2.8. It was integrated into a realtime ultrasound scanner and used to image human forearm skin; the resulting images showed, for the first time, the efficacy of the EPD process for these imaging applications. PMID:24569258

  2. Future Exploration of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Titan Decadal Panel Collaboration

    2001-11-01

    Titan promises to be the Mars of the Outer Solar System - the focus of not only the broadest range of investigations in planetary science but also the focus of public attention. The reasons for exploring Titan are threefold: 1. Titan and Astrobiology : Titan ranks with Mars and Europa as a prime body for astrobiological study due to its abundant organics. Like Europa, it may well have a liquid water interior. 2. Titan - A world in its own right. Titan deserves study even only to put other satellites (its remarkably smaller Saturnian siblings, and its same-sized but volatile-poor Jovian counterparts) in context. The added dimension of an atmosphere makes Titan's origin and evolution particularly interesting. 3. Titan - an environmental laboratory for Earth. Titan will be an unrivalled place to investigate meteorological, oceanographical and other processes. Many of these (e.g. wave generation by wind) are only empirically parameterized - the very different physical parameters of the Titan environment will bring new insights to these phenomena. While Cassini-Huygens will dramatically boost our knowledge of Titan, it will likely only whet our appetite for more. The potential for prebiotic materials at various locations (in particular where liquid water has interacted with photochemical deposits) and the need to monitor Titan's meteorology favor future missions that may exploit Titan's unique thick-atmosphere, low-gravity environment - a mobile platform like an airship or helicopter, able to explore on global scales, but access the surface for in-situ chemical analysis and probe the interior by electromagnetic and seismic means. Such missions have dramatic potential to capture the public's imagination, on both sides of the Atlantic.

  3. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  4. Titan Saturn System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is a high priority for exploration, as recommended by NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap. NASA's 2003 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision Program Themes. Recent revolutionary Cassini-Huygens discoveries have dramatically escalated interest in Titan as the next scientific target in the outer solar system. This study demonstrates that an exciting Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) that explores two worlds of intense astrobiological interest can be initiated now as a single NASA/ESA collaboration.

  5. Future Titan Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. H.; Coustenis, A.; Lorenz, R.; Lunine, J.; Stofan, E.

    2012-04-01

    New discoveries about Titan from the Cassini-Huygens mission have led to a broad range of mission class studies for future missions, ranging from NASA Discovery class to International Flagship class. Three consistent science themes emerge and serve as a framework for discussing the various mission concepts: Goal A: Explore Titan, an Earth-Like System - How does Titan function as a system? How are the similarities and differences with Earth, and other solar system bodies, a result of the interplay of the geology, hydrology, meteorology, and aeronomy present in the Titan system?; Goal B: Examine Titan’s Organic Inventory—A Path to Prebiological Molecules - What is the complexity of Titan’s organic chemistry in the atmosphere, within its lakes, on its surface, and in its putative subsurface water ocean and how does this inventory differ from known abiotic organic material in meteorites and therefore contribute to our understanding of the origin of life in the Solar System?; and Goal C: Explore Enceladus and Saturn’s magnetosphere—clues to Titan’s origin and evolution - What is the exchange of energy and material with the Saturn magnetosphere and solar wind? What is the source of geysers on Enceladus? Does complex chemistry occur in the geyser source? Within this scientific framework the presentation will overview the Titan Explorer, Titan AND Enceladus Mission, Titan Saturn System Mission, Titan Mare Explorer, and Titan Submersible. Future timelines and plans will be discussed.

  6. Recovery of strontium activity from a strontium-82/rubidium-82 generator

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Sosnowski, Kenneth M.

    1999-10-12

    Strontium-82 is recovered from spent strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators to provide a source of strontium-82 for additional strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators. The process involves stripping of the strontium-82 from used strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators followed by purification of the strontium-82 material to remove additional metal contaminants to desired levels.

  7. Phonon thermal transport through tilt grain boundaries in strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zexi; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Shengfeng; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Deng, Bowen; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr

    2014-08-21

    In this work, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study phonon scattering at two tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in SrTiO{sub 3}. Mode-wise energy transmission coefficients are obtained based on phonon wave-packet dynamics simulations. The Kapitza conductance is then quantified using a lattice dynamics approach. The obtained results of the Kapitza conductance of both GBs compare well with those obtained by the direct method, except for the temperature dependence. Contrary to common belief, the results of this work show that the optical modes in SrTiO{sub 3} contribute significantly to phonon thermal transport, accounting for over 50% of the Kapitza conductance. To understand the effect of the GB structural disorder on phonon transport, we compare the local phonon density of states of the atoms in the GB region with that in the single crystalline grain region. Our results show that the excess vibrational modes introduced by the structural disorder do not have a significant effect on phonon scattering at the GBs, but the absence of certain modes in the GB region appears to be responsible for phonon reflections at GBs. This work has also demonstrated phonon mode conversion and simultaneous generation of new modes. Some of the new modes have the same frequency as the initial wave packet, while some have the same wave vector but lower frequencies.

  8. Intrinsic Mobility Limiting Mechanisms in Lanthanum-Doped Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Amit; Kajdos, Adam P.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-05-01

    The temperature dependent Hall mobility data from La-doped SrTiO3 thin films are analyzed and modeled considering various electron scattering mechanisms. We find that a ˜6 meV transverse optical phonon deformation potential scattering mechanism is necessary to explain the dependence of transport on temperature between 10-200 K. Also, we find that the low temperature electron mobility in intrinsic (nominally undoped) SrTiO3 is limited by acoustic phonon scattering. Adding the above two scattering mechanisms to longitudinal optical phonon and ionized impurity scattering mechanisms, excellent quantitative agreement between mobility measurement and model is achieved in the whole temperature range (2-300 K) and carrier concentrations ranging over a few orders of magnitude (8×1017 -2×1020 cm-3).

  9. Structural instabilities in strontium titanate from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasota, Christopher Andrew

    For some time now, first-principles calculation methods have proven to be an effective tool for investigating the physics of condensed matter systems. The additional use of density functional theory (DFT) and the local density approximation (LDA) has permitted even complex materials to be studied on desktop workstations with remarkable success. The incorporation of linear response theory into these methods has extended their power, allowing investigation of important dynamical properties. Contained within the following pages are the results of a first-principles study of SrTiO3. This transition metal oxide is often grouped with ferroelectric materials, due to its similar composition and perovskite structure. Although it behaves as if it were to become ferroelectric, it fails to do so, even at the lowest temperatures. Using the LAPW method for bulk materials, the ground-state equilibrium properties for the cubic phase were found. Additional linear response calculations produced the phonon frequencies throughout the Brillouin zone. Imaginary values for these frequencies revealed two distinct regions of reciprocal space corresponding to structural instabilities of the ferroelectric (FE) and antiferrodistortive (AFD) types. A cell-doubling AFD transition to tetragonal structure is observed experimentally, so subsequent calculations were continued in this phase. Total energy calculations were performed for both FE and AFD distortions in this new phase, and it was found that the AFD instability is enhanced with decreasing lattice parameter, while the FE instability is diminished. Furthermore, these calculations suggest that this material is marginally stable against FE distortions, even at the 105 K volume.

  10. Residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate thin film tunable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, L. M. Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Lam, P.; Harris, D.; Maria, J.-P.

    2014-07-28

    Loss reduction is critical to develop Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} thin film tunable microwave dielectric components and dielectric energy storage devices. The presence of ferroelectricity, and hence the domain wall contributions to dielectric loss, will degrade the tunable performance in the microwave region. In this work, residual ferroelectricity—a persistent ferroelectric response above the global phase transition temperature—was characterized in tunable dielectrics using Rayleigh analysis. Chemical solution deposited Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} films, with relative tunabilities of 86% over 250 kV/cm at 100 kHz, demonstrated residual ferroelectricity 65 °C above the ostensible paraelectric transition temperature. Frequency dispersion observed in the dielectric temperature response was consistent with the presence of nanopolar regions as one source of residual ferroelectricity. The application of AC electric field for the Rayleigh analysis of these samples led to a doubling of the dielectric loss for fields over 10 kV/cm at room temperature.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of novel lanthanide- and actinide-containing titanates and zircono-titanates; relevance to nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, S.L.S.

    1995-08-01

    Before experiments using actinide elements are performed, synthetic routes are tested using lanthanides of comparable ionic radii as surrogates. Compound and solid solution formation in several lanthanide-containing titanate and zircono-titanate systems have been established using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, which helped to define interesting and novel experiments, some of which have been performed and are discussed, for selected actinide elements. The aqueous solubilities of several lanthanide- and actinide-containing compounds, representative of the systems studied, were tested in several leachants, including the WIPP {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} brine, following modified Materials Characterization Center procedures (MCC-3). The WIPP {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} brine is a synthetic substitute for that found in nature at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The concentrations of cerium, used as a surrogate for plutonium, leached by the WIPP {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} brine from all the cerium-containing compounds and solid solutions tested were below the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry limit of detection (10 ppm) established for cerium in this brine. The concentrations of plutonium leached from the two plutonium-containing solid solutions were less than 1 ppm as determined by gross alpha counting and alpha pulse height analysis. Concentrations of strontium leached by the WIPP brine from stable strontium containing titanate compounds, studied as possible immobilizers of both {sup 90}Sr and actinide elements, were also quite low. These compound and solid solution formation investigations and the aqueous solubility studies suggest that the types of titanate and zircono-titanate compounds and solid solutions studied in this work appear to be useful as host matrices for nuclear waste immobilization.

  12. The astrobiology of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Hebrard, E.; Israel, G.; Nguyen, M.-J.; Szopa, C.; Gpcos Team

    Largest satellite of Saturn and the only satellite in the solar system having a dense atmosphere, Titan is one of the key planetary bodies for astrobiological studies, due to several aspects: Its analogies with planet Earth, in spite of much lower temperatures, The Cassini-Huygens data have largely confirmed the many analogies between Titan and our own planet. Both have similar vertical temperature profiles, (although much colder, of course, on Titan). Both have condensable and non condensable greenhouse gases in their atmosphere. Both are geologically very active. Furthermore, the data also suggest strongly the presence of a methane cycle on Titan analogous to the water cycle on Earth. The presence of an active organic chemistry, involving several of the key compounds of prebiotic chemistry. The recent data obtained from the Huygens instruments show that the organic matter in Titan low atmosphere (stratosphere and troposphere) is mainly concentrated in the aerosol particles. Because of the vertical temperature profile in this part of the atmosphere, most of the volatile organics are probably mainly condensed on the aerosol particles. The nucleus of these particles seems to be made of complex macromolecular organic matter, well mimicked in the laboratory by the "Titan's tholins". Now, laboratory tholins are known to release many organic compounds of biological interest, such as amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases, when they are in contact with liquid water. Such hydrolysis may have occurred on the surface of Titan, in the bodies of liquid water which episodically may form on Titan's surface from meteoritic and cometary impacts. The formation of biologically interesting compounds may also occur in the deep water ocean, from the hydrolysis of complex organic material included in the chrondritic matter accreted during the formation of Titan. The possible emergence and persistence of Life on Titan 1 All ingredients which seems necessary for Life are present on

  13. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  14. The effect of a hydrostatic pressure induced phase transformation on the unipolar electrical response of Nb modified 95/5 lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadez, J. C.; Sahul, R.; Alberta, E.; Hackenberger, W.; Lynch, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Niobium doped lead zirconate titanate (95/5 NbPZT) undergoes a hydrostatic pressure induced ferroelectric rhombohedral to antiferroelectric orthorhombic phase transformation (FE-AFE). This work reports on the experimental characterization of the large field dielectric response to unipolar electric field as it passes through the forward and reverse FE-AFE transformations. The poled ceramic was hydrostatically depoled by driving the FE-AFE phase transformation and stress-strain and stress-electric displacement responses were measured. After this initial characterization, specimens of 95/5 NbPZT were subjected to unipolar electric field loading at different hydrostatic pressure levels. Electric field was varied from zero to 1 MV/m at a series of fixed pressure levels between zero and 550 MPa. This resulted in minor hysteresis loops with the area inside the loops dependent on both pressure and electric field amplitude. Two different slopes were taken from the D-E loops, identified as the small field and large field slopes. Each changed with pressure and displayed distinct jumps at the forward and reverse FE-AFE phase transformations. The area within the loops in the ferroelectric regime, attributed to domain wall motion, increased as pressure was increased and dropped abruptly as the material passed through the pressure induced phase transformation.

  15. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  16. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had bone marrow disease, blood disorders, or kidney disease.you should know that strontium-89 chloride may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, ...

  17. Accumulation of bone strontium measured by in vivo XRF in rats supplemented with strontium citrate and strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Chettle, David R; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Druchok, Cheryl; Webber, Colin E; Adachi, Jonathan D; Beattie, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Strontium ranelate is an approved pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in Europe and Australia, but not in Canada or the United States. Strontium citrate, an alternative strontium salt, however, is available for purchase over-the-counter as a nutritional supplement. The effects of strontium citrate on bone are largely unknown. The study's objectives were 1) to quantify bone strontium accumulation in female Sprague Dawley rats administered strontium citrate (N=7) and compare these levels to rats administered strontium ranelate (N=6) and vehicle (N=6) over 8 weeks, and 2) to verify an in vivo X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) system for measurement of bone strontium in the rat. Daily doses of strontium citrate and strontium ranelate were determined with the intention to achieve equivalent amounts of elemental strontium. However, post-hoc analyses of each strontium compound conducted using energy dispersive spectrometry microanalysis revealed a higher elemental strontium concentration in strontium citrate than strontium ranelate. Bone strontium levels were measured at baseline and 8 weeks follow-up using a unique in vivo XRF technique previously used in humans. XRF measurements were validated against ex vivo measurements of bone strontium using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Weight gain in rats in all three groups was equivalent over the study duration. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare bone strontium levels amongst the three groups. Bone strontium levels in rats administered strontium citrate were significantly greater (p<0.05) than rats administered strontium ranelate and vehicle. ANCOVA analyses were performed with Sr dose as a covariate to account for differences in strontium dosing. The ANCOVA revealed differences in bone strontium levels between the strontium groups were not significant, but that bone strontium levels were still very significantly greater than vehicle. PMID:22995463

  18. The greenhouse of Titan.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of non-gray radiative equilibrium and gray convective equilibrium on Titan suggests that a massive molecular-hydrogen greenhouse effect may be responsible for the disagreement between the observed IR temperatures and the equilibrium temperature of an atmosphereless Titan. Calculations of convection indicate a probable minimum optical depth of 14 which corresponds to a molecular hydrogen shell of substantial thickness with total pressures of about 0.1 bar. It is suggested that there is an equilibrium between outgassing and blow-off on the one hand and accretion from the protons trapped in a hypothetical Saturnian magnetic field on the other, in the present atmosphere of Titan. It is believed that an outgassing equivalent to the volatilization of a few kilometers of subsurface ice is required to maintain the present blow-off rate without compensation for all geological time. The presence of an extensive hydrogen corona around Titan is postulated, with surface temperatures up to 200 K.

  19. Raising the Titanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Romona

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which groups of students investigate engineering principles by writing a feasibility study to raise the luxury liner, Titanic. The problem statement and directions, and suggestions for problem solutions are included. (CW)

  20. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  1. Clash of the Titans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2010-01-01

    WebQuests and the 5E learning cycle are titans of the science classroom. These popular inquiry-based strategies are most often used as separate entities, but the author has discovered that using a combined WebQuest and 5E learning cycle format taps into the inherent power and potential of both strategies. In the lesson, "Clash of the Titans,"…

  2. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  3. Titan Probe navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Wood, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed Cassini mission, a combined Saturn Orbiter/Titan Probe spacecraft will be launched from the Space Shuttle to arrive at Saturn around 2002, by means of a delta-VEGA trajectory. After Saturn-orbit insertion and a pericrone raise maneuver, the probe will be released to enter the Titan atmosphere and impact onto its surface. During its descent phase and impact onto Titan, the probe will maintain radio contact with the orbiter. Since the Titan-probe experimental phase lasts for only about four hours, probe-orbiter geometry and probe-delivery accuracy are critical to successful completion of this part of the mission. From a preliminary navigation analysis for probe delivery accuracy, it seems feasible to deliver the probe within 50 km (1-sigma value) of the desired aim-point in the Titan B-plane. The covariance study, however, clearly indicates the need for optical data, in addition to radio metric data. A Monte Carlo study indicates that a Delta-V capability of 98 m/sec for trajectory correction maneuvers will be sufficient to cover 99 percent of all contingencies during the segment from Saturn-orbit insertion to Titan-probe release.

  4. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  5. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  6. Witnessing Springtime on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Have you ever wondered what springtime is like on Saturns largest moon, Titan? A team of researchers has analyzed a decade of data from the Cassini spacecraft to determine how Titans gradual progression through seasons has affected its temperatures.Observing the Saturn SystemThough Titan orbits Saturn once every ~16 days, it is Saturns ~30-year march around the Sun that sets Titans seasons: each traditional season on Titan spans roughly 7.5 years. Thus, when the Cassini spacecraft first arrived at Saturn in 2004 to study the giant planet and its ring system and moons, Titans northern hemisphere was in early winter. A decade later, the season in the northern hemisphere had advanced to late spring.A team scientists led by Donald Jennings (Goddard Space Flight Center) has now used data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on board Cassini to analyze the evolution of Titans surface temperature between 2004 and 2014.Changing of SeasonsSurface brightness temperatures (with errors) on Titan are shown in blue for five time periods between 2004 and 2014. The location of maximum temperature migrates from 19S to 16N over the decade. Two climate models are also shown in green (high thermal inertia) and red (low thermal inertia). [Jennings et al. 2016]CIRS uses the decreased opacity of Titans atmosphere at 19 m to detect infrared emission from Titans surface at this wavelength. From this data, Jennings and collaborators determine Titans surface temperature for five time intervals between 2004 and 2014. They bin the data into 10 latitude bins that span from the south pole (90S) to the north pole (90N).The authors find that the maximum temperature on the moon stays stable over the ten-year period at 94 K, or a chilly -240F). But as time passes, the latitude with the warmest temperature shifts from 19S to 16N, marking the transition from early winter to late spring. Over the decade of monitoring, the surface temperature near the south pole decreased by ~2 K, and that

  7. The environment of Titan, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Information regarding the physical characteristics of Titan and atmospheric models necessary to support design and mission planning of spacecraft that are to orbit Titan, enter its atmosphere or land on its surface is given.

  8. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Weather on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Hall, J. L.; Geballe, T. R.

    2000-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere potentially sports a cycle similar to the hydrologic one on Earth with clouds, rain and seas, but with methane playing the terrestrial role of water. Over the past ten years many independent efforts indicated no strong evidence for cloudiness until some unique spectra were analyzed in 1998 (Griffith et al.). These surprising observations displayed enhanced fluxes of 14-200% on two nights at precisely the wavelengths (windows) that sense Titan's lower altitude where clouds might reside. The morphology of these enhancements in all 4 windows observed indicate that clouds covered ~6-9% of Titan's surface and existed at ~15 km altitude. Here I discuss new observations recorded in 1999 aimed to further characterize Titan's clouds. While we find no evidence for a massive cloud system similar to the one observed previously, 1%-4% fluctuations in flux occur daily. These modulations, similar in wavelength and morphology to the more pronounced ones observed earlier, suggest the presence of clouds covering <=1% of Titan's disk. The variations are too small to have been detected by most prior measurements. Repeated observations, spaced 30 minutes apart, indicate a temporal variability observable in the time scale of a couple of hours. The cloud heights hint that convection governs their evolutions. Their short lives point to the presence of rain. C. A. Griffith and J. L. Hall are supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program NAG5-6790.

  10. Hypsometry of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Stiles, Bryan; Le Gall, Alice; Hayes, Alexander; Aharonson, Oded; Wood, Charles A.; Stofan, Ellen; Kirk, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Cassini RADAR topography data are used to evaluate Titan's hypsometric profile, and to make comparisons with other planetary bodies. Titan's hypsogram is unimodal and strikingly narrow compared with the terrestrial planets. To investigate topographic extremes, a novel variant on the classic hypsogram is introduced, with a logarithmic abscissa to highlight mountainous terrain. In such a plot, the top of the terrestrial hypsogram is quite distinct from those of Mars and Venus due to the 'glacial buzz-saw' that clips terrestrial topography above the snowline. In contrast to the positive skew seen in other hypsograms, with a long tail of positive relief due to mountains, there is an indication (weak, given the limited data for Titan so far) that the Titan hypsogram appears slightly negatively skewed, suggesting a significant population of unfilled depressions. Limited data permit only a simplistic comparison of Titan topography with other icy satellites but we find that the standard deviation of terrain height (albeit at different scales) is similar to those of Ganymede and Europa.

  11. Flight through Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Ádámkovics, Máté; Gibbard, Seran; Roe, Henry G.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    We assembled spectral image data cubes of Titan in H-band (1.413-1.808 μm), using adaptive optics on the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope, by stepping a spectrometer slit across Titan's disk. We constructed images of Titan at each wavelength by 'glueing' the spectra together, producing 1400 ultra-narrowband (~0.1nm) views of the satellite. With this method one can characterise Titan's atmosphere over the entire disk, in more specific vertical detail than possible with either narrowband imaging or slit spectroscopy at one position. Data were obtained of Titan's leading hemisphere on UT 20 February 2001. At the shorter wavelengths we probe all the way down to the surface, revealing the familiar bright and dark terrain, while at longer wavelengths we probe various altitudes in the atmosphere. The data have been assembled into a movie, showing the surface and different haze layers while stepping up in altitude. The transitions from the surface to the tropospheric haze, and through the tropopause into the upper atmospheric haze, are clearly recognised.

  12. Titanic Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    New Detailed VLT Images of Saturn's Largest Moon Optimizing space missions Titan, the largest moon of Saturn was discovered by Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens in 1655 and certainly deserves its name. With a diameter of no less than 5,150 km, it is larger than Mercury and twice as large as Pluto. It is unique in having a hazy atmosphere of nitrogen, methane and oily hydrocarbons. Although it was explored in some detail by the NASA Voyager missions, many aspects of the atmosphere and surface still remain unknown. Thus, the existence of seasonal or diurnal phenomena, the presence of clouds, the surface composition and topography are still under debate. There have even been speculations that some kind of primitive life (now possibly extinct) may be found on Titan. Titan is the main target of the NASA/ESA Cassini/Huygens mission, launched in 1997 and scheduled to arrive at Saturn on July 1, 2004. The ESA Huygens probe is designed to enter the atmosphere of Titan, and to descend by parachute to the surface. Ground-based observations are essential to optimize the return of this space mission, because they will complement the information gained from space and add confidence to the interpretation of the data. Hence, the advent of the adaptive optics system NAOS-CONICA (NACO) [1] in combination with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile now offers a unique opportunity to study the resolved disc of Titan with high sensitivity and increased spatial resolution. Adaptive Optics (AO) systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a special camera at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second (see e.g. ESO Press Release 25/01 , ESO PR Photos 04a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 19a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 21a-c/02, ESO Press Release 17/02, and ESO Press Release 26/03 for earlier NACO

  13. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; Cassini RADAR Team

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  14. Diurnal variations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  15. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  17. Flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Frederic J.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Roth, Duane C.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encounters the massive Titan about once every month. These encounters are essential to the mission as Titan is the only satellite of Saturn that can provide enough gravity assist to shape the orbit tour and allow outstanding science for many years. From a navigation point of view, these encounters provide many challenges, in particular those that fly close enough to the surface for the atmospheric drag to perturb the orbit. This paper discusses the dynamics models developed to successfully navigate Cassini and determine its trajectory. This includes the moon's gravity pull with its second degree zonal harmonics J2, the attitude thrust control perturbations and the acceleration of drag.

  18. Titan's "Hot Cross Bun": A Titan Laccolith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R. L.; Lucas, A.; Mitchell, K. L.; Lunine, J. I.; Turtle, E. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Malaska, M.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s RADAR instrument acquired Synthetic Aperture Radar data during the T83 flyby on May 22, 2012. The data showed a feature centered at 38.5N, 203W that resembles a “hot cross bun”. This type of feature has not been seen on Titan before, even though 52% of Titan’s surface has been imaged using SAR. The feature, approximately 100 km across, is mostly radar bright but the cross pattern, interpreted to be extensional fractures, located roughly at the center of the brighter area, appears darker at radar wavelengths (2.3 cm). Radar illumination of the image indicates that the fractures are lower in elevation than the surrounding bright region. The morphology of the region is markedly similar to that of a 30-km dome-shaped feature on Venus that lies at the summit of the Kunapipi volcano. The Venus feature is interpreted to be the result of intrusion of magma at the summit of the volcano [1]. A similar feature, interpreted as a laccolith, is seen on the Moon near the crater Ramsden [2]. The lunar feature, imaged by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the cross-shaped depression over a 300 m high rise. No topographic data for the feature on Titan are available at this time, but the morphology seen by the SAR data suggests that the feature may have been formed by material pushing up from below. Laccoliths form when an igneous intrusion splits apart two strata, resulting in a domeline structure. This previously unknown type of structure on Titan may be yet another indication of cryovolcanism. [1] Stofan, E.R., et al, Icarus, 152, 75-95, 2001. [2] Wichman, R.W. and Schultz, P. H. (1996). Icarus, 122, Issue 1, July 1996, pages 193-199. doi:10.1006/icar.1996.0118

  19. Interferometry with Strontium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Lambert, Enoch; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin

    2014-05-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. Cold Strontium atoms are extracted from an LVIS. The atoms will be photo-ionized with a two-photon transition to an auto-ionizing state in the continuum. The ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions from a pair of diode lasers injection locked to two beams from a master laser which have been shifted up and down by half the hyperfine splitting. We are developing laser instrumentation for this project including a method to prevent mode-hopping by analyzing laser frequency noise, and an inexpensive, robust wavelength meter. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  20. Sinking with the Titanic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2015-03-01

    In the Titanic movie, when the rear part of the ship is about to sink, Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) says to Rose DeWitt Bukater (Kate Winslet) to get ready to swim, because the sinking body will suck them into the abysses. Is this sucking phenomenon really happening? And, if so, why?

  1. Titan Nitriles Awaiting Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2003-05-01

    The nitrogen-methane haze of Titan is known to harbor at least four molecules containing a nitrile (-CN) group: H-CN, NC-CN, CH3-CN, and HCC-CN. The low-temperature reaction chemistry of these molecules is of interest as the Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe approach the Saturnian system. As part of our preparation for Cassini-Huygens results we have undertaken an experimental study of the dominant chemical changes of nitrile molecules. Our results point to isomerization products formed by both low-temperature photochemistry and radiation chemistry. Among the new molecules we can predict are isonitriles (e.g. CH3-NC) and enimines (e.g. H2C=C=NH). We also expect, depending on the amount of H2O present, that cyanate ions (OCN-) can form on Titan. This presentation will include our latest results for Titan nitriles, as well a few nitriles not yet detected on Titan but present in either cometary comae or the interstellar medium. Since nitriles can form biological molecules, such as alpha-amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines, our results may also have astrobiological implications. -- The authors acknowledge NASA funding through the SARA and Planetary Atmospheres programs. RLH acknowledges support from NASA grant NAG-5-1843.

  2. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  4. Titanates and Titanate-Metal Compounds in Biological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Drury, Jeanie L.; Chung, Whasun Oh; Hobbs, David T.; Wataha, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions are notorious environmental contaminants, some causing toxicity at exquisitely low (ppm-level) concentrations. Yet, the redox properties of metal ions make them attractive candidates for bio-therapeutics. Titanates are insoluble particulate compounds of titanium and oxygen with crystalline surfaces that bind metal ions; these compounds offer a means to scavenge metal ions in environmental contexts or deliver them in therapeutic contexts while limiting systemic exposure and toxicity. In either application, the toxicological properties of titanates are crucial. To date, the accurate measurement of the in vitro toxicity of titanates has been complicated by their particulate nature, which interferes with many assays that are optical density (OD)-dependent, and at present, little to no in vivo titanate toxicity data exist. Compatibility data garnered thus far for native titanates in vitro are inconsistent and lacking in mechanistic understanding. These data suggest that native titanates have little toxicity toward several oral and skin bacteria species, but do suppress mammalian cell metabolism in a cells-pecific manner. Titanate compounds bind several types of metal ions, including some common environmental toxins, and enhance delivery to bacteria or cells. Substantial work remains to address the practical applicability of titanates. Nevertheless, titanates have promise to serve as novel vehicles for metal-based therapeutics or as a new class of metal scavengers for environmental applications. PMID:26430701

  5. Demonstration of strontium removal from Hanford N-Area well water

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C.D.; DesChane, J.R.; Corneillie, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    As part of the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study to demonstrate the efficiency of several ion-exchange materials in removing strontium-90 from actual groundwater from the Hanford N-Springs Pump and Treat Demonstration Facility. The objective of this experiment was to determine the strontium-loading distribution coefficients (Kds) for some titanate ion-exchange materials, modified minerals, and organic ion-exchange resins. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing strontium from N-area groundwaters. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion-exchange materials under similar operating conditions, and show that additional flow studies are needed to predict materials capacities and to develop complete ion-exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV IE-911 (manufactured by UOP) and SuperLig 644 (IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc.), and materials produced on an experimental basis by Allied Signal (nontitanates), Selion Inc. (titanates), and Pennsylvania State University (modified mica). In all, the performance of seven different ion-exchange materials was evaluated using actual N-Area groundwater. The evaluation consisted of the determining strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Tests were performed at two different solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., phase ratios) of 2000 and 4000 using actual N-Area groundwater samples from three different wells. Actual N-Area groundwater used in the present study was obtained from three monitoring wells in FY 1998. These samples were taken from wells with strontium-90 concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 3.9 pCi/L.

  6. Titan III-C Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows a Titan III-C launch vehicle. Titan vehicles are designed to carry payloads equal to the size and weight of those on the space shuttle. The Titan IV Centaur can put 10,000 pound payloads into geosynchronous orbit, 22,300 miles above Earth. For more information about Titan and Centaur, please see chapters 4 and 8, respectively, in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  7. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  8. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  9. Titan's Eccentricity Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2011-12-01

    The large eccentricity (e=0.03) of Titan's orbit causes significant variations in the tidal field from Saturn and induces periodic stresses in the satellite body at the orbital period (about 16 days). Peak-to-peak variations of the tidal field (from pericenter to apocenter) are about 18% (6e). If Titan hosts a liquid layer (such as an internal ocean), the gravity field would exhibit significant periodic variations. The response of the body to fast variations of the external, perturbing field is controlled by the Love numbers, defined for each spherical harmonic as the ratio between the perturbed and perturbing potential. For Titan the largest effect is by far on the quadrupole field, and the corresponding Love number is indicated by k2 (assumed to be identical for all degree 2 harmonics). Models of Titan's interior generally envisage a core made up of silicates, surrounded by a layer of high pressure ice, possibly a liquid water or water-ammonia ocean, and an ice-I outer shell, with variations associated with the dehydration state of the core or the presence of mixed rock-ice layers. Previous analysis of Titan's tidal response [1] shows that k2 depends crucially on the presence or absence of an internal ocean. k2 was found to vary from about 0.03 for a purely rocky interior to 0.48 for a rigid rocky core surrounded by an ocean and a thin (20 km) ice shell. A large k2 entails changes in the satellite's quadrupole coefficients by a few percent, enough to be detected by accurate range rate measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. So far, of the many Cassini's flybys of Titan, six were used for gravity measurements. During gravity flybys the spacecraft is tracked from the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network using microwave links at X- and Ka-band frequencies. A state-of-the-art instrumentation enables range rate measurements accurate to 10-50 micron/s at integration times of 60 s. The first four flybys provided the static gravity field and the moment of inertia factor

  10. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  11. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  12. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  13. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  14. Changes on Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Drossart, P.; Lawrence, K. J.; Matsoukas, C. K.; Hirtzig, M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.; Bratsolis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Titan Radar Mapper have investigated Titan's surface since 2004, unveiling a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmospheric interactions, and climate evolution. We focus on understanding the origin of the major geomorphological units identified by Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1,2], Malaska et al. (2015) [3] and regions we studied in Solomonidou et al. (2014; 2015) [4,5]. Here, we investigate the nature of: Undifferentiated Plains, Hummocky/Mountainous terrains, candidate cryovolcanic sites, Labyrinth, and Dunes in terms of surface albedo behavior and spectral evolution with time to identify possible changes. Using a radiative transfer code, we find that temporal variations of surface albedo occur for some areas. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, both candidate cryovolcanic regions, change with time, becoming darker and brighter respectively in surface albedo. In contrast, we find that the Undifferentiated Plains and the suggested evaporitic areas [6] in the equatorial regions do not present any significant changes. We are able to report the differences and similarities among the various regions and provide constraints on their chemical composition and specific processes of origin. Our results support the hypothesis that both endogenic and exogenic processes have played important roles in shaping Titan's geologic evolution. Such a variety of geologic processes and their relationship to the methane cycle make Titan important for astrobiology and habitability studies and particularly significant in solar system studies. [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-588, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435, 2013; [3] Malaska, M., et al : Icarus, submitted, 2015;[4] Solomonidou et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: In press, 2015; [6] Barnes

  15. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  16. Landscape Evolution of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Titan may have acquired its massive atmosphere relatively recently in solar system history. The warming sun may have been key to generating Titan's atmosphere over time, starting from a thin atmosphere with condensed surface volatiles like Triton, with increased luminosity releasing methane, and then large amounts of nitrogen (perhaps suddenly), into the atmosphere. This thick atmosphere, initially with much more methane than at present, resulted in global fluvial erosion that has over time retreated towards the poles with the removal of methane from the atmosphere. Basement rock, as manifested by bright, rough, ridges, scarps, crenulated blocks, or aligned massifs, mostly appears within 30 degrees of the equator. This landscape was intensely eroded by fluvial processes as evidenced by numerous valley systems, fan-like depositional features and regularly-spaced ridges (crenulated terrain). Much of this bedrock landscape, however, is mantled by dunes, suggesting that fluvial erosion no longer dominates in equatorial regions. High midlatitude regions on Titan exhibit dissected sedimentary plains at a number of localities, suggesting deposition (perhaps by sediment eroded from equatorial regions) followed by erosion. The polar regions are mainly dominated by deposits of fluvial and lacustrine sediment. Fluvial processes are active in polar areas as evidenced by alkane lakes and occasional cloud cover.

  17. Evolution of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H.; Povoden, G.; Selsis, F.; Ribas, I.; Tehrany, M. G.; Guinan, E. F.; Hanslmeier, A.; Bauer, S. J.

    2003-04-01

    We show that anomalies of heavy isotopes in Titan's atmosphere can be explained by using observational data of the radiation and particle environment of solar proxies. These observations indicate a larger solar wind flux and high solar EUV radiation of the early Sun during the first billion years are responsible for a fractionated atmospheric loss. For studying the evolution of the thermal escape of Titan's atmosphere we use a scaling law based on an approximate solution of the heat balance equation in the exosphere. Further, isotope fractionation by non-thermal atmospheric escape processes like dissociative recombination, impact dissociation, atmospheric sputtering and ion pick-up processes. We show that Titan lost an atmospheric mass We discuss also possible chemical reactions of methane and other out-gassing substances due to the high solar EUV fluxes powered thermospheric temperature 4 Gyr ago. This could have lead to molecules of higher mass like ethane and other organic compounds. The efficient production of such molecules was reduced by the decrease of the solar activity resulting in a kind of frozen state. At present only high energy processes like lightning discharges may give similar reactions.

  18. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  19. Titan ballute aerocapture using the stochastic TitanGRAM model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wyatt R.

    2004-01-01

    Aerocapture using a towed, inflatable ballute system has been shown to provide a sifnificatn performance advantages compared to traditional technologies, including lower heating rates and accomodation of larger navigational uncertainties. This paper extends previous results by designing a ballute aerocapture separation algorithm that can operate in a more realistic Titan atmospheric model based on TitanGRAM.

  20. Titan's methane clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  1. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, the Huygens Probe gave us a snapshot of a world tantalizingly like our own, yet frozen in its evolution on the threshold of life. The descent under parachute, like that of Huygens in 2005, is happening again, but this time in the Saturn-cast twilight of winter in Titan's northern reaches. With a pop, the parachute is released, and then a muffled splash signals the beginning of the first floating exploration of an extraterrestrial sea-this one not of water but of liquid hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, a hot air balloon, a "montgolfiere," cruises 6 miles above sunnier terrain, imaging vistas of dunes, river channels, mountains and valleys carved in water ice, and probing the subsurface for vast quantities of "missing" methane and ethane that might be hidden within a porous icy crust. Balloon and floater return their data to a Titan Orbiter equipped to strip away Titan's mysteries with imaging, radar profiling, and atmospheric sampling, much more powerful and more complete than Cassini was capable of. This spacecraft, preparing to enter a circular orbit around Saturn's cloud-shrouded giant moon, has just completed a series of flybys of Enceladus, a tiny but active world with plumes that blow water and organics from the interior into space. Specialized instruments on the orbiter were able to analyze these plumes directly during the flybys. Titan and Enceladus could hardly seem more different, and yet they are linked by their origin in the Saturn system, by a magnetosphere that sweeps up mass and delivers energy, and by the possibility that one or both worlds harbor life. It is the goal of the NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) to explore and investigate these exotic and inviting worlds, to understand their natures and assess the possibilities of habitability in this system so distant from our home world. Orbiting, landing, and ballooning at Titan represent a new and exciting approach to planetary exploration. The TSSM mission

  2. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  3. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  4. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  5. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  6. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  7. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  8. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  9. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  10. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  12. Synthesis of nanosized sodium titanates

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Elvington, Mark C.

    2015-09-29

    Methods directed to the synthesis and peroxide-modification of nanosized monosodium titanate are described. Methods include combination of reactants at a low concentration to a solution including a nonionic surfactant. The nanosized monosodium titanate can exhibit high selectivity for sorbing various metallic ions.

  13. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  14. The Use of Strontium-87/Strontium-86 Ratios to Measure Atmospheric Transport into Forested Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graustein, William C.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios indicate the sources of strontium in samples of natural waters, vegetation, and soil material taken from watersheds in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. More than 75 percent of the strontium in the vegetation is ultimately derived from atmospheric transport and less than 25 percent from the weathering of the underlying rock. Much of the airborne strontium enters the watersheds by impacting on coniferous foliage, but deciduous foliage apparently traps little, if any, strontium-bearing aerosol. The strontium and presumably other nutrients are continuously recycled in a nearly closed system consisting of upper soil horizons, forest litter, and the standing crop of vegetation.

  15. The use of strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios to measure atmospheric transport into forested watersheds.

    PubMed

    Graustein, W C; Armstrong, R L

    1983-01-21

    Strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios indicate the sources of strontium in samples of natural waters, vegetation, and soil material taken from watersheds in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. More than 75 percent of the strontium in the vegetation is ultimately derived from atmospheric transport and less than 25 percent from the weathering of the underlying rock. Much of the airborne strontium enters the watersheds by impacting on coniferous foliage, but deciduous foliage apparently traps little, if any, strontium-bearing aerosol. The strontium and presumably other nutrients are continuously recycled in a nearly closed system consisting of upper soil horizons, forest litter, and the standing crop of vegetation. PMID:17798277

  16. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

    1992-12-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

  17. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

  18. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 .mu., and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 .mu.. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  19. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  20. Titan's Carbon Conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Teanby, N. A.; Vinatier, S.; BÉ Zard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Irwin, P. G.; Flasar, F. M.; Cassini Cirs Team

    2010-12-01

    As recently as a year ago, a consensus was emerging that carbon-13 in Titan's methane was enriched by some ~10% over the terrestrial value (12C/13C = ~77-82 on Titan versus 89 on Earth, Niemann et al 2005, Nixon et al 2008). At the same time, several measurements of 12C/13C in ethane, the main product of methane photolysis, appeared to show no enrichment (Nixon et al 2008, Jennings et al 2009). This led to the suggestion that a steady state equilibrium was being reached, with a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE) in a key reaction (C2H + CH4 → C2H2 + CH3) responsible for the slight enrichment in the atmospheric reservoir relative to both the incoming flux of methane and outgoing flux of ethane (Jennings et al 2009). This paradigm was overturned earlier this year when the Huygens GCMS team revised their measurement of 12CH4/13CH4 upwards to agree with the terrestrial value (Niemann et al, in preparation), eliminating any need for the KIE fractionation. However, this presents a new problem in the sense that the KIE effect is probably real - it is confirmed for the CH3D and 12CH4 reactions with ethynyl (Opansky and Leone 1996), so almost certainly for 13CH4-12CH4 pair as well - and so some fractionation of methane should be occurring. This is true regardless as to whether the atmospheric methane is being replenished or not - differing only in degree - provided the ethynyl abstraction reaction is the dominant path for methane loss as predicted by current models (Lavvas et al. 2008). In this forum we will present updated measurements by the CIRS team of the 12CH4/13CH4 derived from recent high signal-to-noise Titan observations, and discuss the degree of agreement with both the earlier published ratios, and the newer revised GCMS results. We will also discuss the implications for Titan's methane evolution over geologic time including clues from the D/H ratio. We conclude by highlighting the currently open questions and avenues for future work. Jennings, D.E. et al., J. Chem

  1. Titan Science Return Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William

    2014-01-01

    Each proposal for a NASA mission concept includes a Science Traceability Matrix (STM), intended to show that what is being proposed would contribute to satisfying one or more of the agency's top-level science goals. But the information traditionally provided cannot be used directly to quantitatively compare anticipated science return. We added numerical elements to NASA's STM and developed a software tool to process the data. We then applied this methodology to evaluate a group of competing concepts for a proposed mission to Saturn's moon, Titan.

  2. Titan Airship Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerzhanovich, V.; Yavrouian, A.; Cutts, J.; Colozza, A.; Fairbrother, D.

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is considered to be one of the prime candidates for studying prebiotic materials - the substances that precede the formation of life but have disappeared from the Earth as a result of the evolution of life. A unique combination of a dense, predominantly nitrogen, atmosphere (more than four times that of the Earth), low gravity (six times less than on the Earth) and small temperature variations makes Titan the almost ideal planet for studies with lighter-than-air aerial platforms (aerobots). Moreover, since methane clouds and photochemical haze obscure the surface, low-altitude aerial platforms are the only practical means that can provide global mapping of the Titan surface at visible and infrared wavelengths. One major challenge in Titan exploration is the extremely cold atmosphere (approx. 90 K). However, current material technology the capability to operate aerobots at these very low temperatures. A second challenge is the remoteness from the Sun (10 AU) that makes the nuclear (radioisotopic) energy the only practical source of power. A third challenge is remoteness from the Earth (approx. 10 AU, two-way light-time approx. 160 min) which imposes restrictions on data rates and makes impractical any meaningful real-time control. A small-size airship (approx. 25 cu m) can carry a payload approximately 100 kg. A Stirling engine coupled to a radioisotope heat source would be the prime choice for producing both mechanical and electrical power for sensing, control, and communications. The cold atmospheric temperature makes Stirling machines especially effective. With the radioisotope power source the airship may fly with speed approximately 5 m/s for a year or more providing an excellent platform for in situ atmosphere measurements and a high-resolution remote sensing with unlimited access on a global scale. In a station-keeping mode the airship can be used for in situ studies on the surface by winching down an instrument package. Floating above the

  3. First Principles Theory of Sub-Monolayer Strontium on Silicon (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Kevin; Reiner, James; Walker, Frederick; Ahn, Charles; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2008-03-01

    Conventional attempts to continue transistor scaling consistent with Moore's law will soon result in unacceptable quantum mechanical leakage currents across the dielectric oxide layer. One promising solution to this problem is to replace the current silicon dioxide layer with a thicker crystalline oxide with a higher dielectric constant, grown epitaxially on silicon. Although there has been progress in growing high quality epitaxial interfaces for some materials, the initial stages of growth, including the deposition of the initial metal layer, are not well understood. Using ab initio density functional theory, we study the initial stages of the deposition of strontium titanate on silicon (001), a good model system due its successful epitaxial growth. We present the binding energies of several new low energy structures with sub-monolayer converages of strontium which differ significantly from the conventional view of this surface. Additionally, to include finite temperature effects, we calculate vibrational free energies. We compare our results to experimental samples grown by molecular beam expitaxy.

  4. Strontium and Actinides Removal from Savannah River Site Actual Waste Samples by Freshly Precipitated Manganese Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-10-30

    The authors investigated the performance of freshly precipitated manganese oxide and monosodium titanate (MST) for the removal of strontium (Sr) and actinides from actual high-level waste. Manganese oxide precipitation occurs upon addition of a reductant such as formate (HCO2-) or peroxide (H2O2) to a waste solution containing permanganate (MnO4-). Tests described in this document address the capability of manganese oxide treatment to remove Rs, Pu, and Np from actual high-level waste containing elevated concentrations of Pu. Additionally, tests investigate MST (using two unique batches) performance with the same waste for direct comparison to the manganese oxide performance.

  5. Titan's astrobiology: some new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Francois; Coll, Patrice; Buch, Arnaud; Cloix, Megane; Guan, Yuan Yong; Jerome, Murielle; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra I.; Szopa, Cyril; Cottin, Hervé

    The Cassini-Huygens observations of Titan have strongly strengthened its astrobiological impor-tance, clearly showing that Titan is one of the key planetary bodies for astrobiological studies. Indeed the Cassini-Huygens data show that there are many similarities which can be found when comparing Titan and the early Earth, in spite of much lower temperatures for Titan. One of these similarities is the presence of an active and complex organic chemistry in Titan's environment, which occurs from the high atmosphere to the surface and very likely in the sub-surface. This organic chemistry involves several of the key compounds of terrestrial prebiotic chemistry, and it represents, by itself, a major astrobiological aspect of Titan. Moreover, the potential presence of an internal water-ocean makes Titan a potential habitable environment, of obvious astrobiological importance. In fact, after five years of close observation by remote sensing and in situ instrumentations from the Cassini-Huygens mission, Titan does not look any more like a frozen primitive Earth, but it looks like an evolving planet, geologically active, with cryo-volcanism, eolian erosion, clouds and precipitations, and a methane cycle analogous to the water cycle on Earth. But the new data also show that a complex organic chemistry is taking place in the very high atmospheric layers of the satellite, with the formation in the ionosphere of high molecular weight (up about 10 000 Daltons) ions. Are these ions abundant enough in the lower atmosphere zones to act as organic monomers which then grow by aggregation, sedimentation and condensation down to the surface? This is one of the key questions that chemical models have now to answer. Cassini-Huygens observations have shown that there is no large surface ocean on Titan, but large regional lakes which behave like evolving liquid media. Those lakes are probably accumulating complex organics of astrobiological interest, including organic aerosols, and could

  6. Titan: A Place with Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Titan is the largest moon of the planet Saturn and is the only moon in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Its atmosphere is mostly made of nitrogen and has a pressure one and a half times larger than sea level pressure on Earth. In these respects Titan's atmosphere is the closest twin to Earth's. Methane is found in Titan's atmosphere and results in the formation of a organic smog layer in the atmosphere via chemistry that is similar to the current theories for the origin of life on Earth. Unfortunately, Titan is much too cold for water to be liquid and life is therefore unlikely, earth-like life that is. Titan's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect which is much stronger than the Earth's. However the organic smog layer produces an anti-greenhouse effect that cuts the greenhouse warming in half. The surface of Titan remains unknown, hidden by the thick smog layer, but it may be an ocean of liquid methane and ethane or maybe just lakes. When the NASA/ESA mission to the Saturn System, Cassini/Huygens reaches Saturn in a few years it will launch a probe that to the surface of Titan and show us this world that is strange and yet in many ways similar to our own.

  7. The Geology of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    Titan, the largest and most complex satellite in the solar system exhibits an organic dominated surface chemistry and shares surface features with other large icy satellites as well as the terrestrial planets. It is subject to tidal stresses, and its surface appears to have been modified tectonically. Cassini's global observations at infrared and radar wavelengths as well as local investigations by the instruments on the Huygens probe has revealed that Titan has the largest known abundance of organic material in the solar system apart from Earth, and that its active hydrological cycle is analogous to that of Earth, but with methane replacing water. The surface of Titan exhibits morphological features of different sizes and origins created by geological processes that span the entire dynamic range of aeolian, fluvial and tectonic activities, with likely evidence that cryovolcanism might exists where liquid water, perhaps in concert with ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide, makes its way to the surface from the interior [e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]. Extended dune fields, lakes, mountainous terrain, dendritic erosion patterns and erosional remnants indicate dynamic surface processes. Valleys, small-scale gullies and rounded cobbles require erosion by extended energetic flow of liquids. There is strong evidence that liquid hydrocarbons are ponded on the surface in lakes, predominantly, but not exclusively, at high northern latitudes. A variety of features including extensive flows and caldera-like constructs are interpreted to be cryovolcanic in origin. Chains and isolated blocks of rugged terrain rising from smoother areas are best described as mountains and might be related to tectonic processes. Impact craters form on all solid bodies in the solar system, and have been detected on Titan. But very few have been observed so they must be rapidly destroyed or buried by other geologic processes The morphologies of the impact

  8. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  9. Touchdown on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Europe's Huygens probe is on target for a Dec. 25 separation from the Cassini Saturn orbiter that has carried it like a baby for more than seven years. The probe will spend three weeks coasting to a plunge into Titan's thick atmosphere on the morning of Jan. 14. If all goes as planned, the 349-kg. Huygens will spend more than 2 hr. descending by parachute to the mysterious surface of the planet-sized moon, and hopefully devote yet more time to broadcasting data after it lands. Before the day is over, Huygens is programmed to beam about 30 megabytes of data - including some 1,100 images-back to Earth through Cassini, a trip that will take some 75 min. to complete over the 1- billion-km. distance that separates the two planets. Within that data should be answers to questions that date back to 1655, when Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens found the moon with a homemade telescope and named it for the family of giants the ancient Greeks believed once ruled the earth. In the Solar System, there is no other world like Titan, with a nitrogen and methane atmospheric and a cold, hidden surface darker than Earth under the full Moon.

  10. Mapping products of Titan's surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Karkoschka, Erich; Barnes, Jason W.; Tomasko, Martin G.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Le Corre, Lucille; Langhans, Mirjam; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Lorenz, Ralf D.; Perry, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing instruments aboard the Cassini spacecraft have been observed the surface of Titan globally in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens instruments revealing a wealth of new morphological features indicating a geologically active surface. We present a summary of mapping products of Titan's surface derived from data of the remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (ISS, VIMS, RADAR) as well as the Huygens probe (DISR) that were achieved during the nominal Cassini mission including an overview of Titan's recent nomenclature.

  11. Sorption of strontium on bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Khan, S.; Riaz-ur-Rehman; Ali Khan, M.

    1995-12-31

    Sorption of Sr on bentonite was studied using the batch technique. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were determined as a function of contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration and temperature. The data were interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Thermodynamic parameters for the sorption system were determined at three different temperatures. The positive value of the heat of sorption, {Delta}H{degree} = 30.62 kJ/mol at 295 K, shows that the sorption of strontium on bentonite is endothermic. The negative value of the free energy of sorption, {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}10.69 kJ/mol at 298 K, shows the spontaneity of the reaction. {Delta}G{degree} becomes more negative with increasing temperature, which shows that the sorption process is more favorable at higher temperatures. The mean free energy for sorption, E {approximately} 9 kJ/mol, suggests that ion exchange is the predominant mode of sorption in the Sr concentration range studies, i.e., 0.01--0.3 mol/dm{sup 3}. The presence of complementary cations depresses the sorption of strontium on bentonite in the order Ca{sup 2+}>Mg{sup 2+}>K{sup +}>Na{sup +}. Some organic complexing agents and natural ligands also affect the sorption of strontium. The desorption studies with ground water at low strontium loads on bentonite show that about 90% of Sr is irreversibly sorbed on the bentonite.

  12. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turtle, E. P.; DelGenio, A. D.; Barbara, J. M.; Perry, J. E.; Schaller, E. L.; McEwen, A. S.; West, R. A.; Ray, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem has observed Titan for 1/4 Titan year, and we report here the first evidence of seasonal shifts in preferred locations of tropospheric methane clouds. South \\polar convective cloud activity, common in late southern summer, has become rare. North \\polar and northern mid \\latitude clouds appeared during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown extensive cloud systems at low latitudes. In contrast, southern mid \\latitude and subtropical clouds have appeared sporadically throughout the mission, exhibiting little seasonality to date. These differences in behavior suggest that Titan s clouds, and thus its general circulation, are influenced by both the rapid temperature response of a low \\thermal \\inertia surface and the much longer radiative timescale of Titan s cold thick troposphere. North \\polar clouds are often seen near lakes and seas, suggesting that local increases in methane concentration and/or lifting generated by surface roughness gradients may promote cloud formation. Citation

  13. Ices in Titan's Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Analyses of Cassini CIRS far-infrared limb spectra of Titan at 15N, 15S, and 58S reveal a broad emission feature between 70 and 270/cm, restricted to altitudes between 60 and 100 km. This emission feature is chemically different from Titan's photochemical aerosol, which has an emission feature peak around 145 cm-1. The shape of the observed broad emission feature resembles a mixture of the solid component of the two most abundant nitrites in Titan's stratosphere, that of HCN and HC3N. Following the saturation vapor pressure vertical profiles of HCN and HC3N, the 60 to 100 km altitude range corresponds closely to the vertical location where these nitriles are expected to condense out and form small, suspended ice particles. This is the first time ices in Titan's stratosphere have been identified at latitudes south of 50N. Results and physical implications will be discussed.

  14. Titan's greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1992-01-01

    Thermal mechanisms active in Titan's atmosphere are discussed in a brief review of data obtained during the Voyager I flyby in 1980. Particular attention is given to the greenhouse effect (GHE) produced by atmospheric H2, N2, and CH4; this GHE is stronger than that on earth, with CH4 and H2 playing roles similar to those of H2O and CO2 on earth. Also active on Titan is an antigreenhouse effect, in which dark-brown and orange organic aerosols block incoming solar light while allowing IR radiation from the Titan surface to escape. The combination of GHE and anti-GHE leads to a surface temperature about 12 C higher than it would be if Titan had no atmosphere.

  15. Planetary science: Huygens rediscovers Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Tobias

    2005-12-01

    The first analyses of data sent by the Huygens probe from Saturn's largest moon Titan are flooding in. They paint a picture of a `Peter Pan' world - potentially like Earth, but with its development frozen at an early stage.

  16. The thermosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedson, A. J.; Yung, Y. L.

    1984-01-01

    The vertical structure of Titan's thermosphere is calculated down to the mesopause as a function of local time based on Voyager 1 occultation data. The thermal time scales that characterize the diurnal behavior of the thermosphere are discussed, the input model atmosphere used to calculate the temperature profile is presented, and the dominant heating and cooling mechanisms in the thermosphere are examined. The temperature profiles obtained by integrating the heat transfer equation with and without electron heating are presented and discussed. The implications that derived exospheric temperatures have for the neutral hydrogen torus are investigated. The diurnal exospheric temperature is unlikely to exceed 225 K, averages between 187 and 197 K, and has a variational amplitude of 28 K or less. The vertical extent of the hydrogen cloud is too large to be explained in terms of simple thermal escape of hydrogen from the exosphere.

  17. The TITAN magnet configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN study uses copper-alloy ohmic-heating coils (OHC) to startup inductively a reversed-field-pinch (RFP) fusion reactor. The plasma equilibrium is maintained with a pair of superconducting equilibrium-field coils (EFCs). A second pair of copper EFCs provides the necessary trimming of the equilibrium field during plasma transients. A compact toroidal-field-coil (TFC) set is provided by an integrated blanket/coil (IBC). The IBC concept also is applied to the toroidal-field divertor coils. Steady-state operation is achieved with oscillating-field current drive, which oscillates at low amplitude and frequency the OHCs, EFCs, the TFCs, and divertor coils about their steady-state currents. An integrated magnet design, which uses low-field, low technology coils, and the related design basis is given. 18 refs.

  18. The TITAN magnet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, C. G.

    The TITAN study uses copper-alloy ohmic-heating coils (OHC) to start up inductively a reversed-field-pinch (RFP) fusion reactor. The plasma equilibrium is maintained with a pair of superconducting equilibrium-field coils (EFCs). A second pair of copper EFCs provides the necessary trimming of the equilibrium field during plasma transients. A compact toroidal-field-coil (TFC) set is provided by an integrated blanket/coil (IBC). The IBC concept also is applied to the toroidal-field divertor coils. Steady-state operation is achieved with oscillating-field current drive, which oscillates at low amplitude and frequency the OHCs, EFCs, the TFCs, and divertor coils about their steady-state currents. An integrated magnet design, which uses low-field, low technology coils, and the related design basis is given.

  19. Life on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potashko, Oleksandr

    Volcanoes engender life on heavenly bodies; they are pacemakers of life. All planets during their period of formation pass through volcanism hence - all planets and their satellites pass through the life. Tracks of life If we want to find tracks of life - most promising places are places with volcanic activity, current or past. In the case of just-in-time volcanic activity we have 100% probability to find a life. Therefore the most perspective “search for life” are Enceladus, Io and comets, further would be Venus, Jupiter’s satellites, Saturn’s satellites and first of all - Titan. Titan has atmosphere. It might be result of high volcanic activity - from one side, from other side atmosphere is a necessary condition development life from procaryota to eucaryota. Existence of a planet means that all its elements after hydrogen formed just there inside a planet. The forming of the elements leads to the formation of mineral and organic substances and further to the organic life. Development of the life depends upon many factors, e.g. the distance from star/s. The intensity of the processes of the element formation is inversely to the distance from the star. Therefore we may suppose that the intensity of the life in Mercury was very high. Hence we may detect tracks of life in Mercury, particularly near volcanoes. The distance from the star is only one parameter and now Titan looks very active - mainly due to interior reason. Its atmosphere compounds are analogous to comet tail compounds. Their collation may lead to interesting result as progress occurs at one of them. Volcanic activity is as a source of life origin as well a reason for a death of life. It depends upon the thickness of planet crust. In the case of small thickness of a crust the probability is high that volcanoes may destroy a life on a planet - like Noachian deluge. Destroying of the life under volcano influences doesn’t lead to full dead. As result we would have periodic Noachian deluge or

  20. Titan atmospheric models intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, P.

    2008-09-01

    Several groups over the world have developed independently models of the photochemistry of Titan. The Cassini mission reveals daily that the chemical complexity is beyond our expectations e. g. observation of heavy positive and negative ions..., and the models are updated accordingly. At this stage, there is no consensus on the various input parameters, and it becomes increasingly difficult to compare outputs form different models. An ISSI team of experts of those models will be gathered shortly to proceed to an intercomparison, i.e. to assess how the models behave, given identical sets of inputs (collectively defined). Expected discrepancies will have to be elucidated and reduced. This intercomparison will also be an occasion to estimate explicitly the importance of various physicalchemical processes on model predictions versus observations. More robust and validated models are expected from this study for the interpretation of Titanrelated data.

  1. Titan's rotation - Surface feature observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, M. T.; Karkoschka, E.; Tomasko, M.

    1993-06-01

    A surface feature or a near-surface fracture is suggested to account for the time variations in the 0.94, 1.08, and 1.28 micron atmospheric windows of Titan's geometric albedo, relative to its albedo in adjacent methane bands. These observations are noted to be consistent with synchronous rotation. They can also be explained by a 0.1-higher surface albedo on Titan's leading hemisphere.

  2. From Titan's chemistry and exobiology to Titan's astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, François

    2015-04-01

    When the IDS proposal « Titan's chemistry and exobiology » was submitted to ESA 25 years ago, in the frame of what will become the Cassini-Huygens mission, Titan was already seen as a quite interesting planetary object in the solar system for Exobiology. Several organic compounds of prebiotic interest were identified in its atmosphere, which was thus was expected to be chemically very active, especially in term of organic processes. Atmospheric aerosols seemed to play a key role in this chemistry. Moreover, the presence of an internal aqueous ocean, compatible with life was suspected. A few years later, when astrobiology was (re)invented, Titan became one of the most interesting planetary target for this new (but very similar to exobiology) field. With the Cassini-Huygens mission, the exo/astrobiological interest of Titan has become more and more important. However, the mission has been providing a vision of Titan quite different from what it was supposed. Its atmospheric organic chemistry is very complex and starts in much higher zones than it was believed before, involving high molecular weight species in the ionosphere. Titan's surface appears to be far from homogeneous: instead of been covered by a global methane-ethane ocean, it is very diversified, with dunes, lakes, bright and dark areas, impact and volcanic craters with potential cryovolcanic activity. These various geological areas are continuously feeded by atmospheric aerosols, which represent an important step in the complexity of Titan's organic chemistry, but probably not the final one. Indeed, after being deposited on the surface, in the potential cryovolvanic zones, these particles may react with water ice and form compounds of exo/astrobiological interest, such as amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases. Moreover, The Cassini-Huygens data strongly support the potential presence of an internal water ocean, which becomes less and less hypothetical and of great interest for exobiology. These

  3. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  4. Strontium Substitution for Calcium in Lithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Chi, Thomas; Miller, Joe; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strontium has chemical similarity to calcium, which enables the replacement of calcium by strontium in biomineralization processes. Incorporating strontium into human bone and teeth has been studied extensively but little research has been performed of the incorporation of strontium into urinary calculi. We used synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption techniques to examine the presence of strontium in different types of human kidney stones. Materials and Methods Multiple unique human stone samples were obtained via consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomies/ureteroscopies. A portion of each stone was sent for standard laboratory analysis and a portion was retained for x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements. X-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements determined the presence, spatial distribution and speciation of strontium in each stone sample. Results Traditional kidney stone analyses identified calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid and cystine stones. X-ray fluorescence measurements identified strontium in all stone types except pure cystine. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping of the samples revealed co-localization of calcium and strontium. X-ray absorption measurements of the calcium phosphate stone showed strontium predominately present as strontium apatite. Conclusions Advanced x-ray fluorescence imaging identified strontium in all calcium based stones, present as strontium apatite. This finding may be critical since apatite is thought to be the initial nidus for calcium stone formation. Strontium is not identified by standard laboratory stone analyses. Its substitution for calcium can be reliably identified in stones from multiple calcium based stone formers, which may offer opportunities to gain insight into early events in lithogenesis. PMID:23260568

  5. The Surface Composition of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. N.; Pearson, N.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Barnes, J. W.; Jaumann, R.; Soderblom, L. A.; Griffith, C. A.; Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouelic, S.; Lunine, J.; Sotin, C.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Nelson, R.; Stephan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the surface composition of Titan has been inhibited by the lack of spectral properties of potential compounds. We have measured the 0.35 to 5-micron spectral reflectance of a wide range of compounds that might be relevant to Titan and trends are now coming to light with possible spectral matches for classes of materials. While some compounds have been identified and mapped on Titan's surface, such as liquid ethane + methane lakes and benzene, the compounds responsible for the main spectral properties have remained elusive (Clark et al, JGR 2010). Titan's surface is seen in the near infrared in only a few spectral windows, near 0.94, 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, 2.0, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns in the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) spectral range. At shorter wavelengths, UV absorption in the spectra of Titan's haze constrains the surface composition because haze particles settle onto Titan's surface. The average apparent reflectance in the IR windows generally decreases with increasing wavelength except for the 2.7 and 5-micron windows which are at similar levels. The decrease has led researchers to infer a number of compounds responsible for the observed decreasing spectral shape; the most common being water ice. But ice is incompatible with the 2.78/2.68 micron I/F ratio. Many organic compounds have absorptions that are not seen in spectra of Titan, eliminating them as possible major components at the surface, including many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) previously thought to be compatible with parts of Titan's spectrum. We find that ring compounds similar to benzene rings, but with some C-H bonds replaced by NH have a closer match to Titan's overall spectrum and can explain the relative intensities observed in the spectral windows, including the 2.68 and 2.78-micron double window, the low 3-5 micron reflectance, and increased absorption near 2.1-microns. Key among these compounds that show general properties that match Titan are

  6. Mapping of Titan: Results from the first Titan radar passes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lorenz, R.D.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.; Wall, S.; Elachi, C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Ostro, S.; Janssen, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first two swaths collected by Cassini's Titan Radar Mapper were obtained in October of 2004 (Ta) and February of 2005 (T3). The Ta swath provides evidence for cryovolcanic processes, the possible occurrence of fluvial channels and lakes, and some tectonic activity. The T3 swath has extensive areas of dunes and two large impact craters. We interpret the brightness variations in much of the swaths to result from roughness variations caused by fracturing and erosion of Titan's icy surface, with additional contributions from a combination of volume scattering and compositional variations. Despite the small amount of Titan mapped to date, the significant differences between the terrains of the two swaths suggest that Titan is geologically complex. The overall scarcity of impact craters provides evidence that the surface imaged to date is relatively young, with resurfacing by cryovolcanism, fluvial erosion, aeolian erosion, and likely atmospheric deposition of materials. Future radar swaths will help to further define the nature of and extent to which internal and external processes have shaped Titan's surface. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  8. Titan's Oxygen Chemistry: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörst, S. M.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Lavvas, P.; Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    Prior to the arrival of Cassini in the Saturn system, photochemical models were unable to simultaneously reproduce the observed abundances of CO, CO2, and H2O. The observations were explained by invoking an internal source of CO in addition to an external source of H2O or by assuming that the observed CO is the remnant of a larger primordial abundance. In 2008, we showed that the flux of O+ detected by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) coupled with the previously known flux of H2O was sufficient to explain the oxygen bearing species in Titan's atmosphere [1]. This work demonstrated that it is no longer necessary to invoke outgassing from Titan's interior as a source for atmospheric CO or to assume that the observed CO is the remnant of a larger primordial abundance in Titan's atmosphere. Instead, it is most likely that the oxygen bearing species in Titan's atmosphere are the result of external input, most likely Enceladus. At the time, only one measurement of H2O existed, from the Infrared Space Observation (ISO) [2], which was roughly consistent with our model, as shown in Figure 1. Two recent observations, from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) [3] and Herschel [4], indicate that our 2008 model over predicts the abundance of water in Titan's atmosphere by an order of magnitude and the model of Moreno et al. 2012 was unable to simultaneously reproduce the abundance of all 3 species. The new observations indicate that photochemical models may be missing chemical and/or physical processes. It is therefore time to revisit the photochemical model, now with stronger constraints on the stratospheric H2O abundance, including the behavior as a function of altitude in the stratosphere, to ensure that the new observations do not point to a fundamental flaw in our understanding of Titan's atmosphere. We will present results from our recently updated model of Titan's oxygen chemistry.

  9. Sorption of strontium on clinoptilolite and heulandite

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyavskaya, N.B.

    1986-05-01

    The author investigates the sorption of strontium on the isostructural zeolites clinoptilolite and heulandite. In the Sr/Na/zeolite/H/sub 2/O system, clinoptilolite manifests selectivity for strontium, and heulandite for sodium. The role of the nature of the exchange ions is discussed. Modification of the clinoptilolite with acid, subsequently obtaining the Na, NH/sub 4/, or N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ form, increases the capacity for strontium by a factor of 2-4.

  10. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.