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Sample records for nitric oxide enhances

  1. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  2. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation by low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa; Tanigawa; Tanigawa; Imai; Hongo; Kondo

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the intracellular signal transduction pathways for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induction. The electromagnetic field (EMF) is believed to increase the free radical lifespan [S. Roy, Y. Noda, V. Eckert, M.G. Traber, A. Mori, R. Liburdy, L. Packer, The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced oxidative burst in rat peritoneal neutrophils is increased by a 0.1 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field, FEBS Lett. 376 (1995) 164-6; F.S. Prato, M. Kavaliers, J.J. Carson, Behavioural evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents, Bioelectromagnetics 17 (1996) 123-30; A.L. Hulbert, J. Metcalfe, R. Hesketh, Biological response to electromagnetic fields, FASEB 12 (1998) 395-420]. We tested the effects of EMF on endotoxin induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo. Male BALB/C mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneously (i.p.), followed by the exposure to EMF (0.1 mT, 60 Hz). Five hours and 30 min after the LPS administration, mice were administered with a NO spin trap, ferrous N-methyl-D-glucaminedithiocarbamate (MGD-Fe). Thirty minutes later, mice were sacrificed, and their livers were removed. The results were compared to three control groups: group A (LPS (-) EMF(-)); group B (LPS(-) EMF(+)); group C (LPS(+) EMF(-)). The ESR spectra of obtained livers were examined at room temperature. Three-line spectra of NO adducts were observed in the livers of all groups. In groups A and B very weak signals were observed, but in groups C and D strong spectra were observed. The signal intensity of the NO adducts in Group D was also significantly stronger than that in Group C. EMF itself did not induce NO generation, however, it enhanced LPS induced NO generation in vivo. PMID:10927193

  3. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. Electrospun nitric oxide releasing bandage with enhanced wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lowe, A; Bills, J; Verma, R; Lavery, L; Davis, K; Balkus, K J

    2015-02-01

    Research has shown that nitric oxide (NO) enhances wound healing. The incorporation of NO into polymers for medical materials and surgical devices has potential benefits for many wound healing applications. In this work, acrylonitrile (AN)-based terpolymers were electrospun to form non-woven sheets of bandage or wound dressing type materials. NO is bound to the polymer backbone via the formation of a diazeniumdiolate group. In a 14 day NO release study, the dressings released 79 μmol NO g(-1) polymer. The NO-loaded dressings were tested for NO release in vivo, which demonstrate upregulation of NO-inducible genes with dressing application compared to empty dressings. Studies were also conducted to evaluate healing progression in wounds with dressing application performed weekly and daily. In two separate studies, excisional wounds were created on the dorsa of 10 mice. Dressings with NO loaded on the fibers or empty controls were applied to the wounds and measurements of the wound area were taken at each dressing change. The data show significantly enhanced healing progression in the wounds with weekly NO application, which is more dramatic with daily application. Further, the application of daily NO bandages results in improved wound vascularity. These data demonstrate the potential for this novel NO-releasing dressing as a valid wound healing therapy. PMID:25463501

  5. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  6. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. The authors show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  7. Nitric Oxide Mediates Glutamate-Linked Enhancement of cGMP Levels in the Cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  8. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  9. Increasing nitric oxide content in Arabidopsis thaliana by expressing rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase resulted in enhanced stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Tao; Li, Rong-Jun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Chao-Lun; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2012-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays essential roles in many physiological and developmental processes in plants, including biotic and abiotic stresses, which have adverse effects on agricultural production. However, due to the lack of findings regarding nitric oxide synthase (NOS), many difficulties arise in investigating the physiological roles of NO in vivo and thus its utilization for genetic engineering. Here, to explore the possibility of manipulating the endogenous NO level, rat neuronal NOS (nNOS) was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The 35S::nNOS plants showed higher NOS activity and accumulation of NO using the fluorescent probe 3-amino, 4-aminomethyl-2', 7'-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA) assay and the hemoglobin assay. Compared with the wild type, the 35S::nNOS plants displayed improved salt and drought tolerance, which was further confirmed by changes in physiological parameters including reduced water loss rate, reduced stomatal aperture, and altered proline and malondialdehyde content. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression of several stress-regulated genes was up-regulated in the transgenic lines. Furthermore, the transgenic lines also showed enhanced disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 by activating the expression of defense-related genes. In addition, we found that the 35S::nNOS lines flowered late by regulating the expression of CO, FLC and LFY genes. Together, these results demonstrated that it is a useful strategy to exploit the roles of plant NO in various processes by the expression of rat nNOS. The approach may also be useful for genetic engineering of crops with increased environmental adaptations. PMID:22186181

  10. Nitric Oxide Nanoparticle Technology

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections account for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Staphylococcus aureus is rapidly evolving resistance to contemporary topical as well as systemic antibiotics. Alternatives to current treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections are needed for more effective treatment now and in the future. Nitric oxide's proven roles in both wound repair and as an antimicrobial agent make it an excellent candidate for the treatment of skin infections. Recent attempts at novel nitric oxide therapies, in the form of nitric oxide donors, have shown limited potential in treating cutaneous infection. However, more recent developments in nitric oxide delivery, using nitric oxide nanoparticle technology, demonstrate substantial promise in the promotion of wound repair and eradication of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:20725551

  11. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  12. Enhancement of nitric oxide production by pulmonary cells following silica exposure.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Huffman, L J; Judy, D J; Bylander, J E; Lapp, L N; Weber, S L; Blackford, J A; Dey, R D

    1998-10-01

    In vivo exposure of rat lungs to crystalline silica either by intratracheal instillation or by inhalation results in an increase in mRNA levels for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BALC), elevated nitric oxide (.NO) production by BALC, and an increase in .NO-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) from alveolar macrophages (AM). Induction of iNOS message occurs in both AM and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) harvested from silica-exposed lungs but is not significantly elevated in lavaged lung tissue. In vitro exposure of AM to silica does not stimulate .NO production or enhance iNOS message. However, treatment of naive AM with conditioned media from BALC harvested from silica-exposed rats does increase iNOS message and .NO production by these AM. The potency of this conditioned medium is dependent on interaction between AM and PMN. In the rat model, a relationship exists between the ability of various dusts to cause PMN recruitment or protein leakage into the alveolar space and the induction of iNOS message in BALC, i.e., silica > coal mine dust > carbonyl iron > titanium dioxide. Similarly, a comparison of BALC from a healthy volunteer, a silica-exposed coal miner with a normal chest radiograph, and a silica-exposed coal miner with an abnormal chest radiograph shows a correlation between pathology and both the level of iNOS message in BALC and the magnitude of .NO-dependent CL from AM. These data suggest that .NO may play a role in silicosis and that human pulmonary phagocytes exhibit enhanced .NO production in response to an inflammatory insult. PMID:9788892

  13. Overexpression of Rat Neurons Nitric Oxide Synthase in Rice Enhances Drought and Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Wen-Shu; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Han, Tong-Tong; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play an important role in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis mutants with lower or higher levels of endogenous NO. The exogenous application of NO donors or scavengers has also suggested an important role for NO in plant defense against environmental stress. In this study, rice plants under drought and high salinity conditions showed increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO levels. Overexpression of rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in rice increased both NOS activity and NO accumulation, resulting in improved tolerance of the transgenic plants to both drought and salt stresses. nNOS-overexpressing plants exhibited stronger water-holding capability, higher proline accumulation, less lipid peroxidation and reduced electrolyte leakage under drought and salt conditions than wild rice. Moreover, nNOS-overexpressing plants accumulated less H2O2, due to the observed up-regulation of OsCATA, OsCATB and OsPOX1. In agreement, the activities of CAT and POX were higher in transgenic rice than wild type. Additionally, the expression of six tested stress-responsive genes including OsDREB2A, OsDREB2B, OsSNAC1, OsSNAC2, OsLEA3 and OsRD29A, in nNOS-overexpressing plants was higher than that in the wild type under drought and high salinity conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that nNOS overexpression suppresses the stress-enhanced electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 accumulation, and promotes proline accumulation and the expression of stress-responsive genes under stress conditions, thereby promoting increased tolerance to drought and salt stresses. PMID:26121399

  14. Absorption-Enhancing Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Absorption of Hydrophobic Drugs in Rat Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hisanao; Miyazaki, Kaori; Takizawa, Yusuke; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Katsuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous gas that plays a versatile role in the physiological system, has the ability to increase the intestinal absorption of water-soluble compounds through the paracellular route. However, it remains unclear whether NO can enhance the absorption of hydrophobic drugs through the transcellular route. In this study, we examined the absorption-enhancing effect of NO on intestinal permeability of hydrophobic drugs in rat intestine. The pretreatment of rat gastrointestinal sacs with NOC7, a NO-releasing reagent, significantly increased the permeation of griseofulvin from mucosa to serosa in the sacs prepared from the duodenum, but not in those prepared from the other regions such as jejunum, ileum, and colon. The absorption-enhancing effect of NOC7 on the duodenal permeation varied depending on the hydrophobicity of the drugs used. Furthermore, NOC7 treatment was found to be apparently ineffective on the griseofulvin permeation in the duodenum pretreated with dithiothreitol (DTT) that was used as a mucus remover, even though the permeation was increased by pretreatment with DTT alone. These results suggest that NO increases the absorption of hydrophobic drugs through the transcellular route in the duodenum by modulating the mucus layer function. PMID:26458075

  15. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, M.; Dominiczak, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an important regulatory molecule in cardiovascular function. Reduced availability of nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:9497971

  16. Amperometric Nitric Oxide Sensors with Enhanced Selectivity Over Carbon Monoxide via Platinum Oxide Formation Under Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    An improved planar amperometric nitric oxide (NO) sensor with enhanced selectivity over carbon monoxide (CO), a volatile interfering species for NO sensors that has been largely overlooked until recently, is described. Formation of an oxide film on the inner platinum working electrode via anodic polarization using an inner alkaline electrolyte solution provides the basis for improved selectivity. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that formation of oxidized Pt film inhibits adsorption of CO to the electrode surface, which is a necessary initial step in the electrocatalytic oxidation of CO on Pt. Previous NO gas sensors that employ internal electrolyte solutions have been assembled using acidic internal solutions, that inhibit the formation of a dense platinum oxide film on the working electrode surface. It is demonstrated herein that increasing the internal electrolyte pH promotes oxidized platinum film formation, resulting in improved selectivity over CO. Selectivity coefficients (log KNO,j) for sensors assembled with internal solutions at various pH values range from −0.08 at pH 2.0 to −2.06 at pH 11.7 with average NO sensitivities of 1.24 nA/μM and LOD of <1 nM. PMID:24067100

  17. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  18. Ibuprofen-arginine generates nitric oxide and has enhanced anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Clara; Di Paola, Rosanna; Perrotta, Cristiana; Mazzon, Emanuela; Cattaneo, Dario; Trabucchi, Emilio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Clementi, Emilio

    2009-10-01

    Ibuprofen, a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug chemically related to fenoprofen and naproxen, has moderate but definite anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic properties, with considerably less gastrointestinal adverse effect than other drugs in the same family. Currently available in the market are preparations in which bioavailability of ibuprofen is increased by salification with various salts. We have investigated the pharmacological properties of one such salt, ibuprofen-arginine, of biological interest because l-arginine acts as substrate of the nitric oxide (NO) synthesising enzymes. Using epithelial HeLa cells expressing the endothelial NO synthase we show that ibuprofen-arginine releases NO and that this NO protects against the cytotoxic apoptogenic effects of staurosporine. We also found that ibuprofen-arginine is endowed with enhanced anti-inflammatory effects with respect to ibuprofen, as shown by reduced hind paw oedema, neutrophil infiltration and chondrocyte apoptosis in collagen-induced mouse arthritis, a model of chronic inflammation. NO has pleiotropic beneficial effects that may contribute to limit inflammation and anti-inflammatory compounds able to release NO display higher efficacy than the parent drugs in defined clinical settings. Our results open the possibility that NO generation contributes to the enhanced anti-inflammatory effects of ibuprofen-arginine vs. ibuprofen, suggesting co-administration of anti-inflammatory drugs and arginine as an additional way to exploit the beneficial effects of NO. PMID:19539763

  19. Only an early nitric oxide burst and the following wave of secondary nitric oxide generation enhanced effective defence responses of pelargonium to a necrotrophic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Arasimowicz, Magdalena; Milczarek, Grzegorz; Jelen, Henryk; Jackowiak, Hanna

    2007-01-01

    Participation of nitric oxide (NO) in cross-talk between ivy pelargonium (Pelargonium peltatum) leaves and Botrytis cinerea was investigated using electrochemical and biochemical approaches. In response to the necrotroph, leaves initiated a near-immediate NO burst, but the specificity of its generation was dependent on the genetic makeup of the host plant. In the resistant cultivar, a strong NO burst was followed by a wave of secondary NO generation, shown by bio-imaging with DAF-2DA. The epicentre of NO synthesis was located in targeted cells, which exhibited a TUNEL-positive reaction. Soon after the challenge, an elevated concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was correlated with a reversible inhibition of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and suppression of ethylene synthesis. The induced NO generation initially expanded and then gradually disappeared on successive days, provoking noncell-death-associated resistance with an enhanced pool of antioxidants, which finally favoured the maintenance of homeostasis of surrounding cells. By contrast, in the susceptible pelargonium, a weak NO burst was recorded and further NO generation increased only as the disease progressed, which was accompanied by very intensive H(2)O(2) and ethylene synthesis. The pathogen colonizing susceptible cells also acquired the ability to produce considerable amounts of NO and enhanced nitrosative and oxidative stress in host tissues. PMID:17688587

  20. The role of pre-ischaemic application of the nitric oxide donor spermine/nitric oxide complex in enhancing flap survival in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Küntscher, M V; Juran, S; Menke, H; Gebhard, M M; Erdmann, D; Germann, G

    2002-07-01

    Spermine/nitric oxide complex (Sper/NO) is a new nitric oxide (NO) donor with a long half-life providing controlled biological release of NO in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine whether flap survival could be improved by pre-ischaemic or post-ischaemic intravenous administration of Sper/NO. We divided 37 male Wistar rats into four experimental groups. An extended epigastric adipocutaneous flap was raised in each animal. The mean area of flap necrosis was assessed for all groups on the fifth postoperative day, using planimetry software. The average area of flap necrosis was mean +/- s.d. = 68.2%+/-18.1% in the control group, and 29.7% +/- 13.3% in the non-ischaemic controls. The group with pre-ischaemic application of Sper/NO demonstrated an average flap necrosis of mean+/-s.d. = 11.2%+/-5.9%, whereas this increased to 59.2%+/-14.4% in the group receiving Sper/NO 5 min prior to reperfusion. The group with pre-ischaemic application of Sper/NO showed a significantly lower area of flap necrosis than either of the control groups or the group receiving Sper/NO just prior to reperfusion (P < 0.05). The group receiving Sper/NO just prior to reperfusion demonstrated a significantly higher mean area of flap necrosis than the non-ischaemic controls (P < 0.05), but did not differ significantly from the control group. Our data show that pharmacological preconditioning and enhancement of flap survival can be achieved by intravenous administration of Sper/NO. The application of Sper/NO at the end of the ischaemia period or in the early reperfusion period provides no protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:12372374

  1. Nitric oxide pretreatment enhances atheroma component highlighting in vivo with intercellular adhesion molecule-1-targeted echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kee, Patrick H; Kim, Hyunggun; Huang, Shaoling; Laing, Susan T; Moody, Melanie R; Vela, Deborah; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D

    2014-06-01

    We present an ultrasound technique for the detection of inflammatory changes in developing atheromas. We used contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging with (i) microbubbles targeted to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule of adhesion involved in inflammatory processes in lesions of atheromas in New Zealand White rabbits, and (ii) pretreatment with nitric oxide-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound activation at the site of the endothelium to enhance the permeability of the arterial wall and the penetration of ICAM-1-targeted microbubbles. This procedure increases acoustic enhancement 1.2-fold. Pretreatment with nitric oxide-loaded echogenic liposomes and ultrasound activation can potentially facilitate the subsequent penetration of targeted echogenic liposomes into the arterial wall, thus allowing improved detection of inflammatory changes in developing atheromas. PMID:24613216

  2. Nitric oxide isoenzymes regulate lipopolysaccharide-enhanced insulin transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Dohgu, Shinya; Lynch, Jessica L; Fleegal-DeMotta, Melissa A; Erickson, Michelle A; Nakaoke, Ryota; Vo, Than Q

    2008-04-01

    Insulin transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has many effects within the central nervous system. Insulin transport is not static but altered by obesity and inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria, enhances insulin transport across the BBB but also releases nitric oxide (NO), which opposes LPS-enhanced insulin transport. Here we determined the role of NO synthase (NOS) in mediating the effects of LPS on insulin BBB transport. The activity of all three NOS isoenzymes was stimulated in vivo by LPS. Endothelial NOS and inducible NOS together mediated the LPS-enhanced transport of insulin, whereas neuronal NOS (nNOS) opposed LPS-enhanced insulin transport. This dual pattern of NOS action was found in most brain regions with the exception of the striatum, which did not respond to LPS, and the parietal cortex, hippocampus, and pons medulla, which did not respond to nNOS inhibition. In vitro studies of a brain endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer BBB model showed that LPS did not directly affect insulin transport, whereas NO inhibited insulin transport. This suggests that the stimulatory effect of LPS and NOS on insulin transport is mediated through cells of the neurovascular unit other than BECs. Protein and mRNA levels of the isoenzymes indicated that the effects of LPS are mainly posttranslational. In conclusion, LPS affects insulin transport across the BBB by modulating NOS isoenzyme activity. NO released by endothelial NOS and inducible NOS acts indirectly to stimulate insulin transport, whereas NO released by nNOS acts directly on BECs to inhibit insulin transport. PMID:18187549

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transfer enhances dilation of newborn piglet pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Aschner, J L; Kovacs, N; Perciaccante, J V; Figueroa, J P; Thrikawala, N; Robins, G S; Busija, D W

    1999-07-01

    We determined the expression and functional correlate of in vitro transfection with a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the gene for bovine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (AdCMVeNOS) or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (AdCMVLacZ) in pulmonary endothelial cells (EC), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and pulmonary arteries (PA) from newborn piglets. AdCMVeNOS and AdCMVeLacZ vectors, grown in 293-cell monolayers, were purified by double-cesium gradient ultracentrifugation. Cell cultures and PA were incubated with increasing vector titers for 30 or 60 min, followed by incubation in fresh medium for 18 h at 37 degrees C. LacZ expression was assessed by histochemical staining; eNOS expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Functional eNOS expression was determined by measurement of cGMP and quantification of the relaxation response to bradykinin (BK). In PA, LacZ transgene expression was preferentially localized to the adventitia and endothelium. Increased eNOS protein expression was observed in EC and VSMC transfected with AdCMVeNOS. Functional studies revealed increased cGMP abundance in cultured cells and enhanced relaxation to BK in AdCMVeNOS-transfected PA. These studies demonstrate that gene transfer with AdCMVeNOS results in functional expression and altered vasoactive responses in the neonatal pulmonary vasculature. Gene transfer with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors is a useful tool for the study of targeted genes in vascular biology. PMID:10409217

  4. Glucocorticoids enhance concanavalin A-induced mitogenic response through the inhibition of nitric oxide production.

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, F; Silva, A

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are known to inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation of T cells. In this study we show two experimental situations where the addition of GC increases lymphocyte proliferation. It has been reported by different authors that rat spleen (SPL) cells proliferate poorly after concanavalin A (Con A) activation. These poor responses have been related to the suppressor activity of macrophages. Similarly, it is known that T-cell proliferation is depressed in the presence of an excess of macrophages in the culture. Here we show that in both experimental situations, the inclusion of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, in the culture medium enhances the Con A-stimulated proliferation. We provide evidence that this effect is a consequence of the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by the hormone. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that rat SPL cells are inefficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) because of their spontaneous high production of NO. Taken together our results suggest that the effects of GC on T-cell activation may be to promote or inhibit proliferation depending on the level of endogenous NO synthesis. The possible significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9038714

  5. Dipyridamole enhances ischaemia-induced arteriogenesis through an endocrine nitrite/nitric oxide-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Prasanna K.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Branch, Billy; Hood, Jay; Thoma, Steven; Illum, Sandra; Pardue, Sibile; Teng, Xinjun; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Anti-platelet agents, such as dipyridamole, have several clinical benefits for peripheral artery disease with the speculation of angiogenic potential that could preserve ischaemic tissue viability, yet the effect of dipyridamole on ischaemic arteriogenesis or angiogenesis is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that dipyridamole therapy augments arteriolar vessel development and function during chronic ischaemia. Methods and results Mice were treated with 200 mg/kg dipyridamole twice daily to achieve therapeutic plasma levels (0.8–1.2 µg/mL). Chronic hindlimb ischaemia was induced by permanent femoral artery ligation followed by measurement of tissue perfusion using laser Doppler blood flow along with quantification of vascular density, cell proliferation, and activation of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. Dipyridamole treatment quickly restored ischaemic hindlimb blood flow, increased vascular density and cell proliferation, and enhanced collateral artery perfusion compared with control treatments. The beneficial effects of dipyridamole on blood flow and vascular density were dependent on NO production as dipyridamole did not augment ischaemic tissue reperfusion, vascular density, or endothelial cell proliferation in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS)-deficient mice. Blood and tissue nitrite levels were significantly higher in dipyridamole-treated mice compared with controls and eNOS−/− mice, verifying increased NO production that was regulated in a PKA-dependent manner. Conclusion Dipyridamole augments nitrite/NO production, leading to enhanced arteriogenesis activity and blood perfusion in ischaemic limbs. Together, these data suggest that dipyridamole can augment ischaemic vessel function and restore blood flow, which may be beneficial in peripheral artery disease. PMID:20061326

  6. Enhancing the pharmacodynamic profile of a class of selective COX-2 inhibiting nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Biava, Mariangela; Battilocchio, Claudio; Poce, Giovanna; Alfonso, Salvatore; Consalvi, Sara; Di Capua, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Sautebin, Lidia; Rossi, Antonietta; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giordani, Antonio; Persiani, Stefano; Colovic, Milena; Dovizio, Melania; Patrignani, Paola; Anzini, Maurizio

    2014-01-15

    We report herein the development, synthesis, physicochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel class of pharmacodynamic hybrids that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) isoform and present suitable nitric oxide releasing properties. The replacement of the ester moiety with the amide group gave access to in vivo more stable and active derivatives that highlighted outstanding pharmacological properties. In particular, the glycine derivative proved to be extremely active in suppressing hyperalgesia and edema. PMID:24373735

  7. Cardiac preservation is enhanced in a heterotopic rat transplant model by supplementing the nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, D J; Oz, M C; Koga, S; Taha, Z; Broekman, M J; Marcus, A J; Liao, H; Naka, Y; Brett, J; Cannon, P J

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a novel biologic messenger with diverse effects but its role in organ transplantation remains poorly understood. Using a porphyrinic microsensor, the first direct measurements of coronary vascular and endocardial NO production were made. NO was measured directly in the effluent of preserved, heterotopically transplanted rat hearts stimulated with L-arginine and bradykinin; NO concentrations fell from 2.1 +/- 0.4 microM for freshly explanted hearts to 0.7 +/- 0.2 and 0.2 +/- 0.08 microM for hearts preserved for 19 and 38 h, respectively. NO levels were increased by SOD, suggesting a role for superoxide-mediated destruction of NO. Consistent with these data, addition of the NO donor nitroglycerin (NTG) to a balanced salt preservation solution enhanced graft survival in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with 92% of hearts supplemented with NTG surviving 12 h of preservation versus only 17% in its absence. NTG similarly enhanced preservation of hearts stored in University of Wisconsin solution, the clinical standard for preservation. Other stimulators of the NO pathway, including nitroprusside, L-arginine, or 8-bromoguanosine 3',5' monophosphate, also enhanced graft survival, whereas the competitive NO synthase antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was associated with poor preservation. Likely mechanisms whereby supplementation of the NO pathway enhanced preservation included increased blood flow to the reperfused graft and decreased graft leukostasis. NO was also measured in endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation and detected based on its ability to inhibit thrombin-mediated platelet aggregation and serotonin release. NO became undetectable in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation and was restored to normoxic levels on addition of SOD. These studies suggest that the NO pathway fails during preservation/transplantation because of formation of oxygen free radicals during reperfusion, which quench available NO

  8. Enhancement of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase–Nitric-Oxide Signaling Mediates the Central Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Evoked Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated brainstem GABAergic signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-mediated pressor response in conscious rats. Given the well established link between neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling and GABAergic transmission in brainstem cardiovascular regulating areas, we elucidated the role of nNOS-generated NO in the central CB1R-elicited pressor response. Compared with vehicle, intracisternal (i.c.) microinjection of the CB1R agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55212-2) (15 μg/rat) significantly enhanced nNOS phosphorylation as well as the total nitrate and nitrite content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) at 5, 10, and 30 min, which paralleled the elicited pressor response. These findings were corroborated by: 1) the parallel dose-related increases in blood pressure and RVLM-NO levels, measured in real time by in vivo electrochemistry, elicited by intra-RVLM WIN55212-2 (100, 200, or 300 pmol /80 nl; n = 5) in conscious rats; and 2) the significantly higher phosphorylated nNOS (p-nNOS) levels in the WIN55212-2-injected RVLM compared with the contralateral RVLM. Subsequent neurochemical studies showed that WIN55212-2 (15 μg/rat i.c.) significantly increased the number and percentage of neurons immunostained for nNOS (nitroxidergic neurons) and c-Fos (marker of neuronal activity) within the RVLM. The increases in blood pressure and the neurochemical responses elicited by intracisternal WIN55212-2 were attenuated by prior central CB1R blockade by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 30 μg/rat i.c.) or selective nNOS inhibition by Nω-propyl-L-arginine (1 μg/rat i.c.). These findings implicate RVLM p-nNOS/NO signaling as a molecular mechanism in the central CB1R-evoked pressor effect in conscious rats. PMID:22366659

  9. Endogenous nitric oxide enhances the light-response of cones during light-adaptation in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Teruya; Stell, William K

    2011-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is a non-invasive indicator of retinal function. Light flashes evoke a cornea-negative a-wave followed by a cornea-positive b-wave. Light-adaptation is known to increase the amplitude of cone-dependent b-waves. To identify the underlying mechanism, we recorded rat cone photoresponses in situ, using intravitreally-injected glutamate to block synaptic transmission and intense paired-flash stimuli to isolate cone a-waves. Steady adapting illumination caused a progressive increase in cone a-wave amplitude, which was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by intravitreal CPTIO, a nitric oxide scavenger. We conclude that light-adaptation causes release of nitric oxide, which enhances the cone photoresponse. PMID:20951158

  10. Correlation of nitric oxide produced by an inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein with enhanced expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Inonotus obliquus cocultured with Phellinus morii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Xi, Qi; Xu, Qian; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Dai, Yucheng; Keller, Nancy P; Zheng, Weifa

    2015-05-01

    Fungal interspecific interactions enhance biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites (PM), and production of nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in this process. However, it remains unknown which signaling pathway(s) or regulator(s) mediate fungal PM biosynthesis. In this study, we cocultured two white-rot fungi, Inonotus obliquus and Phellinus morii, to examine NO production, expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and accumulation of phenylpropanoid-derived polyphenols by I. obliquus. Coculture of the two fungi caused an enhanced NO biosynthesis followed by increased transcription of the genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate CoA ligase (4CL), as well as an upregulated biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) inhibited NO production by more than 90% followed by cease in transcription of PAL and 4Cl. Treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one did not affect NO production but suppressed transcription of PAL and 4CL and reduced accumulation of total phenolic constituents. Genome-wide analysis of I. obliquus revealed two genes encoding a constitutive and an inducible NOS-like protein, respectively (cNOSL and iNOSL). Coculture of the two fungi did not increase the expression of the cNOSL gene but triggered expression of the iNOSL gene. Cloned iNOSL from Escherichia coli shows higher activity in transferring L-arginine to NO, and this activity is lost upon AG addition. Thus, iNOSL is more responsible for NO production in I. obliquus and may act as an important regulator governing PM production during fungal interspecific interactions. PMID:25582560

  11. Tropospheric nitric oxide measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in tropospheric photo-chemistry. The photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons, for example, can serve as either a source or a sink for ozone, depending on the local abundance of NO. Nitric oxide also helps govern atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The OH radical is the single most important player in photochemical transformations because it controls the atmospheric lifetimes of so many chemical species. Although NO serves as a very effective catalyst in many important chemical processes, its concentration is low enough to normally be expressed in units of parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Consequently, commercially available detectors for NO (with detection limits of about one part per billion) have proven to be unsuitable for use anywhere except in urban areas and near other local pollution sources. Under the sponsorship of NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE), Wallops has developed an extremely sensitive detector with a detection limit of a few pptv. The system was specifically designed for aircraft use, with the objective of applying it in global aircraft studies of tropospheric chemistry. Studies with the detector are examined.

  12. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  13. Enhancement of tolerance of Ganoderma lucidum to cadmium by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Yao, Yuan; Zuo, Lei; Shi, Wenjin; Gao, Ni; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered as a signaling molecule involved in regulation of diverse physiological processes and stress responses in animals and plants. However, whether NO regulates fungal, particularly edible fungi, response to heavy metal stresses, is unknown. This study investigated the effect of nitric oxide on biological responses of mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum to cadmium (Cd) toxicity. Exposure of Ganoderma lucidum to Cd (400 µM) triggered production of H2O2 and O2(-) in the mycelia and further induced lipid peroxidation as well as sharply decrease of fresh biomass. However, such an effect can be reversed by exogenous supply of NO. Mycelia treated with 100 µM SNP accumulated less H2O2, O2(-), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and fresh biomass of this treatment was improved. Treatment with SNP significantly increased activities of antioxidant enzyme (peroxidase and catalase) to resist Cd stress. Meanwhile, NO-mediated alleviation of Cd toxicity was closely related to the accumulated proline as well as reduced Cd accumulation. These results suggested that NO plays a crucial role in preventing the mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum from Cd toxicity. PMID:26411634

  14. Enhanced expression of constitutive and inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Moon, C; Wie, M B; Kim, H; Tanuma, N; Matsumoto, Y; Shin, T

    2000-06-01

    To elucidate the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we analyzed the expression of constitutive neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) in the spinal cords of rats with EAE. We further examined the structural interaction between apoptotic cells and spinal cord cells including neurons and astrocytes, which are potent cell types of nitric oxide (NO) production in the brain. Western blot analysis showed that three forms of NOS significantly increased in the spinal cords of rats at the peak stage of EAE, while small amounts of these enzymes were identified in the spinal cords of rats without EAE. Immunohistochemical study showed that the expression of either nNOS or eNOS increased in the brain cells including neurons and astrocytes during the peak and recovery stages of EAE, while the expression of iNOS was found mainly in the inflammatory macrophages in the perivascular EAE lesions. Double labeling showed that apoptotic cells had intimate contacts with either neurons or astrocytes, which are major cell types to express nNOS and eNOS constitutively. Our results suggest that the three NOS may play an important role in the recovery of EAE. PMID:14612615

  15. Prolonged nitric oxide exposure enhances anoikis resistance and migration through epithelial-mesenchymal transition and caveolin-1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Chunhacha, Preedakorn

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in tumor microenvironment may have a significant impact on metastatic behaviors of cancer. Noncytotoxic doses of NO enhanced anoikis resistance and migration in lung cancer H23 cells via an increase in lamellipodia, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including vimentin and snail, and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). However, the induction of EMT was found in Cav-1-knock down cells treated with NO, suggesting that EMT was through Cav-1-independent pathway. These effects of NO were consistently observed in other lung cancer cells including H292 and H460 cells. These findings highlight the novel role of NO on EMT and metastatic behaviors of cancer cells. PMID:24967418

  16. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  17. Enhanced nitric oxide and cyclic GMP formation plays a role in the anti-platelet activity of simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Chou, T-C; Lin, Y-F; Wu, W-C; Chu, K-M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has been found that 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) exert various vascular protective effects, beyond their cholesterol-lowering property, including inhibition of platelet-dependent thrombus formation. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP-mediated processes in platelets contribute to the anti-aggregatory activity of simvastatin. Experimental approach: After rabbit platelets were incubated with simvastatin for 5 min, aggregation was induced and the platelet aggregation, nitric oxide synthase activity, guanylyl cyclase activity, NO and cyclic GMP formation were measured appropriately. Key results: Treatment with simvastatin concentration-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen or arachidonic acid with an IC50 range of 52–158 μM. We also demonstrated that simvastatin (20–80 μM) concentration-dependently further enhanced collagen-induced NO and cyclic GMP formation through increasing NOS activity (from 2.64±0.12 to 3.52±0.21–5.10±0.14 μmol min−1 mg protein−1) and guanylyl cyclase activity (from 142.9±7.2 to 163.5±17.5–283.8±19.5 pmol min−1 mg protein−1) in the platelets. On the contrary, inhibition of platelet aggregation by simvastatin was markedly attenuated (by about 50%) by addition of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, a NO scavenger or a NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. The anti-aggregatory effects of simvastatin were significantly increased by addition of a selective inhibitor of cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase. Conclusions and implications: Our findings indicate that enhancement of a NO/cyclic GMP-mediated process plays an important role in the anti-aggregatory activity of simvastatin. PMID:18264124

  18. Enhanced expression of hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase in rats developmentally exposed to organophosphates.

    PubMed

    Naseh, Maryam; Vatanparast, Jafar

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is highly expressed in the hypothalamus, and nitric oxide (NO) specifically contributes to the regulation of neuronal activity within distinct hypothalamic regions. We studied the long-lasting effects of developmental exposure to low doses of organophosphate chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) on the expression of NOS in the hypothalamic subnuclei that subserve neuroendocrine, autonomic and cognitive functions. A daily dose of 1 mg/kg of either CPF or DZN was administered to developing rats during gestational days 15-18 or postnatal days (PND) 1-4. Brain sections from PND 60 rats were processed using NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunohistochemistry. The number of labeled neurons and the optical density (OD) were assessed in the supraoptic (SON), paraventricular (PVN), medial septum, vertical limb, and horizontal limb of the diagonal band. Developmental exposure to organophosphates increased the number of labeled neurons and OD in different subnuclei in the hypothalamus without gender selectivity. The effect on OD was more pronounced and was significant for more cases. Prenatal exposure to CPF and DZN significantly increased the OD in all regions studied with the exception of PVN. Neonatal exposure to DZN also consistently increased OD in all studied subnuclei. For rats that treated with CPF during early postnatal period, this effect was statistically significant only for the SON and PVN. These findings suggest that overexpression of NOS in the hypothalamus may contribute to the mechanisms inducing or compensating for endocrine, autonomic and cognitive abnormalities after developmental exposure to organophosphates. PMID:25050544

  19. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  20. Biotransformation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Kasama, K

    1987-01-01

    Previous investigations into the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have mostly been conducted with special reference to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and its direct effects on the respiratory system, while the study of nitric oxide (NO) has been disregarded. We carried out a study on NO by exposing rats and mice to 15NO or administering 15N-nitrite and 15N-nitrate to these animals by IP injection in order to elucidate the metabolic fate of NO. The results of our study and previous findings led us to assume that the major metabolic path of inhaled NO is as follows: inhaled NO reacts with hemoglobin, forming nitrosyl-hemoglobin (NOHb), and from NOHb, nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) are generated. Major quantities of NO3- are discharged into the urine and a certain amount is discharged into the oral cavity through the salivary glands and transformed to NO2-. Part of this NO2- is converted to N2 gas in the stomach. Nitrate in the intestine is partly reduced to ammonia (NH3) through NO2-, reabsorbed into the body, and converted to urea. Most of the metabolites of inhaled NO are excreted rapidly from the body within 48 hr. PMID:3665863

  1. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal-elicitor-enhanced biosynthesis of antioxidant polyphenols in submerged cultures of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Zhang, Yanxia; Pan, Shenyuan; Zhang, Meimei; Jiang, Hong

    2009-10-01

    A fungal elicitor prepared from the cell debris of the plant-pathogenic ascomycete Alternaria alternata induces multiple responses by Inonotus obliquus cells, including an increase in generation of nitric oxide (NO), activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and accumulation of total mycelial phenolic compounds (TMP), but does not trigger production of oxylipins or jasmonic acid (JA). The role of NO in TMP production was investigated via the effects of the NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG). TMP profiles were assayed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy combining multivariate pattern recognition strategies. Pretreatment of I. obliquus mycelia with cPITO or AG suppressed not only elicitor-enhanced NO generation and PAL activity, but also the elicitor-induced increase in TMP production. This TMP reduction by either a NO scavenger or a NOS inhibitor was reversed by exogenous addition of either a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or JA separately. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of TMP profiles showed that the induced TMP were hispidin analogues including inoscavins, phelligridins, davallialactone and methyldavallialactone, which possess high antioxidant activities. Thus, NO mediates an elicitor-induced increase in production of antioxidant polyphenols in I. obliquus via a signalling pathway independent of oxylipins or JA, a mechanism which differs from those in some higher plants. PMID:19556296

  2. Nitric oxide induces stomatal closure and enhances the adaptive plant responses against drought stress.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, C; García Mata, C; Lamattina, L

    2001-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very active molecule involved in many and diverse biological pathways where it has proved to be protective against damages provoked by oxidative stress conditions. In this work, we studied the effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine SNP-treated on the response of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to water stress conditions. After 2 and 3 h of drought, detached wheat leaves pretreated with 150 microM SNP retained up to 15% more water than those pretreated with water or NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-). The effect of SNP treatment on water retention was also found in wheat seedlings after 7 d of drought. These results were consistent with a 20% decrease in the transpiration rate of SNP-treated detached wheat leaves for the same analyzed time. In parallel experiments, NO was also able to induce a 35%, 30%, and 65% of stomatal closure in three different species, Tradescantia sp. (monocotyledonous) and two dicotyledonous, Salpichroa organifolia and fava bean (Vicia faba), respectively. In SNP-treated leaves of Tradescantia sp., the stomatal closure was correlated with a 10% increase on RWC. Ion leakage, a cell injury index, was 25% lower in SNP-treated wheat leaves compared with control ones after the recovery period. Carboxy-PTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a specific NO scavenger, reverted SNP action by restoring the transpiration rate, stomatal aperture, and the ion leakage to the level found in untreated leaves. Northern-blot analysis showed that SNP-treated wheat leaves display a 2-fold accumulation of a group three late embryogenesis abundant transcript with respect to control leaves both after 2 and 4 h of drought periods. All together, these results suggest that the exogenous application of NO donors might confer an increased tolerance to severe drought stress conditions in plants. PMID:11457969

  3. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  4. Measurement of nitric oxide concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V; Laurendeau, Normand M; Lucht, Robert P; Kuehner, Joel P; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2006-11-15

    We have measured nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (ERE-CARS). Visible pump and Stokes beams were tuned to a Q-branch vibrational Raman resonance of NO. A UV probe beam was tuned into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v"=1,v'=0) vibrational band in the A(2)Sigma(+)-X(2)Pi electronic transition, thus providing a substantial electronic-resonance enhancement of the resulting CARS signal. NO concentrations were measured at levels down to 50 parts in 10(6) in H(2)/air flames at atmospheric pressure. NO was also detected in heavily sooting C(2)H(2)/air flames at atmospheric pressure with minimal background interference. PMID:17072422

  5. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components. PMID:26682617

  6. Nitric oxide release combined with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity prevents muscular dystrophy pathology and enhances stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Silvia; Sciorati, Clara; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Innocenzi, Anna; Covarello, Diego; Galvez, Beatriz G.; Perrotta, Cristiana; Monopoli, Angela; Sanvito, Francesca; Bottinelli, Roberto; Ongini, Ennio; Cossu, Giulio; Clementi, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a relatively common disease that affects skeletal muscle, leading to progressive paralysis and death. There is currently no resolutive therapy. We have developed a treatment in which we combined the effects of nitric oxide with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity by using HCT 1026, a nitric oxide-releasing derivative of flurbiprofen. Here, we report the results of long-term (1-year) oral treatment with HCT 1026 of two murine models for limb girdle and Duchenne muscular dystrophies (α-sarcoglycan-null and mdx mice). In both models, HCT 1026 significantly ameliorated the morphological, biochemical, and functional phenotype in the absence of secondary effects, efficiently slowing down disease progression. HCT 1026 acted by reducing inflammation, preventing muscle damage, and preserving the number and function of satellite cells. HCT 1026 was significantly more effective than the corticosteroid prednisolone, which was analyzed in parallel. As an additional beneficial effect, HCT 1026 enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of arterially delivered donor stem cells, by increasing 4-fold their ability to migrate and reconstitute muscle fibers. The therapeutic strategy we propose is not selective for a subset of mutations; it provides ground for immediate clinical experimentation with HCT 1026 alone, which is approved for use in humans; and it sets the stage for combined therapies with donor or autologous, genetically corrected stem cells. PMID:17182743

  7. Novel nitric oxide generating compound glycidyl nitrate enhances the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Shoucheng; Bednarski, Mark; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Knox, Susan J.

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Glycidyl nitrate (GLYN) is a NO generating small molecule and has ability to release NO on bioactivation in tumor cells. • GLYN-induced intracellular NO generation was attenuated by NO scavengers. • GLYN increases tumor blood flow in tumor-bearing animal model. • GLYN significantly increased the anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin and radiation therapy in mice. • GLYN is well tolerated with no obvious systemic toxicities at its effective therapeutic doses in preclinical animal studies. - Abstract: Selective release of nitric oxide (NO) in tumors could improve the tumor blood flow and drug delivery for chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy, thereby increasing the therapeutic index. Glycidyl nitrate (GLYN) is a NO generating small molecule, and has ability to release NO on bioactivation in SCC VII tumor cells. GLYN-induced intracellular NO generation was significantly attenuated by NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (cPTIO) and NAC. GLYN significantly increases tumor blood flow, but has no effect on the blood flow of normal tissues in tumor-bearing mice. When used with cisplatin, GLYN significantly increased the tumor growth inhibition effect of cisplatin. GLYN also had a modest radiosensitizing effect in vitro and in vivo. GLYN was well tolerated and there were no acute toxicities found at its effective therapeutic doses in preclinical studies. These results suggest that GLYN is a promising new drug for use with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and provide a compelling rationale for future studies of GLYN and related compounds.

  8. Enhanced nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production and damage after inhalation of silica.

    PubMed

    Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell; Robinson, Victor A; Hubbs, Ann; Willard, Patsy; Pack, Donna; Ramsey, Dawn; McLaurin, Jeff; Khan, Amir; Landsittel, Douglas; Teass, Alexander; Castranova, Vincent

    2002-08-01

    In previous reports from this study, measurements of pulmonary inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell cytokine production and nuclear factor-kappa B activation, cytotoxic damage, and fibrosis were detailed. In this study, we investigated the temporal relationship between silica inhalation, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and damage mediated by these radicals in the rat. Rats were exposed to a silica aerosol (15 mg/m(3) silica, 6 h/day, 5 days/wk) for 116 days. We report time-dependent changes in 1) activation of alveolar macrophages and concomitant production of NO and ROS, 2) immunohistochemical localization of inducible NO synthase and the NO-induced damage product nitrotyrosine, 3) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid NO(x) and superoxide dismutase concentrations, and 4) lung lipid peroxidation levels. The major observations made in this study are as follows: 1) NO and ROS production and resultant damage increased during silica exposure, and 2) the sites of inducible NO synthase activation and NO-mediated damage are associated anatomically with pathological lesions in the lungs. PMID:12114212

  9. Accessible Chiral Linker to Enhance Potency and Selectivity of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The three important mammalian isozymes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Inhibitors of nNOS show promise as treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Eight easily synthesized compounds containing either one (20a,b) or two (9a–d; 15a,b) 2-amino-4-methylpyridine groups with a chiral pyrrolidine linker were designed as selective nNOS inhibitors. Inhibitor 9c is the best of these compounds, having a potency of 9.7 nM and dual selectivity of 693 and 295 against eNOS and iNOS, respectively. Crystal structures of nNOS complexed with either 9a or 9c show a double-headed binding mode, where each 2-aminopyridine headgroup interacts with either a nNOS active site Glu residue or a heme propionate. In addition, the pyrrolidine nitrogen of 9c contributes additional hydrogen bonds to the heme propionate, resulting in a unique binding orientation. In contrast, the lack of hydrogen bonds from the pyrrolidine of 9a to the heme propionate allows the inhibitor to adopt two different binding orientations. Both 9a and 9c bind to eNOS in a single-headed mode, which is the structural basis for the isozyme selectivity. PMID:24660051

  10. Nitric oxide as an antioxidant

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, J.; Harel, S.; Granit, R. )

    1991-08-15

    Benzoate monohydroxy compounds, and in particular salicylate, were produced during interaction of ferrous complexes with hydrogen peroxide (Fenton reaction) in a N2 environment. These reactions were inhibited when Fe complexes were flushed, prior to the addition in the model system, by nitric oxide. Methionine oxidation to ethylene by Fenton reagents was also inhibited by nitric oxide. Myoglobin in several forms such as metmyoglobin, oxymyoglobin, and nitric oxide-myoglobin were interacted with an equimolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Spectra changes in the visible region and the changes in membrane (microsomes) lipid peroxidation by the accumulation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) were determined. The results showed that metmyoglobin and oxymyoglobin were activated by H2O2 to ferryl myoglobin, which initiates membrane lipid peroxidation; but not nitric oxide-myoglobin, which, during interaction with H2O2, did not form ferryl but metmyoglobin which only poorly affected lipid peroxidation. It is assumed that nitric oxide, liganded to ferrous complexes, acts to prevent the prooxidative reaction of these complexes with H2O2.

  11. Therapeutic effect of enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and preventing eNOS uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium is an important protective molecule in the vasculature. It is generated by the enzyme endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Similar to all NOS isoforms, functional eNOS transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), via the flavins flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide in the carboxy-terminal reductase domain, to the heme in the amino-terminal oxygenase domain. Here, the substrate L-arginine is oxidized to L-citrulline and NO. Cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia or cigarette smoking reduce bioactive NO. These risk factors lead to an enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vessel wall. NADPH oxidases represent major sources of this ROS and have been found upregulated in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide avidly reacts with eNOS-derived NO to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-). The essential NOS cofactor (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is highly sensitive to oxidation by this ONOO-. In BH4 deficiency, oxygen reduction uncouples from NO synthesis, thereby converting NOS to a superoxide-producing enzyme. Among conventional drugs, compounds interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and statins can reduce vascular oxidative stress and increase bioactive NO. In recent years, we have identified a number of small molecules that have the potential to prevent eNOS uncoupling and, at the same time, enhance eNOS expression. These include the protein kinase C inhibitor midostaurin, the pentacyclic triterpenoids ursolic acid and betulinic acid, the eNOS enhancing compounds AVE9488 and AVE3085, and the polyphenolic phytoalexin trans-resveratrol. Such compounds enhance NO production from eNOS also under pathophysiological conditions and may thus have therapeutic potential. PMID:21198553

  12. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced nitric oxide production through NF-{kappa}B signaling in cultured astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Kato, Shin; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ito, Tetsuya; Togari, Hajime; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the number of reports of encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with influenza virus has increased. In addition, the use of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac sodium (DCF), is associated with a significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Activated astrocytes are a source of nitric oxide (NO), which is largely produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, we investigated whether DCF enhances nitric oxide production in astrocytes stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. We stimulated cultured rat astrocytes with three cytokines, interleukin-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}, and then treated the astrocytes with DCF or acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol: APAP). iNOS and NO production in astrocyte cultures were induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The addition of DCF augmented NO production, but the addition of APAP did not. NF-{kappa}B inhibitors SN50 and MG132 inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. Similarly, NF-{kappa}B p65 Stealth small interfering RNA suppressed iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. LDH activity and DAPI staining showed that DCF induces cell damage in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes. An iNOS inhibitor, L-NMMA, inhibited the cytokine- and DCF-induced cell damage. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that iNOS and NO are induced in astrocyte cultures by proinflammatory cytokines. Addition of DCF further augments NO production. This effect is mediated via NF-{kappa}B signaling and leads to cell damage. The enhancement of DCF on NO production may explain the significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy in patients treated with DCF.

  13. Endothelial dysfunction enhances vasoconstriction due to scavenging of nitric oxide by a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binglan; Shahid, Mohd; Egorina, Elena M.; Sovershaev, Mikhail A.; Raher, Michael J.; Lei, Chong; Wu, Mei X.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no safe and effective hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) to substitute for red blood cell transfusion. It is uncertain whether a deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability (endothelial dysfunction) prevents or augments the HBOC-induced vasoconstriction. Methods Hemodynamic effects of infusion of PolyHeme (1.08 g hemoglobin/kg, Northfield Laboratories, Evanston, IL) or murine tetrameric hemoglobin (0.48 g hemoglobin/kg) were determined in awake healthy lambs, awake mice and anesthetized mice. In vitro, a cumulative dose-tension response was obtained by sequential addition of PolyHeme or tetrameric hemoglobin to phenylephrine-precontracted murine aortic rings. Results Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in awake lambs, but produced acute systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction. Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in healthy wild-type mice, but induced severe systemic vasoconstriction in mice with endothelial dysfunction (either db/db mice or high-fat fed wild-type mice for 4–6 weeks). The db/db mice were more sensitive to systemic vasoconstriction than wild-type mice after the infusion of either tetrameric hemoglobin or PolyHeme. Murine aortic ring studies confirmed that db/db mice have an impaired response to an endothelial-dependent vasodilator and an enhanced vasoconstrictor response to a HBOC. Conclusions Reduction of low molecular weight hemoglobin concentrations to less than 1% is insufficient to abrogate the vasoconstrictor effects of HBOC infusion in healthy awake sheep or in mice with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels associated with endothelial dysfunction. These findings suggest that testing HBOCs in animals with endothelial dysfunction can provide a more sensitive indication of their potential vasoconstrictor effects. PMID:20179495

  14. Glucocorticoid enhances interleukin-1-induced pressor response in freely moving rats through its effect on nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sakata, Y; Fujioka, T; Sadamitsu, D; Maekawa, T

    1999-04-01

    We investigated whether changes in nitric oxide (NO) release might be responsible for the modulation by glucocorticoids of the pressor response to i.p. injection of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in freely moving rats. In such rats, IL-1beta (10 microgram/kg) induced a biphasic pressor response, with a rise in the plasma concentration of NOx (NO2(-) and NO3(-): metabolites of NO) during the second phase. Systemic pretreatment with an exogenous glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), enhanced the second phase of the pressor response and completely suppressed the increase in plasma NOx. Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor), enhanced the pressor response while attenuating the increase in plasma NOx. After bilateral adrenalectomy, IL-1beta induced a smaller pressor response, but a larger increase in plasma NOx; dexamethasone reversed these changes. Our results suggest that endogenous NO moderates the pressor response to IL-1beta in freely moving rats, and that glucocorticoids enhance the IL-1beta-induced pressor response at least in part by reducing endogenous NO release. PMID:10086983

  15. UV-B irradiation alleviates the deterioration of cold-stored mangoes by enhancing endogenous nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiazhao; Li, Mengya; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Maojun; Dong, Jufang

    2015-02-15

    Effects of UV-B radiation on chilling injury, ripening and endogenous nitric oxide (NO) levels in mango fruit were evaluated. Chilling injury index, ion leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the fruit pretreated with 5kJm(-2) UV-B for 4h were significantly lower than those of the control during fruit ripening at ambient temperature following cold storage at 6°C for 10days. Fruit firmness of the mangoes irradiated with UV-B was significantly higher than the control during the ripening period. Endogenous NO levels of the UV-B-irradiated fruit were rapidly increased after UV-B treatment. Pre-treatment of mangoes with the NO specific scavenger, not only abolished UV-B-triggered NO accumulation, but also suppressed the UV-B-reduced chilling injury, oxidative damage, and ripening delay of the fruit. Together, the results suggest that UV-B treatment may enhance chilling tolerance and delay fruit ripening of mangoes by triggering endogenous NO generation in the fruit. PMID:25236246

  16. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  17. Chronic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in nucleus tractus solitarii enhances baroreceptor reflex in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Hidefumi; Kasparov, Sergey; Wong, Liang-Fong; Murphy, David; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-01-01

    In acute experiments, we demonstrated previously that nitric oxide (NO) donors exogenously applied to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) depressed the baroreceptor cardiac reflex. In this study, we determined a role for endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in the NTS for chronically regulating baroreceptor reflex function in conscious rats. A recombinant adenoviral vector directing expression of a truncated form of eNOS was microinjected bilaterally into the NTS to inhibit endogenous eNOS activity. Arterial pressure was monitored continuously using radio-telemetry in freely moving animals and spontaneous baroreceptor reflex gain (sBRG) determined by a time-series method. sBRG showed a gradual increase from day 7 to 21 after gene transfer and the value at day 21 (1.68 ± 0.20 ms mmHg−1, n = 6) was significantly higher than that before gene transfer (1.13 ± 0.09 ms mmHg−1, P < 0.001). This value was also significantly higher than that in rats in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in the NTS (1.04 ± 0.21 ms mmHg−1; n = 6, P < 0.01) and saline-treated groups (1.12 ± 0.15 ms mmHg−1; n = 4, P < 0.05), which did not change from control levels. In addition, heart rate decreased from 336 ± 6 to 318 ± 8 b.p.m. (P < 0.05) 21 days after gene transfer. This value was also significantly lower than that in control groups (eGFP: 348 ± 9 b.p.m., n = 6, P < 0.01; saline: 347 ± 5 b.p.m., n = 4, P < 0.05). Gene transfer did not affect arterial pressure. These findings suggest that in the conscious rat eNOS is constitutively active within the NTS and is a factor regulating baroreceptor reflex gain and heart rate. PMID:12509491

  18. Nitric Oxide-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Atheroma using Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Targeted Echogenic Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunggun; Kee, Patrick H.; Rim, Yonghoon; Moody, Melanie R.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Vela, Deborah; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Laing, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate whether pretreatment with nitric-oxide loaded echogenic liposomes (NO-ELIP) plus ultrasound can improve highlighting by molecularly targeted [anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)] ELIP of atheroma components. Atherosclerotic animals were treated with anti-VCAM-1 ELIP or immunoglobulin (IgG)-ELIP. Each group was randomized to receive pretreatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound, NO-ELIP without ultrasound, or NO-ELIP plus ultrasound. Intravascular ultrasound highlighting data of the same arterial segments were collected before and after treatment. Pretreatment with NO-ELIP plus ultrasound demonstrated a significant increase in acoustic enhancement by anti-VCAM-1 ELIP (21.3 ± 1.5% for gray scale value, 53.9 ± 3.1% for radiofrequency data; p<0.001 vs. IgG-ELIP, p<0.05 vs. pretreatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound or NO-ELIP without ultrasound). NO-ELIP plus ultrasound can improve highlighting of atheroma by anti-VCAM-1 ELIP. This NO pretreatment strategy may be useful for optimizing contrast agent delivery to the vascular wall for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:25819469

  19. Nitric Oxide-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Atheroma using Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1-Targeted Echogenic Immunoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunggun; Kee, Patrick H; Rim, Yonghoon; Moody, Melanie R; Klegerman, Melvin E; Vela, Deborah; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Laing, Susan T

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-treatment with nitric oxide-loaded echogenic liposomes (NO-ELIP) plus ultrasound can improve highlighting by molecularly targeted (anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1]) ELIP of atheroma components. Atherosclerotic animals were treated with anti-VCAM-1-ELIP or immunoglobulin (IgG)-ELIP. Each group was selected at random to receive pre-treatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound, NO-ELIP without ultrasound and NO-ELIP plus ultrasound. Intravascular ultrasound highlighting data for the same arterial segments were collected before and after treatment. Pre-treatment with NO-ELIP plus ultrasound resulted in a significant increase in acoustic enhancement by anti-VCAM-1-ELIP (21.3 ± 1.5% for gray-scale value, 53.9 ± 3.1% for radiofrequency data; p < 0.001 vs. IgG-ELIP, p < 0.05 vs. pre-treatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound or NO-ELIP without ultrasound). NO-ELIP plus ultrasound can improve highlighting of atheroma by anti-VCAM-1 ELIP. This NO pre-treatment strategy may be useful in optimizing contrast agent delivery to the vascular wall for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:25819469

  20. Constitutive production of nitric oxide leads to enhanced drought stress resistance and extensive transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in plant responses to many environmental stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines that constitutively express rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) were described recently. In this study, it is reported that the nNOS transgenic Arabidopsis plants displayed high levels of osmolytes and increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Transcriptomic analysis identified 601 or 510 genes that were differentially expressed as a consequence of drought stress or nNOS transformation, respectively. Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in photosynthesis, redox, stress, and phytohormone and secondary metabolism were greatly affected by the nNOS transgene. Several CBF genes and members of zinc finger gene families, which are known to regulate transcription in the stress response, were changed by the nNOS transgene. Genes regulated by both the nNOS transgene and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments were compared and identified, including those for two ABA receptors (AtPYL4 and AtPYL5). Moreover, overexpression of AtPYL4 and AtPYL5 enhanced drought resistance, antioxidant enzyme activity, and osmolyte levels. These observations increase our understanding of the role of NO in drought stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:24868034

  1. Endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide enhances aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes via HIF-1α-mediated target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Brix, Britta; Mesters, Jeroen R; Pellerin, Luc; Jöhren, Olaf

    2012-07-11

    Astrocytes exhibit a prominent glycolytic activity, but whether such a metabolic profile is influenced by intercellular communication is unknown. Treatment of primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes with the nitric oxide (NO) donor DetaNONOate induced a time-dependent enhancement in the expression of genes encoding various glycolytic enzymes as well as transporters for glucose and lactate. Such an effect was shown to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1α, which is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus to exert its transcriptional regulation. NO action was dependent on both the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MEK signaling pathways and required the activation of COX, but was independent of the soluble guanylate cyclase pathway. Furthermore, as a consequence of NO treatment, an enhanced lactate production and release by astrocytes was evidenced, which was prevented by downregulating HIF-1α. Several brain cell types represent possible sources of NO. It was found that endothelial cells, which express the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) isoform, constitutively produced the largest amount of NO in culture. When astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of brain vascular endothelial cells, stabilization of HIF-1α and an enhancement in glucose transporter-1, hexokinase-2, and monocarboxylate transporter-4 expression as well as increased lactate production was found in astrocytes. This effect was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME and was not seen when astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of cortical neurons. Our findings suggest that endothelial cell-derived NO participates to the maintenance of a high glycolytic activity in astrocytes mediated by astrocytic HIF-1α activation. PMID:22787058

  2. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450. PMID:18399354

  3. Nitric oxide function in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process in the intima of conduit arteries, which disturbs the endothelium-dependent regulation of the vascular tone by the labile liposoluble radical nitric oxide (NO) formed by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This defect predisposes to coronary vasospasm and cardiac ischaemia, with anginal pain as the typical clinical manifestation. It is now appreciated that endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherogenesis and that it may also involve the microcirculation, in which atherosclerotic lesions do not develop. On the other hand, the inflammatory environment in atherosclerotic plaques may result in the expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) isozyme. Whether the dysfunction in endothelial NO production is causal to, or the result of, atherosclerotic lesion formation is still highly debated. Most evidence supports the hypothesis that constitutive endothelial NO release protects against atherogenesis e.g. by preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Nitric oxide generated by the inducible isozyme may be beneficial by replacing the failing endothelial production but excessive release may damage the vascular wall cells, especially in combination with reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:18472828

  4. Nitric oxide mediates isoflavone accumulation and the antioxidant system enhancement in soybean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Caifeng; Yang, Runqiang; Zhou, Yulin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationships between endogenous NO signal transduction pathways, the antioxidant system and isoflavone accumulation induced by UV-B radiation in soybean sprouts. Results showed that UV-B-triggered NO generation induced isoflavone accumulation by up-regulating the activity and gene expression of key enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, PAL; chalcone isomerase, CHI; chalcone synthase, CHS; isoflavone synthase, IFS) that participate in isoflavone biosynthesis and enhanced the antioxidant system by regulating levels of antioxidants (glutathione reductase, GR; glutathione S-transferase, GST; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; glutathione GSH; ascorbic acid, ASC), antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; peroxidase, POD; catalase, CAT) and their gene expression. These effects were inhibited by the addition of a specific NO-scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (cPTIO). The inhibition was reversed through application of the exogenous NO donor, SNP. Overall, NO is an essential signaling molecule, mediating UV-B-induced isoflavone accumulation and the antioxidant system enhancement in soybean sprouts. PMID:26988515

  5. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux. PMID:27246638

  6. Pulsed ultrasound enhances the delivery of nitric oxide from bubble liposomes to ex vivo porcine carotid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, JT; Raymond, JL; Verleye, MC; Pyne-Geithman, GJ; Holland, CK

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is a novel technique for enhancing the penetration of drugs into diseased tissue beds noninvasively. By encapsulating drugs into microsized and nanosized liposomes, the therapeutic can be shielded from degradation within the vasculature until delivery to a target site by ultrasound exposure. Traditional in vitro or ex vivo techniques to quantify this delivery profile include optical approaches, cell culture, and electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate an approach to characterize the degree of nitric oxide (NO) delivery to porcine carotid tissue by direct measurement of ex vivo vascular tone. An ex vivo perfusion model was adapted to assess ultrasound-mediated delivery of NO. This potent vasodilator was coencapsulated with inert octafluoropropane gas to produce acoustically active bubble liposomes. Porcine carotid arteries were excised post mortem and mounted in a physiologic buffer solution. Vascular tone was assessed in real time by coupling the artery to an isometric force transducer. NO-loaded bubble liposomes were infused into the lumen of the artery, which was exposed to 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at a peak-to-peak acoustic pressure amplitude of 0.34 MPa. Acoustic cavitation emissions were monitored passively. Changes in vascular tone were measured and compared with control and sham NO bubble liposome exposures. Our results demonstrate that ultrasound-triggered NO release from bubble liposomes induces potent vasorelaxation within porcine carotid arteries (maximal relaxation 31%±8%), which was significantly stronger than vasorelaxation due to NO release from bubble liposomes in the absence of ultrasound (maximal relaxation 7%±3%), and comparable with relaxation due to 12 μM sodium nitroprusside infusions (maximal relaxation 32%±3%). This approach is a valuable mechanistic tool for assessing the extent of drug release and delivery to the vasculature caused by ultrasound. PMID:25336947

  7. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced phagocytosis of cultured microglia via nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Asai, Hayato; Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Suzuki, Mieko; Kato, Shin; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2013-04-15

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a central nervous system complication with a high mortality rate, which is increased significantly by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (DCF). In the present study, we investigated the effects of DCF on brain immune cells (i.e. microglia) stimulated with three proinflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interferon-γ. Similar to previous findings in astrocytes, all three cytokines induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), as well as NO production, in microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system augmented iNOS expression and NO production. Immunocytochemical analysis and the phagocytosis assay revealed that cytokine treatment induced morphological changes to and phagocytosis by the microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system enhanced microglial activation, as well as the phagocytic activity of cytokine-stimulated microglia. Inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated microglia with or without DCF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is one of the main signaling pathways involved. The iNOS inhibitor N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) reduced both cytokine-induced phagocytosis and phagocytosis induced by the combination of cytokines plus DCF. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside induced phagocytosis, indicating that NO production is a key regulator of microglial phagocytosis. In conclusion, DCF acts synergistically with proinflammatory cytokines to increase the production of NO in microglia, leading to phagocytic activity of the activated microglia. These findings, together with previous observations regarding astrocytes, may explain the significant increase in mortality of IAE patients treated with DCF. - Highlights: ► Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is associated with a high mortality rate. ► Hyperimmunization in the brain is believed to be responsible for

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  9. Nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Deckel, A W

    2001-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule produced when the semiessential amino acid l-arginine is converted to l-citrulline and NO via the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO is known to be involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission, neuromodulation, and inflammation, to name only a few. During neuropathological conditions, the production of NO can be either protective or toxic, dependent on the stage of the disease, the isoforms of NOS involved, and the initial pathological event. This paper reviews the properties of NO and NOS and the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). It discusses ways in which NO and NOS may interact with the protein product of HD and reviews data implicating NOS in the neuropathology of HD. This is followed by a synthesis of current information regarding how NO/NOS may contribute to HD-related pathology and identification of areas for potential future research. PMID:11288139

  10. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  11. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  12. Enhanced neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression is central to cardiac vagal phenotype in exercise-trained mice

    PubMed Central

    Danson, E J F; Paterson, D J

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether enhanced cardiac vagal responsiveness elicited by exercise training is dependent on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS-1), since the NO-cGMP pathway facilitates acetylcholine release. Isolated atria with intact right vagal innervation were taken from male mice (18-22 weeks old) after a period of 10 weeks voluntary wheel-running (+EX, n = 27; peaked 9.8 ± 0.6 km day−1 at 5 weeks), and from mice housed in cages without wheels (-EX, n = 27). Immunostaining of whole atria for NOS-1 identified intrinsic neurones, all of which co-localized with choline acetyltransferase-positive ganglia. Western blot analysis confirmed that NOS-1 protein level was significantly greater in +EX compared to -EX atria (P < 0.05, unpaired t test). Basal heart rates (HR) were slower in +EX than in -EX atria (322 ± 6 versus 360 ± 7 beats min−1; P < 0.05, unpaired t test) However, in +EX atria, HR responses to vagal stimulation (VNS, 3 and 5 Hz) were significantly enhanced compared to -EX atria (3 Hz, +EX: −76 ± 8 beats min−1versus -EX: −62 ± 7 beats min−1; 5 Hz, +EX: −106 ± 4 beats min−1versus -EX: −93 ± 3 beats min−1; P < 0.01, unpaired t test). Inhibition of NOS-1 with vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO, 100 μm) or soluble guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo[4, 3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μm) abolished the difference in HR responses to VNS between +EX and -EX atria, and effects of l-VNIO were reversed by excess l-arginine (1 mm; P < 0.01, ANOVA). There were no differences between the HR responses to the bath-applied acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine chloride in +EX and -EX atria (IC50 concentrations were 5.9 ± 0.4 μm (-EX) and 5.7 ± 0.4 μm (+EX)), suggesting that the changes in vagal responsiveness resulted from presynaptic facilitation of neurotransmission. In conclusion, NOS-1 appears to be a key protein in generating the cardiac vagal gain of function elicited by exercise training. PMID:12509490

  13. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II. PMID:27118175

  14. Enhancement of bioreductive drug toxicity in murine tumours by inhibition of the activity of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, S. A.; Wood, P. J.; Cole, S.; Williams, C.; Adams, G. E.; Stratford, I. J.

    1997-01-01

    Nitro-L-arginine inhibits the production of nitric oxide and can thereby cause vasoconstriction in vivo. One consequence of this is that nitro-L-arginine can increase hypoxia in a range of transplantable and spontaneous murine solid tumours. Bioreductive drugs such as RB6145 are more active under hypoxic conditions, and the combination of RB6145 with nitro-L-arginine in vivo shows greater anti-tumour activity than either agent individually. In mice given nitro-L-arginine at 10 mg kg(-1) i.p. up to 1 h before or after 300 mg kg(-1) i.p. RB6145, survival of KHT tumour cells was reduced by 3-4 logs when assessed by clonogenic assay 24 h after treatment. RB6145 or nitro-L-arginine alone caused no more than 20% cell kill. Similar effects were found in SCCVII tumours. The tumour response to the drug combination was tumour size dependent, with increased tumour cell sensitivity occurring when the tumour volume at the time of treatment was increased. Further, the response of KHT tumours to the combination of RB6145 and nitro-L-arginine was also dependent on the time interval between treatment and on when tumours were excised for determination of survival in vitro. The relative surviving fraction was about 0.3 for intervals less than 4 h but was reduced to 0.01 at 12 h and 0.001 at 24 h. These results were supported by histological examination of tumours, when necrosis at 2 h after treatment was less than 5% but increased to greater than 90% at 24 h. RB6145-induced normal tissue damage, as measured by CFU-A survival, was not altered by combining with nitro-L-arginine. Hence, this drug combination may provide therapeutic benefit. It is likely that the substantial anti-tumour effects are due to enhancement of bioreductive toxicity through increased tumour hypoxia, although additional mechanism(s) may also contribute to the overall response. Images Figure 4 PMID:9275019

  15. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  16. Nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin enhances susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection acting in the cell invasion and oxidative stress associated with anemia.

    PubMed

    Tatakihara, Vera Lucia Hideko; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Panis, Carolina; Cecchini, Rubens; Zanluqui, Nagela Ghabdan; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Martins, Maria Isabel Lovo; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2015-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Approximately 8 million people are thought to be affected with this disease worldwide. T. cruzi infection causes an intense inflammatory response, which is critical for the control of parasite proliferation and disease development. Nitric oxide-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) are an emergent class of pharmaceutical derivatives with promising utility as chemopreventive agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of NO-indomethacin on parasite burden, cell invasion, and oxidative stress in erythrocytes during the acute phase of infection. NO-indomethacin was dissolved in dimethyl formamide followed by i.p. administration of 50 ppm into mice 30 min after infection with 5×10(3) blood trypomastigote forms (Y strain). The drug was administered every day until the animals died. Control animals received 100 μL of drug vehicle via the same route. Within the NO-indomethacin-treatment group, parasitemia and mortality (100%) were higher and oxidative stress in erythrocytes, anemia, and entry of parasites into macrophages were significantly greater than that seen in controls. Increase in the entry and survival of intracellular T. cruzi was associated with inhibition of nitric oxide production by macrophages treated with NO-indomethacin (2.5 μM). The results of this study provide strong evidence that NO-NSAIDs potently inhibit nitric oxide production, suggesting that NO-NSAID-based therapies against infections would be difficult to design and would require caution. PMID:25559858

  17. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  18. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  19. Nitric oxide in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling - nitrated fatty acids (NO2-FAs) and S-guanylation - and conclude with suggestions for future directions in NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  20. Airway nitric oxide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, D.; Gustafsson, L.; Hemmingsson, Tryggve; Frostell, C.; Paiva, M.

    2005-10-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), a molecule with a wide range of biological effects, is found in exhaled gas. Elevation of expired NO is an early sign of airway inflammation in asthma and dust inhalation. Animal experiments have demonstrated a marked increase of expired NO after venous gas emboli (bubbles, VGE), which may occur after decompression in conjunction with extravehicular activity (EVA). For this MAP project, astronauts will perform a simple inhalation-exhalation procedure weekly during their flights, and before and after EVA. Furthermore, the microgravity environment offers a possibility to gain new insights into how and where NO is formed in the lungs and what local effects NO may have there. The planned experiments have been made possible by recent developments of new techniques by the team's industrial partners; Aerocrine has developed a highly compact and accurate NO analyser, and Linde Gas Theapeutics has developed a highly compact device for NO administration in the inhaled air.

  1. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  2. Large enhancement in the heterogeneous oxidation rate of organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-10-27

    In this paper we report an unexpectedly large acceleration in the effective heterogeneous OH reaction rate in the presence of NO. This 10–50 fold acceleration originates from free radical chain reactions, propagated by alkoxy radicals that form inside the aerosol by the reaction of NO with peroxy radicals, which do not appear to produce chain terminating products (e.g., alkyl nitrates), unlike gas phase mechanisms. Lastly, a kinetic model, constrained by experiments, suggests that in polluted regions heterogeneous oxidation plays a much more prominent role in the daily chemical evolution of organic aerosol than previously believed.

  3. Comparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Bailey, S. M.

    2004-03-01

    A time-dependent thermospheric model has been used to calculate the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere for a 935-day period, 11 March 1998 to 30 September 2000. This model uses daily values of the observed solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm) as an energy input parameter. The model does not include an energy input from auroral electron precipitation. The results of the model calculation of nitric oxide density at 110 km were compared with observations of nitric oxide density made with the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) for the 935-day period. At the equator the model calculations and the observations agree very well with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.876. The correlation coefficient remains high for the altitude region 107-117 km, the region where solar soft X-rays (2-7 nm) are the major source of nitric oxide production. The comparison of the model calculations with the observations as a function of latitude show that there is excess nitric oxide poleward of 30°N and S latitude particularly during the fall-winter season. We believe that the source of this excess nitric oxide is the nitric oxide that is produced in the auroral region (65°-75°N and S geomagnetic latitude) by precipitating auroral electrons. We believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported equatorward by horizontal winds. At midlatitudes the excess nitric oxide decays to about half of its initial value in one day. At times of large geomagnetic storms we believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported all the way to the equator by horizontal winds. The excellent correlation of the model calculations and the SNOE observations of nitric oxide at 110 km between 30°S and 30°N support the hypothesis that solar soft X-rays are the source of the variability of nitric oxide in the thermosphere at low latitudes.

  4. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  5. Pre-activation of mesenchymal stem cells with TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide enhances its paracrine effects on radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Min, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Qi-Yi; Leung, Felix W.; Shi, Liu; Zhou, Yu; Yu, Tao; Wang, Chuan-Ming; An, Geng; Sha, Wei-Hong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) may represent a promising alternative to MSCs transplantation, however, the low concentrations of growth factors in non-activated MSC-CM hamper its clinical application. Recent data indicated that the paracrine potential of MSCs could be enhanced by inflammatory factors. Herein, we pre-activated bone-marrow-derived MSCs under radiation-induced inflammatory condition (MSCIEC-6(IR)) and investigated the evidence and mechanism for the differential effects of MSC-CMIEC-6(IR) and non-activated MSC-CM on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Systemic infusion of MSC-CMIEC-6(IR), but not non-activated MSC-CM, dramatically improved intestinal damage and survival of irradiated rats. Such benefits may involve the modulation of epithelial regeneration and inflammation, as indicated by the regeneration of intestinal epithelial/stem cells, the regulation of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. The mechanism for the superior paracrine efficacy of MSCIEC-6(IR) is related to a higher secretion of regenerative, immunomodulatory and trafficking molecules, including the pivotal factor IGF-1, induced by TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide partially via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent mechanism. Together, our findings suggest that pre-activation of MSCs with TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide enhances its paracine effects on RIII via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent mechanism, which may help us to maximize the paracrine potential of MSCs. PMID:25732721

  6. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  7. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  9. Reversibility of heme-nitric oxide reactions for use in an inhaled nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Soller, Babs R.; Rencus, Tal

    1997-06-01

    Nitric Oxide is a simple gaseous compound which serves as a regulatory molecule in a number of physiological processes. Due to its biological role as a potent local vasodilator,there has been widespread interest in the therapeutic use of gaseous nitric oxide a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Our goal is the development of a sensor for the direct and continuous measurement of inhaled nitric oxide concentrations. This study evaluated the reversibility of potential sensing compounds upon reaction with nitric oxide. Previously, absorption spectroscopy was used to study the sensitivity of the Fe II, Fe III and oxygenated forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. This study focused on the photo-reversibility of the hem's reaction with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome-c in the Fe III state reversibly reacted with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin and myoglobin in the Fe II state non-reversibly reacted with nitric oxide to form an unstable product. Cytochrome-c (FeII) does not react with nitric oxide. The oxy forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin react with nitric oxide to form their respective met forms, unreversible via photolysis. For all reversible reactions, photolysis was gradual and complete within five minutes.

  10. 21-NO-prednisolone is a novel nitric oxide-releasing derivative of prednisolone with enhanced anti-inflammatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Clark, Mark; Del Soldato, Piero; Fiorucci, Stefano; Flower, Roderick J; Perretti, Mauro

    2000-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel derivative of the glucocorticoid prednisolone were investigated. NCX-1015 (prednisolone 21-[(4′-nitrooxymethyl)benzoate]) incubation in human platelet-rich plasma produced a time (0–60 min) and concentration (3–300 μM) dependent release of nitrite, that was mirrored by accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in the human platelets. Intraperitoneal injection of NCX-1015 to mice (up to 27.7 μmol kg−1) produced nitrite accumulation in the peritoneal cavity maximal at 60 min. NCX-1015 dose-dependently induced the steroid sensitive cell surface marker CD163 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). NCX-1015 was more potent than prednisolone in inducing CD163. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide induced interleukin-1β release from these cells was inhibited by NCX-1015 with higher potency than prednisolone. In the zymosan peritonitis model, NCX-1015 was more active than prednisolone in suppressing neutrophil extravasation (ED50 of 5.5 and 25.8 μmol kg−1, respectively), nitrite accumulation (ED50 of 1.38 and 22.2 μmol kg−1, respectively) and release of the chemokine KC (ED50 of 5.5 and 27.7 μmol kg−1, respectively) as determined at the 4 h time-point. No differences were measured for the levels of interleukin-1β or prostaglandin E2. NCX-1015 administered orally was also found to be equally active. Co-administration of the nitric oxide donors NOC-18 ((z)-1-[(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)amino] diazen-1-ium-1, 2-diolate; 7.9 μmol kg−1) or sodium nitroprusside (13.8 μmol kg−1) with prednisolone resulted in an additive anti-migratory action. In a chronic model of granulomatous tissue inflammation, administration of NCX-1015 (13.9 μmol kg−1) from day 1 (i.e. after induction of inflammation) was more effective than prednisolone in reducing the granuloma dry weight, and this was associated to a lower anti-angiogenic effect. In conclusion we show that NCX-1015 is

  11. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane--Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases. PMID:26091398

  12. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane—Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases. PMID:26091398

  13. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26391043

  14. Inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Olivier, Paul; Loron, Gauthier; Fontaine, Romain; Maury, Laure; Baud, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease that affects premature infants and contributes to their morbidity and mortality. With the advent of prenatal steroids and postnatal exogenous surfactant and less aggressive respiratory support, premature infants can develop chronic oxygen dependency without even acute respiratory distress. This 'new bronchopulmonary dysplasia' could be the result of impaired postnatal growth. Several experimental studies have suggested a possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor/nitric oxide (VEGF/NO) pathway in restoring pulmonary angiogenesis and enhancing distal lung growth. The results of the clinical studies are, however, inconclusive, and it is currently unclear which subsets of premature infants might benefit from inhaled nitric oxide. Besides, severe intracranial haemorrhage and/or cystic periventricular leucomalacia may affect the most immature babies, many of whom are spared from severe initial respiratory disease. Recently, inhaled nitric oxide was shown to significantly decrease the incidence of these neurological events, and to improve the long-term outcome in a few clinical trials. At times neuroprotective, at times neurotoxic, nitric oxide is capable of divergent effects depending upon the extent of cerebral damage, the redox state of the cell, and the experimental model used. Recently, our group found that inhaled nitric oxide had remote effects including angiogenesis and maturation on the developing brain in rodent pups. Thus, we await the results of the recently completed randomised clinical trial of inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (the European Nitric Oxide or 'EUNO' trial) where, besides the primary endpoint of chronic oxygen dependency reduction at 36 weeks' postconceptional age, long-term lung and brain will be followed-up until 7 years of age. PMID:18986855

  15. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Mediates Phosphodiesterase Activity, Decreased Cyclic Di-GMP Levels, and Enhanced Dispersal▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Nicolas; Schleheck, David; Klebensberger, Janosch; Webb, Jeremy S.; Hassett, Daniel J.; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria in biofilms often undergo active dispersal events and revert to a free-swimming, planktonic state to complete the biofilm life cycle. The signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) was previously found to trigger biofilm dispersal in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa at low, nontoxic concentrations (N. Barraud, D. J. Hassett, S. H. Hwang, S. A. Rice, S. Kjelleberg, and J. S. Webb, J. Bacteriol. 188:7344-7353, 2006). NO was further shown to increase cell motility and susceptibility to antimicrobials. Recently, numerous studies revealed that increased degradation of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) triggers a planktonic mode of growth in eubacteria. In this study, the potential link between NO and c-di-GMP signaling was investigated by performing (i) PDE inhibitor studies, (ii) enzymatic assays to measure PDE activity, and (iii) direct quantification of intracellular c-di-GMP levels. The results suggest a role for c-di-GMP signaling in triggering the biofilm dispersal event induced by NO, as dispersal requires PDE activity and addition of NO stimulates PDE and induces the concomitant decrease in intracellular c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, gene expression studies indicated global responses to low, nontoxic levels of NO in P. aeruginosa biofilms, including upregulation of genes involved in motility and energy metabolism and downregulation of adhesins and virulence factors. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of candidate genes and physiological characterization of the corresponding mutant strains uncovered that the chemotaxis transducer BdlA is involved in the biofilm dispersal response induced by NO. PMID:19801410

  16. Hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance through nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis in barley seedling roots

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Fei-Hua; He, En-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are emerging as messenger molecules involved in the modulation of plant physiological processes. Here, we investigated a signalling network involving H2S and NO in salt tolerance pathway of barley. NaHS, a donor of H2S, at a low concentration of either 50 or 100 μM, had significant rescue effects on the 150 mM NaCl-induced inhibition of plant growth and modulated the K+/Na+ balance by decreasing the net K+ efflux and increasing the gene expression of an inward-rectifying potassium channel (HvAKT1) and a high-affinity K+ uptake system (HvHAK4). H2S and NO maintained the lower Na+ content in the cytoplast by increasing the amount of PM H+-ATPase, the transcriptional levels of PM H+-ATPase (HvHA1) and Na+/H+ antiporter (HvSOS1). H2S and NO modulated Na+ compartmentation into the vacuoles with up-regulation of the transcriptional levels of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (HvVNHX2) and H+-ATPase subunit β (HvVHA-β) and increased in the protein expression of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE1). H2S mimicked the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) by increasing NO production, whereas the function was quenched with the addition of NO scavenger. These results indicated that H2S increased salt tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, which were mediated by the NO signal. PMID:26213372

  17. Miltefosine enhances phagocytosis but decreases nitric oxide production by peritoneal macrophages of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Charlene Barreto; Alves, Erica Alessandra Rocha; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro; Urdapilleta, Ada Amalia Ayala; Kückelhaus, Carlos dos Santos; Muniz-Junqueira, Maria Imaculada; Kückelhaus, Selma Aparecida Souza

    2012-05-01

    Miltefosine is an anticancer drug currently used to treat visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, also presents a broad-spectrum of fungicidal and antiamoebae activities. It acts on the metabolism of phospholipids and glycoproteins of the membrane of parasites. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of miltefosine (0.4 to 50.0 μg/mL) on the phagocytosis and nitric oxide production by macrophages of C57BL/6 mice to clarify the immunomodulatory effects of the drug on macrophages of C57BL/6, strain mice that is biased to Th1 response. Peritoneal macrophages were in vitro treated with miltefosine and phagocytosis of sensitized or nonsensitized Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed. NO production was evaluated by Griess reaction. In the concentration of 1.6 μg/mL and 50.0 μg/mL, miltefosine increased phagocytosis of non-opsonized S. cerevisiae in 59.7% and 214.3%, respectively. For phagocytosis through opsonin receptors, miltefosine (50.0 μg/mL) increased the phagocytic index in 208.6% (p=0.04, paired t test). Miltefosine (50.0 μg/mL) decreased in 39.3% NO production by macrophages. However, treatment with miltefosine (50.0 μg/mL) after infection of macrophages with Leishmania amazonensis increased NO production in 73.4% (p=0.01, Wilcoxon test). Our data showed that, besides the antimicrobial effect of miltefosine, the drug showed immunomodulatory effects on macrophages of C57BL/6 mice, improving phagocytosis and decreasing NO production, but was able to increase NO production when macrophages were previously infected with L. amazonensis. These results suggest that miltefosine may favor the better evolution of infectious diseases by improving the innate immune response of macrophages. PMID:22465961

  18. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  19. The Effect of Nitric Oxide on Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shank, J. L.; Silliker, J. H.; Harper, R. H.

    1962-01-01

    Nitric oxide, as well as several other oxides of nitrogen, were assayed for their antibacterial action. It is shown that nitric oxide has virtually no effect on bacteria, whereas both NaNO3 and NaNO2 appear to have either neutral or stimulatory effects. It is suggested that the formation of nitrous acid is mainly responsible for the quantitative as well as the qualitative changes that occur in the bacterial flora of cured meat. A pH-dependent “nitrite cycle” is presented to account for the production of nitrous acid in cured meat systems. PMID:13911227

  20. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinelli, G. P. T.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Holstein, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO.

  1. Neutralizing a Surface Charge on the FMN Subdomain Increases the Activity of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Enhancing the Oxygen Reactivity of the Enzyme Heme-Nitric Oxide Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs) are calmodulin-dependent flavoheme enzymes that oxidize l-Arg to nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. Their catalytic behaviors are complex and are determined by their rates of heme reduction (kr), ferric heme-NO dissociation (kd), and ferrous heme-NO oxidation (kox). We found that point mutation (E762N) of a conserved residue on the enzyme's FMN subdomain caused the NO synthesis activity to double compared with wild type nNOS. However, in the absence of l-Arg, NADPH oxidation rates suggested that electron flux through the heme was slower in E762N nNOS, and this correlated with the mutant having a 60% slower kr. During NO synthesis, little heme-NO complex accumulated in the mutant, compared with ∼50–70% of the wild-type nNOS accumulating as this complex. This suggested that the E762N nNOS is hyperactive because it minimizes buildup of an inactive ferrous heme-NO complex during NO synthesis. Indeed, we found that kox was 2 times faster in the E762N mutant than in wild-type nNOS. The mutational effect on kox was independent of calmodulin. Computer simulation and experimental measures both indicated that the slower kr and faster kox of E762N nNOS combine to lower its apparent Km,O2 for NO synthesis by at least 5-fold, which in turn increases its V/Km value and enables it to be hyperactive in steady-state NO synthesis. Our work underscores how sensitive nNOS activity is to changes in the kox and reveals a novel means for the FMN module or protein-protein interactions to alter nNOS activity. PMID:19473991

  2. Nitric Oxide Catalysis of Diazene E/Z Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Bohle, D Scott; Rosadiuk, Kristopher A

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide is an efficient catalyst for the cis-trans (E/Z) isomerization of diazenes. We compare the effect of room temperature solutions bearing low concentrations of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, or oxygen on the rate of cis-trans isomerization, CTI, of the alkene bond in stilbene and on the azo double bond in azobenzene, as well as in four azo derivatives as measured by UV-vis spectroscopy. These rate enhancements can be as large as 3 orders of magnitude for azobenzene in solution. A mechanism is proposed where catalysis is promoted by the interaction of the nitric oxide with the diazene nitrogen lone pairs. Density functional theory, B3LYP/6-311++g** suggests that the binding of NO to the diazene should be weak and reversible but that its NO adduct has an E/Z isomerization barrier of 7.5 kcal/mol. PMID:26200101

  3. [Exhaled nitric oxide in pediatric asthma].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Caro, Francisco; Pérez Guirado, Alejandro; Ruiz Del Árbol Sánchez, Paloma; de Miguel Mallén, Angeles; Alvarez Berciano, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide has become a new diagnostic tool in pediatric daily practice. It provides valuable information on the nature of the underlying inflammation, being useful to establish the diagnosis and to differentiate which patients could benefit more from the anti-inflammatory treatment. As well, it can be useful in predicting asthmatic exacerbations and be used as a guide to make therapeutic modifications. Taking everything to account, the pediatrician has to know its interpretation and its applications. This manuscript reviews the main applications of exhaled nitric oxide in pediatric asthma. PMID:21132252

  4. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by a persistent elevation of pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). The current treatment for pulmonary hypertension is limited and only provides symptomatic relief due to unknown etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. Both vasoconstriction and structural remodeling (enhanced proliferation of VSMC) of the pulmonary arteries contribute to the progressive course of PAH, irrespective of different underlying causes. The exact molecular mechanism of PAH, however, is not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to provide recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of PAH. Specifically, this review focuses on nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress and inflammation and how these factors contribute to the development and progression of PAH. This review also discusses recent and potential therapeutic advancements for the treatment of PAH. PMID:20051913

  5. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation...

  6. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  7. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  8. Copper deficiency attenuates endothelial nitric oxide release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary copper deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to deter...

  9. Nitric oxide. Novel biology with clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Billiar, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author provides the reader with a view of the regulation and function of nitric oxide (NO), based on the three distinct enzyme isoforms that synthesize NO. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nitric oxide is a short-lived molecule exhibiting functions as diverse as neurotransmission and microbial killing. Recent advances in the characterization of the enzymes responsible for NO synthesis and in the understanding of how NO interacts with targets have led to new insights into the many facets of this diverse molecule. METHODS: Nitric oxide is produced by one of three enzyme isoforms of NO synthesis. These enzymes vary considerably in their distribution, regulation, and function. Accordingly, the NO synthesis or lack of NO production will have consequences unique to that isoform. Therefore, this review summarizes the regulation and function of NO generated by each of the three isoforms. RESULTS: Nitric oxide exhibits many unique characteristics that allow this molecule to perform so many functions. The amount, duration, and location of the NO synthesis will depend on the isoform of NO synthase expressed. For each isoform, there probably are disease processes in which deficiency states exist. For induced NO synthesis, states of overexpression exist. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the regulation and function of the enzymes that produce NO and the unique characteristics of each enzyme isoform is likely to lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat a number of diseases. PMID:7537035

  10. Electron-impact excitation of nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    The absolute cross sections for the excitation of the nitrosyl cation Baer-Miescher bands, two nitric oxide bands, and several atomic nitrogen multiplets in the vacuum UV by electron impact on NO have been measured over an energy range extending from threshold to 300 eV. The variation of the dipole transition moment for the nitrosyl cation band system was also determined.

  11. Nitric oxide methods in seed biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous, free radical that is involved in many aspects of plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Compelling evidence points to a central role for NO in the loss of seed dormancy. NO is highly reactive, toxic at high concentrations, and unstable. Methods f...

  12. Nitric oxide enhances the sensitivity of alpaca melanocytes to respond to {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone by up-regulating melanocortin-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yanjun; Cao, Jing; Wang, Haidong; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Zhiwei; Bai, Rui; Hao, HuanQing; He, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng

    2010-06-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) and {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH) have been correlated with the synthesis of melanin. The NO-dependent signaling of cellular response to activate the hypothalamopituitary proopiomelanocortin system, thereby enhances the hypophysial secretion of {alpha}-MSH to stimulate {alpha}-MSH-receptor responsive cells. In this study we investigated whether an NO-induced pathway can enhance the ability of the melanocyte to respond to {alpha}-MSH on melanogenesis in alpaca skin melanocytes in vitro. It is important for us to know how to enhance the coat color of alpaca. We set up three groups for experiments using the third passage number of alpaca melanocytes: the control cultures were allowed a total of 5 days growth; the UV group cultures like the control group but the melanocytes were then irradiated everyday (once) with 312 mJ/cm{sup 2} of UVB; the UV + L-NAME group is the same as group UV but has the addition of 300 {mu}M L-NAME (every 6 h). To determine the inhibited effect of NO produce, NO produces were measured. To determine the effect of the NO to the key protein and gene of {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis, the key gene and protein of the {alpha}-MSH pathway were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western immunoblotting. The results provide exciting new evidence that NO can enhance {alpha}-MSH pathway in alpaca skin melanocytes by elevated MC1R. And we suggest that the NO pathway may more rapidly cause the synthesis of melanin in alpaca skin under UV, which at that time elevates the expression of MC1R and stimulates the keratinocytes to secrete {alpha}-MSH to enhance the {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis. This process will be of considerable interest in future studies.

  13. Nitric oxide, S-nitrosylation and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, K K K; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    2005-09-01

    Nitric oxide is a critically important signaling molecule, controlling a wide range of pathways and biological processes. Highly reactive nitric oxide mediates its function through reaction with different molecules directly or indirectly. One of these modifications is the S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues in proteins. S-nitrosylation is emerging as an important redox signaling mechanism and has been found to regulate a broad range of biologic, physiologic and cellular functions. One of the major findings in this area recently is the linkage of nitrosative stress to various neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative stress has long been regarded as a prime mediator in the development of neurodegeneration as various indices of oxidative stress are readily observed in postmortem studies. A causative role for nitrosative stress in neurodegeneration is just now being appreciated. The direct connection of S-nitrosylation to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease in recent studies further provide insights into how imbalance in nitric oxide metabolism can contribute to the development of selective injury and disease. PMID:16191392

  14. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  15. Global observations of nitric oxide in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Mankoff, K. D.; Bailey, S. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere (97-150 km) has been measured from the polar-orbiting Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude for the 2 1/2 year period from 11 March 1998 until 30 September 2000. The observations show that the maximum density occurs near 106-110 km and that the density is highly variable. The nitric oxide density at low latitudes correlates well with the solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm), indicating that it is the solar X-rays that produce thermospheric nitric oxide at low and midlatitudes. Nitric oxide is produced at auroral latitudes (60°-70° geomagnetic) by the precipitation of electrons (1-10 keV) into the thermosphere. During high geomagnetic activity, increased nitric oxide may be present at midlatitudes as the result of meridional winds that carry the nitric oxide equatorward.

  16. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  17. Nitric Oxide and the Biological Cascades Underlying Increased Neurogenesis, Enhanced Learning Ability, and Academic Ability as an Effect of Increased Bouts of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    HUNT, SAMUEL J.; NAVALTA, JAMES W.

    2012-01-01

    The consummate principle underlying all physiological research is corporeal adaptation at every level of the organism observed. With respect to humans, the body learns to function based on the external stimuli from the environment, beginning in the womb, throughout the developmental stages of life. Nitric Oxide (NO) appears to be the governor of the plasticity of several systems in mammals implicit in their proper development. It is the purpose of this review to describe the physiological pathways that lead to plasticity of not only the vasculature but also of the brain and how physical activity plays a key role in those alterations by initiating the mechanism that triggers NO production. Further, this review hopes to show a connection between these changes and learning, comprising both motor learning and cognitive learning. This review will show how NO plays a significant role in vascularization and neurogenesis, necessary to enhance the mind-body connection and comprehensive physical performance and adaptation. It is our belief that this review effectively demonstrates, using a multidisciplinary approach, the causal mechanisms underlying the increases in neurogenesis as related to improved learning and academic performance as a result of adequate bouts of physical activity of a vigorous nature. PMID:27182387

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment prevents nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in articular cartilage injury via enhancement of the expression of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ueng, Steve W N; Yuan, Li-Jen; Lin, Song-Shu; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, I-Chun; Yang, Chuen-Yung; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2013-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), and localized hypoxia-induced apoptosis are thought to be correlated to the degree of cartilage injury. We investigated the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on (1) interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced NO production and apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes and (2) healing of articular cartilage defects. For the in vitro study, RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect mRNA and protein expressions of HSP70, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and caspase 3 in IL-1β-treated chondrocytes. To clarify that the HSP70 was necessary for anti-iNOS and anti-apoptotic activity by HBO, we treated the cells with an HSP70 inhibitor, KNK437. For the in vivo study, cartilage defects were created in rabbits. The HBO group was exposed to 100% oxygen at 2.5 ATA for 1.5 h a day for 10 weeks. The control group was exposed to normal air. After sacrifice, specimen sections were sent for examination using a scoring system. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to detect the expressions of iNOS, HSP70, and caspase 3. Our results suggested that HBO upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of HSP70 and suppressed those of iNOS and caspase 3 in chondrocytes. KNK437 inhibited the HBO-induced downregulation of iNOS and casapase 3 activities. The histological scores showed that HBO markedly enhanced cartilage repair. Immunohistostaining showed that HBO enhanced HSP70 expression and suppressed iNOS and caspase 3 expressions in chondrocytes. Accordingly, HBO treatment prevents NO-induced apoptosis in articular cartilage injury via enhancement of the expression of heat shock protein 70. PMID:22991091

  19. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  1. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1. PMID:23247505

  2. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  3. Biological nitric oxide signalling: chemistry and terminology

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tassiele A; da Silva, Roberto S; Miranda, Katrina M; Switzer, Christopher H; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen oxide signalling and stress is an area of extreme clinical, pharmacological, toxicological, biochemical and chemical research interest. The utility of nitric oxide and derived species as signalling agents is due to their novel and vast chemical interactions with a variety of biological targets. Herein, the chemistry associated with the interaction of the biologically relevant nitrogen oxide species with fundamental biochemical targets is discussed. Specifically, the chemical interactions of nitrogen oxides with nucleophiles (e.g. thiols), metals (e.g. hemeproteins) and paramagnetic species (e.g. dioxygen and superoxide) are addressed. Importantly, the terms associated with the mechanisms by which NO (and derived species) react with their respective biological targets have been defined by numerous past chemical studies. Thus, in order to assist researchers in referring to chemical processes associated with nitrogen oxide biology, the vernacular associated with these chemical interactions is addressed. PMID:23617570

  4. Nitric oxide pre-treatment enhances atheroma component highlighting in vivo with ICAM-1 targeted echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Patrick H.; Kim, Hyunggun; Huang, Shaoling; Laing, Susan T.; Moody, Melanie R.; Vela, Deborah; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We present an ultrasound technique to detect the inflammatory changes in developing atheroma. We used contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEUS) with 1) ICAM-1 targeted microbubbles, a molecule of adhesion involved in the inflammatory processes into the lesions of atheroma in New Zealand White rabbits, 2) a pre-treatment with NO-loaded microbubbles and US activation at the site of the endothelium in order to enhance the permeability of the arterial wall and the penetration of the ICAM-1 targeted microbubbles. Following this procedure, the acoustic enhancement is increased by 1.2 fold. NO-ELIP pretreatment with ultrasound activation can potentially facilitate the subsequent penetration of targeted ELIP into the arterial wall, thus allowing improved detection of inflammatory changes in developing atheroma. PMID:24613216

  5. Experimental Assessment and Enhancement of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in an Inverse Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, William P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1997-01-01

    We have experimentally assessed the quantitative nature of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of NO concentration in a unique atmospheric pressure, laminar, axial inverse diffusion flame (IDF). The PLIF measurements were assessed relative to a two-dimensional array of separate laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements. We demonstrated and evaluated several experimentally-based procedures for enhancing the quantitative nature of PLIF concentration images. Because these experimentally-based PLIF correction schemes require only the ability to make PLIF and LSF measurements, they produce a more broadly applicable PLIF diagnostic compared to numerically-based correction schemes. We experimentally assessed the influence of interferences on both narrow-band and broad-band fluorescence measurements at atmospheric and high pressures. Optimum excitation and detection schemes were determined for the LSF and PLIF measurements. Single-input and multiple-input, experimentally-based PLIF enhancement procedures were developed for application in test environments with both negligible and significant quench-dependent error gradients. Each experimentally-based procedure provides an enhancement of approximately 50% in the quantitative nature of the PLIF measurements, and results in concentration images nominally as quantitative as LSF point measurements. These correction procedures can be applied to other species, including radicals, for which no experimental data are available from which to implement numerically-based PLIF enhancement procedures.

  6. [Nitric oxide and the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Dzúrik, R; Spustová, V

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NO) is one of the crucial modulators of the vascular tonus. Apart from its effect on the cardiovascular system it exerts an effect also on other types of cells and ensures their functions.Specially comprehensive is its synthesis and action in the kidneys: NO is formed in the endothelial cells due to the activity of constitutional endothelial synthase (eNOS), in mesangial cells of inductive synthase (iNOS), in smooth muscle cells (vsmNOS), in tubular cells neuronal NOS (nNOS) and iNOS and in the macula densa nNOS. By modulation of the v.afferens it influences the blood flow through the glomeruli and filtration pressure in the glomeruli. It participates in the tubuloglomerular feedback: the cells of the macula densa produce NO via nNOS, the genetic transcription and translation of which as well as the kationic translation system ensure the transport of the L-arginine precursor and regulate very sensitively NO formation. The latter diffuses via the extraglomerular mesangium into the iuxtaglomerular apparatus where renin is forned.NO reduces proteinuria and renal proliferation. During renal insufficiency NO production is inhibited and in diabetes NO production is increased. Diabetic hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are ascribed to produced NO. Experimental studies contributed substantially to the knowledge of renal effects of NO. At present intensive clinical research has been started which, no doubt, will influence medical practice. PMID:15635855

  7. Constitutive Store-Operated Ca(2+) Entry Leads to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Production and Proliferation in Infantile Hemangioma-Derived Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Estella; Bottino, Cinzia; Diofano, Federica; Poletto, Valentina; Codazzi, Alessia Claudia; Mannarino, Savina; Campanelli, Rita; Fois, Gabriella; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Guerra, Germano; Montagna, Daniela; Laforenza, Umberto; Rosti, Vittorio; Massa, Margherita; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-02-15

    Clonal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been implicated in the aberrant vascular growth that features infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common benign vascular tumor in childhood that may cause ulceration, bleeding, and/or permanent disfigurement. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), truly endothelial EPCs endowed with clonal ability and capable of forming patent vessels in vivo, remodel their Ca(2+) toolkit in tumor-derived patients to acquire an adaptive advantage. Particularly, they upregulate the proangiogenic store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathway due to the overexpression of its underlying components, that is, stromal interaction molecule 1 (Stim1), Orai1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). The present work was undertaken to assess whether and how the Ca(2+) signalosome is altered in IH-ECFCs by employing Ca(2+) and nitric oxide (NO) imaging, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and functional assays. IH-ECFCs display a lower intracellular Ca(2+) release in response to either pharmacological (i.e., cyclopiazonic acid) or physiological (i.e., ATP and vascular endothelial growth factor) stimulation. Conversely, Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1 transcripts and proteins are normally expressed in these cells and mediate a constitutive SOCE, which is sensitive to BTP-2, La(3+), and Pyr6 and recharges the intracellular Ca(2+) pool. The resting SOCE in IH-ECFCs is also associated to an increase in their proliferation rate and the basal production of NO compared to normal cells. Likewise, the pharmacological blockade of SOCE and NO synthesis block IH-ECFC growth. Collectively, these data indicate that the constitutive SOCE activation enhances IH-ECFC proliferation by augmenting basal NO production and sheds novel light on the molecular mechanisms of IH. PMID:26654173

  8. Disruption of Nitric Oxide Signaling by Helicobacter pylori Results in Enhanced Inflammation by Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Verriere, Thomas; Scull, Brooks P.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Glumac, Ashley; Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    A strong cellular crosstalk exists between the pathogen Helicobacter pylori and high-output NO production. However, how NO and H. pylori interact to signal in gastric epithelial cells and modulate the innate immune response is unknown. We show that chemical or cellular sources of NO induce the anti-inflammatory effector heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in gastric epithelial cells through a pathway that requires NF-κB. However, H. pylori decreases NO-induced NF-κB activation, thereby inhibiting HO-1 expression. This inhibitory effect of H. pylori results from activation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 by the H. pylori virulence factor CagA and by the host signaling molecules ERK1/2 and JNK. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 is downregulated in gastric epithelial cells of patients infected with cagA+, but not cagA− H. pylori. Enhancement of HO-1 activity in infected cells or in H. pylori-infected mice inhibits chemokine generation and reduces inflammation. These data define a mechanism by which H. pylori favors its own pathogenesis by inhibiting HO-1 induction through the action of CagA. PMID:21987660

  9. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia: the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sogut, Sadik; Akyol, Omer

    2006-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an unknown etiology. Recent years added new information to our understanding of FM pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, oxidative stress, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in FM revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of FM. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide may play an important role in FM pathophysiology, however it is still not clear whether oxidative stress abnormalities documented in FM are the cause or the effect. This should encourage further researches evaluating the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of FM and the efficacy of antioxidant treatments (omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, vitamins and others) in double blind and placebo controlled trials. These future researches will enhance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:16328420

  10. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  11. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  12. Nitric oxide and asthma: a review.

    PubMed

    Ashutosh, K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from the amino acid arginine by enzymes called nitric oxide synthases. NO has an important physiologic role in the regulation of vascular tone, response to vascular injury, and hemostasis. It also acts as a neurotransmitter for the nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerves and has important antimicrobial, immunologic, and proinflammatory activities. The lung is rich in nitric oxide synthases, and NO is normally present in the exhaled air. Use of NO in the treatment of asthma has not withstood the test of time and is not recommended. With the advent of analyzers capable of measuring NO rapidly and reliably, however, the analysis of NO in exhaled air is being increasingly recognized as a potential noninvasive test for the evaluation of the inflammatory component of the pathology of patients with asthma. An increase in the exhaled NO has been shown to accompany eosinophilic inflammation and to correlate with other indices of inflammation in asthma. Exhaled NO increases during exacerbation and decreases with recovery in patients with asthma. As exhaled NO is not increased during bronchospasm in the absence of coexisting inflammation, it could serve to differentiate between the inflammatory and bronchospastic components in asthma, thereby guiding therapy with steroids and other anti-inflammatory medications. Levels of NO also can be increased in certain other conditions, for example, allergic rhinitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome, but these can be clinically differentiated from asthma and do not lessen the diagnostic value of exhaled NO. Measurements of exhaled NO are influenced by several physiologic and technical variables, which results in a wide variation in the levels reported from the different laboratories. Standardization of technique, a better understanding of the confounding effects of physiologic and environmental variables, and establishment of the normal range and variability of exhaled NO are needed before its

  13. Nitric oxide regulates vascular adaptive mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Knaub, Leslie A; Olivera-Fragoso, Luis F; Keller, Amy C; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Watson, Peter A; Reusch, Jane E B

    2013-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and physical inactivity, are all correlated with impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function and decreased nitric oxide (NO) production. NO-mediated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been established in many tissues, yet the role of eNOS in vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is unclear. We hypothesized that genetic eNOS deletion and 3-day nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents would result in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defunct fission/fusion and autophagy profiles within the aorta. We observed a significant, eNOS expression-dependent decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunits from complexes I, II, III, and V in eNOS heterozygotes and eNOS null mice compared with age-matched controls. In response to NOS inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment in Sprague Dawley rats, significant decreases were observed in ETC protein subunits from complexes I, III, and IV as well as voltage-dependent anion channel 1. Decreased protein content of upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, cAMP response element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, were observed in response to 3-day L-NAME treatment. Both genetic eNOS deletion and NOS inhibition resulted in decreased manganese superoxide dismutase protein. L-NAME treatment resulted in significant changes to mitochondrial dynamic protein profiles with decreased fusion, increased fission, and minimally perturbed autophagy. In addition, L-NAME treatment blocked mitochondrial adaptation to an exercise intervention in the aorta. These results suggest that eNOS/NO play a role in basal and adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis in the vasculature and regulation of mitochondrial turnover. PMID:23585138

  14. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  15. Sensor materials for an intravascular fiber optic nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Stahl, Russell F.

    1996-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule in physiological processes including neurotransmission and the control of blood pressure. It is produced in excess during septic shock, the profound hypotensive state which accompanies severe infections. In-vivo measurement of NO would enhance the understanding of its varied biological roles. Our goal is the development of an intravascular fiber-optic sensor for the continuous measurement of NO. This study evaluated nitric oxide sensitive compounds as potential sensing materials in the presence and absence of oxygen. Using absorption spectroscopy we studied both the Fe II and Fe III forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. The Fe II forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin and the Fe III form of cytochrome-c were found to have the highest sensitivity to NO. Cytochrome c (Fe III) is selective for NO even at high oxygen levels, while myoglobin is selective only under normal oxygen levels. NO concentrations as low as 1 (mu) M can be detected with our fiber-optic spectrometer using cytochrome c, and as low as 300 nM using myoglobin. Either of these materials would be adequate to monitor the increase in nitric oxide production during the onset of septic shock.

  16. The response of thermospheric nitric oxide to an auroral storm

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The response of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO) to the auroral storm of September 19, 1984 is analyzed. Measurements of nitric oxide from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) ultraviolet spectrometer are compared with the calculations of a one-dimensional photochemical model of the lower thermosphere. The NCAR Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TGCM) is used to calculate the response of the background neutral atmosphere to auroral forcings such as Joule and particle heating. The output of the TGCM is used as input to the photochemical model. The time history of the auroral energy input is assessed using particle data from the NOAA 6 and 7 satellites. The SME NO measurements were made from 100 km to 140 km along two orbital tracks: one over the United States and one over Europe. The observations show a factor of 3 increase in NO at auroral latitudes for both orbits as a result of the storm. Nitric oxide at mid-latitudes also increased by a factor of 3 but only over the United States. Calculations of the mid-latitude NO response show that temperature increases which result from Joule heating lead to NO enhancements. A larger response is initially seen for altitudes greater than 120 km.

  17. Macrophage oxidation of L-arginine to nitrite and nitrate: nitric oxide is an intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Marletta, M.A.; Yoon, P.S.; Iyengar, R.; Leaf, C.D.; Wishnok, J.S.

    1988-11-29

    Previous studies have shown that murine macrophages immunostimulated with interferon ..gamma.. and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide synthesize NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and citrulline from L-arginine by oxidation of one of the two chemically equivalent guanido nitrogens. The enzymatic activity for this very unusual reaction was found in the 100,000g supernatant isolated from activated RAW 264.7 cells and was totally absent in unstimulated cells. This activity requires NADPH and L-arginine and is enhanced by Mg/sup 2 +/. When the subcellular fraction containing the enzyme activity was incubated with L-arginine, NADPH, and Mg/sup 2 +/, the formation of nitric oxide was observed. Nitric oxide formation was dependent on the presence of L-arginine and NADPH and was inhibited by the NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis inhibitor N/sup G/-monomethyl-L-arginine. Furthermore, when incubated with L-(guanido-/sup 15/N/sub 2/)arginine, the nitric oxide was /sup 15/N-labeled. The results show that nitric oxide is an intermediate in the L-arginine to NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and citrulline pathway. L-Arginine is required for the activation of macrophages to the bactericidal/tumoricidal state and suggests that nitric oxide is serving as an intracellular signal for this activation process in a manner similar to that very recently observed in endothelial cells, where nitric oxide leads to vascular smooth muscle relaxation.

  18. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  19. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:26499181

  20. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  1. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  2. Noise-Induced "Toughening" Effect in Wistar Rats: Enhanced Auditory Brainstem Responses Are Related to Calretinin and Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Juan C; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C; Jareño-Flores, Tania; Miller, Josef M; Juiz, José M

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this "toughening" effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with "toughening" and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1 h every 72 h, four times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament, and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signaling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol. PMID:27065815

  3. Noise-Induced “Toughening” Effect in Wistar Rats: Enhanced Auditory Brainstem Responses Are Related to Calretinin and Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Jareño-Flores, Tania; Miller, Josef M.; Juiz, José M.

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this “toughening” effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with “toughening” and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1 h every 72 h, four times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament, and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signaling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol. PMID:27065815

  4. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  5. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  7. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  8. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  11. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  12. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  13. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  14. Pharmacology of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and nitrovasodilators.

    PubMed Central

    Ignarro, L. J.; Ross, G.; Tillisch, J.

    1991-01-01

    Nitric oxide is the active chemical species responsible for the vasodilator action of nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, and related nitrovasodilators. The most potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation known, nitric oxide was recently discovered to occur endogenously as the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. The pharmacology of endothelium-derived nitric oxide is virtually identical to that of the clinically used nitrovasodilators. Although endothelium-derived relaxing factor or endothelium-derived nitric oxide seems to be important in animals, its significance in humans still needs to be shown. We review the recent discoveries in the identification, biosynthesis, metabolism, and biologic actions of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, its significance in humans, and its relation to the clinically used nitrovasodilators. PMID:1902612

  15. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. A.; Pritchard, H. O. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions by employing successive combustion zones is described. After combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion (ignited by the emission products from the primary zone) in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emission of nitric oxide.

  16. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. PMID:23404577

  17. Nitric oxide modulators: an emerging class of medicinal agents.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, S R; Satyanarayana, K; Rao, M N A; Pai, K V

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  18. Nitric Oxide Signaling and Neural Stem Cell Differentiation in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tao Li, Jessica; Somasundaram, Chandra; Bian, Ka; Xiong, Weijun; Mahmooduddin, Faiz; Nath, Rahul K.; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to examine whether nitric oxide signaling plays a role in human embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural cells. This article reviews current literature on nitric oxide signaling and neural stem cell differentiation for potential therapeutic application to peripheral nerve regeneration. Methods: Human embryonic H9-stem cells were grown, maintained on mitomycin C–treated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layer, cultured on Matrigel to be feeder-free, and used for all the experiments. Fluorescent dual-immunolabeling and confocal image analysis were used to detect the presence of the neural precursor cell markers nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to determine the percentage of expression. Results: We have shown the confocal image of stage 1 human embryonic stem cells coexpressing nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis indicated 24.3% positive labeling of nitric oxide synthase-1. Adding retinoic acid (10−6 M) to the culture medium increased the percent of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 33.9%. Combining retinoic acid (10−6 M) with 8-brom cyclic guanosine monophosphate (10−5 M), the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis demonstrated a further increase of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 45.4%. Our current results demonstrate a prodifferentiation potency of nitric oxide synthase-1, stimulated by retinoic acid with and without cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Conclusion: We demonstrated for the first time how nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling contributes to the development of neural precursors derived from human embryonic stem cells and enhances the differentiation of precursors toward functional neurons for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20563304

  19. Nitric oxide scavengers as a therapeutic approach to nitric oxide mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Fricker, S P

    1999-08-01

    The essential role of nitric oxide (NO) in normal physiology and its involvement in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases render the compound an attractive therapeutic target. NO donor drugs are used in the treatment of hypotension and angina where abnormalities in the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway have been implicated. Overproduction of NO has been associated with a number of disease states including septic shock, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, neurodegenerative diseases and allograft rejection. NO is produced by a group of enzymes, the nitric oxide synthases. Selective inhibition of the inducible isoform is one approach to the treatment of diseases where there is an overproduction of NO; an alternative approach is to scavenge or remove excess NO. A number of NO scavenger molecules have demonstrated pharmacological activity in disease models, particularly models of septic shock. These include organic molecules such as PTIO (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), haemoglobin derivatives such as the pyridoxalated haemoglobin polyoxyethylene conjugate (PHP), low molecular weight iron compounds of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and diethyldithiocarbamate and ruthenium polyaminocarboxylate complexes. The data suggest a potential role for NO scavengers in the treatment of NO mediated disease. PMID:15992146

  20. Plant pathogenic Streptomyces species produce nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in response to host signals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent intercellular signal for defense, development and metabolism in animals and plants. In mammals, highly regulated nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) generate NO. NOS homologs exist in some prokaryotes, but direct evidence for NO production by these proteins has been lacking...

  1. HBOC Vasoactivity: Interplay Between Nitric Oxide Scavenging and Capacity to Generate Bioactive Nitric Oxide Species

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite many advances in blood substitute research, the development of materials that are effective in maintaining blood volume and oxygen delivery remains a priority for emergency care and trauma. Clinical trials on hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have not provided information on the mechanism of toxicity, although all commercial formulations have safety concerns. Specifically, it is important to reconcile the different hypotheses of Hb toxicity, such as nitric oxide (NO) depletion and oxidative reactions, to provide a coherent molecular basis for designing a safe HBOC. Recent Advances: HBOCs with different sizes often exhibit differences in the degree of HBOC-induced vasoactivity. This has been attributed to differences in the degree of NO scavenging and in the extent of Hb extravasation. Additionally, it is appears that Hb can undergo reactions that compensate for NO scavenging by generating bioactive forms of NO. Critical Issues: Engineering modifications to enhance bioactive NO production can result in diminished oxygen delivery by virtue of increased oxygen affinity. This strategy can prevent the HBOC from fulfilling the intended goal on preserving oxygenation; however, the NO production effects will increase perfusion and oxygen transport. Future Directions: Hb modifications influence NO scavenging and the capacity of certain HBOCs to compensate for NO scavenging through nitrite-mediated reactions that generate bioactive NO. Based on the current understanding of these NO-related factors, possible synthetic strategies are presented that address how HBOC formulations can be prepared that: (i) effectively deliver oxygen, (ii) maintain tissue perfusion, and (iii) limit/reverse underlying inflammation within the vasculature. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2284–2297. PMID:23249305

  2. Nitric Oxide Plasma Sources for Bio-Decontamination and Plasma Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor N.; Shekhter, Anatoly B.

    One of the main products generated in atmospheric plasma sources is nitric oxide. The nitric oxide molecule is known as anti-bacterial agent on one hand and the molecule providing signaling and regulation biological functions on the other hand. Human body produces NO to kill invading pathogens. At the same time nitric oxide works as a primary vasoregulator and anti-hypertensive agent. NO also ­regulates: inflammation, collagen production, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Exogenous NO generated by plasma devices could enhance bio-activity of NO-assisted ­processes in human organism. Some applications of nitric oxide for bio-decontamination and plasma therapy will be illustrated and discussed in the paper.

  3. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  4. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:25612116

  5. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  6. The emerging multifaceted roles of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, P C; Schroeder, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical with a multitude of organ specific regulatory functions. Since 1985, NO has been the subject of numerous research efforts and as a result, has been found to play a major role in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune, and central nervous systems. In addition, deranged NO synthesis is the basis for a number of pathophysiologic states, such as atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, pyloric stenosis, and the hypertension associated with renal failure. Traditional NO donors such as sodium nitroprusside and new pharmacologic NO adducts such as S-nitrosothiols may serve as exogenous sources of NO for the treatment of NO-deficient pathologic states. This review is an attempt to acquaint the surgical community with the fundamentals of NO biochemistry and physiology. Increased knowledge of its functions in normal homeostasis and pathologic states will enable physicians to better understand these disease processes and utilize new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:7717775

  7. Nitric Oxide Release Part II. Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis W.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A wide range of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing materials have emerged as potential therapeutics that exploit NO’s vast biological roles. Macromolecular NO-releasing scaffolds are particularly promising due to their ability to store and deliver larger NO payloads in a more controlled and effective manner compared to low molecular weight NO donors. While a variety of scaffolds (e.g., particles, dendrimers, and polymers/films) have been cleverly designed, the ultimate clinical utility of most NO-releasing macromolecules remains unrealized. Although not wholly predictive of clinical success, in vitro and in vivo investigations have enabled a preliminary evaluation of the therapeutic potential of such materials. Herein, we review the application of macromolecular NO therapies for cardiovascular disease, cancer, bacterial infections, and wound healing. PMID:22362384

  8. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José-Luís

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology) and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources). Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed. PMID:20169170

  9. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  10. Nitric oxide flow tagging in unseeded air.

    PubMed

    Dam, N; Klein-Douwel, R J; Sijtsema, N M; Meulen, J J

    2001-01-01

    A scheme for molecular tagging velocimetry is presented that can be used in air flows without any kind of seeding. The method is based on the local and instantaneous creation of nitric oxide (NO) molecules from N(2) and O(2) in the waist region of a focused ArF excimer laser beam. This NO distribution is advected by the flow and can be visualized any time later by laser-induced fluorescence in the gamma bands. The creation of NO is confirmed by use of an excitation spectrum. Two examples of the application of the new scheme for air-flow velocimetry are given in which single laser pulses are used for creation and visualization of NO. PMID:18033499

  11. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment. PMID:25114633

  13. Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Jaron, Dov

    2013-01-01

    Several apparent paradoxes are evident when one compares mathematical predictions from models of nitric oxide (NO) diffusion and convection in vasculature structures with experimental measurements of NO (or related metabolites) in animal and human studies. Values for NO predicted from mathematical models are generally much lower than in vivo NO values reported in the literature for experiments, specifically with NO microelectrodes positioned at perivascular locations next to different sizes of blood vessels in the microcirculation and NO electrodes inserted into a wide range of tissues supplied by the microcirculation of each specific organ system under investigation. There continues to be uncertainty about the roles of NO scavenging by hemoglobin versus a storage function that may conserve NO, and other signaling targets for NO need to be considered. This review describes model predictions and relevant experimental data with respect to several signaling pathways in the microcirculation that involve NO. PMID:22196161

  14. Nitric oxide, stomatal closure, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven; Barros, Raimundo; Bright, Jo; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John; Harrison, Judith; Morris, Peter; Ribeiro, Dimas; Wilson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Various data indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous signal in plants that mediates responses to several stimuli. Experimental evidence in support of such signalling roles for NO has been obtained via the application of NO, usually in the form of NO donors, via the measurement of endogenous NO, and through the manipulation of endogenous NO content by chemical and genetic means. Stomatal closure, initiated by abscisic acid (ABA), is effected through a complex symphony of intracellular signalling in which NO appears to be one component. Exogenous NO induces stomatal closure, ABA triggers NO generation, removal of NO by scavengers inhibits stomatal closure in response to ABA, and ABA-induced stomatal closure is reduced in mutants that are impaired in NO generation. The data indicate that ABA-induced guard cell NO generation requires both nitric oxide synthase-like activity and, in Arabidopsis, the NIA1 isoform of nitrate reductase (NR). NO stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cGMP production. Both these NO-stimulated events are required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. ABA also stimulates the generation of H2O2 in guard cells, and pharmacological and genetic data demonstrate that NO accumulation in these cells is dependent on such production. Recent data have extended this model to maize mesophyll cells where the induction of antioxidant defences by water stress and ABA required the generation of H2O2 and NO and the activation of a MAPK. Published data suggest that drought and salinity induce NO generation which activates cellular processes that afford some protection against the oxidative stress associated with these conditions. Exogenous NO can also protect cells against oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest an emerging model of stress responses in which ABA has several ameliorative functions. These include the rapid induction of stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss and the activation of antioxidant defences

  15. Effect of nitric oxide compounds on monkey ciliary muscle in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Rasmussen, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of various nitric oxide compounds and their inhibitors on monkey ciliary muscle contraction in vitro were investigated in both the longitudinal and circular vectors. The responses to nitric oxide compounds in carbachol precontracted ciliary muscle consisted of an initial relaxation often followed by recovery to near carbachol precontracted levels while the compound was still present. Sodium nitroprusside produced the greatest relaxation responses (nearly 100% relaxation in both vectors at 10−3 M). The highest concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (10−4 M) and L-arginine (10−3 M) produced relaxation responses of approximately 50% in both vectors. 8-Bromo cyclic GMP produced the smallest relaxation responses (25–35%). Nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced carbachol contraction up to 20% in the longitudinal but not the circular vector. Phosphodiesterase inhibition did not further enhance the relaxation response to L-arginine. Guanylate cyclase inhibition partially attenuated the relaxation response to sodium nitroprusside. Nitric oxide generating compounds were effective in relaxing precontracted monkey ciliary muscle in vitro. Endogenous production of nitric oxide is likely involved in the regulation of the contractile response in monkey ciliary muscle. Nitric oxide generating compounds may have potential value in therapeutic areas where modulation of ciliary muscle tension is desirable. PMID:21147103

  16. Nitric oxide regulates blastocyst hatching in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xuenan; Wang, Xiyan; Sun, Zhanxuan; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Xuanxuan; Li, Zhixin; Dou, Zhaohua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to determine the regulatory role of nitric oxide in mouse blastocyst hatching. Methods: Kunming female mice were superovulated and then mated with mature male mice. On day 2.5 of their pregnancy, the pregnant mice were killed and morulae were flushed from their uterine horns with culture media. Morulae were cultured in media with different concentrations of N-nitro-L arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), 8-Br-3’-5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) or the combination of L-NAME with SNP or 8-Br-cGMP for 48 h. The hatched blastocysts were examined on day 5 and the expressions of epithelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and active cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase 3 (caspase 3) were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Results: L-NAME significantly reduced the expression of eNOS in blastocyst cells. With the increase of the concentrations of L-NAME, SNP or 8-Br-cGMP, blastocyst hatching rate was significantly lowered. In addition, 5 mM L-NAME, 2 μM SNP and 2 μM 8-Br-cGMP completely inhibited blastocyst hatching. Low concentrations of SNP or 8-Br-cGMP in culture media containing 5 mM L-NAME significantly reversed the inhibition of blastocyst hatching and promoted hatching development. Moreover, 5 mM L-NAME and 2 μM 8-Br-cGMP had no significant influence on the expression of active caspase 3 in blastocyst cells. SNP (> 500 nM) significantly increased the expression of active caspase 3 in blastocyst cells. Conclusions: NO/cGMP pathway plays an important role in mouse blastocyst hatching. Excessive or depleted NO can interrupt blastocyst hatching. Excessive NO leads to apoptosis of blastocyst cells. PMID:26221236

  17. AB239. Icariside II enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression by suppressing miR-155 in diabetic-like human cavernous endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ruili; Lei, Hongen; Yang, Bicheng; Wang, Lin; Li, Huixi; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of Icariside II (ICA II) on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression regulated by miR-155, the human cavernous endothelial cells (HCECs) were exposed to a diabetic-like environment and treated with ICA II. Methods HCECs were treated with 200 µg/mL BSA as the Normal Control group (NC), with 200 µg/mL AGE-BSA plus 250 mg/dL glucose as the diabetes mellitus (DM) group, or with an addition of ICA II in DM group as the treatment group (DM+ICA II). Bioinformatics were first used to predict miRNAs targeting eNOS gene and then potential candidates including miR-155, miR-543, miR-31, miR-429, miR-200b were further verified by real-time PCR in a diabetic-like condition. Expressions levels of miRNAs, eNOS and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were performed by Real-time PCR; Protein expression levels of eNOS and RAGE were analyzed by western blot; nitric oxide (NO) content was detected by DAF-FM DA probe and NaNO2 standard curve methods. Results The expression of miR-155 in DM group is significantly higher than that that in the normal control (NC) group, whereas this phenomenon was effectively reversed by ICA II treatment. Furthermore, the miR-155 targeting gene eNOS and its consequent NO product were significantly reduced in DM group, while these changes were also recovered after ICA II treatment. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that ICA II could promotes eNOS mRNA and protein levels by suppressing miR-155 in HCECs exposed to a diabetic-like environment.

  18. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  19. [Nitric oxide and anti-protozoan chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2004-06-01

    Constitutive nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively expressed types of NO-synthase enzymes (NOS-I and -III), being involved in physiological processes such as nervous transmission and vasodilatation. Inducible NO, synthesized by the NO-synthase isoform NOS-II, is an anti-pathogen and tumoricidal agent. However, inducible NO production requires a tight control because of cytotoxic and immune-modulation activity. NO produced by human and canine macrophages has long been demonstrated to be involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania. Mechanisms of parasite survival and persistence in the host have been throughly investigated, and include suppression of NOS-II and the parasite entry into NOS-II negative cells. Both intracellular and extracellular morphotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi are killed by NO in vitro and in vivo, although a role of NO in the pathogenesis of heart disease has been reported. Killing of extracellular protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis and Naegleria fowleri by activated macrophages is also mediated by NO. The main control of Plasmodium spp infection in human and murine hepatocytes, and in human monocytes is achieved by NO-mediated mechanisms. Protection from severe malaria in African children has been found associated with polymorphisms of the NOS-II promoter; however, a pathogenic role of endogenous NO has been documented in cerebral malaria. Although several macromolecules are putative NO targets, recent experimental work has shown that NO-releasing compounds inhibit cysteine proteases (CP) of P. falciparum, T. cruzi and L. infantum in a dose-dependent manner. CPs are present in a wide range of parasitic protozoa and appear to be relevant in several aspects of the life cycle and of the parasite-host relationships. Comparative analysis of 3-D amino acid sequence models of CPs from a broad range of living organisms, from viruses to mammals, suggests that the Sy atom of the Cys catalytic residue undergoes NO-dependent chemical

  20. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed nitric oxide formation from hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinming; Sommers, Erin M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2002-04-01

    Hydroxyurea represents an approved treatment for sickle cell anemia and a number of cancers. Chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies show horseradish peroxidase catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Gas chromatographic headspace analysis and infrared spectroscopy also reveal the production of nitrous oxide in this reaction, which provides evidence for nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These reactions also generate carbon dioxide, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. None of these products form within 1 h in the absence of hydrogen peroxide or horseradish peroxidase. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and trapping studies show the intermediacy of a nitroxide radical and a C-nitroso species during this reaction. Absorption spectroscopy indicates that both compounds I and II of horseradish peroxidase act as one-electron oxidants of hydroxyurea. Nitroxyl, generated from Angeli's salt, reacts with ferric horseradish peroxidase to produce a ferrous horseradish peroxidase-nitric oxide complex. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments with a nitric oxide specific trap reveal that horseradish peroxidase is capable of oxidizing nitroxyl to nitric oxide. A mechanistic model that includes the observed nitroxide radical and C-nitroso compound intermediates has been forwarded to explain the observed product distribution. These studies suggest that direct nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea and peroxidases may contribute to the overall pharmacological properties of this drug. PMID:11916434

  1. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  2. Nitric oxide-oxygen radicals interactions in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rubbo, H; Batthyany, C; Radi, R

    2000-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common diseases and the principal cause of death in western civilization. The pathogenesis of this disease can be explained on the basis of the 'oxidative-modification hypothesis,' which proposes that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation represents a key early event. Nitric oxide (*NO) regulates critical lipid membrane and lipoprotein oxidation events by a) contributing to the formation of more potent secondary oxidants from superoxide (i.e.: peroxynitrite), and b) its antioxidant properties through termination reactions with lipid radicals to possibly less reactive secondary nitrogen-containing products (LONO, LOONO). Relative rates of production and steady state concentrations of superoxide and *NO and cellular sites of production will profoundly influence the expression of differential oxidant injury-enhancing and protective effects of *NO. Full understanding of the physiological roles of *NO, coupled with detailed insight into *NO regulation of oxygen radical-dependent reactions, will yield a more rational basis for intervention strategies directed toward oxidant-dependent atherogenic processes. PMID:15693284

  3. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representativeNitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway. PMID:26946536

  4. Cloning and enhanced expression of the cytochrome P450nor gene (nicA; CYP55A5) encoding nitric oxide reductase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Masahiko; Matsumura, Kengo; Higashida, Katsuya; Hata, Yoji; Kawato, Akitsugu; Abe, Yasuhisa; Akita, Osamu; Takaya, Naoki; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2004-10-01

    We cloned and characterized the gene and cDNA of Aspergillus oryzae cytochrome P450nor (Anor). The Anor gene (nicA; CYP55A5) has a different gene structure from other P450nor genes in that it has an extra intron. There were not only two kinds of mRNA but also two sets of TATA-box and CCAAT-box, and it appears that this gene has two expression patterns, like CYP55A1 of Fusarium oxysporum. A reporter analysis using the uidA gene indicated that gene expression of CYP55A5 was induced under anaerobic conditions, like CYP55A1. When the CYP55A5 gene was overexpressed in A. oryzae, a large amount of active Anor were accumulated as intracellular protein. Anor employed both NADH and NADPH as electron donors for reducing nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Anor measured the amount of NO generated from 3-(2-Hydroxy-1-(1-methylethyl)-2-nitrosohydrazino)-1-propanamine (NOC5) with a spectrophotometer. The sensitivity was 10 nmol/ml. PMID:15502348

  5. Indications for the occurrence of nitric oxide synthases in fungi and plants and the involvement in photoconidiation of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ninnemann, H; Maier, J

    1996-08-01

    Indications for the occurrence of nitric oxide synthases in Dictyostelium, Neurospora, Phycomyces and the leguminous plant Mucuna hassjoo as well as a physiological role of nitric oxide in Neurospora crassa are demonstrated. An exogenous nitic oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, inhibited light-stimulated conidiation in N. crassa. Specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, like the arginine derivatives NG -nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), enhanced conidiation in darkness nad in the light, whereas the stereoisomer D-NAME was inactive. This communication reports to our knowledge the first time the presence of enzymatic activity of nitric oxide synthase in fungi and a higher plant and an effect of nitric oxide in fungal photo-physiology. PMID:8760579

  6. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Dendrimers as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Chudasama, Shalini L.; Lu, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of a series of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers was evaluated against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A direct comparison of the bactericidal efficacy between NO-releasing and control PPI dendrimers (i.e., non-NO-releasing) revealed both enhanced biocidal action of NO-releasing dendrimers and reduced toxicity against mammalian fibroblast cells. Antibacterial activity for the NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers was shown to be a function of both dendrimer size (molecular weight) and exterior functionality. In addition to minimal toxicity against fibroblasts, NO-releasing PPI dendrimers modified with styrene oxide exhibited the greatest biocidal activity (≥9.999% killing) against all bacterial strains tested. The N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers presented in this study hold promise as effective NO-based therapeutics for combating bacterial infections. PMID:23013537

  7. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  8. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  13. Calculated Effects of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karen E.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. The study was conducted for standard facility conditions corresponding to Mach 6, 7, and 8 flight simulations. The analytically determined levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility are compared with experimentally measured levels. Results of the analysis indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, which corroborates the measured levels. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate how nitric oxide affects scramjet performance in terms of combustor pressure rise, heat release, and thrust performance. Results indicate minimal effects on engine performance for the test conditions of this investigation.

  14. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  15. Treatment of severe status asthmaticus with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rishani, R; El-Khatib, M; Mroueh, S

    1999-12-01

    The paper reports on a 13-year-old girl with chronic asthma who presented in acute respiratory failure following an exacerbation of her disease. Nitric oxide was added to the ventilator circuit at 7 ppm and then 15 ppm after the patient failed to respond to bronchodilators and steroids. This was followed by rapid improvement in respiratory mechanics and blood gases with no adverse effects. Nitric oxide appears to have a direct relaxing effect on the bronchial smooth muscle. PMID:10587422

  16. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  17. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  18. [Inhaled nitric oxide: one modality in the treatment of ARDS].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, R; Ramírez-Hernández, J M; Gargallo-Hernández, J J; Hernández-Vásquez, R; Domínguez-Rodríguez, M I; Alemán-Alarcón, C E; Gallegos-Rodríguez, G

    1999-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), refractory to treatment with conventional mechanical ventilation. The hemodynamic parameters showed severe pulmonary hypertension with increased intrapulmonary shunt. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered and we observed a diminishing in pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunt with an important increase of oxygen exchange. We reviewed the literature and make a suggestion concerning use of inhaled nitric oxide in patients with ARDS. PMID:10491897

  19. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  20. Tapentadol and nitric oxide synthase systems.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Gąsińska, Emilia; Nagraba, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    Tapentadol, a new analgesic drug with a dual mechanism of action (μ-opioid receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition), is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. In this paper, the possible additional involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in the antinociceptive activity of tapentadol was investigated using an unspecific inhibitor of NOS, L-NOArg, a relatively specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, 7-NI, a relatively selective inhibitor of inducible NOS, L-NIL, and a potent inhibitor of endothelial NOS, L-NIO. Tapentadol (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) increased the threshold for mechanical (Randall-Selitto test) and thermal (tail-flick test) nociceptive stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. All four NOS inhibitors, administered intraperitoneally in the dose range 0.1-10 mg/kg, potentiated the analgesic action of tapentadol at a low dose of 2 mg/kg in both models of pain. We conclude that NOS systems participate in tapentadol analgesia. PMID:25485639

  1. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  2. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  3. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  4. Modulation of nitric oxide bioavailability by erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Tse; Han, Tae H.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Vaughn, Mark W.; van Herle, Helga; Hein, Travis W.; Zhang, Cuihua; Kuo, Lih; Liao, James C.

    2001-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylyl cyclase in smooth muscle cells to induce vasodilation in the vasculature. However, as hemoglobin (Hb) is an effective scavenger of NO and is present in high concentrations inside the red blood cell (RBC), the bioavailability of NO would be too low to elicit soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in the presence of blood. Therefore, NO bioactivity must be preserved. Here we present evidence suggesting that the RBC participates in the preservation of NO bioactivity by reducing NO influx. The NO uptake by RBCs was increased and decreased by altering the degree of band 3 binding to the cytoskeleton. Methemoglobin and denatured hemoglobin binding to the RBC membrane or cytoskeleton also were shown to contribute to reducing the NO uptake rate of the RBC. These alterations in NO uptake by the RBC, hence the NO bioavailability, were determined to correlate with the vasodilation of isolated blood vessels. Our observations suggest that RBC membrane and cytoskeleton associated NO-inert proteins provide a barrier for NO diffusion and thus account for the reduction in the NO uptake rate of RBCs.

  5. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate. PMID:25976309

  6. Nitric oxide and cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), is a ubiquitous, water soluble, free radical gas, which plays key role in various physiological as well as pathological processes. Over past decades, NO has emerged as a molecule of interest in carcinogenesis and tumor growth progression. However, there is considerable controversy and confusion in understanding its role in cancer biology. It is said to have both tumoricidal as well as tumor promoting effects which depend on its timing, location, and concentration. NO has been suggested to modulate different cancer-related events including angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell cycle, invasion, and metastasis. On the other hand, it is also emerging as a potential anti-oncogenic agent. Strategies for manipulating in vivo production and exogenous delivery of this molecule for therapeutic gain are being investigated. However, further validation and experimental/clinical trials are required for development of novel strategies based on NO for cancer treatment and prevention. This review discusses the range of actions of NO in cancer by performing an online MEDLINE search using relevant search terms and a review of the literature. Various mechanisms by which NO acts in different cancers such as breast, cervical, gastric,colorectal, and head and neck cancers are addressed. It also offers an insight into the dichotomous nature of NO and discusses its novel therapeutic applications for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23718886

  7. [Inhalation of nitric oxide - dependence: case report

    PubMed

    Carvalho, W B; Matsumoto, T; Horita, S M; Almeida, N M; Martins, F R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Describe the hemodynamic response with rebound of pulmonary hypertension after withdrawal of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in a pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: Case report of a child with ARDS and pulmonary hypertension evaluated through ecocardiografic with dopller, receiving inhaled NO for a period of 21 days. RESULTS: There was a decrease of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) from 52 mmHg to 44 mmHg after the initial titulation of NO inhalation dose. After the withdrawal of inhaled NO an elevation of PAP was observed (55 mmHg). It was necessary to reinstall the inhaled NO to obtain a more appropriate value (34 mmHg). A new attempt of interruption of the inhaled NO after prolonged inhalation (20 days) resulted in a new clinic worsening and increase of PAP, with the indication to reinstall the inhaled NO. In the 24th day of permanence in the intensive care unit the patient died due to multiple organ dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility of pulmonary hypertension rebound after withdrawal of inhaled NO is a complication that may have important clinical implications for patients who need a prolonged treatment with NO. This case report emphasizes these implications. PMID:14647690

  8. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  9. Nitric oxide synthase in ferret brain: localization and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T.; Mitchell, J. A.; Schmidt, H. H.; Kohlhaas, K. L.; Warner, T. D.; Förstermann, U.; Murad, F.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we have investigated the distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the ferret brain. Nitric oxide synthase was determined biochemically and immunochemically. 2. In the rat brain, the highest nitric oxide synthase activity has been detected in the cerebellum. However, in the ferret brain, the highest activity was found in the striatum and the lowest in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The enzymatic activity was localized predominantly in the cytosolic fractions, it was dependent on NADPH and Ca2+, and inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine or NG-methyl-L-arginine. 3. Western blot analysis revealed that all regions of the ferret brain contained a 160 kD protein crossreacting with an antibody to nitric oxide synthase purified from the rat cerebellum, and the levels of relative intensity of staining by the antibody correlated with the distribution of nitric oxide synthase activity. 4. These results indicate that the ferret brain contains a nitric oxide synthase similar to the rat brain, but the distribution of enzymatic activity in the ferret brain differs markedly from the rat brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1282076

  10. Enhanced nitric oxide production during lead (Pb²⁺) exposure recovers protein expression but not presynaptic localization of synaptic proteins in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neal, April P; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2012-02-23

    We have previously reported that lead (Pb(2+)) exposure results in both presynaptic and postsynaptic changes in developing neurons as a result of inhibition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). NMDAR inhibition by Pb(2+) during synaptogenesis disrupts downstream trans-synaptic signaling of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and exogenous addition of BDNF can recover the effects of Pb(2+) on both presynaptic protein expression and presynaptic vesicular release. NMDAR activity can modulate other trans-synaptic signaling pathways, such as nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Thus, it is possible that other trans-synaptic pathways in addition to BDNF signaling may be disrupted by Pb(2+) exposure. The current study investigated whether exogenous addition of NO could recover the presynaptic vesicular proteins lost as a result of Pb(2+) exposure during synaptogenesis, namely Synaptophysin (Syn) and Synaptobrevin (Syb). We observed that exogenous addition of NO during Pb(2+) exposure results in complete recovery of whole-cell Syn levels and partial recovery of Syn and Syb synaptic targeting in Pb(2+)-exposed neurons. PMID:22265330

  11. Observations of Lower Thermospheric Nitric Oxide from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    The production of nitric oxide is a key response of the upper atmosphere to solar energy deposition. NO plays a strong role in the thermospheric energy balance as it emits efficiently in the infrared, it is the terminal ion in the lower ionosphere, and if transported to lower altitudes will catalytically destroy ozone. NO is primarily produced through the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen with molecular oxygen. One of the primary loss mechanisms of NO is photodissociation by solar ultraviolet irradiance. In order to produce the excited atomic nitrogen atom, the strong N2 molecular bond must be broken. At low latitudes, solar soft X-ray irradiance is the energy source that leads to NO. At high latitudes, auroral electrons and the energetic secondary electrons provide the source of energy that leads to the large amounts of NO observed there. Coupling between latitude regions may occur as high latitude NO is transported by winds to lower latitude. In this talk we describe observations of NO from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE). SNOE observed fluorescently scattered sunlight by NO at 215 and 237 nm to obtain global concentrations of NO in the lower thermosphere daily from February 1998 through December 2003. We will present case studies of the observed response to large auroral storms. In particular, the effects of the large storms of April 2002 and November 2003 will be presented. The SNOE observations show that auroral energy deposition produces a significant global effect on the upper atmosphere.

  12. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  13. Role of nitric oxide in parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide is produced by a number of different cell types in response to cytokine stimulation and thus has been found to play a role in immunologically mediated protection against a growing list of protozoan and helminth parasites in vitro and in animal models. The biochemical basis of its effects on the parasite targets appears to involve primarily inactivation of enzymes crucial to energy metabolism and growth, although it has other biologic activities as well. NO is produced not only by macrophages and macrophage-like cells commonly associated with the effector arm of cell-mediated immune reactivity but also by cells commonly considered to lie outside the immunologic network, such as hepatocytes and endothelial cells, which are intimately involved in the life cycle of a number of parasites. NO production is stimulated by gamma interferon in combination with tumor necrosis factor alpha or other secondary activation signals and is regulated by a number of cytokines (especially interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and transforming growth factor beta) and other mediators, as well as through its own inherent inhibitory activity. The potential for design of prevention and/or intervention approaches against parasitic infection (e.g., vaccination or combination chemo- and immunotherapy strategies) on the basis of induction of cell-mediated immunity and NO production appears to be great, but the possible pathogenic consequences of overproduction of NO must be taken into account. Moreover, more research on the role and regulation of NO in human parasitic infection is needed before its possible clinical relevance can be determined. PMID:8531884

  14. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  15. Studies in nitric oxide mutagenesis in e. coli and s. typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Elespuru, R.K.; Mark, T.W.

    1995-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a toxic and bio-regulatory molecule produced endogenously in response to varying stimuli. It has been shown to deaminate DNA and to cause mutations shown to deaminate DNA and to cause mutations in Salmonella typhimurium as well as in mammalian systems. In exploring the mechanism of mutation generation by nitric oxide, several problems have become apparent. One arises from the evidence that different sources of nitric oxide, i.e. gaseous NO or No generated from drugs, behave differently both chemically and biologically. Hence, experiments with the two sources of NO are not comparable. In addition, an oxidation product of nitric oxide, No{sub 2}, is a DNA-strand breaking agent and may contribute to the genetic effects observed, especially from bubbled NO. While Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 is readily mutable by NO-delivering drugs, E. coli B strain WU3610 (wild type for DNA repair) has proved to be non-mutable. The experiments of Hartman and colleagues with sodium nitrite indicate a greatly enhanced sensitivity to mutation induction in UV repair-deficient strains and in certain target DNA sequences. We have sought to determine if the sodium nitrite model also fits nitric oxide. Contrary to expectations, however, the uvrA derivative of WU3610 is not mutable by SperNO, the most potent NO-delivering drug for Salmonella TA1535.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven J; Desikan, Radhika; Clarke, Andrew; Hurst, Roger D; Hancock, John T

    2002-05-01

    It is now clear that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) function as signalling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses results in H(2)O(2) generation, from a variety of sources. H(2)O(2) is removed from cells via a number of antioxidant mechanisms, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Both biotic and abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but the biosynthetic origins of NO in plants have not yet been resolved. Cellular responses to H(2)O(2) and NO are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several stimuli. In this review the potential roles of H(2)O(2) and NO during various stresses and the signalling pathways they activate are discussed. Key signalling components that might provide targets for enhancing crop production are also identified. PMID:11997372

  17. Natural Product Nitric Oxide Chemistry: New Activity of Old Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Torregrossa, Ashley C.; Parthasarathy, Deepa K.; Bryan, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a therapy and preventative care measure for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) may prove to be beneficial when used in conjunction with or in place of conventional medicine. However, the lack of understanding of a mechanism of action of many CAMs limits their use and acceptance in western medicine. We have recently recognized and characterized specific nitric oxide (NO) activity of select alternative and herbal medicines that may account for many of their reported health benefits. The ability of certain CAM to restore NO homeostasis both through enhancing endothelial production of NO and by providing a system for reducing nitrate and nitrite to NO as a compensatory pathway for repleting NO bioavailability may prove to be a safe and cost-effective strategy for combating CVD. We will review the current state of science behind NO activity of herbal medicines and their effects on CVD. PMID:22548122

  18. TCF7L2 polymorphism is associated with low nitric oxide release, endothelial dysfunction and enhanced inflammatory response after myocardial infarction☆

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Riobaldo; Moura, Filipe A.; Carvalho, Luiz S.F.; Daher, Mauricio; Santos, Simone N.; Costa, Ana P.R.; Figueiredo, Valeria N.; Andrade, Joalbo M.; Neves, Francisco A.R.; Silva, Jose C. Quinaglia e; Sposito, Andrei C.

    2016-01-01

    Backgound The favorable effects of insulin during myocardial infarction (MI) remain unclear due to the divergence between mechanistic studies and clinical trials of exogenous insulin administration. The rs7903146 polymorphism of the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene is associated with attenuated insulin secretion. Methods In non-diabetic patients with ST-elevation MI (STEMI), using such a model of genetically determined down-regulation of endogenous insulin secretion we investigated the change in plasma insulin, C-peptide, interleukin-2 (IL-2), C-reactive protein (CRP), and nitric oxide (NOx) levels between admission (D1) and the fifth day after MI (D5). Coronary angiography and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were performed at admission and 30 days after MI, respectively. Homeostasis Model Assessment estimated insulin secretion (HOMA2%β) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA2%S). Results Although glycemia did not differ between genotypes, carriers of the T-allele had lower HOMA2%β and higher HOMA2%S at both D1 and D5. As compared with non-carriers, T-allele carriers had higher plasma IL-2 and CRP at D5, higher intracoronary thrombus grade, lower FMD and NOx change between D1 and D5 and higher 30-day mortality. Conclusion In non-diabetic STEMI patients, the rs7903146 TCF7L2 gene polymorphism is associated with lower insulin secretion, worse endothelial function, higher coronary thrombotic burden, and higher short-term mortality. General significance During the acute phase of MI, a lower capacity of insulin secretion may influence clinical outcome. PMID:27213136

  19. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  20. Racial Differences in Nitric Oxide-Dependent Vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Along with the growing heterogeneity of the American population, ethnic/racial disparity is becoming a clear health issue in the United States. The awareness of ethnic/racial disparities has been growing because of considerable data gathered from recent clinical and epidemiological studies. These studies have highlighted the importance of addressing these differences in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases potentially according to race. It is becoming particularly clear that there is a 2- to 3-fold racial difference in certain cardiovascular diseases (eg, preeclampsia) associated with dysfunctional nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation. In this review, the authors summarize the current literature on racial disparities in nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation in relation to cardiovascular health with an emphasis on vascular nitric oxide bioavailability as a balance between production via endothelial nitric oxide synthase and degradation through reactive oxygen species. The major hypotheses postulated on the biological basis of these differences are also highlighted. PMID:18212350

  1. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  2. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nianzhen Li

    2002-06-27

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca{sup 2+} elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca{sup 2+} elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca{sup 2+} wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca{sup 2+}, possibly through store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. The NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca{sup 2+} change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca{sup 2+} using fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca{sup 2+} elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca{sup 2+} wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by recording the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-dependent neuronal slow inward current (SIC

  3. Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Marian; Stelmach, Halina; Rusak, Tomasz; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can affect platelet responses through the inhibition of energy production. It was found that NO donors: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine, SNAP, (5-50 microM) and sodium nitroprusside, SNP, (5-100 microM) inhibited collagen- and ADP-induced aggregation of porcine platelets. The corresponding IC50 values for SNAP and SNP varied from 5 to 30 microM and from 9 to 75 microM, respectively. Collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet secretion was inhibited by SNAP (IC50 = 50 microM) and by SNP (IC50 = 100 microM). SNAP (20-100 microM), SNP (10-200 microM) and collagen (20 microg/ml) stimulated glycolysis in intact platelets. The degree of glycolysis stimulation exerted by NO donors was similar to that produced by respiratory chain inhibitors (cyanide and antimycin A) or uncouplers (2,4-dinitrophenol). Neither the NO donors nor the respiratory chain blockers affected glycolysis in platelet homogenate. SNAP (20-100 microM) and SNP (50-200 microM) inhibited oxygen consumption by platelets. The effect of SNP and SNAP on glycolysis and respiration was not reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a selective inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. SNAP (5-100 microM) and SNP (10-300 microM) inhibited the activity of platelet cytochrome oxidase and had no effect on NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and succinate dehydrogenase. Blocking of the mitochondrial energy production by antimycin A slightly affected collagen-evoked aggregation and strongly inhibited platelet secretion. The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:15448739

  4. Role of nitric oxide on motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Del Bel, E A; Guimarães, F S; Bermúdez-Echeverry, M; Gomes, M Z; Schiaveto-de-souza, A; Padovan-Neto, F E; Tumas, V; Barion-Cavalcanti, A P; Lazzarini, M; Nucci-da-Silva, L P; de Paula-Souza, D

    2005-03-01

    The present review paper describes results indicating the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on motor control. Our last studies showed that systemic injections of low doses of inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for NO formation, induce anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus maze whereas higher doses decrease maze exploration. Also, NOS inhibitors decrease locomotion and rearing in an open field arena. These results may involve motor effects of this compounds, since inhibitors of NOS, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and 7-Nitroindazole (7-NIO), induced catalepsy in mice. This effect was also found in rats after systemic, intracebroventricular or intrastriatal administration. Acute administration of L-NOARG has an additive cataleptic effect with haloperidol, a dopamine D2 antagonist. The catalepsy is also potentiated by WAY 100135 (5-HT1a receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5HT2a and alfal adrenergic receptor antagonist), and ritanserin (5-HT2a and 5HT2c receptor antagonist). Atropine sulfate and biperiden, antimuscarinic drugs, block L-NOARG-induced catalepsy in mice. L-NOARG subchronic administration in mice induces rapid tolerance (3 days) to its cataleptic effects. It also produces cross-tolerance to haloperidol-induced catalepsy. After subchronic L-NOARG treatment there is an increase in the density NADPH-d positive neurons in the dorsal part of nucleus caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and tegmental pedunculupontinus nucleus. In contrast, this treatment decreases NADPH-d neuronal number in the substantia nigra compacta. Considering these results we suggest that (i) NO may modulate motor behavior, probably by interfering with dopaminergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic neurotransmission in the striatum; (ii) Subchronic NO synthesis inhibition induces plastic changes in NO-producing neurons in brain areas related to motor control and causes cross-tolerance to the

  5. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  6. Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and identification of novel nitric oxide signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dawson, T M; Sasaki, M; Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Dawson, V L

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) participate in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes in the nervous system. nNOS was originally felt to be a constitutively expressed enzyme, but recent observations suggest that its levels are dynamically controlled in response to neuronal development, plasticity and injury. nNOS expression is regulated through alternative promoter usage through alternative mRNA splicing and it is likely that this plays an important role in the inducibility of gene expression in response to extracellular stimuli. Emerging data also suggests that NO may be the key mediator linking activity to gene expression and long-lasting neuronal responses through NO activating p21Ras through redox-sensitive modulation. PMID:9932430

  7. Cardiovascular roles of nitric oxide: A review of insights from nitric oxide synthase gene disrupted mice†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Victor W.T.; Huang, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous molecule that plays many key roles in the cardiovascular system. Each of the enzymes that generate NO—neuronal, inducible and endothelial NO synthase—has been genetically disrupted in mice. This review discusses the cardiovascular phenotypes of each of the NO synthase (NOS) gene knockout mice, and the insights gained into the roles of NO in the cardiovascular system. Mice lacking the endothelial isoform are hypertensive, have endothelial dysfunction and show a more severe outcome in response to vascular injury, to stroke and cerebral ischaemia, and to diet-induced atherosclerosis. Mice lacking the neuronal isoform show a less severe outcome in response to stroke and cerebral ischaemia but have increased diet-induced atherosclerosis. Mice lacking the inducible isoform show reduced hypotension to septic shock. Together, NOS gene knockout mice have been useful tools that complement our other approaches to studying the multiple roles of NO in the cardiovascular system. PMID:17658499

  8. Depolarization of mitochondria in neurons promotes activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Dutta, Somhrita; Sure, Venkata N; Grovenburg, Samuel M; Gordon, Angellica O; Peterson, Nicholas R; Rutkai, Ibolya; Busija, David W

    2016-05-01

    The diverse signaling events following mitochondrial depolarization in neurons are not clear. We examined for the first time the effects of mitochondrial depolarization on mitochondrial function, intracellular calcium, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activation, and nitric oxide (NO) production in cultured neurons and perivascular nerves. Cultured rat primary cortical neurons were studied on 7-10 days in vitro, and endothelium-denuded cerebral arteries of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied ex vivo. Diazoxide and BMS-191095 (BMS), activators of mitochondrial KATP channels, depolarized mitochondria in cultured neurons and increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate was unaffected by mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, diazoxide and BMS not only increased the nNOS phosphorylation at positive regulatory serine 1417 but also decreased nNOS phosphorylation at negative regulatory serine 847. Furthermore, diazoxide and BMS increased NO production in cultured neurons measured with both fluorescence microscopy and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which was sensitive to inhibition by the selective nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). Diazoxide also protected cultured neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, which was blocked by NOS inhibition and rescued by NO donors. Finally, BMS induced vasodilation of endothelium denuded, freshly isolated cerebral arteries that was diminished by 7-NI and tetrodotoxin. Thus pharmacological depolarization of mitochondria promotes activation of nNOS leading to generation of NO in cultured neurons and endothelium-denuded arteries. Mitochondrial-induced NO production leads to increased cellular resistance to lethal stress by cultured neurons and to vasodilation of denuded cerebral arteries. PMID:26945078

  9. Nitric oxide production and the expression of two nitric oxide synthases in the avian retina.

    PubMed

    Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Gleason, Evanna

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to exert multiple effects on the function of many retinal neurons and their synapses. Therefore, it is equally important to understand the potential sources of NO within the retina. To explore this, we employ a combination of 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM) based NO detection and immunohistochemistry for the NO synthetic enzymes, neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and eNOS). We find DAF signals in photoreceptors, horizontal cells, amacrine cells, efferent synapses, Müller cells, and cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). nNOS immunoreactivity was consistent with the DAF signal with the exception that horizontal cells and Müller cells were not clearly labeled. eNOS-like immunoreactivity (eNOS-LI) was more widespread with photoreceptors, horizontal cells, occasional bipolar cells, amacrine cells, Müller cells, and cells in the GCL all showing labeling. Double labeling with antibodies raised against calretinin, syntaxin, and glutamine synthetase confirmed that horizontal cells, amacrine cells, and Müller cells (respectively) were expressing eNOS-LI. Although little or no nNOS labeling is observed in horizontal cells or Müller cells, the expression of eNOS-LI is consistent with the ability of these cells to produce NO. Together these results suggest that the capability to produce NO is widespread in the chicken retina. We propose that multiple forms of regulation for nNOS and eNOS play a role in the patterning of NO production in the chicken retina. PMID:23721886

  10. Targeting of nitric oxide synthase to endothelial cell caveolae via palmitoylation: implications for nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cardeña, G; Oh, P; Liu, J; Schnitzer, J E; Sessa, W C

    1996-01-01

    The membrane association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular endothelium. Previously, we have shown that in cultured endothelial cells and in intact blood vessels, eNOS is found primarily in the perinuclear region of the cells and in discrete regions of the plasma membrane, suggesting trafficking of the protein from the Golgi to specialized plasma membrane structures. Here, we show that eNOS is found in Triton X-100-insoluble membranes prepared from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and colocalizes with caveolin, a coat protein of caveolae, in cultured bovine lung microvascular endothelial cells as determined by confocal microscopy. To examine if eNOS is indeed in caveolae, we purified luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes and their caveolae directly from intact, perfused rat lungs. eNOS is found in the luminal plasma membranes and is markedly enriched in the purified caveolae. Because palmitoylation of eNOS does not significantly influence its membrane association, we next examined whether this modification can affect eNOS targeting to caveolae. Wild-type eNOS, but not the palmitoylation mutant form of the enzyme, colocalizes with caveolin on the cell surface in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, demonstrating that palmitoylation of eNOS is necessary for its targeting into caveolae. These data suggest that the subcellular targeting of eNOS to caveolae can restrict NO signaling to specific targets within a limited microenvironment at the cell surface and may influence signal transduction through caveolae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692835

  11. Nitric Oxide Regulation of Mitochondrial Processes: Commonality in Medical Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    The vital status of diverse classes of eukaryotic mitochondria is reflected by the high degree of evolutionary modification functionally linked to ongoing multifaceted organelle development. From this teleological perspective, a logistical enhancement of eukaryotic cellular energy requirements indicates a convergence of metabolic processes within the mitochondrial matrix for optimal synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate and necessitates an evolutionarily driven retrofit of the primordial endosymbiont bacterial plasma membrane into the inner mitochondrial membrane. The biochemical complexity of eukaryotic inner membrane electron transport complexes linked to temporally-defined, state-dependent, fluctuations in mitochondrial oxygen utilization is capable of generating deleterious reactive oxygen species. Within this functional context, an extensive neurochemical literature supports the role of the free radical gas nitric oxide (NO) as a key signaling molecule involved in the regulation of multiple aspects of mitochondrial respiration/oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, the unique chemical properties of NO underlie its rapid metabolism in vivo within a mechanistic spectrum of small oxidative molecules, free and protein-bound thiol adducts, and reversible binding to ferrous heme iron centers. Recent compelling work has identified a medically relevant dual regulation pathway for mitochondrial NO expression mediated by traditionally characterized NO synthases (NOS) and by enzymatic reduction of available cellular nitrite pools by a diverse class of cytosolic and mitochondrial nitrite reductases. Accordingly, our short review presents selected medically-based discussion topics relating to multi-faceted NO regulation of mitochondrial functions in human health and disease states. PMID:26177568

  12. Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide by plant-derived products.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Dirsch, Verena M

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is recognised as a central anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic principle in the vasculature. Decreased availability of NO in the vasculature promotes the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, may improve vascular function by enhancing NO bioavailability. In this article we first outline common pathways modulating endothelial NO production or bioavailability to provide a basis for subsequent mechanistic discussions. Then we comprehensively review natural products and plant extracts known to positively influence eNOS activity and/or endothelial function in vitro or in vivo. We will discuss red wine, highlighting polyphenols, oligomeric procyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol as modulators of endothelial NO production. Other dietary products and their active components known to activate eNOS include cocoa (OPC and its monomer (-)-epicatechin), pomegranates (polyphenols), black and green tea (flavanoids, especially epigallocatechin gallate), olive oil (oleic acid and polyphenols), soy (genistein), and quercetin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in plants. In addition, phytomedical preparations made from ginkgo, hawthorn and ginseng, as well as formulations used in traditional Chinese Medicine, have been shown to affect endothelial NO production. Recurring phytochemical patterns among active fractions and purified compounds are discussed. In summary, there is increasing evidence that several single natural products and plant extracts influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19497380

  13. Parameters controlling nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Mikus, T.

    1973-01-01

    Nitric oxide forms in the primary zone of gas turbine combustors where the burnt gas composition is close to stoichiometric and gas temperatures are highest. It was found that combustor air inlet conditions, mean primary zone fuel-air ratio, residence time, and the uniformity of the primary zone are the most important variables affecting nitric oxide emissions. Relatively simple models of the flow in a gas turbine combustor, coupled with a rate equation for nitric oxide formation via the Zeldovich mechanism are shown to correlate the variation in measured NOx emissions. Data from a number of different combustor concepts are analyzed and shown to be in reasonable agreement with predictions. The NOx formation model is used to assess the extent to which an advanced combustor concept, the NASA swirl can, has produced a lean well-mixed primary zone generally believed to be the best low NOx emissions burner type.

  14. [Level of nitric oxide in the kidneys during apoptosis activation].

    PubMed

    Komarievtseva, I O; Orlova, O A; Blahodarenko, Ie A

    2002-01-01

    The content of nitric oxide stable metabolites in a tissue of kidneys of rats in conditions of activation of apoptosis was investigated. Research was carried out in two models: acute renal failure and a hypertrophy of a unique kidney after a unilateral nephrectomy. Detection of apoptosis was carried out by definition of DNA fragmentation. Substantial increase of the nitric oxide stable metabolites contents is revealed at activation of apoptosis in both models. Change of a ratio of the contents of nitrite--anions in relation to the general contents of NO2- + NO3- is revealed, indicating the role of peroxide processes in effect of nitric oxide and its metabolites on the cell. PMID:14964872

  15. [Study on the altered nitric oxide metabolism in experimental diabetes].

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamási; Soltész, Zsuzsa; Magyar, Kálmán; Szöko, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Decreased biological action of nitric oxide (NO) and increased oxidative stress are established to be involved in the development of endothelium dysfunction, early sign of diabetic angiopathy. In the present study, increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzyme activity in the aorta and decreased activity in the kidney tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats has been found in the early phase of the disease. Augmentation of oxidative transformation of NO in the kidney and heart of the diabetic animals has been demonstrated by the measurement of the stable end-products of NO and other reactive nitrogen species. Insulin treatment was found effective to reduce the intensified oxidative metabolism of NO without increasing its production. Reduced biological effects of NO observed in endothelial dysfunction, is thus probably the consequence of its increased oxidative inactivation. PMID:17094672

  16. Nitric oxide synthase in macula densa regulates glomerular capillary pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C S; Welch, W J; Murad, F; Gross, S S; Taylor, G; Levi, R; Schmidt, H H

    1992-01-01

    Tubular-fluid reabsorption by specialized cells of the nephron at the junction of the ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule, termed the macula densa, releases compounds causing vasoconstriction of the adjacent afferent arteriole. Activation of this tubuloglomerular feedback response reduces glomerular capillary pressure of the nephron and, hence, the glomerular filtration rate. The tubuloglomerular feedback response functions in a negative-feedback mode to relate glomerular capillary pressure to tubular-fluid delivery and reabsorption. This system has been implicated in renal autoregulation, renin release, and longterm body fluid and blood-pressure homeostasis. Here we report that arginine-derived nitric oxide, generated in the macula densa, is an additional intercellular signaling molecule that is released during tubular-fluid reabsorption and counters the vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole. Antibody to rat cerebellar constitutive nitric oxide synthase stained rat macula densa cells specifically. Microperfusion of the macula densa segment of single nephrons with N omega-methyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) or with pyocyanin (a lipid-soluble inhibitor of endothelium-derived relaxation factor) showed that generation of nitric oxide can vasodilate the afferent arteriole and increase glomerular capillary pressure; this effect was blocked by drugs that prevent tubular-fluid reabsorption. We conclude that nitric oxide synthase in macula densa cells is activated by tubular-fluid reabsorption and mediates a vasodilating component to the tubuloglomerular feedback response. These findings imply a role for arginine-derived nitric oxide in body fluid-volume and blood-pressure homeostasis, in addition to its established roles in modulation of vascular tone by the endothelium and in neurotransmission. Images PMID:1281548

  17. Thyroid disorders and nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Ogonowski, Natalia; Piro, Giselle; Pessah, Déborah; Arreche, Noelia; Puchulu, Bernardita; Balaszczuk, Ana M; Fellet, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether nitric oxide participates in the cardiovascular function and haemodynamic adaptation to acute haemorrhage in animals with thyroid disorders. Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2months old treated with T3 (hyper, 20μg/100g body weight) or 0.02% methimazole (hypo, w/v) during 28days were pre-treated with N(G) nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and submitted to 20% blood loss. Heart function was evaluated by echocardiography. Measurements of arterial blood pressure, heart rate, nitric oxide synthase activity and protein levels were performed. We found that hypo decreased fractional shortening and ejection fraction and increased left ventricle internal diameter. Hyper decreased ventricle diameter and no changes in cardiac contractility. Haemorrhage elicited a hypotension of similar magnitude within 10min. Then, this parameter was stabilized at about 30-40min and maintained until finalized, 120min. L-NAME rats showed that the immediate hypotension would be independent of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition blunted the changes of heart rate induced by blood loss. Hyper and hypo had lower atrial enzyme activity associated with a decreased enzyme isoform in hypo. In ventricle, hyper and hypo had a higher enzyme activity, which was not correlated with changes in protein levels. Haemorrhage induced an increased heart nitric oxide production. We concluded that thyroid disorders were associated with hypertrophic remodelling which impacted differently on cardiac function and its adaptation to a hypovolemia. Hypovolemia triggered a nitric oxide synthase activation modulating the heart function to maintain haemodynamic homeostasis. This involvement depends on a specific enzyme isoform, cardiac chamber and thyroid state. PMID:27270898

  18. Novel antileukemic agents derived from tamibarotene and nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haiyong; Feng, Jinhong; Li, Minyong; Xu, Wenfang

    2011-12-01

    A series of novel nitric oxide-releasing tamibarotene derivatives were synthesized by coupling nitric oxide (NO) donors with tamibarotene via various spacers, and were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against human leukemic HL-60, NB4 and K562 cell lines in vitro. The test results showed that three compounds (7g, 9a and 9e) exhibited more potent antileukemic activity than the control tamibarotene. Furthermore, the preliminary structure-activity analysis revealed that amino acids serving as spacers could bring about significantly improved biological activities of NO donor hybrids. These interesting results could provide new insights into the development of NO-based antileukemic agents. PMID:22014829

  19. Nitroaromatic amino acids as inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Kowaluk, E A; Daanen, J F; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K M; Wagenaar, F L; Kerwin, J F

    1998-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.) is an important biomodulator of many physiological processes. The inhibition of inappropriate production of NO. by the isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of stroke, inflammation, and other processes. In this study, certain 2-nitroaryl-substituted amino acid analogues were discovered to inhibit NOS. Analogues bearing a 5-methyl substituent on the aromatic ring demonstrated maximal inhibitory potency. For two selected inhibitors, investigation of the kinetics of the enzyme showed the inhibition to be competitive with l-arginine. Additionally, functional NOS inhibition in tissue preparations was demonstrated. PMID:9651169

  20. Nitric oxide and biopterin in depression and stress.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, J G; Opperhuizen, A

    1999-01-18

    Depression has been hypothesized to be related to the reduced biosynthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenalin and dopamine. Much past research has also been devoted to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in depression. The present article reviews the evidence linking tetrahydrobiopterin, a co-factor in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide, an apparent neuroendocrine modulator of the HPA axis, to the immune system and to neuronal control within affective disorder and stress. On the basis of this review, it is suggested that future psychoneuroimmunological research should more fully explore the possible role of tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide in depressive disorders. PMID:10195314

  1. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Tinker, A C

    1998-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that excessive nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important pathological role in inflammatory arthritis. Since NO synthesized by constitutive isoforms of NOS has a physiological role, a great deal of activity has been directed at identifying inhibitors of NOS that are selective for the induced isoform. The major chemical areas that have been described so far in the search for such selective iNOS inhibitors and the activity of some of these compounds in animal models of arthritis are reviewed. PMID:18465556

  2. The potential of Angeli’s salt to decrease nitric oxide scavenging by plasma hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaojun; Azarov, Ivan; Jeffers, Anne; Presley, Tennille; Richardson, Jodi; King, S. Bruce; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Release of hemoglobin from the erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis contributes to the pathology of a variety of diseased states. This effect is partially due to the enhanced ability of cell-free plasma hemoglobin, which is primarily found in the ferrous, oxygenated state, to scavenge nitric oxide. Oxidation of the cell-free hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not effectively scavenge nitric oxide, using inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to be effective in limiting pulmonary and systemic vasoconstriction. However, the ferric heme species may be reduced back to ferrous hemoglobin in plasma and has the potential to drive injurious redox chemistry. We propose that compounds that selectively convert cell-free hemoglobin to ferric, and ideally iron-nitrosylated heme species that do not actively scavenge nitric oxide would effectively treat intravascular hemolysis. We show here that nitroxyl, generated by Angeli’s salt (Sodium α-oxyhyponitrite, Na2N2O3), preferentially reacts with cell-free hemoglobin compared to that encapsulated in the red blood cell under physiologically relevant conditions. Nitroxyl oxidizes oxygenated ferrous hemoglobin to methemoglobin and can convert the methemoglobin to a more stable, less toxic species, iron-nitrosyl hemoglobin. These results support the notion that Angeli’s salt or a similar compound could be used to effectively treat conditions associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:18243145

  3. Cadmium attenuates bradykinin-driven nitric oxide production by interplaying with the localization pattern of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Syamantak; Gupta, Ravi; Reddy, Himabindu; Sinha, Swaraj; Muley, Ajit; Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium, a ubiquitous heavy metal, interferes with endothelial functions and angiogenesis. Bradykinin is a Ca-mobilizing soluble peptide that acts via nitric oxide to promote vasodilation and capillary permeability. The objective of the present study was to explore the Cd implications in bradykinin-dependent endothelial functions. An egg yolk angiogenesis model was employed to evaluate the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced angiogenesis. The results demonstrate that 100 nmol/L Cd attenuated bradykinin-dependent angiogenesis. The results of the in vitro wound healing and tube formation assays by using EAhy 926, a transformed endothelial cell line, suggest that Cd blocked bradykinin-mediated endothelial migration and tube formation by 38% and 67%, respectively, while nitric oxide supplementation could reverse the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced endothelial migration by 94%. The detection of nitric oxide by using a DAF-2DA fluorescent probe, Griess assay, and ultrasensitive electrode suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-induced nitric oxide production. Fluorescence imaging of eNOS-GFP transfected endothelial cells, immunofluorescence, and Western blot studies of Cd and bradykinin-treated cells show that Cd interfered with the localization pattern of eNOS, which possibly attenuates nitric oxide production in part. Additionally, Ca imaging of Cd- and bradykinin-treated cells suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-dependent Ca influx into the cells, thus partially blocking Ca-dependent nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. The results of this study conclude that Cd blunted the effect of bradykinin by interfering with the Ca-associated NOS activity specifically by impeding subcellular trafficking of eNOS. PMID:19767824

  4. The energy-conserving nitric-oxide-reductase system in Paracoccus denitrificans. Distinction from the nitrite reductase that catalyses synthesis of nitric oxide and evidence from trapping experiments for nitric oxide as a free intermediate during denitrification.

    PubMed

    Carr, G J; Page, M D; Ferguson, S J

    1989-02-15

    1. A Clark-type electrode that responds to nitric oxide has been used to show that cytoplasmic membrane vesicles of Paracoccus denitrificans have a nitric-oxide reductase activity. Nitrous oxide is the reaction product. NADH, succinate or isoascorbate plus 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylene diamine can act as reductants. The NADH-dependent activity is resistant to freezing of the vesicles and thus the NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity of stored frozen vesicles provides a method for calibrating the electrode by titration of dissolved nitric oxide with NADH. The periplasmic nitrite reductase and nitrous-oxide reductase enzymes are absent from the vesicles which indicates that nitric-oxide reductase is a discrete enzyme associated with the denitrification process. This conclusion was supported by the finding that nitric-oxide reductase activity was absent from both membranes prepared from aerobically grown P. denitrificans and bovine heart submitochondrial particles. 2. The NADH: nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity was inhibited by concentrations of antimycin or myxothiazol that were just sufficient to inhibit the cytochrome bc1 complex of the ubiquinol--cytochrome-c oxidoreductase. The activity was deduced to be proton translocating by the observations of: (a) up to 3.5-fold stimulation upon addition of an uncoupler; and (b) ATP synthesis with a P:2e ratio of 0.75. 3. Nitrite reductase of cytochrome cd1 type was highly purified from P. denitrificans in a new, high-yield, rapid two- or three-step procedure. This enzyme catalysed stoichiometric synthesis of nitric oxide. This observation, taken together with the finding that the maximum rate of NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity catalysed by the vesicles was comparable with that of NADH:nitrate-oxidoreductase, is consistent with a role for nitric-oxide reductase in the physiological conversion of nitrate or nitrite to dinitrogen gas. 4. Intact cells of P. denitrificans also reduced nitric oxide in an

  5. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jing . E-mail: jing.pope@okstate.edu; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Goad, John T.; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey

    2007-03-15

    Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, but inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation.

  6. Endothelial cell nitric oxide production in acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, S I; Klings, E S; Hendra, K P; Upchurch, G R; Rishikof, D C; Loscalzo, J; Farber, H W

    1999-10-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is the most common form of acute pulmonary disease associated with sickle cell disease. To investigate the possibility that alterations in endothelial cell (EC) production and metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) products might be contributory, we measured NO products from cultured pulmonary EC exposed to red blood cells and/or plasma from sickle cell patients during crisis. Exposure to plasma from patients with ACS caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) and a 7- to 14-fold increase in total nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) production by both pulmonary arterial and microvascular EC. Increases occurred within 2 h of exposure to plasma in a concentration-dependent manner and were associated with increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein and eNOS enzymatic activity, but not with changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) III or NOS II transcripts, inducible NOS (iNOS) protein nor iNOS enzymatic activity. RSNO and NO(x) increased whether plasma was obtained from patients with ACS or other forms of vasoocclusive crisis. Furthermore, an oxidative state occurred and oxidative metabolites of NO, particularly peroxynitrite, were produced. These findings suggest that altered NO production and metabolism to damaging oxidative molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of ACS. PMID:10516198

  7. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  8. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  9. Nitric oxide emissions from a central California dairy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were monitored downwind from a central California dairy facility during 2011 and 2012. NO concentrations at the dairy were significantly higher than the background levels during August 2011, but were indistinguishable from upwind concentrations during January, Apr...

  10. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  11. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  12. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  13. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  14. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  15. Absorptivity of nitric oxide in the fundamental vibrational band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. F.; Vasquez, M. C.; Beattie, W. H.; McDowell, R. S.

    1983-05-01

    From observations of the spectral absorbance of mixtures of nitric oxide in nitrogen at room temperature, an integrated absorptivity for the NO fundamental band of 137.3 + or - 4.6 per(sq cm atm) at 0 C is derived. The indicated uncertainty is the estimated maximum error.

  16. Nitric oxide and almitrine: the definitive answer for hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Payen, D M; Muret, J

    1999-02-01

    Hypoxia-induced by acute lung injury results from abnormal ventilation/perfusion ratio distribution towards shunt or low ventilation/perfusion zones. Pharmacological modification of pulmonary blood flow distribution improving ventilation/perfusion ratio should correct hypoxia. The development of inhaled nitric oxide therapy had confirmed this concept, but with a relatively high proportion of 'non responders'. Then development of other drugs used alone or in association with nitric oxide may reinforce the benefit of nitric oxide. This has been tested with almitrine bismesylate, a lipophilic drug that reinforce hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Using inhaled nitric oxide in combination with almitrine, several studies in adult respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury patients have shown spectacular results in term of PaO2 and pulmonary shunt reduction. Moreover, the proportion of responders to this combination seems largely great than those observed for each drug alone. In conclusion, pulmonary blood flow manipulation improving ventilation/perfusion mismatching is one of the major strategies to correct severe hypoxia. PMID:17013295

  17. Oscillations of nitric oxide concentration in the perturbed denitrification pathway of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, I

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of nitric oxide in Paracoccus denitrificans has been studied using a Clark-type electrode. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and the SH reagent N-ethylmaleimide, both of which released nitric oxide from cells respiring nitrite, were found to be efficient inhibitors of nitric oxide reductase activity. Control experiments with another uncoupler, pentachlorophenol, showed that the inhibitory effect of CCCP was not the result of a decrease in membrane potential. The denitrification pathway in cells with partly inhibited nitric oxide reductase, or in a reconstituted system containing purified nitric reductase and membrane vesicles, exhibited marked sustained oscillations of nitric oxide concentration. The occurrence of the oscillations was strictly dependent on the initial concentration of nitrite. The observed oscillatory kinetics is considered to reflect two regulatory signals destabilizing the denitrification pathway, namely the inhibition of nitric oxide reductase by nitric oxide and/or by nitrite. PMID:1325776

  18. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  19. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  20. Electron transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CP1 in electrochemical reduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; He, Jiaxin; Li, Han; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-10-01

    This study reports catalytic electro-chemical reduction of nitric oxide (NO) enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CP1. The current generated in the presence of bacteria was 4.36times that in the absence of the bacteria. The strain was able to catalyze electro-chemical reduction of NO via indirect electron transfer with an electrode, revealed by a series of cyclic voltammetry experiments. Soluble electron shuttles secreted into solution by live bacteria were responsible for the catalytic effects. The enhancement of NO reduction was also confirmed by detection of nitrous oxide; the level of this intermediate was 46.4% higher in the presence of bacteria than in controls, illustrated that the electron transfer pathway did not directly reduce nitric oxide to N2. The findings of this study may offer a new model for bioelectrochemical research in the field of NO removal by biocatalysts. PMID:27426634

  1. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air. PMID:9517592

  2. Nitric oxide synthesis and biological functions of nitric oxide released from ruthenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Paulo, M; Araújo, A V; Rodrigues, G J; Bendhack, L M

    2011-09-01

    During three decades, an enormous number of studies have demonstrated the critical role of nitric oxide (NO) as a second messenger engaged in the activation of many systems including vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The underlying cellular mechanisms involved in vasodilatation are essentially due to soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC) modulation in the cytoplasm of vascular smooth cells. sGC activation culminates in cyclic GMP (cGMP) production, which in turn leads to protein kinase G (PKG) activation. NO binds to the sGC heme moiety, thereby activating this enzyme. Activation of the NO-sGC-cGMP-PKG pathway entails Ca(2+) signaling reduction and vasodilatation. Endothelium dysfunction leads to decreased production or bioavailability of endogenous NO that could contribute to vascular diseases. Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been studied as a new class of NO donors with potential therapeutic use in order to supply the NO deficiency. In this context, this article shall provide a brief review of the effects exerted by the NO that is enzymatically produced via endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS) activation and by the NO released from NO donor compounds in the vascular smooth muscle cells on both conduit and resistance arteries, as well as veins. In addition, the involvement of the nitrite molecule as an endogenous NO reservoir engaged in vasodilatation will be described. PMID:21755266

  3. NOSTRIN: A protein modulating nitric oxide release and subcellular distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kirstin; Opitz, Nils; Dedio, Jürgen; Renné, Christoph; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2002-01-01

    Activity and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is regulated in a remarkably complex fashion, yet the complex molecular machinery mastering stimulus-induced eNOS translocation and trafficking is poorly understood. In a search by the yeast two-hybrid system using the eNOS oxygenase domain as bait, we have identified a previously uncharacterized eNOS-interacting protein, dubbed NOSTRIN (for eNOS traffic inducer). NOSTRIN contains a single polypeptide chain of 506-aa residues of 58 kDa with an N-terminal cdc15 domain and a C-terminal SH3 domain. NOSTRIN mRNA is abundant in highly vascularized tissues such as placenta, kidney, lung, and heart, and NOSTRIN protein is expressed in vascular endothelial cells. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the eNOS–NOSTRIN interaction in vitro and in vivo, and NOSTRIN's SH3 domain was essential and sufficient for eNOS binding. NOSTRIN colocalized extensively with eNOS at the plasma membrane of confluent human umbilical venous endothelial cells and in punctate cytosolic structures of CHO-eNOS cells. NOSTRIN overexpression induced a profound redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to vesicle-like structures matching the NOSTRIN pattern and at the same time led to a significant inhibition of NO release. We conclude that NOSTRIN contributes to the intricate protein network controlling activity, trafficking, and targeting of eNOS. PMID:12446846

  4. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  5. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  6. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  7. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  8. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  9. Nitric oxide as a mediator of oxidant lung injury due to paraquat.

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, H I; Pakbaz, H; Absood, A; Said, S I

    1994-01-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N omega-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury. PMID:7519778

  10. The role of nitric oxide on DNA damage induced by benzene metabolites

    PubMed Central

    MELIKIAN, ASSIEH A.; CHEN, KUN-MING; LI, HEYI; SODUM, RAMA; FIALA, EMERICH; EL-BAYOUMY, KARAM

    2013-01-01

    Benzene, a tobacco constituent, is a leukemogen in humans and a carcinogen in rodents. Several benzene metabolites generate superoxide anion (O2•−) and induce nitric oxide synthase in the bone marrow of mice. We hypothesized that the reaction of nitric oxide (•NO) with O2•− leads to the formation of peroxynitrite as an intermediate during benzene metabolism. This hypothesis was supported by demonstrating that the exposure of mice to benzene produced nitrated metabolites and enhanced the levels of protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine in the bone marrow of mice in vivo. In the current study, we investigated the influence of nitric oxide, generated from sodium 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, on DNA strand breaks induced by each single or binary benzene metabolite at different doses and compared the levels of the DNA damage induced by each benzene metabolite in the presence of nitric oxide with the levels of DNA strand breaks induced by peroxynitrite at similar doses in vitro. We found that among benzene metabolites only 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (BT) can induce significant DNA damage in the absence of nitric oxide. While 1,4-dihydroxybenzene (HQ), 1,4-benzo-quinone (BQ) and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (CAT) require •NO to induce DNA strand breaks, hydroquinone was the most potent DNA-damaging benzene metabolite in the presence of •NO. The order of DNA breaks by benzene metabolites in the presence of •NO is: Peroxynitrite = HQ > BT > BQ > CAT. The •NO and O2•− scavengers inhibited DNA damage induced by [HQ+•NO]. Benzene, trans,trans-muconaldehyde, and phenol, do not induce DNA strand breaks either in the absence or presence of •NO. However, adding phenol to [HQ+•NO] leads to greater DNA damage than [HQ+•NO] alone. Collectively, these results suggest that nitric oxide is an important factor in DNA damage induced by certain benzene metabolites, probably via the formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate. Phenol, the major benzene metabolite

  11. Photo-crosslinked Biodegradable Elastomers for Controlled Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Kibbe, Melina R.; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of nitric oxide (NO) has important applications in medicine, especially for procedures that involve the vasculature. We report photo-curable biodegradable poly(diol citrate) elastomers capable of slow release of NO. A methacrylated poly(diol citrate) macromonomer was prepared by polycondensation of citric acid with 1, 8-octanediol or 1, 12-dodecanediol followed by functionalization with 2-aminoethyl methacrylate. A miscible NO donor, diazeniumdiolated N, N-diethyldiethylenetriamine, was synthesized and incorporated into the polymer matrix. An elastomeric network was obtained via photo-polymerization of macromonomers upon UV irradiation within three minutes. Films and tubes of the NO-releasing crosslinked macromonomers exhibited strong tensile strength and radial compressive strength, respectively. They also exhibited cell compatibility and biodegradability in vitro. Sustained NO release under physiological conditions was achieved for at least one week. NO release enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells but inhibited the proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells. Photo-polymerizable NO-releasing materials provide a new approach for the localized and sustained delivery of NO to treat thrombosis and restenosis in the vasculature. PMID:24707352

  12. Nitric oxide destabilizes Pias3 and regulates sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Liu, Guang-Hui; Wu, Kaiyuan; Han, Peiwei; Wang, Peng; Li, Jiangmei; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Chang

    2007-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related protein modifiers (SUMO) modification is an important mechanism for posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, it is largely unknown how the sumoylation pathway is regulated. Here, we report that nitric oxide (NO) causes global hyposumoylation in mammalian cells. Both SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (Pias3) were targets for S-nitrosation. S-nitrosation did not interfere with the SUMO conjugating activity of Ubc9, but promoted Pias3 degradation by facilitating its interaction with tripartite motif-containing 32 (Trim32), a ubiquitin E3 ligase. On the one hand, NO promoted Trim32-mediated Pias3 ubiquitination. On the other hand, NO enhanced the stimulatory effect of Pias3 on Trim32 autoubiquitination. The residue Cys459 of Pias3 was identified as a target site for S-nitrosation. Mutation of Cys459 abolished the stimulatory effect of NO on the Pias3-Trim32 interaction, indicating a requirement of S-nitrosation at Cys459 for positive regulation of the Pias3-Trim32 interplay. This study reveals a novel crosstalk between S-nitrosation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, which may be crucial for NO-related physiological and pathological processes. PMID:17987106

  13. A Novel Protocol for Detection of Nitric Oxide in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prachi; David, Anisha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells is mostly undertaken using diaminofluorescein (DAF) dyes. Serious drawbacks and limitations have been identified in methods using DAF as a probe for NO detection. The present work reporting an alternative fluorescent probe for NO detection is thus proposed for varied applications in plant systems for physiological investigations. This method involves a simple, two-step synthesis, characterization, and application of MNIP-Cu {Copper derivative of [4-methoxy-2-(1H-napthol[2,3-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol]} for specific and rapid binding with NO, leading to its detection in plant cells by epifluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) whole seedlings, hypocotyl segments, stigmas from capitulum, protoplasts, and isolated oil bodies, present investigations demonstrate the versatile nature of MNIP-Cu in applications for NO localization studies. MNIP-Cu can detect NO in vivo without any time lag (ex. 330-385 nm; em. 420-500 nm). It exhibits fluorescence both under anoxic and oxygen-rich conditions. This probe is specific to NO, which enhances its fluorescence due to MNIP-Cu complexing with NO and treatment with PTIO leads to quenching of fluorescence. It is relatively nontoxic when used at a concentration of up to 50 μM. PMID:27094412

  14. Role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Mallet, Robert T

    2006-04-01

    Hypoxia is one of the most frequently encountered stresses in health and disease. The duration, frequency, and severity of hypoxic episodes are critical factors determining whether hypoxia is beneficial or harmful. Adaptation to intermittent hypoxia has been demonstrated to confer cardiovascular protection against more severe and sustained hypoxia, and, moreover, to protect against other stresses, including ischemia. Thus, the direct and cross protective effects of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia have been used for treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases and to increase efficiency of exercise training. Evidence is mounting that nitric oxide (NO) plays a central role in these adaptive mechanisms. NO-dependent protective mechanisms activated by intermittent hypoxia include stimulation of NO synthesis as well as restriction of NO overproduction. In addition, alternative, nonenzymic sources of NO and negative feedback of NO synthesis are important factors in optimizing NO concentrations. The adaptive enhancement of NO synthesis and/or availability activates or increases expression of other protective factors, including heat shock proteins, antioxidants and prostaglandins, making the protection more robust and sustained. Understanding the role of NO in mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia will support development of therapies to prevent and treat hypoxic or ischemic damage to organs and cells and to increase adaptive capabilities of the organism. PMID:16565431

  15. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary amine-functionalized chitosan oligosaccharides of different molecular weights (i.e., ~2500, 5000, 10000) were synthesized by grafting 2-methyl aziridine from the primary amines on chitosan oligosaccharides, followed by reaction with nitric oxide (NO) gas under basic conditions to yield N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. The total NO storage, maximum NO flux, and half-life of the resulting NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides were controlled by the molar ratio of 2-methyl aziridine to primary amines (e.g., 1:1, 2:1) and the functional group surrounding the N-diazeniumdiolates (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains), respectively. The secondary amine-modified chitosan oligosaccharides greatly increased the NO payload over existing biodegradable macromolecular NO donors. In addition, the water-solubility of the chitosan oligosaccharides enabled their penetration across the extracellular polysaccharides matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and association with embedded bacteria. The effectiveness of these chitosan oligosaccharides at biofilm eradication was shown to depend on both the molecular weight and ionic characteristics. Low molecular weight and cationic chitosan oligosaccharides exhibited rapid association with bacteria throughout the entire biofilm, leading to enhanced biofilm killing. At concentrations resulting in 5-log killing of bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, the NO-releasing and control chitosan oligosaccharides elicited no significant cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast L929 cells in vitro. PMID:24268196

  16. Porins facilitate nitric oxide-mediated killing of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fabrino, Daniela Leite; Bleck, Christopher K E; Anes, Elsa; Hasilik, Andrej; Melo, Rossana C N; Niederweis, Michael; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Non-pathogenic mycobacteria such us Mycobacterium smegmatis reside in macrophages within phagosomes that fuse with late endocytic/lysosomal compartments. This sequential fusion process is required for the killing of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by macrophages. Porins are proteins that allow the influx of hydrophilic molecules across the mycobacterial outer membrane. Deletion of the porins MspA, MspC and MspD significantly increased survival of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophages. However, the mechanism underlying this observation is unknown. Internalization of wild-type M. smegmatis (SMR5) and the porin triple mutant (ML16) by macrophages was identical indicating that the viability of the porin mutant in vivo was enhanced. This was not due to effects on phagosome trafficking since fusion of phagosomes containing the mutant with late endocytic compartments was unaffected. Moreover, in ML16-infected macrophages, the generation of nitric oxide (NO) was similar to the wild type-infected cells. However, ML16 was significantly more resistant to the effects of NO in vitro compared to SMR5. Our data provide evidence that porins render mycobacteria vulnerable to killing by reactive nitrogen intermediates within phagosomes probably by facilitating uptake of NO across the mycobacterial outer membrane. PMID:19460455

  17. Kinetic-dependent Killing of Oral Pathogens with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Worley, B.V.; Sergesketter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)–releasing silica nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-condensation of tetramethyl orthosilicate with aminosilanes and subsequent conversion of secondary amines to N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. A series of ~150 nm NO-releasing particles with different NO totals and release kinetics (i.e., half-lives) were achieved by altering both the identity and mol% composition of the aminosilane precursors. Independent of identical 2 h NO-release totals, enhanced antibacterial action was observed against the periodontopathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with extended NO-release kinetics at pH 7.4. Negligible bactericidal effect was observed against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans at pH 7.4, even when using NO-releasing silica particles with greater NO-release totals. However, antibacterial activity was observed against S. mutans at lower pH (6.4). This result was attributed to more rapid proton-initiated decomposition of the N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors and greater NO-release payloads. The data suggest a differential sensitivity to NO between cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria with implications for the future development of NO-releasing oral care therapeutics. PMID:26078424

  18. Nitric oxide regulates neutrophil migration through microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation. PMID:18079439

  19. Nitric Oxide Loaded Echogenic Liposomes for Nitric Oxide Delivery and Inhibition of Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shao-Ling; Kee, Patrick H.; Kim, Hyunggun; Moody, Melanie R.; Chrzanowski, Stephen M.; MacDonald, Robert C.; McPherson, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a new bioactive gas delivery method using echogenic liposomes (ELIP) as the gas carrier. Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas with potent therapeutic effects. Bioavailability of NO by systemic delivery is low with potential systemic effects. Methods Liposomes containing phospholipids and cholesterol were prepared using a new freezing under pressure method. The encapsulation and release profile of NO from NO containing-ELIP (NO-ELIP) or a mixture of NO/Argon (NO/Ar-ELIP was studied. Uptake of NO from NO-ELIP by cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) both in the absence and presence of hemoglobin was determined. The effect of NO-ELIP delivery to attenuate intimal hyperplasia in a balloon-injured artery was determined. Results Coencapsulation of NO with argon (Ar) enabled the adjustment the amount of encapsulated NO. A total of 10 µl of gas can be encapsulated into 1 mg liposomes. The release profile of NO from NO-ELIP demonstrated an initial rapid release followed by a slower release over 8 hours. Sixty-eight percent of cells remained viable when incubated with 80 µg/ml of NO/Ar-ELIP for 4 hours. NO delivery to VSMC using NO/Ar-ELIP was 7-fold higher than unencapsulated NO. NO/Ar-ELIP remained effective NO delivery to VSMC even in the presence of hemoglobin. Local NO-ELIP administration to balloon-injured carotid arteries attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and reduced arterial wall thickening by 41±9%. Conclusions Liposomes can protect and deliver a bioactive gas to target tissues with the potential for both visualization of gas delivery and controlled therapeutic gas release. PMID:19660697

  20. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  1. Fine Particulate Matter Constituents, Nitric Oxide Synthase DNA Methylation and Exhaled Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Qiao, Liping; Li, Huichu; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yunhui; Xu, Wenxi; Wang, Cuicui; Wang, Hongli; Zhao, Zhuohui; Xu, Xiaohui; Hu, Hui; Kan, Haidong

    2015-10-01

    It remains unknown how fine particulate matter (PM2.5) constituents affect differently the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, a biomarker of airway inflammation) and the DNA methylation of its encoding gene (NOS2A). We aimed to investigate the short-term effects of PM2.5 constituents on NOS2A methylation and FeNO. We designed a longitudinal study among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with six repeated health measurements in Shanghai, China. We applied linear mixed-effect models to evaluate the associations. We observed that the inverse association between PM2.5 and methylation at position 1 was limited within 24 h, and the positive association between PM2.5 and FeNO was the strongest at lag 1 day. Organic carbon, element carbon, NO3(-) and NH4(+) were robustly and significantly associated with decreased methylation and elevated FeNO. An interquartile range increase in total PM2.5 and the four constituents was associated with decreases of 1.19, 1.63, 1.62, 1.17, and 1.14 in percent methylation of NOS2A, respectively, and increases of 13.30%,16.93%, 8.97%, 18.26%, and 11.42% in FeNO, respectively. Our results indicated that organic carbon, element carbon, NO3(-) and NH4(+) might be mainly responsible for the effects of PM2.5 on the decreased NOS2A DNA methylation and elevated FeNO in COPD patients. PMID:26372312

  2. Interleukin-12 gene-expression of macrophages is regulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rothe, H; Hartmann, B; Geerlings, P; Kolb, H

    1996-07-01

    Interleukin-12 is a heterodimeric cytokine, mainly produced by macrophages. In our present study we demonstrate that interleukin-12 expression is regulated by nitric oxide. Incubation of the macrophage cell line IC 21 with interferon-gamma gave rise to both interleukin-12 p40 mRNA and nitric oxide production. The concurrent addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine inhibited nitrite production and in parallel completely suppressed interleukin-12 p40 mRNA formation. This indicated that endogenous nitric oxide synthase activity was required for IL-12 p40 gene expression. Exposure of the cells towards the nitric oxide generating compounds nitroprusside or S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine induced interleukin-12 p40 mRNA. Maximal mRNA levels were induced with nitric oxide donors at 1 microM concentration. We conclude that nitric oxide may exert an autoregulatory and paracrine control of interleukin-12 gene expression. PMID:8694804

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children. PMID:17687720

  4. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  5. Nitric oxide releasing acridone carboxamide derivatives as reverters of doxorubicin resistance in MCF7/Dx cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rajendra Prasad, V V S; Deepak Reddy, G; Kathmann, Ietje; Amareswararao, M; Peters, G J

    2016-02-01

    A series of nitric oxide donating acridone derivatives are synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activity against different sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines MCF7/Wt, MCF7/Mr (BCRP overexpression) and MCF7/Dx (P-gp expression). The results showed that NO-donating acridones are potent against both the sensitive and resistant cells. Structure activity relationship indicate that the nitric oxide donating moiety connected through a butyl chain at N(10) position as well as morpholino moiety linkage through an amide bridge on the acridone ring system at C-2 position, are required to exert a good cytotoxic effect. Further, good correlations were observed when cytotoxic properties were compared with in vitro nitric oxide release rate, nitric oxide donating group potentiated the cytotoxic effect of the acridone derivatives. Exogenous release of nitric oxide by NO donating acridones enhanced the accumulation of doxorubicin in MCF7/Dx cell lines when it was coadministered with doxorubicin, which inhibited the efflux process of doxorubicin. In summary, a nitric oxide donating group can potentiate the anti-MDR property of acridones. PMID:26657603

  6. Nitric oxide binding to the cardiolipin complex of ferric cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    Silkstone, G; Kapetanaki, S M; Husu, I; Vos, M H; Wilson, M T

    2012-08-28

    Cardiolipin, a phospholipid specific to the mitochondrion, interacts with the small electron transfer heme protein cytochrome c through both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Once in a complex with cardiolipin, cytochrome c has been shown to undergo a conformational change that leads to the rupture of the bond between the heme iron and the intrinsic sulfur ligand of a methionine residue and to enhance the peroxidatic properties of the protein considered important to its apoptotic activity. Here we report that the ferric cytochrome c/cardiolipin complex binds nitric oxide tightly through a multistep process in which the first step is the relatively slow displacement (5 s(-1)) from heme coordination of an intrinsic ligand that replaces methionine in the complex. Nanosecond photolysis of the nitrosyl adduct demonstrated that a fraction of the nitric oxide escapes from the heme pocket and subsequently recombines to the heme in second-order processes (k = 1.8 × 10(6) and 5.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) that, under these conditions, were much faster than recombination of the intrinsic ligand with which they compete. Ultrafast (femtosecond) laser photolysis showed that the geminate recombination of nitric oxide to the heme occurred with time constants (τ = 22 and 72 ps) and that ~23% of the photolyzed nitric oxide escaped into the bulk phase. This high value for the escape fraction relative to other heme proteins indicates the open nature of the heme pocket in this complex. These results are summarized in a scheme and are discussed in terms of the possible modulation of the apoptotic activity of cytochrome c by nitric oxide. PMID:22803508

  7. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  8. Nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere - Measurements and geophysical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvath, J. J.; Frederick, J. E.; Orsini, N.; Douglass, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    A rocket-borne parachute-deployed chemiluminescence instrument has obtained seven new measurements of atmospheric nitric oxide for altitudes between 30 and 50 km at mid-latitudes. These results, when combined with profiles measured by an earlier version of the instrument, cover all four seasons and provide a more comprehensive picture of upper stratospheric nitric oxide than has been available previously. At the highest altitudes studied, the vertical gradient in mixing ratio displays positive and negative values during different observations, with the largest values tending to appear at the greatest heights in summer. Examination of the differences among the profiles, which exceed a factor of 3 near the stratopause, suggests that they arise from the action of transport processes which carry air into the mid-latitude upper stratosphere from regions of the atmosphere that contain widely different odd-nitrogen abundances.

  9. The role of nitric oxide in prostaglandin biology; update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwon F.

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin share many similarities. Two major forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) have been identified: constitutive vs inducible. In general, the constitutive form functions in housekeeping and physiologic roles whereas the inducible form is up-regulated by mitogenic or inflammatory stimuli and is responsible for pathophysiological responses. The cross talk between the COX and NOS pathways was initially reported 1993 and since then, numerous studies have been undertaken to delineate the functional consequences of this interaction as well as the potential mechanism by which each pathway interacts. This review will focus in particular on recent advances in this field that extend our understanding of these two pathways under various systems. PMID:21820072

  10. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Hemoglobin in Health, Disease, and Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). It is made in endothelial cells lining blood vessels and diffuses to smooth muscle cells where it leads to muscle relaxation, vessel dilatation, and increased blood flow and also plays a large role in controlling platelet aggregation and inflammation. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen carrying molecule in the blood, reacts at nearly diffusion limited rates with nitric oxide to (in some reactions) form nitrate ands thereby destroy NO activity. The presence of such large amounts of such a potent NO scavenger in the blood challenges the idea that NO is indeed the EDRF. Encapsulation in red blood cells in healthy individuals limits NO scavenging by Hb. Biophysical experiments will be described exploring and evaluating these mechanisms. Other studies will be described discussing how red cells break open (lyse) in pathological situations and the cell-free Hb reduces NO bioavailability. Finally, methods to restore NO bioavailability through therapeutics will be discussed.

  11. Nitric oxide: a regulator of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 kinases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Heim, Rachel A; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-06-15

    Generation of nitric oxide (NO(•)) can upstream induce and downstream mediate the kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which plays a critical role in regulating gene expression. There are four known eIF2α kinases (EIF2AKs), and NO(•) affects each one uniquely. Whereas NO(•) directly activates EIF2AK1 (HRI), it indirectly activates EIF2AK3 (PERK). EIF2AK4 (GCN2) is activated by depletion of l-arginine, which is used by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the production of NO(•). Finally EIF2AK2 (PKR), which can mediate inducible NOS expression and therefore NO(•) production, can also be activated by NO(•). The production of NO(•) and activation of EIF2AKs coordinately regulate physiological and pathological events such as innate immune response and cell apoptosis. PMID:21463677

  12. Effect of fuel/air nonuniformity on nitric oxide emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    A flame tube combustor holding jet A fuel was used in experiments performed at a pressure of .3 Mpa and a reference velocity of 25 meters/second for three inlet air temperatures of 600, 700, and 800 K. The gas sample measurements were taken at locations 18 cm and 48 cm downstream of the perforated plate flameholder. Nonuniform fuel/air profiles were produced using a fuel injector by separately fueling the inner five fuel tubes and the outer ring of twelve fuel tubes. Six fuel/air profiles were produced for nominal overall equivalence ratios of .5 and .6. An example of three of three of these profiles and their resultant nitric oxide NOx emissions are presented. The uniform fuel/air profile cases produced uniform and relatively low profile levels. When the profiles were either center-peaked or edge-peaked, the overall mass-weighted nitric oxide levels increased.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donators for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L; Viappiani, Serena; Bolla, Manlio

    2009-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the most commonly used medications for the treatment of the symptoms of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, the toxicity of NSAIDs substantially limits their long-term use. Some newer NSAIDs, namely selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, exhibit greater gastrointestinal safety, and concomitant use of anti-secretory drugs can also reduce NSAID-induced gastropathy. However, NSAIDs also adversely affect the cardiovascular system. A new class of anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donators (CINODs), has been designed to exert similar anti-inflammatory effects as NSAIDs, but with an improved safety profile. CINODs release nitric oxide, providing protective effects in the gastrointestinal tract and attenuating the detrimental effects on blood pressure normally associated with NSAIDs. We provide an outline of the rationale for CINODs and their activity, in addition to an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical profile of the most advanced CINOD, naproxcinod. PMID:19230986

  14. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  15. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  16. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  17. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  18. Application of a Nitric Oxide Sensor in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Carlota; Lopes de Almeida, José Pedro; Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the biochemical properties and effects of nitric oxide (NO) in intact and dysfunctional arterial and venous endothelium. Application of the NO electrochemical sensor in vivo and in vitro in erythrocytes of healthy subjects and patients with vascular disease are reviewed. The electrochemical NO sensor device applied to human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the description of others NO types of sensors are also mentioned. PMID:25587407

  19. Tutorial Review: Electrochemical Nitric Oxide Sensors for Physiological Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Privett, Benjamin J.; Shin, Jae Ho; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The important biological roles of nitric oxide (NO) have prompted the development of analytical techniques capable of sensitive and selective detection of NO. Electrochemical sensing, more than any other NO-detection method, embodies the parameters necessary for quantifying NO in challenging physiological environments such as blood and the brain. Herein, we provide a broad overview of the field of electrochemical NO sensors, including design, fabrication, and analytical performance characteristics. Both electrochemical sensors and biological applications are detailed. PMID:20502795

  20. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  1. A Dirofilaria immitis Polyprotein Up-Regulates Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Tsukidate, Setsuko; Fujita, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recombinant Dirofilaria immitis polyprotein (rDiAg) on nitric oxide (NO) production by peritoneal macrophages. rDiAg induced NO production by macrophages from wild-type and lipopolysaccharide-hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ, but not CD40−/−, mice. These results suggest that CD40 is involved in rDiAg-driven NO production by murine macrophages. PMID:12183583

  2. The Role of Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rabender, Christopher S.; Alam, Asim; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Cardnell, Robert J.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Graves, Paul; Zweit, Jamal; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    Here evidence suggests that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) of tumor cells, in contrast to normal tissues, synthesize predominantly superoxide and peroxynitrite. Based on HPLC analysis, the underlying mechanism for this uncoupling is a reduced tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio (BH4:BH2) found in breast, colorectal, epidermoid and head and neck tumors compared to normal tissues. Increasing BH4:BH2 and reconstitution of coupled NOS activity in breast cancer cells with the BH4 salvage pathway precursor, sepiapterin, causes significant shifts in downstream signaling including increased cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) activity, decreased β-catenin expression and TCF4 promoter activity, and reduced NF-κB promoter activity. Sepiapterin inhibited breast tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo as measured by clonogenic assay, Ki67 staining and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). In summary, using diverse tumor types, it is demonstrated that the BH4:BH2 ratio is lower in tumor tissues and as a consequence nitric oxide synthase activity generates more peroxynitrite and superoxide anion than nitric oxide resulting in important tumor growth promoting and anti-apoptotic signaling properties. Implications The synthetic BH4, Kuvan®, is used to elevate BH4:BH2 in some phenylketonuria patients and to treat diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction suggesting a novel, testable approach for correcting an abnormality of tumor metabolism to control tumor growth. PMID:25724429

  3. Nitric oxide in atherosclerosis: vascular protector or villain?

    PubMed

    Dusting, G J; Fennessy, P; Yin, Z L; Gurevich, V

    1998-11-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in physiological vasodilatation, cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Nitric oxide and prostacyclin (PGI2), both released from the endothelium, act synergistically to inhibit platelet aggregation and adhesion. These autacoids also inhibit the adhesion and migration of leucocytes and, in some arteries, they synergize in terms of vasodilation. 2. The development of atherosclerosis and hyperlipaemia per se is accompanied by impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. 3. Atherosclerosis is associated with marked changes in the activity of isoforms of NO synthase (NOS) in the artery wall, including increased expression of the NOS2 (inducible) isoform in complex human lesions as well as in the neointima of experimental animal models. 4. Failure of NO release from the endothelium with normal physiological stimuli, which has been attributed to a defect in the operation of the endothelial NOS (NOS3), provides conditions propitious for leucocyte adhesion, vasospasm, thrombosis and, in addition, may promote increased proliferation of intimal cells. 5. Nitric oxide and superoxide anions generated by inflammatory cells in atherosclerosis react to form cytodestructive peroxynitrite radicals, potentially causing injury to the endothelium and myocytes, and this may be a factor in apoptosis of cells leading to plaque rupture. 6. We have been able to reverse these NO defects with therapeutic agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, antagonists of platelet-activating factor and NO donor compounds, all offering promise in protecting against some manifestations of vascular disease. PMID:9809190

  4. Effect of vardenafil on nitric oxide synthase expression in the paraventricular nucleus of rats without sexual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, M-S; Ko, I-G; Kim, S-E; Kim, B-K; Kim, C-J; Kim, D-H; Yoon, S-J; Kim, K-H

    2012-05-01

    Vardenafil hydrochloride (HCl) is a potent and selective phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor that enhances nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation of human corpus cavernosum and NO-induced rabbit penile erection, and enhances erectile function in patients. In the present study, the effect of vardenafil on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and neuronal NOS expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats without sexual stimulation was investigated using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry and neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The present results showed that NOS and nNOS expression in the PVN was increased by vardenafil treatment as the dose- and duration-dependently without sexual stimulation. The phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, vardenafil, augmented NOS expression in the brain without sexual stimulation. The present study suggests that sexual behaviour can be directly modulated by neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide. PMID:21950284

  5. Nitric oxide ameliorates zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced phytotoxicity in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Chao; Yin, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiu-Ling; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Xiao, Qiang; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-10-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been found to function in enhancing plant tolerance to various environmental stresses. However, role of NO in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. Here, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) was used to investigate the possible roles and the regulatory mechanisms of NO in counteracting ZnO NPs toxicity in rice seedlings. Our results showed that 10 μM SNP significantly inhibited the appearance of ZnO NP toxicity symptoms. SNP addition significantly reduced Zn accumulation, reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation caused by ZnO NPs. The protective role of SNP in reducing ZnO NPs-induced oxidative damage is closely related to NO-mediated antioxidant system. A decrease in superoxide dismutase activity, as well as an increase in reduced glutathione content and peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity was observed under SNP and ZnO NPs combined treatments, compared to ZnO NPs treatment alone. The relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes exhibited a similar change. The role of NO in enhancing ZnO NPs tolerance was further confirmed by genetic analysis using a NO excess mutant (noe1) and an OsNOA1-silenced plant (noa1) of rice. Together, this study provides the first evidence indicating that NO functions in ameliorating ZnO NPs-induced phytotoxicity. PMID:25958266

  6. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  7. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone.

    PubMed

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2' ,7' -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. PMID:27448766

  8. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots. PMID:25943507

  9. Mincle-mediated translational regulation is required for strong nitric oxide production and inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Kang, Ji-Seon; Choi, Won Young; Zhang, Quanri; Kim, Chul Han; Choi, Un Yung; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Kim, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    In response to persistent mycobacteria infection, the host induces a granuloma, which often fails to eradicate bacteria and results in tissue damage. Diverse host receptors are required to control the formation and resolution of granuloma, but little is known concerning their regulatory interactions. Here we show that Mincle, the inducible receptor for mycobacterial cord factor, is the key switch for the transition of macrophages from cytokine expression to high nitric oxide production. In addition to its stimulatory role on TLR-mediated transcription, Mincle enhanced the translation of key genes required for nitric oxide synthesis through p38 and eIF5A hypusination, leading to granuloma resolution. Thus, Mincle has dual functions in the promotion and subsequent resolution of inflammation during anti-mycobacterial defence using both transcriptional and translational controls. PMID:27089465

  10. Targeting tumor hypoxia with the epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001: a superagonist of nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Fens, Marcel H; Cabrales, Pedro; Scicinski, Jan; Larkin, Sandra K; Suh, Jung H; Kuypers, Frans A; Oronsky, Neil; Lybeck, Michelle; Oronsky, Arnold; Oronsky, Bryan

    2016-08-01

    This study reveals a novel interaction between deoxyhemoglobin, nitrite and the non-toxic compound, RRx-001, to generate supraphysiologic levels of nitric oxide (NO) in blood. We characterize the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin, which in the presence of bound RRx-001 reduces nitrite at a much faster rate, leading to markedly increased NO generation. These data expand on the paradigm that hemoglobin generates NO via nitrite reduction during hypoxia and ischemia when nitric oxide synthase (NOS) function is limited. Here, we demonstrate that RRx-001 greatly enhances NO generation from nitrite reduction. RRx-001 is thus the first example of a functional superagonist for nitrite reductase. We hypothesize that physiologically this reaction releases the potentially cytotoxic effector NO selectively in hypoxic tumor regions. It may be that a binary NO-H2O2 trigger is indirectly responsible for the observed tumoricidal activity of RRx-001 since NO is known to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. PMID:27377482

  11. Nitric oxide, antioxidants and prooxidants in plant defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Felicitas; Durner, Jörg; Gaupels, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In plant cells the free radical nitric oxide (NO) interacts both with anti- as well as prooxidants. This review provides a short survey of the central roles of ascorbate and glutathione—the latter alone or in conjunction with S-nitrosoglutathione reductase—in controlling NO bioavailability. Other major topics include the regulation of antioxidant enzymes by NO and the interplay between NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under stress conditions NO regulates antioxidant enzymes at the level of activity and gene expression, which can cause either enhancement or reduction of the cellular redox status. For instance chronic NO production during salt stress induced the antioxidant system thereby increasing salt tolerance in various plants. In contrast, rapid NO accumulation in response to strong stress stimuli was occasionally linked to inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and a subsequent rise in hydrogen peroxide levels. Moreover, during incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae interactions ROS burst and cell death progression were shown to be terminated by S-nitrosylation-triggered inhibition of NADPH oxidases, further highlighting the multiple roles of NO during redox-signaling. In chemical reactions between NO and ROS reactive nitrogen species (RNS) arise with characteristics different from their precursors. Recently, peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide has attracted much attention. We will describe putative functions of this molecule and other NO derivatives in plant cells. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHb) were proposed to act in NO degradation. Additionally, like other oxidases nsHb is also capable of catalyzing protein nitration through a nitrite- and hydrogen peroxide-dependent process. The physiological significance of the described findings under abiotic and biotic stress conditions will be discussed with a special emphasis on pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:24198820

  12. Altered Nitric Oxide System in Cardiovascular and Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by a family of NO synthases (NOS), including neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOS (n/i/eNOS). NO-mediated effects can be beneficial or harmful depending on the specific risk factors affecting the disease. In hypertension, the vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine is blunted, and that to direct NO donors is maintained. A reduction in the activity of eNOS is mainly responsible for the elevation of blood pressure, and an abnormal expression of iNOS is likely to be related to the progression of vascular dysfunction. While eNOS/nNOS-derived NO is protective against the development of atherosclerosis, iNOS-derived NO may be proatherogenic. eNOS-derived NO may prevent the progression of myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury is significantly enhanced in eNOS-deficient animals. An important component of heart failure is the loss of coronary vascular eNOS activity. A pressure-overload may cause severer left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction in eNOS null mice than in wild-type mice. iNOS-derived NO has detrimental effects on the myocardium. NO plays an important role in regulating the angiogenesis and slowing the interstitial fibrosis of the obstructed kidney. In unilateral ureteral obstruction, the expression of eNOS was decreased in the affected kidney. In triply n/i/eNOS null mice, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus developed along with reduced aquaporin-2 abundance. In chronic kidney disease model of subtotal-nephrectomized rats, treatment with NOS inhibitors decreased systemic NO production and induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction (renocardiac syndrome). PMID:27231671

  13. Carnosine facilitates nitric oxide production in endothelial f-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Nakashima, Yukiko; Toda, Ken-Ichi

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effect of carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) on nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in endothelial F-2 cells. Carnosine enhanced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, and the stimulatory effect of carnosine was observed at concentrations exceeding 5 mM. The carnosine-stimulated NO production was inhibited by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not by N(G)-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester. In contrast, beta-alanine, histidine (carnosine components) and anserine (N-methyl carnosine) failed to increase NO production. Carnosine had no effect on NO production for the initial 5 min, but thereafter resulted in a gradual increase in NO production up to 15 min. Carnosine did not induce phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. The carnosine-induced increase in NO production was observed even when extracellular Ca2+ was depleted by ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'-N'-tetraacetic acid however, the effect was abolished upon depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA. After F-2 cells were incubated with carnosine for 4 min, intracellular Ca2+ concentration gradually increased. The carnosine-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration occurred even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carnosine facilitates NO production in endothelial F-2 cells. It is also suggested that eNOS is activated by Ca2+, which might be released from intracellular Ca2+ stores in response to carnosine. PMID:19881293

  14. Nitric oxide targets oligodendrocytes and promotes their morphological differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Garthwaite, Giti; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Wilson, Gary W; Goodwin, David A; Garthwaite, John

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system, nitric oxide (NO) transmits signals from one neurone to another, or from neurones to astrocytes or blood vessels, but the possibility of oligodendrocytes being physiological NO targets has been largely ignored. By exploiting immunocytochemistry for cGMP, the second messenger generated on activation of NO receptors, oligodendrocytes were found to respond to both exogenous and endogenous NO in cerebellar slices from rats aged 8 days to adulthood. Atrial natriuretic peptide, which acts on membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase-coupled receptors, also raised oligodendrocyte cGMP in cerebellar slices. The main endogenous source of NO accessing oligodendrocytes appeared to be the neuronal NO synthase isoform, which was active even under basal conditions and in a manner that was independent of glutamate receptors. Oligodendrocytes in brainstem slices were also shown to be potential NO targets. In contrast, in the optic nerve, oligodendrocyte cGMP was raised by natriuretic peptides but not NO. When cultures of cerebral cortex were continuously exposed to low NO concentrations (estimated as 40–90 pM), oligodendrocytes responded with a striking increase in arborization. This stimulation of oligodendrocyte growth could be replicated by low concentrations of 8-bromo-cGMP (maximum effect at 1 µM). It is concluded that oligodendrocytes are probably widespread targets for physiological NO (or natriuretic peptide) signals, with the resulting rise in cGMP serving to enhance their growth and maturation. NO might help coordinate the myelination of axons to the ongoing level of neuronal activity during development and could potentially contribute to adaptive changes in myelination in the adult. PMID:25327839

  15. Nitric oxide in inflammation and pain associated with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Steven B

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease involving chondrocytes, cartilage and other joint tissues, and has a number of underlying causes, including both biochemical and mechanical factors. Although proinflammatory factors including nitric oxide (NO) are associated with OA, there is recent evidence suggesting that NO and its redox derivatives may also play protective roles in the joint. However, the mechanisms that underlie the development and progression of OA are not completely understood. Experiments have demonstrated that NO plays a catabolic role in the development of OA and mediates the inflammatory response, is involved in the degradation of matrix metalloproteinases, inhibits the synthesis of both collagen and proteoglycans, and helps to mediate apoptosis. However, there is also evidence that in cultured chondrocytes the addition of exogenous NO may inhibit proinflammatory activation by preventing the nuclear localization of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB, whereas the presence of peroxynitrite – a redox derivative of NO – appears to enhance the inflammatory response by sustaining the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, under some conditions exogenous NO can stimulate collagen synthesis in cultured rat fibroblasts and human tendon cells. The protective roles of NO in multiple cell types, along with the opposing activities in cultured chondrocytes, suggest that NO may play additional protective roles in chondrocyte function. NO and its derivatives have a similarly complicated involvement in nociception and pain, which may contribute to the functional disability of OA. Further research may help to elucidate a potential role for NO-donating agents in the management of OA. PMID:19007427

  16. Synthesis of MoS2/g-C3N4 nanocomposites with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity for the removal of nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Wen, M Q; Xiong, T; Zang, Z G; Wei, W; Tang, X S; Dong, F

    2016-05-16

    Molybdenum disulfide and graphitic carbon nitride (MoS2-g-C3N4) nanocomposites with visible-light induced photocatalytic activity were successfully synthesized by a facile ultrasonic dispersion method. The crystalline structure and morphology of the MoS2-g-C3N4 nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microcopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical property of the as-prepared nanocomposites was studied by ultraviolet visible diffusion reflection (UV-vis) and photoluminescence(PL) spectrum. It could be observed from the TEM image that the MoS2 nanosheets and g-C3N4 nanoparticles were well combined together. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity of MoS2-g-C3N4 composites was evaluated by the removal of nitric oxide under visible light irradiation (>400nm). The experimental results demonstrated that the nanocomposites with the MoS2 content of 1.5 wt% exhibited optimal photocatalytic activity and the corresponding removal rate of NO achieved 51.67%, higher than that of pure g-C3N4 nanoparticles. A possible photocatalytic mechanism for the MoS2-g-C3N4 nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the hetero-structure of MoS2 and g-C3N4. PMID:27409846

  17. Nitric Oxide Mediates Root K+/Na+ Balance in a Mangrove Plant, Kandelia obovata, by Enhancing the Expression of AKT1-Type K+ Channel and Na+/H+ Antiporter under High Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Xiao, Qiang; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K+ content and Na+ efflux, but decreased Na+ content and K+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K+ and reducing Na+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K+/Na+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K+ channel, PM Na+/H+ antiporter, PM H+-ATPase, vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter and vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K+/Na+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K+/Na+ transport system. PMID:23977070

  18. A Finite Rate Chemical Analysis of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination Effects on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen F.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. A finite rate chemical analysis was performed to determine the levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility at conditions corresponding to Mach 6 to 8 flight simulations. Results indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, corroborating previously obtained measurements. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on scramjet performance. Results indicate that nitric oxide in the test gas causes a small increase in heat release and thrust performance for the test conditions investigated. However, a rate constant uncertainty analysis suggests that the effect of nitric oxide ranges from no net effect, to an increase of about 10 percent in thrust performance.

  19. Solar-terrestrial coupling: Solar soft X-rays and thermospheric nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Charles A.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the solar soft x-ray irradiances and the thermospheric nitric oxide density in the tropics from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite. The analysis of these observations for 44 days of low geomagnetic activity in the spring of 1998 show that there is a correlation between the solar soft x-ray irradiances and thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics. Photochemical model calculations that used the measured solar soft x-ray irradiances as input parameters adequately reproduce the magnitude of the time-varying component of the thermospheric nitric oxide in the tropics. An additional amount of nitric oxide is present in the tropics that does not vary with the time period of the solar rotation. The conclusion of this analysis is that solar soft x-rays are the primary cause of the variation in the thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics during times of low geomagnetic activity.

  20. Febrigenic signaling to the brain does not involve nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Rudaya, Alla Y; Ivanov, Andrei I; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of peripheral nitric oxide (NO) in febrigenic signaling to the brain has been proposed because peripherally administered NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever in rodents. However, how the unstable molecule of NO can reach the brain to trigger fever is unclear. It is also unclear whether NOS inhibitors attenuate fever by blocking febrigenic signaling or, alternatively, by suppressing thermogenesis in brown fat. Male Wistar rats were chronically implanted with jugular catheters; their colonic and tail skin temperatures (Tc and Tsk) were monitored. Study 1 was designed to determine whether the relatively stable, physiologically relevant forms of NO, that is, S-nitrosoalbumin (SNA) and S-nitrosoglutathione (SNG), are pyrogenic and whether they enhance LPS fever. At a neutral ambient temperature (Ta) of 31°C, afebrile or LPS (1 μg kg−1, i.v.)-treated rats were infused i.v. with SNA (0.34 or 4.1 μmol kg−1; the controls received NaNO2 and albumin) or SNG (10 or 60 μmol kg−1; the controls received glutathione). Tc of SNA- or SNG-treated rats never exceeded that of the controls. In Study 2, we tested whether the known fever-attenuating effect of the NOS inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) at a subneutral Ta (when fever is brought about by thermogenesis) also occurs at a neutral Ta (when fever is brought about by skin vasoconstriction). At a subneutral Ta of 24°C, L-NAME (2.5 mg kg−1, i.v.) attenuated LPS (10 μg kg−1, i.v.) fever, presumably by inhibiting thermogenesis. At 31°C, L-NAME enhanced LPS fever by augmenting skin vasoconstriction (Tsk fall). In summary, both SNA and SNG had no pyrogenic effect of their own and failed to enhance LPS fever; peripheral L-NAME attenuated only fever brought about by increased thermogenesis. It is concluded that NO is uninvolved in febrigenic signaling to the brain. PMID:15006900

  1. Oxygen-sensing under the influence of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta; Tug, Suzan; Kirsch, Michael; Fandrey, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    The transcription factor complex Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) controls the expression of most genes involved in adaptation to hypoxic conditions. Oxygen-dependency is maintained by prolyl- and asparagyl-4-hydroxylases (PHDs/FIH-1) belonging to the superfamily of iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases. Hydroxylation of the HIF-1alpha subunit by PHDs and FIH-1 leads to its degradation and inactivation. By hydroxylating HIF-1alpha in an oxygen-dependent manner PHDs and FIH-1 function as oxygen-sensing enzymes of HIF signalling. Besides molecular oxygen nitric oxide (NO), a mediator of the inflammatory response, can regulate HIF-1alpha accumulation, HIF-1 activity and HIF-1 dependent target gene expression. Recent studies addressing regulation of HIF-1 by NO revealed a complex and paradoxical picture. Acute exposure of cells to high doses of NO increased HIF-1alpha levels irrespective of the residing oxygen concentration whereas prolonged exposure to NO or low doses of this radical reduced HIF-1alpha accumulation even under hypoxic conditions. Several mechanisms were found to contribute to this paradoxical role of NO in regulating HIF-1. More recent studies support the view that NO regulates HIF-1 by modulating the activity of the oxygen-sensor enzymes PHDs and FIH-1. NO dependent HIF-1alpha accumulation under normoxia was due to direct inhibition of PHDs and FIH-1 most likely by competitive binding of NO to the ferrous iron in the catalytically active center of the enzymes. In contrast, reduced HIF-1alpha accumulation by NO under hypoxia was mainly due to enhanced HIF-1alpha degradation by induction of PHD activity. Three major mechanisms are discussed to be involved in enhancing the PHD activity despite the lack of oxygen: (1) NO mediated induction of a HIF-1 dependent feedback loop leading to newly expressed PHD2 and enhanced nuclear localization, (2) O2-redistribution towards PHDs after inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO, (3

  2. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide in anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine on marble-burying behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Gawali, Nitin B; Chowdhury, Amrita A; Kothavade, Pankaj S; Bulani, Vipin D; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M; Juvekar, Archana R

    2016-01-01

    In view of the reports that nitric oxide modulates the neurotransmitters implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), patients with OCD exhibit higher plasma nitrate levels, and drugs useful in OCD influence nitric oxide. Agmatine is a polyamine and widely distributed in mammalian brain which interacts with nitrergic systems. Hence, the present study was carried out to understand the involvement of nitrergic systems in the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine. We used marble-burying behaviour (MBB) of mice as the animal model of OCD, and nitric oxide levels in hippocampus (HC) and cortex homogenate were measured. Results revealed that, agmatine (20 and 40mg/kg, i.p) significantly inhibited the MBB. Intraperitoneal administration of nitric oxide enhancers viz. nitric oxide precursor - l-arginine (l-ARG) (400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) increased MBB as well as brain nitrites levels, whereas treatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (30mg/kg and 50mg/kg, i.p.) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (20mg/kg and 40mg/kg) attenuated MBB and nitrites levels in brain. Further, in combination studies, the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine (20mg/kg, ip) was exacerbated by prior administration of l-ARG (400mg/kg) and conversely l-NAME (15mg/kg) or 7-NI (10.0mg/kg) attenuated OCD-like behaviour with HC and cortex changes in the levels of NO. None of the above treatment had any significant influence on locomotor activity. In conclusion, Agmatine is effective in ameliorating the compulsive-like behaviour in mice which appears to be related to nitric oxide in brain. PMID:26593708

  4. Histochemical study of the nitric oxide synthase activity in experimental trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Hadaś, E; Gustowska, L; Boczoń, K; Janczewska, D

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide plays a critical role in a variety of biological activities. It has been nicknamed a "killer" and "mediator" due to its toxic and signalling properties. Apart from its regular physiological function, nitric oxide indirectly participates in infectious diseases. Our report seems to be the first presentation of the nitric oxide synthase participation in the host biochemical defence mechanisms and in morphological transformation of muscle cells in trichinellosis. PMID:16883715

  5. Syringaresinol causes vasorelaxation by elevating nitric oxide production through the phosphorylation and dimerization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Kim, Sookon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Lee, Jung Joon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in vascular functions, including vasorelaxation. We here investigated the pharmacological effect of the natural product syringaresinol on vascular relaxation and eNOS-mediated NO production as well as its underlying biochemical mechanism in endothelial cells. Treatment of aortic rings from wild type, but not eNOS-/- mice, with syringaresinol induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was abolished by addition of the NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Treatment of human endothelial cells and mouse aortic rings with syringaresinol increased NO production, which was correlated with eNOS phosphorylation via the activation of Akt and AMP kinase (AMPK) as well as elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. A phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor blocked the increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels, AMPK-dependent eNOS phosphorylation, and NO production, but not Akt activation, in syringaresinol-treated endothelial cells. Syringaresinol-induced AMPK activation was inhibited by co-treatment with PLC inhibitor, Ca2+ chelator, calmodulin antagonist, and CaMKKβ siRNA. This compound also increased eNOS dimerization, which was inhibited by a PLC inhibitor and a Ca2+-chelator. The chemicals that inhibit eNOS phosphorylation and dimerization attenuated vasorelaxation and cGMP production. These results suggest that syringaresinol induces vasorelaxation by enhancing NO production in endothelial cells via two distinct mechanisms, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt- and PLC/Ca2+/CaMKKβ-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent eNOS dimerization. PMID:22170035

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury Disrupts Cerebrovascular Tone Through Endothelial Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression and Nitric Oxide Gain of Function

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Nuria; Sonkusare, Swapnil K.; Longden, Thomas A.; Tran, Tram L.; Sackheim, Adrian M.; Nelson, Mark T.; Wellman, George C.; Freeman, Kalev

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to increase the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and can lead to loss of cerebrovascular tone; however, the sources, amounts, and consequences of excess NO on the cerebral vasculature are unknown. Our objective was to elucidate the mechanism of decreased cerebral artery tone after TBI. Methods and Results Cerebral arteries were isolated from rats 24 hours after moderate fluid‐percussion TBI. Pressure‐induced increases in vasoconstriction (myogenic tone) and smooth muscle Ca2+ were severely blunted in cerebral arteries after TBI. However, myogenic tone and smooth muscle Ca2+ were restored by inhibition of NO synthesis or endothelium removal, suggesting that TBI increased endothelial NO levels. Live native cell NO, indexed by 4,5‐diaminofluorescein (DAF‐2 DA) fluorescence, was increased in endothelium and smooth muscle of cerebral arteries after TBI. Clamped concentrations of 20 to 30 nmol/L NO were required to simulate the loss of myogenic tone and increased (DAF‐2T) fluorescence observed following TBI. In comparison, basal NO in control arteries was estimated as 0.4 nmol/L. Consistent with TBI causing enhanced NO‐mediated vasodilation, inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, and large‐conductance Ca2+‐activated potassium (BK) channel restored function of arteries from animals with TBI. Expression of the inducible isoform of NO synthase was upregulated in cerebral arteries isolated from animals with TBI, and the inducible isoform of NO synthase inhibitor 1400W restored myogenic responses following TBI. Conclusions The mechanism of profound cerebral artery vasodilation after TBI is a gain of function in vascular NO production by 60‐fold over controls, resulting from upregulation of the inducible isoform of NO synthase in the endothelium. PMID:25527626

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated hyporeactivity to noradrenaline precedes the induction of nitric oxide synthase in endotoxin shock.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C.; Mitchell, J. A.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The role of an enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO) and the relative importance of the constitutive and inducible NO synthase (NOS) for the development of immediate (within 60 min) and delayed (at 180 min) vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline was investigated in a model of circulatory shock induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in the rat. 2. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate. In addition, the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent NOS activity was measured ex vivo by the conversion of [3H]-arginine to [3H]-citrulline in homogenates from several organs obtained from vehicle- and LPS-treated rats. 3. E. coli LPS (10 mg kg-1, i.v. bolus) caused a rapid (within 5 min) and sustained fall in MAP. At 30 and 60 min after LPS, pressor responses to noradrenaline (0.3, 1 or 3 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) were significantly reduced. The pressor responses were restored by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 1 mg kg-1, i.v. at 60 min), a potent inhibitor of NO synthesis. In contrast, L-NAME did not potentiate the noradrenaline-induced pressor responses in control animals. 4. Dexamethasone (3 mg kg-1, i.v., 60 min prior to LPS), a potent inhibitor of the induction of NOS, did not alter initial MAP or pressor responses to noradrenaline in control rats, but significantly attenuated the LPS-induced fall in MAP at 15 to 60 min after LPS. Dexamethasone did not influence the development of the LPS-induced immediate (within 60 min) hyporeactivity to noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682137

  8. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  9. Modulation of Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis by Nitric Oxide and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Audrey; Bruckdorfer, K. Richard; Abraham, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma: SSc) is a multisystem, connective tissue disease of unknown aetiology characterized by vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity, and enhanced fibroblast activity resulting in fibrosis of the skin, heart, and lungs, and ultimately internal organ failure, and death. One of the most important and early modulators of disease activity is thought to be oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that the free radical nitric oxide (NO), a key mediator of oxidative stress, can profoundly influence the early microvasculopathy, and possibly the ensuing fibrogenic response. Animal models and human studies have also identified dietary antioxidants, such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), to function as a protective system against oxidative stress and fibrosis. Hence, targeting EGCG may prove a possible candidate for therapeutic treatment aimed at reducing both oxidant stress and the fibrotic effects associated with SSc. PMID:22111028

  10. Use of a solid mixture containing diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) to liberate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce to extend postharvest life.

    PubMed

    Wills, R B H; Soegiarto, L; Bowyer, M C

    2007-08-01

    Postharvest treatment of fruit and vegetables with a low concentration of nitric oxide gas can extend postharvest life but application of nitric oxide by release from a gas cylinder is not feasible for many horticultural situations. This paper reports on development of a solid mixture to generate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce. The solid NO-donor compound, diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) was found to quantitatively liberate nitric oxide in the presence of a range of acidic substances including citric acid. A solid mixture of DETANO and citric acid with wheat starch added as a filler and moisture absorbent in the ratio of 1:10:20 was found to be stable for at least six months when stored in dry air. However, in humid air, absorption of moisture from the atmosphere led to reaction of DETANO with citric acid and the evolution of nitric oxide gas. When the dry mixture was placed in a container with strawberry and mushroom, the moisture given off by produce activated the mixture and resulted in a similar extension in postharvest life as achieved by direct fumigation with nitric oxide gas. Commercial use of such a solid mixture could be through tablets or sachets which are more manageable in a farm or packing house than gas fumigation. PMID:17604663

  11. Nitric Oxide Suppresses β-Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Naatz, Aaron; Hogg, Neil; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide, produced in pancreatic β cells in response to proinflammatory cytokines, plays a dual role in the regulation of β-cell fate. While nitric oxide induces cellular damage and impairs β-cell function, it also promotes β-cell survival through activation of protective pathways that promote β-cell recovery. In this study, we identify a novel mechanism in which nitric oxide prevents β-cell apoptosis by attenuating the DNA damage response (DDR). Nitric oxide suppresses activation of the DDR (as measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1 and p53) in response to multiple genotoxic agents, including camptothecin, H2O2, and nitric oxide itself, despite the presence of DNA damage. While camptothecin and H2O2 both induce DDR activation, nitric oxide suppresses only camptothecin-induced apoptosis and not H2O2-induced necrosis. The ability of nitric oxide to suppress the DDR appears to be selective for pancreatic β cells, as nitric oxide fails to inhibit DDR signaling in macrophages, hepatocytes, and fibroblasts, three additional cell types examined. While originally described as the damaging agent responsible for cytokine-induced β-cell death, these studies identify a novel role for nitric oxide as a protective molecule that promotes β-cell survival by suppressing DDR signaling and attenuating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:27185882

  12. Nitric oxide and thermogenesis--challenge in molecular cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Otasevic, Vesna; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Stancic, Ana; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Bato

    2011-01-01

    Only recently we can link thermogenesis, mitochondria, nitric oxide, and redox regulation in biochemical terms. Currently, we are discussing these processes from the aspect of fundamental principles of molecular physiology. Thus, the present article highlights both cell physiology and the principles of the maintenance of energy homeostasis in organisms. Energy homeostasis means much more than simple combustion; adipose tissues at this point of evolution development are related to a broad spectrum of metabolic disturbances and all aspects of cellular remodeling (i.e. structural, metabolic and endocrine changes). Therefore, this paper addresses not only thermogenesis but also energy homeostasis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, proliferation and differentiation of brown adipocytes, their life and death, mitochondriogenesis and angiogenesis. These processes will be united by molecular players of oxidation/reduction reactions, thus creating the principles based on the redox regulation. PMID:21622264

  13. The effects of fire on biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Boston, Penelope J.; Winstead, Edward L.; Sebacher, Shirley

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) before and after a controlled burn conducted in a chaparral ecosystem on June 22, 1987, showed significantly enhanced emissions of both gases after the burn. Mean NO emissions from heavily burned and wetted (to simulate rainfall) sites exceeded 40 ng N/sq m s, and increase of 2 to 3 compared to preburn wetted site measurements. N2O emissions from burned and wetted sites ranged from 9 to 22 ng N/sq m s. Preburn N2O emissions from these wetted sites were all below the detection level of the instrumentation, indicating a flux below 2 ng N/sq m s. The flux of NO exceeded the N2O flux from burned wetted sites by factors ranging from 2.7 to 3.4. These measurements, coupled with preburn and postburn measurements of ammonium and nitrate in the soil of this chaparral ecosystem and measurements of NO and N2O emissions obtained under controlled laboratory conditions, suggest that the postfire enhancement of NO and N2O emissions is due to production of these gases by nitrifying bacteria.

  14. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  15. The role of nitric oxide in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. Firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. This review will focus on the role of nitric oxide in the cellular and tissue effects of LLLT. Red and near-IR light is primarily absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain). Nitric oxide produced in the mitochondria can inhibit respiration by binding to cytochrome c oxidase and competitively displacing oxygen, especially in stressed or hypoxic cells. If light absorption displaced the nitric oxide and thus allowed the cytochrome c oxidase to recover and cellular respiration to resume, this would explain many of the observations made in LLLT. Why the effect is only seen in hypoxic, stressed or damaged cells or tissues? How the effects can keep working for some time (hours or days) postillumination? Why increased NO concentrations are sometimes measured in cell culture or in animals? How blood flow can be increased? Why angiogenesis is sometimes increased after LLLT in vivo?

  16. Nitric oxide production increases during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2015-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised human and animals. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the immunomodulatory and immunopathological role of nitric oxide (NO) in central nervous systems and to identify any correlation between toxoplasmosis neuropathology and investigate the consequences of the cellular responses protect against T. gondii. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and levels of endothelial, neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, nNOS, iNOS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilament (NF) were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of a chronic infection at 10 30 and 60 days post infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of eNOS (p < 0.05), nNOS (p < 0.05), iNOS (p < 0.005), GFAP (p < 0.005) and NF (p < 0.005) were remarkably higher in T. gondii-infected mice than in uninfected control. The most prominent finding from our study was 10 and 30 days after inoculation data indicating that increased levels of NO not only a potential neuroprotective role for immunoregulatory and immunopathological but also might be a molecular trigger of bradyzoite development. Furthermore, this findings were shown that high expressed NO origin was not only inducible nitric oxide synthase but also endothelial and neuronal. We demonstrated that activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages is a significant event in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE). The results also clearly indicated that increased levels of NO might contribute to neuropathology related with TE. Furthermore, expression of NF might gives an idea of the progress and critical for diagnostic significance of this disease. PMID:26115941

  17. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  18. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  19. Application of nitric oxide measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malinovschi, Andrei; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Tufvesson, Ellen; Rolla, Giovanni; Bjermer, Leif; Alving, Kjell; Diamant, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a convenient, non-invasive method for the assessment of active, mainly Th2-driven, airway inflammation, which is sensitive to treatment with standard anti-inflammatory therapy. Consequently, FeNO serves as a valued tool to aid diagnosis and monitoring in several asthma phenotypes. More recently, FeNO has been evaluated in several other respiratory, infectious, and/or immunological conditions. In this short review, we provide an overview of several clinical studies and discuss the status of potential applications of NO measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma. PMID:26672962

  20. Natural nitric oxide (NO) inhibitors from Chloranthus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Jing-Jun; Li, Zhen-Zhen; Tang, Gui-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Yin, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Eight new lindenane sesquiterpenoid dimers, chlojapolides A-H (1-8), along with 11 known analogues were isolated from the whole plant of Chloranthus japonicus. Their structures including absolute configurations were elucidated by spectral and chemical methods. All the compounds were examined for their inhibitory effects on the nitric oxide (NO) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and compounds 1, 11, 13, and 17 exhibited pronounced inhibition with IC50 values in the range of 6.91-15.75μM, being more active than the positive control, quercetin (IC50=15.90μM). PMID:27177824

  1. Flavanols, the Kuna, Cocoa Consumption, and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Norman K.; Fisher, Naomi D.L.; McCullough, Marjorie L.

    2013-01-01

    The Kuna Indians who reside in an archipelago on the Caribbean Coast of Panama have very low blood pressure levels, live longer than other Panamanians, and have a reduced frequency of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and cancer -- at least on their death certificates. One outstanding feature of their diet includes a very high intake of flavanol-rich cocoa. Flavonoids in cocoa activate nitric oxide synthesis in healthy humans. The possibility that the high flavanol intake protects the Kuna against high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and cancer is sufficiently intriguing and sufficiently important that large, randomized controlled clinical trials should be pursued. PMID:20409950

  2. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-measuring devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Vitale, Carolina; Vatrella, Alessandro; Molino, Antonio; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been employed in the diagnosis of specific types of airway inflammation, guiding treatment monitoring by predicting and assessing response to anti-inflammatory therapy and monitoring for compliance and detecting relapse. Various techniques are currently used to analyze exhaled NO concentrations under a range of conditions for both health and disease. These include chemiluminescence and electrochemical sensor devices. The cost effectiveness and ability to achieve adequate flexibility in sensitivity and selectivity of NO measurement for these methods are evaluated alongside the potential for use of laser-based technology. This review explores the technologies involved in the measurement of exhaled NO. PMID:27382340

  3. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    PubMed Central

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  4. Protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi provided by oral immunization with Phytomonas serpens: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Pinge-Filho, P; Peron, J P S; de Moura, T R; Menolli, R A; Graça, V K; Estevão, D; Tadokoro, C E; Jankevicius, J V; Rizzo, L V

    2005-01-31

    We have previously demonstrated that Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoa that causes Chagas' disease. These antigens are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in Balb/c mice. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 mice treated with the nitric oxide inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 50 mg kg(-1)) infected with T. cruzi, were used to demonstrate the role of nitric oxide (NO) to host protection against T. cruzi infection achieved by oral immunization with live P. serpens. A reduction in parasitaemia and an increase in survival were observed in C57BL/6 infected mice and previously immunized with P. serpens, when compared to non-immunized mice. iNOS (KO) mice immunized and C57BL/6 immunized and treated with AG presented parasitaemia and mortality rates comparable to those of infected and non-immunized mice. By itself, immunization with P. serpens did not induce inflammation in the myocardium, but C57BL/6 mice so immunized showed fewer amastigotes nests in the heart following an acute T. cruzi infection than those in non-immunized mice. These results suggest that protective immunity against T. cruzi infection induced by immunization with P. serpens is dependent upon enhanced NO production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. PMID:15585334

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  6. Macula Densa Nitric Oxide Synthase 1β Protects against Salt-Sensitive Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Wei, Jin; Stec, David E; Roman, Richard J; Ge, Ying; Cheng, Liang; Liu, Eddie Y; Zhang, Jie; Hansen, Pernille B Laerkegaard; Fan, Fan; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Lei; Pollock, Jennifer; Huang, Paul L; Fu, Yiling; Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Ruisheng

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important negative modulator of tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness. We recently found that macula densa expresses α-, β-, and γ-splice variants of neuronal nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), and NOS1β expression in the macula densa increases on a high-salt diet. This study tested whether upregulation of NOS1β expression in the macula densa affects sodium excretion and salt-sensitive hypertension by decreasing tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness. Expression levels of NOS1β mRNA and protein were 30- and five-fold higher, respectively, than those of NOS1α in the renal cortex of C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, macula densa NO production was similar in the isolated perfused juxtaglomerular apparatus of wild-type (WT) and nitric oxide synthase 1α-knockout (NOS1αKO) mice. Compared with control mice, mice with macula densa-specific knockout of all nitric oxide synthase 1 isoforms (MD-NOS1KO) had a significantly enhanced tubuloglomerular feedback response and after acute volume expansion, significantly reduced GFR, urine flow, and sodium excretion. Mean arterial pressure increased significantly in MD-NOS1KO mice (P<0.01) but not NOS1flox/flox mice fed a high-salt diet. After infusion of angiotensin II, mean arterial pressure increased by 61.6 mmHg in MD-NOS1KO mice versus 32.0 mmHg in WT mice (P<0.01) fed a high-salt diet. These results indicate that NOS1β is a primary NOS1 isoform expressed in the macula densa and regulates the tubuloglomerular feedback response, the natriuretic response to acute volume expansion, and the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. These findings show a novel mechanism for salt sensitivity of BP and the significance of tubuloglomerular feedback response in long-term control of sodium excretion and BP. PMID:26647426

  7. Role of Nitric Oxide in the Regulation of Renin and Vasopressin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    Research during recent years has established nitric oxide as a unique signaling molecule that plays important roles in the regulation of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and other systems. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the control of the secretion of hormones by the pancreas, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, and evidence is accumulating that it contributes to the regulation of the secretion of renin and vasopressin, hormones that play key roles in the control of sodium and water balance. Several lines of evidence have implicated nitric oxide in the control of renin secretion. The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in vascular and tubular elements of the kidney, particularly in cells of the macula densa, a structure that plays an important role in the control of renin secretion. Guanylyl cyclase, a major target for nitric oxide, is also present in the kidney. Drugs that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis generally suppress renin release in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a stimulatory role for the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the control of renin secretion. Under some conditions, however, blockade of nitric oxide synthesis increases renin secretion. Recent studies indicate that nitric oxide not only contributes to the regulation of basal renin secretion, but also participates in the renin secretory responses to activation of the renal baroreceptor, macula densa, and beta adrenoceptor mechanisms that regulate renin secretion. Histochemical and immunocytochemical studies have revealed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary gland. Colocalization of nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin has been demonstrated in some hypothalamic neurons. Nitric oxide synthase activity in the hypothalamus and pituitary is increased by maneuvers known to stimulate vasopressin secretion, including salt loading and dehydration, Administration of L-arginine and nitric

  8. The role of nitric oxide in ocular surface cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Gun Sic; Kim, Jin Kook; Kim, Young Myeong

    2002-06-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ocular surface remains unknown. We investigated the conditions leading to an increase of NO generation in tear and the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue. We evaluated the dual action (cell survival or cell death) of NO depending on its amount. We measured the concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in the tears of ocular surface diseases and examined the main source of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When cultured human corneal fibroblast were treated with NO producing donor with or without serum, the viabilities of cells was studied. We found that the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue were corneal epithelium, fibroblast, endothelium, and inflammatory cells. Three forms of NOS (eNOS, bNOS, and iNOS) were expressed in experimentally induced inflammation. In the fibroblast culture system, the NO donor (SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine) prevented the death of corneal fibroblast cells caused by serum deprivation in a dose dependent manner up to 500 micrometer SNAP, but a higher dose decreased cell viability. This study suggested that NO might act as a double-edged sword in ocular surface diseases depending on the degree of inflammation related with NO concentration. PMID:12068145

  9. Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Catalase: Structural and Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the structures of bovine catalase in its native form and complexed with ammonia and nitric oxide, obtained by X-ray crystallography. Using the NO generator 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, we were able to generate sufficiently high NO concentrations within the catalase crystals that substantial occupation was observed despite a high dissociation rate. Nitric oxide seems to be slightly bent from the heme normal that may indicate some iron(II) character in the formally ferric catalase. Microspectrophotometric investigations inline with the synchrotron X-ray beam reveal photoreduction of the central heme iron. In the cases of the native and ammonia-complexed catalase, reduction is accompanied by a relaxation phase. This is likely not the case for the catalase NO complex. The kinetics of binding of NO to catalase were investigated using NO photolyzed from N,N′-bis(carboxymethyl)-N,N′-dinitroso-p-phenylenediamine using an assay that combines catalase with myoglobin binding kinetics. The off rate is 1.5 s–1. Implications for catalase function are discussed. PMID:21524057

  10. Role of nitric oxide in inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Gao, Hui-Ming; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Jeohn, Gwang-Ho; Cooper, Cynthia L; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2002-05-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that inflammation in the brain is closely associated with the pathogenesis of several degenerative neurologic disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and AIDS dementia. The hallmark of brain inflammation is the activation of glial cells, especially that of microglia that produce a variety of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors, including cytokines, fatty acid metabolites, free radicals--such as nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide. Excessive production of NO, as a consequence of nitric oxide synthase induction in activated glia, has been attributed to participate in neurodegeneration. Using primary mixed neuron-glia cultures and glia-enriched cultures prepared from embryonic rodent brain tissues, we have systemically studied the relationship between the production of NO and neurodegeneration in response to stimulation by the inflammagen lipopolysaccharide. This review summarizes our recent findings on the kinetics of NO generation, the relative contribution of microglia and astrocytes to NO accumulation, the relationship between NO production and neurodegeneration, and points of intervention along the pathways associated with NO generation to achieve neuroprotection. We also describe our results relating to the effect of several opioid-related agents on microglial activation and neuroprotection. Among these agents, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, especially its non-opioid enantiomer (+)-naloxone, promises to be of potential therapeutic value for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:12076984

  11. Diurnal variation of nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Pirre, M.; Ramaroson, R.; Matthews, W. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two recent measurements of the temporal variation of nitric oxide at constant altitude near 40 km are reported. The observations were made at float altitude with a balloon-borne chemiluminescence detector together with in situ ozone measurements. The first measurement was made at 44 N on September 17, 1987, at an altitude of 40 km from before sunrise until 1000 LT. The second observation was made at the same latitude on June 18, 1988, at 39 km from 0800 to 1230 LT. At an altitude of 40 km, nitric oxide was observed to start increasing very rapidly at sunrise when the solar zenith angle reached about 95 deg. After the rapid initial buildup, the rate of NO increase stabilized for 3 hours at about 1.2 ppbv/hour. Near 1100 LT at 39 km in summer, the NO mixing ratio was observed to become nearly constant. These features of the diurnal variation of NO are in accord with the temporal variation expected from a time-dependent zero-dimensional photochemical model.

  12. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Vascular Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo D.; Rezende, Bruno A.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    The family of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has significant importance in various physiological mechanisms and is also involved in many pathological processes. Three NOS isoforms have been identified: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS 1), endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS 3), and an inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS 2). Both nNOS and eNOS are constitutively expressed. Classically, eNOS is considered the main isoform involved in the control of the vascular function. However, more recent studies have shown that nNOS is present in the vascular endothelium and importantly contributes to the maintenance of the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. In physiological conditions, besides nitric oxide (NO), nNOS also produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2•-) considered as key mediators in non-neuronal cells signaling. This mini-review highlights recent scientific releases on the role of nNOS in vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:27313545

  13. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  14. The flavonoid luteolin induces nitric oxide production and arterial relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongwei; Wyeth, Richard P.; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Luteolin, a flavone present in many foods and medicinal plants, may have beneficial effects on various human chronic diseases. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that luteolin can directly act on vascular endothelial cells (ECs), leading to nitric oxide (NO) production and subsequent vascular relaxation. Methods Rat aortic rings were mounted in organ bath. Luteolin was added cumulatively and vessel relaxation of rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine (PE) or potassium was recorded. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Ser1177 and NO production from aortic rings and primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) exposed to luteolin were measured by using Western blot and fluorometric assay, respectively. Results Luteolin dose-dependently (10-100 μmol/L) elicited relaxation of PE- or potassium-contracted aortic rings. The vasorelaxation effect of luteolin was attenuated by the eNOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, suggesting that this luteolin action is at least partially mediated by activating eNOS activity. We further found that luteolin dose-dependently (10-100 μmol/L) increased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 (up to 1.9 fold) in isolated rat rings. Consistently, exposure of HAECs to luteolin also increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Conclusion Luteolin may be a vascular protective agent by directly acting on vascular ECs to stimulate NO-dependent vascular dilatation. PMID:23604495

  15. Cytokinins can act as suppressors of nitric oxide in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Zhong; Kong, Dong-Dong; Gu, Xue-Xin; Gao, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Zheng; Xia, Min; Gao, Qian; Tian, Li-Li; Xu, Zhang-Hong; Bao, Fang; Hu, Yong; Ye, Neng-Sheng; Pei, Zhen-Ming; He, Yi-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is essential for normal plant physiological processes. However, very little is known about the mechanisms of NO modulation in plants. Here, we report a unique mechanism for the catabolism of NO based on the reaction with the plant hormone cytokinin. We screened for NO-insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis and isolated two allelic lines, cnu1-1 and 1–2 (continuous NO-unstressed 1), that were identified as the previously reported altered meristem program 1 (amp1) and as having elevated levels of cytokinins. A double mutant of cnu1-2 and nitric oxide overexpression 1 (nox1) reduced the severity of the phenotypes ascribed to excess NO levels as did treating the nox1 line with trans-zeatin, the predominant form of cytokinin in Arabidopsis. We further showed that peroxinitrite, an active NO derivative, can react with zeatin in vitro, which together with the results in vivo suggests that cytokinins suppress the action of NO most likely through direct interaction between them, leading to the reduction of endogenous NO levels. These results provide insights into NO signaling and regulation of its bioactivity in plants. PMID:23319631

  16. A protective role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Peter; Steenbergen, Eric; van Goor, Harry

    2002-03-01

    In acute glomerulonephritis (GN), increased nitric oxide (NO) production occurs, suggesting a pathophysiological role for NO in the disease process. Although NO potentially could have both toxic as well as protective effects, its exact role in the pathophysiology of GN is unclear and may depend on the NOS isoform generating NO. The protective effects of NO such as prevention of leukocyte and platelet activation and adhesion have been attributed to NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Evidence for a beneficial role for eNOS includes the demonstration of reduced eNOS expression in experimental models of GN as well as human biopsy specimens that is mostly likely due to endothelial cell necrosis. Reduced NO production in GN also may occur through reaction of NO with superoxide anions or the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/hypochlorous acid (HOCL) system. Further evidence has been provided by the observation that in several experimental models of GN, glomerular injury is exacerbated following treatment with non-selective NO inhibitors. Finally, the development of GN is severely aggravated in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS as compared to wild-type mice, providing direct support for a protective role of eNOS-derived NO in acute GN. PMID:11849432

  17. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  18. Salmonella typhimurium mutants that downregulate phagocyte nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Björkman, J; Borg, S; Syk, A; Pettersson, S; Andersson, D I; Rhen, M

    2000-06-01

    To examine the potential and strategies of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium to increase its fitness in host cells, we applied a selection that enriches for mutants with increased bacterial growth yields in murine J774-A.1 macrophage-like cells. The selection, which was based on intracellular growth competition, rapidly yielded isolates that out-competed the wild-type strain during intracellular growth. J774-A.1 cells responded to challenge with S. typhimurium by mounting an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression and a concomitant nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibition of NO production with the use of the competitive inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA) resulted in a 20-fold increase in bacterial growth yield, suggesting that the NO response prevented bacterial intracellular growth. In accordance with this observation, five out of the nine growth advantage mutants isolated inhibited production of NO from J774-A.1 cells, despite an induction of iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein. Accompanying bacterial phenotypes included alterations in lipopolysaccharide structure and in the profiles of proteins secreted by invasion-competent bacteria. The results indicate that S. typhimurium has the ability to mutate in several different ways to increase its host fitness and that inhibition of iNOS activity may be a major adaptation. PMID:11207580

  19. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation. PMID:25510468

  20. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  1. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  2. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  3. Nitric oxide-modulating agents for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Brendan J R

    2005-11-01

    Almost 20 years after the identification of the biological role of nitric oxide (NO), the full therapeutic potential of novel agents that mimic the activity of NO or interfere with its synthesis has yet to be realised for utilities involving the gastrointestinal tract. New utilities for classical NO donors, which were used as vasodilators for decades, in the treatment of motility disorders have been explored and a product for treating anal fissure was recently launched. New classes of compounds incorporating a NO-donating moiety into standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the NO-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) or COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donors (CINODs) have also been developed. These have been shown to exhibit reduced gastrointestinal injury in experimental models, and reports on their efficacy and safety in Phase I and II studies are now available. Modulation of the inducible NO synthase isoform that generates excessive NO that can lead to subsequent cytotoxic moieties, such as peroxynitrite, may have therapeutic possibilities in a range of inflammatory diseases of the gut. Likewise, agents that promote the decomposition of peroxynitrite or removal of its other component, superoxide, may also prove to be of use. Further targets for pharmaceutical exploitation are likely to come from both genomic and molecular insights into the processes that regulate the NO system. PMID:16255675

  4. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H.; Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim's tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on 57Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  5. Furoxan-Bearing Micelles for Nitric Oxide Delivery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Urara; Wang, Tengjiao; Chen, Jerry J Y; Uyama, Hiroshi; van der Vlies, André J

    2016-07-01

    Furoxans, or 1,2,5-oxadiazole-N-oxides, are a class of nitric oxide (NO)-donating compounds that release NO in response to thiol-containing molecules. In this study, polymeric micelles bearing furoxan moieties are prepared from an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of a hydrophobic furoxan-bearing block and a hydrophilic poly(N-acryloylmorpholine) block. The block copolymer is prepared using a combination of the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and the copper-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition techniques. The block copolymers form spherical micelles with a diameter of 50 nm by self-assembly in water. The micelles release NO in response to cysteine and show improved stability against hydrolytic decomposition. Furthermore, the micelles show a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with ibuprofen in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26953715

  6. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Menaka, K. B.; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, N. Suchetha

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis. PMID:20407654

  7. Involvement of nitric oxide in inflammation of ovaries in gilts.

    PubMed

    Jana, Barbara; Andronowska, Aneta; Kucharski, Jan

    2002-03-01

    NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) and an inducible type of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were demonstrated in porcine ovaries after unilateral infusion of bacteria into the hilus of an ovary. In group I one ml of saline was infused into the hilus of each ovary from the 15th day to the 19th day of the estrous cycle. In group II one ml of bacterial suspension (10(9) colony forming units of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium pyogenes, in a proportion 1:1:1, respectively) in saline was infused into the hilus of one ovary on days corresponding to those of the control group (gr. I), whereas saline was infused into the contralateral ovary. The ovaries were collected on the 7th day of the next estrous cycle. In the bacteria-treated ovary, the activity of NADPH-d was higher in the endothelium of blood vessels, corpora lutea and follicular walls in comparison to that observed in the respective structures of the contralateral ovary. The highest activity of NADPH-d was found in the vascular endothelium in the bacteria-infused ovary. Vascular smooth muscle cells found in both ovaries of the bacteria-treated gilts were more intensely stained for NADPH-d than those in control animals. After bacteria administration, the intensity of NADPH-d reaction in all the structures of both ovaries in group II was higher than in control group. The strongest immunostaining for iNOS was observed in all structures of the bacteria-infused ovary. In the contralateral ovary, iNOS-immunoreactivity was weaker but still stronger than that in control group. The present results revealed that infusions of bacteria into the hilus of one ovary enhanced the activity of NADPH-d and immunoreactivity for iNOS in both porcine ovaries. However, the activity of both enzymes was higher in the bacteria-infused ovary than in the contralateral one. These data suggest that locally synthesized NO can mediate an inflammatory effect of bacteria in the porcine ovaries. PMID:14666163

  8. Interaction of caveolin-1, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthases in hypoxic human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiangang; Lee, Waisin; Li, Yue; Lau, Chi Fai; Ng, Kwong Man; Fung, Man Lung; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-10-01

    Neuroblastoma cells are capable of hypoxic adaptation, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 (cav-1), a plasma membrane signal molecule, might play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury by modulating nitric oxide (NO) production. We investigated the alterations of cav-1, cav-2, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and NO levels in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia with 2% [O2]. The major discoveries include: (i) cav-1 but not cav-2 was up-regulated in the cells exposed to 15 h of hypoxia; (ii) NO donor 1-[N, N-di-(2-aminoethyl) amino] diazen-1-ium-1, 2-diolate up-regulated the expression of cav-1, whereas the non-selective NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W each abolished the increase in cav-1 expression in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that iNOS-induced NO production contributes to the up-regulation of cav-1 in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, we studied the roles played by cav-1 in regulating NO, NOS, and apoptotic cell death in the SK-N-MC cells subjected to 15 h of hypoxic treatment. Both cav-1 transfection and cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide abolished the induction of iNOS, reduced the production of NO, and reduced the rates of apoptotic cell death in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that increased expression of cav-1 in response to hypoxic stimulation could prevent oxidative injury induced by reactive oxygen species. The interactions of cav-1, NO, and NOS could be an important signal pathway in protecting the neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury, contributing to the hypoxic tolerance of neuroblastoma cells. PMID:18717816

  9. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    PubMed Central

    Seyffarth, Gunter; Nelson, Paul N; Dunmore, Simon J; Rodrigo, Nalinda; Murphy, Damian J; Carson, Ray J

    2004-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour. PMID:15191613

  10. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  11. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones, having chemical structures similar to estrogens, are believed to stimulate nitric oxide production and thus lower blood pressure. The efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation to stimulate nitric oxide production and lower blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood press...

  12. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  13. 75 FR 43535 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy for Premature Infants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... week of pregnancy) with respiratory failure. Inhaled nitric oxide therapy is typically administered in...-term infants, use of this therapy may shorten the length of time respiratory support is required... receive respiratory support? Are there short-term risks of inhaled nitric oxide therapy among...

  14. SALICYLIC ACID- AND NITRIC OXIDE-MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in plant defense signaling is discussed, with emphasis on the role of nitric oxide and salicylic acid in the development of disease resistance. Nitric Oxide has recently been shown to have an important role in plant disease resistance. We show an increase in NOS-like activity in TMV...

  15. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:22022485

  16. Effect of endogenous nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiration of rat hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Curran, R.D.; Ochoa, J.B.; Harbrecht, B.G.; Hoffman, R.A.; Simmons, R.L.; Billiar, T.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Nitric oxide, a highly reactive radical, was recently identified as an intermediate of L-arginine metabolism in mammalian cells. We have shown that nitric oxide synthesis is induced in vitro in cultured hepatocytes by supernatants from activated Kupffer cells or in vivo by injecting rats with nonviable Corynebacterium parvum. In both cases, nitric oxide biosynthesis in hepatocytes was associated with suppression of total protein synthesis. This study attempts to determine the effect of nitric oxide biosynthesis on the activity of specific hepatocytic mitochondrial enzymes and to determine whether inhibition of protein synthesis is caused by suppression of energy metabolism. Exposure of hepatocytes to supernatants from activated Kupffer cells led to a 30% decrease of aconitase (Krebs cycle) and complex I (mitochondrial electron transport chain) activity. Using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, we demonstrated that the inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity was due, in part, to the action of nitric oxide. In contrast, in vivo nitric oxide synthesis of hepatocytes from Corynebacterium parvum-treated animals had no effect on mitochondrial respiration. This suggests that inhibition of protein synthesis by nitric oxide is not likely to be mediated by inhibition of energy metabolism.

  17. Nitric oxide-releasing mesalamine: potential utility for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J L

    2003-05-01

    Nitric oxide can accelerate ulcer healing and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of a nitric oxide-releasing moiety to mesalamine significantly boosts its anti-inflammatory activity. NO-releasing mesalamine suppresses inflammatory cytokine production and reduces leukocyte infiltration. PMID:12846442

  18. The inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of a nitric oxide releasing cream on normal skin.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, A D; Copeland, P; Hay, I; Husain, A; Ewen, S W

    1999-09-01

    We describe the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of nitric oxide in vivo in human skin. Nitrite and ascorbic acid were mixed on the skin of 12 normal volunteers, three times daily, to release nitric oxide. Exposure to nitric oxide was varied by randomizing the concentration of nitrite and duration of application. Nitric oxide treated skin showed significant increases in cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, neutrophil elastase, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, nitrosotyrosine, p53, and apoptotic cells compared with skin treated with ascorbic acid alone. There was no significant increase in mast cells. Following application of nitric oxide there were significantly fewer CD1a positive Langerhans cells in the epidermis. These appeared to lose dendritic morphology and migrate from the epidermis. There was no significant difference in staining for Ki-67, a marker related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, between active and control skin but staining was greater after exposure to higher dose nitric oxide than the low dose. Apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and p53 staining were relatively greater after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. These results suggest that nitric oxide is pro-inflammatory and is toxic to DNA, leading to the accumulation of p53 and subsequent apoptosis. High-dose nitric oxide paradoxically led to a smaller increase in macrophages and T cells than low dose suggesting an immunosuppressive effect of higher levels. PMID:10469339

  19. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase participates in septic shock myocardial depression by nitric oxide overproduction and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ce; Yi, Chenju; Wang, Huiping; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is involved in septic shock myocardial depression. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method was used to induce septic shock. There was a significant depression of hemodynamic parameters recorded in the septic shock stage. After using nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AMG), and neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), depression of the parameters was partly attenuated. Nitric oxide production in isolated cardiac mitochondria increased obviously in the CLP-septic shock stage, L-NAME and 7-NI both decreased NO production significantly. Nitrite/nitrate (NOx) production in the septic shock stage was much greater than those in the corresponding sham groups, and NOx production in the cytosol by inducible NOS was greater. Treatment with AMG suppressed NOx production in the cytosol by iNOS, whereas treatment with 7-NI decreased NOx production in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial NOS expression increased significantly in the septic shock stage, and its overexpression was attenuated using 7-NI. There was no significant decrease in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore measurement in the CLP-septic shock group, whereas a significant decrease was observed in those treated with L-NAME or 7-NI. These results indicate that overexpression of mitochondrial NOS is involved in myocardial depression. PMID:21993446

  20. Behavioral impairments and changes of nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the brains of molarless KM mice.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qian; Hu, Xingxue; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Jianjun; Jiang, Qingsong

    2015-02-01

    More studies showed that as a common disorder in senior population, loss of teeth could adversely affect human cognitive function, and nitric oxide (NO) might play an important role in the cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism has not yet been well-established. The objectives of this study are to evaluate behavior changes of KM mice after loss of molars, and levels of NO and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the brain in molarless condition. It is hypothesized that loss of molars of the mice tested results in the cognitive impairments and that the process is mediated by NO in the brain through the signaling pathways. Morris water maze is used to test the behavioral changes after 8 weeks of the surgery. The changes of NO and iNOS are evaluated by using Griess assay, western blot, and immunohistochemistry method. The results show that 8 weeks after loss of molars, the spatial learning and memory of KM mice impair and the levels of NO and iNOS in mice hippocampus increase. These findings suggest that molar extraction is associated with the behavioral impairment, and that the changes of NO and iNOS in the hippocampus may be involved in the behavioral changes in the molarless condition. PMID:25447296

  1. Nitric oxide generated from isoniazid activation by KatG: source of nitric oxide and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Graham S; Master, Sharon; Rusnak, Frank; Deretic, Vojo

    2004-08-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) is a frontline antituberculosis agent. Once taken up by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, INH requires activation by the catalase-peroxidase KatG, converting INH from its prodrug form into a range of bactericidal reactive species. Here we used 15N-labeled INH together with electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping techniques to demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO*) is generated from oxidation at the hydrazide nitrogens during the activation of INH by M. tuberculosis KatG. We also observed that a specific scavenger of NO* provided protection against the antimycobacterial activity of INH in bacterial culture. No significant increases in mycobacterial protein nitration were detected, suggesting that NOdot; and not peroxynitrite, a nitrating metabolite of NO*, is involved in antimycobacterial action. In conclusion, INH-derived NO* has biological activity, which directly contributes to the antimycobacterial action of INH. PMID:15273113

  2. Truncating mutation in the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene is associated with infantile achalasia.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Edvardson, Simon; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Zangen, Tzili; Hashavya, Saar; Begin, Michal; Yaacov, Barak; Cinamon, Yuval; Koplewitz, Benjamin Z; Vromen, Amos; Elpeleg, Orly; Smith, Brian C

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide is thought to have a role in the pathogenesis of achalasia. We performed a genetic analysis of 2 siblings with infant-onset achalasia. Exome analysis revealed that they were homozygous for a premature stop codon in the gene encoding nitric oxide synthase 1. Kinetic analyses and molecular modeling showed that the truncated protein product has defects in folding, nitric oxide production, and binding of cofactors. Heller myotomy had no effect in these patients, but sildenafil therapy increased their ability to drink. The finding recapitulates the previously reported phenotype of nitric oxide synthase 1-deficient mice, which have achalasia. Nitric oxide signaling appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of achalasia in humans. PMID:25479138

  3. Nitric Oxide Participation in the Fungicidal Mechanism of Gamma Interferon-Activated Murine Macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Angel; de Gregori, Waldemar; Velez, Diana; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz E.

    2000-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis restricted to Latin America and produced by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is probably acquired by inhalation of conidia produced by the mycelial form. The macrophage (Mφ) represents the major cell defense against this pathogen; when activated with gamma interferon (IFN-γ), murine Mφs kill the fungus by an oxygen-independent mechanism. Our goal was to determine the role of nitric oxide in the fungicidal effect of Mφs on P. brasiliensis conidia. The results revealed that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs inhibited the conidium-to-yeast transformation process in a dose-dependent manner; maximal inhibition was observed in Mφs activated with 50 U/ml and incubated for 96 h at 37°C. When Mφs were activated with 150 to 200 U of cytokine per ml, the number of CFU was 70% lower than in nonactivated controls, indicating that there was a fungicidal effect. The inhibitory effect was reversed by the addition of anti-IFN-γ monoclonal antibodies. Activation by IFN-γ also enhancednitric oxide production, as revealed by increasing NO2 values (8 ± 3 μM in nonactivated Mφs versus 43 ± 13 μM in activated Mφs). The neutralization of IFN-γ also reversed nitric oxide production at basal levels (8 ± 5 μM). Additionally, we found that there was a significant inverse correlation (r = −0.8975) between NO2− concentration and transformation of P. brasiliensis conidia. Additionally, treatment with any of the three different nitric oxide inhibitors used (arginase, NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, and aminoguanidine), reverted the inhibition of the transformation process with 40 to 70% of intracellular yeast and significantly reduced nitric oxide production. These results show that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs kill P. brasiliensis conidia through the l-arginine–nitric oxide pathway. PMID:10768942

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, but not 1, modulates NMDA receptor-mediated activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-03-01

    In cerebellar neurons in culture, activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) prevents glutamate and NMDA-induced neuronal death, indicating that it interferes with the excitotoxic mechanisms leading to death. However, it is not known which step of these mechanisms is affected by mGluRs. The aims of this work were to assess: (a) whether activation of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 or mGluR5) impairs NMDA-induced activation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway; (b) which mGluR (1 or 5) is responsible for this impairment and (c) whether impairment of the pathway occurs at the level of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide or of activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by NMDA. It is shown that activation of mGluR1 enhances the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by increasing activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide. In contrast, mGluR5 activation inhibits the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by reducing NMDA-induced activation of nNOS. This is due to reduced NMDA-induced increase in cAMP, reduced activation of Akt by cAMP and of nNOS by Akt. The impairment of activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5 would contribute to its neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in cerebellar neurons in culture. PMID:20043967

  5. Engineering nitric oxide synthase chimeras to function as NO dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Binder, Katherine; Sharma, Manisha; Wei, Chin-Chuan; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) catalyze a two-step oxidation of l-arginine to form nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. NOS contains a N-terminal oxygenase domain (NOSoxy) that is the site of NO synthesis, and a C-terminal reductase domain (NOSred) that binds nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and provides electrons to the NOSoxy heme during catalysis. The three NOS isoforms in mammals inducible NOS (iNOS), neuronal NOS (nNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) share high structural similarity but differ in NO release rates and catalytic properties due to differences in enzyme kinetic parameters. These parameters must be balanced for NOS enzymes to release NO, rather than consume it in a competing, inherent NO dioxygenase reaction. To improve understanding, we drew on a global catalytic model and previous findings to design three NOS chimeras that may predominantly function as NO dioxygenases: iNOSoxy/nNOSred (Wild type (WT) chimera), V346I iNOSoxy/nNOSred (V346I chimera) and iNOSoxy/S1412D nNOSred (S1412D chimera). The WT and S1412D chimeras had higher NO release than the parent iNOS, while the V346I chimera exhibited much lower NO release, consistent with expectations. Measurements indicated that a greater NO dioxygenase activity was achieved, particularly in the V346I chimera, which dioxygenated an estimated two to four NO per NO that it released, while the other chimeras had nearly equivalent NO dioxygenase and NO release activities. Computer simulations of the global catalytic model using the measured kinetic parameters produced results that mimicked the measured outcomes, and this provided further insights on the catalytic behaviors of the chimeras and basis of their increased NO dioxygenase activities. PMID:27013266

  6. Behavioral effects of cocaine mediated by nitric oxide-GAPDH transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Risheng; Serritella, Anthony V; Sen, Tanusree; Farook, Justin M; Sedlak, Thomas W; Baraban, Jay; Snyder, Solomon H; Sen, Nilkantha

    2013-05-22

    Cocaine's behavioral-stimulant effects derive from potentiation of synaptic signaling by dopamine and serotonin leading to transcriptional alterations in postsynaptic cells. We report that a signaling cascade involving nitric oxide (NO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mediates cocaine's transcriptional and behavioral actions. Lower, behavioral-stimulant doses enhance the cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling system, while higher, neurotoxic doses stimulate the p53 cytotoxic system. The drug CGP3466B, which potently and selectively blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and GAPDH-Siah binding, prevents these actions as well as behavioral effects of cocaine providing a strategy for anticocaine therapy. PMID:23719162

  7. Quinoline-based two-photon fluorescent probe for nitric oxide in live cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaohu; Heo, Cheol Ho; Chen, Shiyu; Kim, Hwan Myung; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    A two-photon fluorescent probe (QNO) for nitric oxide is reported. The probe is designed with a photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) mechanism and shows 12-fold fluorescence enhancement toward NO. Adopting a quinoline derivative as the fluorophore, QNO has a large two-photon action cross section value of 52 GM and long-wavelength emission. It also features high selectivity, low cytotoxicity, and pH insensitivity. By utilizing two-photon microscopy (TPM), QNO can detect NO in live cells and live tissues at a depth of 90-180 μm. PMID:24341482

  8. Nitrones are able to release nitric oxide in aqueous environment under hydroxyl free radical attack.

    PubMed

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Ibolya, Fülöp; Pop, Maria Cristiana; Dergez, Timea; Mitroi, Brânduşa; Dogaru, Maria Titica; Tokés, Béla

    2011-10-30

    Importance of a nitric oxide donor that can act as a spin trap might bring some new therapeutic possibilities regarding the treatment of ischemic diseases by reducing the intensity of free radical produced reperfusion lesions. These substances might be also used as a new type of photo protectors since they can absorb UV radiation, capture free radicals formed by interaction of UV radiation with tissue constituents, and tanning of the skin will be permitted due to nitric oxide release. The purpose of this work was to measure the ability of nitrones to release nitric oxide and how different factors (temperature, nitrone concentration, and free radicals) influence the releasing ability. Mostly, indirect determination of nitric oxide was carried out, by measuring nitrite and nitrate amounts (as decomposition products of nitric oxide), all nitrones proved to release significant amounts of nitric oxide. Nitrite measurements were made based on an HPLC-VIS method that uses pre-column derivatization of nitrite by forming an azo dye (limit of quantification: 5ng/ml). No good correlation was found between the amount of nitric oxide and temperature for most studied nitrones but between the formation of nitric oxide and nitrone concentration an asymptotic correlation was found. Fenton reagent also yielded formation of nitric oxide from nitrones and formed amounts were not different from those recorded for UV irradiation. Most of the nitrones effectively released about 0.5% of the maximum amount of nitric oxide that is chemically possible and estimated concentrations of 0.1μM were present in the solutions during decomposition. PMID:21645628

  9. Arginase activity and nitric oxide levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Meral; Okur, Hacer Kuzu; Pelin, Zerrin; Öğünç, Ayliz Velioğlu; Öztürk, Levent

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by repetitive obstruction of the upper airways, and it is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There have been several studies demonstrating low levels of nitric oxide in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome compared with healthy controls. In this study, we hypothesized that reduced nitric oxide levels would result in high arginase activity. Arginase reacts with L-arginine and produces urea and L-ornithine, whereas L-arginine is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide. METHODS: The study group consisted of 51 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (M/F: 43/8; mean age 49±10 years of age) and 15 healthy control subjects (M/F: 13/3; mean age 46±14 years of age). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients were divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide levels and arginase activity were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of serum samples. RESULTS: Serum nitric oxide levels in the control subjects were higher than in the obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). Arginase activity was significantly higher (p<0.01) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases compared with the control group. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients with cardiovascular diseases had higher arginase activity than the controls (p<0.001) and the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Low nitric oxide levels are associated with high arginase activity. The mechanism of nitric oxide depletion in sleep apnea patients suggests that increased arginase activity might reduce the substrate availability of nitric oxide synthase and thus could reduce nitric oxide levels. PMID:24714832

  10. Role of Nitric Oxide and Flavohemoglobin Homolog Genes in Aspergillus nidulans Sexual Development and Mycotoxin Production ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Sachin; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Grayburn, W. Scott; Calvo, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Flavohemoglobins are widely distributed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins are involved in reducing nitric oxide levels. Deletion of the Aspergillus nidulans flavohemoglobin gene fhbA induced sexual development and decreased sterigmatocystin production. Supplementation with a nitric oxide-releasing compound promoted cleistothecial formation and increased nsdD and steA expression, indicating that nitric oxide induces sexual development. This is the first study on the effect of nitric oxide on morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:21642398

  11. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and p66Shc Interplay in Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Simona; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Gaetano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability play a causal role in endothelial cell dysfunction occurring in the vasculature of diabetic patients. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms underpinning diabetic endothelial and vascular dysfunction. In particular, we focused our attention on the complex interplay existing among NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and one crucial regulator of intracellular ROS production, p66Shc protein. PMID:24734227

  12. Diffusion of nitric oxide into low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Denicola, Ana; Batthyány, Carlos; Lissi, Eduardo; Freeman, Bruce A; Rubbo, Homero; Radi, Rafael

    2002-01-11

    A key early event in the development of atherosclerosis is the oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) via different mechanisms including free radical reactions with both protein and lipid components. Nitric oxide (( small middle dot)NO) is capable of inhibiting LDL oxidation by scavenging radical species involved in oxidative chain propagation reactions. Herein, the diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO into LDL is studied by fluorescence quenching of pyrene derivatives. Selected probes 1-(pyrenyl)methyltrimethylammonium (PMTMA) and 1-(pyrenyl)-methyl-3-(9-octadecenoyloxy)-22,23-bisnor-5-cholenate (PMChO) were chosen so that they could be incorporated at different depths of the LDL particle. Indeed, PMTMA and PMChO were located in the surface and core of LDL, respectively, as indicated by changes in fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quenching studies with water-soluble quenchers and the lifetime values (tau(o)) of the excited probes. The apparent second order rate quenching constants of ( small middle dot)NO (k(NO)) for both probes were 2.6-3.8 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) and 1.2 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) in solution and native LDL, respectively, indicating that there is no significant barrier to the diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO to the surface and core of LDL. Nitric oxide was also capable of diffusing through oxidized LDL. Considering the preferential partitioning of ( small middle dot)NO in apolar milieu (6-8 for n-octanol:water) and therefore a larger ( small middle dot)NO concentration in LDL with respect to the aqueous phase, a corrected k(NO) value of approximately 0.2 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) can be determined, which still is sufficiently large and consistent with a facile diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO through LDL. Applying the Einstein-Smoluchowsky treatment, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D(')NO) of ( small middle dot)NO in native LDL is on average 2 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1), six times larger than that previously reported for erythrocyte plasma membrane

  13. Inhibitory effects of NO on carotid body: contribution of neural and endothelial nitric oxide synthase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Viviana; Mosqueira, Matías; Rey, Sergio; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2003-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) produced within the carotid body is a tonic inhibitor of chemoreception and determined the contribution of neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) isoforms to the inhibitory NO effect. Accordingly, we studied the effect of NO generated from S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamide (SNAP) and compared the effects of the nonselective inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the selective nNOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-imidazole (TRIM) on chemosensory dose-response curves induced by nicotine and NaCN and responses to hypoxia (Po(2) approximately 30 Torr). CBs excised from pentobarbitone-anesthetized cats were perfused in vitro with Tyrode at 38 degrees C and pH 7.40, and chemosensory discharges were recorded from the carotid sinus nerve. SNAP (100 microM) reduced the responses to nicotine and NaCN. l-NAME (1 mM) enhanced the responses to nicotine and NaCN by increasing their duration, but TRIM (100 microM) only enhanced the responses to high doses of NaCN. The amplitude of the response to hypoxia was enhanced by l-NAME but not by TRIM. Our results suggest that both isoforms contribute to the NO action, but eNOS being the main source for NO in the cat CB and exerting a tonic effect upon chemoreceptor activity. PMID:12388352

  14. Armeniacae semen extract suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced expressions of cyclooxygenase [correction of cycloosygenase]-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in mouse BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Yang, Hye-Young; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Ok-Jin; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Cho, Sonhae

    2005-03-01

    Armeniacae semen is the seed of Prunus armeniaca L. var. ansu MAXIM which is classified into Rosaceae. In traditional oriental medicine, Armeniacae semen has been used for the treatment of pain and inflammatory diseases. In this study, the effect of Armeniacae semen extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, prostaglandin E2 immunoassay, and nitric oxide detection on mouse BV2 microglial cells. In the present results, Armeniacae semen extract suppressed prostaglandin E2 synthesis and nitric oxide production by inhibiting the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated enhancement of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression in BV2 cells. These results show that Armeniacae semen exerts anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects probably by suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions. PMID:15744067

  15. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Bruno P.; Santos, Daniela F.; Santos, Ana I.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO). In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA) induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons. PMID:26587180

  16. Anti-obesogenic role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased remarkably in the past four decades. Because obesity can promote the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, understanding the mechanisms that engender weight gain and discovering safe anti-obesity therapies are of critical importance. In particular, the gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), appears to be a central factor regulating adiposity and systemic metabolism. Obese and diabetic states are characterized by a deficit in bioavailable NO, with such decreases commonly attributed to downregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), loss of eNOS activity, or quenching of NO by its reaction with oxygen radicals. Gain-of-function studies, in which vascular-derived NO has been increased pharmacologically or genetically, reveal remarkable actions of NO on body composition and systemic metabolism. This review addresses the metabolic actions of eNOS and the potential therapeutic utility of harnessing its anti-obesogenic effects. PMID:25189393

  17. microRNA and human inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Geller, David A

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression involves both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Human iNOS gene transcription is controlled in a cell type-specific manner by extracellular cytokines. Transcriptional regulation of human iNOS gene involves transcription factors NF-κB, Stat-1, AP-1, C/EBPβ, KLF6, Oct 1, and NRF. Important posttranscriptional mechanisms also regulate human iNOS mRNA stability through RNA binding proteins HuR, TTP, KSRP, and PABP. Recently, there are several miRNAs that were validated to regulate human and rodent iNOS gene expression. Among them, miR-939 and miR-26a were identified to bind with the human iNOS 3'-UTR and exert a translational blockade of human iNOS protein synthesis. PMID:25189382

  18. The metabolites of nitric oxide in sickle-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rees, D C; Cervi, P; Grimwade, D; O'Driscoll, A; Hamilton, M; Parker, N E; Porter, J B

    1995-12-01

    Plasma NOx concentrations were raised in 22 acute painful crises in SCD. We have measured blood concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) in sickle-cell disease (SCD), and shown that they are increased compared with healthy controls (P = 0.002), and haemoglobin E/beta-thalassaemic controls (P = 0.05). Concentrations in steady-state SCD were also higher than in healthy controls (P = 0.04) but not significantly different from the concentrations at the beginning of painful crises (P = 0.34). Importantly, in 12 regularly exchanged sicklers, the mean pre-transfusion NOx concentration did not differ significantly from the control population (P = 0.52), suggesting that the changes in NO metabolism can be reversed. It is unlikely that the increased concentrations of NOx in SCD result from anaemia or haemolysis as the untransfused haemoglobin E/beta-thalassaemics did not show increased levels. PMID:8547126

  19. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  20. Effects of nitric oxide on neuroendocrine function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R J; Kriegsfeld, L J; Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1997-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an unusual chemical messenger. NO mediates blood vessel relaxation when produced by endothelial cells. When produced by macrophages, NO contributes to the cytotoxic function of these immune cells. NO also functions as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The effects on blood vessel tone and neuronal function form the basis for an important role of NO on neuroendocrine function and behavior. NO mediates hypothalamic portal blood flow and, thus, affects oxytocin and vasopression secretion; furthermore, NO mediates neuroendocrine function in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes. NO influences several motivated behaviors including sexual, aggressive, and ingestive behaviors. Learning and memory are also influenced by NO. Taken together, NO is emerging as an important chemical mediator of neuroendocrine function and behavior. PMID:9344634

  1. Erythropoietin and cerebral vascular protection: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-11-01

    Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a major clinical problem causing cerebral ischemia and infarction. The pathogenesis of vasospasm is related to a number of pathological processes including endothelial damage and alterations in vasomotor function leading to narrowing of arterial diameter and a subsequent decrease in cerebral blood flow. Discovery of the tissue protective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) stimulated the search for therapeutic application of EPO for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have identified the role of EPO in vascular protection mediated by the preservation of endothelial cell integrity and stimulation of angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the EPO-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase and its contribution to the prevention of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:17049112

  2. Influence of nitric oxide in the improvement of muscle power

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Daniela Navarro D'Almeida; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether nitric oxide (NO) supplementa-tion is directly related to increased muscle power in response to strength exercise training METHODS The study included 36 individuals who underwent training for eight weeks (three times per week) with weights, who were randomly divided into two groups, both receiving the same training protocol, but one group used 3g of arginine, as a precursor of NO, and the other received placebo RESULTS There was no significant difference between groups, only a significant difference for both groups between moments: before and after the training protocol CONCLUSION Oral administration of arginine asso-ciated with a training program did not increase the muscular power of individuals. Level of Evidence I, Study Type: Highquality randomized trial with statistically significant diffe-rence or no statistically significant difference but narrow confidence intervals. PMID:27057140

  3. Differential regulation of cytokine production by nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, J; Chain, B M

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has recently been identified as a potent and pleiotropic intracellular mediator produced by and acting on many cells of the body. Although considerable attention has been devoted to the regulation of NO by inflammatory cytokines, and also to the role of NO as an important effector molecule in immune function, there is very little information on the role of this mediator in modulating T-cell-dependent cytokine production. In this study we show that physiological levels of NO (either produced by activated macrophages or by the addition of exogenous NO donors) can selectively down-regulate interleukin-3 (IL-3) production by spleen cells from contact-sensitized mice, while leaving IL-2 activity unaffected. Thus NO may have an important role as an immunomodulatory as well as effector molecule in the immune system. PMID:8244457

  4. Solar cycle variation of thermospheric nitric oxide at solstice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J.-C.; Fesen, C. G.; Rusch, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A coupled, two-dimensional, chemical-diffusive model of the thermosphere is used to study the role of solar activity in the global distribution of nitric oxide. The model calculates self-consistently the zonally averaged temperature, circulation, and composition for solstice under solar maximum and solar minimum conditions. A decrease of the NO density by a factor of three to four in the E region is predicted from solar maximum to solar minimum. It is found that the main features of the overall morphology and the changes induced by the solar cycle are well reproduced in the model, although some details are not satisfactorily predicted. The sensitivity of the NO distribution to eddy transport and to the quenching of metastable N(2D) atoms by atomic oxygen is also described.

  5. Salivary Nitric Oxide, a Biomarker for Stress and Anxiety?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala Fawzi; Al-Awaida, Wajdy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if salivary nitrate correlates to the daily psychological stress and anxiety in a group of human subjects. Methods The convenient sample recruitment method was employed; data from seventy three subjects were analyzed. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) inventories were used to determine stress and anxiety scores respectively. Salivary nitric oxide was measured through nitrate (NOx) levels using the Griess reaction method. Results Although stress and anxiety were correlated. No significant correlation exists between salivary nitrate and daily psychological stress and anxiety in the study's participants. Conclusion While all previous studies focused NOx levels in acute stress models. This is the first study to investigate the correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Although stress and anxiety were correlated, there is no correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Further studies are required to investigate this correlation using other biological samples such as plasma. PMID:27247597

  6. Working with nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are gasotransmitter molecules important in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Although these molecules were first known as environmental toxicants, it is now evident that that they are intricately involved in diverse cellular functions with impact on numerous physiological and pathogenic processes. NO and H2S share some common characteristics but also have unique chemical properties that suggest potential complementary interactions between the two in affecting cellular biochemistry and metabolism. Central among these is the interactions between NO, H2S, and thiols that constitute new ways to regulate protein function, signaling, and cellular responses. In this review, we discuss fundamental biochemical principals, molecular functions, measurement methods, and the pathophysiological relevance of NO and H2S. PMID:25550314

  7. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:26633380

  8. Nitric oxide inhibits falcipain, the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Colasanti, M; Salvati, L; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule possessing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the papain-like cysteine protease involved in Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite hemoglobin degradation, is reported. In particular, NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-p6ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenami de (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit dose-dependently the falcipain activity present in the P. falciparum trophozoite extract, this effect likely attributable to S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. The results represent a new insight into the modulation mechanism of falcipain activity, thereby being relevant in developing new strategies for inhibition of the P. falciparum life cycle. PMID:10623597

  9. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Nitric oxide regulates synaptic transmission between spiny projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Yotam; Heiman, Myriam; Peterson, Jayms D.; Musatov, Sergei; Scarduzio, Mariangela; Logan, Stephen M.; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Surmeier, Dalton J.; Heintz, Nathaniel; Greengard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent axon collaterals are a major means of communication between spiny projection neurons (SPNs) in the striatum and profoundly affect the function of the basal ganglia. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie this communication. We show that intrastriatal nitric oxide (NO) signaling elevates the expression of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) within recurrent collaterals of SPNs. Down-regulation of striatal NO signaling resulted in an attenuation of GABAergic signaling in SPN local collaterals, down-regulation of VGAT expression in local processes of SPNs, and impaired motor behavior. PKG1 and cAMP response element-binding protein are involved in the signal transduction that transcriptionally regulates VGAT by NO. These data suggest that transcriptional control of the vesicular GABA transporter by NO regulates GABA transmission and action selection. PMID:25413364

  11. Voltametric assessment of brain nitric oxide during heatstroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Canini, F; Bourdon, L; Cespuglio, R; Buguet, A

    1997-08-01

    Anesthetized rats exposed to a high ambient temperature develop heatstroke with brain ischemia. Since nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role during normothermic ischemia, its cortical and cerebellar production were continuously assessed in pentobarbital anesthetized rats exposed to heat by using differential pulsed voltammetry. After 60 min at thermoneutrality, the rats were submitted to an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C until death. After 60 min in the heat, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline, MK801 (1 mg.kg(-1)), an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, or L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-ANA; 100 mg.kg(-1)), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Just before death, a 70% increase in NO production was observed in both the cerebellum and the cortex of saline-treated rats. The cortical increase in NO was not modified by MK801 while the NO signal was suppressed by L-ANA. PMID:9291142

  12. Nitric oxide evoked p53-accumulation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brüne, Bernhard; Schneiderhan, Nicole

    2003-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 accumulates under conditions of cellular stress and affects cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. This has been exemplified for endogenously produced or exogenously supplied nitric oxide (NO) and thus accounts at least in part for cell destructive signaling qualities of this bioactive molecule and/or derived reactive nitrogen species. However, detailed mechanisms of toxicity and pathways of cell demise remain to be elucidated. Establishing that NO-treatment left the ubiquitination and the p53-Mdm2 interaction intact may point to an impaired nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling to account for p53 stabilization. This was verified by heterokaryon analysis. We conclude that attenuated nuclear export contributes to stabilization and activation of p53 under the influence of NO. PMID:12628747

  13. Nitric oxide inhibitory constituents from the barks of Cinnamomum cassia.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2016-07-01

    Six new compounds including one γ-butyrolactone, cinncassin A (1), two tetrahydrofuran derivatives, cinncassins B and C (2, 3), two lignans, cinncassins D and E (4, 5), and one phenylpropanol glucoside, cinnacassoside D (6), together with 14 known lignans (7-20) were isolated from the barks of Cinnamomum cassia. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data analysis as well as chemical methods, and the absolute configurations were established by experimental and calculated ECD data. The anti-inflammatory activities of the isolates were evaluated on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BV-2 microglial cells. Compounds 5, 7, 8, and 15 showed potent inhibition activities with IC50 values of 17.6, 17.7, 18.7, and 17.5μM, respectively. PMID:27223848

  14. Production of nitric oxide by lightning on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Gregory, G. L.; Harvey, G. A.; Howell, W. E.; Borucki, W. J.; Orville, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The first measurements of the production of nitric oxide (NO) by a laboratory discharge in a simulated Venus atmosphere are presented. The average NO yield over a range of energies was found to be 3.7 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the 15th molecules/joule. Simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) resulting from the lightning-induced dissociation of carbon dioxide (CO2) indicated a CO yield of about 4 x 10 to the 17th molecules/joule. These measurements suggest that at and below cloud level, a region where solar ultraviolet radiation cannot penetrate, the dissociation of CO2 by lightning may be a significant source of oxygen atoms. Depending on the assumed value for the total energy dissipated by lightning on Venus, the production of NO by lightning may be a significant sink of atmospheric nitrogen over the history of Venus.

  15. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  16. A multifaceted molecule, nitric oxide in oral and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Uğar-Cankal, Dilek; Ozmeric, Nurdan

    2006-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule with multiple effects on different tissues. NO takes important roles in vasodilatation, bacterial challenge and cytokine stimulation, regulation of mineralized tissue function, neurotransmission, and platelet aggregation, etc. However, under pathological conditions, NO has damaging effects. NO is synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) and inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) is closely related to the pathophysiological characteristics of inflammatory diseases such as periodontal diseases. The expression of iNOS has been investigated in salivary gland-related diseases, temporomandibular joint disorders and oral cancer as well. The beneficial and damaging effects of NO in diseases related with periodontal, dental and maxillofacial area are discussed in this review. The biological pathways involved with NO and NO inhibitors may be good drug targets to have a role in the future management of patients with diseases in orofacial region. PMID:16387291

  17. Metallo Protoporphyrin Functionalized Microelectrodes for Electrocatalytic Sensing of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Zhong; Alwarappan, Subbiah; Zhang, Wenbo; Scafa, Nikki; Zhang, Xueji

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been considered as an important bio-regulatory molecule in the physiological process. All the existing methods often employed for NO measurement are mainly indirect and not suitable for in vivo conditions. In this paper, we report a systematic study of electrocatalytic NO reduction by comparing the redox properties of NO at carbon microelectrodes functionalized by Fe, Mn and Co protoporphyrins. The mechanisms of electrocatalytic reduction of NO by different metalloporphyrins have been proposed and compared. In addition, by varying the metallic cores of the metalloporphyrins, NO exhibits voltammograms in which the cathodic peak current occur at different potential. A comparative study on the electrochemical behavior of each of these metalloporphyrin (as a result of varying the metallic core) has been performed and a possible mechanism for the observed behavior is proposed. The results confirmed the potential applicability of using metalloporphyrins modified electrodes for voltammetric NO detection. PMID:20526418

  18. Regulation of Injury-Induced Neurogenesis by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Bruno P.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2012-01-01

    The finding that neural stem cells (NSCs) are able to divide, migrate, and differentiate into several cellular types in the adult brain raised a new hope for restorative neurology. Nitric oxide (NO), a pleiotropic signaling molecule in the central nervous system (CNS), has been described to be able to modulate neurogenesis, acting as a pro- or antineurogenic agent. Some authors suggest that NO is a physiological inhibitor of neurogenesis, while others described NO to favor neurogenesis, particularly under inflammatory conditions. Thus, targeting the NO system may be a powerful strategy to control the formation of new neurons. However, the exact mechanisms by which NO regulates neural proliferation and differentiation are not yet completely clarified. In this paper we will discuss the potential interest of the modulation of the NO system for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or other pathological conditions that may affect the CNS. PMID:22997523

  19. Exhaled Nitric Oxide: Sources of Error in Offline Measurement

    PubMed Central

    LINN, WILLIAM S.; AVILA, MARISELA; GONG, HENRY

    2007-01-01

    Delayed offline measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), although useful in environmental and clinical research, is limited by the instability of stored breath samples. The authors characterized sources of instability with the goal of minimizing them. Breath and other air samples were stored under various conditions, and NO levels were measured repeatedly over 1–7 d. Concentration change rates varied positively with temperature and negatively with initial NO level, thus “stable” levels reflected a balance of NO-adding and NO-removing processes. Storage under refrigeration for a standardized period of time can optimize offline eNO measurement, although samples at room temperature are effectively stable for several hours. PMID:16268114

  20. Antibacterial Efficacy of Exogenous Nitric Oxide on Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Sergesketter, A.R.; Offenbacher, S.; Schoenfisch, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Current treatments for periodontitis (e.g., scaling/root planing and chlorhexidine) have limited efficacy since they fail to suppress microbial biofilms satisfactorily over time, and the use of adjunctive antimicrobials can promote the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Herein, we report the novel application of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing scaffolds (i.e., dendrimers and silica particles) as anti-periodontopathogenic agents. The effectiveness of macromolecular NO release was demonstrated by a 3-log reduction in periodontopathogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis viability. In contrast, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis, caries-associated organisms, were substantially less sensitive to NO treatment. Both dendrimer- and silica-based NO release exhibited substantially less toxicity to human gingival fibroblasts at concentrations necessary to eradicate periodontopathogens than did clinical concentrations of chlorhexidine. These results suggest the potential utility of macromolecular NO-release scaffolds as a novel platform for the development of periodontal disease therapeutics. PMID:25139363

  1. Detection of hydrazine compounds in gaseous samples by their conversion to nitric oxide-yielding derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rounbehler, D.P.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a method of detecting the presence of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in a gaseous sample, essentially in real time. The method consists of the steps of: (a) contacting a gaseous sample with aldehyde or ketone vapors to convert hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in the sample to hydrazine derivatives; (b) heating the sample in the presence of an oxidant to decompose derivatives produced in steps (a) to produce nitric oxide gas; and (c) determining the amount of nitric oxide gas produced in step (b), wherein any nitric oxide gas determined is indicative of the presence of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in the gaseous sample.

  2. Storm time variation of radiative cooling of thermosphere by nitric oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. V. Sunil; Bag, Tikemani; Bharti, Gaurav

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental vibration-rotation band emission (Δν=1, Δ j=0,± 1) by nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is one of the most important cooling mechanisms in thermosphere. The collisional vibrational excitation of NO(ν=0) by impact with atomic oxygen is the main source of vibrationally excited nitric oxide. The variation of NO density depends on latitude, longitude and season. The present study aims to understand how the radiative flux gets influenced by the severe geomagnetic storm conditions. The variation of Nitric Oxide (NO) radiative flux exiting thermosphere is studied during the superstorm event of 7-12 November, 2004. The observations of TIMED/SABER suggest a strong anti-correlation with the O/N_2 ratio observed by GUVI during the same period. On a global scale the NO radiative flux showed an enhancement during the main phase on 8 November, 2004, whereas maximum depletion in O/N_2 is observed on 10 November, 2004. Both O/N_2 and NO radiative flux were found to propagate equatorward due to the effect of meridional wind resulting from joule and particle heating in polar region. Larger penetrations is observed in western longitude sectors. These observed variations are effectively connected to the variations in neutral densities. In the equatorial sectors, O/N_2 shows enhancement but almost no variation in radiative flux is observed. The possible reasons for the observed variations in NO radiative emission and O/N_2 ratios are discussed in the light of equator ward increase in the densities and prompt penetration.

  3. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  4. Nitric oxide alters metabolism in isolated alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Huffman, L

    1996-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells may be exposed to nitric oxide (.NO) from external sources, and these cells can also generate .NO. Therefore we studied the effects of altering .NO levels on various type II cell metabolic processes. Incubation of cells with the .NO generator, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 1 mM), leads to reductions of 60-70% in the synthesis of disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) and cell ATP levels. Cellular oxygen consumption, an indirect measure of cell ATP synthesis, is also reduced by SNAP. There is no direct effect of SNAP on lung mitochondrial ATP synthesis, suggesting that .NO does not directly inhibit this process. On the other hand, incubation of cells with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for .NO synthesis, results in increases in DSPC synthesis, cell ATP content, and cellular oxygen consumption. The L-NAME effects are reversed by addition of L-arginine, the substrate for NOS. Production of .NO by type II cells is inhibited by L-NAME, a better inhibitor of constitutive NOS (cNOS) than inducible NOS (iNOS), and is reduced in the absence of external calcium. Aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of iNOS, has no effect on cell ATP content or on .NO production. These results indicate that alveolar type II cell lipid and energy metabolism can be affected by .NO and suggest that there may be cNOS activity in these cells. PMID:8760128

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates microvascular hyperpermeability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Takuya; Pappas, Peter J; Hobson, Robert W; Boric, Mauricio P; Sessa, William C; Durán, Walter N

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of blood flow, but its role in permeability is still challenged. We tested in vivo the hypotheses that: (a) endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is not essential for regulation of baseline permeability; (b) eNOS is essential for hyperpermeability responses in inflammation; and (c) molecular inhibition of eNOS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain (AP-Cav) reduces eNOS-regulated hyperpermeability. We used eNOS-deficient (eNOS−/−) mice and their wild-type control as experimental animals, platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 10−7 m as the test pro-inflammatory agent, and integrated optical intensity (IOI) as an index of microvascular permeability. PAF increased permeability in wild-type cremaster muscle from a baseline of 2.4 ± 2.2 to a peak net value of 84.4 ± 2.7 units, while the corresponding values in cremaster muscle of eNOS−/− mice were 1.0 ± 0.3 and 15.6 ± 7.7 units (P < 0.05). Similarly, PAF increased IOI in the mesentery of wild-type mice but much less in the mesentery of eNOS−/− mice. PAF increased IOI to comparable values in the mesenteries of wild-type mice and those lacking the gene for inducible NOS (iNOS). Administration of AP-Cav blocked the microvascular hyperpermeability responses to 10−7 m PAF. We conclude that: (1) baseline permeability does not depend on eNOS; (2) eNOS and NO are integral elements of the signalling pathway for the hyperpermeability response to PAF; (3) iNOS does not affect either baseline permeability or hyperpermeability responses to PAF; and (4) caveolin-1 inhibits eNOS regulation of microvascular permeability in vivo. Our results establish eNOS as an important regulator of microvascular permeability in inflammation. PMID:16675496

  6. Muscular nitric oxide synthase (muNOS) and utrophin.

    PubMed

    Chaubourt, Emmanuel; Voisin, Vincent; Fossier, Philippe; Baux, Gérard; Israël, Maurice; De La Porte, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the severe X-linked recessive disorder which results in progressive muscle degeneration, is due to a lack of dystrophin, a membrane cytoskeletal protein. Three types of treatment are envisaged: pharmacological (glucocorticoid), myoblast transplantation, and gene therapy. An alternative to the pharmacological approach is to compensate for dystrophin loss by the upregulation of another cytoskeletal protein, utrophin. Utrophin and dystrophin are part of a complex of proteins and glycoproteins, which links the basal lamina to the cytoskeleton, thus ensuring the stability of the muscle membrane. One protein of the complex, syntrophin, is associated with a muscular isoform of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). We have demonstrated an overexpression of utrophin, visualised by immunofluorescence and quantified by Western blotting, in normal myotubes and in mdx (the animal model of DMD) myotubes, as in normal (C57) and mdx mice, both treated with nitric oxide (NO) donor or L-arginine, the NOS substrate. There is evidence that utrophin may be capable of performing the same cellular functions as dystrophin and may functionally compensate for its lack. Thus, we propose to use NO donors, as palliative treatment of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, pending, or in combination with, gene and/or cellular therapy. Discussion has focussed on the various isoforms of NOS that could be implicated in the regeneration process. Dystrophic and healthy muscles respond to treatment, suggesting that although NOS is delocalised in the cytoplasm in the case of DMD, it conserves substantial activity. eNOS present in mitochondria and iNOS present in cytoplasm and the neuromuscular junction could also be activated. Lastly, production of NO by endothelial NOS of the capillaries would also be beneficial through increased supply of metabolites and oxygen to the muscles. PMID:11755782

  7. Decoding the Substrate Supply to Human Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Habermeier, Alice; Closs, Ellen I.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide, produced by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) from L-arginine is an important second messenger molecule in the central nervous system: It influences the synthesis and release of neurotransmitters and plays an important role in long-term potentiation, long-term depression and neuroendocrine secretion. However, under certain pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis, excessive NO production can lead to tissue damage. It is thus desirable to control NO production in these situations. So far, little is known about the substrate supply to human nNOS as a determinant of its activity. Measuring bioactive NO via cGMP formation in reporter cells, we demonstrate here that nNOS in both, human A673 neuroepithelioma and TGW-nu-I neuroblastoma cells can be fast and efficiently nourished by extracellular arginine that enters the cells via membrane transporters (pool I that is freely exchangeable with the extracellular space). When this pool was depleted, NO synthesis was partially sustained by intracellular arginine sources not freely exchangeable with the extracellular space (pool II). Protein breakdown made up by far the largest part of pool II in both cell types. In contrast, citrulline to arginine conversion maintained NO synthesis only in TGW-nu-I neuroblastoma, but not A673 neuroepithelioma cells. Histidine mimicked the effect of protease inhibitors causing an almost complete nNOS inhibition in cells incubated additionally in lysine that depletes the exchangeable arginine pool. Our results identify new ways to modulate nNOS activity by modifying its substrate supply. PMID:23874440

  8. Thromboresistance Characterization of Extruded Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silicone Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Kagya A.; Archangeli, Christopher; Handa, Hitesh; Major, Terry; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Annich, Gail M.; Bartlett, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheters used in clinical practice can activate platelets, leading to thrombus formation and stagnation of blood flow. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymers have been shown previously to reduce clot formation on a number of blood contacting devices. In this work, trilaminar NO-releasing silicone catheters were fabricated and tested for their thrombogenicity. All catheters had specifications of L = 6 cm, inner diameter = 21 gauge (0.0723 cm), outer diameter = 12 gauge (0.2052 cm), and NO-releasing layer thickness = 200 ± 11 μm. Control and NO-releasing catheters were characterized in vitro for their NO flux and NO release duration by gas phase chemiluminescence measurements. The catheters were then implanted in the right and left internal jugular veins of (N = 6 and average weight = 3 kg) adult male rabbits for 4 hours thrombogenicity testing. Platelet counts and function, methemoglobin (metHb), hemoglobin (Hb), and white cell counts and functional time (defined as patency time of catheter) were monitored as measured outcomes. Nitric oxide-releasing catheters (N = 6) maintained an average flux above (2 ± 0.5) × 10−10 mol/min/cm2 for more than 24 hours, whereas controls showed no NO release. Methemoglobin, Hb, white cell, and platelet counts and platelet function at 4 hours were not significantly different from baseline (α = 0.05). However, clots on controls were visibly larger and prevented blood draws at a significantly (p < 0.05) earlier time (2.3 ± 0.7 hours) into the experiment, whereas all NO-releasing catheters survived the entire 4 hours test period. Results indicate that catheter NO flux levels attenuated thrombus formation in a short-term animal model. PMID:22395119

  9. Elevation in Exhaled Nitric Oxide Predicts for Radiation Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Thomas; Martinez, Josue; McCurdy, Matthew R.; Wolski, Michael; McAleer, Mary Francis

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis is a major toxicity after thoracic radiotherapy (RT), with no method available to accurately predict the individual risk. This was a prospective study to evaluate exhaled nitric oxide as a predictive biomarker for radiation pneumonitis in esophageal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 34 patients prescribed neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer were enrolled in the present trial. Each patient underwent respiratory surveys and exhaled nitric oxide (NO) measurements before, at the end of, and 1 to 2 months after completing RT. Pneumonitis toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The demographics, dosimetric factors, and exhaled NO levels were evaluated for correlation with symptomatic patients (scores {>=}2). Results: Of the 34 patients, 28 were evaluable. All had received 50.4 Gy RT with concurrent chemotherapy. The pneumonitis toxicity score was Grade 3 for 1, Grade 2 for 3, Grade 1 for 7, and Grade 0 for 17. The dosimetric factors were not predictive of symptoms. The mean exhaled NO level measured before, at completion, and at restaging was 17.3 {+-} 8.5 (range, 5.5-36.7), 16.0 {+-} 14.2 (range, 5.8-67.7), and 14.7 {+-} 6.2 (range, 5.5-28.0) parts per billion, respectively. The ratio of exhaled NO at the end of RT vs. before treatment was 3.4 (range, 1.7-6.7) for the symptomatic and 0.8 (range, 0.3-1.3) for the asymptomatic (p = .0017) patients. The elevation in exhaled NO preceded the peak symptoms by 33 days (range, 21-50). The interval to peak symptoms was inversely related to the exhaled NO elevation. Conclusions: Elevations in exhaled NO at the end of RT was found to predict for radiation pneumonitis symptoms.

  10. Analytical study of mechanisms for nitric oxide formation during combustion of methane in a jet-stirred combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in the formation of nitric oxide during the combustion of methane was examined analytically by means of a detailed chemical mechanism for the oxidation of methane, for the reaction between hydrocarbon fragments, and for the formation of nitric oxide. By comparing predicted nitric oxide levels with values reported in the literature from jet-stirred combuster experiments, it was determined that the nitric oxide levels observed in fuel-rich flames cannot be described by a mechanism in which the rate of nitric oxide formation is controlled solely by the kinetics of oxygen atom formation. A proposed mechanism for the formation of nitric oxide in methane-rich flames reproduces the observed levels. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide appears to be an important factor in nitric oxide formation.

  11. Superoxide reacts with nitric oxide to nitrate tyrosine at physiological pH via peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Reiter, C D; Teng, R J; Beckman, J S

    2000-10-20

    Tyrosine nitration is a widely used marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Pfeiffer and Mayer (Pfeiffer, S., and Mayer, B. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 27280-27285) reported that superoxide produced from hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in combination with nitric oxide produced from spermine NONOate did not nitrate tyrosine at neutral pH. They suggested that nitric oxide and superoxide at neutral pH form a less reactive intermediate distinct from preformed alkaline peroxynitrite that does not nitrate tyrosine. Using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to rapidly mix potassium superoxide with nitric oxide at pH 7.4, we report that an intermediate spectrally and kinetically identical to preformed alkaline cis-peroxynitrite was formed in 100% yield. Furthermore, this intermediate nitrated tyrosine in the same yield and at the same rate as preformed peroxynitrite. Equivalent concentrations of nitric oxide under aerobic conditions in the absence of superoxide did not produce detectable concentrations of nitrotyrosine. Carbon dioxide increased the efficiency of nitration by nitric oxide plus superoxide to the same extent as peroxynitrite. In experiments using xanthine oxidase as a source of superoxide, tyrosine nitration was substantially inhibited by urate formed from hypoxanthine oxidation, which was sufficient to account for the lack of tyrosine nitration previously reported. We conclude that peroxynitrite formed from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at physiological pH remains an important species responsible for tyrosine nitration in vivo. PMID:10906340

  12. New nitric oxide donors based on ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C N; da Silva, R S; Bendhack, L M

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors produce NO-related activity when applied to biological systems. Among its diverse functions, NO has been implicated in vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Despite the great importance of NO in biological systems, its pharmacological and physiological studies have been limited due to its high reactivity and short half-life. In this review we will focus on our recent investigations of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes as NO-delivery agents and their effects on vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation. The high affinity of ruthenium for NO is a marked feature of its chemistry. The main signaling pathway responsible for the vascular relaxation induced by NO involves the activation of soluble guanylyl-cyclase, with subsequent accumulation of cGMP and activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. This in turn can activate several proteins such as K+ channels as well as induce vasodilatation by a decrease in cytosolic Ca2+. Oxidative stress and associated oxidative damage are mediators of vascular damage in several cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. The increased production of the superoxide anion (O2-) by the vascular wall has been observed in different animal models of hypertension. Vascular relaxation to the endogenous NO-related response or to NO released from NO deliverers is impaired in vessels from renal hypertensive (2K-1C) rats. A growing amount of evidence supports the possibility that increased NO inactivation by excess O2- may account for the decreased NO bioavailability and vascular dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:19219301

  13. Nitric Oxide and Peroxynitrite in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    PACHER, PÁL; BECKMAN, JOSEPH S.; LIAUDET, LUCAS

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that mammalian cells have the ability to synthesize the free radical nitric oxide (NO) has stimulated an extraordinary impetus for scientific research in all the fields of biology and medicine. Since its early description as an endothelial-derived relaxing factor, NO has emerged as a fundamental signaling device regulating virtually every critical cellular function, as well as a potent mediator of cellular damage in a wide range of conditions. Recent evidence indicates that most of the cytotoxicity attributed to NO is rather due to peroxynitrite, produced from the diffusion-controlled reaction between NO and another free radical, the superoxide anion. Peroxynitrite interacts with lipids, DNA, and proteins via direct oxidative reactions or via indirect, radical-mediated mechanisms. These reactions trigger cellular responses ranging from subtle modulations of cell signaling to overwhelming oxidative injury, committing cells to necrosis or apoptosis. In vivo, peroxynitrite generation represents a crucial pathogenic mechanism in conditions such as stroke, myocardial infarction, chronic heart failure, diabetes, circulatory shock, chronic inflammatory diseases, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, novel pharmacological strategies aimed at removing peroxynitrite might represent powerful therapeutic tools in the future. Evidence supporting these novel roles of NO and peroxynitrite is presented in detail in this review. PMID:17237348

  14. The influence of organic peroxides on platelet aggregation and sensitivity to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Naseem, K M; Bruckdorfer, K R

    1999-01-01

    The effects of oxidative stress, induced by water-soluble and lipid peroxides, on platelet reactivity and platelet sensitivity to nitric oxide were investigated. Hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide potentiated thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. In contrast, 15(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid had no such effect, while 12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid inhibited platelet reactivity. All of the peroxides tested were found to decrease platelet sensitivity to nitric oxide, although the mechanisms by which the various peroxides altered platelet sensitivity to nitric oxide were different. The water-soluble peroxides opposed the actions of nitric oxide without affecting cyclic GMP levels, while 15(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused a significant reduction in the concentration of cyclic GMP formed in response to NO. The data from this study demonstrate that water-soluble and lipid peroxides both affect platelet reactivity and regulation, but by different mechanisms. Thus, caution should be exercised when selecting peroxides to be used as models of oxidative stress. PMID:16801085

  15. Effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and oxidative status in platelets.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Mariana Alves de Sá; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Pereira, Natália Rodrigues; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Moss, Monique Bandeira; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have suggested an increase of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on periodontitis patients. An enhancement has been demonstrated on both platelet activation and oxidative stress on periodontitis patients, which may contribute for this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and oxidative status in platelets. A total of eight periodontitis patients and eight controls were included in this study. Clinical, laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed on baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment (except for western blot analysis). The clinical periodontal evaluation included measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), % of sites with plaque and % of sites with bleeding on probing. We evaluated: l-[(3)H]arginine influx; nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes activity and expression; expression of guanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes; cGMP levels; platelet aggregation; oxidative status through superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The initial results showed an activation of both l-arginine influx and via system y (+ )L associated with reduced intraplatelet cGMP levels in periodontitis patients and increased systemic levels of CRP. After periodontal treatment, there was a significant reduction of the % of sites with PPD 4-5mm, % of sites with CAL 4-5 mm, and an enhancement in cGMP levels and SOD activity. Moreover, CRP levels were reduced after treatment. Therefore, alterations in the intraplatelet l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and oxidant-antioxidant balance associated with a systemic inflammatory response may lead to platelet dysfunction, which may contribute to a higher risk of CVD in periodontitis. PMID:23918883

  16. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Induces Anti-contractile Effect Dependent on Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and NPR-B Activation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pernomian, Laena; Prado, Alejandro F.; Silva, Bruno R.; Azevedo, Aline; Pinheiro, Lucas C.; Tanus-Santos, José E.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation in C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta isolated from septic rats. Methods and Results: Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery was used to induce sepsis in male rats. Vascular reactivity was conducted in rat aorta and resistance mesenteric artery (RMA). Measurement of survival rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma nitric oxide, specific protein expression, and localization were evaluated. Septic rats had a survival rate about 37% at 4 h after the surgery, and these rats presented hypotension compared to control-operated (Sham) rats. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was decreased in sepsis. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) induced anti-contractile effect in aortas. Plasma nitric oxide was increased in sepsis. Nitric oxide-synthase but not natriuretic peptide receptor-B expression was increased in septic rat aortas. C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C, protein kinase-Cα mRNA, and basal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ROS production were lower in septic rats. Phenylephrine and CNP enhanced ROS production. However, stimulated ROS production was low in sepsis. Conclusion: CNP induced anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine contraction in aortas from Sham and septic rats that was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. PMID:27445832

  17. Exogenous nitric oxide donor protects Artemisia annua from oxidative stress generated by boron and aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M Masroor A; Naeem, M; Idrees, Mohd; Moinuddin; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Ram, M

    2012-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signal molecule modulating the response of plants to environmental stress. Here we report the effects of boron (B) and aluminium (Al) contamination in soil, carried out with or without application of exogenous SNP (NO donor), on various plant processes in Artemisia annua, including changes in artemisinin content. The addition of B or Al to soil medium significantly reduced the yield and growth of plants and lowered the values of net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO(2) concentration and total chlorophyll content. The follow-up treatment of NO donor favoured growth and improved the photosynthetic efficiency in stressed as well as non-stressed plants. Artemisinin content was enhanced by 24.6% and 43.8% at 1mmole of soil-applied B or Al. When SNP was applied at 2mmole concentration together with either 1mmole of B and/or Al, it further stimulated artemisinin biosynthesis compared to the control. Application of B+Al+SNP proved to be the best treatment combination for the artemisinin content in Artemisia annua leaves. PMID:22421454

  18. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated blood flow regulation as affected by smoking and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Toda, Hiroshi

    2010-12-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, cerebral and coronary vascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Chronic smoking impairs endothelial function by decreasing the formation of nitric oxide and increasing the degradation of nitric oxide via generation of oxygen free radicals. Nitric oxide liberated from efferent nitrergic nerves is also involved in vasodilatation, increased regional blood flow, and hypotension that are impaired through nitric oxide sequestering by smoking-induced factors. Influence of smoking on nitric oxide-induced blood flow regulation is not necessarily the same in all organs and tissues. However, human studies are limited mainly to the forearm blood flow measurement that assesses endothelial function under basal and stimulated conditions and also determination of penile tumescence and erection in response to endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide. Therefore, information about blood flow regulation in other organs, such as the brain and placenta, has been provided mainly from studies on experimental animals. Nicotine, a major constituent of cigarette smoke, acutely dilates cerebral arteries and arterioles through nitric oxide liberated from nitrergic neurons, but chronically interferes with endothelial function in various vasculatures, both being noted in studies on experimental animals. Cigarette smoke constituents other than nicotine also have some vascular actions. Not only active but also passive smoking is undoubtedly harmful for both the smokers themselves and their neighbors, who should bear in mind that they can face serious diseases in the future, which may result in lengthy hospitalization, and a shortened lifespan. PMID:20868673

  20. The production of nitric oxide by marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea and inhibition of archaeal ammonia oxidation by a nitric oxide scavenger.

    PubMed

    Martens-Habbena, Willm; Qin, Wei; Horak, Rachel E A; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Schauer, Andrew J; Moffett, James W; Armbrust, E Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Devol, Allan H; Stahl, David A

    2015-07-01

    Nitrification is a critical process for the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, linking mineralization to the nitrogen loss processes of denitrification and anammox. Recent studies indicate a significant contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to nitrification. However, quantification of the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to in situ ammonia oxidation remains challenging. We show here the production of nitric oxide (NO) by Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. Activity of SCM1 was always associated with the release of NO with quasi-steady state concentrations between 0.05 and 0.08 μM. NO production and metabolic activity were inhibited by the nitrogen free radical scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5,-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO). Comparison of marine and terrestrial AOB strains with SCM1 and the recently isolated marine AOA strain HCA1 demonstrated a differential sensitivity of AOB and AOA to PTIO and allylthiourea (ATU). Similar to the investigated AOA strains, bulk water column nitrification at coastal and open ocean sites with sub-micromolar ammonia/ammonium concentrations was inhibited by PTIO and insensitive to ATU. These experiments support predictions from kinetic, molecular and biogeochemical studies, indicating that marine nitrification at low ammonia/ammonium concentrations is largely driven by archaea and suggest an important role of NO in the archaeal metabolism. PMID:25420929

  1. Controlled release of nitric oxide chemotherapy using a nano-sized biodegradable multi-arm polymer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shaofeng; Cai, Shuang; Yang, Qiuhong; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a cell signaling molecule that can be a potent inducer of cell death in cancers at elevated concentrations. Nitric oxide molecules are short-lived in vivo; therefore, NO-donating prodrugs have been developed that can deliver NO to tissues at micromolar concentrations. However, NO is also toxic to normal tissues and chronic exposure at low levels can induce tumor growth. We have designed a polymeric carrier system to deliver nitric oxide locoregionally to tumorigenic tissues. A highly water solubility and biodegradable 4-arm polymer nanocarrier, sugar poly-(6-O-methacryloyl-D-galactose), was synthesized using MADIX/RAFT polymerization, and utilized to deliver high concentrations of nitric oxide to xenografts of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The in vitro release of the newly synthesized nitric oxide donor, O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[4-(2-hydroxy)ethyl]-3-methylpiperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate and its corresponding multi-arm polymer-based nanoconjugate demonstrated a 1- and 2.3-fold increase in half-life, respectively, compared to the release half-life of the nitric oxide -donor prodrug JS-K. When administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, the subcutaneously injected multi-arm polymer nitric oxide nanoparticles resulted in 50% tumor inhibition and a 7-week extension of the average survival time, compared to intravenous JS-K therapy (nitric oxide nanoparticles: CR=25%, PR=37.5%, PD=37.5%; JS-K: PD=100%). In summary, we have developed an effective nitric oxide anti-cancer chemotherapy that could be administered regionally to provide the local disease control, improving prognosis for head and neck cancers. PMID:22281420

  2. The Biological Chemistry of Nitric Oxide as It Pertains to the Extrapulmonary Effects of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of nitric oxide (NO) have been studied for over 200 years. However, it is only within the last 20 years that the biological implications of this chemistry have been considered. The classical model of NO action within the vasculature centers on production in the endothelium, diffusion to the smooth muscle, and subsequent activation of guanylate cyclase via binding to its heme iron. In the context of this model, it is difficult to conceptualize extrapulmonary effects of inhaled NO. However, NO possesses complex redox chemistry and is capable of forming a range of nitrogen oxide species and is therefore capable of interacting with a variety of biomolecules. Of particular interest is its reaction with reduced cysteine to form an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). SNOs are formed throughout NO biology and are a post-translational modification that has been shown to regulate many proteins under physiologic conditions. Hemoglobin, which was considered to be solely a consumer of NO, can form SNO in a conformationally dependent manner, which allows for the transport of inhaled NO beyond the realm of the lung. Higher oxides of nitrogen are capable of modifying proteins via nitration of tyrosines, which has been shown to occur under pathologic conditions. By virtue of its redox reactivity, one can appreciate that inhaled NO has a variety of routes by which it can act and that these routes may lead to extrapulmonary effects. PMID:16565423

  3. Surface plasmon resonance biochip based on ZnO thin film for nitric oxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei-Yi; Chiu, Nan-Fu; Lu, Hui-Hsin; Shih, Hsueh-Ching; Yang, Dongfang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the design of a novel optical sensor that comprises surface plasmon resonance sensing chip and zinc oxide nano-film was proposed for the detection of nitric oxide gas. The electrical and optical properties of zinc oxide film vary in the presence of nitric oxide. This effect was utilized to prepare biochemical sensors with transduction based on surface plasmon resonance. Due to the refractive index of the transparent zinc oxide film that was deposited on the gold film, however, changes will be observed in the surface plasmon resonance spectra. For this reason, the thickness of zinc oxide film will be investigated and determined in this study. The interaction of nitric oxide with a 20 nm zinc oxide layer on gold leads to the shift of the resonance angle. The analysis on the reflectance intensity of light demonstrates that such effect is caused by the variation of conductivity and permittivity of zinc oxide film. Finally, a shift in surface plasmon resonance angle was measured in 25 ppm nitric oxide at 180 C and a calibration curve of nitride oxide concentration versus response intensity was successfully obtained in the range of 250 to 1000 ppm nitric oxide at lower temperature of 150 C. Moreover, these effects are quasi-reversible. PMID:19164025

  4. Nitric oxide synthase: role as a transmitter/mediator in the brain and endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a unique biological messenger molecule. It is produced by endothelial cells to mediate blood vessel relaxation; it mediates, in part, the immune functions of activated macrophages; and in the central and peripheral nervous system it serves as a neurotransmitter. In the nervous system, nitric oxide may regulate neurotransmitter release, it may play a key role in synaptic plasticity and morphogenesis, and it may regulate sexual and aggressive behavior. Under conditions of excessive formation, nitric oxide is emerging as an important neurotoxin. PMID:8712777

  5. A hypothesis about cellular signaling with nitric oxide in the earliest life forms in evolution.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid; Barber, Roger

    2009-11-01

    We propose that nitric oxide participated as an extracellular and intracellular messenger in the early evolution of life. From a toxic and noxious substance it evolved into an important material for cellular communication and regulation with unique chemistry and properties. The presence of some nitric oxide complexes in extraterrestrial samples may support evidence for life forms in the past or present. Although nitric oxide probably participated in the evolution and maintenance of life, if pollution continues at an ever-increasing rate, it could also end life on the planet as we know it today. PMID:19439177

  6. Nitro-linolenic acid is a nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Carreras, Alfonso; Padilla, María N; Melguizo, Manuel; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-07-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), which are the result of the interaction between reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and non-saturated fatty acids, constitute a new research area in plant systems, and their study has significantly increased. Very recently, the endogenous presence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) has been reported in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this regard, the signaling role of this molecule has been shown to be key in setting up a defense mechanism by inducing the chaperone network in plants. Here, we report on the ability of NO2-Ln to release nitric oxide (NO) in an aqueous medium with several approaches, such as by a spectrofluorometric probe with DAF-2, the oxyhemoglobin oxidation method, ozone chemiluminescence, and also by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis cell cultures. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. PMID:27164295

  7. Endothelial cell expression of haemoglobin α regulates nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Straub, Adam C; Lohman, Alexander W; Billaud, Marie; Johnstone, Scott R; Dwyer, Scott T; Lee, Monica Y; Bortz, Pamela Schoppee; Best, Angela K; Columbus, Linda; Gaston, Benjamin; Isakson, Brant E

    2012-11-15

    Models of unregulated nitric oxide (NO) diffusion do not consistently account for the biochemistry of NO synthase (NOS)-dependent signalling in many cell systems. For example, endothelial NOS controls blood pressure, blood flow and oxygen delivery through its effect on vascular smooth muscle tone, but the regulation of these processes is not adequately explained by simple NO diffusion from endothelium to smooth muscle. Here we report a new model for the regulation of NO signalling by demonstrating that haemoglobin (Hb) α (encoded by the HBA1 and HBA2 genes in humans) is expressed in human and mouse arterial endothelial cells and enriched at the myoendothelial junction, where it regulates the effects of NO on vascular reactivity. Notably, this function is unique to Hb α and is abrogated by its genetic depletion. Mechanistically, endothelial Hb α haem iron in the Fe(3+) state permits NO signalling, and this signalling is shut off when Hb α is reduced to the Fe(2+) state by endothelial cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3, also known as diaphorase 1). Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CYB5R3 increases NO bioactivity in small arteries. These data reveal a new mechanism by which the regulation of the intracellular Hb α oxidation state controls NOS signalling in non-erythroid cells. This model may be relevant to haem-containing globins in a broad range of NOS-containing somatic cells. PMID:23123858

  8. An introduction to nitric oxide sensing and response in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stern, Andrew M; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a radical gas that has been intensively studied for its role as a bacteriostatic agent. NO reacts in complex ways with biological molecules, especially metal centers and other radicals, to generate other bioactive compounds that inhibit enzymes, oxidize macromolecules, and arrest bacterial growth. Bacteria encounter not only NO derived from the host during infection but also NO derived from other bacteria and inorganic sources. The transcriptional responses used by bacteria to respond to NO are diverse but usually involve an iron-containing transcription factor that binds NO and alters its affinity for either DNA or factors involved in transcription, leading to the production of enzymatic tolerance systems. Some of these systems, such as flavohemoglobin and flavorubredoxin, directly remove NO. Some do not but are still important for NO tolerance through other mechanisms. The targets of NO that are protected by these systems include many metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched chain amino acid synthesis. This chapter discusses these topics and others and serves as a general introduction to microbial NO biology. PMID:24581392

  9. [Pathophysiological and therapeutic implications of nitric oxide in hepatology].

    PubMed

    Battista, S; Bar, F; Pollet, C; Mengozzi, G; Molino, G

    2002-12-01

    The L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway has been recognized as a main regulator of several cell functions. Accordingly, there is an increasing number of pathophysiological conditions in which a precise knowledge of NO status could prove helpful in understanding the mechanisms involved in disease development, prevention and treatment. These include several hepatic disorders, such as liver cirrhosis and associated hyperdynamic circulation with portal hypertension, ischaemia-reperfusion injury occurring during liver transplantation, and chronic cholestatic conditions. Overall, NO seems to exert a dual role in the pathobiology of liver diseases: one mostly beneficial, due to its vasoactive effects; and one mostly negative, due to its local toxic effects. Protective actions are primarily mediated via vasodilation, antithrombosis, inhibition of neutrophil adhesion and inhibition of apoptosis. Deleterious effects are dependent upon the formation of highly reactive substances during oxidative stress. In this review aspects related to NO implications in the homeostasis of liver functions as well as in the pathogenesis of some relevant hepatic clinical syndromes will be discussed in view of possible therapeutic options. PMID:16491056

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  11. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement with a handheld device.

    PubMed

    Magori, Erhard; Hiltawsky, Karsten; Fleischer, Maximilian; Simon, Elfriede; Pohle, Roland; von Sicard, Oliver; Tawil, Angelika

    2011-06-01

    A sensing system for fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurement is presented, which is characterized by a compact setup and a cost potential to be made available for the patient at home. The sensing is based on the work function measurement of a phthalocyanine-type sensing material, which is shown to be sufficiently sensitive for NO(2) in the ppb range. The transducer used to measure the work function is a field effect transistor with a suspended gate electrode. Selectivity is given with respect to other breath components including typically metabolic by-products. The measurement system includes breath treatments in a simple setup, which essentially are dehumidification and a quantitative conversion of NO to NO(2) with a conversion rate of approx. 95%, using a disposable oxidation catalyst. The accomplishment of the correct exhalation maneuver and feeding of the suited portion of exhaled air to the sensor is provided by breath sampling means. The sensor is not gas consuming. This allows us to fill the measurement chamber once, instead of establishing a gas flow for the measurement. This feature simplifies the device architecture. In this paper, we report on sensor characteristics, system architecture and measurement with artificial breath-gas as well as with human breath with the device. PMID:21646688

  12. Cardioprotection by H2S Donors: Nitric Oxide-Dependent and ‑Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chatzianastasiou, Athanasia; Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Efentakis, Panagiotis; Kaludercic, Nina; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Di Lisa, Fabio; Daiber, Andreas; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Szabó, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling molecule with protective effects in the cardiovascular system. To harness the therapeutic potential of H2S, a number of donors have been developed. The present study compares the cardioprotective actions of representative H2S donors from different classes and studies their mechanisms of action in myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to H2O2 led to significant cytotoxicity, which was inhibited by sodium sulfide (Na2S), thiovaline (TV), GYY4137 [morpholin-4-ium 4 methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate], and AP39 [(10-oxo-10-(4-(3-thioxo-3H-1,2-dithiol5yl)phenoxy)decyl) triphenylphospho-nium bromide]. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis prevented the cytoprotective effects of Na2S and TV, but not GYY4137 and AP39, against H2O2-induced cardiomyocyte injury. Mice subjected to left anterior descending coronary ligation were protected from ischemia-reperfusion injury by the H2S donors tested. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in vivo blocked only the beneficial effect of Na2S. Moreover, Na2S, but not AP39, administration enhanced the phosphorylation of endothelial NOS and vasodilator-associated phosphoprotein. Both Na2S and AP39 reduced infarct size in mice lacking cyclophilin-D (CypD), a modulator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). Nevertheless, only AP39 displayed a direct effect on mitochondria by increasing the mitochondrial Ca(2+) retention capacity, which is evidence of decreased propensity to undergo permeability transition. We conclude that although all the H2S donors we tested limited infarct size, the pathways involved were not conserved. Na2S had no direct effects on PTP opening, and its action was nitric oxide dependent. In contrast, the cardioprotection exhibited by AP39 could result from a direct inhibitory effect on PTP acting at a site different than CypD. PMID:27342567

  13. Electric fields caused by blood flow modulate vascular endothelial electrophysiology and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan P; Hallock, Kevin J; Bergethon, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells are exposed to a ubiquitous, yet unexamined electrical force caused by blood flow: the electrokinetic vascular streaming potential (EVSP). In this study, the hypothesis that extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields parameterized by the EVSP have significant biological effects on endothelial cell properties was studied by measuring membrane potential and nitric oxide production under ELF stimulation between 0 and 2 Hz and 0-6.67 V/m. Using membrane potential and nitric oxide sensitive fluorescent dyes, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) in culture were studied in the presence and absence of EVSP-modeled electric fields. The transmembrane potential of BAECs was shown to depolarize between 1 and 7 mV with a strong dependency on both the magnitude and frequency of the isolated ELF field. The findings also support a field interaction with a frequency-dependent tuning curve. The ELF field complexly modulates the nitric oxide response to adenosine triphosphate stimulation with potentiation seen with up to a sevenfold increase. This potentiation was also frequency and magnitude dependent. An early logarithmic phase of NO production is enhanced in a field strength-dependent manner, but the ELF field does not modify a later exponential phase. This study shows that using electric fields on the order of those generated by blood flow influences the essential biology of endothelial cells. The inclusion of ELF electric fields in the paradigm of vascular biology may create novel opportunities for advancing both the understanding and therapies for treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:22674251

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition Attenuates Cardiac Response to Hemodilution with Viscogenic Plasma Expander

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Increased vascular wall shear stress by elevated plasma viscosity significantly enhances the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity during an acute isovolemic hemodilution. Also the modulation of plasma viscosity has effects on the cardiac function that were revealed if a left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume (PV) measurement was used. The aim of this study was to assess cardiac function responses to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors with the presence of an elevated plasma viscosity but a low hematocrit level. Furthermore, systemic parameters were monitored in a murine model. Materials and Methods As test group five anesthetized hamsters were administered with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), NOS inhibitor, whereas five other hamsters were used as control group without L-NAME infusion. The dosage of L-NAME was 10 mg/kg. An isovolemic hemodilution was performed by 40% of estimated blood volume with 6% w/v dextran 2000 kDa, high viscosity plasma expanders (PEs) with viscosity 6.34 cP. LV function was measured and assessed using a 1.4 Fr PV conductance catheter. Results The study results demonstrated that NOS inhibition prevented the normal cardiac adaptive response after hemodilution. The endsystolic pressure increased 14% after L-NAME infusion and maintained higher than at the baseline after hemodilution, whereas it gradually decreased in the animals without L-NAME infusion. The admission of L-NAME significantly decreased the maximum rate of ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dtmax), stroke volume and cardiac output after hemodilution if compared to the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion This finding supports the presumption that nitric oxide induced by an increased plasma viscosity with the use of a high viscosity PE plays a major role in the cardiac function during an acute isovolemic hemodilution. PMID:24653740

  15. The transport of nitric oxide in the upper atmosphere by planetary waves and the zonal mean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. A.; Avery, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent numerical model was developed and used to study the interaction between planetary waves, the zonal mean circulation, and the trace constituent nitric oxide in the region between 55 km and 120 km. The factors which contribute to the structure of the nitric oxide distribution were examined, and the sensitivity of the distribution to changes in planetary wave amplitude was investigated. Wave-induced changes in the mean nitric oxide concentration were examined as a possible mechanism for the observed winter anomaly. Results indicate that vertically-propagating planetary waves induce a wave-like structure in the nitric oxide distribution and that at certain levels, transports of nitric oxide by planetary waves could significantly affect the mean nitric oxide distribution. The magnitude and direction of these transports at a given level was found to depend not only on the amplitude of the planetary wave, but also on the loss rate of nitric oxide at that level.

  16. Nitric oxide donors prevent while the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME increases arachidonic acid plus CYP2E1-dependent toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Defeng; Cederbaum, Arthur . E-mail: arthur.cederbaum@mssm.edu

    2006-10-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) play an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury. AA promotes toxicity in rat hepatocytes with high levels of cytochrome P4502E1 and in HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1. Nitric oxide (NO) participates in the regulation of various cell activities as well as in cytotoxic events. NO may act as a protectant against cytotoxic stress or may enhance cytotoxicity when produced at elevated concentrations. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of endogenously or exogenously produced NO on AA toxicity in liver cells with high expression of CYP2E1 and assess possible mechanisms for its actions. Pyrazole-induced rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 were treated with AA in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase L-N {sup G}-Nitroarginine Methylester (L-NAME) or the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and (Z)-1-[-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NONO). AA decreased cell viability from 100% to 48 {+-} 6% after treatment for 48 h. In the presence of L-NAME, viability was further lowered to 23 {+-} 5%, while, SNAP or DETA-NONO increased viability to 66 {+-} 8 or 71 {+-} 6%. The L-NAME potentiated toxicity was primarily necrotic in nature. L-NAME did not affect CYP2E1 activity or CYP2E1 content. SNAP significantly lowered CYP2E1 activity but not protein. AA treatment increased lipid peroxidation and lowered GSH levels. L-NAME potentiated while SNAP prevented these changes. Thus, L-NAME increased, while NO donors decreased AA-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants prevented the L-NAME potentiation of AA toxicity. Damage to mitochondria by AA was shown by a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). L-NAME potentiated this decline in MMP in association with its increase in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. NO donors decreased this decline in MMP in association with their decrease in AA

  17. Chemical generation of nitric oxide in the mouth from the enterosalivary circulation of dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C; Dougall, H; Johnston, P; Green, S; Brogan, R; Leifert, C; Smith, L; Golden, M; Benjamin, N

    1995-06-01

    High concentrations of nitrite present in saliva (derived from dietary nitrate) may, upon acidification, generate nitrogen oxides in the stomach in sufficient amounts to provide protection from swallowed pathogens. We now show that, in the rat, reduction of nitrate to nitrite is confined to a specialized area on the posterior surface of the tongue, which is heavily colonized by bacteria, and that nitrate reduction is absent in germ-free rats. We also show that in humans increased salivary nitrite production resulting from nitrate intake enhances oral nitric oxide production. We propose that the salivary generation of nitrite is accomplished by a symbiotic relationship involving nitrate-reducing bacteria on the tongue surface, which is designed to provide host defence against microbial pathogens in the mouth and lower gut. These results provide further evidence for beneficial effects of dietary nitrate. PMID:7585121

  18. Contribution of polyamines metabolism and GABA shunt to chilling tolerance induced by nitric oxide in cold-stored banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-04-15

    Effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on polyamines (PAs) catabolism, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, proline accumulation and chilling injury of banana fruit under cold storage was investigated. Banana fruit treated with NO sustained lower chilling injury index than the control. Notably elevated nitric oxide synthetase activity and endogenous NO level were observed in NO-treated banana fruit. PAs contents in treated fruit were significantly higher than control fruit, due to the elevated activities of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase. NO treatment increased the activities of diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase and glutamate decarboxylase, while reduced GABA transaminase activity to lower levels compared with control fruit, which resulted the accumulation of GABA. Besides, NO treatment upregulated proline content and significantly enhanced the ornithine aminotransferase activity. These results indicated that the chilling tolerance induced by NO treatment might be ascribed to the enhanced catabolism of PAs, GABA and proline. PMID:26616957

  19. Nitric oxide as a regulator of B. anthracis pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Taissia G; Teunis, Allison; Vaseghi, Haley; Zhou, Weidong; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A; Popov, Serguei G

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key physiological regulator in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. It can cause a variety of biological effects by reacting with its targets or/and indirectly inducing oxidative stress. NO can also be produced by bacteria including the pathogenic Bacillus anthracis; however, its role in the infectious process only begins to emerge. NO incapacitates macrophages by S-nitrosylating the intracellular proteins and protects B. anthracis from oxidative stress. It is also implicated in the formation of toxic peroxynitrite. In this study we further assessed the effects of B. anthracis NO produced by the NO synthase (bNOS) on bacterial metabolism and host cells in experiments with the bNOS knockout Sterne strain. The mutation abrogated accumulation of nitrite and nitrate as tracer products of NO in the culture medium and markedly attenuated growth in both aerobic and microaerobic conditions. The regulatory role of NO was also suggested by the abnormally high rate of nitrate denitrification by the mutant in the presence of oxygen. Anaerobic regulation mediated by NO was reflected in reduced fermentation of glucose by the mutant correlating with the reduced toxicity of bacteria toward host cells in culture. The toxic effect of NO required permeabilization of the target cells as well as the activity of fermentation-derived metabolite in the conditions of reduced pH. The host cells demonstrated increased phosphorylation of major survivor protein kinase AKT correlating with reduced toxicity of the mutant in comparison with Sterne. Our global proteomic analysis of lymph from the lymph nodes of infected mice harboring bacteria revealed numerous changes in the pattern and levels of proteins associated with the activity of bNOS influencing key cell physiological processes relevant to energy metabolism, growth, signal transduction, stress response, septic shock, and homeostasis. This is the first in vivo observation of the bacterial NO effect on the lymphatic

  20. Production and Consumption of Nitric Oxide by Three Methanotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tie; Roy, Réal; Knowles, Roger

    2000-01-01

    We studied nitrogen oxide production and consumption by methanotrophs Methylobacter luteus (group I), Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (group II), and an isolate from a hardwood swamp soil, here identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Methylobacter sp. strain T20 (group I). All could consume nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, NO), and produce small amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O). Only Methylobacter strain T20 produced large amounts of NO (>250 parts per million by volume [ppmv] in the headspace) at specific activities of up to 2.0 × 10−17 mol of NO cell−1 day−1, mostly after a culture became O2 limited. Production of NO by strain T20 occurred mostly in nitrate-containing medium under anaerobic or nearly anaerobic conditions, was inhibited by chlorate, tungstate, and O2, and required CH4. Denitrification (methanol-supported N2O production from nitrate in the presence of acetylene) could not be detected and thus did not appear to be involved in the production of NO. Furthermore, cd1 and Cu nitrite reductases, NO reductase, and N2O reductase could not be detected by PCR amplification of the nirS, nirK, norB, and nosZ genes, respectively. M. luteus and M. trichosporium produced some NO in ammonium-containing medium under aerobic conditions, likely as a result of methanotrophic nitrification and chemical decomposition of nitrite. For Methylobacter strain T20, arginine did not stimulate NO production under aerobiosis, suggesting that NO synthase was not involved. We conclude that strain T20 causes assimilatory reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which then decomposes chemically to NO. The production of NO by methanotrophs such as Methylobacter strain T20 could be of ecological significance in habitats near aerobic-anaerobic interfaces where fluctuating O2 and nitrate availability occur. PMID:10966405

  1. Modeling toxic compounds from nitric oxide emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallero, Daniel A.; Peirce, Jeffrey; Cho, Ki Don

    Determining the amount and rate of degradation of toxic pollutants in soil and groundwater is difficult and often requires invasive techniques, such as deploying extensive monitoring well networks. Even with these networks, degradation rates across entire systems cannot readily be extrapolated from the samples. When organic compounds are degraded by microbes, especially nitrifying bacteria, oxides or nitrogen (NO x) are released to the atmosphere. Thus, the flux of nitric oxide (NO) from the soil to the lower troposphere can be used to predict the rate at which organic compounds are degraded. By characterizing and applying biogenic and anthropogenic processes in soils the rates of degradation of organic compounds. Toluene was selected as a representative of toxic aromatic compounds, since it is inherently toxic, it is a substituted benzene compound and is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 12 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Measured toluene concentrations in soil, microbial population growth and NO fluxes in chamber studies were used to develop and parameterize a numerical model based on carbon and nitrogen cycling. These measurements, in turn, were used as indicators of bioremediation of air toxic (i.e. toluene) concentrations. The model found that chemical concentration, soil microbial abundance, and NO production can be directly related to the experimental results (significant at P < 0.01) for all toluene concentrations tested. This indicates that the model may prove useful in monitoring and predicting the fate of toxic aromatic contaminants in a complex soil system. It may also be useful in predicting the release of ozone precursors, such as changes in reservoirs of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. As such, the model may be a tool for decision makers in ozone non-attainment areas.

  2. Isolation and characterization of nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, N; Sakurai, T

    1997-11-11

    Nitric oxide reductase was isolated from the membrane fraction of a denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus halodenitrificans, in the presence of n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside. A relatively simple and effective procedure to purify NO reductase using DEAE-Toyopearl and hydroxyapatite (ceramic) chromatographies has been developed. The enzyme consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 20 and 42 kDa associated with the c-type heme and two b-type hemes, respectively. The optical and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of the oxidized (as isolated) and reduced enzymes indicated that the heme c is in the low-spin state and the hemes b are in the high- and low-spin states. The EPR spectrum also showed the presence of the split high-spin component (g perpendicular = 6.6, 6.0) and two low spin components (gz,y,x = 2.96, 2.26, 1.46, gz = 3.59). Although the presence of an extra iron was suggested from atomic absorption spectroscopy, a non-heme iron could not be detected by colorimetric titrations using ferene and 2-(5-nitro-2-pyridylazo)- 5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamino)phenolate (PAPS). One of the extra signals at g = 4.3 and 2.00 might come from a non-heme iron, while they may originate from an adventitious iron and a certain nonmetallic radical, respectively. When CO acted on the reduced enzyme, both of the low-spin hemes were not affected, and when NO acted on the reduced enzyme, the optical and MCD spectra were of a mixture of the oxidized and reduced enzymes. Consequently, the reduction of NO was supposed to take place at the high-spin heme b. The heme c and the low-spin heme b centers were considered to function as electron mediators during the intermolecular and intramolecular processes. PMID:9374857

  3. Nitric oxide as a regulator of B. anthracis pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Taissia G.; Teunis, Allison; Vaseghi, Haley; Zhou, Weidong; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key physiological regulator in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. It can cause a variety of biological effects by reacting with its targets or/and indirectly inducing oxidative stress. NO can also be produced by bacteria including the pathogenic Bacillus anthracis; however, its role in the infectious process only begins to emerge. NO incapacitates macrophages by S-nitrosylating the intracellular proteins and protects B. anthracis from oxidative stress. It is also implicated in the formation of toxic peroxynitrite. In this study we further assessed the effects of B. anthracis NO produced by the NO synthase (bNOS) on bacterial metabolism and host cells in experiments with the bNOS knockout Sterne strain. The mutation abrogated accumulation of nitrite and nitrate as tracer products of NO in the culture medium and markedly attenuated growth in both aerobic and microaerobic conditions. The regulatory role of NO was also suggested by the abnormally high rate of nitrate denitrification by the mutant in the presence of oxygen. Anaerobic regulation mediated by NO was reflected in reduced fermentation of glucose by the mutant correlating with the reduced toxicity of bacteria toward host cells in culture. The toxic effect of NO required permeabilization of the target cells as well as the activity of fermentation-derived metabolite in the conditions of reduced pH. The host cells demonstrated increased phosphorylation of major survivor protein kinase AKT correlating with reduced toxicity of the mutant in comparison with Sterne. Our global proteomic analysis of lymph from the lymph nodes of infected mice harboring bacteria revealed numerous changes in the pattern and levels of proteins associated with the activity of bNOS influencing key cell physiological processes relevant to energy metabolism, growth, signal transduction, stress response, septic shock, and homeostasis. This is the first in vivo observation of the bacterial NO effect on the lymphatic

  4. The Achievements of the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) completed nearly six years of continuous observation before it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on December 13, 2003. The primary goals of SNOE were to determine the magnitude and variability of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere and to determine the relationship between NO and the energetic inputs to the atmosphere that create it. SNOE observations confirmed previously held suspicions that the solar soft X-ray irradiance was stronger than the prior sparsely available data and empirical models suggested. SNOE demonstrated that solar soft X-ray irradiance and auroral energy deposition control the abundance of NO over the globe, but provided the very surprising results that wintertime midlatitude NO is controlled by auroral energy while summertime polar NO is controlled by solar irradiance. The morphology of NO is also providing clues to the processes in the magnetospheric which lead to the auroral energy deposition. Serendipitous observations of polar mesospheric clouds by SNOE have provided an excellent database for climatological studies of these clouds, showing that there is a strong hemispheric asymmetry in their distribution and that they are strongly influenced by local dynamics. Many students contributed greatly toward SNOE's design, development, testing, launch, operations, and data analysis. SNOE was managed for NASA by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) under the Student Explorers Demonstration Initiative (STEDI). The goal of STEDI was to show that small relevant research satellite missions could be developed at low cost and with high educational benefit by giving students a large involvement. SNOE was developed and operated through its primary mission for under five million dollars (excluding only launch vehicle costs). The SNOE development team consisted primarily of students working closely with a small number of experienced professionals. Students had significant responsibilities in all areas

  5. Association of expired nitric oxide with occupational particulate exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee Young; Wand, Matthew P; Hauser, Russ; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C

    2003-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with adverse respiratory health effects. This study assessed the utility of expired nitric oxide to detect acute airway responses to metal-containing fine particulates. Using a repeated-measures study design, we investigated the association between the fractional concentration of expired nitric oxide (F(E)NO) and exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic mass median diameter of less than or equal to 2.5 micro m (PM(2.5)) in boilermakers exposed to residual oil fly ash and metal fumes. Subjects were monitored for 5 days during boiler repair overhauls in 1999 (n = 20) or 2000 (n = 14). The Wilcoxon median baseline F(E)NO was 10.6 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1, 12.7] in 1999 and 7.4 ppb (95% CI: 6.7, 8.0) in 2000. The Wilcoxon median PM(2.5) 8-hr time-weighted average was 0.56 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.37, 0.93) in 1999 and 0.86 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.65, 1.07) in 2000. F(E)NO levels during the work week were significantly lower than baseline F(E)NO in 1999 (p < 0.001). A significant inverse exposure-response relationship between log-transformed F(E)NO and the previous workday's PM(2.5) concentration was found in 1999, after adjusting for smoking status, age, and sampling year. With each 1 mg/m(3) incremental increase in PM(2.5) exposure, log F(E)NO decreased by 0.24 (95% CI: -0.38, -0.10) in 1999. The lack of an exposure-response relationship between PM(2.5) exposure and F(E)NO in 2000 could be attributable to exposure misclassification resulting from the use of respirators. In conclusion, occupational exposure to metal-containing fine particulates was associated with significant decreases in F(E)NO in a survey of workers with limited respirator usage. PMID:12727593

  6. Nitric oxide delivery by ultrasonic cracking: some limitations.

    PubMed

    Postema, Michiel; Bouakaz, Ayache; ten Cate, Folkert J; Schmitz, Georg; de Jong, Nico; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2006-12-22

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in smooth muscle relaxation. Its use has been widespread in cardiology. Due to the effective scavenging of NO by hemoglobin, however, the drug has to be applied locally or in large quantities, to have the effect desired. We propose the use of encapsulated microbubbles that act as a vehicle to carry the gas to a region of interest. By applying a burst of high-amplitude ultrasound, the shell encapsulating the gas can be cracked. Consequently, the gas is released upon which its dissolution and diffusion begins. This process is generally referred to as (ultra)sonic cracking. To test if the quantities of released gas are high enough to allow for NO-delivery in small vessels (ø<200 microm), we analyzed high-speed optical recordings of insonified stiff-shelled microbubbles. These microbubbles were subjected to ultrasonic cracking using 0.5 or 1.7 MHz ultrasound with mechanical index MI>0.6. The mean quantity released from a single microbubble is 1.7 fmol. This is already more than the NO production of a 1mm long vessel with a 50 microm diameter during 100 ms. However, we simulated that the dissolution time of typical released NO microbubbles is equal to the half-life time of NO in whole blood due to scavenging by hemoglobin (1.8 ms), but much smaller than the extravascular half-life time of NO (>90 ms). We conclude that ultrasonic cracking can only be a successful means for nitric oxide delivery, if the gas is released in or near the red blood cell-free plasma next to the endothelium. A complicating factor in the in vivo situation is the variation in blood pressure. Although our simulations and acoustic measurements demonstrate that the dissolution speed of free gas increases with the hydrostatic pressure, the in vitro acoustic amplitudes suggest that the number of released microbubbles decreases at higher hydrostatic pressures. This indicates that ultrasonic cracking mostly occurs during the expansion phase. PMID:16889810

  7. Pharmacology and potential therapeutic applications of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and related nitric oxide-donating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, J E; Moore, P K

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the biological significance, therapeutic potential and mechanism(s) of action of a range of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAID) and related nitric oxide-releasing donating drugs (NODD). The slow release of nitric oxide (NO) from these compounds leads to subtle changes in the profile of pharmacological activity of the parent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). For example, compared with NSAID, NO-NSAID cause markedly diminished gastrointestinal toxicity and improved anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy. In addition, nitroparacetamol exhibits hepatoprotection as opposed to the hepatotoxic activity of paracetamol. The possibility that NO-NSAID or NODD may be of therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of disease states including pain and inflammation, thrombosis and restenosis, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, colitis, cancer, urinary incontinence, liver disease, impotence, bronchial asthma and osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:12237248

  8. Vest Chest Physiotherapy Airway Clearance is Associated with Nitric Oxide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Sarna, Pawanjit S.; Murphy, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Vest chest physiotherapy (VCPT) enhances airway clearance in cystic fibrosis (CF) by an unknown mechanism. Because cilia are sensitive to nitric oxide (NO), we hypothesized that VCPT enhances clearance by changing NO metabolism. Methods. Both normal subjects and stable CF subjects had pre- and post-VCPT airway clearance assessed using nasal saccharin transit time (NSTT) followed by a collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyzed for NO metabolites (NOx). Results. VCPT shorted NSTT by 35% in normal and stable CF subjects with no difference observed between the groups. EBC NOx concentrations decreased 68% in control subjects after VCPT (before = 115 ± 32 μM versus after = 37 ± 17 μM; P < 0.002). CF subjects had a trend toward lower EBC NOx. Conclusion. We found an association between VCPT-stimulated clearance and exhaled NOx levels in human subjects. We speculate that VCPT stimulates clearance via increased NO metabolism. PMID:24349778

  9. Hepatocellular Protection by Nitric Oxide or Nitrite in Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yuta; Hines, Ian; Zibari, Gazi; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced liver injury occurs in several pathophysiological disorders including hemorrhagic shock and burn as well as resectional and transplantation surgery. One of the earliest events associated with reperfusion of ischemic liver is endothelial dysfunction characterized by the decreased production of endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide (NO). This rapid post-ischemic decrease in NO bioavailability appears to be due to decreased synthesis of NO, enhanced inactivation of NO by the overproduction of superoxide or both. This review presents the most current evidence supporting the concept that decreased bioavailability of NO concomitant with enhanced production of reactive oxygen species initiates hepatocellular injury and that endogenous NO or exogenous NO produced from nitrite play important roles in limiting post-ischemic tissue injury. PMID:18940177

  10. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  11. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Padilla, Javier; Guzman, Jaime N; Ilijic, Ema; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Galtieri, Daniel J; Yang, Ben; Schieber, Simon; Oertel, Wolfgang; Wokosin, David; Schumacker, Paul T; Surmeier, D James

    2014-06-01

    Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, we studied LC neurons using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. We found that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca(2+) concentration that were attributable to the opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide increased the spike rate but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress was also increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity-dependent Ca(2+) entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  12. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  13. Vanillic acid prevents the deregulation of lipid metabolism, endothelin 1 and up regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in nitric oxide deficient hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subramanian; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the main factors causing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of vanillic acid against nitric oxide deficient rats. Hypertension was induced in adult male albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing 180-220g, by oral administration of N(ω)-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) 40mg/kg in drinking water for 4 weeks. Vanillic acid was administered orally at a dose of 50mg/kg b.w. Nitric oxide deficient rats showed increased levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and decreased heart nitric oxide metabolites (NOx). A significant increase in the levels of plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the plasma, liver and kidney and decreased level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are observed, whereas there is a decrease in the activities of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) in nitric oxide deficient rats. l-NAME rats also showed an increase in TC, TG, FFA and PL levels in the liver and kidney tissues. Vanillic acid treatment brought the above parameters towards near normal level. Moreover the down regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and up regulated expression of endothelin 1 (ET1) components was also attenuated by vanillic acid treatment. All the above outcomes were confirmed by the histopathological examination. These results suggest that vanillic acid has enough potential to attenuate hypertension, dyslipidemia and hepatic and renal damage in nitric oxide deficient rats. PMID:25239071

  14. EXAMINING THE TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines the temporal variability of airborne emissions of ammonia from livestock operations and fertilizer application and nitric oxide from soils. In the United States, the livestock operations and fertilizer categories comprise the majority of the ammonia emissions...

  15. The effect of nitric oxide on the growth of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengbin, Zhang; Cai, Lin; Chunying, Liu; Mingyi, Sun; Haibing, Ding

    2003-10-01

    The incubation experiments of Skeletonema costatum, Dicrateria zhanjiangensis nov. sp., and Platymonas subcordiformis, and those of Emiliania huxleyi were carried out in the Marine Physical Chemistry Laboratory in Ocean University of China and in the Marine Organic Geochemistry Laboratory in the University of Georgia respectively. Nitric oxide was added into the media when these marine microalgae were growing. We found the growth of these four microalgae were promoted or inhibited when nitric oxide of different concentrations was added one or two times each day during the cultivation process. The results are consistent with the influence of nitric oxide on the growth of high plants. The results show that nitric oxide may be a new factor of regulation and control for the phytoplankton growth in seawater.

  16. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase attenuates vasopressin-dependent Ca2+ signaling in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Gaspers, Lawrence D; Boucherie, Sylviane; Memin, Elisabeth; Stellato, Kerri Anne; Guillon, Gilles; Combettes, Laurent; Thomas, Andrew P

    2002-09-13

    Increases in both Ca(2+) and nitric oxide levels are vital for a variety of cellular processes; however, the interaction between these two crucial messengers is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase in hepatocytes, in response to inflammatory mediators, dramatically attenuates Ca(2+) signaling by the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-forming hormone, vasopressin. The inhibitory effects of induction were reversed by nitric oxide inhibitors and mimicked by prolonged cyclic GMP elevation. Induction was without effect on Ca(2+) signals in response to AlF(4)(-) or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, indicating that phospholipase C activation and release of Ca(2+) from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) stores were not targets for nitric oxide inhibition. Vasopressin receptor levels, however, were dramatically reduced in induced cultures. Our data provide a possible mechanism for hepatocyte dysfunction during chronic inflammation. PMID:12097323

  17. Activation of CFTR chloride current by nitric oxide in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Y J; Chao, A C; Kouyama, K; Hsu, Y P; Bocian, R C; Moss, R B; Gardner, P

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide, which is produced by cytokine-activated mononuclear cells, is thought to play an important role in inflammation and immunity. While the function of nitric oxide as a direct cytotoxic effector molecule is well established, its function as a transducer molecule in immune cells is not. By use of whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we show that nitric oxide activates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator CI- currents in normal human cloned T cells by a cGMP-dependent mechanism. This pathway is defective in cystic fibrosis-derived human cloned T cells. These findings not only delineate a novel transduction mechanism for nitric oxide but also support the hypothesis that an intrinsic immune defect may exist in cystic fibrosis. PMID:7540975

  18. Nitric Oxide Measurement from Purified Enzymes and Estimation of Scavenging Activity by Gas Phase Chemiluminescence Method.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Aprajita; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Mishra, Sonal; Wany, Aakanksha; Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitrate reductase (NR) is a key enzyme that produces nitric oxide (NO) using nitrite as a substrate. Lower plants such as algae are shown to have nitric oxide synthase enzyme and higher plants contain NOS activity but enzyme responsible for NO production in higher plants is subjected to debate. In plant nitric oxide research, it is very important to measure NO very precisely in order to determine its functional role. A significant amount of NO is being scavenged by various cell components. The net NO production depends in production minus scavenging. Here, we describe methods to measure NO from purified NR and inducible nitric oxide synthase from mouse (iNOS), we also describe a method of measure NO scavenging by tobacco cell suspensions and mitochondria from roots. PMID:27094408

  19. Nitric oxide synthase in the peripheral nervous system of the goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Brüning, G; Hattwig, K; Mayer, B

    1996-04-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase was located in various organs of the goldfish by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Positive cells were detected throughout the digestive tract. A particularly dense plexus of nitric-oxide-synthase-containing fibers was present at the opening of the pneumatic duct into the esophagus and at the intestinal sphincter separating the esophagus and the intestinal bulb. The nitroxergic innervation was mainly confined to the muscularis. The muscular layer of the swim bladder and of the pneumatic duct was densely equipped with stained neurons and fibers. In the heart, the majority of small neurons located at the sinu-atrial junction was found to be positive for nitric oxide synthase. The muscularis of the urinary duct was supplied by fibers originating from many intramural ganglia harboring intensely stained neurons. These results suggest that nitric oxide represents a widespread transmitter in the peripheral nervous system of teleost species. PMID:8601299

  20. Nitric oxide mediated amelioration of arsenic toxicity which alters the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene expression in Hordeum vulgare L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, Shalini; Dubey, Pragyan; Singh, Aradhana; Singh, A K

    2015-10-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) as a key molecule in the signal transduction pathway of a biotic stress response has already been described. Recent studies indicate that it also participate in the signaling of abiotic stresses. In the present study, we showed the altered expression of stress responsive gene alternative oxidase (Aox1) in seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in response to arsenic toxicity. Arsenic toxicity decreased the germination percentage, biomass, chlorophyll and carotenoid content whereas, arsenic toxicity enhanced the MDA content and proline content in a dose dependent manner. Other enzyme activities like catalase and superoxide dismutase increased with the increase in concentrations but it fell down at higher concentration of arsenic. Pretreatment of nitric oxide results in the enhanced expression of alternative oxidase which showed the adaptation of alternative pathway during the arsenic stress and it also enhances the growth ability and adaptability towards the arsenic stress. The results support the conclusion that nitric oxide ameliorates the arsenic toxicity not only at the level of antioxidant defense but also by affecting other mechanism of detoxification. PMID:26036416

  1. Effects of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition in cold-restraint and ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, B S; Pfeiffer, C J; Cho, C H

    1996-01-01

    Gastric actions of Nw-nitro-1-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were investigated in rats, as this agent is a reliable nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME solutions were placed in subcutaneous osmotic minipumps which continuously released L-NAME at 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 40 mg/kg/day. L-NAME dose and time-dependently enhanced stress-induced gastric ulceration but did not affect mucosal mast cell population. Ulcerogenic actions of L-NAME were reversed by L-arginine but not by D-arginine. Ten L-NAME treatment also enhanced the ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage, depressed gastric mucosal blood flow but did not alter gastric mucus, secretory volume, or acid output. It is concluded that in the present models, chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced ulcerogenesis by decreasing mucosal resistance due to reduced mucosal blood perfusion. This implicates nitric oxide as a mucosal defense factor which acts in part by maintaining mucosal blood flow. PMID:8626050

  2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26820711

  3. Nitric Oxide Mediates Tightening of the Endothelial Barrier by Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, decreases paracellular endothelial permeability in a process that requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. To define the proximal mechanism of this effect, we tested whether it might involve enhanced generation and/or sparing of nitric oxide (NO) by the vitamin. EA.hy926 endothelial cells cultured on semi-porous filter supports showed decreased endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin in response to exogenous NO provided by the NO donor spermine NONOATE, as well as to activation of the downstream NO pathway by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, a cell-penetrant cyclic GMP analog. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increased endothelial permeability, indicating a role constitutive NO generation by eNOS in maintaining the permeability barrier. Inhibition of guanylate cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one also increased endothelial permeability and blocked barrier tightening by spermine NONOATE. Loading cells with what are likely physiologic concentrations of ascorbate decreased endothelial permeability. This effect was blocked by inhibition of either eNOS or guanylate cyclase, suggesting that it involved generation of NO by eNOS and subsequent NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase. These results show that endothelial permeability barrier function depends on constitutive generation of NO and that ascorbate-dependent tightening of this barrier involves maintaining NO through the eNOS/guanylate cyclase pathway. PMID:21156160

  4. EBP50 induces apoptosis in macrophages by upregulating nitric oxide production to eliminate intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yang; Deng, Yating; Huang, Zikun; Luo, Qing; Peng, Yiping; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Hong; Ye, Jianqing; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is known to have the capacity to inhibit the positioning of iNOS on BCG-containing phagosomes by interfering with EBP50, a scaffolding protein that controls the recruitment of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the vicinity of phagosomes in macrophages. However, knockdown of the expression of EBP50 still facilitates the intracellular survival of BCG, which suggested that EBP50 may have some other unknown antimycobacterial properties. In this study we show that overexpression of EBP50 by a recombinant lentivirus had no effect on the iNOS recruitment to M.tuberculosis-containing phagosomes, but significantly promoted the elimination of intracellular M.tuberculosis. We revealed in the present study that the enhancement of intracellular killing to M. tuberculosis upon EBP50 overexpression was due to the increased level of apoptosis in macrophages. We showed that EBP50 overexpression significantly increased the expression of iNOS and generation of nitric oxide (NO), and EBP50-induced apoptosis was NO-dependent and mediated by Bax and caspase-3. We found that M. tuberculosis decreases while Mycobacterium smegmatis increases the expression of EBP50 in RAW264.7 cells, which suggested that virulent mycobacteria are capable of modulating the antimycobacterial properties of macrophages by inhibiting the expression and interfering with the function of EBP50. PMID:26729618

  5. Hemolysis in sickle cell mice causes pulmonary hypertension due to global impairment in nitric oxide bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Hunter C.; Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Manci, Elizabeth A.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Schimel, Daniel M.; Cochard, Audrey E.; Wang, Xunde; Schechter, Alan N.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a highly prevalent complication of sickle cell disease and is a strong risk factor for early mortality. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary vasculopathy remain unclear. Transgenic mice provide opportunities for mechanistic studies of vascular pathophysiology in an animal model. By microcardiac catheterization, all mice expressing exclusively human sickle hemoglobin had pulmonary hypertension, profound pulmonary and systemic endothelial dysfunction, and vascular instability characterized by diminished responses to authentic nitric oxide (NO), NO donors, and endothelium-dependent vasodilators and enhanced responses to vasoconstrictors. However, endothelium-independent vasodilation in sickle mice was normal. Mechanisms of vasculopathy in sickle mice involve global dysregulation of the NO axis: impaired constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity (NOS) with loss of endothelial NOS (eNOS) dimerization, increased NO scavenging by plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, increased arginase activity, and depleted intravascular nitrite reserves. Light microscopy and computed tomography revealed no plexogenic arterial remodeling or thrombi/emboli. Transplanting sickle marrow into wild-type mice conferred the same phenotype, and similar pathobiology was observed in a nonsickle mouse model of acute alloimmune hemolysis. Although the time course is shorter than typical pulmonary hypertension in human sickle cell disease, these results demonstrate that hemolytic anemia is sufficient to produce endothelial dysfunction and global dysregulation of NO. PMID:17158223

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase gene methylation and parkinsonism in manganese-exposed welders

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Susan Searles; Checkoway, Harvey; Criswell, Susan R.; Farin, Federico M.; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Sheppard, Lianne; Racette, Brad A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neurologist-assessed parkinsonism signs are prevalent among workers exposed to manganese (Mn)-containing welding fume. Neuroinflammation may possibly play a role. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, coded by NOS2, is involved in inflammation, and particulate exposure increases the gene’s expression through methylation of CpG sites in the 5′ region. Methods We assessed DNA methylation at three CpG sites in the NOS2 exon 1 from blood from 201 welders. All were non-Hispanic Caucasian men 25–65 years old who were examined by a neurologist specializing in movement disorders. We categorized the workers according to their Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3) scores as parkinsonism cases (UPDRS3 ≥ 15; n = 49), controls (UPDRS3 < 6; n = 103), or intermediate (UPDRS3 ≥6 to <15; n = 49). Results While accounting for age, examiner and experimental plate, parkinsonism cases had lower mean NOS2 methylation than controls (p-value for trend = 0.04), specifically at CpG site 8329 located in an exonic splicing enhancer of NOS2 (p-value for trend = 0.07). These associations were not observed for the intermediate UPDRS3 group (both p-value for trend ≥ 0.59). Conclusions Inflammation mediated by inducible nitric oxide synthase may possibly contribute to the association between welding fume and parkinsonism, but requires verification in a longitudinal study. PMID:25634431

  7. L-theanine promotes nitric oxide production in endothelial cells through eNOS phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Dias, Paul M; Majumder, Syamantak; Joshi, Manoj K; Sinkar, Vilas P; Banerjee, Gautam; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-03-01

    Consumption of tea (Camellia sinensis) improves vascular function and is linked to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial nitric oxide is the key regulator of vascular functions in endothelium. In this study, we establish that l-theanine, a non-protein amino-acid found in tea, promotes nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. l-theanine potentiated NO production in endothelial cells was evaluated using Griess reaction, NO sensitive electrode and a NO specific fluorescent probe (4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluororescein diacetate). l-Theanine induced NO production was partially attenuated in presence of l-NAME or l-NIO and completely abolished using eNOS siRNA. eNOS activation was Ca(2+) and Akt independent, as assessed by fluo-4AM and immunoblotting experiments, respectively and was associated with phosphorylation of eNOS Ser 1177. eNOS phosphorylation was inhibited in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD-98059 and partially inhibited by PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002 and Wortmanin suggesting PI3K-ERK1/2 dependent pathway. Increased NO production was associated with vasodilation in ex ovo (chorioallantoic membrane) model. These results demonstrated that l-theanine administration in vitro activated ERK/eNOS resulting in enhanced NO production and thereby vasodilation in the artery. The results of our experiments are suggestive of l-theanine mediated vascular health benefits of tea. PMID:22819553

  8. Cloned and expressed nitric oxide synthase structurally resembles cytochrome P-450 reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Hwang, Paul M.; Glatt, Charles E.; Lowenstein, Charles; Reed, Randall R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric oxide is a messenger molecule, mediating the effect of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in blood vessels and the cytotoxic actions of macrophages, and playing a part in neuronal communication in the brain. Cloning of a complementary DNA for brain nitric oxide synthase reveals recognition sites for NADPH, FAD, flavin mononucleotide and calmodulin as well as phosphorylation sites, indicating that the synthase is regulated by many different factors. The only known mammalian enzyme with close homology is cytochrome P-450 reductase.

  9. Evaluation of Salivary Nitric Oxide Levels in Smokers, Tobacco Chewers and Patients with Oral Lichenoid Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joy Idiculla; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Sabarinath, B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, acts as a signalling molecule affecting numerous physiological and pathological processes. Role of nitric oxide as a mediator in tobacco related habits and the resultant oral lichenoid reactions was assessed. Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the salivary nitric oxide levels in normal patients with that of smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study which included 30 healthy patients without any chronic inflammatory lesion and habit as controls (group I), 30 smokers without the habit of tobacco/betel nut chewing and any oral lesion (group II), 30 tobacco chewers without the habit of smoking and any oral lesion (group III) and 30 histologically confirmed cases of oral lichenoid reaction with the habit of tobacco usage (group IV). Saliva from these patients was collected and the nitrite concentration was assessed. Results Our results concluded that there was highly significant increase in the nitric oxide levels in smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions compared to that of controls. Also, there was a significant increase in nitric oxide levels in patients with smoking associated oral lichenoid reactions in comparison with smokers and in patients with lichenoid reactions associated with tobacco chewing in comparison with tobacco chewers. Conclusion Estimation of salivary nitric oxide levels is a simple, non-invasive procedure and could be analysed to suggest the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The increased activity of the enzyme may indicate that nitric oxide has a pathophysiological role in these lesions. PMID:26894179

  10. L-arginine inhibits isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through nitric oxide and polyamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Xiao, Feng-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Nitric oxide exhibits antihypertrophic functions and inhibits cardiac remodelling. However, the metabolism of polyamines and the potential interactions with nitric oxide in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. We randomly divided Wistar rats into four treatment groups: controls, isoproterenol (ISO), ISO and L-arginine, and L-arginine. Isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and/or L-arginine (800 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) was administered once daily for 7 days. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and fibrogenesis of heart was assessed by Van Gieson staining. Polyamines were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and plasma nitric oxide content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined with a spectrophotometer. The expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase, spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analysed by Western blot. Heart-to-body weight ratio, left ventricle-to-body weight ratio, atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, collagen fibres and LDH activity were elevated, both ornithine decarboxylase and SSAT proteins were up-regulated, and total polyamines were increased in the group treated with ISO. Additionally, the expression of iNOS was up-regulated, eNOS was down-regulated, and nitric oxide levels were low. Notably, cotreatment with L-arginine reversed most of these changes except for SSAT expression,which was further up-regulated. We propose that increased polyamines and decreased nitric oxide are involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and suggest that L-arginine pre-treatment can attenuate cardiac hypertrophy through the regulation of key enzymes of the polyamine and nitric oxide pathways. PMID:18816294

  11. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  12. Comparison of a Thermospheric Photochemical Model with SNOE Observations of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Bailey, S. M.; Mankoff, K. D.

    2002-12-01

    A time-dependent, photochemical model has been used to calculate nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere for 935 days (March 11, 1998 - September 30, 2000) as a function of latitude. The model data has been compared with observations made by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE). The energy inputs to the model are solar soft x-rays, solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, and auroral electrons. The solar soft x-rays in the 2-7 nm wavelength band have been measured by the SNOE solar x-ray photometer. The atmospheric structure is calculated using the MSIS model with the 10.7 cm radio flux and the geomagnetic index Ap as inputs. The model calculation has been performed for latitudes between 0 and 80 degrees N in steps of 5 degrees. A model calculation for the two and a half years using only solar soft x-rays (no auroral electrons) shows strong seasonal behavior in the nitric oxide density particularly in the regions of polar night. The correlation of the calculated nitric oxide density at the equator with SNOE observations shows excellent agreement and a high correlation coefficient. A model calculation with both solar soft x-rays and auroral electron precipitation shows large and varying nitric oxide density in the auroral region between 60 and 70 degrees geomagnetic latitude. When the model calculation is subtracted from the SNOE observations, excess nitric oxide is found equatorward of the auroral region. Since the only source of odd nitrogen in the region between 0 and 55 degrees N is the solar soft x-ray source and that is accounted for in the model, this excess nitric oxide is attributed to nitric oxide that has been transported out of the auroral region by meridional winds.

  13. Inhaled aerosolized prostacyclin and nitric oxide as selective pulmonary vasodilators in ARDS--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Heerden, P V; Blythe, D; Webb, S A

    1996-10-01

    Nitric oxide 10 ppm and inhaled aerosolized prostacyclin 50 ng/kg/min were compared as selective pulmonary vasodilators in five patients with hypoxaemia secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Neither agent resulted in systemic haemodynamic changes, indicating true pulmonary selectivity. Inhaled aerolized prostacyclin improved oxygenation to a degree comparable to nitric oxide, as measured by the arterial alveolar oxygen partial pressure gradient and shunt fraction. PMID:8909667

  14. Conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide at zinc via S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Abelman, Rebecca; Warren, Timothy H

    2014-01-01

    Nitrite is an important reservoir of nitric oxide activity in the plasma and cells. Using a biomimetic model, we demonstrate the conversion of zinc-bound nitrite in the tris(pyrazolyl)borate complex (iPr2)TpZn(NO2) to the corresponding S-nitrosothiol RSNO and zinc thiolate (iPr2)TpZn-SR via reaction with thiols H-SR. Decomposition of the S-nitrosothiol formed releases nitric oxide gas. PMID:24217415

  15. Estimation of salivary nitric oxide in oral precancer patients.

    PubMed

    Metgud, R; Anandani, C; Singh, K

    2015-05-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer has been the subject of speculation and conflicting reports in the literature. The high incidence of oral cancer and precancer has been linked to tobacco chewing and smoking habits; NO is considered an indicator of tobacco-related diseases. We compared salivary NO levels in oral precancer and normal patients. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 15 patients with oral precancer (group 1) and 15 healthy age and sex matched subjects (group 2). Salivary nitrite levels were estimated using a colorimetric method and a spectrophotometer. The salivary nitrite concentration of group 2 (median = 4.21 μg/ml) was significantly less than for group 1 (median = 12.91 μg/ml). We have added evidence concerning involvement of NO in the pathogenesis of oral cancer, but whether it is a potentially carcinogenic agent at the concentration at which it is present in oral precancer patients requires further evaluation. PMID:25831210

  16. Subcellular targeting and trafficking of nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Oess, Stefanie; Icking, Ann; Fulton, David; Govers, Roland; Müller-Esterl, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Unlike most other endogenous messengers that are deposited in vesicles, processed on demand and/or secreted in a regulated fashion, NO (nitric oxide) is a highly active molecule that readily diffuses through cell membranes and thus cannot be stored inside the producing cell. Rather, its signalling capacity must be controlled at the levels of biosynthesis and local availability. The importance of temporal and spatial control of NO production is highlighted by the finding that differential localization of NO synthases in cardiomyocytes translates into distinct effects of NO in the heart. Thus NO synthases belong to the most tightly controlled enzymes, being regulated at transcriptional and translational levels, through co- and post-translational modifications, by substrate availability and not least via specific sorting to subcellular compartments, where they are in close proximity to their target proteins. Considerable efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the intracellular targeting and trafficking of NO synthases, to ultimately understand the cellular pathways controlling the formation and function of this powerful signalling molecule. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms and triggers for subcellular routing and dynamic redistribution of NO synthases and the ensuing consequences for NO production and action. PMID:16722822

  17. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%-18% O₂ at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  18. Differential Modulation of Nitric Oxide Synthases in Aging: Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Cau, Stefany B. A.; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular aging is the term that describes the structural and functional disturbances of the vasculature with advancing aging. The molecular mechanisms of aging-associated endothelial dysfunction are complex, but reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and altered vascular expression and activity of NO synthase (NOS) enzymes have been implicated as major players. Impaired vascular relaxation in aging has been attributed to reduced endothelial NOS (eNOS)-derived NO, while increased inducible NOS (iNOS) expression seems to account for nitrosative stress and disrupted vascular homeostasis. Although eNOS