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Sample records for nitric oxide pathway

  1. Oscillations of nitric oxide concentration in the perturbed denitrification pathway of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, I

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of nitric oxide in Paracoccus denitrificans has been studied using a Clark-type electrode. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and the SH reagent N-ethylmaleimide, both of which released nitric oxide from cells respiring nitrite, were found to be efficient inhibitors of nitric oxide reductase activity. Control experiments with another uncoupler, pentachlorophenol, showed that the inhibitory effect of CCCP was not the result of a decrease in membrane potential. The denitrification pathway in cells with partly inhibited nitric oxide reductase, or in a reconstituted system containing purified nitric reductase and membrane vesicles, exhibited marked sustained oscillations of nitric oxide concentration. The occurrence of the oscillations was strictly dependent on the initial concentration of nitrite. The observed oscillatory kinetics is considered to reflect two regulatory signals destabilizing the denitrification pathway, namely the inhibition of nitric oxide reductase by nitric oxide and/or by nitrite. PMID:1325776

  2. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications. PMID:27451093

  3. Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and identification of novel nitric oxide signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dawson, T M; Sasaki, M; Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Dawson, V L

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) participate in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes in the nervous system. nNOS was originally felt to be a constitutively expressed enzyme, but recent observations suggest that its levels are dynamically controlled in response to neuronal development, plasticity and injury. nNOS expression is regulated through alternative promoter usage through alternative mRNA splicing and it is likely that this plays an important role in the inducibility of gene expression in response to extracellular stimuli. Emerging data also suggests that NO may be the key mediator linking activity to gene expression and long-lasting neuronal responses through NO activating p21Ras through redox-sensitive modulation. PMID:9932430

  4. L-arginine inhibits isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through nitric oxide and polyamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Xiao, Feng-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Nitric oxide exhibits antihypertrophic functions and inhibits cardiac remodelling. However, the metabolism of polyamines and the potential interactions with nitric oxide in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. We randomly divided Wistar rats into four treatment groups: controls, isoproterenol (ISO), ISO and L-arginine, and L-arginine. Isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and/or L-arginine (800 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) was administered once daily for 7 days. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and fibrogenesis of heart was assessed by Van Gieson staining. Polyamines were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and plasma nitric oxide content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined with a spectrophotometer. The expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase, spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analysed by Western blot. Heart-to-body weight ratio, left ventricle-to-body weight ratio, atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, collagen fibres and LDH activity were elevated, both ornithine decarboxylase and SSAT proteins were up-regulated, and total polyamines were increased in the group treated with ISO. Additionally, the expression of iNOS was up-regulated, eNOS was down-regulated, and nitric oxide levels were low. Notably, cotreatment with L-arginine reversed most of these changes except for SSAT expression,which was further up-regulated. We propose that increased polyamines and decreased nitric oxide are involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and suggest that L-arginine pre-treatment can attenuate cardiac hypertrophy through the regulation of key enzymes of the polyamine and nitric oxide pathways. PMID:18816294

  5. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide pathway in adult patients who are candidates for cardiac surgery: patterns and differences

    PubMed Central

    Cavalca, Viviana; Tremoli, Elena; Porro, Benedetta; Veglia, Fabrizio; Myasoedova, Veronika; Squellerio, Isabella; Manzone, Daniela; Zanobini, Marco; Trezzi, Matteo; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Werba, José Pablo; Tedesco, Calogero; Alamanni, Francesco; Parolari, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated whether oxidative stress and the arginine/nitric oxide pathway differ in control subjects and in adult patients who are candidates for the three most common cardiac surgical operations: coronary bypass surgery, aortic valve replacement for calcific non-rheumatic aortic stenosis or mitral valve repair for degenerative mitral insufficiency. METHODS In this prospective observational study, we studied 165 consecutive patients undergoing surgery from January to June 2011 (coronary bypass surgery, n = 63; aortic valve replacement for calcific non-rheumatic aortic stenosis, n = 51; mitral valve repair for degenerative mitral insufficiency, n = 51). Thirty-three healthy subjects with cardiovascular risk factors similar to surgery patients were also studied (Controls). Oxidative stress (the ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and urinary isoprostane), antioxidants (alpha- and gamma tocopherol) and factors involved in nitric oxide synthesis (arginine, symmetric and asymmetric dimethylarginine) were measured before surgery. Analysis of variance general linear models and principal component analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS Surgical patients had increased levels of oxidative stress and decreased levels of antioxidants. Increased levels of nitric oxide inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine were detected in surgical candidates, suggesting arginine/nitric oxide pathway impairment. Concerning the differences among surgical procedures, higher oxidative stress and a major imbalance of the ratio between substrate and inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis were evidenced in patients who were candidates for mitral valve repair with respect to coronary bypass surgery patients and patients with calcific non-rheumatic aortic stenosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients undergoing cardiac surgery have increased oxidative stress and a trend towards an impaired arginine/nitric oxide pathway with respect to Controls. Patients affected by mitral valve

  7. Reciprocal regulation of the nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathway in pathophysiology: relevance and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwon F.; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways share a number of similarities. Nitric oxide is the mediator generated from the NO synthase (NOS) pathway, and COX converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane A2. Two major forms of NOS and COX have been identified to date. The constitutive isoforms critically regulate several physiological states. The inducible isoforms are overexpressed during inflammation in a variety of cells, producing large amounts of NO and prostaglandins, which may underlie pathological processes. The cross-talk between the COX and NOS pathways was initially reported by Salvemini and colleagues in 1993, when they demonstrated in a series of in vitro and in vivo studies that NO activates the COX enzymes to produce increased amounts of prostaglandins. Those studies led to the concept that COX enzymes represent important endogenous “receptor” targets for amplifying or modulating the multifaceted roles of NO in physiology and pathology. Since then, numerous studies have furthered our mechanistic understanding of these interactions in pathophysiological settings and delineated potential clinical outcomes. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that the canonical nitroxidative species (NO, superoxide, and/or peroxynitrite) modulate biosynthesis of prostaglandins through non-COX-related pathways. This article provides a comprehensive state-of-the art overview in this area. PMID:23389111

  8. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  9. Nitric Oxide Synthetic Pathway in Red Blood Cells Is Impaired in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eligini, Sonia; Porro, Benedetta; Lualdi, Alessandro; Squellerio, Isabella; Veglia, Fabrizio; Chiorino, Elisa; Crisci, Mauro; Garlaschè, Anna; Giovannardi, Marta; Werba, Josè-Pablo; Tremoli, Elena; Cavalca, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Background All the enzymatic factors/cofactors involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism have been recently found in red blood cells. Increased oxidative stress impairs NO bioavailability and has been described in plasma of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of the study was to highlight a potential dysfunction of the metabolic profile of NO in red blood cells and in plasma from CAD patients compared with healthy controls. Methods We determined L-arginine/NO pathway by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography methods. The ratio of oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione, as index of oxidative stress, was measured by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. NO synthase expression and activity were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining and ex-vivo experiments of L-[15N2]arginine conversion to L-[15N]citrulline respectively. Results Increased amounts of asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines were found both in red blood cells and in plasma of CAD patients in respect to controls. Interestingly NO synthase expression and activity were reduced in CAD red blood cells. In contrast, oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio was increased in CAD and was associated to arginase activity. Conclusion Our study analyzed for the first time the whole metabolic pathway of L-arginine/NO, both in red blood cells and in plasma, highlighting an impairment of NO pathway in erythrocytes from CAD patients, associated with decreased NO synthase expression/activity and increased oxidative stress. PMID:23940508

  10. Reaction pathways in the coadsorption of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide at caesium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, A. F.; Roberts, M. W.; Santra, A. K.

    2002-09-01

    The reactivity of caesium surfaces to nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and mixtures of NO and CO at low temperatures (90-220 K) has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reaction pathways for CO-NO mixtures are controlled by oxygen transients generated by the dissociative chemisorption of NO emphasising the limitations of evidence that might be deduced from the reactivity of the individual molecules, CO on its own not being adsorbed at a caesium surface. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of CO 2δ- , CO 3, and NO 2 species is discussed.

  11. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide–soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  12. Plasma kallikrein-bradykinin pathway promotes circulatory nitric oxide metabolite availability during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Gayatri; Gangwar, Anamika; Sharma, Manish; Himashree, Gidugu; Singh, Krishan; Bhaumik, Gopinath; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an indispensible signalling molecule under hypoxic environment for both ethnic high altitude natives as well as lowland residents at high altitude. Several studies have reported higher levels of NO and bioactive NO products for both high altitude natives as well as healthy high altitude sojourners. But the metabolic pathways regulating the formation of NO and associated metabolites during hypoxia still remain elusive. In the present study, we profiled plasma proteomes of Ladakhi natives (3520 m) and lowland residents (post 1, 4 and 7 days stay) at the same altitude. This has resulted in the identification of 208 hypoxia responsive proteins (p < 0.05) and kininogen-plasma kallikrein-bradykinin as a major pathway regulating eNOS activity during hypoxia. In corroboration, we have also observed significant higher levels of plasma biomarkers for NO production (l-citrulline, nitrite, nitrate) for Ladakhi natives as compared to both lowland individuals healthy high altitude sojourners indicating higher NO availability. Since hypoxia-induced free radicals reduce NO availability, we also measured plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls and protein oxidation products in both Ladakhi natives and high altitude sojourners. Interestingly Ladakhi natives had significant lower levels of oxidative stress in comparison to high altitude sojourners but higher than lowland controls. These results suggest that plasma kallikrein-bradykinin-eNOS pathway along with moderate oxidative stress contributes to high altitude adaptation of Ladakhi natives. PMID:26952290

  13. Apigenin attenuates diabetes-associated cognitive decline in rats via suppressing oxidative stress and nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Yu, Jing; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Our present investigation aimed to determine the neuroprotection of apigenin (API) against diabetes-associated cognitive decline (DACD) a diabetic rat model and exploring its potential mechanism. Diabetic rat model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. All experiment animals treated with vehicle or API by doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg for seven weeks. Firstly, the body weight and blood glucose levels were detected. We used Morris water maze test to evaluate learning and memory function. The oxidative indicators (malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH)), cNOS, iNOS, caspase-3 and caspase-9 were measured in cerebral cortex and hippocampus using corresponding commercial kits. API can increase body weight, reduce the blood glucose levels, and improve the cognitive function in rats induced by diabetes. API decrease the MDA content, and increase SOD activity and GSH level of diabetic animals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of diabetic rats. Meanwhile, constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3/9 were markedly exhibited in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of diabetic rats. In summary, our current work discloses that API attenuates DACD in rats via suppressing oxidative stress, nitric oxide and apoptotic cascades synthase pathway. PMID:26629041

  14. Apigenin attenuates diabetes-associated cognitive decline in rats via suppressing oxidative stress and nitric oxide synthase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Yu, Jing; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Our present investigation aimed to determine the neuroprotection of apigenin (API) against diabetes-associated cognitive decline (DACD) a diabetic rat model and exploring its potential mechanism. Diabetic rat model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. All experiment animals treated with vehicle or API by doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg for seven weeks. Firstly, the body weight and blood glucose levels were detected. We used Morris water maze test to evaluate learning and memory function. The oxidative indicators (malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH)), cNOS, iNOS, caspase-3 and caspase-9 were measured in cerebral cortex and hippocampus using corresponding commercial kits. API can increase body weight, reduce the blood glucose levels, and improve the cognitive function in rats induced by diabetes. API decrease the MDA content, and increase SOD activity and GSH level of diabetic animals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of diabetic rats. Meanwhile, constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3/9 were markedly exhibited in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of diabetic rats. In summary, our current work discloses that API attenuates DACD in rats via suppressing oxidative stress, nitric oxide and apoptotic cascades synthase pathway. PMID:26629041

  15. Metabolism via Arginase or Nitric Oxide Synthase: Two Competing Arginine Pathways in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Meera; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale; Closs, Ellen I.; Munder, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in the immune system, both as antimicrobial effector cells and as immunoregulatory cells, which induce, suppress or modulate adaptive immune responses. These key aspects of macrophage biology are fundamentally driven by the phenotype of macrophage arginine metabolism that is prevalent in an evolving or ongoing immune response. M1 macrophages express the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, which metabolizes arginine to nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline. NO can be metabolized to further downstream reactive nitrogen species, while citrulline might be reused for efficient NO synthesis via the citrulline–NO cycle. M2 macrophages are characterized by expression of the enzyme arginase, which hydrolyzes arginine to ornithine and urea. The arginase pathway limits arginine availability for NO synthesis and ornithine itself can further feed into the important downstream pathways of polyamine and proline syntheses, which are important for cellular proliferation and tissue repair. M1 versus M2 polarization leads to opposing outcomes of inflammatory reactions, but depending on the context, M1 and M2 macrophages can be both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Notably, M1/M2 macrophage polarization can be driven by microbial infection or innate danger signals without any influence of adaptive immune cells, secondarily driving the T helper (Th)1/Th2 polarization of the evolving adaptive immune response. Since both arginine metabolic pathways cross-inhibit each other on the level of the respective arginine break-down products and Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes can drive or amplify macrophage M1/M2 dichotomy via cytokine activation, this forms the basis of a self-sustaining M1/M2 polarization of the whole immune response. Understanding the arginine metabolism of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes is therefore central to find new possibilities to manipulate immune responses in infection, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, and cancer. PMID:25386178

  16. Behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of Crohn's disease: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Heydarpour, Pouria; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Khoshkish, Shayan; Fakhraei, Nahid; Salehi-Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Wang, Hongxing; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased psychiatric co-morbidities. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation and tissue injury in CD, and it may also play a central role in pathogenesis of the accompanying behavioral despair. This study investigated the role of the NO pathway in behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of CD. Colitis was induced by intrarectal (i.r.) injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (10mg TNBS in 50% ethanol). Forced swimming test (FST), pharmacological studies and tissues collection were performed 72 h following TNBS administration. To address a possible inflammatory origin for the behavioral despair following colitis induction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level was measured in both the hippocampal and colonic tissue samples. In parallel, hippocampal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrite level were evaluated. Pharmacological studies targeting the NO pathway were performed 30-60 min before behavioral test. Colitis was confirmed by increased colonic TNF-α level and microscopic score. Colitic mice demonstrated a significantly higher immobility time in the FST associated to a significant increase of hippocampal TNF-α, iNOS expression and nitrite content. Acute NOS inhibition using either Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) or aminoguanidine hydrochloride (a specific iNOS inhibitor) decreased the immobility time in colitic groups. Moreover, acute treatment with both NOS inhibitors decreased the TNF-α level and nitrite content in the hippocampal samples. This study suggests that the NO pathway may be involved in the behavioral effects in the mouse TNBS model of CD. These findings endow new insights into the gut-brain communication during the development of colonic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat behavior changes associated with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26268932

  17. A common pathway of nitric oxide release from AZD3582 and glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Georg; Grosser, Nina; Hoogstraate, Janet; Schröder, Henning

    2004-02-01

    4-(Nitrooxy)-butyl-(S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-propanoate (AZD3582) is a cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD). It donates nitric oxide (NO) in biological systems through as yet unidentified mechanisms. cGMP, a marker of intracellularly generated NO, was increased up to 27-fold over basal levels by AZD3582 (1-30microM) in LLC-PK1 kidney epithelial cells. A 5h pretreatment with glyceryl tinitrate (GTN, 0.1-1microM) attenuated the cGMP response to a subsequent challenge with AZD3582 or GTN. Similarly, AZD3582 (10-30microM) pretreatment reduced the increase in cGMP on subsequent incubation with AZD3582 or GTN. In contrast, cGMP stimulation by SIN-1, which releases NO independently of enzymatic catalysis, remained unimpaired in cells pretreated with GTN or AZD3582. Our results demonstrate that AZD3582 decreases the sensitivity of the guanylyl cyclase/cGMP system to GTN and vice versa. This suggests that bioactivation pathways for organic nitrates, which involve enzymatic catalysis, may be responsible for NO donation from AZD3582. PMID:14757506

  18. Mangiferin Prevents Guinea Pig Tracheal Contraction via Activation of the Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Aline B.; Coelho, Luciana P.; Insuela, Daniella B. R.; Carvalho, Vinicius F.; dos Santos, Marcelo H.; Silva, Patricia MR.; Martins, Marco A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have described the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin, a natural glucoside xanthone (2-C-β-Dgluco-pyranosyl-1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone) that is present in mango trees and other plants, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the potential contribution of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway to the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin on isolated tracheal rings preparations. The functional effect of mangiferin on allergic and non-allergic contraction of guinea pig tracheal rings was assessed in conventional organ baths. Cultured tracheal rings were exposed to mangiferin or vehicle, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3 and cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels were quantified using western blotting and enzyme immunoassays, respectively. Mangiferin (0.1–10 µM) inhibited tracheal contractions induced by distinct stimuli, such as allergen, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or carbachol, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mangiferin also caused marked relaxation of tracheal rings that were precontracted by carbachol, suggesting that it has both anti-contraction and relaxant properties that are prevented by removing the epithelium. The effect of mangiferin was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 µM), and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1], [2], [4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 µM), but not the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)adenine (SQ22536) (100 µM). The antispasmodic effect of mangiferin was also sensitive to K+ channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), glibenclamide and apamin. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Ca2+-induced contractions in K+ (60 mM)-depolarised tracheal rings preparations. In addition, mangiferin increased NOS3 protein levels and cGMP intracellular levels in cultured tracheal rings. Finally, mangiferin-induced increase in cGMP levels was abrogated by co-incubation with either ODQ or L

  19. Intersection of two signalling pathways: extracellular nucleotides regulate pollen germination and pollen tube growth via nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Reichler, Stuart A.; Torres, Jonathan; Rivera, Amy L.; Cintolesi, Viviana A.; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant and animal cells release or secrete ATP by various mechanisms, and this activity allows extracellular ATP to serve as a signalling molecule. Recent reports suggest that extracellular ATP induces plant responses ranging from increased cytosolic calcium to changes in auxin transport, xenobiotic resistance, pollen germination, and growth. Although calcium has been identified as a secondary messenger for the extracellular ATP signal, other parts of this signal transduction chain remain unknown. Increasing the extracellular concentration of ATPγS, a poorly-hydrolysable ATP analogue, inhibited both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, while the addition of AMPS had no effect. Because pollen tube elongation is also sensitive to nitric oxide, this raised the possibility that a connection exists between the two pathways. Four approaches were used to test whether the germination and growth effects of extracellular ATPγS were transduced via nitric oxide. The results showed that increases in extracellular ATPγS induced increases in cellular nitric oxide, chemical agonists of the nitric oxide signalling pathway lowered the threshold of extracellular ATPγS that inhibits pollen germination, an antagonist of guanylate cyclase, which can inhibit some nitric oxide signalling pathways, blocked the ATPγS-induced inhibition of both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, and the effects of applied ATPγS were blocked in nia1nia2 mutants, which have diminished NO production. The concurrence of these four data sets support the conclusion that the suppression of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation by extracellular nucleotides is mediated in part via the nitric oxide signalling pathway. PMID:19363208

  20. 11,12-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid activates the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Like; Cui, Yuying; Geng, Bing; Zeng, Xiangjun; Tang, Chaoshu

    2008-01-01

    The present study was to test the hypothesis that 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET), a metabolic product of arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450 epoxygenase, regulates nitric oxide (NO) generation of the L-arginine/NO synthase (NOS) pathway in human platelets. Human platelets were incubated in the presence or absence of different concentrations of 11,12-EET for 2 h at 37 degrees C, followed by measurements of activities of the L-arginine/NOS pathway. Incubation with 11,12-EET increased the platelet NOS activity, nitrite production, cGMP content, and the platelet uptake of L-[(3)H]arginine in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 11,12-EET attenuated intracellular free Ca(2+) accumulation stimulated by collagen, which was at least partly mediated by EET-activated L-arginine/NOS pathway. It is suggested that 11,12-EET regulates platelet function through up-regulating the activity of the L-arginine/NOS/NO pathway. PMID:17932624

  1. Bioanalytical profile of the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway and its evaluation by capillary electrophoresis◇

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2007-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent progress in fundamental understanding and analytical profiling of the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway. It focuses on key analytical references of NO actions and on the experimental acquisition of these references in vivo, with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) comprising one of the most flexible and technologically promising analytical platform for comprehensive high-resolution profiling of NO-related metabolites. Second aim of this review is to express demands and bridge efforts of experimental biologists, medical professionals and chemical analysis-oriented scientists who strive to understand evolution and physiological roles of NO and to develop analytical methods for use in biology and medicine. PMID:17329176

  2. Regulatory role for the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in metabolism of energy substrates.

    PubMed

    Jobgen, Wenjuan Shi; Fried, Susan K; Fu, Wenjiang J; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2006-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase in virtually all cell types. Emerging evidence shows that NO regulates the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids in mammals. As an oxidant, pathological levels of NO inhibit nearly all enzyme-catalyzed reactions through protein oxidation. However, as a signaling molecule, physiological levels of NO stimulate glucose uptake as well as glucose and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and adipose tissue; inhibit the synthesis of glucose, glycogen, and fat in target tissues (e.g., liver and adipose); and enhance lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, an inhibition of NO synthesis causes hyperlipidemia and fat accretion in rats, whereas dietary arginine supplementation reduces fat mass in diabetic fatty rats. The putative underlying mechanisms may involve multiple cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate-dependent pathways. First, NO stimulates the phosphorylation of adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resulting in (1) a decreased level of malonyl-CoA via inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and activation of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase and (2) a decreased expression of genes related to lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). Second, NO increases the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipins, leading to the translocation of the lipase to the neutral lipid droplets and, hence, the stimulation of lipolysis. Third, NO activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, thereby enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. Fourth, NO increases blood flow to insulin-sensitive tissues, promoting substrate uptake and product removal via the circulation. Modulation of the arginine-NO pathway through dietary supplementation with L-arginine or L-citrulline may aid in the prevention and

  3. Nitric oxide induces the alternative oxidase pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings deprived of inorganic phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Beatriz; Moran, Jose F.; Ratcliffe, R. George; Gupta, Kapuganti J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate starvation compromises electron flow through the cytochrome pathway of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and plants commonly respond to phosphate deprivation by increasing flow through the alternative oxidase (AOX). To test whether this response is linked to the increase in nitric oxide (NO) production that also increases under phosphate starvation, Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were grown for 15 d on media containing either 0 or 1mM inorganic phosphate. The effects of the phosphate supply on growth, the production of NO, respiration, the AOX level and the production of superoxide were compared for wild-type (WT) seedlings and the nitrate reductase double mutant nia. Phosphate deprivation increased NO production in WT roots, and the AOX level and the capacity of the alternative pathway to consume electrons in WT seedlings; whereas the same treatment failed to stimulate NO production and AOX expression in the nia mutant, and the plants had an altered growth phenotype. The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione rescued the growth phenotype of the nia mutants under phosphate deprivation to some extent, and it also increased the respiratory capacity of AOX. It is concluded that NO is required for the induction of the AOX pathway when seedlings are grown under phosphate-limiting conditions. PMID:26163703

  4. The Nitric Oxide/Cyclic GMP Pathway in Organ Transplantation: Critical Role in Successful Lung Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, David J.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Chowdhury, Nepal C.; Liao, Hui; Oz, Mehmet C.; Michler, Robert E.; Kubaszewski, Eugeniusz; Malinski, Tadeusz; Stern, David M.

    1994-12-01

    Reestablishment of vascular homeostasis following ex vivo preservation is a critical determinant of successful organ transplantation. Because the nitric oxide (NO) pathway modulates pulmonary vascular tone and leukocyte/endothelial interactions, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen intermediates would lead to decreased NO (and hence cGMP) levels following pulmonary reperfusion, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and leukostasis. Using an orthotopic rat model of lung transplantation, a porphyrinic microsensor was used to make direct in vivo measurements of pulmonary NO. NO levels measured at the surface of the transplanted lung plummeted immediately upon reperfusion, with levels moderately increased by topical application of superoxide dismutase. Because cGMP levels declined in preserved lungs after reperfusion, this led us to buttress the NO pathway by adding a membrane-permeant cGMP analog to the preservation solution. Compared with grafts stored in its absence, grafts stored with supplemental 8-Br-cGMP and evaluated 30 min after reperfusion demonstrated lower pulmonary vascular resistances with increased graft blood flow, improved arterial oxygenation, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and improved recipient survival. These beneficial effects were dose dependent, mimicked by the type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor 2-o-propoxyphenyl-8-azapurin-6-one, and inhibited by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase antagonist, the R isomer of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate. Augmenting the NO pathway at the level of cGMP improves graft function and recipient survival following lung transplantation.

  5. Effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and oxidative status in platelets.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Mariana Alves de Sá; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Pereira, Natália Rodrigues; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Moss, Monique Bandeira; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have suggested an increase of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on periodontitis patients. An enhancement has been demonstrated on both platelet activation and oxidative stress on periodontitis patients, which may contribute for this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and oxidative status in platelets. A total of eight periodontitis patients and eight controls were included in this study. Clinical, laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed on baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment (except for western blot analysis). The clinical periodontal evaluation included measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), % of sites with plaque and % of sites with bleeding on probing. We evaluated: l-[(3)H]arginine influx; nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes activity and expression; expression of guanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes; cGMP levels; platelet aggregation; oxidative status through superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The initial results showed an activation of both l-arginine influx and via system y (+ )L associated with reduced intraplatelet cGMP levels in periodontitis patients and increased systemic levels of CRP. After periodontal treatment, there was a significant reduction of the % of sites with PPD 4-5mm, % of sites with CAL 4-5 mm, and an enhancement in cGMP levels and SOD activity. Moreover, CRP levels were reduced after treatment. Therefore, alterations in the intraplatelet l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and oxidant-antioxidant balance associated with a systemic inflammatory response may lead to platelet dysfunction, which may contribute to a higher risk of CVD in periodontitis. PMID:23918883

  6. Beneficial effects of L-arginine–nitric oxide-producing pathway in rats treated with alloxan

    PubMed Central

    Vasilijević, Ana; Buzadžić, Biljana; Korać, Aleksandra; Petrović, Vesna; Janković, Aleksandra; Korać, Bato

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate molecular mechanisms and factors involved in β cell regeneration, we evaluated a possible role of the l-arginine–nitric oxide (NO)-producing pathway in alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. Diabetes was induced in male Mill Hill rats with a single alloxan dose (120 mg kg−1). Both non-diabetic and diabetic groups were additionally separated into three subgroups: (i) receiving l-arginine · HCl (2.25%), (ii) receiving l-NAME · HCl (0.01%) for 12 days as drinking liquids, and (iii) control. Treatment of diabetic animals started after diabetes induction (glucose level ≥ 12 mmol l−1). We found that disturbed glucose homeostasis, i.e. blood insulin and glucose levels in diabetic rats was restored after l-arginine treatment. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that l-arginine had a favourable effect on β cell neogenesis, i.e. it increased the area of insulin-immunopositive cells. Moreover, confocal microscopy showed colocalization of insulin and pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. This increase in insulin-expressing cells was accompanied by increased cell proliferation (observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen-PCNA immunopositivity) which occurred in a regulated manner since it was associated with increased apoptosis (detected by the TUNEL method). Furthermore, l-arginine enhanced both nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunopositivities. The effect of l-arginine on antioxidative defence was observed especially in restoring to control level the diabetes-induced increase in glutathione peroxidase activity. In contrast to l-arginine, diabetic pancreas was not affected by l-NAME supplementation. In conclusion, the results suggest beneficial l-arginine effects on alloxan-induced diabetes resulting from the stimulation of β cell neogenesis, including complex mechanisms of transcriptional and redox regulation. PMID:17717015

  7. Effects of chronic noradrenaline on the nitric oxide pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, T; Comini, L; Agnoletti, L; Pedersini, P; Gaia, G; Cargnoni, A; Bellet, M; Curello, S; Ferrari, R

    1998-08-01

    Altered endothelium-dependent vasodilation has been observed in congestive heart failure (CHF), a disease characterized by a sustained adrenergic activation. The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that chronically elevated catecholamines influence the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the human endothelium. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were exposed for 7 days to a concentration of noradrenaline (NA, 1 ng/mL) similar to that found in the blood of patients with CHF. Kinetics of endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, measured by [3H]L-arginine to [3H]L-citrulline conversion, and protein expression of ecNOS and iNOS, assessed by Western blot analysis, were unaffected by chronic NA treatment. Furthermore, no changes in subcellular fraction-associated ecNOS were found; this indirectly shows that chronic NA did not cause phosphorylation of the enzyme. Moreover, [3H]L-arginine transport through the plasma membrane was conserved in chronically NA-treated cells. The data demonstrate that prolonged in vitro exposure to pathologic CHF-like NA does not affect the L-arginine: NO pathway in human endothelial cells. PMID:9782366

  8. Suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway by 7-deacetylgedunin, a limonoid from Xylocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Sarigaputi, Chanin; Sangpech, Nuanpan; Palaga, Tanapat; Pudhom, Khanitha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, limonoids isolated from Xylocarpus plants were tested for their in vitro anti-inflammatory effects. The results demonstrated that only 7-deacetylgedunin (1), a gedunin-type limonoid, significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-γ-stimulated production of nitric oxide in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The suppression of nitric oxide production by 1 was correlated with the downregulation of mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mechanistic studies revealed that the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB, IκBα degradation, and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ, were suppressed by 1. PMID:25714725

  9. Signalling pathway involved in nitric oxide synthase type II activation in chondrocytes: synergistic effect of leptin with interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Miguel; Lago, Rocío; Lago, Francisca; Reino, Juan Jesús Gomez; Gualillo, Oreste

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with IL-1, on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) type II activity in vitro in human primary chondrocytes, in the mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line, and in mature and hypertrophic ATDC5 differentiated chondrocytes. For completeness, we also investigated the signalling pathway of the putative synergism between leptin and IL-1. For this purpose, nitric oxide production was evaluated using the Griess colorimetric reaction in culture medium of cells stimulated over 48 hours with leptin (800 nmol/l) and IL-1 (0.025 ng/ml), alone or combined. Specific pharmacological inhibitors of NOS type II (aminoguanidine [1 mmol/l]), janus kinase (JAK)2 (tyrphostin AG490 and Tkip), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; wortmannin [1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/l] and LY294002 [1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/l]), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)1 (PD098059 [1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 μmol/l]) and p38 kinase (SB203580 [1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 μmol/l]) were added 1 hour before stimulation. Nitric oxide synthase type II mRNA expression in ATDC5 chondrocytes was investigated by real-time PCR and NOS II protein expression was analyzed by western blot. Our results indicate that stimulation of chondrocytes with IL-1 results in dose-dependent nitric oxide production. In contrast, leptin alone was unable to induce nitric oxide production or expression of NOS type II mRNA or its protein. However, co-stimulation with leptin and IL-1 resulted in a net increase in nitric oxide concentration over IL-1 challenge that was eliminated by pretreatment with the NOS II specific inhibitor aminoguanidine. Pretreatment with tyrphostin AG490 and Tkip (a SOCS-1 mimetic peptide that inhibits JAK2) blocked nitric oxide production induced by leptin/IL-1. Finally, wortmannin, LY294002, PD098059 and SB203580 significantly decreased nitric oxide production. These findings were confirmed in mature and hypertrophic ATDC5 chondrocytes, and

  10. Treated effect of silymarin on vascular function of aged rats: Dependant on nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; Demir, Omer; Dost, Turhan; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Context: Aging leads to endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness which are the main causes of many cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports have shown that the cell protective effect of silymarin (SM) is dependent on its antioxidant properties. Objectives: We investigated the effect of SM on vascular functions of aged rats and the involvement of nitric oxide or cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in this effect. Materials and methods: Isolated rat aortas were obtained from 22-month old rats. Each ring was incubated with SM (50 mg/L), SM/l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (100 μM, l-NAME) or SM/indomethacin (10 μM, INDO) in tissue bath. Three- to four-month-old rats were used as young controls. Endothelium-intact rings were precontracted with α-receptor agonist phenylephrine (0.001-30 µM) or voltage-dependent high potassium (40 mM), endothelium dependent/independent relaxant responses were obtained using acetylcholine (0.001-30 µM) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0001-3 µM), respectively. Results: Aging increased phenylephrine sensitivity (6.45 ± 0.08; 6.88 ± 0.09) and decreased KCl contraction (882 ± 118.4; 499 ± 80.4). SM treatment decreased the Emax of both agents (548 ± 109; 223 ± 48.9). Aging deteriorated acetylcholine relaxation (93.9 ± 2.09; 72.0 ± 2.56) and SM improved the response (86.3 ± 1.90). l-NAME prevented the SM effect whereas INDO was ineffective. Discussion and Conclusion: Immediate SM treatment partially restored endothelial dysfunction and vascular tone in aging. The possible mechanism might not be mediated by prostacyclin or the COX pathway in acute administration; the nitric oxide pathway and calcium antagonistic features of SM relate to its action on the vessel. PMID:24188646

  11. Ageing is associated with impairment of nitric oxide and prostanoid dilator pathways in the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nivedita; Prasad, Sanjay; Singer, Donald R J; MacAllister, Raymond J

    2002-05-01

    Ageing is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. We assessed the activity of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin pathways in older subjects. Bilateral venous occlusion plethysmography was used to measure forearm blood flow during intra-arterial infusion of the NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-monomethyl--arginine (-NMMA; 1, 2 and 4 micromol/min), the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin (3, 9 and 30 micromol/min), and the smooth muscle constrictor, noradrenaline (60, 120 and 240 pmol/min); each dose infused for 5 min. Eighteen young and 15 healthy older subjects (mean age+/-S.E.M., 32+/-1 and 65+/-1 years respectively) were studied. Effects of treatment were calculated from the ratio of blood flow in the infused to control arm, expressed as a percentage. Dose-response curves were compared by analysis of the area under the curve (AUC) using independent samples t test. All agents caused dose-dependent decreases in basal forearm blood flow. AUC values for noradrenaline, aspirin and -NMMA in younger and older subjects were 162+/-24, 173+/-24 and 170+/-17, and 138+/-22, 70+/-22 and 89+/-22 respectively. Effects of aspirin and -NMMA, but not noradrenaline, were reduced in older subjects (P=0.004, 0.007 and 0.461 respectively). Our findings suggest a generalized abnormality of basal endothelial function in older people, with similar impairment of NO and prostanoid dilator pathways. Defects in both pathways could contribute to the development of age-related cardiovascular disease. PMID:11980580

  12. Nitric Oxide Plays a Key Role in Ovariectomy-Induced Apoptosis in Anterior Pituitary: Interplay between Nitric Oxide Pathway and Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ronchetti, Sonia A; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Duvilanski, Beatriz H; Cabilla, Jimena P

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the estrogenic status produce deep changes in pituitary physiology, mainly because estrogens (E2) are one of the main regulators of pituitary cell population. Also, E2 negatively regulate pituitary neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity and expression and may thereby modulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), an important regulator of cell death and survival. Little is known about how ovary ablation affects anterior pituitary cell remodelling and molecular mechanisms that regulate this process have not yet been elucidated. In this work we used freshly dispersed anterior pituitaries as well as cell cultures from ovariectomized female rats in order to study whether E2 deficiency induces apoptosis in the anterior pituitary cells, the role of NO in this process and effects of E2 on the NO pathway. Our results showed that cell activity gradually decreases after ovariectomy (OVX) as a consequence of cell death, which is completely prevented by a pan-caspase inhibitor. Furthermore, there is an increase of fragmented nuclei and DNA cleavage thereby presenting the first direct evidence of the existence of apoptosis in the anterior pituitary gland after OVX. NO production and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) expression in anterior pituitary cells increased concomitantly to the apoptosis. Inhibition of both, NO synthase (NOS) and sGC activities prevented the drop of cell viability after OVX, showing for the first time that increased NO levels and sGC activity observed post-OVX play a key role in the induction of apoptosis. Conversely, E2 and prolactin treatments decreased nNOS expression and activity in pituitary cells from OVX rats in a time- and E2 receptor-dependent manner, thus suggesting interplay between NO and E2 pathways in anterior pituitary. PMID:27611913

  13. Protective effect of relaxin in cardiac anaphylaxis: involvement of the nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Masini, E; Zagli, G; Ndisang, J F; Solazzo, M; Mannaioni, P F; Bani, D

    2002-01-01

    Relaxin (RLX) is a multifunctional hormone best known for its role in pregnancy and parturition, that has been also shown to influence coronary perfusion and mast cell activation through the generation of endogenous nitric oxide (NO). In this study we report on the effects of RLX on the biochemical and mechanical changes of ex vivo perfused hearts isolated from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs induced by challenge with the specific antigen. The possible involvement of NO in the RLX action has been also investigated. A 30-min perfusion with RLX (30 ng ml−1) before ovalbumin challenge fully abated the positive chronotropic and inotropic effects evoked by anaphylactic reaction to the antigen. RLX also blunted the short-term coronary constriction following to antigen challenge. Conversely, perfusion with chemically inactivated RLX had no effect. The release of histamine in the perfusate and the accumulation of calcium in heart tissue induced by antigen challenge were significantly decreased by RLX, while the amounts of nitrites in the perfusate were significantly increased, as were NO synthase activity and expression and cGMP levels in heart tissue. These findings indicate that RLX has a protective effect in cardiac anaphylaxis which involves an up-regulation of the NO biosynthetic pathway. PMID:12237253

  14. Detoxification of nitric oxide by flavohemoglobin and the denitrification pathway in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ephemeral nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical, highly reactive, environmentally rare, and a potent signaling molecule in organisms across kingdoms of life. This gaseous small molecule can freely transverse membranes and has been implicated in aspects of pathogenicity both in animal and plant ho...

  15. Nitric oxide detoxification by Fusarium verticillioides involves flavohemoglobins and the denitrification pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly mobile and potent signaling molecule, yet as a free radical it can also cause nitrosative stress to cells. To alleviate negative effects from excessive accumulation of endogenous NO or from potential exogenous sources, flavohemoglobin proteins can convert NO into nonto...

  16. Nitric oxide decreases the permselectivity of the paracellular pathway in thick ascending limbs

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Casandra M.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Thick ascending limbs (THALs) reabsorb 25–30% of the filtered NaCl. About 50–70% is reabsorbed via the transcellular pathway and 30–50% is reabsorbed through the Na-selective paracellular pathway. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits transepithelial Na reabsorption, but its effects on the paracellular pathway are unknown. We hypothesized that NO decreases the selectivity of the paracellular pathway in THALs via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). To assess relative Na/Cl permeability ratios (PNa/PCl), we perfused rat THALs and measured the effect of reducing bath NaCl on transepithelial voltage, creating dilution potentials, with vehicle, NO donors and endogenous NO. PNa/PCl was calculated using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation. Reducing bath Na/Cl to 16/8; 32/24; and 64/56 mmol/l created dilution potentials of −13.6 ± 2.2, −10.8 ± 3.0, and −6.1 ± 0.9 mV, respectively. Calculated PNa/PCls were 2.0 ± 0.2, 2.2 ± 0.5, and 1.9 ± 0.2. The NO donor spermine NONOate (SPM; 200 μmol/l) blunted the dilution potential caused by 32/24 mmol/l Na/Cl from −11.1 ± 2.1 to −6.5 ± 1.6 mV (p<0.004) and PNa/PCl from 2.2 ± 0.4 to 1.5± 0.2. Nitroglycerin (200 μmol/l), another NO donor, also reduced PNa/PCl. Controls showed no significant changes. Dibutyryl-cGMP decreased dilution potentials from −13.4 ± 2.9 to −7.5 ± 1.8 mV (n=6, p<0.01). PKG inhibition with KT5823 (4μM) blocked the effect of SPM, while phosphodiesterase 2 inhibition did not. Endogenously-produced NO mimicked the effect of the NO donors. Conclusion: NO reduces the selectivity of the paracellular pathway in thick ascending limbs via cGMP and PKG. PMID:25895589

  17. Activation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways leading to nitric oxide-mediated antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Cader, Mohamed Sarjoon; Amarasinghe, Aruna; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), well-characterized pattern-recognizing receptors of the innate arm of the immune system, are vital in detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The TLR-PAMP interaction initiates an intracellular signaling cascade, predominantly culminating in upregulation of antiviral components, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). After activation, various TLR pathways can promote iNOS production via the myeloid differentiation primary response-88 (MyD-88) adapter protein. Subsequently, iNOS facilitates production of nitric oxide (NO), a highly reactive and potent antiviral molecule that can inhibit replication of RNA and DNA viruses. Furthermore, NO can diffuse freely across cell membranes and elicit antiviral mechanisms in various ways, including direct and indirect damage to viral genomes. This review emphasizes current knowledge of NO-mediated antiviral responses elicited after activation of TLR signaling pathways. PMID:27233799

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the unusual pathway of oxidation of L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chenais, B; Yapo, A; Lepoivre, M; Tenu, J P

    1991-02-22

    A very unusual pathway of the oxidation of L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide has been discovered recently in cytotoxic macrophages. In an attempt to detect molecules generated through this metabolic pathway, a fast radio high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed to analyse the whole set of radiolabelled L-arginine-derived metabolites produced by mammalian cells after appropriate induction. A new intermediate which might be NG-hydroxy-L-arginine was found. PMID:2045453

  19. Nitric Oxide Nanoparticle Technology

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections account for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Staphylococcus aureus is rapidly evolving resistance to contemporary topical as well as systemic antibiotics. Alternatives to current treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections are needed for more effective treatment now and in the future. Nitric oxide's proven roles in both wound repair and as an antimicrobial agent make it an excellent candidate for the treatment of skin infections. Recent attempts at novel nitric oxide therapies, in the form of nitric oxide donors, have shown limited potential in treating cutaneous infection. However, more recent developments in nitric oxide delivery, using nitric oxide nanoparticle technology, demonstrate substantial promise in the promotion of wound repair and eradication of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:20725551

  20. Cardiac preservation is enhanced in a heterotopic rat transplant model by supplementing the nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, D J; Oz, M C; Koga, S; Taha, Z; Broekman, M J; Marcus, A J; Liao, H; Naka, Y; Brett, J; Cannon, P J

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a novel biologic messenger with diverse effects but its role in organ transplantation remains poorly understood. Using a porphyrinic microsensor, the first direct measurements of coronary vascular and endocardial NO production were made. NO was measured directly in the effluent of preserved, heterotopically transplanted rat hearts stimulated with L-arginine and bradykinin; NO concentrations fell from 2.1 +/- 0.4 microM for freshly explanted hearts to 0.7 +/- 0.2 and 0.2 +/- 0.08 microM for hearts preserved for 19 and 38 h, respectively. NO levels were increased by SOD, suggesting a role for superoxide-mediated destruction of NO. Consistent with these data, addition of the NO donor nitroglycerin (NTG) to a balanced salt preservation solution enhanced graft survival in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with 92% of hearts supplemented with NTG surviving 12 h of preservation versus only 17% in its absence. NTG similarly enhanced preservation of hearts stored in University of Wisconsin solution, the clinical standard for preservation. Other stimulators of the NO pathway, including nitroprusside, L-arginine, or 8-bromoguanosine 3',5' monophosphate, also enhanced graft survival, whereas the competitive NO synthase antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was associated with poor preservation. Likely mechanisms whereby supplementation of the NO pathway enhanced preservation included increased blood flow to the reperfused graft and decreased graft leukostasis. NO was also measured in endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation and detected based on its ability to inhibit thrombin-mediated platelet aggregation and serotonin release. NO became undetectable in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation and was restored to normoxic levels on addition of SOD. These studies suggest that the NO pathway fails during preservation/transplantation because of formation of oxygen free radicals during reperfusion, which quench available NO

  1. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  2. Bidirectional cross-regulation between the endothelial nitric oxide synthase and β-catenin signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Warboys, Christina M.; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Qiuping; Shaifta, Yasin; Vanderslott, Genevieve; Passacquale, Gabriella; Hu, Yanhua; Xu, Qingbo; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Ferro, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aims β-catenin has been shown to be regulated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in endothelial cells. We investigated here whether β-catenin interacts with and regulates endothelial NOS (eNOS) and whether eNOS activation promotes β-catenin signalling. Methods and results We identified β-catenin as a novel eNOS binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by mass spectroscopy and western blot analyses of β-catenin and eNOS immunoprecipitates. This was confirmed by in situ proximity ligation assay. eNOS activity, assessed by cGMP production and eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177), was enhanced in β-catenin−/− mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (MPECs) relative to wild-type MPECs. eNOS activation (using adenosine, salbutamol, thrombin, or histamine), or application of an NO donor (spermine NONOate) or cGMP-analogue (8-bromo-cGMP) caused nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HUVEC as shown by western blotting of nuclear extracts. Exposure to spermine NONOate, 8-bromo-cGMP, or sildenafil (a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor) also increased the expression of β-catenin-dependent transcripts, IL-8, and cyclin D1. Stimulation of wild-type MPECs with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), spermine NONOate, 8-bromo-cGMP, or sildenafil increased tube length relative to controls in an angiogenesis assay. These responses were abrogated in β-catenin−/− MPECs, with the exception of that to bFGF which is NO-independent. In C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneous VEGF-supplemented Matrigel plugs containing β-catenin−/− MPECs exhibited reduced angiogenesis compared with plugs containing wild-type MPECs. Angiogenesis was not altered in bFGF-supplemented Matrigel. Conclusion These data reveal bidirectional cross-talk and regulation between the NO-cGMP and β-catenin signalling pathways. PMID:25062958

  3. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  4. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  5. Correlation of nitric oxide produced by an inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein with enhanced expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Inonotus obliquus cocultured with Phellinus morii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Xi, Qi; Xu, Qian; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Dai, Yucheng; Keller, Nancy P; Zheng, Weifa

    2015-05-01

    Fungal interspecific interactions enhance biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites (PM), and production of nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in this process. However, it remains unknown which signaling pathway(s) or regulator(s) mediate fungal PM biosynthesis. In this study, we cocultured two white-rot fungi, Inonotus obliquus and Phellinus morii, to examine NO production, expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and accumulation of phenylpropanoid-derived polyphenols by I. obliquus. Coculture of the two fungi caused an enhanced NO biosynthesis followed by increased transcription of the genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate CoA ligase (4CL), as well as an upregulated biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) inhibited NO production by more than 90% followed by cease in transcription of PAL and 4Cl. Treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one did not affect NO production but suppressed transcription of PAL and 4CL and reduced accumulation of total phenolic constituents. Genome-wide analysis of I. obliquus revealed two genes encoding a constitutive and an inducible NOS-like protein, respectively (cNOSL and iNOSL). Coculture of the two fungi did not increase the expression of the cNOSL gene but triggered expression of the iNOSL gene. Cloned iNOSL from Escherichia coli shows higher activity in transferring L-arginine to NO, and this activity is lost upon AG addition. Thus, iNOSL is more responsible for NO production in I. obliquus and may act as an important regulator governing PM production during fungal interspecific interactions. PMID:25582560

  6. Atorvastatin attenuates the antinociceptive tolerance of morphine via nitric oxide dependent pathway in male mice.

    PubMed

    Hassanipour, Mahsa; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Shirzadian, Armin; Rahimi, Nastaran; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Dehpour, Ahmadreza

    2016-07-01

    The development of morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance limits its therapeutic efficacy in pain management. Atorvastatin, or competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, is mainstay agent in hypercholesterolemia treatment. Beyond the cholesterol-lowering activity, exploration of neuroprotective properties of this statin indicates its potential benefit in central nervous disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of atorvastatin in development and expression of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance in male mice and probable involvement of nitric oxide. Chronic and acute treatment with atorvastatin 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, could alleviate morphine tolerance in development and expression phases. Chronic co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors including L-NAME (non selective NOS inhibitor; 2mg/kg), aminoguanidine (selective inducible NOS inhibitor; 50mg/kg) and 7-NI (selective neuronal NOS inhibitor; 15mg/kg) with atorvastatin blocked the protective effect of atorvastatin in tolerance reversal. Moreover, reversing the atorvastatin effect was also observed in acute simultaneous treatment of L-NAME (5mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg) with atorvastatin. Co-treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (chronic dose: 10mg/kg and acute dose: 20mg/kg) was associated with prevention of atorvastatin anti-tolerance properties. Our results revealed that the atorvastatin modulating role in morphine antinociceptive tolerance is mediated at least in part via nitric oxide in animal pain models of hot plate and tail flick. PMID:27381980

  7. Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Dental Pulp Cells Is Mediated by the Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Young; Jeong, Yeon Jin; Kang, Gi Chang; Kim, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Sun Hun; Chung, Hyun-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is recognized as a mediator and regulator of inflammatory responses. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and NOS is abundantly expressed in the human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). NO produced by NOS can be cytotoxic at higher concentrations to HDPCs. However, the mechanism by which this cytotoxic pathway is activated in cells exposed to NO is not known. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the NO-induced cytotoxic mechanism in HDPCs. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, reduced the viability of HDPCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide on apoptosis of cultured HDPCs. Cells showed typical apoptotic morphology after exposure to SNP. Besides, the number of Annexin V positive cells was increased among the SNP-treated HDPCs. SNP enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) ameliorated the decrement of cell viability induced by SNP. However, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) did not inhibited the decrement of cell viability induced by SNP. SNP increased cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression levels. Moreover, SNP-treated HDPCs elevated activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9. While pretreatment with inhibitors of caspase (z-VAD-fmk, z-DEVD-fmk) reversed the NO-induced apoptosis of HDPCs. From these results, it can be suggested that NO induces apoptosis of HDPCs through the mitochondria-dependent pathway mediated by ROS and Bcl-2 family, but not by the cyclic GMP pathway. PMID:24634593

  8. Involvement of nitric oxide pathway in the PAF-induced relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Moritoki, H.; Hisayama, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Miyano, H.; Kondoh, W.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanism of the vasorelaxant effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on rat thoracic aorta and the effect of aging on the PAF-induced relaxation were investigated. 2. PAF at concentrations causing relaxation induced marked increases in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) production, but did not induce an increase in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). 3. Removal of the endothelium by mechanical rubbing, and treatment with the PAF antagonists CV-3988, CV-6209 and FR-900452, the nitric oxide biosynthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine, the radical scavenger, haemoglobin, and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue, inhibited PAF-induced relaxation and abolished or attenuated PAF-stimulated cyclic GMP production. 4. The relaxation was greatest in arteries from rats aged 4 weeks. With an increase in age, the response of the arteries to PAF was attenuated. 5. Endothelium-dependent cyclic GMP production also decreased with increase in age of the rats. 6. These results suggest that PAF stimulates production of nitric oxide from L-arginine by acting on the PAF receptors in the endothelium, which in turn stimulates soluble guanylate cyclase in the smooth muscle cells, and so increases production of cyclic GMP, thus relaxing the arteries. Age-associated decrease in PAF-induced relaxation may result from a reduction of cyclic GMP formation. PMID:1358382

  9. Nitric oxide sustains long-term skeletal muscle regeneration by regulating fate of satellite cells via signaling pathways requiring Vangl2 and cyclic GMP.

    PubMed

    Buono, Roberta; Vantaggiato, Chiara; Pisa, Viviana; Azzoni, Emanuele; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Brunelli, Silvia; Sciorati, Clara; Clementi, Emilio

    2012-02-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic precursors that proliferate, activate, and differentiate on muscle injury to sustain the regenerative capacity of adult skeletal muscle; in this process, they self-renew through the return to quiescence of the cycling progeny. This mechanism, while efficient in physiological conditions does not prevent exhaustion of satellite cells in pathologies such as muscular dystrophy where numerous rounds of damage occur. Here, we describe a key role of nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule in adult skeletal muscle, on satellite cells maintenance, studied ex vivo on isolated myofibers and in vivo using the α-sarcoglycan null mouse model of dystrophy and a cardiotoxin-induced model of repetitive damage. Nitric oxide stimulated satellite cells proliferation in a pathway dependent on cGMP generation. Furthermore, it increased the number of Pax7(+)/Myf5(-) cells in a cGMP-independent pathway requiring enhanced expression of Vangl2, a member of the planar cell polarity pathway involved in the Wnt noncanonical pathway. The enhanced self-renewal ability of satellite cells induced by nitric oxide is sufficient to delay the reduction of the satellite cell pool during repetitive acute and chronic damages, favoring muscle regeneration; in the α-sarcoglycan null dystrophic mouse, it also slowed disease progression persistently. These results identify nitric oxide as a key messenger in satellite cells maintenance, expand the significance of the Vangl2-dependent Wnt noncanonical pathway in myogenesis, and indicate novel strategies to optimize nitric oxide-based therapies for muscular dystrophy. PMID:22084027

  10. Inorganic Nitrate Promotes the Browning of White Adipose Tissue through the Nitrate-Nitrite-Nitric Oxide Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end-product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach we mechanistically define that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown-adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious co-morbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Since resulting beige/brite cells exhibit anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25249574

  11. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  12. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  13. 5-HT1D receptor inhibits renal sympathetic neurotransmission by nitric oxide pathway in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-09-01

    Although serotonin has been shown to inhibit peripheral sympathetic outflow, serotonin regulation on renal sympathetic outflow has not yet been elucidated. This study investigated which 5-HT receptor subtypes are involved. Wistar rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital; 60mg/kg, i.p.), and prepared for in situ autoperfused rat kidney, which allows continuous measurement of systemic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and renal perfusion pressure (PP). Electrical stimulation of renal sympathetic nerves resulted in frequency-dependent increases in PP (18.3±1.0, 43.7±2.7 and 66.7±4.0 for 2, 4 and 6Hz, respectively), without altering SBP or HR. 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-HT1/7 agonist) (0.00000125-0.1μg/kg each) or l-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist; 0.0125μg/kg) i.a. bolus inhibited vasopressor responses by renal nerve electrical stimulation, unlike i.a. bolus of agonists α-methyl-5-HT (5-HT2), 1-PBG (5-HT3), cisapride (5-HT4), AS-19 (5-HT7), CGS-12066B (5-HT1B) or 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) (0.0125μg/kg each). The effect of l-694,247 did not affect the exogenous norepinephrine-induced vasoconstrictions, whereas was abolished by antagonist LY310762 (5-HT1D; 1mg/kg) or l-NAME (nitric oxide; 10mg/kg), but not by indomethacin (COX1/2; 2mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel; 20mg/kg). These results suggest that 5-HT mechanism-induced inhibition of rat vasopressor renal sympathetic outflow is mainly mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1D receptors via nitric oxide release. PMID:26003124

  14. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute myocardial infarction of rats by inhibiting inflammation and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang; Du, Ping; Wang, Junjie

    2015-09-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF) is the main active component of the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine peony, Paeonia Suffruticosa. PF has diverse biological functions and exhibits anti‑oxidative, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic activity. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a catalyzing enzyme that is involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). NO has an important regulatory role in the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems. PF has previously been demonstrated to inhibit the gene expression of iNOS. The present study aimed to identify a potentially novel cytoprotective function of PF, and to elucidate its effects against myocardial ischemic damage in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). PF was able to significantly decrease the myocardial infarct size as well as the activities of creatine kinase (CK), the MB isoenzyme of CK, lactate dehydrogenase and cardiac troponin T. In addition, in the PF‑treated groups, the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6 and nuclear factor‑κB were markedly inhibited. Furthermore, treatment with PF inhibited the activities and protein expression levels of iNOS. Decreased caspase‑3 and caspase‑9 activities were also observed in the AMI rat model treated with various doses of PF. The results of the present study indicated that the cardioprotective effects of PF may be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and iNOS signaling pathways. PMID:26035555

  15. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, M.; Dominiczak, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an important regulatory molecule in cardiovascular function. Reduced availability of nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:9497971

  16. Differential modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway by distinct neurosteroids in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cauli, O; González-Usano, A; Agustí, A; Felipo, V

    2011-09-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway mediates many responses to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, including modulation of some types of learning and memory. The glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated by GABAergic neurotransmission. Activation of GABA(A) receptors reduces the function of the pathway. Several neurosteroids modulate the activity of GABA(A) and/or NMDA receptors, suggesting that they could modulate the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway. The aim of this work was to assess, by in vivo microdialysis, the effects of several neurosteroids with different effects on GABA(A) and NMDA receptors on the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. To assess the effects of the neurosteroids on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, they were administered through the microdialysis probe before administration of NMDA and the effects on NMDA-induced increase in extracellular cGMP were analyzed. We also assessed the effects of the neurosteroids on basal levels of extracellular cGMP. To assess the effects of neurosteroids on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and on NMDA-induced activation of NOS, we also measured the effects of the neurosteroids on extracellular citrulline. Pregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) behave as agonists of GABA(A) receptors and completely block NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Pregnanolone but not THDOC also reduced basal levels of extracellular cGMP. Pregnenolone did not affect extracellular cGMP or its increase by NMDA administration. Pregnenolone sulfate increased basal extracellular cGMP and potentiated NMDA-induced increase in cGMP, behaving as an enhancer of NMDA receptors activation. Allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate behave as antagonists of NMDA receptors, increasing basal cGMP and blocking completely NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate seems to do this by activating sigma receptors. These data support the concept that, at

  17. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  18. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, K.P.; Rogers, H.W.; Corbett, J.A.; Schreiber, R.D.; McDaniel, M.L.; Unanue, E.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Immunodeficient mice are remarkably resistant to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. The authors examined the role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the CB-17/lcr SCID (SCID) response to LM. SCID spleen cells produced large quantities of NO (as measured by nitrite formation) when incubated in the presence of heat-killed LM. NO produced large quantities of nitrite in response to LM, but only in the presence of IFN-[gamma]. The production of NO induced by LM was not affected by neutralizing antibodies to TNF or IL-1. The production of NO was inhibited by addition of either of two inhibitors of NO synthase, N[sup G]-monomethyl arginine, or aminoguanidine. In a different situation, NK cells that were stimulated by TNF and Listeria products to release IFN-[gamma] did not produce NO. Macrophages cultured with IFN-[gamma] killed live LM. This increased killing of LM was significantly inhibited by amino-guanidine. In vivo, administration of aminoguanidine resulted in a marked increase in the mortality and spleen bacterial loads of LM-infected SCID or immunocompetent control mice. It is concluded that NO is a critical effector molecule of T cell-independent natural resistence of LM as studied in the SCID mouse, and that the NO-mediated response is essential for both SCID and immunocompetent host to survive after LM infection. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Density Functional Theory Calculations and Analysis of Reaction Pathways for Reduction of Nitric Oxide by Hydrogen on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Farberow, Carrie A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-10-03

    Reaction pathways are explored for low temperature (e.g., 400 K) reduction of nitric oxide by hydrogen on Pt(111). First-principles electronic structure calculations based on periodic, self-consistent density functional theory(DFT-GGA, PW91) are employed to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for proposed reaction schemes on Pt(111). The surface of Pt(111) during NO reduction by H₂ at low temperatures is predicted to operate at a high NO coverage, and this environment is explicitly taken into account in the DFT calculations. Maximum rate analyses are performed to assess the most likely reaction mechanisms leading to formation of N₂O, the major product observed experimentally at low temperatures. The results of these analyses suggest that the reaction most likely proceeds via the addition of at least two H atoms to adsorbed NO, followed by cleavage of the N-O bond.

  20. Blocking the mitogen activated protein kinase-p38 pathway is associated with increase expression of nitric oxide synthase and higher production of nitric oxide by bovine macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-03-15

    This study evaluated the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 pathway in the nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages ingesting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms in vitro. Bovine monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with MAP organisms with or without a specific inhibitor of the MAPKp38 pathway and activation of the MAPKp38, interleukin - (IL) IL-10, IL-12, iNOS mRNA expression and NO production were evaluated. Incubation of macrophages with MAP organisms activates the MAPKp38 pathway at early time points post infection. Chemically inhibition of MAPKp38 before incubation of bovine macrophages with MAP resulted in increased expression of IL-12 mRNA at 2, 6 and 24h, decreased expression of IL-10 mRNA at 2, 6 and 24h and increased expression of iNOS mRNA at 2 and 6h. Nitric oxide was evaluated to indirectly determine the effects of MAPKp38 pathway on the anti-microbial activity of bovine macrophages. Incubation of bovine macrophages with MAP resulted in modest increased production of NO at 4 and 6h post infection. Pretreatment of bovine macrophages with the MAPKp38 inhibitor SB203580 before addition of MAP organisms resulted in increased production of NO at 2, 4, 6 and 24h post infection. This study expanded our knowledge of the importance of the MAPKp38 pathway in limiting an appropriate macrophage response to MAP and suggested how activation of MAPKp38 pathway may be a target of this organism to disrupt earlier antimicrobial mechanisms of macrophages. These findings raises the interesting possibility that the cellular manipulation of MAPKp38 may be useful in designing novel vaccines against MAP. PMID:25700780

  1. Passive stretch reduces calpain activity through nitric oxide pathway in unloaded soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Li, Quan; Sheng, Juan-Juan; Chang, Hui; Song, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Unloading in spaceflight or long-term bed rest induces to pronounced atrophy of anti-gravity skeletal muscles. Passive stretch partially resists unloading-induced atrophy of skeletal muscle, but the mechanism remains elusive. The aims of this study were to investigate the hypotheses that stretch tension might increase protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in unloaded skeletal muscle, and then nNOS-derived NO alleviated atrophy of skeletal muscle by inhibiting calpain activity. The tail-suspended rats were used to unload rat hindlimbs for 2 weeks, at the same time, left soleus muscle was stretched by applying a plaster cast to fix the ankle at 35° dorsiflexion. Stretch partially resisted atrophy and inhibited the decreased protein level and activity of nNOS in unloaded soleus muscles. Unloading increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. Stretch reduced frequency of calcium sparks and restored intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration to control levels in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. The increased protein level and activity of calpain as well as the higher degradation of desmin induced by unloading were inhibited by stretch in soleus muscles. In conclusion, these results suggest that stretch can preserve the stability of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channels which prevents the elevated [Ca(2+)]i by means of keeping nNOS activity, and then the enhanced protein level and activity of calpain return to control levels in unloaded soleus muscles. Therefore, stretch can resist in part atrophy of unloaded soleus muscles. PMID:22547201

  2. Interactions between Nitric Oxide and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling Pathways in Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Induction and activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthases (NOS) and excessive production of NO are common features of almost all diseases associated with infection and acute or chronic inflammation, although the contribution of NO to the pathophysiology of these diseases is highly multifactorial and often still a matter of controversy. Because of its direct impact on tissue oxygenation and cellular oxygen (O2) consumption and redistribution, the ability of NO to regulate various aspects of hypoxia-induced signaling has received widespread attention. Conditions of tissue hypoxia and the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) have been implicated in hypoxia or in cancer biology, but are also being increasingly recognized as important features of acute and chronic inflammation. Thus, the activation of HIF transcription factors has been increasingly implicated in inflammatory diseases, and recent studies have indicated its critical importance in regulating phagocyte function, inflammatory mediator production, and regulation of epithelial integrity and repair processes. Finally, HIF also appears to contribute to important features of tissue fibrosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, processes that are associated with tissue remodeling in various non-malignant chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we briefly summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to the general mechanisms involved in HIF regulation and the impact of NO on HIF activation. Secondly, we will summarize the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF signaling in infection, inflammation, and tissue repair and remodeling, and will address the involvement of NO. The growing interest in hypoxia-induced signaling and its relation with NO biology is expected to lead to further insights into the complex roles of NO in acute or chronic inflammatory diseases and may point to the importance of HIF signaling as key feature of NO-mediated events during these disorders. PMID

  3. Nitric Oxide-Related Biological Pathways in Patients with Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Baranyi, Andreas; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd; Theokas, Simon; Robier, Christoph; Baranyi, Maria; Koppitz, Michael; Reicht, Gerhard; Hlade, Peter; Meinitzer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Major depression is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and increased mortality following myocardial infarction. However, biomarkers of depression and increased cardiovascular risk are still missing. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate, whether nitric-oxide (NO) related factors for endothelial dysfunction, such as global arginine bioavailability, arginase activity, L-arginine/ADMA ratio and the arginine metabolites asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) might be biomarkers for depression-induced cardiovascular risk. Methods In 71 in-patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls the Global Arginine Bioavailability Ratio (GABR), arginase activity (arginine/ornithine ratio), the L-arginine/ADMA ratio, ADMA, and SDMA were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Psychiatric and laboratory assessments were obtained at baseline at the time of in-patient admittance and at the time of hospital discharge. Results The ADMA concentrations in patients with major depression were significantly elevated and the SDMA concentrations were significantly decreased in comparison with the healthy controls. Even after a first improvement of depression, ADMA and SDMA levels remained nearly unchanged. In addition, after a first improvement of depression at the time of hospital discharge, a significant decrease in arginase activity, an increased L-arginine/ADMA ratio and a trend for increased global arginine bioavailability were observed. Conclusions Our study results are evidence that in patients with major depression ADMA and SDMA might be biomarkers to indicate an increased cardiovascular threat due to depression-triggered NO reduction. GABR, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio and arginase activity might be indicators of therapy success and increased NO production after remission. PMID:26581044

  4. Dipyridamole enhances ischaemia-induced arteriogenesis through an endocrine nitrite/nitric oxide-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Prasanna K.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Branch, Billy; Hood, Jay; Thoma, Steven; Illum, Sandra; Pardue, Sibile; Teng, Xinjun; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Anti-platelet agents, such as dipyridamole, have several clinical benefits for peripheral artery disease with the speculation of angiogenic potential that could preserve ischaemic tissue viability, yet the effect of dipyridamole on ischaemic arteriogenesis or angiogenesis is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that dipyridamole therapy augments arteriolar vessel development and function during chronic ischaemia. Methods and results Mice were treated with 200 mg/kg dipyridamole twice daily to achieve therapeutic plasma levels (0.8–1.2 µg/mL). Chronic hindlimb ischaemia was induced by permanent femoral artery ligation followed by measurement of tissue perfusion using laser Doppler blood flow along with quantification of vascular density, cell proliferation, and activation of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. Dipyridamole treatment quickly restored ischaemic hindlimb blood flow, increased vascular density and cell proliferation, and enhanced collateral artery perfusion compared with control treatments. The beneficial effects of dipyridamole on blood flow and vascular density were dependent on NO production as dipyridamole did not augment ischaemic tissue reperfusion, vascular density, or endothelial cell proliferation in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS)-deficient mice. Blood and tissue nitrite levels were significantly higher in dipyridamole-treated mice compared with controls and eNOS−/− mice, verifying increased NO production that was regulated in a PKA-dependent manner. Conclusion Dipyridamole augments nitrite/NO production, leading to enhanced arteriogenesis activity and blood perfusion in ischaemic limbs. Together, these data suggest that dipyridamole can augment ischaemic vessel function and restore blood flow, which may be beneficial in peripheral artery disease. PMID:20061326

  5. Signal transduction pathways in erythrocyte nitric oxide metabolism under high fibrinogen levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Carlota; Freitas, T.; Lopez de Almeida, J. P.; Silva-Herdade, A.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies show that the fibrinogen molecule modulates the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) in erythrocyte. The in vitro induced hiperfibrinogenemia interferes in the metabolism of the NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the phosphorylation degree of the band 3. The soluble form of fibrinogen binds into CD47 protein present in the erythrocyte membrane. The soluble thrombomodulin is an inflammatory marker that binds to the erythrocyte CD47 in a site with a sequence peptide known as 4N1K. A study done in vitro shows that when hiperfibrinogenemia was induced in the presence of the peptide 4N1K agonist of CD47 it were observed variations in the efflux of NO from erythrocyte and an increase in the concentrations of GSNO, peroxinitrite, nitrite and nitrate of the erythrocytes. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the peptide 4N1K, on the metabolism of NO in the erythrocyte under high fibrinogen concentration and in the presence of inhibitors of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3. In this in vitro study, whole blood samples were harvested from healthy subjects and NO, peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and S-nitro-glutathione (GSNO) were determined in presence of 4N1K, calpeptine, Syk inhibitor and under high fibrinogen concentrations. The results obtained in erythrocytes under high fibrinogen levels when 4N1K is present with the Syk inhibitor or with calpeptine, showed in relation to the control samples increased significant concentrations of efflux of NO and of peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and GSNO. In conclusion it was verified that in the in vitro model of hiperfibrinogenemia the peptide 4N1K, agonist of CD47, induces mobilization of NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3.

  6. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo and learning ability decrease in parallel in mature compared with young rats.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-04-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to learn this task decreases with age and whether this reduction is associated with a decreased function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo, as analyzed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. We show that 7-mo-old rats need significantly more (192 +/- 64%) trials than do 3-mo-old rats to learn the Y-maze task. Moreover, the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is reduced by 60 +/- 23% in 7-mo-old rats compared with 3-mo-old rats. The results reported support the idea that the reduction in the ability to learn the Y-maze task (and likely other types of learning) of mature compared with young rats would be a consequence of reduced function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. PMID:17412964

  7. The Function of the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Brain in Vivo and Learning Ability Decrease in Parallel in Mature Compared with Young Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to…

  8. The relationship between inflammation and the anticoagulant pathway: the emerging role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Hooper, W Craig

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation represents the interaction of the immune and coagulation systems in an attempt to restore normal hemostasis following injury. The underlying basis of the interrelationship between these two physiological systems revolves around the following: a) the activation of coagulation by inflammation, b) the augmentation of the inflammatory response by coagulation, c) the significant attenuation of inflammation by the anticoagulant response and d) the separate influence of the vascular endothelium on coagulation and inflammation as well as its mediation or control of the cross-talk between these two physiological systems. In hemostasis, the protein C anticoagulant pathway is a major mechanism that functions to prevent the development of a pathological thrombus through the regulation of the procoagulant pathway. The endothelium is essential in maintaining a physiological balance between the anticoagulant and procoagulant pathways with proinflammatory cytokines functioning, in part, to regulate endothelial-cell- surface associated coagulation and anticoagulation proteins. In addition to its anticoagulant properties, activated protein C can also function as a regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production. Current evidence suggests that activated protein C may act to control inflammation through NF-kappaB and/or nitric oxide synthase. A better understanding of the relationship between APC and inflammation may provide new targets for drug design. PMID:15032695

  9. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and synaptic plasticity in the rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, E.; Charles, S. L.; Garthwaite, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, an enzyme that synthesizes guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in response to NO, contributes to plasticity of synaptic transmission in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG). 2. Exposure of ganglia to the NO donor, nitroprusside, caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP which was augmented in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The compound, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely blocked this cyclic GMP response. 3. As assessed by extracellular recording, nitroprusside (100 microM) and another NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (30 microM) increased the efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission in response to electrical stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, an effect that was reversible and which could be replicated by the cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ganglionic depolarizations resulting from stimulation of nicotinic receptors with carbachol were not increased by nitroprusside. The potentiating actions of the NO donors on synaptic transmission, but not that of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, were inhibited by ODQ. 4. Brief tetanic stimulation of the preganglionic nerve resulted in a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission that was unaffected by ODQ, either in the absence or presence of the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 microM). A lack of influence of L-NOARG was confirmed in intracellular recordings of LTP of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. Furthermore, under conditions where tetanically-induced LTP was saturated, nitroprusside was still able to potentiate synaptic transmission, as judged from extracellular recording. 5. We conclude that NO is capable of potentiating ganglionic neurotransmission and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of soluble guanylyl

  10. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, Maristela; Batista, Wagner L.; Ogata, Fernando T.; Monteiro, Hugo P. Arai, Roberto J.

    2008-05-16

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras{sup C118S}) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG.

  11. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Maristela; Batista, Wagner L; Ogata, Fernando T; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P; Arai, Roberto J

    2008-05-16

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras(C118S)) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG. PMID:18325324

  12. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  13. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Amira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the increase. The [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited in the presence of NG-monomethyl L-arginine or 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), and diaminofluorescein-2/diaminofluorescein-2 triazole (DAF-2/DAF-2T) fluorometry demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) was also produced by H2S in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 64.8 μM, indicating that NO was involved in the H2S effect. The H2S-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by pretreatment with U73122, xestospongin C, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, KT5823, and GP2A, indicating that phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), protein kinase G (PKG), and Gq-protein play roles as intermediate components in the H2S-triggered intracellular signaling. Innovation: To our knowledge, our study is the first one highlighting the effect of H2S on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic acinar cells. Moreover, a novel cascade was presumed to function via the synergistic interaction between H2S and NO. Conclusion: We conclude that H2S affects [Ca2+]i homeostasis that is mediated by H2S-evoked NO production via an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-PKG-Gq-protein-PLC-IP3 pathway to induce Ca2+ release, and this pathway is identical to the one we recently proposed for a sole effect of NO and the two gaseous molecules synergistically function to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis

  15. Nitric oxide pathway activity modulation alters the protective effects of (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate on reserpine-induced impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Neng; Chang, Kuo-Chi; Lin, Rui-Feng; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Shih, Ruoh-Lan; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Soung, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Cheng-Chia

    2016-05-15

    Reserpine (RES) has been reported to increase the brain's neural oxidative stress and cause cognitive dysfunction. Having powerful antioxidative properties, green tea catechins, especially (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), are able to protect against many oxidative injuries. In this study, we examined the protecting properties of EGCG on RES-induced impairment of short-term memory in three-month-old male Wistar rats. RES (1mg/kg i.p.) induced memory impairment (p<0.001) as evaluated by the social recognition task. EGCG treatment (100mg/kg i.p. for 7days, starting 6days before RES injection) was able to improve the impaired memory caused by RES. RES treatment increased the nitric oxide (NO) level and lipid peroxidation (LPO) production, and decreased the antioxidation power in hippocampi. EGCG treatment was able to counteract the RES-induced NO level and LPO production, as well as enhanced the hippocampal antioxidation power in RES-treated rats. In order to examine the implication of NO pathway activity in RES treatment, either NO precursor (L-arginine; L-A) or NO synthase inhibitor (L-NAME; L-N) was co-pretreated with EGCG; NO precursor treatment eliminated the protective effect of EGCG, in contrast to that NO synthase inhibitor treatment significantly increased the EGCG effects on cognitive and biochemical protection in RES-treated rats. These results suggested that the NO pathway was implicated, at least in part, in the RES-induced impairment, as well as in the protective effect of EGCG in treating RES-induced impairment of memory. The above evidence provides a clinically relevant value for EGCG in preventing RES-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26944334

  16. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Denny, Carina; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Matias de Alencar, Severino; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Luiz Rosalen, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23737853

  17. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marcelo; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Denny, Carina; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Matias de Alencar, Severino; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Luiz Rosalen, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23737853

  18. Cellular mechanisms for the treatment of chronic heart failure: the nitric oxide- and adenosine-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2002-05-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that several drugs proven to improve survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) enhance endogenous nitric oxide (NO)- and/or adenosine-dependent pathways. Indeed, we and others have demonstrated that: i) antagonists of either renin-angiotensin-aldosterone or beta-adrenergic systems enhance NO-dependent pathways; ii) although carvedilol and amlodipine belong to different drug classes, both of them can increase cardiac adenosine levels; iii) increased adenosine levels by dipyridamole are associated with the improvement of CHF. Interestingly, both NO and adenosine have multifactorial beneficial actions in cardiovascular systems. First of all, both of them induce vasodilation and decrease myocardial hypercontractility, which may contribute to a reduction in the severity of myocardial ischaemia. Both adenosine and NO are also involved in cardioprotection attributable to acute and late phases of ischaemic preconditioning, respectively. Secondly, they can modulate the neurohormonal systems that contribute to the progression of CHF. Thus, we propose that enhancement of endogenous NO and/or adenosine as potential therapeutic targets in a new strategy for the treatment for CHF. PMID:15989539

  19. Nitric oxide induces thioredoxin-1 nuclear translocation: Possible association with the p21Ras survival pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Yodoi, J.; Debbas, V.; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Stern, A.; Monteiro, Hugo P. . E-mail: hpmonte@uol.com.br

    2006-10-06

    One of the major redox-regulating molecules with thiol reducing activity is thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1). TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that exists in the extracellular millieu, cytoplasm, and nucleus, and has a distinct role in each environment. It is well known that TRX-1 promptly migrates to the nuclear compartment in cells exposed to oxidants. However, the intracellular location of TRX-1 in cells exposed to nitrosothiols has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the exposure of HeLa cells to increasing concentrations of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) promoted TRX-1 nuclear accumulation. The SNAP-induced TRX-1 translocation to the nucleus was inhibited by FPTIII, a selective inhibitor of p21Ras. Furthermore, TRX-1 migration was attenuated in cells stably transfected with NO insensitive p21Ras (p21{sup RasC118S}). Downstream to p21Ras, the MAP Kinases ERK1/2 were activated by SNAP under conditions that promote TRX-1 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of MEK prevented SNAP-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and TRX-1 nuclear migration. In addition, cells treated with p21Ras or MEK inhibitor showed increased susceptibility to cell death induced by SNAP. In conclusion, our observations suggest that the nuclear translocation of TRX-1 is induced by SNAP involving p21Ras survival pathway.

  20. Tropospheric nitric oxide measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in tropospheric photo-chemistry. The photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons, for example, can serve as either a source or a sink for ozone, depending on the local abundance of NO. Nitric oxide also helps govern atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The OH radical is the single most important player in photochemical transformations because it controls the atmospheric lifetimes of so many chemical species. Although NO serves as a very effective catalyst in many important chemical processes, its concentration is low enough to normally be expressed in units of parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Consequently, commercially available detectors for NO (with detection limits of about one part per billion) have proven to be unsuitable for use anywhere except in urban areas and near other local pollution sources. Under the sponsorship of NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE), Wallops has developed an extremely sensitive detector with a detection limit of a few pptv. The system was specifically designed for aircraft use, with the objective of applying it in global aircraft studies of tropospheric chemistry. Studies with the detector are examined.

  1. L-Citrulline dilates rat retinal arterioles via nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Morita, Masahiko; Morishita, Koji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    L-Citrulline is an effective precursor of L-arginine produced by the L-citrulline/L-arginine cycle, and it exerts beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system by supporting enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. NO dilates retinal blood vessels via the cyclooxygenase-mediated pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of L-citrulline on retinal circulation and to investigate the potential involvement of NO and prostaglandins in L-citrulline-induced responses in rats. L-Citrulline (10-300 μg kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.) increased the diameter of retinal arterioles without significantly changing mean blood pressure, heart rate, and fundus blood flow. The vasodilator response of retinal arterioles to l-citrulline was significantly diminished following treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.), an NO synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In addition, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid (147 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of argininosuccinate synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme for the recycling of l-citrulline to l-arginine, diminished the L-citrulline-induced retinal vasodilation. These results suggest that both NO- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways contribute to the L-citrulline-induced vasodilation of rat retinal arterioles. The L-citrulline/L-arginine recycling pathway may have more importance in regulating vascular tone in retinal blood vessels than in peripheral resistance vessels. PMID:25953269

  2. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyls PCB 153 and PCB 126 impair the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellar neurons in culture by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Piedrafita, Blanca; Rodrigo, Regina; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants present in human blood and milk. Exposure to PCBs during pregnancy and lactation leads to cognitive impairment in children. Perinatal exposure to PCB 153 or PCB 126 impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo and learning ability in adult rats. The aims of this work were: (1) to assess whether long-term exposure of primary cultures of cerebellar neurons to PCB 153 or PCB 126 reproduces the impairment in the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway found in rat cerebellum in vivo; (2) to provide some insight on the steps of the pathway affected by these PCBs; (3) to assess whether the mechanisms of interference of the pathway are different for PCB 126 and PCB 153. Both PCB 153 and PCB 126 increase basal levels of cGMP by different mechanisms. PCB 126 increases the amount of soluble guanylate cyclase while PCB 153 does not. PCB 153 reduces the amount of calmodulin while PCB 126 does not. Also both PCBs impair the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by different mechanisms, PCB 153 impairs nitric oxide-induced activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and increase in cGMP while PCB 126 does not. PCB 126 reduces NMDA-induced increase in calcium while PCB 153 does not. When PCB 153 and PCB 126 exhibit the same effect, PCB 126 was more potent than PCB 153, as occurs in vivo. PMID:19526286

  4. Growth hormone regulates intestinal ion transport through a modulation of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide-cAMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Cirillo, Pia; Mallardo, Giuseppe; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Passariello, Annalisa; Ruotolo, Serena; Marco, Giulio De; Porcaro, Francesco; Guarino, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Growth hormone (GH) directly interacts with the enterocyte stimulating ion absorption and reducing ion secretion induced by agonists of cAMP. Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the regulation of transepithelial ion transport and acts as a second messenger for GH hemodynamic effects, we tested the hypothesis that NO may be involved in the resulting effects of GH on intestinal ion transport. METHODS: Electrical parameters reflecting trans-epithelial ion transport were measured in Caco-2 cell monolayers mounted in Ussing chambers and exposed to GH and cholera toxin (CT) alone or in combination, in the presence or absence of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Similar experiments were conducted to determine cAMP and nitrite/nitrate concentrations. NOS expression was assayed by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: L-NAME causes total abrogation of absorptive and anti-secretory effects by GH on intestinal ion transport. In addition, L-NAME was able to inhibit the GH-effects on intracellular cAMP concentration under basal conditions and in response to CT. GH induced a Ca2+-dependent increase of nitrites/nitrates production, indicating the involvement of the constitutive rather than the inducible NOS isoform, which was directly confirmed by Western blot analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the GH effects on intestinal ion transport, either under basal conditions or in the presence of cAMP-stimulated ion secretion, are mediated at an intracellular level by the activity of cNOS. PMID:16937444

  5. Nitric oxide regulates K+ and Cl- channels in guard cells through a subset of abscisic acid-evoked signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Gay, Robert; Sokolovski, Sergei; Hills, Adrian; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Blatt, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) triggers a complex sequence of signaling events that lead to concerted modulation of ion channels at the plasma membrane of guard cells and solute efflux to drive stomatal closure in plant leaves. Recent work has indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and its synthesis are a prerequisite for ABA signal transduction in Arabidopsis and Vicia guard cells. Its mechanism(s) of action is not well defined in guard cells and, generally, in higher plants. Here we show directly that NO selectively regulates Ca2+-sensitive ion channels of Vicia guard cells by promoting Ca2+ release from intracellular stores to raise cytosolic-free [Ca2+]. NO-sensitive Ca2+ release was blocked by antagonists of guanylate cyclase and cyclic ADP ribose-dependent endomembrane Ca2+ channels, implying an action mediated via a cGMP-dependent cascade. NO did not recapitulate ABA-evoked control of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-insensitive K+ channels, and NO scavengers failed to block the activation of these K+ channels evoked by ABA. These results place NO action firmly within one branch of the Ca2+-signaling pathways engaged by ABA and define the boundaries of parallel signaling events in the control of guard cell movements. PMID:12949257

  6. Nitric oxide-mediated neuronal apoptosis in rats with recurrent febrile seizures through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Qin, Jiong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Han, Ying; Yang, Zhixian; Chang, Xingzhi; Ji, Xinna

    2008-10-10

    Nitric oxide (NO), as a neurotransmitter, exerts various physiological and pathological effects on the brain. Excess NO is toxic to neurons and may cause neuronal apoptosis. However, the cascade of NO-mediated apoptosis is not fully understood. We utilized a recurrent febrile seizures (FS) rat model and found that plasma NO was increased, neuronal apoptosis was evident, the expression of glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78, a well-established marker of ER stress) was elevated, and caspase-12 (an ER stress-specific proapoptosis molecule) was activated in the hippocampus in a time-dependent manner after recurrent FS. Administration of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) enhanced neuronal apoptosis, down-regulated the expression of GRP78, and increased that of caspase-12 in FS+SNP groups compared with FS groups. In contrast, treatment with N(G)-nitrol-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, a competitive NO synthase inhibitor) inhibited neuronal apoptosis, up-regulated the expression of GRP78, and decreased that of caspase-12 in FS+l-NAME groups compared with FS groups. These results suggest that NO mediates neuronal apoptosis caused by recurrent FS, and that the ER stress pathway is involved in NO-mediated neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18675883

  7. Involvement of interferon-γ in bowel disease pathogenesis by nitric oxide pathway: a study in Algerian patients.

    PubMed

    Rafa, Hayet; Amri, Manel; Saoula, Houria; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Medjeber, Osama; Boutaleb, Amira; Aftis, Saida; Nakmouche, M'hamed; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2010-09-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex, involving a wide range of molecules including cytokines. Abnormalities in the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) may indicate a dysregulation of intestinal immunity probably associated with pathogenic events. The aim of this work was to study the implication of IFN-γ and nitric oxide (NO) in bowel disease pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the circulating IFN-γ and IL-12 production in 2 groups of Algerian patients with IBD (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Moreover, systemic NO concentrations and NO generation by colonic mucosa were determined in these patients. Finally, we examined the effect of IFN-γ on NO production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of these patients. Our results indicate that IFN-γ/IL-12 production in IBD patients was increased in comparison to healthy donors. This strong production correlates with high levels of NO in sera and colonic mucosa culture. Interestingly, NO production was related to the clinical stage of IBD patients (inactive or active stage). The relationship between IFN-γ and NO production in IBD patients were confirmed by in vitro experiments and the role of IFN-γ in NO synthase induction in patients' PBMC culture was suggested. Collectively, our results show that IFN-γ plays a pivotal role in IBD pathogenesis through NO pathway. PMID:20626296

  8. Minocycline Attenuates Depressive-Like Behaviour Induced by Rat Model of Testicular Torsion: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Seyed Soheil Saeedi; Mousavi, Seyyedeh Elaheh; Saravi, Seyed Sobhan Saeedi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-04-01

    Testicular torsion/detorsion (T/D) can induce depression in pre- and post-pubertal patients. This study was conducted to investigate the psychological impact of testicular torsion and mechanism underlying its depressive-like behaviour, as well as antidepressant-like activity of minocycline and possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP pathway in this paradigm in male rats undergoing testicular T/D. Unilateral T/D was performed in 36 male adult Wistar rats, and different doses of minocycline were injected alone or combined with N(ω) -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), non-specific NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor; aminoguanidine (AG), specific inducible NOS inhibitor; l-arginine, an NO precursor; and selective PDE5I, sildenafil. After assessment of locomotor activity in open-field test, immobility times were recorded in the forced swimming test (FST). Moreover, 30 days after testicular T/D, testicular venous testosterone and serum nitrite concentrations were measured. A correlation was observed between either a decrease in plasma testosterone or an increase in serum nitrite concentrations with prolongation in immobility time in the testicular T/D-operated rats FST. Minocycline (160 mg/kg) exerted the highest significant antidepressant-like effect in the operated rats in the FST (p < 0.001). Furthermore, combination of subeffective doses of minocycline (80 mg/kg) and either l-NAME (10 mg/kg) or AG (50 mg/kg) demonstrated a significant robust antidepressant-like activity in T/D group (p < 0.01). Consequently, NO/cGMP pathway was involved in testicular T/D-induced depressive-like behaviour and antidepressant-like activity of minocycline in the animal model. Moreover, a contribution was observed between either decreased testosterone or elevated serum nitrite levels and depressive-like behaviour following testicular T/D. PMID:26381433

  9. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  10. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26391043

  11. Parallel evolution of Nitric Oxide signaling: Diversity of synthesis & memory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L.; Kohn, Andrea B.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of NO signaling can be traceable back to the origin of life with the large scale of parallel evolution of NO synthases (NOSs). Inducible-like NOSs may be the most basal prototype of all NOSs and that neuronal-like NOS might have evolved several times from this prototype. Other enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for NO synthesis have been discovered using reduction of nitrites, an alternative source of NO. Diverse synthetic mechanisms can co-exist within the same cell providing a complex NO-oxygen microenvironment tightly coupled with cellular energetics. The dissection of multiple sources of NO formation is crucial in analysis of complex biological processes such as neuronal integration and learning mechanisms when NO can act as a volume transmitter within memory-forming circuits. In particular, the molecular analysis of learning mechanisms (most notably in insects and gastropod molluscs) opens conceptually different perspectives to understand the logic of recruiting evolutionarily conserved pathways for novel functions. Giant uniquely identified cells from Aplysia and related species precent unuque opportunities for integrative analysis of NO signaling at the single cell level. PMID:21622160

  12. Biotransformation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Kasama, K

    1987-01-01

    Previous investigations into the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have mostly been conducted with special reference to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and its direct effects on the respiratory system, while the study of nitric oxide (NO) has been disregarded. We carried out a study on NO by exposing rats and mice to 15NO or administering 15N-nitrite and 15N-nitrate to these animals by IP injection in order to elucidate the metabolic fate of NO. The results of our study and previous findings led us to assume that the major metabolic path of inhaled NO is as follows: inhaled NO reacts with hemoglobin, forming nitrosyl-hemoglobin (NOHb), and from NOHb, nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) are generated. Major quantities of NO3- are discharged into the urine and a certain amount is discharged into the oral cavity through the salivary glands and transformed to NO2-. Part of this NO2- is converted to N2 gas in the stomach. Nitrate in the intestine is partly reduced to ammonia (NH3) through NO2-, reabsorbed into the body, and converted to urea. Most of the metabolites of inhaled NO are excreted rapidly from the body within 48 hr. PMID:3665863

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signalling pathway in the antidepressant activity of essential oil of Valeriana wallichii Patchouli alcohol chemotype.

    PubMed

    Sah, Sangeeta Pilkhwal; Mathela, Chandra Shekhar; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2011-11-15

    Valeriana wallichii DC (Valerianaceae), popularly named as Indian valerian has been shown to exist as three chemotypes. The present study evaluated the antidepressant like effect of root essential oil of Valeriana wallichii patchouli alcohol chemotype in both acute and chronic treatment study using forced swim test (FST). Mice (n=6 per group) received 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg p.o. doses of test drug. Single administration of oil significantly inhibited the immobility period (57.6% and 46.9%) at doses 20 and 40 mg/kg respectively without changing the motor function (p<0.05). Similarly, daily administration of essential oil (20mg/kg) for 14 days significantly reduced the immobility period (69.9%) in FST (p<0.05). The neurotransmitter levels in mouse brain were estimated on day 14 after the behavioral study. Significant increase in the level of norepinephrine (29%) and serotonin (19%) (p<0.05) was found at 20mg/kg dose, while no change was observed at 10 and 40 mg/kg doses. The antidepressant-like effect of essential oil (20mg/kg) was prevented by pretreatment of mice with l-arginine (750 mg/kg i.p.) and sildenafil (5mg/kg i.p). On the contrary, pretreatment of mice with l-NAME (10mg/kg i.p.) or methylene blue (10mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the antidepressant action of essential oil (10mg/kg). Taken together, these findings demonstrated that nitric oxide pathway is involved in mediating antidepressant like effect of essential oil from this chemotype. PMID:21795033

  14. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  15. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  16. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  17. Respective role of lipoxygenase and nitric oxide-synthase pathways in plasma histamine-induced macromolecular leakage inconscious hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, G; Carpentier, P H; Desquand-Billiald, S; Finet, M; Hanf, R

    1999-01-01

    phase of histamine-induced hypotension.Thus, plasma histamine can trigger both an immediate cysteinyl-leukotriene (Cys-LT)-dependent and a late nitric oxide (NO)-mediated inflammatory cascade. Although the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) pathway might account for histamine-induced venule dilatation, it would not influence histamine-induced extravasation. PMID:10372823

  18. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25473931

  19. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces microglial nitric oxide production and subsequent rat primary cortical neuron apoptosis through p38/JNK MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanye; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Wan, Chunhua; Liu, Jiao; Duan, Zhiqing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-10-01

    It has been widely accepted that microglia, which are the innate immune cells in the brain, upon activation can cause neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in regulating microglial nitric oxide production and its role in causing neuronal damage. The study revealed that TCDD stimulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, a rapid activation of p38 and JNK MAPKs was found in HAPI microglia following TCDD treatment. Blockage of p38 and JNK kinases with their specific inhibitors, SB202190 and SP600125, significantly reduced TCDD-induced iNOS expression and NO production. In addition, it was demonstrated through treating rat primary cortical neurons with media conditioned with TCDD treated microglia that microglial iNOS activation mediates neuronal apoptosis. Lastly, it was also found that p38 and JNK MAPK inhibitors could attenuate the apoptosis of rat cortical neurons upon exposure to medium conditioned by TCDD-treated HAPI microglial cells. Based on these observations, we highlight that the p38/JNK MAPK pathways play an important role in TCDD-induced iNOS activation in rat HAPI microglia and in the subsequent induction of apoptosis in primary cortical neurons. PMID:23969120

  20. L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway modulates gastric motility and gallbladder emptying induced by erythromycin and liquid meal in humans.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, S; Distrutti, E; Quintieri, A; Sarpi, L; Spirchez, Z; Gulla, N; Morelli, A

    1995-06-01

    There is recent evidence that nitric oxide, a soluble gas produced from L-arginine, is released by the smooth muscle cells and neurons of the gastrointestinal tract where it exerts a myorelaxive action. However, little is known about the effects nitric oxide has on gastric and gallbladder motility during the inter- and postprandial phases in man. We therefore investigated the effects 200 mg/kg/hr L-arginine exerts on the gastric and gallbladder motility induced by 2 mg/kg erythromycin or a liquid meal in 21 subjects in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Gastric and gallbladder emptying were evaluated by sonography. Fasting antral motility was expressed as antral motility index (MI). In fasting subjects, L-arginine administration determined a threefold increase in plasma nitrite concentrations. Administration of erythromycin caused a significant rise in the antral MI, which was inhibited by L-arginine (P < 0.05). Ingestion of a liquid meal also significantly increased antral MI, but it returned to basal values 90 min after the end of the meal. Although L-arginine administration caused a significant reduction in the antral MI (P < 0.05), it did not inhibit gastric emptying. L-Arginine provoked an approximately 40% increase in basal gallbladder volume, completely blocked erythromycin-induced emptying, and partially, but significantly, prevented the emptying induced by a liquid meal (P < 0.01). Our study suggests that nitric oxide may be implicated in the physiological modulation of gastric and gallbladder motility during the inter- and postprandial phases in man. PMID:7781462

  1. Nitric oxide as an antioxidant

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, J.; Harel, S.; Granit, R. )

    1991-08-15

    Benzoate monohydroxy compounds, and in particular salicylate, were produced during interaction of ferrous complexes with hydrogen peroxide (Fenton reaction) in a N2 environment. These reactions were inhibited when Fe complexes were flushed, prior to the addition in the model system, by nitric oxide. Methionine oxidation to ethylene by Fenton reagents was also inhibited by nitric oxide. Myoglobin in several forms such as metmyoglobin, oxymyoglobin, and nitric oxide-myoglobin were interacted with an equimolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Spectra changes in the visible region and the changes in membrane (microsomes) lipid peroxidation by the accumulation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) were determined. The results showed that metmyoglobin and oxymyoglobin were activated by H2O2 to ferryl myoglobin, which initiates membrane lipid peroxidation; but not nitric oxide-myoglobin, which, during interaction with H2O2, did not form ferryl but metmyoglobin which only poorly affected lipid peroxidation. It is assumed that nitric oxide, liganded to ferrous complexes, acts to prevent the prooxidative reaction of these complexes with H2O2.

  2. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  3. Signaling pathway of nitric oxide production induced by ginsenoside Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells: a possible involvement of androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Kaneko, Akiyo; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Okabe, Tetsuro

    2007-02-16

    Ginsenosides have been shown to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production in aortic endothelial cells. However, the signaling pathways involved have not been well studied in human aortic endothelial cells. The present study was designed to examine whether purified ginsenoside Rb1, a major active component of ginseng could actually induce NO production and to clarify the signaling pathway in human aortic endothelial cells. NO production was rapidly increased by Rb1. The rapid increase in NO production was abrogated by treatment with nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, L-NAME. Rb1 stimulated rapid phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Thr204) and eNOS (Ser1177). Rapid phosphorylation of eNOS (Ser1177) was prevented by SH-5, an Akt inhibitor or wortmannin, PI3-kinase inhibitor and partially attenuated by PD98059, an upstream inhibitor for ERK1/2. Interestingly, NO production and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 by Rb1 were abolished by androgen receptor antagonist, nilutamide. The results suggest that PI3kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways and androgen receptor are involved in the regulation of acute eNOS activation by Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells. PMID:17196933

  4. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Calcium Mobilization and Arachidonic Acid Pathway Activation during Platelet Aggregation with different aggregating agonists.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debipriya; Mazumder, Sahana; Kumar Sinha, Asru

    2016-03-01

    Platelet aggregation by different aggregating agonists is essential in the normal blood coagulation process, the excess of which caused acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In all cases, the activation of arachidonic acid by cycloxygenase was needed for the synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) but the mechanism of arachidonic acid release in platelets remains obscure. Studies were conducted to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO), if any, on the release of arachidonic acid in platelets. The cytosolic Ca(2+) was visualized and quantitated by fluorescent spectroscopy by using QUIN-2. NO was measured by methemoglobin method. Arachidonic acid was determined by HPLC. TXA2 was measured as ThromboxaneB2 (TXB2) by ELISA. Treatment of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with different aggregating agents resulted in the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) which inhibited the production of NO synthesis and increased TXA2 synthesis. Furthermore, the treatment of washed PRP with different platelet aggregating agents resulted in the increase of [Ca(2+)] in nM ranges. In contrast, the pre-treatment of washed PRP with aspirin increased platelet NO level and inhibited the Ca(2+) mobilization and TXA2 synthesis. These results indicated that the aggregation of platelets by different aggregating agonists was caused by the cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization due to the inhibition of NOS. PMID:27127451

  5. Increasing the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway increases the ability to learn a Y-maze task.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Erceg, Slaven; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-08-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a crucial role in learning. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NMDA receptors contribute to learning processes are not known in detail. Activation of NMDA receptors leads to increased calcium in the postsynaptic neuron. Calcium binds to calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase, increasing nitric oxide (NO), which activates soluble guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP. Part of this cGMP is released to the extracellular space. Several reports indicate that impairment of this glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway reduces the ability to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task by rats. The aim of this work was to assess whether enhancing the function of this pathway increases the ability to learn this task. Prenatal exposure to the polybrominated diphenylether PBDE-99 during embryonic days 2-9 or 11-19 enhances the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo as assessed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. This was associated with an increase in the ability to learn the Y-maze task. Rats prenatally exposed to PBDE need fewer trials than control rats to learn the Y-maze task. These results show that the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP modulates the ability of rats to learn the Y-maze task, that the function of the pathway under physiological conditions is not optimal for learning, and that performance in the Y-maze task may be improved by enhancing slightly the function of the pathway and cGMP formation. PMID:19326454

  6. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  7. Hyperammonemia alters the modulation by different neurosteroids of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway through NMDA- GABAA - or sigma receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    González-Usano, Alba; Cauli, Omar; Agustí, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Several neurosteroids modulate the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum through modulation of NMDA- GABAA - or sigma receptors. Hyperammonemia alters the concentration of several neurosteroids and impairs the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, leading to impaired learning ability. This work aimed to assess whether chronic hyperammonemia alters the modulation by different neurosteroids of GABAA, NMDA, and/or sigma receptors and of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Neurosteroids were administered through microdialysis probes, and extracellular cGMP and citrulline were measured. Then NMDA was administered to assess the effects on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway activation. Hyperammonemia completely modifies the effects of pregnanolone and pregnenolone. Pregnanolone acts as a GABAA receptor agonist in controls, but as an NMDA receptor antagonist in hyperammonemic rats. Pregnenolone does not induce any effect in controls, but acts as a sigma receptor agonist in hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia potentiates the actions of tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) as a GABAA receptor agonist, allopregnanolone as an NMDA receptor antagonist, and pregnenolone sulfate as an NMDA receptor activation enhancer. Neurosteroids that reduce the pathway (pregnanolone, THDOC, allopregnanolone, DHEAS) may contribute to cognitive impairment in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Pregnenolone would impair cognitive function in hyperammonemia. Neurosteroids that restore the pathway in hyperammonemia (pregnenolone sulfate) could restore cognitive function in hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. PMID:23227932

  8. Hyperammonemia alters glycinergic neurotransmission and modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by extracellular glycine in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-05-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway modulates some forms of learning. How glycine modulates this pathway is unclear. Glycine could modulate the pathway biphasically, enhancing its function through NMDA receptor activation or reducing it through glycine receptor activation. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in the cerebellum and induces cognitive impairment. The possible alterations in hyperammonemia of glycinergic neurotransmission and of glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway modulation by glycine remain unknown. The aims were to assess, by in vivo microdialysis in cerebellum: (i) the effects of different glycine concentrations, administered through the microdialysis probe, on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function; (ii) the effects of tonic glycine receptors activation on the pathway function, by blocking them with strychnine; (iii) whether hyperammonemia alters the pathway modulation by glycine; (iv) and whether hyperammonemia alters extracellular glycine concentration and/or glycine receptor membrane expression. In control rats, low glycine levels reduce the pathway function, likely by activating glycine receptors, while 20 μM glycine enhances the pathway function, likely by enhancing NMDA receptor activation. In hyperammonemic rats, glycine did not reduce the pathway function, but enhanced it when administered at 1-20 μM. Hyperammonemia reduces extracellular glycine concentration by approximately 50% and glycine receptor membrane expression. However, tonic glycine receptor activation seems to be enhanced in hyperammonemic rats, as indicated by the larger increase in extracellular cGMP induced by strychnine. These data show that glycine modulates the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway biphasically and that hyperammonemia strongly alters glycinergic neurotransmission and modulation by glycine of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway. These alterations may contribute to the cerebellar aspects of cognitive alterations in hyperammonemia. The findings

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-II, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB and inducible nitric-oxide synthase define a common myogenic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Canicio, J; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1999-06-18

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are potent inducers of skeletal muscle differentiation and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity is essential for this process. Here we show that IGF-II induces nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) activities downstream from PI 3-kinase and that these events are critical for myogenesis. Differentiation of rat L6E9 myoblasts with IGF-II transiently induced NF-kappaB DNA binding activity, inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and nitric oxide (NO) production. IGF-II-induced iNOS expression and NO production were blocked by NF-kappaB inhibition. Both NF-kappaB and NOS activities were essential for IGF-II-induced terminal differentiation (myotube formation and expression of skeletal muscle proteins: myosin heavy chain, GLUT 4, and caveolin 3), which was totally blocked by NF-kappaB or NOS inhibitors in rat and human myoblasts. Moreover, the NOS substrate L-Arg induced myogenesis in the absence of IGFs in both rat and human myoblasts, and this effect was blocked by NOS inhibition. Regarding the mechanisms involved in IGF-II activation of NF-kappaB, PI 3-kinase inhibition prevented NF-kappaB activation, iNOS expression, and NO production. Moreover, IGF-II induced, through a PI 3-kinase-dependent pathway, a decrease in IkappaB-alpha protein content that correlated with a decrease in the amount of IkappaB-alpha associated with p65 NF-kappaB. PMID:10364173

  10. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway in ascorbic acid-mediated protection against acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Koul, Vaishali; Kaur, Anudeep; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible involvement of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase (NO/sGC) pathway in ascorbic acid (AA)-mediated protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia by occluding renal pedicles for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The AKI was assessed in terms of measuring creatinine clearance (CrCl), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma uric acid, potassium level, fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), and microproteinuria. The NO level and oxidative stress in renal tissues were assessed by measuring myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. AA (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 3 days before subjecting rats to AKI. In separate groups, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and sGC inhibitor, methylene blue (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered prior to AA treatment in rats. The significant decrease in CrCl and increase in BUN, plasma uric acid, potassium, FeNa, microproteinuria, and oxidative stress in renal tissues demonstrated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI in rats. The AA treatment ameliorated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI along with the increase in renal NO level. The pretreatment with L-NAME and methylene blue abolished protective effect of AA. It is concluded that AA protects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI. Moreover, the NO/sGC pathway finds its definite involvement in AA-mediated reno-protective effect. PMID:26142728

  11. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  12. Oxidized LDL at low concentration promotes in-vitro angiogenesis and activates nitric oxide synthase through PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shan; Wong, Siu Ling; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Low-concentration oxidized LDL enhances angiogenesis through nitric oxide (NO). {yields} Oxidized LDL increases intracellular NO levels via eNOS phosphorylation. {yields} Akt/PI3K signaling mediates oxidized LDL-induced eNOS phosphorylation. -- Abstract: It has long been considered that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) causes endothelial dysfunction and is remarkably related to the development of atherosclerosis. However, the effect of oxLDL at very low concentration (<10 {mu}g/ml) on the endothelial cells remains speculative. Nitric oxide (NO) has a crucial role in the endothelial cell function. In this study, we investigated the effect of oxLDL at low concentration on NO production and proliferation, migration, tube formation of the human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Results showed that oxLDL at 5 {mu}g/ml enhanced HCAEC proliferation, migration and tube formation. These phenomena were accompanied by an increased intracellular NO production. L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor), LY294002 and wortmannin (PI3K inhibitors) could abolish oxLDL-induced angiogenic effects and prevent NO production in the HCAEC. The phosphorylation of Akt, PI3K and eNOS were up-regulated by oxLDL, which was attenuated by LY294002. Our results suggested that oxLDL at low concentration could promote in-vitro angiogenesis and activate nitric oxide synthesis through PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in HCAEC.

  13. Nitric oxide, S-nitrosylation and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, K K K; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    2005-09-01

    Nitric oxide is a critically important signaling molecule, controlling a wide range of pathways and biological processes. Highly reactive nitric oxide mediates its function through reaction with different molecules directly or indirectly. One of these modifications is the S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues in proteins. S-nitrosylation is emerging as an important redox signaling mechanism and has been found to regulate a broad range of biologic, physiologic and cellular functions. One of the major findings in this area recently is the linkage of nitrosative stress to various neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative stress has long been regarded as a prime mediator in the development of neurodegeneration as various indices of oxidative stress are readily observed in postmortem studies. A causative role for nitrosative stress in neurodegeneration is just now being appreciated. The direct connection of S-nitrosylation to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease in recent studies further provide insights into how imbalance in nitric oxide metabolism can contribute to the development of selective injury and disease. PMID:16191392

  14. Activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junkang; Duan, Zhiqing; Nie, Xiaoke; Xi, Hanqing; Li, Aihong; Guo, Aisong; Wu, Qiyun; Jiang, Shengyang; Zhao, Jianya; Chen, Gang

    2014-07-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to cause alterations in cognitive and motor behavior during both development and adulthood. In this study, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway was investigated in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to better understand the mechanisms of TCDD-induced neurotoxicity. TCDD exposure induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in nNOS expression. High levels of nitric oxide (NO) production by nNOS activation induced mitochondrial cytochrome c (Cyt-c) release and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Additionally, TCDD increased the expression of active caspase-3 and significantly led to apoptosis in PC12 cells. However, these effects above could be effectively inhibited by the addition of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Moreover, in the brain cortex of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, nNOS was also found to have certain relationship with TCDD-induced neuronal apoptosis. Together, our findings establish a role for nNOS as an enhancer of TCDD-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. PMID:24930124

  15. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C; Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Mason, Ronald P; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2012-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1-50nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP(3), probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  16. PKC-Dependent Signaling Pathways within PAG and Thalamus Contribute to the Nitric Oxide-Induced Nociceptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in nociceptive processing in the central nervous system. The release of NO within the spinal cord has long been implicated in the mechanisms underlying exaggerated pain sensitivity, and administration of NO donors can induce hyperalgesia. To elucidate the supraspinal mechanism responsible for NO-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity, we investigated the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors following treatment with the NO donors nitroglycerin and sodium nitroprusside. Both compounds induced a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, increased levels of c-Fos and IL-1β, and activated NF-κB within periaqueductal grey matter and thalamus. Simultaneously, an increased expression and phosphorylation of PKC γ and ε were detected. To clarify the cellular mechanism involved in the NO-induced hypernociception, we examined the expression of transcription factors that act as PKC downstream effectors. A dramatic hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1 was observed. The i.c.v. administration of the PKC blocker calphostin C prevented the NO-induced hypernociception, the hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1, and partially reduced NF-κB activation. Conversely, the increase of IL-1β was unmodified by calphostin C. These results suggest the relevance of cerebral PKC-mediated CREB and STAT1 activation in the NO donor-induced nociceptive behavior. PMID:27335876

  17. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C.; Tanaka, Leonardo Y.; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Mason, Ronald P.; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D.; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1–50 nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP3, probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  18. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  19. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450. PMID:18399354

  20. Differential contribution of the guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G pathway to the proliferation of neural stem cells stimulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno P; Morte, Maria Inês; Lourenço, Ana Sofia; Santos, Ana Isabel; Inácio, Angela; Ambrósio, António F; Carvalho, Caetana M; Araújo, Inês M

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important inflammatory mediator involved in the initial boost in the proliferation of neural stem cells following brain injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the proliferative effect of NO are still unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cyclic GMP (cGMP) and the cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG) are involved in the proliferative effect triggered by NO in neural stem cells. For this purpose, cultures of neural stem cells isolated from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) were used. We observed that long-term exposure to the NO donor (24 h), NOC-18, increased the proliferation of SVZ cells in a cGMP-dependent manner, since the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, prevented cell proliferation. Similarly to NOC-18, the cGMP analogue, 8-Br-cGMP, also increased cell proliferation. Interestingly, shorter exposures to NO (6 h) increased cell proliferation in a cGMP-independent manner via the ERK/MAP kinase pathway. The selective inhibitor of PKG, KT5823, prevented the proliferative effect induced by NO at 24 h but not at 6 h. In conclusion, the proliferative effect of NO is initially mediated by the ERK/MAPK pathway, and at later stages by the GC/cGMP/PKG pathway. Thus, our work shows that NO induces neural stem cell proliferation by targeting these two pathways in a biphasic manner. PMID:22378242

  1. Pregnenolone sulfate restores the glutamate-nitric-oxide-cGMP pathway and extracellular GABA in cerebellum and learning and motor coordination in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Usano, Alba; Cauli, Omar; Agusti, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-02-19

    Around 40% of cirrhotic patients show minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), with mild cognitive impairment which reduces their quality of life and life span. Treatment of MHE is unsatisfactory, and there are no specific treatments for the neurological alterations in MHE. Hyperammonemia is the main contributor to neurological alterations in MHE. New agents acting on molecular targets involved in brain mechanisms leading to neurological alterations are needed to treat MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning of a Y-maze task by impairing the glutamate-nitric-oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, in part by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activation, which also induces motor in-coordination. Acute pregnenolone sulfate (PregS) restores the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in hyperammonemic rats. This work aimed to assess whether chronic treatment of hyperammonemic rats with PregS restores (1) motor coordination; (2) extracellular GABA in cerebellum; (3) learning of the Y-maze task; (4) the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Chronic intracerebral administration of PregS normalizes motor coordination likely due to extracellular GABA reduction. PregS restores learning ability by restoring the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to both enhanced NMDA receptor activation and reduced GABA(A) receptor activation. Similar treatments would improve cognitive and motor alterations in patients with MHE. PMID:24256194

  2. Pregnenolone Sulfate Restores the Glutamate-Nitric-Oxide-cGMP Pathway and Extracellular GABA in Cerebellum and Learning and Motor Coordination in Hyperammonemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Around 40% of cirrhotic patients show minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), with mild cognitive impairment which reduces their quality of life and life span. Treatment of MHE is unsatisfactory, and there are no specific treatments for the neurological alterations in MHE. Hyperammonemia is the main contributor to neurological alterations in MHE. New agents acting on molecular targets involved in brain mechanisms leading to neurological alterations are needed to treat MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning of a Y-maze task by impairing the glutamate-nitric-oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, in part by enhancing GABAA receptor activation, which also induces motor in-coordination. Acute pregnenolone sulfate (PregS) restores the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in hyperammonemic rats. This work aimed to assess whether chronic treatment of hyperammonemic rats with PregS restores (1) motor coordination; (2) extracellular GABA in cerebellum; (3) learning of the Y-maze task; (4) the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Chronic intracerebral administration of PregS normalizes motor coordination likely due to extracellular GABA reduction. PregS restores learning ability by restoring the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to both enhanced NMDA receptor activation and reduced GABAA receptor activation. Similar treatments would improve cognitive and motor alterations in patients with MHE. PMID:24256194

  3. Nitric oxide function in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process in the intima of conduit arteries, which disturbs the endothelium-dependent regulation of the vascular tone by the labile liposoluble radical nitric oxide (NO) formed by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This defect predisposes to coronary vasospasm and cardiac ischaemia, with anginal pain as the typical clinical manifestation. It is now appreciated that endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherogenesis and that it may also involve the microcirculation, in which atherosclerotic lesions do not develop. On the other hand, the inflammatory environment in atherosclerotic plaques may result in the expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) isozyme. Whether the dysfunction in endothelial NO production is causal to, or the result of, atherosclerotic lesion formation is still highly debated. Most evidence supports the hypothesis that constitutive endothelial NO release protects against atherogenesis e.g. by preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Nitric oxide generated by the inducible isozyme may be beneficial by replacing the failing endothelial production but excessive release may damage the vascular wall cells, especially in combination with reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:18472828

  4. Extracellular ATP and nitric oxide signaling pathways regulate redox-dependent responses associated to root hair growth in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Terrile, María Cecilia; Tonón, Claudia Virginia; Iglesias, María José; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) and nitric oxide (NO) have emerged as crucial players in plant development, stress responses and cell viability. Glutathione (GSH) is an abundant reducing agent with proposed roles in plant growth, development and stress physiology. In a recent publication, we demonstrated that eATP and NO restore hypocotyl elongation of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings treated with GSH. Here it is reported that exogenous ATP also restores root hair growth suggesting a role for ATP and NO in the regulation of redox balance associated to specific processes of plant morphogenesis. A tentative model integrating redox-, eATP- and NO-signaling pathways during root hair growth in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. PMID:20404565

  5. Calcium and Superoxide-Mediated Pathways Converge to Induce Nitric Oxide-Dependent Apoptosis in Mycobacterium fortuitum-Infected Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Debika; Khatri, Preeti; Banerjee, Chaitali; Singh, Ambika; Meena, Ramavatar; Saha, Dhira Rani; Raman, Rajagopal; Rajamani, Paulraj; Mitra, Abhijit; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum causes ‘mycobacteriosis’ in wide range of hosts although the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the role of calcium (Ca+2)-signalling cascade on M. fortuitum-induced apoptosis in headkidney macrophages (HKM) of Clarias sp. M. fortuitum could trigger intracellular-Ca+2 influx leading to the activation of calmodulin (CaM), protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) and Calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg). Gene silencing and inhibitor studies established the role of CaM in M. fortuitum pathogenesis. We noted that CaMKIIg activation is regulated by CaM as well as PKCα-dependent superoxide anions. This is altogether first report of oxidised CaMKIIg in mycobacterial infections. Our studies with targeted-siRNA and pharmacological inhibitors implicate CaMKIIg to be pro-apoptotic and critical for the activation of extra-cellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibiting the ERK1/2 pathway attenuated nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Conversely, inhibiting the NOS2-NO axis by specific-siRNA and inhibitors down-regulated ERK1/2 activation suggesting the crosstalk between ERK1/2 and NO is essential for pathogenesis induced by the bacterium. Silencing the NOS2-NO axis enhanced intracellular bacterial survival and attenuated caspase-8 mediated activation of caspase-3 in the infected HKM. Our findings unveil hitherto unknown mechanism of M. fortuitum pathogenesis. We propose that M. fortuitum triggers intracellular Ca+2 elevations resulting in CaM activation and PKCα-mediated superoxide generation. The cascade converges in common pathway mediated by CaMKIIg resulting in the activation of ERK1/2-NOS2 axis. The crosstalk between ERK1/2 and NO shifts the balance in favour of caspase dependent apoptosis of M. fortuitum-infected HKM. PMID:26752289

  6. Calcium and Superoxide-Mediated Pathways Converge to Induce Nitric Oxide-Dependent Apoptosis in Mycobacterium fortuitum-Infected Fish Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Datta, Debika; Khatri, Preeti; Banerjee, Chaitali; Singh, Ambika; Meena, Ramavatar; Saha, Dhira Rani; Raman, Rajagopal; Rajamani, Paulraj; Mitra, Abhijit; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum causes 'mycobacteriosis' in wide range of hosts although the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the role of calcium (Ca+2)-signalling cascade on M. fortuitum-induced apoptosis in headkidney macrophages (HKM) of Clarias sp. M. fortuitum could trigger intracellular-Ca+2 influx leading to the activation of calmodulin (CaM), protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) and Calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg). Gene silencing and inhibitor studies established the role of CaM in M. fortuitum pathogenesis. We noted that CaMKIIg activation is regulated by CaM as well as PKCα-dependent superoxide anions. This is altogether first report of oxidised CaMKIIg in mycobacterial infections. Our studies with targeted-siRNA and pharmacological inhibitors implicate CaMKIIg to be pro-apoptotic and critical for the activation of extra-cellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibiting the ERK1/2 pathway attenuated nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Conversely, inhibiting the NOS2-NO axis by specific-siRNA and inhibitors down-regulated ERK1/2 activation suggesting the crosstalk between ERK1/2 and NO is essential for pathogenesis induced by the bacterium. Silencing the NOS2-NO axis enhanced intracellular bacterial survival and attenuated caspase-8 mediated activation of caspase-3 in the infected HKM. Our findings unveil hitherto unknown mechanism of M. fortuitum pathogenesis. We propose that M. fortuitum triggers intracellular Ca+2 elevations resulting in CaM activation and PKCα-mediated superoxide generation. The cascade converges in common pathway mediated by CaMKIIg resulting in the activation of ERK1/2-NOS2 axis. The crosstalk between ERK1/2 and NO shifts the balance in favour of caspase dependent apoptosis of M. fortuitum-infected HKM. PMID:26752289

  7. Geniposide suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide, PGE2 and inflammatory cytokine by downregulating NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghai; Cao, Jinjun; Fang, Li; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ran, Jihua; Zheng, Xinchuan; Li, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yu; Ge, Di; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Li; Ran, Ying; Fu, Jianfeng

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are important to host immune reactions, but uncontrolled inflammatory mediators may aid in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory diseases. Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside found in the herb gardenia, is believed to have broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory effects in murine models but its mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the action of this compound in murine macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as the stimulation of macrophages by LPS is known to induce inflammatory reactions. We determined the effect of geniposide on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the mRNA and protein expression of the NO and PGE2 synthases, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, and the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein (AP)-1 activity were assayed. To understand the action of geniposide on the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, we studied the effect of NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors on the LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-α. Our findings clearly showed that geniposide mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the LPS-induced NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages, which subsequently reduces overexpression of the inducible enzymes iNOS and COX-2 and suppresses the expression and release of the inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, NO and PGE2. Thus, geniposide shows promise as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24735815

  8. Inhibition of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway limited the cardioprotective effect of post-conditioning in hearts with apical myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Correa, Francisco; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Chagoya, Victoria; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Vigueras, Rosa María; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2015-10-15

    Reperfusion damage involves opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and loss of ATP synthesis. Several cardioprotective pathways are activated by ischemic or pharmacological post-conditioning (PC). The mechanisms that are activated by PC in no co-morbidity murine models include: activation of rescue kinases, oxidative stress reduction, glycolytic flux regulation and preservation of ATP synthesis. However, relatively scarce efforts have been made to define whether the efficacy of PC signaling is blunted by risk factors or systemic diseases associated with ischemic heart pathology. Experimental evidence has shown that the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling is a main mechanism activated by PC in hearts without pathological history. In this work we evaluated the participation of the NO pathway, through downstream kinase activation and inhibition of mPTP in hearts with previous infarct. Myocardial infarction was induced with a single dose of isoproterenol (85 mg/kg i.p.) to male Wistar rats. After 24 h, the hearts were mounted into the Langendorff system and subjected to 30 min of ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion. PC consisted of 5 cycles of 30 s of reperfusion/30 s of ischemia, then the hearts were reperfused with or without inhibitors of the NO/cGMP pathway. PC activates the NO/cGMP pathway, as increased cGMP and NO levels were detected in isoproterenol-treated hearts. The cardioprotective effect of PC was abolished with both L-NAME (inhibitor of constitutive NO synthase) and ODQ (inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase), whereas the NO donor (DETA-NO) restored cardioprotection even in the presence of L-NAME or ODQ. We also found that mitochondrial structure and function was preserved in PC hearts. We conclude that PC exerts cardioprotection in hearts with previous infarct by maintaining mitochondrial structure and function through NO-dependent pathway. PMID:26387613

  9. Vasomodulatory effect of novel peroxovanadate compounds on rat aorta: Role of rho kinase and nitric oxide/cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Vivek; Jain, Manish; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Kalita, Diganta; Boruah, Jeena Jyoti; Das, Siva Prasad; Islam, Nashreen S; Ramasarma, Tangirala; Dikshit, Madhu

    2011-09-01

    M) and/or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, l-NAME (100 μM) suggesting involvement of nitric oxide and cGMP. DPV-asn, like H(2)O(2), exerted a response of vasoconstriction in normal arteries and vasodilation at low concentrations (30nM-1 μM) in PE-pre contracted rings with overlapping mechanisms. These findings suggest usefulness of DPV-asn having low toxicity, in exploring the peroxide-mediated effects on various vascular beds. The present study also convincingly demonstrates role of H(2)O(2) in the modulation of vasoreactivity by using stable peroxide DPV-asn and warrants future studies on peroxide mediated signaling from a newer perspective. PMID:21497197

  10. Peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 activation increases colonic blood flow through nitric oxide pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Million, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) peptides exert profound effects on the secretomotor function of the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, despite the presence of CRF peptides and receptors in colonic tissue, their influence on colonic blood flow (CBF) is unknown. Aim To determine the effect and mechanism of members of the CRF peptide family on CBF in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Methods Proximal CBF was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry simultaneously with mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) measurement. Rats were injected with intravenous human/rat CRF (CRF1>CRF2 affinity), mouse urocortin 2 (mUcn2, selective CRF2 agonist) or sauvagine (SVG, CRF2>CRF1 affinity) at 1 – 30 μg/kg. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (3 mg/kg, iv), the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (Indo, 5 mg/kg, ip) or selective CRF2 antagonist, astressin2-B (Ast2B, 50 μg/kg, iv) was given before SVG injection (10 μg/kg, iv). Results SVG and mUcn2 dose-dependently increased CBF while decreasing MABP and colonic vascular resistance (CVR). CRF had no effect on CBF, but increased CVR. The hyperemic effect of SVG was inhibited by L-NAME but not by Indo, whereas hypotension was partially reduced by L-NAME. Sensory denervation had no effect on SVG-induced changes. Ast2B inhibited SVG-induced hyperemia and decreased CVR, and partially reduced the hypotension. Conclusions Peripheral CRF2 activation induces colonic hyperemia through NO synthesis, without involving prostaglandin synthesis or sensory nerve activation, suggesting a direct action on the endothelium and myenteric neurons. Members of the CRF peptide family may protect the colonic mucosal via the activation of the CRF2 receptor. PMID:25701320

  11. CPG-ODN-INDUCED NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION IS MEDIATED THROUGH CLATHRIN-DEPENDENT ENDOCYTOSIS, ENDOSOMAL MATURATION, AND ACTIVATION OF PKC, MEK1/2 AND P38 MAPK, AND NF-KB PATHWAYS IN AVIAN MACROPHAGE CELLS (HD11)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have characterized the nitric oxide (NO) induction by CpG oligodeoxydinucleotide (CpG-ODN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in an avian macrophage cell line (HD11) and evaluated roles of signal transduction pathways by using selective inhibitors. Our results indicate while CpG-ODN and LPS both stimu...

  12. Nitric oxide induces cotyledon senescence involving co-operation of the NES1/MAD1 and EIN2-associated ORE1 signalling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Li, Manli; Kong, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Lv, Qiang; Wang, Jinzheng; Bao, Fang; Gong, Qingqiu; Xia, Jinchan; He, Yikun

    2014-01-01

    After germination, cotyledons undertake the major role in supplying nutrients to the pre-photoautorophy angiosperm seedlings until they senesce. Like other senescence processes, cotyledon senescence is a programmed degenerative process. Nitric oxide can induce premature cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. A screen for genetic mutants identified the nes1 mutant, in which cotyledon senescence was accelerated by nitric oxide. Map-based cloning revealed that NES1 is allelic to a previously reported mitotic checkpoint family gene, MAD1. The nes1/mad1 mutants were restored to the wild type, in response to nitric oxide, by transforming them with pNES1::NES1. Ectopic expression of NES1 in the wild type delayed nitric oxide-mediated cotyledon senescence, confirming the repressive role of NES1. Moreover, two positive regulators of leaf senescence, the ethylene signalling component EIN2 and the transcription factor ORE1/AtNAC2/ANAC092, were found to function during nitric oxide-induced senescence in cotyledons. The block of ORE1 function delayed senescence and ectopic expression induced the process, revealing the positive role of ORE1. EIN2 was required to induce ORE1. Furthermore, the genetic interaction analysis between NES1 and ORE1 showed that the ore1 loss-of-function mutants were epistatic to nes1, suggesting the dominant role of ORE1 and the antagonistic role of NES1 during nitric oxide-induced cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:24336389

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 modulates the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo through activation of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Llansola, Marta; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Felipo, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate important processes in cerebellum including long-term depression, which also requires formation of nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Some reports suggest that mGluRs could modulate the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. However this modulation has not been studied in detail. The aim of this work was to assess by microdialysis in freely moving rats whether activation of mGluR5 modulates the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo and to analyze the underlying mechanisms. We show that mGluR5 activation increases extracellular glutamate, citrulline and cGMP in cerebellum. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 does not prevent any of these effects, indicating that NMDA receptors activation is not required. However in the presence of MK-801 the effects are more transient, returning faster to basal levels. Blocking AMPA receptors prevents the increase in citrulline and cGMP induced by mGluR5 activation, but not the increase in glutamate. The release of glutamate is prevented by tetrodotoxin but not by fluoroacetate, indicating that glutamate is released from neurons and not from astrocytes. Activation of AMPA receptors increases citrulline and cGMP. These data indicate that activation of mGluR5 induces an increase of extracellular glutamate which activates AMPA receptors, leading to activation of nitric oxide synthase and increased NO, which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP. The response mediated by AMPA receptors desensitize rapidly. Activation of AMPA receptors also induces a mild depolarization, allowing activation of NMDA receptors which prolongs the duration of the effect initiated by activation of AMPA receptors. These data support that the three types of glutamate receptors: mGluR5, AMPA and NMDA cooperate in the modulation of the grade and duration of activation of the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. This pathway would modulate cerebellar processes such as long-term depression. PMID:21300123

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  15. Antidepressant effect of pramipexole in mice forced swimming test: A cross talk between dopamine receptor and NMDA/nitric oxide/cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-07-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist indicated for treating Parkinson disorder. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of pramipexole in forced swimming test (FST) in mice and the possible involvement of activation of D2 receptors and inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) on this effect. Intraperitoneal administration of pramipexole (1-3mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg, i.p.). This effect of pramipexole (1mg/kg, i.p.) was ceased when mice were pretreated with haloperidol (0.15mg/kg, i.p,) and sulpiride (5mg/kg, i.p) as D2 receptor antagonists, NMDA (75mg/kg,i.p.), l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p., a substrate for nitric oxide synthase) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The administration of MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p., a NMDA receptor antagonist) l-NG-Nitro arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, i.p., a non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, i.p., a neuronal NOS inhibitor) and methylene blue (10mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in combination with the sub-effective dose of pramipexole (0.3mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility. Altogether, our data suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole is dependent on the activation of D2 receptor and inhibition of either NMDA receptors and/or NO-cGMP synthesis. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole and reinforce the role of D2 receptors, NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant mechanism of this agent. PMID:27261607

  16. Nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Deckel, A W

    2001-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule produced when the semiessential amino acid l-arginine is converted to l-citrulline and NO via the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO is known to be involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission, neuromodulation, and inflammation, to name only a few. During neuropathological conditions, the production of NO can be either protective or toxic, dependent on the stage of the disease, the isoforms of NOS involved, and the initial pathological event. This paper reviews the properties of NO and NOS and the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). It discusses ways in which NO and NOS may interact with the protein product of HD and reviews data implicating NOS in the neuropathology of HD. This is followed by a synthesis of current information regarding how NO/NOS may contribute to HD-related pathology and identification of areas for potential future research. PMID:11288139

  17. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  18. β-Escin sodium inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase expression via downregulation of the JAK/STAT pathway in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Deng Bo; Xu, Bo; Liu, Jing Tao; Ran, Fu Xiang; Cui, Jing Rong

    2011-12-01

    β-escin, a triterpene saponin, is one of the major active compounds extracted from horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seed. Previous work has found that β-escin sodium has antiinflammatory and antitumor effects. In the present study, we investigated its effect on cell proliferation and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. β-escin sodium (5-40 µg/mL) inhibited cytokine mixture (CM)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in A549 cells by reducing the expression of iNOS. β-escin sodium suppressed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 (Tyr701) and STAT3 (Tyr705) induced by CM but did not affect the activation of c-Jun and NF-κB. β-escin sodium inhibited the activation of protein tyrosine kinase JAK2. Pervanadate treatment reversed the β-escin sodium-induced downregulation of STAT3 and STAT1. β-escin sodium treatment enhanced an activating phosphorylation of the phosphatase SHP2. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of SHP2 inhibited β-escin sodium-induced phospho-STAT dephosphorylation. Moreover β-escin sodium reduced the activation of p38 MAPK. Finally, β-escin sodium inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells, did not change the cell membrane's permeability, nuclear morphology and size and the mitochondria's transmembrane potential of A549 cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that β-escin sodium could downregulate iNOS expression through inhibiting JAK/STAT signaling and p38 MAPK activation in A549 cells. β-escin sodium has a marked antiproliferative effect on A549 cells at least in part by inhibiting the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, but not by a cytotoxic effect. β-escin sodium would be useful as a chemopreventive agent or a therapeutic against inflammatory-associated tumor. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21400616

  19. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  20. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls PCB 52, PCB 180, and PCB 138 impair the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellar neurons in culture by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-04-19

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in the food chain and are present in human blood and milk. Children born to mothers exposed to PCBs show cognitive deficits, which are reproduced in rats perinatally exposed to PCBs. It has been proposed that PCB-induced cognitive impairment is due to impairment of the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. The aim of the present work was to assess whether chronic exposure to the nondioxin-like PCB52, PCB138, or PCB180 alters the function of this pathway in primary cultures of rat cerebellar neurons and to assess whether different PCBs have similar or different mechanisms of action. PCB180 and PCB138 impair the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway at nanomolar concentrations, and PCB52 impairs the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway at micromolar concentrations. The mechanisms by which different PCBs impair the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway are different. Each PCB affects the pathway at more than one step but with different potency and, for some steps, in opposite ways. Exposure to the PCBs alters the basal concentrations of intracellular calcium, NO, and cGMP. The three PCBs increase NO; however, PCB52 and PCB138 increase basal cGMP, while PCB180 decreases it. PCB52 and PCB138 decrease the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by NO, and PCB180 increases it. Long-term exposure to PCB52, PCB180, or PCB138 reduces the activation of NO synthase and the whole glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in response to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The EC(50) was 300 nM for PCB52 and 2 nM for PCB138 or PCB180. These results show that chronic exposure to nondioxin like PCBs impairs the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellar neurons by different mechanisms and with different potencies. Impaired function of this pathway would contribute to the cognitive alterations induced by perinatal exposure to PCBs in humans. PMID:20297801

  2. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representativeNitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway. PMID:26946536

  3. Elevated intracranial dopamine impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in cortical astrocytes in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    DING, SAIDAN; HUANG, WEILONG; YE, YIRU; YANG, JIANJING; HU, JIANGNAN; WANG, XIAOBIN; LIU, LEPING; LU, QIN; LIN, YUANSHAO

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group memory impairment in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) was associated with the inhibition of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (Glu-NO-cGMP) pathway due to elevated dopamine (DA). However, the effects of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in primary cortical astrocytes (PCAs) had not been elucidated in rats with MHE. In the present study, it was identified that when the levels of DA in the cerebral cortex of rats with MHE and high-dose DA (3 mg/kg)-treated rats were increased, the co-localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1), calmodulin (CaM), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cyclic guanine monophosphate (cGMP) with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker protein of astrocytes, all significantly decreased, in both the MHE and high-dose DA-treated rats (P<0.01). Furthermore, NMDA-induced augmentation of the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP localized in PCAs was decreased in MHE and DA-treated rats, as compared with the controls. Chronic exposure of cultured cerebral cortex PCAs to DA treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of intracellular calcium, nitrites and nitrates, the formation of cGMP and the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS and sGC/cGMP. High doses of DA (50 μM) significantly reduced NMDA-induced augmentation of the formation of cGMP and the contents of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP (P<0.01). These results suggest that the suppression of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in PCAs contributes to memory impairment in rats with MHE. PMID:25059564

  4. Combined Cytological and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals a Nitric Oxide Signaling Pathway Involved in Cold-Inhibited Camellia sinensis Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weidong; Sheng, Xianyong; Shu, Zaifa; Li, Dongqin; Pan, Junting; Ye, Xiaoli; Chang, Pinpin; Li, Xinghui; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule plays crucial roles in many abiotic stresses in plant development processes, including pollen tube growth. Here, the signaling networks dominated by NO during cold stress that inhibited Camellia sinensis pollen tube growth are investigated in vitro. Cytological analysis show that cold-induced NO is involved in the inhibition of pollen tube growth along with disruption of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ gradient, increase in ROS content, acidification of cytoplasmic pH and abnormalities in organelle ultrastructure and cell wall component distribution in the pollen tube tip. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs)-related to signaling pathway, such as NO synthesis, cGMP, Ca2+, ROS, pH, actin, cell wall, and MAPK cascade signal pathways, are identified and quantified using transcriptomic analyses and qRT-PCR, which indicate a potential molecular mechanism for the above cytological results. Taken together, these findings suggest that a complex signaling network dominated by NO, including Ca2+, ROS, pH, RACs signaling and the crosstalk among them, is stimulated in the C. sinensis pollen tube in response to cold stress, which further causes secondary and tertiary alterations, such as ultrastructural abnormalities in organelles and cell wall construction, ultimately resulting in perturbed pollen tube extension. PMID:27148289

  5. Combined Cytological and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals a Nitric Oxide Signaling Pathway Involved in Cold-Inhibited Camellia sinensis Pollen Tube Growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Sheng, Xianyong; Shu, Zaifa; Li, Dongqin; Pan, Junting; Ye, Xiaoli; Chang, Pinpin; Li, Xinghui; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule plays crucial roles in many abiotic stresses in plant development processes, including pollen tube growth. Here, the signaling networks dominated by NO during cold stress that inhibited Camellia sinensis pollen tube growth are investigated in vitro. Cytological analysis show that cold-induced NO is involved in the inhibition of pollen tube growth along with disruption of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) gradient, increase in ROS content, acidification of cytoplasmic pH and abnormalities in organelle ultrastructure and cell wall component distribution in the pollen tube tip. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs)-related to signaling pathway, such as NO synthesis, cGMP, Ca(2+), ROS, pH, actin, cell wall, and MAPK cascade signal pathways, are identified and quantified using transcriptomic analyses and qRT-PCR, which indicate a potential molecular mechanism for the above cytological results. Taken together, these findings suggest that a complex signaling network dominated by NO, including Ca(2+), ROS, pH, RACs signaling and the crosstalk among them, is stimulated in the C. sinensis pollen tube in response to cold stress, which further causes secondary and tertiary alterations, such as ultrastructural abnormalities in organelles and cell wall construction, ultimately resulting in perturbed pollen tube extension. PMID:27148289

  6. Nitric oxide participates in the complex interplay of defense-related signaling pathways controlling disease resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Perchepied, Laure; Balagué, Claudine; Riou, Catherine; Claudel-Renard, Clotilde; Rivière, Nathalie; Grezes-Besset, Bruno; Roby, Dominique

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum have been hampered by the extreme susceptibility of this model plant to the fungus. In addition, analyses of the plant defense response suggested the implication of a complex interplay of hormonal and signaling pathways. To get a deeper insight into this host-pathogen interaction, we first analyzed the natural variation in Arabidopsis for resistance to S. sclerotiorum. The results revealed a large variation of resistance and susceptibility in Arabidopsis, with some ecotypes, such as Ws-4, Col-0, and Rbz-1, being strongly resistant, and others, such as Shahdara, Ita-0, and Cvi-0, exhibiting an extreme susceptibility. The role of different signaling pathways in resistance was then determined by assessing the symptoms of mutants affected in the perception, production, or transduction of hormonal signals after inoculation with S. sclerotiorum. This analysis led to the conclusions that i) signaling of inducible defenses is predominantly mediated by jasmonic acid and abscisic acid, influenced by ethylene, and independent of salicylic acid; and ii) nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species are important signals required for plant resistance to S. sclerotiorum. Defense gene expression analysis supported the specific role of NO in defense activation. PMID:20521948

  7. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  8. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  9. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. PMID:26350415

  10. Beta3-adrenergic receptors modulate vascular endothelial growth factor release in response to hypoxia through the nitric oxide pathway in mouse retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Dal Monte, Massimo; Filippi, Luca; Bagnoli, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) play a role in angiogenic processes that characterize neovascularization-associated retinal diseases, but the role of β3-ARs has not been disclosed yet. We used ex vivo retinal explants to investigate the role of β3-ARs in regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release associated with hypoxia. Whether nitric oxide (NO) mediates β3-AR regulation of VEGF release was also investigated. β3-AR activation was obtained using BRL 37344, whereas SR59230A, L-748,337, or specific siRNAs were used to block β3-ARs. Pharmacological approaches were used to interfere with the NO pathway. Western blot was used to determine β-AR levels. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure VEGF release. NO production was assessed by a colorimetric assay. We found that hypoxia upregulates β3-ARs. In addition, we observed that β3-AR activation with BRL 37344 increases VEGF release in response to hypoxia. Either β3-AR blocker or β3-AR silencing downregulates drastically hypoxic levels of VEGF. With experiments using NO synthase (NOS) blockade with L-NAME, NOS activation with fluvastatin or NO supplementation with SNAP, we demonstrated that β3-ARs and VEGF are functionally coupled via the NO pathway. In summary, the data presented here support the assumption that β3-ARs are involved in the regulation of angiogenic responses to hypoxia through the NO signalling, a key pathway in hypoxic/ischemic diseases. Although extrapolation of these data to the human situation is difficult, these findings may help to explore the possible role of β3-ARs in vascularization-associated disorders. PMID:23283573

  11. Isotope Effects Associated with N2O Production By Fungal and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductases: Implications for Tracing Microbial Production Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, N. E.; Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; Hegg, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Site preference (SP), the difference in δ15N between the central (α) and outer (β) N atoms in N2O, has emerged as a conservative tracer of microbial N2O production. The key advantages of SP relative to bulk isotopes are (1) that it is independent of the isotope composition of the substrates of nitrification and denitrification and (2) has not been shown to exhibit fractionation during production. In pure microbial culture distinct SP values for N2O production from bacterial denitrification, including nitrifier-denitrification (-10 to 0 ‰), relative to hydroxylamine oxidation and fungal denitrification (33-37 ‰) provide a promising basis to resolve production pathways. In this study, we determined the δ15N, δ18O, δ15Nα, and δ15Nβ of N2O generated by purified fungal (P450nor) and bacterial nitric oxide reductases. The isotope values were used to calculate SP values, enrichment factors (e), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Both O and Nα displayed normal isotope effects during enzymatic NO reduction by the P450nor with e values of -25.7‰ (KIE = 1.0264) and -12.6‰ (KIE = 1.0127), respectively. However, bulk nitrogen (average δ15N of Nα and Nβ) and Nβ exhibited inverse isotope effects with e values of 14.0‰ (KIE = 0.9862) and 36.1‰ (KIE = 0.9651), respectively. The observed inverse isotope effect in δ15Nβ is consistent with reversible binding of the first NO in the P450nor reaction mechanism. Experiments with bacterial nitric oxide reductase are ongoing, however, preliminary data indicates a inverse isotope effect in the α and β positions and a normal isotope effect in δ18O. In contrast to the constant SP observed during N2O production observed in microbial cultures, the SP measured for purified P450nor was not constant, increasing from ~15‰ to ~29‰ during the course of the reaction. Our results clearly indicate that fractionation of SP during N2O production by P450nor is not zero, and that SP values higher and lower than the

  12. Induction of Proinflammatory Responses in Macrophages by the Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) of Plasmodium falciparum: The requirement of ERK, p38, JNK and NF-κB pathways for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Gowda, D. Channe

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors of Plasmodium falciparum are thought to be the major factors that contribute to malaria pathogenesis by eliciting the production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide by the host innate immune system. Previous studies have shown that micromolar concentrations of GPIs are required for the optimal production of TNF-α by P. falciparum GPIs in IFNγ-unprimed murine cultured macrophages. However, in this study, we demonstrate that the parasite GPIs can effectively induce the production of TNF-α at 5–20 nM concentrations in IFNγ-primed human monocytes and murine macrophages. The potency of the parasite GPIs activity is physiologically relevant to their ability to contribute to severe malaria pathogenesis. More importantly, we investigated the requirement of the ERK, JNK, p38 and NF-κB signaling pathways that are activated in response to P. falciparum GPIs through TLR-mediated recognition (Krishnegowda, G., et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem., accompanying manuscript) for the proinflammatory responses by macrophages. The data conclusively show that the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and nitric oxide by macrophages stimulated with parasite GPIs is critically dependent on the NF-κB and JNK pathways. NF-kB1 is essential for IL-6 and IL-12 production, but not for TNF-α and nitric oxide, whereas, NF-κB/c-Rel appears to be important for all four proinflammatory mediators. JNK1 and JNK2 are functionally redundant for the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide, whereas JNK2, but not JNK1 is essential for IL-12 production. ERK signaling pathway is not involved in TNF-α and nitric oxide production, but interestingly negatively regulates the expression of IL-6 and IL-12. Further, p38 is critical for the production of IL-6 and IL-12, but is only marginally required for the production of TNF-α and nitric oxide. Thus, our data define the differential requirement of the downstream signaling molecules for the

  13. Nitric oxide scavengers as a therapeutic approach to nitric oxide mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Fricker, S P

    1999-08-01

    The essential role of nitric oxide (NO) in normal physiology and its involvement in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases render the compound an attractive therapeutic target. NO donor drugs are used in the treatment of hypotension and angina where abnormalities in the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway have been implicated. Overproduction of NO has been associated with a number of disease states including septic shock, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, neurodegenerative diseases and allograft rejection. NO is produced by a group of enzymes, the nitric oxide synthases. Selective inhibition of the inducible isoform is one approach to the treatment of diseases where there is an overproduction of NO; an alternative approach is to scavenge or remove excess NO. A number of NO scavenger molecules have demonstrated pharmacological activity in disease models, particularly models of septic shock. These include organic molecules such as PTIO (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), haemoglobin derivatives such as the pyridoxalated haemoglobin polyoxyethylene conjugate (PHP), low molecular weight iron compounds of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and diethyldithiocarbamate and ruthenium polyaminocarboxylate complexes. The data suggest a potential role for NO scavengers in the treatment of NO mediated disease. PMID:15992146

  14. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  15. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  16. Nitric oxide in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling - nitrated fatty acids (NO2-FAs) and S-guanylation - and conclude with suggestions for future directions in NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  17. Airway nitric oxide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, D.; Gustafsson, L.; Hemmingsson, Tryggve; Frostell, C.; Paiva, M.

    2005-10-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), a molecule with a wide range of biological effects, is found in exhaled gas. Elevation of expired NO is an early sign of airway inflammation in asthma and dust inhalation. Animal experiments have demonstrated a marked increase of expired NO after venous gas emboli (bubbles, VGE), which may occur after decompression in conjunction with extravehicular activity (EVA). For this MAP project, astronauts will perform a simple inhalation-exhalation procedure weekly during their flights, and before and after EVA. Furthermore, the microgravity environment offers a possibility to gain new insights into how and where NO is formed in the lungs and what local effects NO may have there. The planned experiments have been made possible by recent developments of new techniques by the team's industrial partners; Aerocrine has developed a highly compact and accurate NO analyser, and Linde Gas Theapeutics has developed a highly compact device for NO administration in the inhaled air.

  18. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  19. Rhus coriaria suppresses angiogenesis, metastasis and tumor growth of breast cancer through inhibition of STAT3, NFκB and nitric oxide pathways

    PubMed Central

    El Hasasna, Hussain; Saleh, Alaaeldin; Samri, Halima Al; Athamneh, Khawlah; Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Benhalilou, Nehla; Alyan, Sofyan; Viallet, Jean; Dhaheri, Yusra Al; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that Rhus coriaria exhibits anticancer activities by promoting cell cycle arrest and autophagic cell death of the metastatic triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Here, we investigated the effect of Rhus coriaria on the migration, invasion, metastasis and tumor growth of TNBC cells. Our current study revealed that non-cytotoxic concentrations of Rhus coriaria significantly inhibited migration and invasion, blocked adhesion to fibronectin and downregulated MMP-9 and prostaglandin E2 (PgE2). Not only did Rhus coriaria decrease their adhesion to HUVECs and to lung microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-L) cells, but it also inhibited the transendothelial migration of MDA-MB-231 cells through TNF-α-activated HUVECs. Furthermore, we found that Rhus coriaria inhibited angiogenesis, reduced VEGF production in both MDA-MB-231 and HUVECs and downregulated the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. The underlying mechanism for Rhus coriaria effects appears to be through inhibiting NFκB, STAT3 and nitric oxide (NO) pathways. Most importantly, by using chick embryo tumor growth assay, we showed that Rhus coriaria suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. The results described in the present study identify Rhus coriaria as a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate that modulate triple negative breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:26888313

  20. Antidepressant-Like Effect of the Leaves of Pseudospondias microcarpa in Mice: Evidence for the Involvement of the Serotoninergic System, NMDA Receptor Complex, and Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Adongo, Donatus Wewura; Kukuia, Kennedy Kwami Edem; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ameyaw, Elvis Ofori; Woode, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Depression continues to be a major global health problem. Although antidepressants are used for its treatment, efficacy is often inconsistent. Thus, the search for alternative therapeutic medicines for its treatment is still important. In this study, the antidepressant-like effect of Pseudospondias microcarpa extract (30-300 mg kg(-1), p.o.) was investigated in two predictive models of depression--forced swimming test and tail suspension test in mice. Additionally, the mechanism(s) of action involved were assessed. Acute treatment with the extract dose dependently reduced immobility of mice in both models. The antidepressant-like effect of the extract (100 mg kg(-1), p.o.) was blocked by p-chlorophenylalanine and cyproheptadine but not prazosin, propranolol, or yohimbine. Concomitant administration of D-cycloserine and the extract potentiated the anti-immobility effect. In contrast, D-serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors, abolished the effects. Anti-immobility effects of PME were prevented by pretreatment of mice with L-arginine (750 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and sildenafil (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment of mice with L-NAME (30 mg kg(-1), i.p.) or methylene blue (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) potentiated its effects. The extract produces an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST that is dependent on the serotoninergic system, NMDA receptor complex, and the nitric oxide pathway. PMID:26539489

  1. HIV-1 protein Tat produces biphasic changes in NMDA-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of Src kinase and nitric oxide signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Krogh, Kelly A; Wydeven, Nicole; Wickman, Kevin; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) afflict about half of HIV-infected patients. HIV-infected cells shed viral proteins, such as the transactivator of transcription (Tat), which can cause neurotoxicity by over activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we show that Tat causes a time-dependent, biphasic change in NMDA-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). NMDA-evoked responses were potentiated following 2 h exposure to Tat (50 ng/mL). Tat-induced potentiation of NMDA-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i peaked by 8 h and then adapted by gradually reversing to baseline by 24 h and eventually dropping below control by 48 h. Tat-induced potentiation of NMDA-evoked responses was blocked by inhibition of lipoprotein receptors (LRP) or Src tyrosine kinase. Potentiation was unaffected by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, NOS activity was required for adaptation. Adaptation was also prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Together, these findings indicate that Tat potentiates NMDA-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i via LRP-dependent activation of Src and that this potentiation adapts via activation of the NOS/sGC/PKG pathway. Adaptation may protect neurons from excessive Ca2+ influx and could reveal targets for the treatment of HAND. PMID:24666322

  2. Comparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Bailey, S. M.

    2004-03-01

    A time-dependent thermospheric model has been used to calculate the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere for a 935-day period, 11 March 1998 to 30 September 2000. This model uses daily values of the observed solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm) as an energy input parameter. The model does not include an energy input from auroral electron precipitation. The results of the model calculation of nitric oxide density at 110 km were compared with observations of nitric oxide density made with the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) for the 935-day period. At the equator the model calculations and the observations agree very well with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.876. The correlation coefficient remains high for the altitude region 107-117 km, the region where solar soft X-rays (2-7 nm) are the major source of nitric oxide production. The comparison of the model calculations with the observations as a function of latitude show that there is excess nitric oxide poleward of 30°N and S latitude particularly during the fall-winter season. We believe that the source of this excess nitric oxide is the nitric oxide that is produced in the auroral region (65°-75°N and S geomagnetic latitude) by precipitating auroral electrons. We believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported equatorward by horizontal winds. At midlatitudes the excess nitric oxide decays to about half of its initial value in one day. At times of large geomagnetic storms we believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported all the way to the equator by horizontal winds. The excellent correlation of the model calculations and the SNOE observations of nitric oxide at 110 km between 30°S and 30°N support the hypothesis that solar soft X-rays are the source of the variability of nitric oxide in the thermosphere at low latitudes.

  3. Adiponectin Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Remodeling through Nitric Oxide and the RhoA/ROCK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldine, Wared; Ghantous, Crystal M.; Zibara, Kazem; Dib, Leila; Issaa, Hawraa; Itani, Hana A.; El-Zein, Nabil; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adiponectin (APN), an adipocytokine, exerts protective effects on cardiac remodeling, while angiotensin II (Ang II) induces hypertension and vascular remodeling. The potential protective role of APN on the vasculature during hypertension has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we evaluate the molecular mechanisms of the protective role of APN in the physiological response of the vascular wall to Ang II. Methods and Results: Rat aortic tissues were used to investigate the effect of APN on Ang II-induced vascular remodeling and hypertrophy. We investigated whether nitric oxide (NO), the RhoA/ROCK pathway, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the anti-hypertrophic effect of APN. Ang II-induced protein synthesis was attenuated by pre-treatment with APN, NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), or cGMP. The hypertrophic response to Ang II was associated with a significant increase in RhoA activation and vascular force production, which were prevented by APN and SNAP. NO was also associated with inhibition of Ang II-induced phosphorylation of cofilin. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that 24 h Ang II treatment increased the F- to G-actin ratio, an effect that was inhibited by SNAP. Ang II-induced ROS formation and upregulation of p22phox mRNA expression were inhibited by APN and NO. Both compounds failed to inhibit Nox1 and p47phox expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the anti-hypertrophic effects of APN are due, in part, to NO-dependent inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and ROS formation. PMID:27092079

  4. Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Amini-Khoei, Hossien; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Antidepressant-like effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3 (5-HT3) antagonists including tropisetron and ondansetron have been previously demonstrated in the literature. It was reported that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors activate the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway, which is involved in regulation of behavioral and emotional functions. In our study, treating animals with tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01 and 0.1µg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in forced swimming test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.001µg/kg) with subeffective dose of l-NAME (10mg/kg, nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor) and 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, neural NOS inhibitor) exerted antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST, while aminoguanidine (50mg/kg, inducible NOS inhibitor) did not enhance the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. Besides, l-arginine (750mg/kg, NO precursor) and sildenafil (5mg/kg, phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suppressed the anti-immobility effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. None of the treatments altered the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Also, hippocampal (but not cortical) nitrite level was significantly lower in tropisetron and ondansetron-treated mice compared with saline-injected mice. Also, co-administration of 7-nitroindazole with tropisetron or ondansetron caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron are partially mediated by modulation of NO-cGMP pathway. PMID:27001377

  5. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  6. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  8. Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Jaron, Dov

    2013-01-01

    Several apparent paradoxes are evident when one compares mathematical predictions from models of nitric oxide (NO) diffusion and convection in vasculature structures with experimental measurements of NO (or related metabolites) in animal and human studies. Values for NO predicted from mathematical models are generally much lower than in vivo NO values reported in the literature for experiments, specifically with NO microelectrodes positioned at perivascular locations next to different sizes of blood vessels in the microcirculation and NO electrodes inserted into a wide range of tissues supplied by the microcirculation of each specific organ system under investigation. There continues to be uncertainty about the roles of NO scavenging by hemoglobin versus a storage function that may conserve NO, and other signaling targets for NO need to be considered. This review describes model predictions and relevant experimental data with respect to several signaling pathways in the microcirculation that involve NO. PMID:22196161

  9. Reversibility of heme-nitric oxide reactions for use in an inhaled nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Soller, Babs R.; Rencus, Tal

    1997-06-01

    Nitric Oxide is a simple gaseous compound which serves as a regulatory molecule in a number of physiological processes. Due to its biological role as a potent local vasodilator,there has been widespread interest in the therapeutic use of gaseous nitric oxide a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Our goal is the development of a sensor for the direct and continuous measurement of inhaled nitric oxide concentrations. This study evaluated the reversibility of potential sensing compounds upon reaction with nitric oxide. Previously, absorption spectroscopy was used to study the sensitivity of the Fe II, Fe III and oxygenated forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. This study focused on the photo-reversibility of the hem's reaction with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome-c in the Fe III state reversibly reacted with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin and myoglobin in the Fe II state non-reversibly reacted with nitric oxide to form an unstable product. Cytochrome-c (FeII) does not react with nitric oxide. The oxy forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin react with nitric oxide to form their respective met forms, unreversible via photolysis. For all reversible reactions, photolysis was gradual and complete within five minutes.

  10. Inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Olivier, Paul; Loron, Gauthier; Fontaine, Romain; Maury, Laure; Baud, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease that affects premature infants and contributes to their morbidity and mortality. With the advent of prenatal steroids and postnatal exogenous surfactant and less aggressive respiratory support, premature infants can develop chronic oxygen dependency without even acute respiratory distress. This 'new bronchopulmonary dysplasia' could be the result of impaired postnatal growth. Several experimental studies have suggested a possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor/nitric oxide (VEGF/NO) pathway in restoring pulmonary angiogenesis and enhancing distal lung growth. The results of the clinical studies are, however, inconclusive, and it is currently unclear which subsets of premature infants might benefit from inhaled nitric oxide. Besides, severe intracranial haemorrhage and/or cystic periventricular leucomalacia may affect the most immature babies, many of whom are spared from severe initial respiratory disease. Recently, inhaled nitric oxide was shown to significantly decrease the incidence of these neurological events, and to improve the long-term outcome in a few clinical trials. At times neuroprotective, at times neurotoxic, nitric oxide is capable of divergent effects depending upon the extent of cerebral damage, the redox state of the cell, and the experimental model used. Recently, our group found that inhaled nitric oxide had remote effects including angiogenesis and maturation on the developing brain in rodent pups. Thus, we await the results of the recently completed randomised clinical trial of inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (the European Nitric Oxide or 'EUNO' trial) where, besides the primary endpoint of chronic oxygen dependency reduction at 36 weeks' postconceptional age, long-term lung and brain will be followed-up until 7 years of age. PMID:18986855

  11. Antidepressant-Like Effect of the Leaves of Pseudospondias microcarpa in Mice: Evidence for the Involvement of the Serotoninergic System, NMDA Receptor Complex, and Nitric Oxide Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adongo, Donatus Wewura; Kukuia, Kennedy Kwami Edem; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ameyaw, Elvis Ofori; Woode, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Depression continues to be a major global health problem. Although antidepressants are used for its treatment, efficacy is often inconsistent. Thus, the search for alternative therapeutic medicines for its treatment is still important. In this study, the antidepressant-like effect of Pseudospondias microcarpa extract (30–300 mg kg−1, p.o.) was investigated in two predictive models of depression—forced swimming test and tail suspension test in mice. Additionally, the mechanism(s) of action involved were assessed. Acute treatment with the extract dose dependently reduced immobility of mice in both models. The antidepressant-like effect of the extract (100 mg kg−1, p.o.) was blocked by p-chlorophenylalanine and cyproheptadine but not prazosin, propranolol, or yohimbine. Concomitant administration of d-cycloserine and the extract potentiated the anti-immobility effect. In contrast, d-serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors, abolished the effects. Anti-immobility effects of PME were prevented by pretreatment of mice with L-arginine (750 mg kg−1, i.p.) and sildenafil (5 mg kg−1, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment of mice with L-NAME (30 mg kg−1, i.p.) or methylene blue (10 mg kg−1, i.p.) potentiated its effects. The extract produces an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST that is dependent on the serotoninergic system, NMDA receptor complex, and the nitric oxide pathway. PMID:26539489

  12. Goshajinkigan (Chinese herbal medicine niu-che-sen-qi-wan) improves insulin resistance in diabetic rats via the nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaochen; Sato, Juichi; Bajotto, Gustavo; Khookhor, Oyun; Ohsawa, Isao; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Sato, Yuzo

    2010-02-01

    Goshajinkigan (GJG), an aqueous extract of a combination of 10 herbal medicines, is widely used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy in Japan. In this study, the effect of GJG on insulin-induced glucose disposal in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats was analyzed using the euglycemic clamp technique. Male Wistar rats, aged 9 weeks, were randomly assigned to six groups: group NS, normal rats receiving saline; group NG, normal rats receiving GJG (800 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), p.o.); group NGL, normal rats receiving GJG + N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), i.v.); group DS, diabetic rats receiving saline; group DG, diabetic rats receiving GJG; group DGL, diabetic rats receiving GJG + L-NMMA. After daily oral administrations of saline or GJG for one week, euglycemic clamp experiments were performed. The metabolic clearance rates of glucose (MCR) in the DS, DG, and DGL groups (8.7 +/- 2.9, 18.2 +/- 2.5, and 8.1 +/- 1.8 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), respectively) were significantly lower than those in the NS, NG, and NGL groups (24.1 +/- 4.5, 24.5 +/- 3.1, and 22.2 +/- 2.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), respectively). In addition, the MCR in the DG group was significantly higher than that in the DS and DGL groups, while no significant difference was detected among the NS, NG, and NGL groups. Furthermore, the amelioration of insulin resistance by GJG in diabetic rats was hampered by L-NMMA infusion. These results suggest that daily GJG administrations ameliorate insulin resistance in STZ-diabetic rats, and that the nitric oxide pathway may mediate the effect of GJG. PMID:20229701

  13. Dietary supplementation with cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid increases the activity of the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in tissues of young pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Woo Kim, Sung; Li, Xilong; Datta, Sujay; Pond, Wilson G.; Wu, Guoyao

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from L-arginine by tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-dependent NO synthase (NOS), is critical for neurological and muscular development and function. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may modulate the arginine-NO pathway in tissues of the young pig. Sixteen newborn pigs were nursed by sows for 24 h and then assigned to one of 4 treatment groups, representing supplementation with 0.0%, 0.2% cholesterol, 0.2% DHA, or cholesterol plus DHA to the basal milk-formula. All piglets were euthanized at 49 days of age. Brain, liver and gastrocnemius muscle were analyzed for BH4, NADPH and arginine, GTP cyclohydrolase-I (GTP-CH) and NOS activities, and NOS protein isoforms. Hepatic NOS activity was below the detection limit in all pigs. DHA supplementation (P<0.01) increased GTP-CH activities, as well as BH4 and NADPH concentrations in brain, liver, and muscle by 24–46%, while enhancing (P<0.05) NOS activities by 45–48% in brain and muscle. Dietary cholesterol supplementation increased (P<0.05) NOS and GTP-CH activities by 17–26% in brain but had no effect in liver or muscle. The enhanced NOS activity in the brain or muscle of cholesterol- or DHA-supplemented piglets was attributable to the combined effects of increased eNOS and nNOS activation (changes in phosphorylation levels) and total iNOS protein. Additionally, DHA and cholesterol enhanced (P>0.05) arginine concentrations in brain (35–42%), but not in liver or muscle. These tissue-specific effects of cholesterol and DHA on NO synthesis may play an important role in postnatal growth and development. PMID:18555806

  14. NANC relaxation of the circular smooth muscle of the oesophagus of the Agama lizard involves the L-arginine-nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Knight, G E; Burnstock, G

    1999-02-01

    On carbachol (CCh; 10-30 microM) pre-contracted circular muscle strips of the Agama lizard oesophagus, electrical field stimulation evoked frequency-dependent relaxations in the presence of guanethidine (1 microM) and indomethacin (1 microM). These non-adrenergic inhibitory responses were concentration-dependently inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) within a concentration range of 30-300 microM but not D-NAME (up to 300 microM), although a component remained at 4-16 Hz even with 300 microM L-NAME. The inhibition by L-NAME (300 microM) was completely prevented when L-arginine (L-Arg; 15 mM) but not D-Arg (up to 15 mM) was applied simultaneously with L-NAME (300 microM). Increasing the L-NAME concentration to 1 mM had no additional inhibitory effect. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-dependently relaxed pre-contracted oesophageal strips, L-NAME (up to 300 microM) had no effect. Neither adenosine 5'-triphosphate (up to 0.1 mM) nor vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (up to 0.1 microM) caused the pre-contracted oesophagus to relax. This study has shown that the NANC inhibitory response of the Agama lizard oesophagus circular muscle largely involves the L-Arg-NOS pathway as seen by the effect of L-NAME, L-Arg and SNP. The identity of the L-NAME-resistant component(s) and the lack of effect of tetrodotoxin (up to 3 microM) and omega-conotoxin GVIA (up to 0.1 microM) in relation to the nature of the inhibitory response are discussed. PMID:10190041

  15. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate. PMID:25976309

  16. IL-23/IL-17A axis correlates with the nitric oxide pathway in inflammatory bowel disease: immunomodulatory effect of retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Rafa, Hayet; Saoula, Houria; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Medjeber, Oussama; Soufli, Imene; Toumi, Ryma; de Launoit, Yvan; Moralès, Olivier; Nakmouche, M'hamed; Delhem, Nadira; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2013-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, which are clinically present as 1 of the 2 disorders, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) (Rogler 2004). The immune dysregulation in the intestine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD, involving a wide range of molecules, including cytokines. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of T-helper 17 (Th17) subset in the bowel disease pathogenesis by the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in Algerian patients with IBD. We investigated the correlation between the proinflammatory cytokines [(interleukin (IL)-17, IL-23, and IL-6] and NO production in 2 groups of patients. We analyzed the expression of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) encoding Th17 cytokines, cytokine receptors, and NO synthase 2 (NOS2) in plasma of the patients. In the same way, the expression of p-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and NOS2 was measured by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. We also studied NO modulation by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-17A, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, or IL-1β) in the presence or absence of all-trans retinoic acid (At RA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, and in colonic mucosa cultures. Analysis of cytokines, cytokine receptors, and NOS2 transcripts revealed that the levels of mRNA transcripts of the indicated genes are elevated in all IBD groups. Our study shows a significant positive correlation between the NO and IL-17A, IL-23, and IL-6 levels in plasma of the patients with IBD. Interestingly, the correlation is significantly higher in patients with active CD. Our study shows that both p-STAT3 and inducible NOS expression was upregulated in PBMCs and colonic mucosa, especially in patients with active CD. At RA downregulates NO production in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines for the 2 groups of patients. Collectively, our study indicates that the IL-23/IL-17A axis plays a pivotal role

  17. Nitric oxide regulates blastocyst hatching in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xuenan; Wang, Xiyan; Sun, Zhanxuan; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Xuanxuan; Li, Zhixin; Dou, Zhaohua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to determine the regulatory role of nitric oxide in mouse blastocyst hatching. Methods: Kunming female mice were superovulated and then mated with mature male mice. On day 2.5 of their pregnancy, the pregnant mice were killed and morulae were flushed from their uterine horns with culture media. Morulae were cultured in media with different concentrations of N-nitro-L arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), 8-Br-3’-5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) or the combination of L-NAME with SNP or 8-Br-cGMP for 48 h. The hatched blastocysts were examined on day 5 and the expressions of epithelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and active cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase 3 (caspase 3) were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Results: L-NAME significantly reduced the expression of eNOS in blastocyst cells. With the increase of the concentrations of L-NAME, SNP or 8-Br-cGMP, blastocyst hatching rate was significantly lowered. In addition, 5 mM L-NAME, 2 μM SNP and 2 μM 8-Br-cGMP completely inhibited blastocyst hatching. Low concentrations of SNP or 8-Br-cGMP in culture media containing 5 mM L-NAME significantly reversed the inhibition of blastocyst hatching and promoted hatching development. Moreover, 5 mM L-NAME and 2 μM 8-Br-cGMP had no significant influence on the expression of active caspase 3 in blastocyst cells. SNP (> 500 nM) significantly increased the expression of active caspase 3 in blastocyst cells. Conclusions: NO/cGMP pathway plays an important role in mouse blastocyst hatching. Excessive or depleted NO can interrupt blastocyst hatching. Excessive NO leads to apoptosis of blastocyst cells. PMID:26221236

  18. The role of nitric oxide in prostaglandin biology; update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwon F.

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin share many similarities. Two major forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) have been identified: constitutive vs inducible. In general, the constitutive form functions in housekeeping and physiologic roles whereas the inducible form is up-regulated by mitogenic or inflammatory stimuli and is responsible for pathophysiological responses. The cross talk between the COX and NOS pathways was initially reported 1993 and since then, numerous studies have been undertaken to delineate the functional consequences of this interaction as well as the potential mechanism by which each pathway interacts. This review will focus in particular on recent advances in this field that extend our understanding of these two pathways under various systems. PMID:21820072

  19. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  20. The Effect of Nitric Oxide on Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shank, J. L.; Silliker, J. H.; Harper, R. H.

    1962-01-01

    Nitric oxide, as well as several other oxides of nitrogen, were assayed for their antibacterial action. It is shown that nitric oxide has virtually no effect on bacteria, whereas both NaNO3 and NaNO2 appear to have either neutral or stimulatory effects. It is suggested that the formation of nitrous acid is mainly responsible for the quantitative as well as the qualitative changes that occur in the bacterial flora of cured meat. A pH-dependent “nitrite cycle” is presented to account for the production of nitrous acid in cured meat systems. PMID:13911227

  1. Internally applied endotoxin and the activation of BK channels in cerebral artery smooth muscle via a nitric oxide-like pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, L M; Mathers, D A

    1998-01-01

    In this study the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the acute activation of large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK channels) by internally applied E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) was examined in vascular smooth muscle cells.Cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) were enzymatically dispersed from the middle, posterior communicating and posterior cerebral arteries of adult Wistar rats and maintained at 4°C for 2–4 days before recording with standard patch-clamp techniques.Acute application of LPS (100 μg ml−1) to inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane isolated in a cell-free environment rapidly and reversibly increased the open probability, Po of BK channels in these patches by 3.3±0.30 fold.Acute application of the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 100 μM) to inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane, studied in the presence of intact cells, also reversibly increased Po, by some 1.8±0.2 fold over control.Kinetic analysis showed that both LPS and SNP increased Po by accelerating the rate of BK channel reopening, rather than by retarding the closure of open channels.Neither LPS nor SNP altered the reversal potential or conductance of BK channels.The NOS substrate L-arginine (1 μM) potentiated the acute activation of BK channels by LPS, while the synthetic enantiomer D-arginine (1 μM) inhibited the action of LPS on BK channels.The acute activation of BK channels by LPS was suppressed by pre-incubation of cells with Nω-nitro-L-arginine (50 μM) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1  mM), two competitive antagonists of nitric oxide synthases. Nω-nitro-D-arginine (50 μM), a poor inhibitor of NOS in in vitro assays, had no effect on BK channel activation by LPS.These results indicate that excised, inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane exhibit a NOS-like activity which is acutely activated when LPS is present at the cytoplasmic membrane surface. Possible relationships between this novel mechanism

  2. [Exhaled nitric oxide in pediatric asthma].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Caro, Francisco; Pérez Guirado, Alejandro; Ruiz Del Árbol Sánchez, Paloma; de Miguel Mallén, Angeles; Alvarez Berciano, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide has become a new diagnostic tool in pediatric daily practice. It provides valuable information on the nature of the underlying inflammation, being useful to establish the diagnosis and to differentiate which patients could benefit more from the anti-inflammatory treatment. As well, it can be useful in predicting asthmatic exacerbations and be used as a guide to make therapeutic modifications. Taking everything to account, the pediatrician has to know its interpretation and its applications. This manuscript reviews the main applications of exhaled nitric oxide in pediatric asthma. PMID:21132252

  3. Nitric Oxide Suppresses β-Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Naatz, Aaron; Hogg, Neil; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide, produced in pancreatic β cells in response to proinflammatory cytokines, plays a dual role in the regulation of β-cell fate. While nitric oxide induces cellular damage and impairs β-cell function, it also promotes β-cell survival through activation of protective pathways that promote β-cell recovery. In this study, we identify a novel mechanism in which nitric oxide prevents β-cell apoptosis by attenuating the DNA damage response (DDR). Nitric oxide suppresses activation of the DDR (as measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1 and p53) in response to multiple genotoxic agents, including camptothecin, H2O2, and nitric oxide itself, despite the presence of DNA damage. While camptothecin and H2O2 both induce DDR activation, nitric oxide suppresses only camptothecin-induced apoptosis and not H2O2-induced necrosis. The ability of nitric oxide to suppress the DDR appears to be selective for pancreatic β cells, as nitric oxide fails to inhibit DDR signaling in macrophages, hepatocytes, and fibroblasts, three additional cell types examined. While originally described as the damaging agent responsible for cytokine-induced β-cell death, these studies identify a novel role for nitric oxide as a protective molecule that promotes β-cell survival by suppressing DDR signaling and attenuating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:27185882

  4. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation...

  5. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  6. Copper deficiency attenuates endothelial nitric oxide release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary copper deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to deter...

  7. Nitric oxide. Novel biology with clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Billiar, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author provides the reader with a view of the regulation and function of nitric oxide (NO), based on the three distinct enzyme isoforms that synthesize NO. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nitric oxide is a short-lived molecule exhibiting functions as diverse as neurotransmission and microbial killing. Recent advances in the characterization of the enzymes responsible for NO synthesis and in the understanding of how NO interacts with targets have led to new insights into the many facets of this diverse molecule. METHODS: Nitric oxide is produced by one of three enzyme isoforms of NO synthesis. These enzymes vary considerably in their distribution, regulation, and function. Accordingly, the NO synthesis or lack of NO production will have consequences unique to that isoform. Therefore, this review summarizes the regulation and function of NO generated by each of the three isoforms. RESULTS: Nitric oxide exhibits many unique characteristics that allow this molecule to perform so many functions. The amount, duration, and location of the NO synthesis will depend on the isoform of NO synthase expressed. For each isoform, there probably are disease processes in which deficiency states exist. For induced NO synthesis, states of overexpression exist. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the regulation and function of the enzymes that produce NO and the unique characteristics of each enzyme isoform is likely to lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat a number of diseases. PMID:7537035

  8. Electron-impact excitation of nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    The absolute cross sections for the excitation of the nitrosyl cation Baer-Miescher bands, two nitric oxide bands, and several atomic nitrogen multiplets in the vacuum UV by electron impact on NO have been measured over an energy range extending from threshold to 300 eV. The variation of the dipole transition moment for the nitrosyl cation band system was also determined.

  9. Nitric oxide methods in seed biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous, free radical that is involved in many aspects of plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Compelling evidence points to a central role for NO in the loss of seed dormancy. NO is highly reactive, toxic at high concentrations, and unstable. Methods f...

  10. Lipopolysaccharide induces inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent podocyte dysfunction via a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and cell division control protein 42 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mashmoushi, Ahmad K.; Oates, Jim C.

    2015-01-01

    Urine protein loss in immune complex-mediated diseases such as lupus nephritis is associated with podocyte foot process effacement (podocytopathy) but is not always dependent on glomerular immune complex deposition. Several murine and human studies have associated lupus nephritis with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in what appear to be podocytes. This study was conducted to determine mechanisms of immune-complex-independent and iNOS-dependent podocyte dysfunction. Conditionally immortalized podocytes were cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (SO), or peroxynitrite donors in the presence or absence of inhibitors of iNOS, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase or monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), or with sepiapterin to increase coupling of iNOS homodimers. Podocyte NO, SO, and MCP-1 production and nitrotyrosine modifications were determined. The podocytopathy phenotype was determined by measuring cell motility and membrane permeability to albumin. This study determined that NO produced by iNOS is sufficient and necessary to induce podocytopathy. NO probably induces this phenotype via hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and cell division control protein 42 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 pathways. With LPS stimulation, neither SO nor peroxynitrite produced by uncoupled iNOS or NADPH oxidase nor MCP-1 was sufficient to induce the full phenotype. This study supports the notion that iNOS may induce autocrine podocyte dysfunction. Thus, targeting iNOS or the pathways of its induction may have therapeutic benefit. PMID:25765888

  11. High-Yield Method for Isolation and Culture of Endothelial Cells from Rat Coronary Blood Vessels Suitable for Analysis of Intracellular Calcium and Nitric Oxide Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, Silvia; Mazzetti, Luca; Failli, Paola

    2002-01-01

    We describe here a method for isolating endothelial cells from rat heart blood vessels by means of coronary microperfusion with collagenase. This methods makes it possible to obtain high amounts of endothelial cells in culture which retain the functional properties of their in vivo counterparts, including the ability to uptake fluorescently-labeled acetylated low-density lipoproteins and to respond to vasoactive agents by modulating intracellular calcium and by upregulating intrinsic nitric oxide generation. The main advantages of our technique are: (i) good reproducibility, (ii) accurate sterility that can be maintained throughout the isolation procedure and (iii) high yield of pure endothelial cells, mainly due to microperfusion and temperature-controlled incubation with collagenase which allow an optimal distribution of this enzyme within the coronary vascular bed. PMID:12734571

  12. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  13. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin. PMID:27206740

  14. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  15. Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the NMDA receptor and nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ahangari, Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Chamanara, Mohsen; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant agent that shows clinical antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) synthesis in possible antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Intraperitoneal administration of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the FST (P<0.01) without any effect on locomotor activity in the open-field test (OFT), while higher dose of lamotrigine (30mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST (P<0.001) as well as the number of crossings in the OFT. Pretreatment of animals with NMDA (75mg/kg), l-arginine (750mg/kg, a substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, a phosphodiesterase [PDE] 5 inhibitor) reversed the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) in the FST. Injection of l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, a neuronal NOS inhibitor), methylene blue (20mg/kg, an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]), or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg) as NMDA receptor antagonists in combination with a sub-effective dose of lamotrigine (5mg/kg) diminished the immobility time of animals in the FST compared with either drug alone. None of the drugs produced significant effects on the locomotor activity in the OFT. Based on our findings, it is suggested that the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine might mediated through inhibition of either NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP synthesis. PMID:27470415

  16. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  17. Protective effects of ghrelin against oxidative stress, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via the HMGB1 and TLR4/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Wang, Hui; Wang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of ghrelin against oxidative stress, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and inflammation in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MIRI). In addition, the study aimed to determine its underlying mechanisms. A mouse model of MIRI was used in vivo, in order to ascertain the protective effects of ghrelin on MIRI. Commercial kits were used to measure the serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in MIRI mice. Furthermore, Evan's Blue-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution was used to analyze the protective effects of ghrelin against infarct size in MIRI mice. The underlying mechanisms were determined by measuring MIRI-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑6, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), GSH-peroxidase (GSH‑PX), malondialdehyde (MDA) and caspase‑3/caspase‑9 activities, and iNOS, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), Toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB protein expression in MIRI mice. The results demonstrated that MIRI led to an increase in infarct size; CK, LDH, TNF‑α, IL‑6, MDA, caspase‑3 and caspase-9 serum levels; and iNOS protein expression. MIRI resulted in inhibition of SOD, FSH and GSH‑PX levels. Conversely, these alterations were significantly inhibited following treatment with ghrelin. In addition, the protective effects of ghrelin against MIRI suppressed HMGB1, TLR4 and NF‑κB protein expression in MIRI mice. The present study revealed that ghrelin exerted protective effects against oxidative stress, iNOS and inflammation in MIRI mice via the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. PMID:27485280

  18. Hydrangenol inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the NF-κB pathway and activating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Kang, Chang-Hee; Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Seungheon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Yong Taek; Kim, Gi-Young

    2016-06-01

    We previously demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of water extract of Hydrangea macrophylla in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cells. Here, we investigated whether hydrangenol, a bioactive component of H. macrophylla, attenuates the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and its associated gene, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Our data showed that low dosages of hydrangenol inhibited LPS-stimulated NO release and iNOS expression without any accompanying cytotoxicity. Hydrangenol also suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) subunits, consequently inhibiting DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Additionally, the NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and PS-1145, significantly attenuated LPS-induced iNOS expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced NF-κB inhibition might be a key regulator of iNOS expression. Furthermore, our data showed that hydrangenol suppresses NO production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The presence of cobalt protoporphyrin, a specific HO-1 inducer, potently suppressed LPS-induced NO production. Hydrangenol also promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and subsequently increased its binding activity at the specific antioxidant response element sites. Additionally, transient knockdown of Nrf2 significantly downregulated hydrangenol-induced HO-1 expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced Nrf2 is an upstream regulator of HO-1. Taken together, these data suggest that hydrangenol attenuates NO production and iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by inhibiting NF-κB activation and by stimulating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, hydrangenol is a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of LPS-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:27032067

  19. Global observations of nitric oxide in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Mankoff, K. D.; Bailey, S. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere (97-150 km) has been measured from the polar-orbiting Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude for the 2 1/2 year period from 11 March 1998 until 30 September 2000. The observations show that the maximum density occurs near 106-110 km and that the density is highly variable. The nitric oxide density at low latitudes correlates well with the solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm), indicating that it is the solar X-rays that produce thermospheric nitric oxide at low and midlatitudes. Nitric oxide is produced at auroral latitudes (60°-70° geomagnetic) by the precipitation of electrons (1-10 keV) into the thermosphere. During high geomagnetic activity, increased nitric oxide may be present at midlatitudes as the result of meridional winds that carry the nitric oxide equatorward.

  20. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  1. Role of Nitric Oxide in the Regulation of Renin and Vasopressin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    Research during recent years has established nitric oxide as a unique signaling molecule that plays important roles in the regulation of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and other systems. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the control of the secretion of hormones by the pancreas, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, and evidence is accumulating that it contributes to the regulation of the secretion of renin and vasopressin, hormones that play key roles in the control of sodium and water balance. Several lines of evidence have implicated nitric oxide in the control of renin secretion. The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in vascular and tubular elements of the kidney, particularly in cells of the macula densa, a structure that plays an important role in the control of renin secretion. Guanylyl cyclase, a major target for nitric oxide, is also present in the kidney. Drugs that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis generally suppress renin release in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a stimulatory role for the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the control of renin secretion. Under some conditions, however, blockade of nitric oxide synthesis increases renin secretion. Recent studies indicate that nitric oxide not only contributes to the regulation of basal renin secretion, but also participates in the renin secretory responses to activation of the renal baroreceptor, macula densa, and beta adrenoceptor mechanisms that regulate renin secretion. Histochemical and immunocytochemical studies have revealed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary gland. Colocalization of nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin has been demonstrated in some hypothalamic neurons. Nitric oxide synthase activity in the hypothalamus and pituitary is increased by maneuvers known to stimulate vasopressin secretion, including salt loading and dehydration, Administration of L-arginine and nitric

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  3. Differential effects of chronic hyperammonemia on modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and low and high affinity AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Reznikov, Vitaliy; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies show that chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning ability of rats by impairing the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) pathway in cerebellum. Three types of glutamate receptors cooperate in modulating the NO-cGMP pathway: metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), (RS)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. The aim of this work was to assess whether hyperammonemia alters the modulation of this pathway by mGluR5 and AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo. The results support that in control rats: (1) low AMPA concentrations (0.1mM) activate nearly completely Ca(2+)-permeable (glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2)-lacking) AMPA receptors and the NO-cGMP pathway; (2) higher AMPA concentrations (0.3 mM) also activate Ca(2+)-impermeable (GluR2-containing) AMPA receptors, leading to activation of NMDA receptors and of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, the data support that chronic hyperammonemia: (1) reduces glutamate release and activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5; (2) strongly reduces the direct activation by AMPA receptors of the NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to reduced entry of Ca(2+) through GluR2-lacking, high affinity AMPA receptors; (3) strongly increases the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by high affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to increased entry of Na(+) through GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors activation; (4) reduces the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by low affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to reduced activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22521775

  4. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1. PMID:23247505

  5. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air. PMID:9517592

  6. Coordinated regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae-truncated denitrification pathway by the nitric oxide-sensitive repressor, NsrR, and nitrite-insensitive NarQ-NarP.

    PubMed

    Overton, Tim W; Whitehead, Rebekah; Li, Ying; Snyder, Lori A S; Saunders, Nigel J; Smith, Harry; Cole, Jeff A

    2006-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives anaerobically by reducing nitrite to nitrous oxide catalyzed by the nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, AniA and NorB. P(aniA) is activated by FNR (regulator of fumarate and nitrate reduction), the two-component regulatory system NarQ-NarP, and induced by nitrite; P(norB) is induced by NO independently of FNR by an uncharacterized mechanism. We report the results of microarray analysis, bioinformatic analysis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, which revealed that only five genes with readily identified NarP-binding sites are differentially expressed in narP(+) and narP strains. These include three genes implicated in the truncated gonococcal denitrification pathway: aniA, norB, and narQ. We also report that (i) nitrite induces aniA transcription in a narP mutant; (ii) nitrite induction involves indirect inactivation by nitric oxide of a gonococcal repressor, NsrR, identified from a multigenome bioinformatic study; (iii) in an nsrR mutant, aniA, norB, and dnrN (encoding a putative reactive nitrogen species response protein) were expressed constitutively in the absence of nitrite, suggesting that NsrR is the only NO-sensing transcription factor in N. gonorrhoeae; and (iv) NO rather than nitrite is the ligand to which NsrR responds. When expressed in Escherichia coli, gonococcal NarQ and chimaeras of E. coli and gonococcal NarQ are ligand-insensitive and constitutively active: a "locked-on" phenotype. We conclude that genes involved in the truncated denitrification pathway of N. gonorrhoeae are key components of the small NarQP regulon, that NarP indirectly regulates P(norB) by stimulating NO production by AniA, and that NsrR plays a critical role in enabling gonococci to evade NO generated as a host defense mechanism. PMID:16954205

  7. Biological nitric oxide signalling: chemistry and terminology

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tassiele A; da Silva, Roberto S; Miranda, Katrina M; Switzer, Christopher H; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen oxide signalling and stress is an area of extreme clinical, pharmacological, toxicological, biochemical and chemical research interest. The utility of nitric oxide and derived species as signalling agents is due to their novel and vast chemical interactions with a variety of biological targets. Herein, the chemistry associated with the interaction of the biologically relevant nitrogen oxide species with fundamental biochemical targets is discussed. Specifically, the chemical interactions of nitrogen oxides with nucleophiles (e.g. thiols), metals (e.g. hemeproteins) and paramagnetic species (e.g. dioxygen and superoxide) are addressed. Importantly, the terms associated with the mechanisms by which NO (and derived species) react with their respective biological targets have been defined by numerous past chemical studies. Thus, in order to assist researchers in referring to chemical processes associated with nitrogen oxide biology, the vernacular associated with these chemical interactions is addressed. PMID:23617570

  8. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  9. 2'-Benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde inhibits nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells via regulation of AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Yeon; Hong, Su-Hyung; Park, Sun-Dong; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Kim, Soo-A

    2012-12-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, an active compound of cinnamon, has been reported to exert various biological functions such as anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. Previously, we showed that 2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) has an inhibitory effect on nitric oxide (NO) production through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling. In an effort to find a more effective anti-atherosclerotic agent, here we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA) in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. We showed that BCA more effectively inhibited NO production than HCA with less cytotoxicity. We also demonstrated that BCA inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner. Signal transduction studies showed that BCA significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK and AP-1-dependent reporter gene activity. LPS-induced expression levels of JunB, c-Jun and c-Fos were also decreased by BCA treatment. Moreover, the LPS-induced DNA binding activity of AP-1 was markedly inhibited by BCA. The direct injection of BCA into mice inhibited the LPS-induced increase in plasma nitrite levels, confirming the anti-inflammatory effect of BCA in vivo. Overall, these observations suggest that BCA has the potential for use as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. PMID:23036374

  10. The Role of Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rabender, Christopher S.; Alam, Asim; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Cardnell, Robert J.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Graves, Paul; Zweit, Jamal; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    Here evidence suggests that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) of tumor cells, in contrast to normal tissues, synthesize predominantly superoxide and peroxynitrite. Based on HPLC analysis, the underlying mechanism for this uncoupling is a reduced tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio (BH4:BH2) found in breast, colorectal, epidermoid and head and neck tumors compared to normal tissues. Increasing BH4:BH2 and reconstitution of coupled NOS activity in breast cancer cells with the BH4 salvage pathway precursor, sepiapterin, causes significant shifts in downstream signaling including increased cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) activity, decreased β-catenin expression and TCF4 promoter activity, and reduced NF-κB promoter activity. Sepiapterin inhibited breast tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo as measured by clonogenic assay, Ki67 staining and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). In summary, using diverse tumor types, it is demonstrated that the BH4:BH2 ratio is lower in tumor tissues and as a consequence nitric oxide synthase activity generates more peroxynitrite and superoxide anion than nitric oxide resulting in important tumor growth promoting and anti-apoptotic signaling properties. Implications The synthetic BH4, Kuvan®, is used to elevate BH4:BH2 in some phenylketonuria patients and to treat diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction suggesting a novel, testable approach for correcting an abnormality of tumor metabolism to control tumor growth. PMID:25724429

  11. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    diclofenac and tetra-ethyl-ammonium (TEA) pretreatment of GPAPs induced a suppression of the relaxation caused by ESera, and produced a very significant rightward shifts of the CRC (16-fold) for diclofenac and increase the Emax. In contract, the relaxation caused by ACh was not significantly affected by diclofenac or by TEA. Conclusion Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the nitric oxide largely contribute to the relaxation effect of Esera and of ACh in GPAPs. In addition, their contractile effects are also mediated by cyclooxygenase activation, and probably the K+ channels involvement, that confirm the use of various preparations of Esera for the treatments of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18505582

  12. [Nitric oxide and the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Dzúrik, R; Spustová, V

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NO) is one of the crucial modulators of the vascular tonus. Apart from its effect on the cardiovascular system it exerts an effect also on other types of cells and ensures their functions.Specially comprehensive is its synthesis and action in the kidneys: NO is formed in the endothelial cells due to the activity of constitutional endothelial synthase (eNOS), in mesangial cells of inductive synthase (iNOS), in smooth muscle cells (vsmNOS), in tubular cells neuronal NOS (nNOS) and iNOS and in the macula densa nNOS. By modulation of the v.afferens it influences the blood flow through the glomeruli and filtration pressure in the glomeruli. It participates in the tubuloglomerular feedback: the cells of the macula densa produce NO via nNOS, the genetic transcription and translation of which as well as the kationic translation system ensure the transport of the L-arginine precursor and regulate very sensitively NO formation. The latter diffuses via the extraglomerular mesangium into the iuxtaglomerular apparatus where renin is forned.NO reduces proteinuria and renal proliferation. During renal insufficiency NO production is inhibited and in diabetes NO production is increased. Diabetic hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are ascribed to produced NO. Experimental studies contributed substantially to the knowledge of renal effects of NO. At present intensive clinical research has been started which, no doubt, will influence medical practice. PMID:15635855

  13. Macrophage oxidation of L-arginine to nitrite and nitrate: nitric oxide is an intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Marletta, M.A.; Yoon, P.S.; Iyengar, R.; Leaf, C.D.; Wishnok, J.S.

    1988-11-29

    Previous studies have shown that murine macrophages immunostimulated with interferon ..gamma.. and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide synthesize NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and citrulline from L-arginine by oxidation of one of the two chemically equivalent guanido nitrogens. The enzymatic activity for this very unusual reaction was found in the 100,000g supernatant isolated from activated RAW 264.7 cells and was totally absent in unstimulated cells. This activity requires NADPH and L-arginine and is enhanced by Mg/sup 2 +/. When the subcellular fraction containing the enzyme activity was incubated with L-arginine, NADPH, and Mg/sup 2 +/, the formation of nitric oxide was observed. Nitric oxide formation was dependent on the presence of L-arginine and NADPH and was inhibited by the NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis inhibitor N/sup G/-monomethyl-L-arginine. Furthermore, when incubated with L-(guanido-/sup 15/N/sub 2/)arginine, the nitric oxide was /sup 15/N-labeled. The results show that nitric oxide is an intermediate in the L-arginine to NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and citrulline pathway. L-Arginine is required for the activation of macrophages to the bactericidal/tumoricidal state and suggests that nitric oxide is serving as an intracellular signal for this activation process in a manner similar to that very recently observed in endothelial cells, where nitric oxide leads to vascular smooth muscle relaxation.

  14. Vascular effects of dietary nitrate (as found in green leafy vegetables and beetroot) via the nitrate‐nitrite‐nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lidder, Satnam; Webb, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that dietary (inorganic) nitrate has important vascular effects came from the relatively recent realization of the ‘nitrate‐nitrite‐nitric oxide (NO) pathway’. Dietary nitrate has been demonstrated to have a range of beneficial vascular effects, including reducing blood pressure, inhibiting platelet aggregation, preserving or improving endothelial dysfunction, enhancing exercise performance in healthy individuals and patients with peripheral arterial disease. Pre‐clinical studies with nitrate or nitrite also show the potential to protect against ischaemia‐reperfusion injury and reduce arterial stiffness, inflammation and intimal thickness. However, there is a need for good evidence for hard endpoints beyond epidemiological studies. Whilst these suggest reduction in cardiovascular risk with diets high in nitrate‐rich vegetables (such as a Mediterranean diet), others have suggested possible small positive and negative associations with dietary nitrate and cancer, but these remain unproven. Interactions with other nutrients, such as vitamin C, polyphenols and fatty acids may enhance or inhibit these effects. In order to provide simple guidance on nitrate intake from different vegetables, we have developed the Nitrate ‘Veg‐Table’ with ‘Nitrate Units’ [each unit being 1 mmol of nitrate (62 mg)] to achieve a nitrate intake that is likely to be sufficient to derive benefit, but also to minimize the risk of potential side effects from excessive ingestion, given the current available evidence. The lack of data concerning the long term effects of dietary nitrate is a limitation, and this will need to be addressed in future trials. PMID:22882425

  15. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production. PMID:26988103

  16. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  17. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  18. Nitric oxide and asthma: a review.

    PubMed

    Ashutosh, K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from the amino acid arginine by enzymes called nitric oxide synthases. NO has an important physiologic role in the regulation of vascular tone, response to vascular injury, and hemostasis. It also acts as a neurotransmitter for the nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerves and has important antimicrobial, immunologic, and proinflammatory activities. The lung is rich in nitric oxide synthases, and NO is normally present in the exhaled air. Use of NO in the treatment of asthma has not withstood the test of time and is not recommended. With the advent of analyzers capable of measuring NO rapidly and reliably, however, the analysis of NO in exhaled air is being increasingly recognized as a potential noninvasive test for the evaluation of the inflammatory component of the pathology of patients with asthma. An increase in the exhaled NO has been shown to accompany eosinophilic inflammation and to correlate with other indices of inflammation in asthma. Exhaled NO increases during exacerbation and decreases with recovery in patients with asthma. As exhaled NO is not increased during bronchospasm in the absence of coexisting inflammation, it could serve to differentiate between the inflammatory and bronchospastic components in asthma, thereby guiding therapy with steroids and other anti-inflammatory medications. Levels of NO also can be increased in certain other conditions, for example, allergic rhinitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome, but these can be clinically differentiated from asthma and do not lessen the diagnostic value of exhaled NO. Measurements of exhaled NO are influenced by several physiologic and technical variables, which results in a wide variation in the levels reported from the different laboratories. Standardization of technique, a better understanding of the confounding effects of physiologic and environmental variables, and establishment of the normal range and variability of exhaled NO are needed before its

  19. Nitric oxide regulates vascular adaptive mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Knaub, Leslie A; Olivera-Fragoso, Luis F; Keller, Amy C; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Watson, Peter A; Reusch, Jane E B

    2013-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and physical inactivity, are all correlated with impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function and decreased nitric oxide (NO) production. NO-mediated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been established in many tissues, yet the role of eNOS in vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is unclear. We hypothesized that genetic eNOS deletion and 3-day nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents would result in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defunct fission/fusion and autophagy profiles within the aorta. We observed a significant, eNOS expression-dependent decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunits from complexes I, II, III, and V in eNOS heterozygotes and eNOS null mice compared with age-matched controls. In response to NOS inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment in Sprague Dawley rats, significant decreases were observed in ETC protein subunits from complexes I, III, and IV as well as voltage-dependent anion channel 1. Decreased protein content of upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, cAMP response element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, were observed in response to 3-day L-NAME treatment. Both genetic eNOS deletion and NOS inhibition resulted in decreased manganese superoxide dismutase protein. L-NAME treatment resulted in significant changes to mitochondrial dynamic protein profiles with decreased fusion, increased fission, and minimally perturbed autophagy. In addition, L-NAME treatment blocked mitochondrial adaptation to an exercise intervention in the aorta. These results suggest that eNOS/NO play a role in basal and adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis in the vasculature and regulation of mitochondrial turnover. PMID:23585138

  20. Nitric oxide synthesis and biological functions of nitric oxide released from ruthenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Paulo, M; Araújo, A V; Rodrigues, G J; Bendhack, L M

    2011-09-01

    During three decades, an enormous number of studies have demonstrated the critical role of nitric oxide (NO) as a second messenger engaged in the activation of many systems including vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The underlying cellular mechanisms involved in vasodilatation are essentially due to soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC) modulation in the cytoplasm of vascular smooth cells. sGC activation culminates in cyclic GMP (cGMP) production, which in turn leads to protein kinase G (PKG) activation. NO binds to the sGC heme moiety, thereby activating this enzyme. Activation of the NO-sGC-cGMP-PKG pathway entails Ca(2+) signaling reduction and vasodilatation. Endothelium dysfunction leads to decreased production or bioavailability of endogenous NO that could contribute to vascular diseases. Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been studied as a new class of NO donors with potential therapeutic use in order to supply the NO deficiency. In this context, this article shall provide a brief review of the effects exerted by the NO that is enzymatically produced via endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS) activation and by the NO released from NO donor compounds in the vascular smooth muscle cells on both conduit and resistance arteries, as well as veins. In addition, the involvement of the nitrite molecule as an endogenous NO reservoir engaged in vasodilatation will be described. PMID:21755266

  1. Role of nitric oxide on motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Del Bel, E A; Guimarães, F S; Bermúdez-Echeverry, M; Gomes, M Z; Schiaveto-de-souza, A; Padovan-Neto, F E; Tumas, V; Barion-Cavalcanti, A P; Lazzarini, M; Nucci-da-Silva, L P; de Paula-Souza, D

    2005-03-01

    The present review paper describes results indicating the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on motor control. Our last studies showed that systemic injections of low doses of inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for NO formation, induce anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus maze whereas higher doses decrease maze exploration. Also, NOS inhibitors decrease locomotion and rearing in an open field arena. These results may involve motor effects of this compounds, since inhibitors of NOS, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and 7-Nitroindazole (7-NIO), induced catalepsy in mice. This effect was also found in rats after systemic, intracebroventricular or intrastriatal administration. Acute administration of L-NOARG has an additive cataleptic effect with haloperidol, a dopamine D2 antagonist. The catalepsy is also potentiated by WAY 100135 (5-HT1a receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5HT2a and alfal adrenergic receptor antagonist), and ritanserin (5-HT2a and 5HT2c receptor antagonist). Atropine sulfate and biperiden, antimuscarinic drugs, block L-NOARG-induced catalepsy in mice. L-NOARG subchronic administration in mice induces rapid tolerance (3 days) to its cataleptic effects. It also produces cross-tolerance to haloperidol-induced catalepsy. After subchronic L-NOARG treatment there is an increase in the density NADPH-d positive neurons in the dorsal part of nucleus caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and tegmental pedunculupontinus nucleus. In contrast, this treatment decreases NADPH-d neuronal number in the substantia nigra compacta. Considering these results we suggest that (i) NO may modulate motor behavior, probably by interfering with dopaminergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic neurotransmission in the striatum; (ii) Subchronic NO synthesis inhibition induces plastic changes in NO-producing neurons in brain areas related to motor control and causes cross-tolerance to the

  2. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  3. Activation of CFTR chloride current by nitric oxide in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Y J; Chao, A C; Kouyama, K; Hsu, Y P; Bocian, R C; Moss, R B; Gardner, P

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide, which is produced by cytokine-activated mononuclear cells, is thought to play an important role in inflammation and immunity. While the function of nitric oxide as a direct cytotoxic effector molecule is well established, its function as a transducer molecule in immune cells is not. By use of whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we show that nitric oxide activates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator CI- currents in normal human cloned T cells by a cGMP-dependent mechanism. This pathway is defective in cystic fibrosis-derived human cloned T cells. These findings not only delineate a novel transduction mechanism for nitric oxide but also support the hypothesis that an intrinsic immune defect may exist in cystic fibrosis. PMID:7540975

  4. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  5. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  6. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  7. Catestatin Gly364Ser Variant Alters Systemic Blood Pressure and the Risk for Hypertension in Human Populations via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kiranmayi, Malapaka; Chirasani, Venkat R; Allu, Prasanna K R; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Martelli, Elizabeth E; Sahu, Bhavani S; Vishnuprabu, Durairajpandian; Kumaragurubaran, Rathnakumar; Sharma, Saurabh; Bodhini, Dhanasekaran; Dixit, Madhulika; Munirajan, Arasambattu K; Khullar, Madhu; Radha, Venkatesan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mullasari, Ajit S; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Senapati, Sanjib; Mahapatra, Nitish R

    2016-08-01

    Catestatin (CST), an endogenous antihypertensive/antiadrenergic peptide, is a novel regulator of cardiovascular physiology. Here, we report case-control studies in 2 geographically/ethnically distinct Indian populations (n≈4000) that showed association of the naturally-occurring human CST-Gly364Ser variant with increased risk for hypertension (age-adjusted odds ratios: 1.483; P=0.009 and 2.951; P=0.005). Consistently, 364Ser allele carriers displayed elevated systolic (up to ≈8 mm Hg; P=0.004) and diastolic (up to ≈6 mm Hg; P=0.001) blood pressure. The variant allele was also found to be in linkage disequilibrium with other functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CHGA promoter and nearby coding region. Functional characterization of the Gly364Ser variant was performed using cellular/molecular biological experiments (viz peptide-receptor binding assays, nitric oxide [NO], phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase, and phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase estimations) and computational approaches (molecular dynamics simulations for structural analysis of wild-type [CST-WT] and variant [CST-364Ser] peptides and docking of peptide/ligand with β-adrenergic receptors [ADRB1/2]). CST-WT and CST-364Ser peptides differed profoundly in their secondary structures and showed differential interactions with ADRB2; although CST-WT displaced the ligand bound to ADRB2, CST-364Ser failed to do the same. Furthermore, CST-WT significantly inhibited ADRB2-stimulated extracellular regulated kinase activation, suggesting an antagonistic role towards ADRB2 unlike CST-364Ser. Consequently, CST-WT was more potent in NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells as compared with CST-364Ser. This NO-producing ability of CST-WT was abrogated by ADRB2 antagonist ICI 118551. In conclusion, CST-364Ser allele enhanced the risk for hypertension in human populations, possibly via diminished endothelial NO production because of altered interactions of CST-364Ser

  8. Developmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls or methylmercury, but not to its combination, impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and learning in 3-month-old rats.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, B; Erceg, S; Cauli, O; Felipo, V

    2008-07-17

    Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated food may affect brain development, leading to long-term alterations in cognitive function. Both types of contaminants, PCBs and MeHg, are often found together contaminating food, especially fish in some polluted areas. Exposure to combinations of neurotoxicants may exert different effects on the developing nervous system than exposure to individual contaminants. Developmental exposure (during pregnancy and lactation) to PCB126 or PCB153 impairs learning ability when the rats are 3 months old. Impairment of learning seems to be a consequence of impairment of the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo. The aims of the present work were 1) to assess whether perinatal exposure to MeHg also affects the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo analyzed by in vivo brain microdialysis and/or the ability to learn the Y maze task when the rats are 3 months old, and 2) to assess whether perinatal exposure to combinations of MeHg with PCB153 or PCB126 potentiates, decreases or does not modify the effects of the individual neurotoxicants. Perinatal exposure to PCB126, PCB153 or MeHg impaired the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum and learning ability. However, co-exposure to PCB126+MeHg or PCB153+MeHg inhibits the impairment of the pathway or learning ability. These results support that the function of this pathway modulates learning of the Y maze task. Moreover, they show that co-exposure to these PCBs and MeHg does not exacerbate, but reduces the effects on the ability to learn this task. PMID:18556134

  9. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:26499181

  10. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  11. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  12. Hexane fraction of Zingiberis Rhizoma Crudus extract inhibits the production of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells via the NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyo Won; Yoon, Cheol-Ho; Park, Kwon Moo; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Yong-Ki

    2009-06-01

    Excessive production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) from activated microglia contributes to uncontrolled inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. It seems possible that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents, including plants used in Oriental medicine, might delay the progression of neurodegeneration through the inhibition of microglial activation. The present study is focused on the inhibitory effect of the rhizome hexane fraction extract of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger hexan extract; GHE) on the production of inflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE(2), and proinflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells, a mouse microglial cell line. GHE significantly inhibited the excessive production of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. In addition, GHE attenuated the mRNA expressions and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and proinflammatory cytokines. The molecular mechanisms that underlie GHE-mediated attenuation are related to the inhibition of the phosphorylation of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Our results indicate that GHE exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by suppressing the transcription of inflammatory mediator genes through the MAPK and NF-kappaB signaling pathways. The anti-inflammatory properties of GHE may make it useful as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19233241

  13. Molecular Steps in the Immune Signaling Pathway Evoked by Plant Elicitor Peptides: Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinases, Nitric Oxide, and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Downstream from the Early Ca2+ Signal1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Yichen; Walker, Robin K.; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous plant elicitor peptides (Peps) can act to facilitate immune signaling and pathogen defense responses. Binding of these peptides to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane-localized Pep receptors (PEPRs) leads to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, an early event in a signaling cascade that activates immune responses. This immune response includes the amplification of signaling evoked by direct perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by plant cells under assault. Work included in this report further characterizes the Pep immune response and identifies new molecular steps in the signal transduction cascade. The PEPR coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 contributes to generation of the Pep-activated Ca2+ signal and leads to increased defense gene expression and resistance to a virulent bacterial pathogen. Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) decode the Ca2+ signal, also facilitating defense gene expression and enhanced resistance to the pathogen. Nitric oxide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation (due to the function of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog proteins D and F) are also involved downstream from the Ca2+ signal in the Pep immune defense signal transduction cascade, as is the case with BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 and CPK5, CPK6, and CPK11. These steps of the pathogen defense response are required for maximal Pep immune activation that limits growth of a virulent bacterial pathogen in the plant. We find a synergism between function of the PEPR and Flagellin Sensing2 receptors in terms of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation. Presented results are also consistent with the involvement of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP and a cyclic GMP-activated Ca2+-conducting channel in the Pep immune signaling pathway. PMID:24019427

  14. Ginsenoside Rg3 attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling and the B‑cell lymphoma/B‑cell lymphoma‑associated X protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Hu, Zhaohui; Sun, Bing; Xu, Jiahong; Jiang, Jinfa; Luo, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that ginsenoside Rg3 (GSRg3) extract from the medicinal plant Panax ginseng, may increase nitric oxide production via increases in the phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The present study used an in vitro neonatal rat cardiomyocyte (NRC) model of anoxia‑reoxygenation injury and an in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Hemodynamic, histopathological and biochemical assessment of the myocardial injury was performed and the expression levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase and creatine kinase (CK) were measured in serum from the animal model, which may reflect myocardial injury. NRC injury was determined using a Cell Counting kit‑8. The GSRg3 anti‑apoptotic effects were assessed using flow cytometry to investigate the number of early‑late apoptotic cells and western blot analysis was performed to analyze the protein expression levels of caspase‑3, caspase‑9, B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2), phosphorylated (p‑)Akt and eNOS. The results suggested that pretreatment with GSRg3 (60 mg/kg) significantly improved rat cardiac function, as demonstrated by increased left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate and first derivative of left ventricular pressure. GSRg3 also reduced the size of the myocardial infarct and LDH/CK levels in the blood following MI/R. In vitro investigations revealed that GSRg3 (10 mM) decreased NRC apoptosis through inhibiting the activation of caspase‑3 and caspase‑9, and increasing the expression levels of p‑Akt, eNOS and the ratio of Bcl‑2/Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax). Overall, the present study revealed that GSRg3 mediated a cardioprotective effect against MI/R‑induced apoptosis via Akt/eNOS signaling and the Bcl‑2/Bax pathway. PMID:25672441

  15. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  16. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  19. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165 Section 868.5165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  2. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  3. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  4. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  5. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:26539501

  6. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:26539501

  7. Pharmacology of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and nitrovasodilators.

    PubMed Central

    Ignarro, L. J.; Ross, G.; Tillisch, J.

    1991-01-01

    Nitric oxide is the active chemical species responsible for the vasodilator action of nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, and related nitrovasodilators. The most potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation known, nitric oxide was recently discovered to occur endogenously as the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. The pharmacology of endothelium-derived nitric oxide is virtually identical to that of the clinically used nitrovasodilators. Although endothelium-derived relaxing factor or endothelium-derived nitric oxide seems to be important in animals, its significance in humans still needs to be shown. We review the recent discoveries in the identification, biosynthesis, metabolism, and biologic actions of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, its significance in humans, and its relation to the clinically used nitrovasodilators. PMID:1902612

  8. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. A.; Pritchard, H. O. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions by employing successive combustion zones is described. After combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion (ignited by the emission products from the primary zone) in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emission of nitric oxide.

  9. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. PMID:23404577

  10. Nitric oxide modulators: an emerging class of medicinal agents.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, S R; Satyanarayana, K; Rao, M N A; Pai, K V

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  11. Dengue Virus Infection Causes the Activation of Distinct NF-κB Pathways for Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and TNF-α Expression in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Ou, Yi-Dan; Yu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tseng, Po-Chun; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes an increase in proinflammatory responses, such as nitric oxide (NO) generation and TNF-α expression; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this inflammatory activation remains undefined, although the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is generally involved. In addition to TNF-α production in DENV-infected murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, inducible NO synthase was transcriptionally and posttranslationally elevated and accompanied by NO generation. NF-κB is known to be activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically inhibiting NF-κB activation abolishes iNOS/NO biosynthesis and TNF-α production. With inhibition, the potential role of NF-κB in oxidative signaling regulation was prevented during DENV infection. Heat-inactivated DENV failed to cause the identified inflammatory responses. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR3 partly decreased NF-κB activation; however, it effectively abolished inducible iNOS/NO biosynthesis but did not inhibit TNF-α production. In contrast to TLR3, viral protein NS2B3 also independently contributed to NF-κB activation to regulate TNF-α production. These results show the distinct pathways for NF-κB activation caused by DENV infection individually for the regulation of iNOS/NO and TNF-α expression. PMID:26199460

  12. Dengue Virus Infection Causes the Activation of Distinct NF-κB Pathways for Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and TNF-α Expression in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Ou, Yi-Dan; Yu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tseng, Po-Chun; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes an increase in proinflammatory responses, such as nitric oxide (NO) generation and TNF-α expression; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this inflammatory activation remains undefined, although the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is generally involved. In addition to TNF-α production in DENV-infected murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, inducible NO synthase was transcriptionally and posttranslationally elevated and accompanied by NO generation. NF-κB is known to be activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically inhibiting NF-κB activation abolishes iNOS/NO biosynthesis and TNF-α production. With inhibition, the potential role of NF-κB in oxidative signaling regulation was prevented during DENV infection. Heat-inactivated DENV failed to cause the identified inflammatory responses. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR3 partly decreased NF-κB activation; however, it effectively abolished inducible iNOS/NO biosynthesis but did not inhibit TNF-α production. In contrast to TLR3, viral protein NS2B3 also independently contributed to NF-κB activation to regulate TNF-α production. These results show the distinct pathways for NF-κB activation caused by DENV infection individually for the regulation of iNOS/NO and TNF-α expression. PMID:26199460

  13. Plant pathogenic Streptomyces species produce nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in response to host signals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent intercellular signal for defense, development and metabolism in animals and plants. In mammals, highly regulated nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) generate NO. NOS homologs exist in some prokaryotes, but direct evidence for NO production by these proteins has been lacking...

  14. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:25612116

  15. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  16. The emerging multifaceted roles of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, P C; Schroeder, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical with a multitude of organ specific regulatory functions. Since 1985, NO has been the subject of numerous research efforts and as a result, has been found to play a major role in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune, and central nervous systems. In addition, deranged NO synthesis is the basis for a number of pathophysiologic states, such as atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, pyloric stenosis, and the hypertension associated with renal failure. Traditional NO donors such as sodium nitroprusside and new pharmacologic NO adducts such as S-nitrosothiols may serve as exogenous sources of NO for the treatment of NO-deficient pathologic states. This review is an attempt to acquaint the surgical community with the fundamentals of NO biochemistry and physiology. Increased knowledge of its functions in normal homeostasis and pathologic states will enable physicians to better understand these disease processes and utilize new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:7717775

  17. Nitric Oxide Release Part II. Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis W.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A wide range of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing materials have emerged as potential therapeutics that exploit NO’s vast biological roles. Macromolecular NO-releasing scaffolds are particularly promising due to their ability to store and deliver larger NO payloads in a more controlled and effective manner compared to low molecular weight NO donors. While a variety of scaffolds (e.g., particles, dendrimers, and polymers/films) have been cleverly designed, the ultimate clinical utility of most NO-releasing macromolecules remains unrealized. Although not wholly predictive of clinical success, in vitro and in vivo investigations have enabled a preliminary evaluation of the therapeutic potential of such materials. Herein, we review the application of macromolecular NO therapies for cardiovascular disease, cancer, bacterial infections, and wound healing. PMID:22362384

  18. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José-Luís

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology) and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources). Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed. PMID:20169170

  19. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  20. Nitric oxide flow tagging in unseeded air.

    PubMed

    Dam, N; Klein-Douwel, R J; Sijtsema, N M; Meulen, J J

    2001-01-01

    A scheme for molecular tagging velocimetry is presented that can be used in air flows without any kind of seeding. The method is based on the local and instantaneous creation of nitric oxide (NO) molecules from N(2) and O(2) in the waist region of a focused ArF excimer laser beam. This NO distribution is advected by the flow and can be visualized any time later by laser-induced fluorescence in the gamma bands. The creation of NO is confirmed by use of an excitation spectrum. Two examples of the application of the new scheme for air-flow velocimetry are given in which single laser pulses are used for creation and visualization of NO. PMID:18033499

  1. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  2. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment. PMID:25114633

  3. Nitric oxide, stomatal closure, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven; Barros, Raimundo; Bright, Jo; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John; Harrison, Judith; Morris, Peter; Ribeiro, Dimas; Wilson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Various data indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous signal in plants that mediates responses to several stimuli. Experimental evidence in support of such signalling roles for NO has been obtained via the application of NO, usually in the form of NO donors, via the measurement of endogenous NO, and through the manipulation of endogenous NO content by chemical and genetic means. Stomatal closure, initiated by abscisic acid (ABA), is effected through a complex symphony of intracellular signalling in which NO appears to be one component. Exogenous NO induces stomatal closure, ABA triggers NO generation, removal of NO by scavengers inhibits stomatal closure in response to ABA, and ABA-induced stomatal closure is reduced in mutants that are impaired in NO generation. The data indicate that ABA-induced guard cell NO generation requires both nitric oxide synthase-like activity and, in Arabidopsis, the NIA1 isoform of nitrate reductase (NR). NO stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cGMP production. Both these NO-stimulated events are required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. ABA also stimulates the generation of H2O2 in guard cells, and pharmacological and genetic data demonstrate that NO accumulation in these cells is dependent on such production. Recent data have extended this model to maize mesophyll cells where the induction of antioxidant defences by water stress and ABA required the generation of H2O2 and NO and the activation of a MAPK. Published data suggest that drought and salinity induce NO generation which activates cellular processes that afford some protection against the oxidative stress associated with these conditions. Exogenous NO can also protect cells against oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest an emerging model of stress responses in which ABA has several ameliorative functions. These include the rapid induction of stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss and the activation of antioxidant defences

  4. Role of nitric oxide in inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Gao, Hui-Ming; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Jeohn, Gwang-Ho; Cooper, Cynthia L; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2002-05-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that inflammation in the brain is closely associated with the pathogenesis of several degenerative neurologic disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and AIDS dementia. The hallmark of brain inflammation is the activation of glial cells, especially that of microglia that produce a variety of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors, including cytokines, fatty acid metabolites, free radicals--such as nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide. Excessive production of NO, as a consequence of nitric oxide synthase induction in activated glia, has been attributed to participate in neurodegeneration. Using primary mixed neuron-glia cultures and glia-enriched cultures prepared from embryonic rodent brain tissues, we have systemically studied the relationship between the production of NO and neurodegeneration in response to stimulation by the inflammagen lipopolysaccharide. This review summarizes our recent findings on the kinetics of NO generation, the relative contribution of microglia and astrocytes to NO accumulation, the relationship between NO production and neurodegeneration, and points of intervention along the pathways associated with NO generation to achieve neuroprotection. We also describe our results relating to the effect of several opioid-related agents on microglial activation and neuroprotection. Among these agents, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, especially its non-opioid enantiomer (+)-naloxone, promises to be of potential therapeutic value for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:12076984

  5. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  6. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation. PMID:25510468

  7. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  8. Changes in the Antioxidant Systems as Part of the Signaling Pathway Responsible for the Programmed Cell Death Activated by Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species in Tobacco Bright-Yellow 2 Cells1

    PubMed Central

    de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Tommasi, Franca; De Gara, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been postulated to be required, together with reactive oxygen species (ROS), for the activation of the hypersensitive reaction, a defense response induced in the noncompatible plant-pathogen interaction. However, its involvement in activating programmed cell death (PCD) in plant cells has been questioned. In this paper, the involvement of the cellular antioxidant metabolism in the signal transduction triggered by these bioactive molecules has been investigated. NO and ROS levels were singularly or simultaneously increased in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 2) cells by the addition to the culture medium of NO and/or ROS generators. The individual increase in NO or ROS had different effects on the studied parameters than the simultaneous increase in the two reactive species. NO generation did not cause an increase in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity or induction of cellular death. It only induced minor changes in ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) metabolisms. An increase in ROS induced oxidative stress in the cells, causing an oxidation of the ASC and GSH redox pairs; however, it had no effect on PAL activity and did not induce cell death when it was generated at low concentrations. In contrast, the simultaneous increase of NO and ROS activated a process of death with the typical cytological and biochemical features of hypersensitive PCD and a remarkable rise in PAL activity. Under the simultaneous generation of NO and ROS, the cellular antioxidant capabilities were also suppressed. The involvement of ASC and GSH as part of the transduction pathway leading to PCD is discussed. PMID:12376637

  9. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed nitric oxide formation from hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinming; Sommers, Erin M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2002-04-01

    Hydroxyurea represents an approved treatment for sickle cell anemia and a number of cancers. Chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies show horseradish peroxidase catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Gas chromatographic headspace analysis and infrared spectroscopy also reveal the production of nitrous oxide in this reaction, which provides evidence for nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These reactions also generate carbon dioxide, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. None of these products form within 1 h in the absence of hydrogen peroxide or horseradish peroxidase. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and trapping studies show the intermediacy of a nitroxide radical and a C-nitroso species during this reaction. Absorption spectroscopy indicates that both compounds I and II of horseradish peroxidase act as one-electron oxidants of hydroxyurea. Nitroxyl, generated from Angeli's salt, reacts with ferric horseradish peroxidase to produce a ferrous horseradish peroxidase-nitric oxide complex. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments with a nitric oxide specific trap reveal that horseradish peroxidase is capable of oxidizing nitroxyl to nitric oxide. A mechanistic model that includes the observed nitroxide radical and C-nitroso compound intermediates has been forwarded to explain the observed product distribution. These studies suggest that direct nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea and peroxidases may contribute to the overall pharmacological properties of this drug. PMID:11916434

  10. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  11. Arginase II reduces arginine availability and nitric oxide production during endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginase is the main pathway for arginine (Arg) disposal and it has been reported that it regulates intracellular Arg availability for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis during endotoxemia. To test the hypothesis that arginase II not only regulates intracellular, but also whole body Arg availability, a mul...

  12. Behavioral impairments and changes of nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the brains of molarless KM mice.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qian; Hu, Xingxue; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Jianjun; Jiang, Qingsong

    2015-02-01

    More studies showed that as a common disorder in senior population, loss of teeth could adversely affect human cognitive function, and nitric oxide (NO) might play an important role in the cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism has not yet been well-established. The objectives of this study are to evaluate behavior changes of KM mice after loss of molars, and levels of NO and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the brain in molarless condition. It is hypothesized that loss of molars of the mice tested results in the cognitive impairments and that the process is mediated by NO in the brain through the signaling pathways. Morris water maze is used to test the behavioral changes after 8 weeks of the surgery. The changes of NO and iNOS are evaluated by using Griess assay, western blot, and immunohistochemistry method. The results show that 8 weeks after loss of molars, the spatial learning and memory of KM mice impair and the levels of NO and iNOS in mice hippocampus increase. These findings suggest that molar extraction is associated with the behavioral impairment, and that the changes of NO and iNOS in the hippocampus may be involved in the behavioral changes in the molarless condition. PMID:25447296

  13. Interaction of caveolin-1, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthases in hypoxic human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiangang; Lee, Waisin; Li, Yue; Lau, Chi Fai; Ng, Kwong Man; Fung, Man Lung; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-10-01

    Neuroblastoma cells are capable of hypoxic adaptation, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 (cav-1), a plasma membrane signal molecule, might play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury by modulating nitric oxide (NO) production. We investigated the alterations of cav-1, cav-2, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and NO levels in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia with 2% [O2]. The major discoveries include: (i) cav-1 but not cav-2 was up-regulated in the cells exposed to 15 h of hypoxia; (ii) NO donor 1-[N, N-di-(2-aminoethyl) amino] diazen-1-ium-1, 2-diolate up-regulated the expression of cav-1, whereas the non-selective NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W each abolished the increase in cav-1 expression in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that iNOS-induced NO production contributes to the up-regulation of cav-1 in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, we studied the roles played by cav-1 in regulating NO, NOS, and apoptotic cell death in the SK-N-MC cells subjected to 15 h of hypoxic treatment. Both cav-1 transfection and cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide abolished the induction of iNOS, reduced the production of NO, and reduced the rates of apoptotic cell death in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that increased expression of cav-1 in response to hypoxic stimulation could prevent oxidative injury induced by reactive oxygen species. The interactions of cav-1, NO, and NOS could be an important signal pathway in protecting the neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury, contributing to the hypoxic tolerance of neuroblastoma cells. PMID:18717816

  14. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation by low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa; Tanigawa; Tanigawa; Imai; Hongo; Kondo

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the intracellular signal transduction pathways for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induction. The electromagnetic field (EMF) is believed to increase the free radical lifespan [S. Roy, Y. Noda, V. Eckert, M.G. Traber, A. Mori, R. Liburdy, L. Packer, The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced oxidative burst in rat peritoneal neutrophils is increased by a 0.1 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field, FEBS Lett. 376 (1995) 164-6; F.S. Prato, M. Kavaliers, J.J. Carson, Behavioural evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents, Bioelectromagnetics 17 (1996) 123-30; A.L. Hulbert, J. Metcalfe, R. Hesketh, Biological response to electromagnetic fields, FASEB 12 (1998) 395-420]. We tested the effects of EMF on endotoxin induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo. Male BALB/C mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneously (i.p.), followed by the exposure to EMF (0.1 mT, 60 Hz). Five hours and 30 min after the LPS administration, mice were administered with a NO spin trap, ferrous N-methyl-D-glucaminedithiocarbamate (MGD-Fe). Thirty minutes later, mice were sacrificed, and their livers were removed. The results were compared to three control groups: group A (LPS (-) EMF(-)); group B (LPS(-) EMF(+)); group C (LPS(+) EMF(-)). The ESR spectra of obtained livers were examined at room temperature. Three-line spectra of NO adducts were observed in the livers of all groups. In groups A and B very weak signals were observed, but in groups C and D strong spectra were observed. The signal intensity of the NO adducts in Group D was also significantly stronger than that in Group C. EMF itself did not induce NO generation, however, it enhanced LPS induced NO generation in vivo. PMID:10927193

  15. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven J; Desikan, Radhika; Clarke, Andrew; Hurst, Roger D; Hancock, John T

    2002-05-01

    It is now clear that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) function as signalling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses results in H(2)O(2) generation, from a variety of sources. H(2)O(2) is removed from cells via a number of antioxidant mechanisms, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Both biotic and abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but the biosynthetic origins of NO in plants have not yet been resolved. Cellular responses to H(2)O(2) and NO are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several stimuli. In this review the potential roles of H(2)O(2) and NO during various stresses and the signalling pathways they activate are discussed. Key signalling components that might provide targets for enhancing crop production are also identified. PMID:11997372

  17. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:26633380

  18. Natural Product Nitric Oxide Chemistry: New Activity of Old Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Torregrossa, Ashley C.; Parthasarathy, Deepa K.; Bryan, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a therapy and preventative care measure for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) may prove to be beneficial when used in conjunction with or in place of conventional medicine. However, the lack of understanding of a mechanism of action of many CAMs limits their use and acceptance in western medicine. We have recently recognized and characterized specific nitric oxide (NO) activity of select alternative and herbal medicines that may account for many of their reported health benefits. The ability of certain CAM to restore NO homeostasis both through enhancing endothelial production of NO and by providing a system for reducing nitrate and nitrite to NO as a compensatory pathway for repleting NO bioavailability may prove to be a safe and cost-effective strategy for combating CVD. We will review the current state of science behind NO activity of herbal medicines and their effects on CVD. PMID:22548122

  19. Nitric oxide evoked p53-accumulation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brüne, Bernhard; Schneiderhan, Nicole

    2003-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 accumulates under conditions of cellular stress and affects cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. This has been exemplified for endogenously produced or exogenously supplied nitric oxide (NO) and thus accounts at least in part for cell destructive signaling qualities of this bioactive molecule and/or derived reactive nitrogen species. However, detailed mechanisms of toxicity and pathways of cell demise remain to be elucidated. Establishing that NO-treatment left the ubiquitination and the p53-Mdm2 interaction intact may point to an impaired nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling to account for p53 stabilization. This was verified by heterokaryon analysis. We conclude that attenuated nuclear export contributes to stabilization and activation of p53 under the influence of NO. PMID:12628747

  20. A multifaceted molecule, nitric oxide in oral and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Uğar-Cankal, Dilek; Ozmeric, Nurdan

    2006-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule with multiple effects on different tissues. NO takes important roles in vasodilatation, bacterial challenge and cytokine stimulation, regulation of mineralized tissue function, neurotransmission, and platelet aggregation, etc. However, under pathological conditions, NO has damaging effects. NO is synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) and inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) is closely related to the pathophysiological characteristics of inflammatory diseases such as periodontal diseases. The expression of iNOS has been investigated in salivary gland-related diseases, temporomandibular joint disorders and oral cancer as well. The beneficial and damaging effects of NO in diseases related with periodontal, dental and maxillofacial area are discussed in this review. The biological pathways involved with NO and NO inhibitors may be good drug targets to have a role in the future management of patients with diseases in orofacial region. PMID:16387291

  1. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  6. Calculated Effects of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karen E.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. The study was conducted for standard facility conditions corresponding to Mach 6, 7, and 8 flight simulations. The analytically determined levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility are compared with experimentally measured levels. Results of the analysis indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, which corroborates the measured levels. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate how nitric oxide affects scramjet performance in terms of combustor pressure rise, heat release, and thrust performance. Results indicate minimal effects on engine performance for the test conditions of this investigation.

  7. Treatment of severe status asthmaticus with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rishani, R; El-Khatib, M; Mroueh, S

    1999-12-01

    The paper reports on a 13-year-old girl with chronic asthma who presented in acute respiratory failure following an exacerbation of her disease. Nitric oxide was added to the ventilator circuit at 7 ppm and then 15 ppm after the patient failed to respond to bronchodilators and steroids. This was followed by rapid improvement in respiratory mechanics and blood gases with no adverse effects. Nitric oxide appears to have a direct relaxing effect on the bronchial smooth muscle. PMID:10587422

  8. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  9. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  10. [Inhaled nitric oxide: one modality in the treatment of ARDS].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, R; Ramírez-Hernández, J M; Gargallo-Hernández, J J; Hernández-Vásquez, R; Domínguez-Rodríguez, M I; Alemán-Alarcón, C E; Gallegos-Rodríguez, G

    1999-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), refractory to treatment with conventional mechanical ventilation. The hemodynamic parameters showed severe pulmonary hypertension with increased intrapulmonary shunt. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered and we observed a diminishing in pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunt with an important increase of oxygen exchange. We reviewed the literature and make a suggestion concerning use of inhaled nitric oxide in patients with ARDS. PMID:10491897

  11. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  12. Tapentadol and nitric oxide synthase systems.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Gąsińska, Emilia; Nagraba, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    Tapentadol, a new analgesic drug with a dual mechanism of action (μ-opioid receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition), is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. In this paper, the possible additional involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in the antinociceptive activity of tapentadol was investigated using an unspecific inhibitor of NOS, L-NOArg, a relatively specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, 7-NI, a relatively selective inhibitor of inducible NOS, L-NIL, and a potent inhibitor of endothelial NOS, L-NIO. Tapentadol (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) increased the threshold for mechanical (Randall-Selitto test) and thermal (tail-flick test) nociceptive stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. All four NOS inhibitors, administered intraperitoneally in the dose range 0.1-10 mg/kg, potentiated the analgesic action of tapentadol at a low dose of 2 mg/kg in both models of pain. We conclude that NOS systems participate in tapentadol analgesia. PMID:25485639

  13. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  14. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  15. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  16. Modulation of nitric oxide bioavailability by erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Tse; Han, Tae H.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Vaughn, Mark W.; van Herle, Helga; Hein, Travis W.; Zhang, Cuihua; Kuo, Lih; Liao, James C.

    2001-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylyl cyclase in smooth muscle cells to induce vasodilation in the vasculature. However, as hemoglobin (Hb) is an effective scavenger of NO and is present in high concentrations inside the red blood cell (RBC), the bioavailability of NO would be too low to elicit soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in the presence of blood. Therefore, NO bioactivity must be preserved. Here we present evidence suggesting that the RBC participates in the preservation of NO bioactivity by reducing NO influx. The NO uptake by RBCs was increased and decreased by altering the degree of band 3 binding to the cytoskeleton. Methemoglobin and denatured hemoglobin binding to the RBC membrane or cytoskeleton also were shown to contribute to reducing the NO uptake rate of the RBC. These alterations in NO uptake by the RBC, hence the NO bioavailability, were determined to correlate with the vasodilation of isolated blood vessels. Our observations suggest that RBC membrane and cytoskeleton associated NO-inert proteins provide a barrier for NO diffusion and thus account for the reduction in the NO uptake rate of RBCs.

  17. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  18. Nitric oxide and cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), is a ubiquitous, water soluble, free radical gas, which plays key role in various physiological as well as pathological processes. Over past decades, NO has emerged as a molecule of interest in carcinogenesis and tumor growth progression. However, there is considerable controversy and confusion in understanding its role in cancer biology. It is said to have both tumoricidal as well as tumor promoting effects which depend on its timing, location, and concentration. NO has been suggested to modulate different cancer-related events including angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell cycle, invasion, and metastasis. On the other hand, it is also emerging as a potential anti-oncogenic agent. Strategies for manipulating in vivo production and exogenous delivery of this molecule for therapeutic gain are being investigated. However, further validation and experimental/clinical trials are required for development of novel strategies based on NO for cancer treatment and prevention. This review discusses the range of actions of NO in cancer by performing an online MEDLINE search using relevant search terms and a review of the literature. Various mechanisms by which NO acts in different cancers such as breast, cervical, gastric,colorectal, and head and neck cancers are addressed. It also offers an insight into the dichotomous nature of NO and discusses its novel therapeutic applications for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23718886

  19. [Inhalation of nitric oxide - dependence: case report

    PubMed

    Carvalho, W B; Matsumoto, T; Horita, S M; Almeida, N M; Martins, F R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Describe the hemodynamic response with rebound of pulmonary hypertension after withdrawal of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in a pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: Case report of a child with ARDS and pulmonary hypertension evaluated through ecocardiografic with dopller, receiving inhaled NO for a period of 21 days. RESULTS: There was a decrease of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) from 52 mmHg to 44 mmHg after the initial titulation of NO inhalation dose. After the withdrawal of inhaled NO an elevation of PAP was observed (55 mmHg). It was necessary to reinstall the inhaled NO to obtain a more appropriate value (34 mmHg). A new attempt of interruption of the inhaled NO after prolonged inhalation (20 days) resulted in a new clinic worsening and increase of PAP, with the indication to reinstall the inhaled NO. In the 24th day of permanence in the intensive care unit the patient died due to multiple organ dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility of pulmonary hypertension rebound after withdrawal of inhaled NO is a complication that may have important clinical implications for patients who need a prolonged treatment with NO. This case report emphasizes these implications. PMID:14647690

  20. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  1. Nitric oxide synthase in ferret brain: localization and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T.; Mitchell, J. A.; Schmidt, H. H.; Kohlhaas, K. L.; Warner, T. D.; Förstermann, U.; Murad, F.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we have investigated the distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the ferret brain. Nitric oxide synthase was determined biochemically and immunochemically. 2. In the rat brain, the highest nitric oxide synthase activity has been detected in the cerebellum. However, in the ferret brain, the highest activity was found in the striatum and the lowest in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The enzymatic activity was localized predominantly in the cytosolic fractions, it was dependent on NADPH and Ca2+, and inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine or NG-methyl-L-arginine. 3. Western blot analysis revealed that all regions of the ferret brain contained a 160 kD protein crossreacting with an antibody to nitric oxide synthase purified from the rat cerebellum, and the levels of relative intensity of staining by the antibody correlated with the distribution of nitric oxide synthase activity. 4. These results indicate that the ferret brain contains a nitric oxide synthase similar to the rat brain, but the distribution of enzymatic activity in the ferret brain differs markedly from the rat brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1282076

  2. BIOCHEMISTRY OF MOBILE ZINC AND NITRIC OXIDE REVEALED BY FLUORESCENT SENSORS

    PubMed Central

    Pluth, Michael D.; Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation of these two species has emerged in several areas of human physiology, providing additional incentive for developing adequate detection systems for Zn(II) ions and NO in biological specimens. Fluorescent probes for both of these bioinorganic analytes provide excellent tools for their detection, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We review the most widely used fluorescent sensors for biological zinc and nitric oxide, together with promising new developments and unmet needs of contemporary Zn(II) and NO biological imaging. The interplay between zinc and nitric oxide in the nervous, cardiovascular, and immune systems is highlighted to illustrate the contributions of selective fluorescent probes to the study of these two important bioinorganic analytes. PMID:21675918

  3. Effect of the nitric oxide donor, glyceryl trinitrate, on human gall bladder motility

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, R; Miller, J; O'Donnell, L; McLean, A; Farthing, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Nitric oxide is a major neurotransmitter in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) pathways. NANC inhibitory innervation has been shown in human gall bladder muscle in vitro; the role of nitric oxide in human gall bladder emptying however is undefined.
Aims—To study the effect of glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor, on gall bladder emptying in healthy subjects using a randomised, double blind, crossover, placebo controlled design.
Methods—Ultrasonographic gall bladder volume was measured in the fasting state in eight healthy volunteers after randomised administration of either glyceryl trinitrate 1200 µg buccal spray or placebo spray. On two further occasions, after randomised administration of either glyceryl trinitrate 1200 µg buccal spray or placebo spray, gall bladder volumes were also measured after a liquid test meal. 
Results—Glyceryl trinitrate significantly increased fasting gall bladder volume to a mean of 114% (SEM 5%) of pretreatment volume (p=0.039). Glyceryl trinitrate also significantly impaired gall bladder emptying between five and 40 minutes postprandially. Gall bladder ejection fraction was also reduced after glyceryl trinitrate compared with placebo (43 (6.9)% versus 68.4 (6.5)%, p=0.016).
Conclusions—This study shows that glyceryl trinitrate produces gall bladder dilatation in the fasting state and reduces postprandial gall bladder emptying, suggesting that nitric oxide mechanisms may be operative in the human gall bladder in vivo. 

 Keywords: gall bladder motility; nitric oxide; glyceryl trinitrate PMID:9577350

  4. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by a persistent elevation of pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). The current treatment for pulmonary hypertension is limited and only provides symptomatic relief due to unknown etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. Both vasoconstriction and structural remodeling (enhanced proliferation of VSMC) of the pulmonary arteries contribute to the progressive course of PAH, irrespective of different underlying causes. The exact molecular mechanism of PAH, however, is not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to provide recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of PAH. Specifically, this review focuses on nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress and inflammation and how these factors contribute to the development and progression of PAH. This review also discusses recent and potential therapeutic advancements for the treatment of PAH. PMID:20051913

  5. Observations of Lower Thermospheric Nitric Oxide from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    The production of nitric oxide is a key response of the upper atmosphere to solar energy deposition. NO plays a strong role in the thermospheric energy balance as it emits efficiently in the infrared, it is the terminal ion in the lower ionosphere, and if transported to lower altitudes will catalytically destroy ozone. NO is primarily produced through the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen with molecular oxygen. One of the primary loss mechanisms of NO is photodissociation by solar ultraviolet irradiance. In order to produce the excited atomic nitrogen atom, the strong N2 molecular bond must be broken. At low latitudes, solar soft X-ray irradiance is the energy source that leads to NO. At high latitudes, auroral electrons and the energetic secondary electrons provide the source of energy that leads to the large amounts of NO observed there. Coupling between latitude regions may occur as high latitude NO is transported by winds to lower latitude. In this talk we describe observations of NO from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE). SNOE observed fluorescently scattered sunlight by NO at 215 and 237 nm to obtain global concentrations of NO in the lower thermosphere daily from February 1998 through December 2003. We will present case studies of the observed response to large auroral storms. In particular, the effects of the large storms of April 2002 and November 2003 will be presented. The SNOE observations show that auroral energy deposition produces a significant global effect on the upper atmosphere.

  6. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  7. Role of nitric oxide in parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide is produced by a number of different cell types in response to cytokine stimulation and thus has been found to play a role in immunologically mediated protection against a growing list of protozoan and helminth parasites in vitro and in animal models. The biochemical basis of its effects on the parasite targets appears to involve primarily inactivation of enzymes crucial to energy metabolism and growth, although it has other biologic activities as well. NO is produced not only by macrophages and macrophage-like cells commonly associated with the effector arm of cell-mediated immune reactivity but also by cells commonly considered to lie outside the immunologic network, such as hepatocytes and endothelial cells, which are intimately involved in the life cycle of a number of parasites. NO production is stimulated by gamma interferon in combination with tumor necrosis factor alpha or other secondary activation signals and is regulated by a number of cytokines (especially interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and transforming growth factor beta) and other mediators, as well as through its own inherent inhibitory activity. The potential for design of prevention and/or intervention approaches against parasitic infection (e.g., vaccination or combination chemo- and immunotherapy strategies) on the basis of induction of cell-mediated immunity and NO production appears to be great, but the possible pathogenic consequences of overproduction of NO must be taken into account. Moreover, more research on the role and regulation of NO in human parasitic infection is needed before its possible clinical relevance can be determined. PMID:8531884

  8. New nitric oxide donors based on ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C N; da Silva, R S; Bendhack, L M

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors produce NO-related activity when applied to biological systems. Among its diverse functions, NO has been implicated in vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Despite the great importance of NO in biological systems, its pharmacological and physiological studies have been limited due to its high reactivity and short half-life. In this review we will focus on our recent investigations of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes as NO-delivery agents and their effects on vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation. The high affinity of ruthenium for NO is a marked feature of its chemistry. The main signaling pathway responsible for the vascular relaxation induced by NO involves the activation of soluble guanylyl-cyclase, with subsequent accumulation of cGMP and activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. This in turn can activate several proteins such as K+ channels as well as induce vasodilatation by a decrease in cytosolic Ca2+. Oxidative stress and associated oxidative damage are mediators of vascular damage in several cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. The increased production of the superoxide anion (O2-) by the vascular wall has been observed in different animal models of hypertension. Vascular relaxation to the endogenous NO-related response or to NO released from NO deliverers is impaired in vessels from renal hypertensive (2K-1C) rats. A growing amount of evidence supports the possibility that increased NO inactivation by excess O2- may account for the decreased NO bioavailability and vascular dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:19219301

  9. Nitric Oxide Regulation of Mitochondrial Processes: Commonality in Medical Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    The vital status of diverse classes of eukaryotic mitochondria is reflected by the high degree of evolutionary modification functionally linked to ongoing multifaceted organelle development. From this teleological perspective, a logistical enhancement of eukaryotic cellular energy requirements indicates a convergence of metabolic processes within the mitochondrial matrix for optimal synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate and necessitates an evolutionarily driven retrofit of the primordial endosymbiont bacterial plasma membrane into the inner mitochondrial membrane. The biochemical complexity of eukaryotic inner membrane electron transport complexes linked to temporally-defined, state-dependent, fluctuations in mitochondrial oxygen utilization is capable of generating deleterious reactive oxygen species. Within this functional context, an extensive neurochemical literature supports the role of the free radical gas nitric oxide (NO) as a key signaling molecule involved in the regulation of multiple aspects of mitochondrial respiration/oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, the unique chemical properties of NO underlie its rapid metabolism in vivo within a mechanistic spectrum of small oxidative molecules, free and protein-bound thiol adducts, and reversible binding to ferrous heme iron centers. Recent compelling work has identified a medically relevant dual regulation pathway for mitochondrial NO expression mediated by traditionally characterized NO synthases (NOS) and by enzymatic reduction of available cellular nitrite pools by a diverse class of cytosolic and mitochondrial nitrite reductases. Accordingly, our short review presents selected medically-based discussion topics relating to multi-faceted NO regulation of mitochondrial functions in human health and disease states. PMID:26177568

  10. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  11. NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND iNOS mRNA EXPRESSION IN IFN-8-STIMULATED CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TRANSFECTED WITH iNOS siRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA interference technology with siRNA in the HD-11 macrophage cell line, we determined how the knock-down of the iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) gene affected IFN-' induced macrophage production of nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA expression of genes involved in this biological pathway i...

  12. New Monocyclic, Bicyclic, and Tricyclic Ethynylcyanodienones as Activators of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE Pathway and Inhibitors of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zheng, Suqing; Higgins, Maureen; Morra, Rocco P; Mendis, Anne T; Chien, Chih-Wei; Ojima, Iwao; Mierke, Dale F; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Honda, Tadashi

    2015-06-11

    A monocyclic compound 3 (3-ethynyl-3-methyl-6-oxocyclohexa-1,4-dienecarbonitrile) is a highly reactive Michael acceptor leading to reversible adducts with nucleophiles, which displays equal or greater potency than the pentacyclic triterpenoid CDDO in inflammation and carcinogenesis related assays. Recently, reversible covalent drugs, which bind with protein targets but not permanently, have been gaining attention because of their unique features. To explore such reversible covalent drugs, we have synthesized monocyclic, bicyclic, and tricyclic compounds containing 3 as an electrophilic fragment and evaluated them as activators of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway and inhibitors of iNOS. Notably, these compounds maintain the unique features of the chemical reactivity and biological potency of 3. Among them, a monocyclic compound 5 is the most potent in these assays while a tricyclic compound 14 displays a more robust and specific activation profile compared to 5. In conclusion, we demonstrate that 3 is a useful electrophilic fragment for exploring reversible covalent drugs. PMID:25965897

  13. Role of the Esophageal Vagus Neural Pathway in Ionizing Irradiation-induced Seizures in Nitric Oxide Synthase-1 Homologous Recombinant Negative NOS1−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    BERNARD, MARK E.; KIM, HYUN; RWIGEMA, JEAN-CLAUDE; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; KELLEY, ERIC E.; MURDOCH, GEOFFERY H.; DIXON, TRACY; WANG, HONG; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim We sought to define the mechanism of total body irradiation (TBI)-induced seizures in NOS1−/− mice and amelioration by intra-esophageal manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid liposomes (MnSOD-PL). Materials and Methods We evaluated the role of vagus nerve pathways in irradiation-induced seizures using biochemical, physiologic, and histopathologic techniques. Results Heterozygous NOS1+/− mice demonstrated radioresistance similar to wild-type C57BL/6NHsd mice (p=0.9269). Irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation in fetal brain cultures from NOS1−/− or wild-type mice was reduced by MnSOD-PL. Right-sided vagotomy did not alter the TBI radiation response of wild-type or reverse the radiosensitivity of NOS1−/− mice. Excised esophagus from irradiated NOS1−/− mice demonstrated an increased histopathologic inflammatory response compared to C57BL/6NHsd mice. Conclusion NOS1−/− mice represent a model system for dissecting the developmental abnormalities leading to esophageal-mediated TBI-induced seizures. PMID:22021678

  14. Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide by plant-derived products.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Dirsch, Verena M

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is recognised as a central anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic principle in the vasculature. Decreased availability of NO in the vasculature promotes the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, may improve vascular function by enhancing NO bioavailability. In this article we first outline common pathways modulating endothelial NO production or bioavailability to provide a basis for subsequent mechanistic discussions. Then we comprehensively review natural products and plant extracts known to positively influence eNOS activity and/or endothelial function in vitro or in vivo. We will discuss red wine, highlighting polyphenols, oligomeric procyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol as modulators of endothelial NO production. Other dietary products and their active components known to activate eNOS include cocoa (OPC and its monomer (-)-epicatechin), pomegranates (polyphenols), black and green tea (flavanoids, especially epigallocatechin gallate), olive oil (oleic acid and polyphenols), soy (genistein), and quercetin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in plants. In addition, phytomedical preparations made from ginkgo, hawthorn and ginseng, as well as formulations used in traditional Chinese Medicine, have been shown to affect endothelial NO production. Recurring phytochemical patterns among active fractions and purified compounds are discussed. In summary, there is increasing evidence that several single natural products and plant extracts influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19497380

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates microvascular hyperpermeability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Takuya; Pappas, Peter J; Hobson, Robert W; Boric, Mauricio P; Sessa, William C; Durán, Walter N

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of blood flow, but its role in permeability is still challenged. We tested in vivo the hypotheses that: (a) endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is not essential for regulation of baseline permeability; (b) eNOS is essential for hyperpermeability responses in inflammation; and (c) molecular inhibition of eNOS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain (AP-Cav) reduces eNOS-regulated hyperpermeability. We used eNOS-deficient (eNOS−/−) mice and their wild-type control as experimental animals, platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 10−7 m as the test pro-inflammatory agent, and integrated optical intensity (IOI) as an index of microvascular permeability. PAF increased permeability in wild-type cremaster muscle from a baseline of 2.4 ± 2.2 to a peak net value of 84.4 ± 2.7 units, while the corresponding values in cremaster muscle of eNOS−/− mice were 1.0 ± 0.3 and 15.6 ± 7.7 units (P < 0.05). Similarly, PAF increased IOI in the mesentery of wild-type mice but much less in the mesentery of eNOS−/− mice. PAF increased IOI to comparable values in the mesenteries of wild-type mice and those lacking the gene for inducible NOS (iNOS). Administration of AP-Cav blocked the microvascular hyperpermeability responses to 10−7 m PAF. We conclude that: (1) baseline permeability does not depend on eNOS; (2) eNOS and NO are integral elements of the signalling pathway for the hyperpermeability response to PAF; (3) iNOS does not affect either baseline permeability or hyperpermeability responses to PAF; and (4) caveolin-1 inhibits eNOS regulation of microvascular permeability in vivo. Our results establish eNOS as an important regulator of microvascular permeability in inflammation. PMID:16675496

  16. Racial Differences in Nitric Oxide-Dependent Vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Along with the growing heterogeneity of the American population, ethnic/racial disparity is becoming a clear health issue in the United States. The awareness of ethnic/racial disparities has been growing because of considerable data gathered from recent clinical and epidemiological studies. These studies have highlighted the importance of addressing these differences in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases potentially according to race. It is becoming particularly clear that there is a 2- to 3-fold racial difference in certain cardiovascular diseases (eg, preeclampsia) associated with dysfunctional nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation. In this review, the authors summarize the current literature on racial disparities in nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation in relation to cardiovascular health with an emphasis on vascular nitric oxide bioavailability as a balance between production via endothelial nitric oxide synthase and degradation through reactive oxygen species. The major hypotheses postulated on the biological basis of these differences are also highlighted. PMID:18212350

  17. Nitric-oxide synthase is a mechanical signal transducer that modulates talin and vinculin expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, J. G.; Spencer, M. J.; Wehling, M.; Lavergne, E.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli can cause changes in muscle mass and structure which indicate that mechanisms exist for transducing mechanical stimuli into signals that influence gene expression. Myotendinous junctions show adaptations to modified muscle loading which suggest that these are transcriptionally distinct domains in muscle fibers that may experience local regulation of expression of structural proteins that are concentrated at these sites. Vinculin and talin are cytoskeletal proteins that are highly enriched at myotendinous junctions that we hypothesize to be subject to local transcriptional regulation. Our findings show that mechanical stimulation of muscle cells in vivo and in vitro causes an increase in the expression of vinculin and talin that is mediated by nitric oxide. Furthermore, nitric oxide-stimulated increases in vinculin and talin expression occur through a protein kinase G-dependent pathway and therefore differ from other mechanisms through which nitric oxide has been shown previously to modulate transcription. Analysis of vinculin mRNA distribution in mechanically stimulated muscle fibers shows that the mRNA is highly concentrated at myotendinous junctions, which supports the hypothesis that myotendinous junctions are distinct domains in which the expression of cytoskeletal proteins is modulated by mechanical stimuli through a nitric oxide and protein kinase G-dependent pathway.

  18. H(1)-Receptor activation triggers the endogenous nitric oxide signalling system in the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Enri; Stranieri, Graciela; Sterin-Borda, Leonor

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histamine is released from mast cells by immunologic and non-immunologic stimuli during salivary gland inflammation, regulating salivary secretion. The receptor-secretory mechanism has not been studied in detail. AIMS: The studies reported were directed toward elucidating signal transduction/second messenger pathways within the rat submandibular gland associated with 2-thiazolylethylamine (ThEA)-induced H(1)-receptor responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To assess the H(1) receptor subtype expression in the rat submandibular gland, a radioligand binding assay was performed. The study also included inositolphosphates and cyclic GMP accumulation, protein kinase C and nitric oxide synthase activities, and amylase release. RESULTS: The histamine H(1) receptor subtype is expressed on the rat submandibular gland with high-affinity binding sites. The ThEA effect was associated with activation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, translocation of protein kinase C, stimulation of nitric oxide synthase activity and increased production of cyclic GMP. ThEA stimulation of nitric oxide synthase and cyclic GMP was blunted by agents able to interfere with calcium movilization, while a protein kinase C inhibitor was able to stimulate ThEA action. On the other hand, ThEA stimulation evoked amylase release via the H1 receptor but was not followed by the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway activation. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that, apart from the effect of ThEA on amylase release, it also appears to be a vasoactive chemical mediator that triggers vasodilatation, modulating the course of inflammation. PMID:12581497

  19. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  20. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%-18% O₂ at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  1. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the eye.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid

    2008-06-01

    This brief review describes the components and pathways utilized in nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling. Since the discovery of the effects of NO and cGMP on smooth muscle relaxation about 30 years ago, the field has expanded in many directions such that many, but not all, biochemical and biological effects seem to be regulated by these unique signaling molecules. While many of the effects of NO are due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that can be considered the receptor for NO, cGMP, in turn, can activate a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) to phosphorylate an array of proteins. Some of the effects of cGMP can be independent of PKG and are due to effects on ion channels or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Also, some of the effects of NO can be independent of sGC activation. The isoenzymes and macromolecules that participate in these signaling pathways can serve as molecular targets to identify compounds that increase or decrease their activation and thus serve as chemical leads for discovering novel drugs for a variety of diseases. Some examples are given. However, with about 90,000 publications in the field since our first reports in 1977, this brief review can only give the readers a sample of the excitement and opportunities we have found in this cell signaling system. PMID:18443613

  2. Nitrosative stress in Escherichia coli: reduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Vine, Claire E; Cole, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The ability of enteric bacteria to protect themselves against reactive nitrogen species generated by their own metabolism, or as part of the innate immune response, is critical to their survival. One important defence mechanism is their ability to reduce NO (nitric oxide) to harmless products. The highest rates of NO reduction by Escherichia coli K-12 were detected after anaerobic growth in the presence of nitrate. Four proteins have been implicated as catalysts of NO reduction: the cytoplasmic sirohaem-containing nitrite reductase, NirB; the periplasmic cytochrome c nitrite reductase, NrfA; the flavorubredoxin NorV and its associated oxidoreductase, NorW; and the flavohaemoglobin, Hmp. Single mutants defective in any one of these proteins and even the mutant defective in all four proteins reduced NO at the same rate as the parent. Clearly, therefore, there are mechanisms of NO reduction by enteric bacteria that remain to be characterized. Far from being minor pathways, the currently unknown pathways are adequate to sustain almost optimal rates of NO reduction, and hence potentially provide significant protection against nitrosative stress. PMID:21265775

  3. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%–18% O2 at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  4. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Antifungal Activity of Oxidative Stress and Azoles Against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Dong; Yang, Chang-Chun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yan; Sun, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small molecule with a wide range of biological activities in mammalian and bacteria. However, the role of NO in fungi, especially Candida albicans, is not clear. In this study, we confirmed the generation of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and found that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was associated with nitric oxide synthase pathway. Our results further indicated that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was reduced under oxidative stress such as menadione or H2O2 treatment. Meanwhile, exogenous NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), synergized with H2O2 against C. albicans. Interestingly, SNP could inhibit the antifungal effect of azoles against C. albicans in vitro, suggesting that NO might be involved in the resistance of C. albicans to antifungals. Collectively, this study demonstrated the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and indicated that NO may play an important role in the response of C. albicans to oxidative stress and azoles. PMID:27570314

  5. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nianzhen Li

    2002-06-27

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca{sup 2+} elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca{sup 2+} elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca{sup 2+} wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca{sup 2+}, possibly through store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. The NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca{sup 2+} change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca{sup 2+} using fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca{sup 2+} elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca{sup 2+} wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by recording the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-dependent neuronal slow inward current (SIC

  6. Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Marian; Stelmach, Halina; Rusak, Tomasz; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can affect platelet responses through the inhibition of energy production. It was found that NO donors: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine, SNAP, (5-50 microM) and sodium nitroprusside, SNP, (5-100 microM) inhibited collagen- and ADP-induced aggregation of porcine platelets. The corresponding IC50 values for SNAP and SNP varied from 5 to 30 microM and from 9 to 75 microM, respectively. Collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet secretion was inhibited by SNAP (IC50 = 50 microM) and by SNP (IC50 = 100 microM). SNAP (20-100 microM), SNP (10-200 microM) and collagen (20 microg/ml) stimulated glycolysis in intact platelets. The degree of glycolysis stimulation exerted by NO donors was similar to that produced by respiratory chain inhibitors (cyanide and antimycin A) or uncouplers (2,4-dinitrophenol). Neither the NO donors nor the respiratory chain blockers affected glycolysis in platelet homogenate. SNAP (20-100 microM) and SNP (50-200 microM) inhibited oxygen consumption by platelets. The effect of SNP and SNAP on glycolysis and respiration was not reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a selective inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. SNAP (5-100 microM) and SNP (10-300 microM) inhibited the activity of platelet cytochrome oxidase and had no effect on NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and succinate dehydrogenase. Blocking of the mitochondrial energy production by antimycin A slightly affected collagen-evoked aggregation and strongly inhibited platelet secretion. The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:15448739

  7. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  8. Cardiovascular roles of nitric oxide: A review of insights from nitric oxide synthase gene disrupted mice†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Victor W.T.; Huang, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous molecule that plays many key roles in the cardiovascular system. Each of the enzymes that generate NO—neuronal, inducible and endothelial NO synthase—has been genetically disrupted in mice. This review discusses the cardiovascular phenotypes of each of the NO synthase (NOS) gene knockout mice, and the insights gained into the roles of NO in the cardiovascular system. Mice lacking the endothelial isoform are hypertensive, have endothelial dysfunction and show a more severe outcome in response to vascular injury, to stroke and cerebral ischaemia, and to diet-induced atherosclerosis. Mice lacking the neuronal isoform show a less severe outcome in response to stroke and cerebral ischaemia but have increased diet-induced atherosclerosis. Mice lacking the inducible isoform show reduced hypotension to septic shock. Together, NOS gene knockout mice have been useful tools that complement our other approaches to studying the multiple roles of NO in the cardiovascular system. PMID:17658499

  9. Depolarization of mitochondria in neurons promotes activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Dutta, Somhrita; Sure, Venkata N; Grovenburg, Samuel M; Gordon, Angellica O; Peterson, Nicholas R; Rutkai, Ibolya; Busija, David W

    2016-05-01

    The diverse signaling events following mitochondrial depolarization in neurons are not clear. We examined for the first time the effects of mitochondrial depolarization on mitochondrial function, intracellular calcium, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activation, and nitric oxide (NO) production in cultured neurons and perivascular nerves. Cultured rat primary cortical neurons were studied on 7-10 days in vitro, and endothelium-denuded cerebral arteries of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied ex vivo. Diazoxide and BMS-191095 (BMS), activators of mitochondrial KATP channels, depolarized mitochondria in cultured neurons and increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate was unaffected by mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, diazoxide and BMS not only increased the nNOS phosphorylation at positive regulatory serine 1417 but also decreased nNOS phosphorylation at negative regulatory serine 847. Furthermore, diazoxide and BMS increased NO production in cultured neurons measured with both fluorescence microscopy and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which was sensitive to inhibition by the selective nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). Diazoxide also protected cultured neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, which was blocked by NOS inhibition and rescued by NO donors. Finally, BMS induced vasodilation of endothelium denuded, freshly isolated cerebral arteries that was diminished by 7-NI and tetrodotoxin. Thus pharmacological depolarization of mitochondria promotes activation of nNOS leading to generation of NO in cultured neurons and endothelium-denuded arteries. Mitochondrial-induced NO production leads to increased cellular resistance to lethal stress by cultured neurons and to vasodilation of denuded cerebral arteries. PMID:26945078

  10. Nitric oxide production and the expression of two nitric oxide synthases in the avian retina.

    PubMed

    Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Gleason, Evanna

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to exert multiple effects on the function of many retinal neurons and their synapses. Therefore, it is equally important to understand the potential sources of NO within the retina. To explore this, we employ a combination of 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM) based NO detection and immunohistochemistry for the NO synthetic enzymes, neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and eNOS). We find DAF signals in photoreceptors, horizontal cells, amacrine cells, efferent synapses, Müller cells, and cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). nNOS immunoreactivity was consistent with the DAF signal with the exception that horizontal cells and Müller cells were not clearly labeled. eNOS-like immunoreactivity (eNOS-LI) was more widespread with photoreceptors, horizontal cells, occasional bipolar cells, amacrine cells, Müller cells, and cells in the GCL all showing labeling. Double labeling with antibodies raised against calretinin, syntaxin, and glutamine synthetase confirmed that horizontal cells, amacrine cells, and Müller cells (respectively) were expressing eNOS-LI. Although little or no nNOS labeling is observed in horizontal cells or Müller cells, the expression of eNOS-LI is consistent with the ability of these cells to produce NO. Together these results suggest that the capability to produce NO is widespread in the chicken retina. We propose that multiple forms of regulation for nNOS and eNOS play a role in the patterning of NO production in the chicken retina. PMID:23721886

  11. Targeting of nitric oxide synthase to endothelial cell caveolae via palmitoylation: implications for nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cardeña, G; Oh, P; Liu, J; Schnitzer, J E; Sessa, W C

    1996-01-01

    The membrane association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular endothelium. Previously, we have shown that in cultured endothelial cells and in intact blood vessels, eNOS is found primarily in the perinuclear region of the cells and in discrete regions of the plasma membrane, suggesting trafficking of the protein from the Golgi to specialized plasma membrane structures. Here, we show that eNOS is found in Triton X-100-insoluble membranes prepared from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and colocalizes with caveolin, a coat protein of caveolae, in cultured bovine lung microvascular endothelial cells as determined by confocal microscopy. To examine if eNOS is indeed in caveolae, we purified luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes and their caveolae directly from intact, perfused rat lungs. eNOS is found in the luminal plasma membranes and is markedly enriched in the purified caveolae. Because palmitoylation of eNOS does not significantly influence its membrane association, we next examined whether this modification can affect eNOS targeting to caveolae. Wild-type eNOS, but not the palmitoylation mutant form of the enzyme, colocalizes with caveolin on the cell surface in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, demonstrating that palmitoylation of eNOS is necessary for its targeting into caveolae. These data suggest that the subcellular targeting of eNOS to caveolae can restrict NO signaling to specific targets within a limited microenvironment at the cell surface and may influence signal transduction through caveolae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692835

  12. An introduction to nitric oxide sensing and response in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stern, Andrew M; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a radical gas that has been intensively studied for its role as a bacteriostatic agent. NO reacts in complex ways with biological molecules, especially metal centers and other radicals, to generate other bioactive compounds that inhibit enzymes, oxidize macromolecules, and arrest bacterial growth. Bacteria encounter not only NO derived from the host during infection but also NO derived from other bacteria and inorganic sources. The transcriptional responses used by bacteria to respond to NO are diverse but usually involve an iron-containing transcription factor that binds NO and alters its affinity for either DNA or factors involved in transcription, leading to the production of enzymatic tolerance systems. Some of these systems, such as flavohemoglobin and flavorubredoxin, directly remove NO. Some do not but are still important for NO tolerance through other mechanisms. The targets of NO that are protected by these systems include many metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched chain amino acid synthesis. This chapter discusses these topics and others and serves as a general introduction to microbial NO biology. PMID:24581392

  13. [Pathophysiological and therapeutic implications of nitric oxide in hepatology].

    PubMed

    Battista, S; Bar, F; Pollet, C; Mengozzi, G; Molino, G

    2002-12-01

    The L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway has been recognized as a main regulator of several cell functions. Accordingly, there is an increasing number of pathophysiological conditions in which a precise knowledge of NO status could prove helpful in understanding the mechanisms involved in disease development, prevention and treatment. These include several hepatic disorders, such as liver cirrhosis and associated hyperdynamic circulation with portal hypertension, ischaemia-reperfusion injury occurring during liver transplantation, and chronic cholestatic conditions. Overall, NO seems to exert a dual role in the pathobiology of liver diseases: one mostly beneficial, due to its vasoactive effects; and one mostly negative, due to its local toxic effects. Protective actions are primarily mediated via vasodilation, antithrombosis, inhibition of neutrophil adhesion and inhibition of apoptosis. Deleterious effects are dependent upon the formation of highly reactive substances during oxidative stress. In this review aspects related to NO implications in the homeostasis of liver functions as well as in the pathogenesis of some relevant hepatic clinical syndromes will be discussed in view of possible therapeutic options. PMID:16491056

  14. Synthesis, Nitric Oxide Release, and Anti-Leukemic Activity of Glutathione-Activated Nitric Oxide Prodrugs: Structural Analogues of PABA/NO, an Anti-Cancer Lead Compound

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C.; Citro, Michael L.; Goodblatt, Michael M.; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O2-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects. PMID:18060792

  15. Parameters controlling nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Mikus, T.

    1973-01-01

    Nitric oxide forms in the primary zone of gas turbine combustors where the burnt gas composition is close to stoichiometric and gas temperatures are highest. It was found that combustor air inlet conditions, mean primary zone fuel-air ratio, residence time, and the uniformity of the primary zone are the most important variables affecting nitric oxide emissions. Relatively simple models of the flow in a gas turbine combustor, coupled with a rate equation for nitric oxide formation via the Zeldovich mechanism are shown to correlate the variation in measured NOx emissions. Data from a number of different combustor concepts are analyzed and shown to be in reasonable agreement with predictions. The NOx formation model is used to assess the extent to which an advanced combustor concept, the NASA swirl can, has produced a lean well-mixed primary zone generally believed to be the best low NOx emissions burner type.

  16. Nitric Oxide Catalysis of Diazene E/Z Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Bohle, D Scott; Rosadiuk, Kristopher A

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide is an efficient catalyst for the cis-trans (E/Z) isomerization of diazenes. We compare the effect of room temperature solutions bearing low concentrations of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, or oxygen on the rate of cis-trans isomerization, CTI, of the alkene bond in stilbene and on the azo double bond in azobenzene, as well as in four azo derivatives as measured by UV-vis spectroscopy. These rate enhancements can be as large as 3 orders of magnitude for azobenzene in solution. A mechanism is proposed where catalysis is promoted by the interaction of the nitric oxide with the diazene nitrogen lone pairs. Density functional theory, B3LYP/6-311++g** suggests that the binding of NO to the diazene should be weak and reversible but that its NO adduct has an E/Z isomerization barrier of 7.5 kcal/mol. PMID:26200101

  17. [Level of nitric oxide in the kidneys during apoptosis activation].

    PubMed

    Komarievtseva, I O; Orlova, O A; Blahodarenko, Ie A

    2002-01-01

    The content of nitric oxide stable metabolites in a tissue of kidneys of rats in conditions of activation of apoptosis was investigated. Research was carried out in two models: acute renal failure and a hypertrophy of a unique kidney after a unilateral nephrectomy. Detection of apoptosis was carried out by definition of DNA fragmentation. Substantial increase of the nitric oxide stable metabolites contents is revealed at activation of apoptosis in both models. Change of a ratio of the contents of nitrite--anions in relation to the general contents of NO2- + NO3- is revealed, indicating the role of peroxide processes in effect of nitric oxide and its metabolites on the cell. PMID:14964872

  18. [Study on the altered nitric oxide metabolism in experimental diabetes].

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamási; Soltész, Zsuzsa; Magyar, Kálmán; Szöko, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Decreased biological action of nitric oxide (NO) and increased oxidative stress are established to be involved in the development of endothelium dysfunction, early sign of diabetic angiopathy. In the present study, increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzyme activity in the aorta and decreased activity in the kidney tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats has been found in the early phase of the disease. Augmentation of oxidative transformation of NO in the kidney and heart of the diabetic animals has been demonstrated by the measurement of the stable end-products of NO and other reactive nitrogen species. Insulin treatment was found effective to reduce the intensified oxidative metabolism of NO without increasing its production. Reduced biological effects of NO observed in endothelial dysfunction, is thus probably the consequence of its increased oxidative inactivation. PMID:17094672

  19. Nitric oxide synthase in macula densa regulates glomerular capillary pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C S; Welch, W J; Murad, F; Gross, S S; Taylor, G; Levi, R; Schmidt, H H

    1992-01-01

    Tubular-fluid reabsorption by specialized cells of the nephron at the junction of the ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule, termed the macula densa, releases compounds causing vasoconstriction of the adjacent afferent arteriole. Activation of this tubuloglomerular feedback response reduces glomerular capillary pressure of the nephron and, hence, the glomerular filtration rate. The tubuloglomerular feedback response functions in a negative-feedback mode to relate glomerular capillary pressure to tubular-fluid delivery and reabsorption. This system has been implicated in renal autoregulation, renin release, and longterm body fluid and blood-pressure homeostasis. Here we report that arginine-derived nitric oxide, generated in the macula densa, is an additional intercellular signaling molecule that is released during tubular-fluid reabsorption and counters the vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole. Antibody to rat cerebellar constitutive nitric oxide synthase stained rat macula densa cells specifically. Microperfusion of the macula densa segment of single nephrons with N omega-methyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) or with pyocyanin (a lipid-soluble inhibitor of endothelium-derived relaxation factor) showed that generation of nitric oxide can vasodilate the afferent arteriole and increase glomerular capillary pressure; this effect was blocked by drugs that prevent tubular-fluid reabsorption. We conclude that nitric oxide synthase in macula densa cells is activated by tubular-fluid reabsorption and mediates a vasodilating component to the tubuloglomerular feedback response. These findings imply a role for arginine-derived nitric oxide in body fluid-volume and blood-pressure homeostasis, in addition to its established roles in modulation of vascular tone by the endothelium and in neurotransmission. Images PMID:1281548

  20. Thyroid disorders and nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Ogonowski, Natalia; Piro, Giselle; Pessah, Déborah; Arreche, Noelia; Puchulu, Bernardita; Balaszczuk, Ana M; Fellet, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether nitric oxide participates in the cardiovascular function and haemodynamic adaptation to acute haemorrhage in animals with thyroid disorders. Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2months old treated with T3 (hyper, 20μg/100g body weight) or 0.02% methimazole (hypo, w/v) during 28days were pre-treated with N(G) nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and submitted to 20% blood loss. Heart function was evaluated by echocardiography. Measurements of arterial blood pressure, heart rate, nitric oxide synthase activity and protein levels were performed. We found that hypo decreased fractional shortening and ejection fraction and increased left ventricle internal diameter. Hyper decreased ventricle diameter and no changes in cardiac contractility. Haemorrhage elicited a hypotension of similar magnitude within 10min. Then, this parameter was stabilized at about 30-40min and maintained until finalized, 120min. L-NAME rats showed that the immediate hypotension would be independent of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition blunted the changes of heart rate induced by blood loss. Hyper and hypo had lower atrial enzyme activity associated with a decreased enzyme isoform in hypo. In ventricle, hyper and hypo had a higher enzyme activity, which was not correlated with changes in protein levels. Haemorrhage induced an increased heart nitric oxide production. We concluded that thyroid disorders were associated with hypertrophic remodelling which impacted differently on cardiac function and its adaptation to a hypovolemia. Hypovolemia triggered a nitric oxide synthase activation modulating the heart function to maintain haemodynamic homeostasis. This involvement depends on a specific enzyme isoform, cardiac chamber and thyroid state. PMID:27270898

  1. Novel antileukemic agents derived from tamibarotene and nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haiyong; Feng, Jinhong; Li, Minyong; Xu, Wenfang

    2011-12-01

    A series of novel nitric oxide-releasing tamibarotene derivatives were synthesized by coupling nitric oxide (NO) donors with tamibarotene via various spacers, and were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against human leukemic HL-60, NB4 and K562 cell lines in vitro. The test results showed that three compounds (7g, 9a and 9e) exhibited more potent antileukemic activity than the control tamibarotene. Furthermore, the preliminary structure-activity analysis revealed that amino acids serving as spacers could bring about significantly improved biological activities of NO donor hybrids. These interesting results could provide new insights into the development of NO-based antileukemic agents. PMID:22014829

  2. Nitroaromatic amino acids as inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Kowaluk, E A; Daanen, J F; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K M; Wagenaar, F L; Kerwin, J F

    1998-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.) is an important biomodulator of many physiological processes. The inhibition of inappropriate production of NO. by the isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of stroke, inflammation, and other processes. In this study, certain 2-nitroaryl-substituted amino acid analogues were discovered to inhibit NOS. Analogues bearing a 5-methyl substituent on the aromatic ring demonstrated maximal inhibitory potency. For two selected inhibitors, investigation of the kinetics of the enzyme showed the inhibition to be competitive with l-arginine. Additionally, functional NOS inhibition in tissue preparations was demonstrated. PMID:9651169

  3. Nitric oxide and biopterin in depression and stress.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, J G; Opperhuizen, A

    1999-01-18

    Depression has been hypothesized to be related to the reduced biosynthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenalin and dopamine. Much past research has also been devoted to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in depression. The present article reviews the evidence linking tetrahydrobiopterin, a co-factor in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide, an apparent neuroendocrine modulator of the HPA axis, to the immune system and to neuronal control within affective disorder and stress. On the basis of this review, it is suggested that future psychoneuroimmunological research should more fully explore the possible role of tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide in depressive disorders. PMID:10195314

  4. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Tinker, A C

    1998-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that excessive nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important pathological role in inflammatory arthritis. Since NO synthesized by constitutive isoforms of NOS has a physiological role, a great deal of activity has been directed at identifying inhibitors of NOS that are selective for the induced isoform. The major chemical areas that have been described so far in the search for such selective iNOS inhibitors and the activity of some of these compounds in animal models of arthritis are reviewed. PMID:18465556

  5. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  6. [Nitric oxide and anti-protozoan chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2004-06-01

    Constitutive nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively expressed types of NO-synthase enzymes (NOS-I and -III), being involved in physiological processes such as nervous transmission and vasodilatation. Inducible NO, synthesized by the NO-synthase isoform NOS-II, is an anti-pathogen and tumoricidal agent. However, inducible NO production requires a tight control because of cytotoxic and immune-modulation activity. NO produced by human and canine macrophages has long been demonstrated to be involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania. Mechanisms of parasite survival and persistence in the host have been throughly investigated, and include suppression of NOS-II and the parasite entry into NOS-II negative cells. Both intracellular and extracellular morphotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi are killed by NO in vitro and in vivo, although a role of NO in the pathogenesis of heart disease has been reported. Killing of extracellular protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis and Naegleria fowleri by activated macrophages is also mediated by NO. The main control of Plasmodium spp infection in human and murine hepatocytes, and in human monocytes is achieved by NO-mediated mechanisms. Protection from severe malaria in African children has been found associated with polymorphisms of the NOS-II promoter; however, a pathogenic role of endogenous NO has been documented in cerebral malaria. Although several macromolecules are putative NO targets, recent experimental work has shown that NO-releasing compounds inhibit cysteine proteases (CP) of P. falciparum, T. cruzi and L. infantum in a dose-dependent manner. CPs are present in a wide range of parasitic protozoa and appear to be relevant in several aspects of the life cycle and of the parasite-host relationships. Comparative analysis of 3-D amino acid sequence models of CPs from a broad range of living organisms, from viruses to mammals, suggests that the Sy atom of the Cys catalytic residue undergoes NO-dependent chemical

  7. Nitrogen oxide cycle regulates nitric oxide levels and bacterial cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Oguchi, Haruka; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kusama, Shinichiro; Sugiura, Ryo; Moriya, Kenta; Hirata, Takuya; Yukioka, Yuriya; Takaya, Naoki; Yajima, Shunsuke; Ito, Shinsaku; Okada, Kiyoshi; Ohsawa, Kanju; Ikeda, Haruo; Takano, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenji; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling controls various metabolic pathways in bacteria and higher eukaryotes. Cellular enzymes synthesize and detoxify NO; however, a mechanism that controls its cellular homeostasis has not been identified. Here, we found a nitrogen oxide cycle involving nitrate reductase (Nar) and the NO dioxygenase flavohemoglobin (Fhb), that facilitate inter-conversion of nitrate, nitrite, and NO in the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. This cycle regulates cellular NO levels, bacterial antibiotic production, and morphological differentiation. NO down-regulates Nar and up-regulates Fhb gene expression via the NO-dependent transcriptional factors DevSR and NsrR, respectively, which are involved in the auto-regulation mechanism of intracellular NO levels. Nitrite generated by the NO cycles induces gene expression in neighboring cells, indicating an additional role of the cycle as a producer of a transmittable inter-cellular communication molecule. PMID:26912114

  8. Nitrogen oxide cycle regulates nitric oxide levels and bacterial cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Oguchi, Haruka; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kusama, Shinichiro; Sugiura, Ryo; Moriya, Kenta; Hirata, Takuya; Yukioka, Yuriya; Takaya, Naoki; Yajima, Shunsuke; Ito, Shinsaku; Okada, Kiyoshi; Ohsawa, Kanju; Ikeda, Haruo; Takano, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenji; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling controls various metabolic pathways in bacteria and higher eukaryotes. Cellular enzymes synthesize and detoxify NO; however, a mechanism that controls its cellular homeostasis has not been identified. Here, we found a nitrogen oxide cycle involving nitrate reductase (Nar) and the NO dioxygenase flavohemoglobin (Fhb), that facilitate inter-conversion of nitrate, nitrite, and NO in the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. This cycle regulates cellular NO levels, bacterial antibiotic production, and morphological differentiation. NO down-regulates Nar and up-regulates Fhb gene expression via the NO-dependent transcriptional factors DevSR and NsrR, respectively, which are involved in the auto-regulation mechanism of intracellular NO levels. Nitrite generated by the NO cycles induces gene expression in neighboring cells, indicating an additional role of the cycle as a producer of a transmittable inter-cellular communication molecule. PMID:26912114

  9. Cadmium attenuates bradykinin-driven nitric oxide production by interplaying with the localization pattern of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Syamantak; Gupta, Ravi; Reddy, Himabindu; Sinha, Swaraj; Muley, Ajit; Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium, a ubiquitous heavy metal, interferes with endothelial functions and angiogenesis. Bradykinin is a Ca-mobilizing soluble peptide that acts via nitric oxide to promote vasodilation and capillary permeability. The objective of the present study was to explore the Cd implications in bradykinin-dependent endothelial functions. An egg yolk angiogenesis model was employed to evaluate the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced angiogenesis. The results demonstrate that 100 nmol/L Cd attenuated bradykinin-dependent angiogenesis. The results of the in vitro wound healing and tube formation assays by using EAhy 926, a transformed endothelial cell line, suggest that Cd blocked bradykinin-mediated endothelial migration and tube formation by 38% and 67%, respectively, while nitric oxide supplementation could reverse the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced endothelial migration by 94%. The detection of nitric oxide by using a DAF-2DA fluorescent probe, Griess assay, and ultrasensitive electrode suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-induced nitric oxide production. Fluorescence imaging of eNOS-GFP transfected endothelial cells, immunofluorescence, and Western blot studies of Cd and bradykinin-treated cells show that Cd interfered with the localization pattern of eNOS, which possibly attenuates nitric oxide production in part. Additionally, Ca imaging of Cd- and bradykinin-treated cells suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-dependent Ca influx into the cells, thus partially blocking Ca-dependent nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. The results of this study conclude that Cd blunted the effect of bradykinin by interfering with the Ca-associated NOS activity specifically by impeding subcellular trafficking of eNOS. PMID:19767824

  10. The energy-conserving nitric-oxide-reductase system in Paracoccus denitrificans. Distinction from the nitrite reductase that catalyses synthesis of nitric oxide and evidence from trapping experiments for nitric oxide as a free intermediate during denitrification.

    PubMed

    Carr, G J; Page, M D; Ferguson, S J

    1989-02-15

    1. A Clark-type electrode that responds to nitric oxide has been used to show that cytoplasmic membrane vesicles of Paracoccus denitrificans have a nitric-oxide reductase activity. Nitrous oxide is the reaction product. NADH, succinate or isoascorbate plus 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylene diamine can act as reductants. The NADH-dependent activity is resistant to freezing of the vesicles and thus the NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity of stored frozen vesicles provides a method for calibrating the electrode by titration of dissolved nitric oxide with NADH. The periplasmic nitrite reductase and nitrous-oxide reductase enzymes are absent from the vesicles which indicates that nitric-oxide reductase is a discrete enzyme associated with the denitrification process. This conclusion was supported by the finding that nitric-oxide reductase activity was absent from both membranes prepared from aerobically grown P. denitrificans and bovine heart submitochondrial particles. 2. The NADH: nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity was inhibited by concentrations of antimycin or myxothiazol that were just sufficient to inhibit the cytochrome bc1 complex of the ubiquinol--cytochrome-c oxidoreductase. The activity was deduced to be proton translocating by the observations of: (a) up to 3.5-fold stimulation upon addition of an uncoupler; and (b) ATP synthesis with a P:2e ratio of 0.75. 3. Nitrite reductase of cytochrome cd1 type was highly purified from P. denitrificans in a new, high-yield, rapid two- or three-step procedure. This enzyme catalysed stoichiometric synthesis of nitric oxide. This observation, taken together with the finding that the maximum rate of NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity catalysed by the vesicles was comparable with that of NADH:nitrate-oxidoreductase, is consistent with a role for nitric-oxide reductase in the physiological conversion of nitrate or nitrite to dinitrogen gas. 4. Intact cells of P. denitrificans also reduced nitric oxide in an

  11. Involvement of Nitric Oxide, Neurotrophins and HPA Axis in Neurobehavioural Alterations Induced by Prenatal Stress.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damian G; Pascuan, Cecilia G; Genaro, Ana M; Zorrilla-Zubilete, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that negative emotions during pregnancy generate adverse effects on the cognitive, behavioural and emotional development of the descendants. The psychoneuroendocrine pathways involve the transplacentary passage of maternal glucocorticoids in order to influence directly on fetal growth and brain development.Nitric oxide is a gaseous neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the control of neural activity by diffusing into neurons and participates in learning and memory processes. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of corticosterone secretion. Thus, it has been found that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an endogenous inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the hippocampus and that nNOS in the hippocampus may participate in the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity via GR.Neurotrophins are a family of secreted growth factors consisting of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3) and NT4. Although initially described in the nervous system, they regulate processes such as cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in several other compartments. It has been demonstrated that the NO-citrulline cycle acts together with BDNF in maintaining the progress of neural differentiation.In the present chapter, we explore the interrelation between nitric oxide, glucocorticoids and neurotrophins in brain areas that are key structures in learning and memory processes. The participation of this interrelation in the behavioural and cognitive alterations induced in the offspring by maternal stress is also addressed. PMID:25287536

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, but not 1, modulates NMDA receptor-mediated activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-03-01

    In cerebellar neurons in culture, activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) prevents glutamate and NMDA-induced neuronal death, indicating that it interferes with the excitotoxic mechanisms leading to death. However, it is not known which step of these mechanisms is affected by mGluRs. The aims of this work were to assess: (a) whether activation of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 or mGluR5) impairs NMDA-induced activation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway; (b) which mGluR (1 or 5) is responsible for this impairment and (c) whether impairment of the pathway occurs at the level of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide or of activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by NMDA. It is shown that activation of mGluR1 enhances the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by increasing activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide. In contrast, mGluR5 activation inhibits the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by reducing NMDA-induced activation of nNOS. This is due to reduced NMDA-induced increase in cAMP, reduced activation of Akt by cAMP and of nNOS by Akt. The impairment of activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5 would contribute to its neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in cerebellar neurons in culture. PMID:20043967

  13. Subcellular targeting and trafficking of nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Oess, Stefanie; Icking, Ann; Fulton, David; Govers, Roland; Müller-Esterl, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Unlike most other endogenous messengers that are deposited in vesicles, processed on demand and/or secreted in a regulated fashion, NO (nitric oxide) is a highly active molecule that readily diffuses through cell membranes and thus cannot be stored inside the producing cell. Rather, its signalling capacity must be controlled at the levels of biosynthesis and local availability. The importance of temporal and spatial control of NO production is highlighted by the finding that differential localization of NO synthases in cardiomyocytes translates into distinct effects of NO in the heart. Thus NO synthases belong to the most tightly controlled enzymes, being regulated at transcriptional and translational levels, through co- and post-translational modifications, by substrate availability and not least via specific sorting to subcellular compartments, where they are in close proximity to their target proteins. Considerable efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the intracellular targeting and trafficking of NO synthases, to ultimately understand the cellular pathways controlling the formation and function of this powerful signalling molecule. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms and triggers for subcellular routing and dynamic redistribution of NO synthases and the ensuing consequences for NO production and action. PMID:16722822

  14. Nitric oxide destabilizes Pias3 and regulates sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Liu, Guang-Hui; Wu, Kaiyuan; Han, Peiwei; Wang, Peng; Li, Jiangmei; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Chang

    2007-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related protein modifiers (SUMO) modification is an important mechanism for posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, it is largely unknown how the sumoylation pathway is regulated. Here, we report that nitric oxide (NO) causes global hyposumoylation in mammalian cells. Both SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (Pias3) were targets for S-nitrosation. S-nitrosation did not interfere with the SUMO conjugating activity of Ubc9, but promoted Pias3 degradation by facilitating its interaction with tripartite motif-containing 32 (Trim32), a ubiquitin E3 ligase. On the one hand, NO promoted Trim32-mediated Pias3 ubiquitination. On the other hand, NO enhanced the stimulatory effect of Pias3 on Trim32 autoubiquitination. The residue Cys459 of Pias3 was identified as a target site for S-nitrosation. Mutation of Cys459 abolished the stimulatory effect of NO on the Pias3-Trim32 interaction, indicating a requirement of S-nitrosation at Cys459 for positive regulation of the Pias3-Trim32 interplay. This study reveals a novel crosstalk between S-nitrosation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, which may be crucial for NO-related physiological and pathological processes. PMID:17987106

  15. Vascular system: role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Doursout, Marie-Françoise; Murad, Ferid

    2008-04-01

    In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) is the first compound of this category. On October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning NO as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. NO-mediated signaling is a recognized component in various physiologic processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of platelet and leukocyte aggregation, attenuation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, neurotransmission, and immune defense), to name only a few. NO has also been implicated in the pathology of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, myocarditis, colitis, and nephritis and a large number of pathologic conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Some of these processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and neurotransmission) require only a brief production of NO at low nanomolar concentrations and are dependent on the recruitment of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling. Other processes are associated with direct interaction of NO or reactive nitrogen species derived from it with target proteins and requires a more sustained production of NO at higher concentrations but do not involve the cGMP pathway. PMID:18401228

  16. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  17. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  18. A motif for reversible nitric oxide interactions in metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyu; Melzer, Marie M; Sen, S Nermin; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Warren, Timothy H

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in numerous biological processes, such as signalling in the respiratory system and vasodilation in the cardiovascular system. Many metal-mediated processes involve direct reaction of NO to form a metal-nitrosyl (M-NO), as occurs at the Fe(2+) centres of soluble guanylate cyclase or cytochrome c oxidase. However, some copper electron-transfer proteins that bear a type 1 Cu site (His2Cu-Cys) reversibly bind NO by an unknown motif. Here, we use model complexes of type 1 Cu sites based on tris(pyrazolyl)borate copper thiolates [Cu(II)]-SR to unravel the factors involved in NO reactivity. Addition of NO provides the fully characterized S-nitrosothiol adduct [Cu(I)](κ(1)-N(O)SR), which reversibly loses NO on purging with an inert gas. Computational analysis outlines a low-barrier pathway for the capture and release of NO. These findings suggest a new motif for reversible binding of NO at bioinorganic metal centres that can interconvert NO and RSNO molecular signals at copper sites. PMID:27325092

  19. Nasal nitric oxide in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Torretta, S; Marchisio, P; Capaccio, P; Pignataro, L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, reduced Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) nNO levels have been reported in children with adenoidal hypertrophy predisposing to chronic nasosinusal inflammation. Given the strict anatomic and physiopathologic link between the nasopharyngeal and middle ear compartments, and considering the high prevalence of otitis prone children among those affected with chronic adenoiditis, we designed a study aimed to test any possible difference in nNO levels between non-allergic children with and without recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) associated with chronic adenoiditis. The study involved 54 children with RAOM (44.4% males; mean age= 7.5±3.5 years) and 51 children without RAOM (47.4% males; mean age= 7.0±3.8 years). nNO levels were significantly reduced in children with RAOM compared to children without RAOM (676.9±250.7 ppb vs 831.8±320.4 ppb, respectively; p= 0.02). Our results could be related to reduced NO production by the ciliated paranasal, nasopharyngeal and middle ear epithelium and the impaired sinusal ostial and Eustachian tube patency due to chronic inflammation, and seem to confirm the involvement of NO pathway in recurrent upper airway infections related to impaired ciliated respiratory mucosa. PMID:27049104

  20. Electron transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CP1 in electrochemical reduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; He, Jiaxin; Li, Han; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-10-01

    This study reports catalytic electro-chemical reduction of nitric oxide (NO) enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CP1. The current generated in the presence of bacteria was 4.36times that in the absence of the bacteria. The strain was able to catalyze electro-chemical reduction of NO via indirect electron transfer with an electrode, revealed by a series of cyclic voltammetry experiments. Soluble electron shuttles secreted into solution by live bacteria were responsible for the catalytic effects. The enhancement of NO reduction was also confirmed by detection of nitrous oxide; the level of this intermediate was 46.4% higher in the presence of bacteria than in controls, illustrated that the electron transfer pathway did not directly reduce nitric oxide to N2. The findings of this study may offer a new model for bioelectrochemical research in the field of NO removal by biocatalysts. PMID:27426634

  1. Endothelial cell nitric oxide production in acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, S I; Klings, E S; Hendra, K P; Upchurch, G R; Rishikof, D C; Loscalzo, J; Farber, H W

    1999-10-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is the most common form of acute pulmonary disease associated with sickle cell disease. To investigate the possibility that alterations in endothelial cell (EC) production and metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) products might be contributory, we measured NO products from cultured pulmonary EC exposed to red blood cells and/or plasma from sickle cell patients during crisis. Exposure to plasma from patients with ACS caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) and a 7- to 14-fold increase in total nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) production by both pulmonary arterial and microvascular EC. Increases occurred within 2 h of exposure to plasma in a concentration-dependent manner and were associated with increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein and eNOS enzymatic activity, but not with changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) III or NOS II transcripts, inducible NOS (iNOS) protein nor iNOS enzymatic activity. RSNO and NO(x) increased whether plasma was obtained from patients with ACS or other forms of vasoocclusive crisis. Furthermore, an oxidative state occurred and oxidative metabolites of NO, particularly peroxynitrite, were produced. These findings suggest that altered NO production and metabolism to damaging oxidative molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of ACS. PMID:10516198

  2. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  3. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  4. Nitric oxide emissions from a central California dairy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were monitored downwind from a central California dairy facility during 2011 and 2012. NO concentrations at the dairy were significantly higher than the background levels during August 2011, but were indistinguishable from upwind concentrations during January, Apr...

  5. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  6. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  7. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  8. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  9. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  10. Absorptivity of nitric oxide in the fundamental vibrational band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. F.; Vasquez, M. C.; Beattie, W. H.; McDowell, R. S.

    1983-05-01

    From observations of the spectral absorbance of mixtures of nitric oxide in nitrogen at room temperature, an integrated absorptivity for the NO fundamental band of 137.3 + or - 4.6 per(sq cm atm) at 0 C is derived. The indicated uncertainty is the estimated maximum error.

  11. Nitric oxide and almitrine: the definitive answer for hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Payen, D M; Muret, J

    1999-02-01

    Hypoxia-induced by acute lung injury results from abnormal ventilation/perfusion ratio distribution towards shunt or low ventilation/perfusion zones. Pharmacological modification of pulmonary blood flow distribution improving ventilation/perfusion ratio should correct hypoxia. The development of inhaled nitric oxide therapy had confirmed this concept, but with a relatively high proportion of 'non responders'. Then development of other drugs used alone or in association with nitric oxide may reinforce the benefit of nitric oxide. This has been tested with almitrine bismesylate, a lipophilic drug that reinforce hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Using inhaled nitric oxide in combination with almitrine, several studies in adult respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury patients have shown spectacular results in term of PaO2 and pulmonary shunt reduction. Moreover, the proportion of responders to this combination seems largely great than those observed for each drug alone. In conclusion, pulmonary blood flow manipulation improving ventilation/perfusion mismatching is one of the major strategies to correct severe hypoxia. PMID:17013295

  12. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  13. NOSTRIN: A protein modulating nitric oxide release and subcellular distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kirstin; Opitz, Nils; Dedio, Jürgen; Renné, Christoph; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2002-01-01

    Activity and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is regulated in a remarkably complex fashion, yet the complex molecular machinery mastering stimulus-induced eNOS translocation and trafficking is poorly understood. In a search by the yeast two-hybrid system using the eNOS oxygenase domain as bait, we have identified a previously uncharacterized eNOS-interacting protein, dubbed NOSTRIN (for eNOS traffic inducer). NOSTRIN contains a single polypeptide chain of 506-aa residues of 58 kDa with an N-terminal cdc15 domain and a C-terminal SH3 domain. NOSTRIN mRNA is abundant in highly vascularized tissues such as placenta, kidney, lung, and heart, and NOSTRIN protein is expressed in vascular endothelial cells. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the eNOS–NOSTRIN interaction in vitro and in vivo, and NOSTRIN's SH3 domain was essential and sufficient for eNOS binding. NOSTRIN colocalized extensively with eNOS at the plasma membrane of confluent human umbilical venous endothelial cells and in punctate cytosolic structures of CHO-eNOS cells. NOSTRIN overexpression induced a profound redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to vesicle-like structures matching the NOSTRIN pattern and at the same time led to a significant inhibition of NO release. We conclude that NOSTRIN contributes to the intricate protein network controlling activity, trafficking, and targeting of eNOS. PMID:12446846

  14. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  15. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  16. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  17. HBOC Vasoactivity: Interplay Between Nitric Oxide Scavenging and Capacity to Generate Bioactive Nitric Oxide Species

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite many advances in blood substitute research, the development of materials that are effective in maintaining blood volume and oxygen delivery remains a priority for emergency care and trauma. Clinical trials on hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have not provided information on the mechanism of toxicity, although all commercial formulations have safety concerns. Specifically, it is important to reconcile the different hypotheses of Hb toxicity, such as nitric oxide (NO) depletion and oxidative reactions, to provide a coherent molecular basis for designing a safe HBOC. Recent Advances: HBOCs with different sizes often exhibit differences in the degree of HBOC-induced vasoactivity. This has been attributed to differences in the degree of NO scavenging and in the extent of Hb extravasation. Additionally, it is appears that Hb can undergo reactions that compensate for NO scavenging by generating bioactive forms of NO. Critical Issues: Engineering modifications to enhance bioactive NO production can result in diminished oxygen delivery by virtue of increased oxygen affinity. This strategy can prevent the HBOC from fulfilling the intended goal on preserving oxygenation; however, the NO production effects will increase perfusion and oxygen transport. Future Directions: Hb modifications influence NO scavenging and the capacity of certain HBOCs to compensate for NO scavenging through nitrite-mediated reactions that generate bioactive NO. Based on the current understanding of these NO-related factors, possible synthetic strategies are presented that address how HBOC formulations can be prepared that: (i) effectively deliver oxygen, (ii) maintain tissue perfusion, and (iii) limit/reverse underlying inflammation within the vasculature. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2284–2297. PMID:23249305

  18. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  19. Nitric oxide as a mediator of oxidant lung injury due to paraquat.

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, H I; Pakbaz, H; Absood, A; Said, S I

    1994-01-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N omega-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury. PMID:7519778

  20. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  1. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  2. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone.

    PubMed

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2' ,7' -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. PMID:27448766

  3. Treatment of sunitinib-induced hypertension in solid tumor by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    León-Mateos, L; Mosquera, J; Antón Aparicio, L

    2015-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) are overexpressed in the majority of renal cell carcinomas. This characteristic has supported the rationale of targeting VEGF-driven tumour vascularization, especially in clear cell RCC. VEGF-inhibiting strategies include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, axitinib, pazopanib, and sorafenib) and neutralizing antibodies such as bevacizumab. Hypertension (HTN) is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. HTN observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of HTN. Although the exact mechanism by tyrosine kinase inhibitors induce HTN has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction) occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition. NO donors could be successfully used not only for the treatment of developed angiogenesis-inhibitor-induced hypertension but also for preventive effects. PMID:26386874

  4. Nitric Oxide Loaded Echogenic Liposomes for Nitric Oxide Delivery and Inhibition of Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shao-Ling; Kee, Patrick H.; Kim, Hyunggun; Moody, Melanie R.; Chrzanowski, Stephen M.; MacDonald, Robert C.; McPherson, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a new bioactive gas delivery method using echogenic liposomes (ELIP) as the gas carrier. Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas with potent therapeutic effects. Bioavailability of NO by systemic delivery is low with potential systemic effects. Methods Liposomes containing phospholipids and cholesterol were prepared using a new freezing under pressure method. The encapsulation and release profile of NO from NO containing-ELIP (NO-ELIP) or a mixture of NO/Argon (NO/Ar-ELIP was studied. Uptake of NO from NO-ELIP by cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) both in the absence and presence of hemoglobin was determined. The effect of NO-ELIP delivery to attenuate intimal hyperplasia in a balloon-injured artery was determined. Results Coencapsulation of NO with argon (Ar) enabled the adjustment the amount of encapsulated NO. A total of 10 µl of gas can be encapsulated into 1 mg liposomes. The release profile of NO from NO-ELIP demonstrated an initial rapid release followed by a slower release over 8 hours. Sixty-eight percent of cells remained viable when incubated with 80 µg/ml of NO/Ar-ELIP for 4 hours. NO delivery to VSMC using NO/Ar-ELIP was 7-fold higher than unencapsulated NO. NO/Ar-ELIP remained effective NO delivery to VSMC even in the presence of hemoglobin. Local NO-ELIP administration to balloon-injured carotid arteries attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and reduced arterial wall thickening by 41±9%. Conclusions Liposomes can protect and deliver a bioactive gas to target tissues with the potential for both visualization of gas delivery and controlled therapeutic gas release. PMID:19660697

  5. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  6. Fine Particulate Matter Constituents, Nitric Oxide Synthase DNA Methylation and Exhaled Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Qiao, Liping; Li, Huichu; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yunhui; Xu, Wenxi; Wang, Cuicui; Wang, Hongli; Zhao, Zhuohui; Xu, Xiaohui; Hu, Hui; Kan, Haidong

    2015-10-01

    It remains unknown how fine particulate matter (PM2.5) constituents affect differently the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, a biomarker of airway inflammation) and the DNA methylation of its encoding gene (NOS2A). We aimed to investigate the short-term effects of PM2.5 constituents on NOS2A methylation and FeNO. We designed a longitudinal study among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with six repeated health measurements in Shanghai, China. We applied linear mixed-effect models to evaluate the associations. We observed that the inverse association between PM2.5 and methylation at position 1 was limited within 24 h, and the positive association between PM2.5 and FeNO was the strongest at lag 1 day. Organic carbon, element carbon, NO3(-) and NH4(+) were robustly and significantly associated with decreased methylation and elevated FeNO. An interquartile range increase in total PM2.5 and the four constituents was associated with decreases of 1.19, 1.63, 1.62, 1.17, and 1.14 in percent methylation of NOS2A, respectively, and increases of 13.30%,16.93%, 8.97%, 18.26%, and 11.42% in FeNO, respectively. Our results indicated that organic carbon, element carbon, NO3(-) and NH4(+) might be mainly responsible for the effects of PM2.5 on the decreased NOS2A DNA methylation and elevated FeNO in COPD patients. PMID:26372312

  7. Interleukin-12 gene-expression of macrophages is regulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rothe, H; Hartmann, B; Geerlings, P; Kolb, H

    1996-07-01

    Interleukin-12 is a heterodimeric cytokine, mainly produced by macrophages. In our present study we demonstrate that interleukin-12 expression is regulated by nitric oxide. Incubation of the macrophage cell line IC 21 with interferon-gamma gave rise to both interleukin-12 p40 mRNA and nitric oxide production. The concurrent addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine inhibited nitrite production and in parallel completely suppressed interleukin-12 p40 mRNA formation. This indicated that endogenous nitric oxide synthase activity was required for IL-12 p40 gene expression. Exposure of the cells towards the nitric oxide generating compounds nitroprusside or S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine induced interleukin-12 p40 mRNA. Maximal mRNA levels were induced with nitric oxide donors at 1 microM concentration. We conclude that nitric oxide may exert an autoregulatory and paracrine control of interleukin-12 gene expression. PMID:8694804

  8. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children. PMID:17687720

  9. [Networks involving quorum sensing, cyclic-di-GMP and nitric oxide on biofilm production in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; Fernández-Domínguez, Ileana J; Nuñez-Reza, Karen J; Xiqui-Vázquez, María L; Baca, Beatriz E

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, and their flexibility is derived in part from a complex extracellular matrix that can be made-to-order to cope with environmental demand. Although common developmental stages leading to biofilm formation have been described, an in-depth knowledge of genetic and signaling is required to understand biofilm formation. Bacteria detect changes in population density by quorum sensing and particular environmental conditions, using signals such as cyclic di-GMP or nitric oxide. The significance of understanding these signaling pathways lies in that they control a broad variety of functions such as biofilm formation, and motility, providing benefits to bacteria as regards host colonization, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Due to the importance of these features, we here review the signaling network and regulatory connections among quorum sensing, c-di-GMP and nitric oxide involving biofilm formation. PMID:25444134

  10. Extract of Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus induces angiogenesis in vitro and activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Wei, Jianteng; Wang, Hui; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Yuyan; Lin, Xiukun

    2012-09-01

    Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in oriental medicine. The angiogentic activity of the extract of M. meretrix was investigated in this study, using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Extract of M. meretrix Linnaeus (AFG-25) was prepared with acetone and ethanol precipitation, and further separated by Sephadex G-25 column. The results show that AFG-25 promoted proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs, and in the presence of eNOS inhibitor NMA, the tube formation induced by AFG-25 is inhibited significantly. Moreover, AFG-25 could also promote the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the resultant elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production. The results suggested that M. meretrix contains active ingredients with angiogentic activity and eNOS/NO signal pathway is in part involved in the proangiogenesis effect induced by AFG-25.

  11. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training. PMID:26694820

  12. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Nitric Oxide in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Yui, Kunio; Kawasaki, Yohei; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains unclear; however, the toxic environmental exposure to oxidative stress has been suggested to play an important role in its pathogenesis. A loss of balance between oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity produces an excess of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (NO). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, are closely related to NO and NO synthase. In the pathophysiology of ASD, NO is related to the activity of primary PUFAs. NO modulates short- and long-term synaptic plasticity and plays essential roles in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes including neurotransmission. NO affects the function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the local cellular milieu, in which biological antioxidants are present. NO plays a double role in the organism showing both neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects. Redox imbalance leads to the activation of the neurotoxic pathway, suggesting crossroads for the neurotoxic or neuroprotective effects of NO. Furthermore, the dual role of NO could depend on the adaptive functions of the antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress-related ROS/RNS as the disease progresses. Increased concentrations of arachidonic acid promote neuronal survival, and the dysregulation of the NO system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorders. Therefore, the NO system could provide useful drug targets for these diseases. NO and NO donors also show therapeutic potential for Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia with refractory symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27071787

  14. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  15. Nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere - Measurements and geophysical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvath, J. J.; Frederick, J. E.; Orsini, N.; Douglass, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    A rocket-borne parachute-deployed chemiluminescence instrument has obtained seven new measurements of atmospheric nitric oxide for altitudes between 30 and 50 km at mid-latitudes. These results, when combined with profiles measured by an earlier version of the instrument, cover all four seasons and provide a more comprehensive picture of upper stratospheric nitric oxide than has been available previously. At the highest altitudes studied, the vertical gradient in mixing ratio displays positive and negative values during different observations, with the largest values tending to appear at the greatest heights in summer. Examination of the differences among the profiles, which exceed a factor of 3 near the stratopause, suggests that they arise from the action of transport processes which carry air into the mid-latitude upper stratosphere from regions of the atmosphere that contain widely different odd-nitrogen abundances.

  16. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Hemoglobin in Health, Disease, and Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). It is made in endothelial cells lining blood vessels and diffuses to smooth muscle cells where it leads to muscle relaxation, vessel dilatation, and increased blood flow and also plays a large role in controlling platelet aggregation and inflammation. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen carrying molecule in the blood, reacts at nearly diffusion limited rates with nitric oxide to (in some reactions) form nitrate ands thereby destroy NO activity. The presence of such large amounts of such a potent NO scavenger in the blood challenges the idea that NO is indeed the EDRF. Encapsulation in red blood cells in healthy individuals limits NO scavenging by Hb. Biophysical experiments will be described exploring and evaluating these mechanisms. Other studies will be described discussing how red cells break open (lyse) in pathological situations and the cell-free Hb reduces NO bioavailability. Finally, methods to restore NO bioavailability through therapeutics will be discussed.

  17. Nitric oxide: a regulator of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 kinases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Heim, Rachel A; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-06-15

    Generation of nitric oxide (NO(•)) can upstream induce and downstream mediate the kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which plays a critical role in regulating gene expression. There are four known eIF2α kinases (EIF2AKs), and NO(•) affects each one uniquely. Whereas NO(•) directly activates EIF2AK1 (HRI), it indirectly activates EIF2AK3 (PERK). EIF2AK4 (GCN2) is activated by depletion of l-arginine, which is used by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the production of NO(•). Finally EIF2AK2 (PKR), which can mediate inducible NOS expression and therefore NO(•) production, can also be activated by NO(•). The production of NO(•) and activation of EIF2AKs coordinately regulate physiological and pathological events such as innate immune response and cell apoptosis. PMID:21463677

  18. Effect of fuel/air nonuniformity on nitric oxide emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    A flame tube combustor holding jet A fuel was used in experiments performed at a pressure of .3 Mpa and a reference velocity of 25 meters/second for three inlet air temperatures of 600, 700, and 800 K. The gas sample measurements were taken at locations 18 cm and 48 cm downstream of the perforated plate flameholder. Nonuniform fuel/air profiles were produced using a fuel injector by separately fueling the inner five fuel tubes and the outer ring of twelve fuel tubes. Six fuel/air profiles were produced for nominal overall equivalence ratios of .5 and .6. An example of three of three of these profiles and their resultant nitric oxide NOx emissions are presented. The uniform fuel/air profile cases produced uniform and relatively low profile levels. When the profiles were either center-peaked or edge-peaked, the overall mass-weighted nitric oxide levels increased.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donators for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L; Viappiani, Serena; Bolla, Manlio

    2009-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the most commonly used medications for the treatment of the symptoms of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, the toxicity of NSAIDs substantially limits their long-term use. Some newer NSAIDs, namely selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, exhibit greater gastrointestinal safety, and concomitant use of anti-secretory drugs can also reduce NSAID-induced gastropathy. However, NSAIDs also adversely affect the cardiovascular system. A new class of anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donators (CINODs), has been designed to exert similar anti-inflammatory effects as NSAIDs, but with an improved safety profile. CINODs release nitric oxide, providing protective effects in the gastrointestinal tract and attenuating the detrimental effects on blood pressure normally associated with NSAIDs. We provide an outline of the rationale for CINODs and their activity, in addition to an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical profile of the most advanced CINOD, naproxcinod. PMID:19230986

  20. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  1. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  2. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  3. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... oxide in a DOT 3AL is cylinder is authorized only by highway and rail. (2) UN cylinder. In a UN cylinder... UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (3) Valves. Cylinders must be equipped with a stainless steel... be equipped with pressure relief devices of any type. (b) Each UN cylinder must be cleaned...

  4. Phylogenesis of constitutively formed nitric oxide in non-mammals.

    PubMed

    Toda, N; Ayajiki, K

    2006-01-01

    It is widely recognized that nitric oxide (NO) in mammalian tissues is produced from L-arginine via catalysis by NO synthase (NOS) isoforms such as neuronal NOS (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) that are constitutively expressed mainly in the central and peripheral nervous system and vascular endothelial cells, respectively. This review concentrates only on these constitutive NOS (cNOS) isoforms while excluding information about iNOS, which is induced mainly in macrophages upon stimulation by cytokines and polysaccharides. The NO signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the functional regulation of mammalian tissues and organs. Evidence has also been accumulated for the role of NO in invertebrates and non-mammalian vertebrates. Expression of nNOS in the brain and peripheral nervous system is widely determined by staining with NADPH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) diaphorase or NOS immunoreactivity, and functional roles of NO formed by nNOS are evidenced in the early phylogenetic stages (invertebrates and fishes). On the other hand, the endothelium mainly produces vasodilating prostanoids rather than NO or does not liberate endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) (fishes), and the ability of endothelial cells to liberate NO is observed later in phylogenetic stages (amphibians). This review article summarizes various types of interesting information obtained from lower organisms (invertebrates, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds) about the properties and distribution of nNOS and eNOS and also the roles of NO produced by the cNOS as an important intercellular signaling molecule. PMID:17236649

  5. Triazine herbicides inhibit relaxin signaling and disrupt nitric oxide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Eun; Lim, Sa Rang; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2016-09-15

    Triazines are herbicides that are widely used worldwide, and we previously observed that the maternal exposure of mice to simazine (50 or 500μg/kg) resulted in smaller ovaries and uteri of their female offspring. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism that may account for the reproductive dysfunction induced by simazine. We found that following maternal exposure, simazine is transmitted to the offspring, as evidenced by its presence in the offspring ovaries. Analyses of the simazine-exposed offspring revealed that the expression of the relaxin hormone receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), prominently decreased in their ovaries and uteri. In addition, downstream target genes of the relaxin pathway including nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (Nos2), Nos3, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) were downregulated in their ovaries. Moreover, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) levels and their phosphorylated active forms decreased in simazine-exposed ovaries. In vitro exposure of the human ovarian granulosa cells (KGN) and uterine endometrium cells (Hec-1A) to very low concentrations (0.001 to 1nM) of triazines including atrazine, terbuthylazine, and propazine repressed NO production with a concurrent reduction in RXFP1, NOS2, and NOS3. The inhibitory action of triazines on NO release was dependent on RXFP1, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and ERK. Radioligand-binding assay also confirmed that triazines competitively inhibited the binding of relaxin to its receptor. Therefore, the present study suggests that triazine herbicides act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with relaxin hormone signaling. Thus, further evaluation of their impact on human health is imperative. PMID:27431321

  6. The shaping of nitric oxide signals by a cellular sink

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Charmaine; Garthwaite, John

    2001-01-01

    The functioning of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger necessitates that there be an inactivation mechanism. Cell suspensions from a rat brain region rich in the NO signalling pathway (cerebellum) were used to investigate the existence of such a mechanism and to determine its properties.The cells consumed NO in a manner that could not be explained by reaction with O2, superoxide ions or contaminating red blood cells. Functionally, the mechanism was able to convert constant rates of NO formation into low steady-state NO concentrations. For example, with NO produced at 90 nm min−1, the cells (20 × 106 ml−1) held NO at 20 nm. Various other cell types behaved similarly.The influence of NO inactivation on the ability of NO to access its receptor, soluble guanylyl cyclase, was explored by measuring cGMP accumulation in response to the clamped NO concentrations. The extrapolated steady-state EC50 for NO was 2 nm, a concentration readily achieved by low NO release rates, despite inactivation.When confronted by higher NO release rates for several minutes, the clamping mechanism failed, resulting in a progressive rise in NO concentration. While the clamp was maintained, cellular respiration was unaffected but, as it failed, respiration became inhibited by NO. The IC50 was measured to be 120 nm (at 100–140 μm O2).It is concluded that cerebellar (and other) cells possess a powerful NO inactivation mechanism that, extrapolated to the whole tissue, would impose on NO a half-life of around 100 ms. This and other properties of the device appear ideal for shaping low-level NO signals for activating its receptor, soluble guanylyl cyclase, whilst avoiding adverse effects on mitochondrial function. The exhaustibility of the mechanism provides a scenario for NO to become toxic. PMID:11691877

  7. From synaptically localized to volume transmission by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Garthwaite, John

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions widely as a transmitter/diffusible second messenger in the central nervous system, exerting physiological effects in target cells by binding to specialized guanylyl cyclase-coupled receptors, resulting in cGMP generation. Despite having many context-dependent physiological roles and being implicated in numerous disease states, there has been a lack of clarity about the ways that NO operates at the cellular and subcellular levels. Recently, several approaches have been used to try to gain a more concrete, quantitative understanding of this unique signalling pathway. These approaches have included analysing the kinetics of NO receptor function, real-time imaging of cellular NO signal transduction in target cells, and the use of ultrasensitive detector cells to record NO as it is being generated from native sources in brain tissue. The current picture is that, when formed in a synapse, NO is likely to act only very locally, probably mostly within the confines of that synapse, and to exist only in picomolar concentrations. Nevertheless, closely neighbouring synapses may also be within reach, raising the possibility of synaptic crosstalk. By engaging its enzyme-coupled receptors, the low NO concentrations are able to stimulate physiological (submicromolar) increases in cGMP concentration in an activity-dependent manner. When many NO-emitting neurones or synapses are active simultaneously in a tissue region, NO can act more like a volume transmitter to influence, and perhaps coordinate, the behaviour of cells within that region, irrespective of their identity and anatomical connectivity. PMID:26486504

  8. Application of a Nitric Oxide Sensor in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Carlota; Lopes de Almeida, José Pedro; Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the biochemical properties and effects of nitric oxide (NO) in intact and dysfunctional arterial and venous endothelium. Application of the NO electrochemical sensor in vivo and in vitro in erythrocytes of healthy subjects and patients with vascular disease are reviewed. The electrochemical NO sensor device applied to human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the description of others NO types of sensors are also mentioned. PMID:25587407

  9. Tutorial Review: Electrochemical Nitric Oxide Sensors for Physiological Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Privett, Benjamin J.; Shin, Jae Ho; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The important biological roles of nitric oxide (NO) have prompted the development of analytical techniques capable of sensitive and selective detection of NO. Electrochemical sensing, more than any other NO-detection method, embodies the parameters necessary for quantifying NO in challenging physiological environments such as blood and the brain. Herein, we provide a broad overview of the field of electrochemical NO sensors, including design, fabrication, and analytical performance characteristics. Both electrochemical sensors and biological applications are detailed. PMID:20502795

  10. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  11. A Dirofilaria immitis Polyprotein Up-Regulates Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Tsukidate, Setsuko; Fujita, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recombinant Dirofilaria immitis polyprotein (rDiAg) on nitric oxide (NO) production by peritoneal macrophages. rDiAg induced NO production by macrophages from wild-type and lipopolysaccharide-hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ, but not CD40−/−, mice. These results suggest that CD40 is involved in rDiAg-driven NO production by murine macrophages. PMID:12183583

  12. Sensor materials for an intravascular fiber optic nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Stahl, Russell F.

    1996-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule in physiological processes including neurotransmission and the control of blood pressure. It is produced in excess during septic shock, the profound hypotensive state which accompanies severe infections. In-vivo measurement of NO would enhance the understanding of its varied biological roles. Our goal is the development of an intravascular fiber-optic sensor for the continuous measurement of NO. This study evaluated nitric oxide sensitive compounds as potential sensing materials in the presence and absence of oxygen. Using absorption spectroscopy we studied both the Fe II and Fe III forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. The Fe II forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin and the Fe III form of cytochrome-c were found to have the highest sensitivity to NO. Cytochrome c (Fe III) is selective for NO even at high oxygen levels, while myoglobin is selective only under normal oxygen levels. NO concentrations as low as 1 (mu) M can be detected with our fiber-optic spectrometer using cytochrome c, and as low as 300 nM using myoglobin. Either of these materials would be adequate to monitor the increase in nitric oxide production during the onset of septic shock.

  13. The response of thermospheric nitric oxide to an auroral storm

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The response of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO) to the auroral storm of September 19, 1984 is analyzed. Measurements of nitric oxide from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) ultraviolet spectrometer are compared with the calculations of a one-dimensional photochemical model of the lower thermosphere. The NCAR Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TGCM) is used to calculate the response of the background neutral atmosphere to auroral forcings such as Joule and particle heating. The output of the TGCM is used as input to the photochemical model. The time history of the auroral energy input is assessed using particle data from the NOAA 6 and 7 satellites. The SME NO measurements were made from 100 km to 140 km along two orbital tracks: one over the United States and one over Europe. The observations show a factor of 3 increase in NO at auroral latitudes for both orbits as a result of the storm. Nitric oxide at mid-latitudes also increased by a factor of 3 but only over the United States. Calculations of the mid-latitude NO response show that temperature increases which result from Joule heating lead to NO enhancements. A larger response is initially seen for altitudes greater than 120 km.

  14. Nitric oxide in atherosclerosis: vascular protector or villain?

    PubMed

    Dusting, G J; Fennessy, P; Yin, Z L; Gurevich, V

    1998-11-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in physiological vasodilatation, cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Nitric oxide and prostacyclin (PGI2), both released from the endothelium, act synergistically to inhibit platelet aggregation and adhesion. These autacoids also inhibit the adhesion and migration of leucocytes and, in some arteries, they synergize in terms of vasodilation. 2. The development of atherosclerosis and hyperlipaemia per se is accompanied by impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. 3. Atherosclerosis is associated with marked changes in the activity of isoforms of NO synthase (NOS) in the artery wall, including increased expression of the NOS2 (inducible) isoform in complex human lesions as well as in the neointima of experimental animal models. 4. Failure of NO release from the endothelium with normal physiological stimuli, which has been attributed to a defect in the operation of the endothelial NOS (NOS3), provides conditions propitious for leucocyte adhesion, vasospasm, thrombosis and, in addition, may promote increased proliferation of intimal cells. 5. Nitric oxide and superoxide anions generated by inflammatory cells in atherosclerosis react to form cytodestructive peroxynitrite radicals, potentially causing injury to the endothelium and myocytes, and this may be a factor in apoptosis of cells leading to plaque rupture. 6. We have been able to reverse these NO defects with therapeutic agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, antagonists of platelet-activating factor and NO donor compounds, all offering promise in protecting against some manifestations of vascular disease. PMID:9809190

  15. Critical Role of Nitric Oxide-cGMP Cascade in the Formation of cAMP-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aonuma, Hitoshi; Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Unoki, Sae

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP pathway plays an essential role in formation of long-term memory (LTM). In some species, the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP pathway has been found to act in parallel and complementary to the cAMP pathway for LTM formation. Here we describe a new role of the NO-cGMP pathway, namely, stimulation of the cAMP pathway to induce LTM. We have…

  16. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinelli, G. P. T.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Holstein, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO.

  17. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on diarrhea and gastrointestinal transit in mice: Roles of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Chih; Liu, Hung-Jung; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Chin; Chou, Liang-Shung; Tsai, Li Hsueh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the diarrheogenic activity, gastrointestinal transit (GIT), and intestinal fluid content and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in gastrointestinal functions of endotoxin-treated mice. METHODS: Diarrheogic activity, GIT, and intestinal fluid content as well as nitric oxide and PGE2 products were measured after intraperitoneal administration of LPS in mice. RESULTS: LPS dose-dependently accumulated abundant fluid into the small intestine, induced diarrhea, but decreased the GIT. Both nitric oxide and PGE2 were found to increase in LPS-treated mice. Western blot analysis indicated that LPS significantly induced the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 in mice intestines. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor) or indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) significantly attenuated the effects of LPS on the diarrheogenic activity and intestine content, but reversed the GIT. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the pathogenesis of LPS treatment may mediate the stimulatory effect of LPS on nitric oxide and PGE2 production and NO/prostaglandin pathway may play an important role on gastrointestinal function. PMID:15637744

  18. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  19. Nitric oxide as a regulatory molecule in the processing of the visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Lima, Monica Gomes; Maximino, Caio; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata; Brasil, Alódia; Crespo-Lopez, Maria Elena; Batista, Evander de Jesus Oliveira; Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Picanço-Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley; Herculano, Anderson Manoel

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive gas with considerable diffusion power that is produced pre- and post synaptically in the central nervous system (CNS). In the visual system, it is involved in the processing of the visual information from the retina to superior visual centers. In this review we discuss the main mechanisms through which nitric oxide acts, in physiological levels, on the retina, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex. In the retina, the cGMP-dependent nitric oxide activity initially amplifies the signal, subsequently increasing the inhibitory activity, suggesting that the signal is "filtered". In the thalamus, on dLGN, neuronal activity is amplified by NO derived from brainstem cholinergic cells, in a cGMP-independent mechanism; the result is the amplification of the signal arriving from retina. Finally, on the visual cortex (V1), NO acts through changes on the cGMP levels, increasing signal detection. These observations suggest that NO works like a filter, modulating the signal along the visual pathways. PMID:24275015

  20. A Finite Rate Chemical Analysis of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination Effects on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen F.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. A finite rate chemical analysis was performed to determine the levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility at conditions corresponding to Mach 6 to 8 flight simulations. Results indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, corroborating previously obtained measurements. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on scramjet performance. Results indicate that nitric oxide in the test gas causes a small increase in heat release and thrust performance for the test conditions investigated. However, a rate constant uncertainty analysis suggests that the effect of nitric oxide ranges from no net effect, to an increase of about 10 percent in thrust performance.

  1. Solar-terrestrial coupling: Solar soft X-rays and thermospheric nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Charles A.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the solar soft x-ray irradiances and the thermospheric nitric oxide density in the tropics from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite. The analysis of these observations for 44 days of low geomagnetic activity in the spring of 1998 show that there is a correlation between the solar soft x-ray irradiances and thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics. Photochemical model calculations that used the measured solar soft x-ray irradiances as input parameters adequately reproduce the magnitude of the time-varying component of the thermospheric nitric oxide in the tropics. An additional amount of nitric oxide is present in the tropics that does not vary with the time period of the solar rotation. The conclusion of this analysis is that solar soft x-rays are the primary cause of the variation in the thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics during times of low geomagnetic activity.

  2. Histochemical study of the nitric oxide synthase activity in experimental trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Hadaś, E; Gustowska, L; Boczoń, K; Janczewska, D

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide plays a critical role in a variety of biological activities. It has been nicknamed a "killer" and "mediator" due to its toxic and signalling properties. Apart from its regular physiological function, nitric oxide indirectly participates in infectious diseases. Our report seems to be the first presentation of the nitric oxide synthase participation in the host biochemical defence mechanisms and in morphological transformation of muscle cells in trichinellosis. PMID:16883715

  3. Role of the decreased nitric oxide bioavailability in the vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Masha, Andi; Dinatale, Stefano; Allasia, Stefano; Martina, Valentino

    2011-09-01

    This mini-review takes into consideration the physiology, synthesis and mechanisms of action of the nitric oxide (NO) and, subsequently, the causes and effects of the NO bioavailability impairment. In diabetes mellitus the reduced NO bioavailability is caused by the increased free radicals production, secondary to hyperglycemia. The reactive oxygen species oxidize the cofactors of the nitric oxide synthase, diminishing their active forms and consequently leading to a decreased NO production. Furthermore the decreased concentration of reduced glutathione results in a diminished production of nitrosoglutathione. These molecules are important intermediates of the NO pathway and physiologically activate the soluble guanylate cyclase. Their decrease in oxidative states of the cell, therefore, leads to a reduced cGMP production which represents the principal molecule that carries out NO's major effects. Finally we considered the eventual therapeutic strategies to improve NO bioavailability by acting on the causes of its decrease. Therefore the treatments proposed are based on the possibility to counteract the oxidation and, in this context, the physiopathological mechanisms strongly support the treatment with thiols. PMID:21235455

  4. Use of a solid mixture containing diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) to liberate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce to extend postharvest life.

    PubMed

    Wills, R B H; Soegiarto, L; Bowyer, M C

    2007-08-01

    Postharvest treatment of fruit and vegetables with a low concentration of nitric oxide gas can extend postharvest life but application of nitric oxide by release from a gas cylinder is not feasible for many horticultural situations. This paper reports on development of a solid mixture to generate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce. The solid NO-donor compound, diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) was found to quantitatively liberate nitric oxide in the presence of a range of acidic substances including citric acid. A solid mixture of DETANO and citric acid with wheat starch added as a filler and moisture absorbent in the ratio of 1:10:20 was found to be stable for at least six months when stored in dry air. However, in humid air, absorption of moisture from the atmosphere led to reaction of DETANO with citric acid and the evolution of nitric oxide gas. When the dry mixture was placed in a container with strawberry and mushroom, the moisture given off by produce activated the mixture and resulted in a similar extension in postharvest life as achieved by direct fumigation with nitric oxide gas. Commercial use of such a solid mixture could be through tablets or sachets which are more manageable in a farm or packing house than gas fumigation. PMID:17604663

  5. Nitric oxide and thermogenesis--challenge in molecular cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Otasevic, Vesna; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Stancic, Ana; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Bato

    2011-01-01

    Only recently we can link thermogenesis, mitochondria, nitric oxide, and redox regulation in biochemical terms. Currently, we are discussing these processes from the aspect of fundamental principles of molecular physiology. Thus, the present article highlights both cell physiology and the principles of the maintenance of energy homeostasis in organisms. Energy homeostasis means much more than simple combustion; adipose tissues at this point of evolution development are related to a broad spectrum of metabolic disturbances and all aspects of cellular remodeling (i.e. structural, metabolic and endocrine changes). Therefore, this paper addresses not only thermogenesis but also energy homeostasis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, proliferation and differentiation of brown adipocytes, their life and death, mitochondriogenesis and angiogenesis. These processes will be united by molecular players of oxidation/reduction reactions, thus creating the principles based on the redox regulation. PMID:21622264

  6. The role of nitric oxide in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. Firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. This review will focus on the role of nitric oxide in the cellular and tissue effects of LLLT. Red and near-IR light is primarily absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain). Nitric oxide produced in the mitochondria can inhibit respiration by binding to cytochrome c oxidase and competitively displacing oxygen, especially in stressed or hypoxic cells. If light absorption displaced the nitric oxide and thus allowed the cytochrome c oxidase to recover and cellular respiration to resume, this would explain many of the observations made in LLLT. Why the effect is only seen in hypoxic, stressed or damaged cells or tissues? How the effects can keep working for some time (hours or days) postillumination? Why increased NO concentrations are sometimes measured in cell culture or in animals? How blood flow can be increased? Why angiogenesis is sometimes increased after LLLT in vivo?

  7. Nitric oxide production increases during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2015-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised human and animals. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the immunomodulatory and immunopathological role of nitric oxide (NO) in central nervous systems and to identify any correlation between toxoplasmosis neuropathology and investigate the consequences of the cellular responses protect against T. gondii. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and levels of endothelial, neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, nNOS, iNOS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilament (NF) were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of a chronic infection at 10 30 and 60 days post infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of eNOS (p < 0.05), nNOS (p < 0.05), iNOS (p < 0.005), GFAP (p < 0.005) and NF (p < 0.005) were remarkably higher in T. gondii-infected mice than in uninfected control. The most prominent finding from our study was 10 and 30 days after inoculation data indicating that increased levels of NO not only a potential neuroprotective role for immunoregulatory and immunopathological but also might be a molecular trigger of bradyzoite development. Furthermore, this findings were shown that high expressed NO origin was not only inducible nitric oxide synthase but also endothelial and neuronal. We demonstrated that activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages is a significant event in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE). The results also clearly indicated that increased levels of NO might contribute to neuropathology related with TE. Furthermore, expression of NF might gives an idea of the progress and critical for diagnostic significance of this disease. PMID:26115941

  8. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  9. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  10. Application of nitric oxide measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malinovschi, Andrei; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Tufvesson, Ellen; Rolla, Giovanni; Bjermer, Leif; Alving, Kjell; Diamant, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a convenient, non-invasive method for the assessment of active, mainly Th2-driven, airway inflammation, which is sensitive to treatment with standard anti-inflammatory therapy. Consequently, FeNO serves as a valued tool to aid diagnosis and monitoring in several asthma phenotypes. More recently, FeNO has been evaluated in several other respiratory, infectious, and/or immunological conditions. In this short review, we provide an overview of several clinical studies and discuss the status of potential applications of NO measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma. PMID:26672962

  11. Natural nitric oxide (NO) inhibitors from Chloranthus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Jing-Jun; Li, Zhen-Zhen; Tang, Gui-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Yin, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Eight new lindenane sesquiterpenoid dimers, chlojapolides A-H (1-8), along with 11 known analogues were isolated from the whole plant of Chloranthus japonicus. Their structures including absolute configurations were elucidated by spectral and chemical methods. All the compounds were examined for their inhibitory effects on the nitric oxide (NO) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and compounds 1, 11, 13, and 17 exhibited pronounced inhibition with IC50 values in the range of 6.91-15.75μM, being more active than the positive control, quercetin (IC50=15.90μM). PMID:27177824

  12. Flavanols, the Kuna, Cocoa Consumption, and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Norman K.; Fisher, Naomi D.L.; McCullough, Marjorie L.

    2013-01-01

    The Kuna Indians who reside in an archipelago on the Caribbean Coast of Panama have very low blood pressure levels, live longer than other Panamanians, and have a reduced frequency of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and cancer -- at least on their death certificates. One outstanding feature of their diet includes a very high intake of flavanol-rich cocoa. Flavonoids in cocoa activate nitric oxide synthesis in healthy humans. The possibility that the high flavanol intake protects the Kuna against high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and cancer is sufficiently intriguing and sufficiently important that large, randomized controlled clinical trials should be pursued. PMID:20409950

  13. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-measuring devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Vitale, Carolina; Vatrella, Alessandro; Molino, Antonio; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been employed in the diagnosis of specific types of airway inflammation, guiding treatment monitoring by predicting and assessing response to anti-inflammatory therapy and monitoring for compliance and detecting relapse. Various techniques are currently used to analyze exhaled NO concentrations under a range of conditions for both health and disease. These include chemiluminescence and electrochemical sensor devices. The cost effectiveness and ability to achieve adequate flexibility in sensitivity and selectivity of NO measurement for these methods are evaluated alongside the potential for use of laser-based technology. This review explores the technologies involved in the measurement of exhaled NO. PMID:27382340

  14. Nitric oxide-oxygen radicals interactions in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rubbo, H; Batthyany, C; Radi, R

    2000-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common diseases and the principal cause of death in western civilization. The pathogenesis of this disease can be explained on the basis of the 'oxidative-modification hypothesis,' which proposes that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation represents a key early event. Nitric oxide (*NO) regulates critical lipid membrane and lipoprotein oxidation events by a) contributing to the formation of more potent secondary oxidants from superoxide (i.e.: peroxynitrite), and b) its antioxidant properties through termination reactions with lipid radicals to possibly less reactive secondary nitrogen-containing products (LONO, LOONO). Relative rates of production and steady state concentrations of superoxide and *NO and cellular sites of production will profoundly influence the expression of differential oxidant injury-enhancing and protective effects of *NO. Full understanding of the physiological roles of *NO, coupled with detailed insight into *NO regulation of oxygen radical-dependent reactions, will yield a more rational basis for intervention strategies directed toward oxidant-dependent atherogenic processes. PMID:15693284

  15. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia: the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sogut, Sadik; Akyol, Omer

    2006-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an unknown etiology. Recent years added new information to our understanding of FM pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, oxidative stress, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in FM revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of FM. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide may play an important role in FM pathophysiology, however it is still not clear whether oxidative stress abnormalities documented in FM are the cause or the effect. This should encourage further researches evaluating the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of FM and the efficacy of antioxidant treatments (omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, vitamins and others) in double blind and placebo controlled trials. These future researches will enhance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:16328420

  16. Nitric Oxide Participation in the Fungicidal Mechanism of Gamma Interferon-Activated Murine Macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Angel; de Gregori, Waldemar; Velez, Diana; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz E.

    2000-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis restricted to Latin America and produced by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is probably acquired by inhalation of conidia produced by the mycelial form. The macrophage (Mφ) represents the major cell defense against this pathogen; when activated with gamma interferon (IFN-γ), murine Mφs kill the fungus by an oxygen-independent mechanism. Our goal was to determine the role of nitric oxide in the fungicidal effect of Mφs on P. brasiliensis conidia. The results revealed that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs inhibited the conidium-to-yeast transformation process in a dose-dependent manner; maximal inhibition was observed in Mφs activated with 50 U/ml and incubated for 96 h at 37°C. When Mφs were activated with 150 to 200 U of cytokine per ml, the number of CFU was 70% lower than in nonactivated controls, indicating that there was a fungicidal effect. The inhibitory effect was reversed by the addition of anti-IFN-γ monoclonal antibodies. Activation by IFN-γ also enhanced Mφ nitric oxide production, as revealed by increasing NO2 values (8 ± 3 μM in nonactivated Mφs versus 43 ± 13 μM in activated Mφs). The neutralization of IFN-γ also reversed nitric oxide production at basal levels (8 ± 5 μM). Additionally, we found that there was a significant inverse correlation (r = −0.8975) between NO2− concentration and transformation of P. brasiliensis conidia. Additionally, treatment with any of the three different nitric oxide inhibitors used (arginase, NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, and aminoguanidine), reverted the inhibition of the transformation process with 40 to 70% of intracellular yeast and significantly reduced nitric oxide production. These results show that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs kill P. brasiliensis conidia through the l-arginine–nitric oxide pathway. PMID:10768942

  17. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  18. Regulation of cardiac nitric oxide signaling by nuclear β-adrenergic and endothelin receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Vaniotis, George; Glazkova, Irina; Merlen, Clémence; Smith, Carter; Villeneuve, Louis R.; Chatenet, David; Therien, Michel; Fournier, Alain; Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Trieu, Phan; Nattel, Stanley; Hébert, Terence E.; Allen, Bruce G.

    2013-01-01

    At the cell surface, βARs and endothelin receptors can regulate nitric oxide (NO) production. β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) and type B endothelin receptors (ETB) are present in cardiac nuclear membranes and regulate transcription. The present study investigated the role of the NO pathway in the regulation of gene transcription by these nuclear G protein-coupled receptors. Nitric oxide production and transcription initiation were measured in nuclei isolated from adult rat heart. The cell-permeable fluorescent dye 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF2 DA) was used to provide a direct assessment of nitric oxide release. Both isoproterenol and endothelin increased NO production in isolated nuclei. Furthermore, a β3AR-selective agonist, BRL 37344, increased NO synthesis whereas the β1AR-selective agonist xamoterol did not. Isoproterenol increased, whereas ET-1 reduced, de novo transcription. The NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME prevented isoproterenol from increasing either NO production or de novo transcription. L-NAME also blocked ET-1-induced NO-production but did not alter the suppression of transcription initiation by ET-1. Inhibition of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) using KT5823 also blocked the ability of isoproterenol to increase transcription initiation. Furthermore, immunoblotting revealed eNOS, but not nNOS, in isolated nuclei. Finally, caged, cell-permeable isoproterenol and endothelin-1 analogs were used to selectively activate intracellular β-adrenergic and endothelin receptors in intact adult cardiomyocytes. Intracellular release of caged ET-1 or isoproterenol analogs increased NO production in intact adult cardiomyocytes. Hence, activation of the NO synthase/guanylyl cyclase/PKG pathway is necessary for nuclear β3ARs to increase de novo transcription. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the potential utility of caged receptor ligands in selectively modulating signaling via endogenous intracellular G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:23684854

  19. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  20. Role of dietary fish oil on nitric oxide synthase activity and oxidative status in mice red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marcela A; Moss, Monique B; Mendes, Iara K S; Águila, Márcia B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) derived from fish oil concomitant with a reduced intake of saturated fats is associated with cardiovascular benefits, which may result from the participation of nitric oxide (NO). In contrast, PUFAs are vulnerable to peroxidation, which could affect the oxidative stability of the cell and reduce NO bioavailability. Therefore, we investigated the effects of high fat diets with increasing amounts of fish oil (0-40% of energy) in place of lard on the l-arginine-NO pathway, the arginase pathway and oxidative status in mice red blood cells (RBC). We found that l-arginine transport, as well as NO synthase (NOS) expression and activity, was enhanced by the highest doses of fish oil (30 and 40%). In contrast, diets rich in lard led to NOS expression and activity impairment. Arginase expression was not significantly affected by any of the dietary regimens. No significant difference in protein and lipid oxidative markers was observed among any of the fish-oil fed mice; only lard feeding induced protein damage in addition to a decreased superoxide dismutase activity. These data suggest that a substantial dose of fish oil, but not low doses, activates the RBC l-arginine-NO pathway without resulting in oxidative damage. PMID:25317541

  1. JS-K, a GST-activated nitric oxide generator, induces DNA double-strand breaks, activates DNA damage response pathways, and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Hideshima, Teru; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Ocio, Enrique M; Raje, Noopur; Catley, Laurence; Li, Chun-Qi; Trudel, Laura J; Yasui, Hiroshi; Vallet, Sonia; Kutok, Jeffery L; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Saavedra, Joseph E; Wogan, Gerald N; Keefer, Larry K; Shami, Paul J; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-07-15

    Here we investigated the cytotoxicity of JS-K, a prodrug designed to release nitric oxide (NO(*)) following reaction with glutathione S-transferases, in multiple myeloma (MM). JS-K showed significant cytotoxicity in both conventional therapy-sensitive and -resistant MM cell lines, as well as patient-derived MM cells. JS-K induced apoptosis in MM cells, which was associated with PARP, caspase-8, and caspase-9 cleavage; increased Fas/CD95 expression; Mcl-1 cleavage; and Bcl-2 phosphorylation, as well as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and endonuclease G (EndoG) release. Moreover, JS-K overcame the survival advantages conferred by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), or by adherence of MM cells to bone marrow stromal cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that JS-K-induced cytotoxicity was mediated via NO(*) in MM cells. Furthermore, JS-K induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and activated DNA damage responses, as evidenced by neutral comet assay, as well as H2AX, Chk2 and p53 phosphorylation. JS-K also activated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) in MM cells; conversely, inhibition of JNK markedly decreased JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Importantly, bortezomib significantly enhanced JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, JS-K is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs survival in a human MM xenograft mouse model. Taken together, these data provide the preclinical rationale for the clinical evaluation of JS-K to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:17384201

  2. The role of nitric oxide in ocular surface cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Gun Sic; Kim, Jin Kook; Kim, Young Myeong

    2002-06-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ocular surface remains unknown. We investigated the conditions leading to an increase of NO generation in tear and the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue. We evaluated the dual action (cell survival or cell death) of NO depending on its amount. We measured the concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in the tears of ocular surface diseases and examined the main source of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When cultured human corneal fibroblast were treated with NO producing donor with or without serum, the viabilities of cells was studied. We found that the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue were corneal epithelium, fibroblast, endothelium, and inflammatory cells. Three forms of NOS (eNOS, bNOS, and iNOS) were expressed in experimentally induced inflammation. In the fibroblast culture system, the NO donor (SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine) prevented the death of corneal fibroblast cells caused by serum deprivation in a dose dependent manner up to 500 micrometer SNAP, but a higher dose decreased cell viability. This study suggested that NO might act as a double-edged sword in ocular surface diseases depending on the degree of inflammation related with NO concentration. PMID:12068145

  3. Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Catalase: Structural and Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the structures of bovine catalase in its native form and complexed with ammonia and nitric oxide, obtained by X-ray crystallography. Using the NO generator 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, we were able to generate sufficiently high NO concentrations within the catalase crystals that substantial occupation was observed despite a high dissociation rate. Nitric oxide seems to be slightly bent from the heme normal that may indicate some iron(II) character in the formally ferric catalase. Microspectrophotometric investigations inline with the synchrotron X-ray beam reveal photoreduction of the central heme iron. In the cases of the native and ammonia-complexed catalase, reduction is accompanied by a relaxation phase. This is likely not the case for the catalase NO complex. The kinetics of binding of NO to catalase were investigated using NO photolyzed from N,N′-bis(carboxymethyl)-N,N′-dinitroso-p-phenylenediamine using an assay that combines catalase with myoglobin binding kinetics. The off rate is 1.5 s–1. Implications for catalase function are discussed. PMID:21524057

  4. Diurnal variation of nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Pirre, M.; Ramaroson, R.; Matthews, W. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two recent measurements of the temporal variation of nitric oxide at constant altitude near 40 km are reported. The observations were made at float altitude with a balloon-borne chemiluminescence detector together with in situ ozone measurements. The first measurement was made at 44 N on September 17, 1987, at an altitude of 40 km from before sunrise until 1000 LT. The second observation was made at the same latitude on June 18, 1988, at 39 km from 0800 to 1230 LT. At an altitude of 40 km, nitric oxide was observed to start increasing very rapidly at sunrise when the solar zenith angle reached about 95 deg. After the rapid initial buildup, the rate of NO increase stabilized for 3 hours at about 1.2 ppbv/hour. Near 1100 LT at 39 km in summer, the NO mixing ratio was observed to become nearly constant. These features of the diurnal variation of NO are in accord with the temporal variation expected from a time-dependent zero-dimensional photochemical model.

  5. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Vascular Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo D.; Rezende, Bruno A.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    The family of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has significant importance in various physiological mechanisms and is also involved in many pathological processes. Three NOS isoforms have been identified: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS 1), endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS 3), and an inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS 2). Both nNOS and eNOS are constitutively expressed. Classically, eNOS is considered the main isoform involved in the control of the vascular function. However, more recent studies have shown that nNOS is present in the vascular endothelium and importantly contributes to the maintenance of the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. In physiological conditions, besides nitric oxide (NO), nNOS also produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2•-) considered as key mediators in non-neuronal cells signaling. This mini-review highlights recent scientific releases on the role of nNOS in vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:27313545

  6. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  7. The flavonoid luteolin induces nitric oxide production and arterial relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongwei; Wyeth, Richard P.; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Luteolin, a flavone present in many foods and medicinal plants, may have beneficial effects on various human chronic diseases. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that luteolin can directly act on vascular endothelial cells (ECs), leading to nitric oxide (NO) production and subsequent vascular relaxation. Methods Rat aortic rings were mounted in organ bath. Luteolin was added cumulatively and vessel relaxation of rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine (PE) or potassium was recorded. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Ser1177 and NO production from aortic rings and primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) exposed to luteolin were measured by using Western blot and fluorometric assay, respectively. Results Luteolin dose-dependently (10-100 μmol/L) elicited relaxation of PE- or potassium-contracted aortic rings. The vasorelaxation effect of luteolin was attenuated by the eNOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, suggesting that this luteolin action is at least partially mediated by activating eNOS activity. We further found that luteolin dose-dependently (10-100 μmol/L) increased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 (up to 1.9 fold) in isolated rat rings. Consistently, exposure of HAECs to luteolin also increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Conclusion Luteolin may be a vascular protective agent by directly acting on vascular ECs to stimulate NO-dependent vascular dilatation. PMID:23604495

  8. Cytokinins can act as suppressors of nitric oxide in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Zhong; Kong, Dong-Dong; Gu, Xue-Xin; Gao, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Zheng; Xia, Min; Gao, Qian; Tian, Li-Li; Xu, Zhang-Hong; Bao, Fang; Hu, Yong; Ye, Neng-Sheng; Pei, Zhen-Ming; He, Yi-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is essential for normal plant physiological processes. However, very little is known about the mechanisms of NO modulation in plants. Here, we report a unique mechanism for the catabolism of NO based on the reaction with the plant hormone cytokinin. We screened for NO-insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis and isolated two allelic lines, cnu1-1 and 1–2 (continuous NO-unstressed 1), that were identified as the previously reported altered meristem program 1 (amp1) and as having elevated levels of cytokinins. A double mutant of cnu1-2 and nitric oxide overexpression 1 (nox1) reduced the severity of the phenotypes ascribed to excess NO levels as did treating the nox1 line with trans-zeatin, the predominant form of cytokinin in Arabidopsis. We further showed that peroxinitrite, an active NO derivative, can react with zeatin in vitro, which together with the results in vivo suggests that cytokinins suppress the action of NO most likely through direct interaction between them, leading to the reduction of endogenous NO levels. These results provide insights into NO signaling and regulation of its bioactivity in plants. PMID:23319631

  9. A protective role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Peter; Steenbergen, Eric; van Goor, Harry

    2002-03-01

    In acute glomerulonephritis (GN), increased nitric oxide (NO) production occurs, suggesting a pathophysiological role for NO in the disease process. Although NO potentially could have both toxic as well as protective effects, its exact role in the pathophysiology of GN is unclear and may depend on the NOS isoform generating NO. The protective effects of NO such as prevention of leukocyte and platelet activation and adhesion have been attributed to NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Evidence for a beneficial role for eNOS includes the demonstration of reduced eNOS expression in experimental models of GN as well as human biopsy specimens that is mostly likely due to endothelial cell necrosis. Reduced NO production in GN also may occur through reaction of NO with superoxide anions or the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/hypochlorous acid (HOCL) system. Further evidence has been provided by the observation that in several experimental models of GN, glomerular injury is exacerbated following treatment with non-selective NO inhibitors. Finally, the development of GN is severely aggravated in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS as compared to wild-type mice, providing direct support for a protective role of eNOS-derived NO in acute GN. PMID:11849432

  10. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  11. Salmonella typhimurium mutants that downregulate phagocyte nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Björkman, J; Borg, S; Syk, A; Pettersson, S; Andersson, D I; Rhen, M

    2000-06-01

    To examine the potential and strategies of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium to increase its fitness in host cells, we applied a selection that enriches for mutants with increased bacterial growth yields in murine J774-A.1 macrophage-like cells. The selection, which was based on intracellular growth competition, rapidly yielded isolates that out-competed the wild-type strain during intracellular growth. J774-A.1 cells responded to challenge with S. typhimurium by mounting an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression and a concomitant nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibition of NO production with the use of the competitive inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA) resulted in a 20-fold increase in bacterial growth yield, suggesting that the NO response prevented bacterial intracellular growth. In accordance with this observation, five out of the nine growth advantage mutants isolated inhibited production of NO from J774-A.1 cells, despite an induction of iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein. Accompanying bacterial phenotypes included alterations in lipopolysaccharide structure and in the profiles of proteins secreted by invasion-competent bacteria. The results indicate that S. typhimurium has the ability to mutate in several different ways to increase its host fitness and that inhibition of iNOS activity may be a major adaptation. PMID:11207580

  12. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  13. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  14. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  15. Nitric oxide-modulating agents for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Brendan J R

    2005-11-01

    Almost 20 years after the identification of the biological role of nitric oxide (NO), the full therapeutic potential of novel agents that mimic the activity of NO or interfere with its synthesis has yet to be realised for utilities involving the gastrointestinal tract. New utilities for classical NO donors, which were used as vasodilators for decades, in the treatment of motility disorders have been explored and a product for treating anal fissure was recently launched. New classes of compounds incorporating a NO-donating moiety into standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the NO-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) or COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donors (CINODs) have also been developed. These have been shown to exhibit reduced gastrointestinal injury in experimental models, and reports on their efficacy and safety in Phase I and II studies are now available. Modulation of the inducible NO synthase isoform that generates excessive NO that can lead to subsequent cytotoxic moieties, such as peroxynitrite, may have therapeutic possibilities in a range of inflammatory diseases of the gut. Likewise, agents that promote the decomposition of peroxynitrite or removal of its other component, superoxide, may also prove to be of use. Further targets for pharmaceutical exploitation are likely to come from both genomic and molecular insights into the processes that regulate the NO system. PMID:16255675

  16. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H.; Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim's tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on 57Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  17. Furoxan-Bearing Micelles for Nitric Oxide Delivery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Urara; Wang, Tengjiao; Chen, Jerry J Y; Uyama, Hiroshi; van der Vlies, André J

    2016-07-01

    Furoxans, or 1,2,5-oxadiazole-N-oxides, are a class of nitric oxide (NO)-donating compounds that release NO in response to thiol-containing molecules. In this study, polymeric micelles bearing furoxan moieties are prepared from an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of a hydrophobic furoxan-bearing block and a hydrophilic poly(N-acryloylmorpholine) block. The block copolymer is prepared using a combination of the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and the copper-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition techniques. The block copolymers form spherical micelles with a diameter of 50 nm by self-assembly in water. The micelles release NO in response to cysteine and show improved stability against hydrolytic decomposition. Furthermore, the micelles show a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with ibuprofen in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26953715

  18. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Menaka, K. B.; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, N. Suchetha

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis. PMID:20407654

  19. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Dendrimers as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Chudasama, Shalini L.; Lu, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of a series of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers was evaluated against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A direct comparison of the bactericidal efficacy between NO-releasing and control PPI dendrimers (i.e., non-NO-releasing) revealed both enhanced biocidal action of NO-releasing dendrimers and reduced toxicity against mammalian fibroblast cells. Antibacterial activity for the NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers was shown to be a function of both dendrimer size (molecular weight) and exterior functionality. In addition to minimal toxicity against fibroblasts, NO-releasing PPI dendrimers modified with styrene oxide exhibited the greatest biocidal activity (≥9.999% killing) against all bacterial strains tested. The N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers presented in this study hold promise as effective NO-based therapeutics for combating bacterial infections. PMID:23013537

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediates Tightening of the Endothelial Barrier by Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, decreases paracellular endothelial permeability in a process that requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. To define the proximal mechanism of this effect, we tested whether it might involve enhanced generation and/or sparing of nitric oxide (NO) by the vitamin. EA.hy926 endothelial cells cultured on semi-porous filter supports showed decreased endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin in response to exogenous NO provided by the NO donor spermine NONOATE, as well as to activation of the downstream NO pathway by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, a cell-penetrant cyclic GMP analog. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increased endothelial permeability, indicating a role constitutive NO generation by eNOS in maintaining the permeability barrier. Inhibition of guanylate cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one also increased endothelial permeability and blocked barrier tightening by spermine NONOATE. Loading cells with what are likely physiologic concentrations of ascorbate decreased endothelial permeability. This effect was blocked by inhibition of either eNOS or guanylate cyclase, suggesting that it involved generation of NO by eNOS and subsequent NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase. These results show that endothelial permeability barrier function depends on constitutive generation of NO and that ascorbate-dependent tightening of this barrier involves maintaining NO through the eNOS/guanylate cyclase pathway. PMID:21156160

  1. A nitric oxide-responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi regulates flagella production and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Henares, Bernadette M; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  2. A Nitric Oxide-Responsive Quorum Sensing Circuit in Vibrio harveyi Regulates Flagella Production and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Henares, Bernadette M.; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  3. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    PubMed Central

    Seyffarth, Gunter; Nelson, Paul N; Dunmore, Simon J; Rodrigo, Nalinda; Murphy, Damian J; Carson, Ray J

    2004-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour. PMID:15191613

  4. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  5. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones, having chemical structures similar to estrogens, are believed to stimulate nitric oxide production and thus lower blood pressure. The efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation to stimulate nitric oxide production and lower blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood press...

  6. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  7. 75 FR 43535 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy for Premature Infants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... week of pregnancy) with respiratory failure. Inhaled nitric oxide therapy is typically administered in...-term infants, use of this therapy may shorten the length of time respiratory support is required... receive respiratory support? Are there short-term risks of inhaled nitric oxide therapy among...

  8. SALICYLIC ACID- AND NITRIC OXIDE-MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in plant defense signaling is discussed, with emphasis on the role of nitric oxide and salicylic acid in the development of disease resistance. Nitric Oxide has recently been shown to have an important role in plant disease resistance. We show an increase in NOS-like activity in TMV...

  9. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:22022485

  10. Effect of endogenous nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiration of rat hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Curran, R.D.; Ochoa, J.B.; Harbrecht, B.G.; Hoffman, R.A.; Simmons, R.L.; Billiar, T.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Nitric oxide, a highly reactive radical, was recently identified as an intermediate of L-arginine metabolism in mammalian cells. We have shown that nitric oxide synthesis is induced in vitro in cultured hepatocytes by supernatants from activated Kupffer cells or in vivo by injecting rats with nonviable Corynebacterium parvum. In both cases, nitric oxide biosynthesis in hepatocytes was associated with suppression of total protein synthesis. This study attempts to determine the effect of nitric oxide biosynthesis on the activity of specific hepatocytic mitochondrial enzymes and to determine whether inhibition of protein synthesis is caused by suppression of energy metabolism. Exposure of hepatocytes to supernatants from activated Kupffer cells led to a 30% decrease of aconitase (Krebs cycle) and complex I (mitochondrial electron transport chain) activity. Using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, we demonstrated that the inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity was due, in part, to the action of nitric oxide. In contrast, in vivo nitric oxide synthesis of hepatocytes from Corynebacterium parvum-treated animals had no effect on mitochondrial respiration. This suggests that inhibition of protein synthesis by nitric oxide is not likely to be mediated by inhibition of energy metabolism.

  11. Nitric oxide-releasing mesalamine: potential utility for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J L

    2003-05-01

    Nitric oxide can accelerate ulcer healing and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of a nitric oxide-releasing moiety to mesalamine significantly boosts its anti-inflammatory activity. NO-releasing mesalamine suppresses inflammatory cytokine production and reduces leukocyte infiltration. PMID:12846442

  12. The inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of a nitric oxide releasing cream on normal skin.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, A D; Copeland, P; Hay, I; Husain, A; Ewen, S W

    1999-09-01

    We describe the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of nitric oxide in vivo in human skin. Nitrite and ascorbic acid were mixed on the skin of 12 normal volunteers, three times daily, to release nitric oxide. Exposure to nitric oxide was varied by randomizing the concentration of nitrite and duration of application. Nitric oxide treated skin showed significant increases in cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, neutrophil elastase, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, nitrosotyrosine, p53, and apoptotic cells compared with skin treated with ascorbic acid alone. There was no significant increase in mast cells. Following application of nitric oxide there were significantly fewer CD1a positive Langerhans cells in the epidermis. These appeared to lose dendritic morphology and migrate from the epidermis. There was no significant difference in staining for Ki-67, a marker related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, between active and control skin but staining was greater after exposure to higher dose nitric oxide than the low dose. Apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and p53 staining were relatively greater after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. These results suggest that nitric oxide is pro-inflammatory and is toxic to DNA, leading to the accumulation of p53 and subsequent apoptosis. High-dose nitric oxide paradoxically led to a smaller increase in macrophages and T cells than low dose suggesting an immunosuppressive effect of higher levels. PMID:10469339

  13. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase participates in septic shock myocardial depression by nitric oxide overproduction and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ce; Yi, Chenju; Wang, Huiping; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is involved in septic shock myocardial depression. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method was used to induce septic shock. There was a significant depression of hemodynamic parameters recorded in the septic shock stage. After using nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AMG), and neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), depression of the parameters was partly attenuated. Nitric oxide production in isolated cardiac mitochondria increased obviously in the CLP-septic shock stage, L-NAME and 7-NI both decreased NO production significantly. Nitrite/nitrate (NOx) production in the septic shock stage was much greater than those in the corresponding sham groups, and NOx production in the cytosol by inducible NOS was greater. Treatment with AMG suppressed NOx production in the cytosol by iNOS, whereas treatment with 7-NI decreased NOx production in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial NOS expression increased significantly in the septic shock stage, and its overexpression was attenuated using 7-NI. There was no significant decrease in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore measurement in the CLP-septic shock group, whereas a significant decrease was observed in those treated with L-NAME or 7-NI. These results indicate that overexpression of mitochondrial NOS is involved in myocardial depression. PMID:21993446

  14. Nitric oxide generated from isoniazid activation by KatG: source of nitric oxide and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Graham S; Master, Sharon; Rusnak, Frank; Deretic, Vojo

    2004-08-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) is a frontline antituberculosis agent. Once taken up by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, INH requires activation by the catalase-peroxidase KatG, converting INH from its prodrug form into a range of bactericidal reactive species. Here we used 15N-labeled INH together with electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping techniques to demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO*) is generated from oxidation at the hydrazide nitrogens during the activation of INH by M. tuberculosis KatG. We also observed that a specific scavenger of NO* provided protection against the antimycobacterial activity of INH in bacterial culture. No significant increases in mycobacterial protein nitration were detected, suggesting that NOdot; and not peroxynitrite, a nitrating metabolite of NO*, is involved in antimycobacterial action. In conclusion, INH-derived NO* has biological activity, which directly contributes to the antimycobacterial action of INH. PMID:15273113

  15. Effect of acute lithium administration on penile erection: involvement of nitric oxide system

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughdaran, Saleh; Sadeghipour, Hamed; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lithium has been the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder (BD) for many years. Although erectile dysfunction is a known adverse effect of this drug, the mechanism of action by which lithium affects erectile function is still unknown. Objective: The aim was to investigate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in modulatory effect of lithium on penile erection (PE). We further evaluated the possible role of Sildenafil in treatment of lithium-induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Erectile function was determined using rat model of apomorphine-induced erections. For evaluating the effect of lithium on penile erection, rats received intraperitoneal injection of graded doses of lithium chloride 30 mins before subcutaneous injection of apomorphine. To determine the possible role of NO pathway, sub-effective dose of N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, was administered 15 min before administration of sub-effective dose of lithium chloride. In other separate experimental groups, sub- effective dose of the nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine, or Sildenafil was injected into the animals 15 min before administration of a potent dose of lithium. 30 min after administration of lithium chloride, animals were assessed in apomorphine test. Serum lithium levels were measured 30 min after administration of effective dose of lithium. Results: Lithium at 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased number of PE (p<0.001), whereas at lower doses (5, 10 and 30 mg/kg) had no effect on apomorphine induced PE. The serum Li+ level of rats receiving 50 mg/kg lithium was 1±0.15 mmol/L which is in therapeutic range of lithium. The inhibitory effect of Lithium was blocked by administration of sub-effective dose of nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg) (p<0.001) and sildenafil (3.5 mg/kg) (p<0.001) whereas pretreatment with a low and sub-effective dose of L-NAME (10mg/kg) potentiated sub-effective dose of

  16. Neostigmine-induced contraction and nitric oxide-induced relaxation of isolated ileum from STZ diabetic guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, Joseph; Jukic, Anne Marie Zaura; LePard, Kathy J.

    2011-01-01

    Both delayed gastrointestinal transit and autonomic neuropathy have been documented in patients with diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of neostigmine, an agent that mimics release of acetylcholine from autonomic neurons by prokinetic agents, to contract smooth muscle, despite dysfunctional enteric neural pathways, was determined using isolated ilea from STZ-treated and control guinea pigs. Both bethanechol- and neostigmine-induced contractions were stronger in diabetic ileum. Bethanechol-induced contractions of control but not diabetic ileum were increased by low dose scopolamine suggesting reduced activation of presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors in diabetic ileum. The muscarinic receptor antagonist 4-DAMP strongly, but the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium only weakly, reduced neostigmine-induced contractions of control and diabetic ilea. The amount of acetylcholine, inferred from tissue choline content, was increased in diabetic ileum. Nicotinic neural and noncholinergic postjunctional smooth muscle receptors contributed more strongly to neostigmine-induced contractions in diabetic than control ileum. Relaxation of diabetic ileum by exogenous nitric oxide generated from sodium nitroprusside was comparable to control ileum, but smooth muscle relaxation by L-arginine using neuronal nitric oxide synthase to generate nitric oxide was weaker in diabetic ileum with evidence for a role for inducible nitric oxide synthase. Despite autonomic neuropathy, neostigmine strongly contracted ileum from diabetic animals but by a different mechanism including stronger activation of postjunctional muscarinic receptors, greater synaptic acetylcholine, stronger activation of noncholinergic excitatory pathways, and weaker activation of inhibitory pathways. A selective medication targeting a specific neural pathway may more effectively treat disordered gastrointestinal transit in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:21880552

  17. Truncating mutation in the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene is associated with infantile achalasia.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Edvardson, Simon; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Zangen, Tzili; Hashavya, Saar; Begin, Michal; Yaacov, Barak; Cinamon, Yuval; Koplewitz, Benjamin Z; Vromen, Amos; Elpeleg, Orly; Smith, Brian C

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide is thought to have a role in the pathogenesis of achalasia. We performed a genetic analysis of 2 siblings with infant-onset achalasia. Exome analysis revealed that they were homozygous for a premature stop codon in the gene encoding nitric oxide synthase 1. Kinetic analyses and molecular modeling showed that the truncated protein product has defects in folding, nitric oxide production, and binding of cofactors. Heller myotomy had no effect in these patients, but sildenafil therapy increased their ability to drink. The finding recapitulates the previously reported phenotype of nitric oxide synthase 1-deficient mice, which have achalasia. Nitric oxide signaling appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of achalasia in humans. PMID:25479138

  18. Getting to NO Alzheimer's Disease: Neuroprotection versus Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Balez, Rachelle; Ooi, Lezanne

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the loss of neurons in the brain which leads to progressive memory loss and behavioral changes. To date, there are only limited medications for AD and no known cure. Nitric oxide (NO) has long been considered part of the neurotoxic insult caused by neuroinflammation in the Alzheimer's brain. However, focusing on early developments, prior to the appearance of cognitive symptoms, is changing that perception. This has highlighted a compensatory, neuroprotective role for NO that protects synapses by increasing neuronal excitability. A potential mechanism for augmentation of excitability by NO is via modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel activity (Kv7 and Kv2). Identification of the ionic mechanisms and signaling pathways that mediate this protection is an important next step for the field. Harnessing the protective role of NO and related signaling pathways could provide a therapeutic avenue that prevents synapse loss early in disease. PMID:26697132

  19. Engineering nitric oxide synthase chimeras to function as NO dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Binder, Katherine; Sharma, Manisha; Wei, Chin-Chuan; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) catalyze a two-step oxidation of l-arginine to form nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. NOS contains a N-terminal oxygenase domain (NOSoxy) that is the site of NO synthesis, and a C-terminal reductase domain (NOSred) that binds nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and provides electrons to the NOSoxy heme during catalysis. The three NOS isoforms in mammals inducible NOS (iNOS), neuronal NOS (nNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) share high structural similarity but differ in NO release rates and catalytic properties due to differences in enzyme kinetic parameters. These parameters must be balanced for NOS enzymes to release NO, rather than consume it in a competing, inherent NO dioxygenase reaction. To improve understanding, we drew on a global catalytic model and previous findings to design three NOS chimeras that may predominantly function as NO dioxygenases: iNOSoxy/nNOSred (Wild type (WT) chimera), V346I iNOSoxy/nNOSred (V346I chimera) and iNOSoxy/S1412D nNOSred (S1412D chimera). The WT and S1412D chimeras had higher NO release than the parent iNOS, while the V346I chimera exhibited much lower NO release, consistent with expectations. Measurements indicated that a greater NO dioxygenase activity was achieved, particularly in the V346I chimera, which dioxygenated an estimated two to four NO per NO that it released, while the other chimeras had nearly equivalent NO dioxygenase and NO release activities. Computer simulations of the global catalytic model using the measured kinetic parameters produced results that mimicked the measured outcomes, and this provided further insights on the catalytic behaviors of the chimeras and basis of their increased NO dioxygenase activities. PMID:27013266

  20. Glutamate-induced activation of nitric oxide synthase is impaired in cerebral cortex in vivo in rats with chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Regina; Erceg, Slaven; Rodriguez-Diaz, Jesus; Saez-Valero, Javier; Piedrafita, Blanca; Suarez, Isabel; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-07-01

    It has been proposed that impairment of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in brain contributes to cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. The aims of this work were to assess whether the function of this pathway and of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are altered in cerebral cortex in vivo in rats with chronic liver failure due to portacaval shunt (PCS) and whether these alterations are due to hyperammonemia. The glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway function and NOS activation by NMDA was analysed by in vivo microdialysis in cerebral cortex of PCS and control rats and in rats with hyperammonemia without liver failure. Similar studies were done in cortical slices from these rats and in cultured cortical neurons exposed to ammonia. Basal NOS activity, nitrites and cGMP are increased in cortex of rats with hyperammonemia or liver failure. These increases seem due to increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. NOS activation by NMDA is impaired in cerebral cortex in both animal models and in neurons exposed to ammonia. Chronic liver failure increases basal NOS activity, nitric oxide and cGMP but reduces activation of NOS induced by NMDA receptors activation. Hyperammonemia is responsible for both effects which will lead, independently, to alterations contributing to neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17286583

  1. Nitric oxide suppresses growth and development in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Christine; Kerschbaum, Hubert H; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2009-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO), a key molecule in inter- and intracellular signalling, is implicated in developmental processes, host defense, and apoptosis in higher plants. We investigated the effect of NO on development in the unicellular green alga, Micrasterias denticulata, using two different NO donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Investigations at the light microsopic level revealed that both NO donors suppressed cell growth. Ultrastructural analyses were performed with SNAP- as well as SNP-treated cells and, additionally, with the control compound N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP). Cells incubated with NO donors lacked a secondary wall and dictyosomal function was impaired, whereas NAP-treated cells showed no difference in development and organelle structure compared to control cells. Moreover, cisternae of the Golgi stacks were slightly involute and no vesicles were pinched off after SNAP and SNP incubation. The NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, potassium salt) abrogated the effect of SNP, thus confirming that inhibition of cell growth is due to nitric oxide. Addition of iodoacetic acid, an inhibitor of cysteine-containing enzymes, like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), evoked similar effects on cell growth and secondary wall formation as obtained by treatment with NO donors. Therefore, we hypothesize that NO inhibits activity of enzymes involved in the secretory pathway, such as GAPDH, via S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residue and, consequently, modulates cell growth in M. denticulata. PMID:18455833

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases in atherosclerosis: role of nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, homocysteine, and polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vacek, Thomas P; Rehman, Shahnaz; Neamtu, Diana; Yu, Shipeng; Givimani, Srikanth; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that involves activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs); MMPs degrade collagen and allow for smooth-muscle cell migration within a vessel. Moreover, this begets an accumulation of other cellular material, resulting in occlusion of the vessel and ischemic events to tissues in need of nutrients. Homocysteine has been shown to activate MMPs via an increase in oxidative stress and acting as a signaling molecule on receptors like the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Nitric oxide has been shown to be beneficial in some cases of deactivating MMPs. However, in other cases, it has been shown to be harmful. Further studies are warranted on the scenarios that are beneficial versus destructive. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to decrease MMP activities in all cases in the literature by acting as an antioxidant and vasodilator. Various MMP-knockout and gene-silencing models have been used to determine the function of the many different MMPs. This has allowed us to discern the role that each MMP has in promoting or alleviating pathological conditions. Furthermore, there has been some study into the MMP polymorphisms that exist in the population. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of MMPs and their polymorphisms on the development of atherosclerosis, with emphasis placed on pathways that involve nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, and homocysteine. PMID:25767394

  3. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction

    PubMed Central

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Local increases in blood flow – ‘hypoxic vasodilation’ – confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclus