Science.gov

Sample records for nitrile butadiene rubber

  1. Polybenzoxazole-filled nitrile butadiene rubber compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor); Guillot, David G. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) having an acrylonitrile content that ranges from approximately 26% by weight to approximately 35% by weight and polybenzoxazole (PBO) fibers. The NBR may be a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene and may be present in the insulation composition in a range of from approximately 45% by weight to approximately 56% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. The PBO fibers may be present in a range of from approximately 3% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. A rocket motor including the insulation composition and a method of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  2. [Identification of migrants from nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves].

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, Motoh; Kawamura, Yoko; Wakui, Chiseko; Maitani, Tamio

    2003-04-01

    Polyvinyl chloride gloves containing di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate are restricted for food contact use. In their place, disposable gloves made from nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are used in contact with foodstuffs. Some unknown substances were found to migrate into n-heptane from NBR gloves. By GC/MS, HR-MS and NMR, their chemical structures were confirmed to be 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (used as a plasticizer), 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol), a mixture of styrenated phenols consisting of 2-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 4-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,6-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,4-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol and 2,4,6-tri(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol (used as antioxidants), and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, which seems to a degradation product of antioxidant. Migration levels of these compounds were 1.68 micrograms/cm2 of 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, 2.80 micrograms/cm2 of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate, 46.08 micrograms/cm2 of styrenated phenols and 4.22 micrograms/cm2 of 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) into n-heptane, respectively. The content of total styrenated phenols was 6,900 micrograms/g in NBR gloves. PMID:12846157

  3. High performance light-colored nitrile-butadiene rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanda; Guo, Baochun; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Lixin; Zhou, Wenyou; Jia, Demin

    2011-12-01

    High mechanical performance nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) with light color was fabricated by the method of in situ formation of zinc disorbate (ZDS) or magnesium disorbate (MDS). The in situ formed ZDS and its polymerization via internal mixing was confirmed by X-ray diffaraction. The mechanical properties, ageing resistance, morphology and the dynamic mechanical analysis were fully studied. It was found that with increasing loading of metallic disorbate both the curing rate and the ionic crosslink density was largely increased. The modulus, tensile strength and tear strength were largely increased. With a comparison between internal mixing and opening mixing, the mechanical performance for the former one was obviously better than the latter one. The high performance was ascribed to the finely dispersion nano domains with irregular shape and obscure interfacial structures. Except for the NBR vulcanizate with a high loading of MDS, the others' ageing resistance with incorporation of these two metallic disorbate was found to be good. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that, with increasing loading of metallic disorbate, the highly increased storage modulus above -20 degrees C, the up-shifted glass transition temperature (Tg) and the reduced mechanical loss were ascribed to strengthened interfacial interactions. PMID:22408977

  4. Thermoplastic nanoclay-modified vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Svetoslav I.; Okhotina, Natalya A.; Nigmatullina, Alina I.; Panfilova, Olga A.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber, containing modified organoclay were developed. It was shown that composites containing 1 to 5 pbw of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite added to rubber show improved physical-mechanical characteristics. Their swelling degree in AI-92 and motor oil was determined. The swelling degree of composites in petrol and motor oil decreases substantially, by 20-63%, due to the introduction of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite. Modification of thermoplastic vulcanizates using layered silicates raised the degradation onset temperature and decreases weight loss upon high temperature heating.

  5. Immediate and long-term effects of electron beam irradiation on nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopitaux, Garance; Coqueret, Xavier; Boursereau, Frédéric; Larnac, Guy

    2003-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation in a formulated nitrile butadiene rubber elastomer, vulcanized thermally prior to irradiation, were investigated. The immediate effects of radiation predominantly result in cross-linking of polymer chains. Upon thermal aging, the amplitude of the relative stiffening due to cross-linking was shown to decrease with increasing absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. The ultimate tensile elongation has been analyzed as a function of aging time by means of a first order kinetic model, and as a function of temperature by an Arrhenius equation. The influence of the radiation dose has been introduced in the model. This set of parameters makes it possible to accurately predict the long-term evolution of mechanical properties for elastomers treated under various conditions.

  6. The physical and degradation properties of starch-graft-acrylonitrile/carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber latex films.

    PubMed

    Misman, M A; Azura, A R; Hamid, Z A A

    2015-09-01

    Starch-graft-acrylonitrile (ANS) is compounded with carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The control XNBR and the ANS/XNBR latex films were prepared through a coagulant dipping process. The films were subjected to ageing and soil burial procedures. For the biodegradation experiment, the surface of the film was assessed after the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of soil burial. The ANS, XNBR, and ANS/XNBR colloidal stability were determined with a Malvern Zetasizer. For the dipped latex films, the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were analyzed. The addition of ANS into the XNBR latex increased the stability of the colloidal dispersions, decreased the latex film tensile strength, but increased the elongation at break due to the bipolar interaction of the ANS and XNBR particles. The ANS/XNBR latex films aged faster than the control films while the morphological analysis showed the existence of a starch crystal region and the formation of microbial colonies on the surfaces of the films. Based on the TGA-DTA curves, a higher ΔT was observed for the ANS/XNBR latex films signifying high thermal energy needed for the film to thermally degrade. PMID:26005134

  7. Predicting the solubility of gases in Nitrile Butadiene Rubber in extreme conditions using molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Musab; Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Mostofi, Arash

    In the oil and gas industry, elastomer seals play an important role in protecting sensitive monitoring equipment from contamination by gases - a problem that is exacerbated by the high pressures and temperatures found down-hole. The ability to predict and prevent such permeative failure has proved elusive to-date. Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) is a common choice of elastomer for seals due to its resistance to heat and fuels. In the conditions found in the well it readily absorbs small molecular weight gases. How this behaviour changes quantitatively for different gases as a function of temperature and pressure is not well-understood. In this work a series of fully atomistic simulations are performed to understand the effect of extreme conditions on gas solubility in NBR. Widom particle insertion is used to compute solubilities. The importance of sampling and allowing structural relaxation upon compression are highlighted, and qualitatively reasonable trends reproduced. Finally, while at STP it has previously been shown that the solubility of CO2 is higher than that of He in NBR, we observe that under the right circumstances it is possible to reverse this trend.

  8. Wear resistance and friction reduction in acrylo nitrile butadiene rubber through hybrid combination of graphite flakes and nano tungsten disulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Neha; Pandey, Akanksha; Parihar, A. S.; Mishra, A. K.; Gandhi, M. N.; Bhattacharyya, A. R.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Prasad, N. E.

    2016-05-01

    Friction and wear have considerable role in the life span of two interacting parts. Incorporation of nanofillers in polymers/elastomers matrix causes commendable changes in its tribologicalproperties. The main purpose of this work is to reduce the coefficient of friction and wear rate of Acrylo Nitrile Butadiene rubber (NBR). To achieve such objective traditionally well knownlubricants graphite(G), tungsten disulphide (WS2) and there hybrid combination was incorporated in NBR matrix. Effect of applied load (force) and concentration of fillers on tribological properties of NBR had been studied. The filler incorporation enhanced the hardnessby 8%, showed resistance to hydraulic oil and aging effect also got improved significantly. A particular optimized concentration of NBR with hybrid combination of 2% WS2 and 4% Graphite showed minimum coefficient of friction as well as wear rate. A hypothesis could be attributed that similar lamellar structure of WS2 and Graphite along with formation of a stable nanoscale disulfide tribofilmcould result in lowering of friction. These substantially improved properties of nanoreinforced rubber materials would definitely pave promising path for plethora of potential technological applications.

  9. Transport properties of carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-nanoclay composites; a promising material for protective gloves in occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in response to one of the research needs of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), i.e. the application of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in the field of occupational safety and health. In order to fill this important knowledge gap, the equilibrium solubility and diffusion of carbon tetrachloride and ethyl acetate through carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-clay nanocomposite, as a promising new material for chemical protective gloves (or barrier against the transport of organic solvent contaminant), were examined by swelling procedure. Near Fickian diffusion was observed for XNBR based nanocomposites containing different amounts of nanoclay. Decontamination potential is a key factor in development of a new material for reusable chemical protective gloves applications, specifically for routine or highly toxic exposures. A thermal decontamination regime for nanocomposite was developed for the first time. Then, successive cycles of exposure/decontamination for nanocomposite were performed to the maximum 10 cycles for the first time. This result confirms that the two selected solvents cannot deteriorate the rubber-nanoclay interaction and, therefore, such gloves can be reusable after decontamination. PMID:24581248

  10. Transport properties of carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-nanoclay composites; a promising material for protective gloves in occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei Aliabadi, Mostafa; Naderi, Ghasem; Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Jahangiri, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in response to one of the research needs of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), i.e. the application of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in the field of occupational safety and health. In order to fill this important knowledge gap, the equilibrium solubility and diffusion of carbon tetrachloride and ethyl acetate through carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-clay nanocomposite, as a promising new material for chemical protective gloves (or barrier against the transport of organic solvent contaminant), were examined by swelling procedure. Near Fickian diffusion was observed for XNBR based nanocomposites containing different amounts of nanoclay. Decontamination potential is a key factor in development of a new material for reusable chemical protective gloves applications, specifically for routine or highly toxic exposures. A thermal decontamination regime for nanocomposite was developed for the first time. Then, successive cycles of exposure/decontamination for nanocomposite were performed to the maximum 10 cycles for the first time. This result confirms that the two selected solvents cannot deteriorate the rubber-nanoclay interaction and, therefore, such gloves can be reusable after decontamination. PMID:24581248

  11. Endocrine disruptive effects of chemicals eluted from nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves using reporter gene assay systems.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kanako; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Ohyama, Ken-ichi; Nagai, Fumiko; Ogata, Akio; Iida, Mitsuru

    2008-03-01

    Disposable gloves made of nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are used for contact with foodstuffs rather than polyvinyl chloride gloves containing di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), because endocrine-disruptive effects are suspected for phthalate diesters including DEHP. However, 4,4'-butylidenebis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol) (BBBC), 2,4-di-t-butylphenol, and 2,2,4-trimetyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate can be eluted from NBR gloves, and possibly also detected in food. In this study, we examined the endocrine-disrupting effects of these chemicals via androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated pathways using stably transfected reporter gene cell lines expressing AR (AR-EcoScreen system) and ER (MVLN cells), respectively. We also examined the binding activities of these chemicals to AR and ER. The IC50 value of BBBC for antagonistic androgen was in the range of 10(-6)M. The strength of inhibition was about 5 times that of a known androgen antagonist, 1,1'-(2,2-dichloroethylidene)bis[4-chlorobenzene] (p,p'-DDE), and similar to that of bisphenol A. The IC50 value of BBBC for antagonistic estrogen was in the range of 10(-6)M. These results suggest that BBBC and its structural homologue, 4,4'-thiobis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol) are androgen and estrogen antagonists. It is therefore necessary to study these chemicals in vivo, and clarify their effect on the endocrine system. PMID:18310895

  12. Isolation and identification of some unknown substances in disposable nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves used for food handling.

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, M; Wakui, C; Kawamura, Y; Maitani, T

    2002-11-01

    In Japan, disposable gloves made from nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are frequently used in contact with foods. In a previous paper, we investigated substances migrating from various gloves made of polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene, natural rubber and NBR. Zinc di-n-butyldithiocarbamate (ZDBC), diethyldithiocarbamate (ZDEC) used as vulcanization accelerators, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) used as a plasticizer and many unknown compounds that migrated from NBR gloves into n-heptane were detected by GC/MS. In this paper, six unknown compounds were obtained from one kind of NBR glove by n-hexane extraction and each was isolated by silica gel chromatography. From the results of NMR and mass spectral analysis of the six unknown compounds, their structures are proposed as 1,4-dione-2,5-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)cyclohexadiene (1), 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-(1,1,3,3-tetra methylbutyl)phenol (2), 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (3), 2,4-bis(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (4), 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)4,6-bis(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (5) and 2,4,6-tris(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (6). Compound 1 was observed in five of the seven kinds of NBR gloves, and compounds 2-4 and 6, which are not listed in Chemical Abstract (CA), were present in four kinds of gloves. PMID:12456282

  13. Probing α-relaxation with nuclear magnetic resonance echo decay and relaxation: a study on nitrile butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Pieruccini, Marco; Corti, Maurizio; Rigamonti, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    One dimensional (1)H NMR measurements have been performed to probe slow molecular motions in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) around its calorimetric glass transition temperature Tg. The purpose is to show how software aided data analysis can extract meaningful dynamical data from these measurements. Spin-lattice relaxation time, free induction decay (FID) and magic sandwich echo (MSE) measurements have been carried out at different values of the static field, as a function of temperature. It has been evidenced how the efficiency of the MSE signal in reconstructing the original FID exhibits a sudden minimum at a given temperature, with a slight dependence from the measuring frequency. Computer simulations performed with the software SPINEVOLUTION have shown that the minimum in the efficiency reconstruction of the MSE signal corresponds to the average motional frequency taking a value around the inter-proton coupling. The FID signals have been fitted with a truncated form of a newly derived exact correlation function for the transverse magnetization of a dipolar interacting spin pair, which allows one to avoid the restriction of the stationary and Gaussian approximations. A direct estimate of the conformational dynamics on approaching the Tg is obtained, and the results are in agreement with the analysis performed via the MSE reconstruction efficiency. The occurrence of a wide distribution of correlation frequencies for the chains motion, with a Vogel-Fulcher type temperature dependence, is addressed. A route for a fruitful study of the dynamics accompanying the glass transition by a variety of NMR measurements is thus proposed. PMID:23379979

  14. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hun Tiar; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Boondamnoen, O.; Tai, Mun Foong

    2015-12-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (-14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability.

  15. New dual-phase polymer electrolytes prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. [polyacryloNitrile-Butadiene Rubber/poly(Styrene-Butadiene) copolymer Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1993-10-01

    A new type of Li[sup +] ion conducting polymer electrolytes consisting of two phases, one of which is a highly polar region (impregnated with lithium salt solution), forming ion-conductive channels, while the other is a nonpolar region, forming supporting polymer matrices have been prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. TEM measurement and EDX analysis show evidence that dual-phase structure is constructed in the electrolyte. Ionic conductivity of the electrolyte increases with increase of lithium salt solution content. Maximum ionic conductivity of 2.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] S/cm is obtained at the lithium salt solution content of 60.5% (w/w). The electrolyte retains rubber-like film with good mechanical strength despite the presence of the solution.

  16. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of a Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM of each of the two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle. Each cured insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive, and some of the curved areas in the rubber may have significant residual stresses. A number of recently bonded NBR insulators have shown fine surface cracks, and stressed insulator areas may be aging at a faster rate than unstressed areas, thus hastening the surface cracking. Thermal analysis data on both vendor insulators by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) through a temperature/frequency sweep from 24 to 74 C have shown a higher flexural storage modulus and Arrhenius activation energy for the stressed area than for the unstressed area. Other thermal analysis techniques are being used to study the insulator surface vs. bulk interior for better understanding this anomaly.

  17. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of an Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM used on both of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of the Space Shuttle. A number of lots of the BSM insulator in 1998-99 exhibited surface cracks and/or crazing. Each insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive. Induced insulator stresses from adhesive cure are likely greatest where the insulator/adhesive contour is the greatest, thus showing increased insulator surface cracking in this area. Thermal analysis testing by Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) was performed on one each of the two vendor BSM insulators previously bonded that exhibited the surface cracking. The TMA data from the film/fiber technique yielded the most meaningful results, with thin insulator surface samples containing cracks having roughly the same modulus (stiffness) as thin insulator bulk samples just underneath.

  18. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. PMID:26076611

  19. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BUTADIENE AT A SYNTHETIC RUBBER PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butadiene emission samples were collected from the process vent stream of a plant manufacturing synthetic rubber from styrene and butadiene. Samples were collected by modification of the evacuated container sampling procedure, outlined in Section 7.1.1 of EPA Method 18. On-site a...

  20. Studies on nitrile rubber degradation in zinc bromide completion fluid and its prevention by surface fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Cantu, Yadira Itzel

    Poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) or nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) is frequently used as an O-ring material in the oil extraction industry due to its excellent chemical properties and resistance to oil. However, degradation of NBR gaskets is known to occur during the well completion and oil extraction process where packers are exposed to completion fluids such as ZnBr2 brine. Under these conditions NBR exhibits accelerated chemical degradation resulting in embrittlement and cracking. Samples of NBR, poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) and poly(butadiene) (PB) have been exposed to ZnBr2 based completion fluid, and analyzed by ATR and diffuse reflectance IR. Analysis shows the ZnBr2 based completion fluid promotes hydrolysis of the nitrile group to form amides and carboxylic groups. Analysis also shows that carbon-carbon double bonds in NBR are unaffected after short exposure to zinc bromide based completion fluid, but are quickly hydrolyzed in acidic bromide mixtures. Although fluoropolymers have excellent chemical resistance, their strength is less than nitrile rubber and replacing the usual gasket materials with fluoroelastomers is expensive. However, a fluoropolymer surface on a nitrile elastomer can provide the needed chemical resistance while retaining their strength. In this study, we have shown that this can be achieved by direct fluorination, a rather easy and inexpensive process. Samples of NBR O-rings have been fluorinated by exposure to F2 and F2/HF mixtures at various temperatures. Fluorination with F 2 produces the desired fluoropolymer layer; however, fluorination by F2/HF mixtures gave a smoother fluorinated layer at lower temperatures and shorter times. Fluorinated samples were exposed to ZnBr2 drilling fluid and solvents. Elemental analysis shows that the fluorinated layer eliminates ZnBr2 diffusion into the NBR polymeric matrix. It was also found that surface fluorination significantly retards the loss of mechanical properties such as elasticity, tensile

  1. Model fire tests on polyphosphazene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widenor, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A video tape record of model room fire tests was shown, comparing polyphosphazene (P-N) rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber closed-cell foams as interior finish thermal insulation under conditions directly translatable to an actual fire situation. Flashover did not occur with the P-N foam and only moderate amounts of low density smoke were formed, whereas with the PVC/nitrile foam, flashover occurred quickly and large volumes of high density smoke were emitted. The P-N foam was produced in a pilot plant under carefully controlled conditions. The PVC/nitrile foam was a commercial product. A major phase of the overall program involved fire tests on P-N open-cell foam cushioning.

  2. Radiation-induced vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene-butadiene rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Patil, N. D.; Dubey, K. A.; Kumar, Virendra; Sabharwal, S.

    2005-04-01

    Radiation vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene butadiene rubber latex (SBRL) has been investigated. The cast films were characterised for their swelling properties, tensile strength and thermal stability as a function of radiation dose as well as SBRL content. The gel content, tensile strength and thermal stability of the copolymer films were found to increase with increasing the SBRL content in the feed solution and radiation dose.

  3. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  4. A molecular study of gas solubility in nitrile rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Musab; Mostofi, Arash; Sutton, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important uses of elastomers in the oil industry is for seals to encase and protect sensitive monitoring equipment from contamination by gases and liquids at the high pressures and temperatures in the well. Failure of such seals sometimes occurs on decompression when they are returned to the surface. The conditions in the well lead to gases being absorbed by Nitrile rubber (NBR) seals. NBR exhibits a strong permselectivity towards CO2 compared to other gases; something attributed experimentally to the enhanced solubility of CO2. In this study an explanation is sought at the molecular level for this phenomenon. A series of molecular mechanics calculations are performed to compute solubilities of different gases in NBR. The effect of acrylonitrile content on their solubilities is studied for the first time by simulation, and we discuss the important issue of convergence with respect to the sampling of different elastomer configurations. It is observed that the presence of cyano groups has a marked impact on the solubility of CO2 and an explanation is offered.

  5. Nanocomposites of nitrile (NBR) rubber with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warasitthinon, Nuthathai

    Nanotechnology offers the promise of creating new materials with enhanced performance. There are different kinds of fillers used in rubber nanocomposites, such as carbon black, silica, carbon fibers, and organoclays. Carbon nanotube reinforced elastomers have potential for improved rubber properties in aggressive environments. The first chapter is an introduction to the literature. The second chapter investigated the incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into rubber matrix for potential use in high temperature applications. The vulcanization kinetics of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes was investigated. The vulcanized NBR rubber with different loading percentages of MWCNTs was also compared to NBR reinforced with carbon black N330. The optimum curing time at 170°C (T90) was found to decrease with increasing content of MWCNTs. Increased filler loading of both carbon black and MWCNTs gave higher modulus and strength. The MWCNTs filled materials gave better retention of modulus and tensile strength at high temperatures, but lower strength as compared to the carbon black filled samples. In the third chapter, carbon black (CB, 50phr) content in nitrile rubber (NBR) nanocomposites was partially replaced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). NBR/CB/CNTs nanocomposites with varying ratio of CB/CNTs (50/0 phr to 40/10 phr) were formulated via the melt-mixing method using an internal mixer. The reinforcing effect of single filler (CB) and mixture of fillers (CB and CNTs) on the properties of NBR nanocomposites was investigated. The cure kinetics and bound rubber content were analyzed using rheometry and solvent swelling method. In addition, mechanical behavior at both room temperature and high temperature (350°F/ 121°C) were examined. The scorch time and curing time values showed that there was no significant effect on the curing behavior of NBR nanocomposites after the partial replacement of CB with

  6. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates. PMID:17629616

  7. Carbon nanotubes as reinforcement of styrene butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Alejandro; Goyanes, Silvia; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.; Mondragon, Iñaki; Marzocca, Angel

    2007-10-01

    This study reports an easy technique to produce cured styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites with a sulphur/accelerator system at 150 °C. Significant improvement in Young's modulus and tensile strength were achieved by incorporating 0.66 wt% of filler without sacrificing SBR elastomer high elongation at break. A comparison with carbon black filled SBR was also made. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate dispersion and fracture surfaces. Results indicated that the homogeneous dispersion of MWCNT throughout SBR matrix and strong interfacial adhesion between oxidized MWCNT and the matrix are responsible for the considerable enhancement of mechanical properties of the composite.

  8. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  9. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Industrywide study

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.; Krishnan, E.R.

    1986-06-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The facility produces 465 million pounds of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and 15 million pounds of nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) annually, requiring 120 million pounds of 1,3-butadiene. Of 470 employees, 143 were directly involved in reaction, recovery, and finishing operations, and were potentially exposed to 1,3-butadiene 8 hours per day.

  10. [The airborne 1,3-butadiene concentrations in rubber and plastic processing plants].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiaki; Tainaka, Hidetsugu; Matsunaga, Ichiro; Goto, Sumio

    2002-03-01

    Environment pollution by 1,3-butadiene had considerably increased in Japan. The main cause of the pollution is the automotive exhaust gas, and leaks from factories, smoking, and burning of rubber and plastic products are considered to be minor sources. The object of this study was to determine the contamination levels of airborne 1,3-butadiene in factories processing rubber and plastics containing 1,3-butadiene. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene were measured in 21 plants (10 rubber processing plants and 11 plastics processing plants) in Osaka. 1,3-Butadiene in air was collected for 10 minutes with a charcoal tube and a portable small pump adjusted to a 250 ml/min flow rate. In each plant, indoor air samples at five points and an outdoor air sample at one point outside the plant were collected. The samples were subjected to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after thermal desorption from the charcoal. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene in the rubber processing plants and the plastics processing plants were 0.14-2.20 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.48 microgram/m3) and 0.23-4.51 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.80 microgram/m3), respectively. In all plants examined, indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were higher than the outdoor concentrations around the plants. Therefore, 1,3-butadiene was considered to arise from the processing of rubber or plastics, but the indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were much lower than the PEL-TWA (1 ppm = 2.21 mg/m3) of OSHA and the TLV-TWA (2 ppm) of ACGIH. The concentrations in the plants with closed room conditions without ventilation were higher than the concentrations in the other plants. It was suggested that ventilation affected the 1,3-butadiene concentration in the plants. PMID:11993233

  11. Application of Lignin as Antioxidant in Styrene Butadiene Rubber Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shusheng; Cheng, Xiansu

    2010-11-01

    Lignin isolated from enzymatic hydrolyzed cornstalks (EHL) is a renewable natural polymer, and rubber is one of the most important polymer materials. The application of EHL in rubber industry is of great significance. The influence of EHL and antioxidant RD on the vulcanizing characteristics, thermal oxidative aging stability under free condition, and water extraction resistance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) were investigated. The effect of EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant on the thermal oxidative ageing of SBR was also evaluated. Results showed that the protection of SBR from thermal oxidative aging by EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant was superior to that of antioxidant D. This is because EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and have excellent auxiliary antioxidant role with antioxidant D. Moreover, the influence of EHL on the vulcanizing characteristics of SBR compounds was better than that of antioxidant RD, and EHL can reduce the cure rate and increase the optimum cure time. It is because that the EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and methoxy group, which can form a special structure to capture free radical and terminate the chain reaction. The retained tensile strength of SBR compounds with EHL was similar to that of the samples with antioxidant RD, while the retained elongation at break of SBR compounds with EHL was higher than that of the samples with antioxidant RD. In addition, the SBR compounds with EHL have a good water extraction resistance property, which was similar to the samples with antioxidant RD. This is because EHL have large molecular weight, good stability and low solubility in water. In conclusion, due to the low price, abundant resources, non-toxic and pollution-free, etc., EHL will have broad application prospect.

  12. The swelling of nitrile rubber by selected species in a synthetic jet turbine fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Lynn

    The swelling of nitrile O-ring seals in petroleum distillate fuels has long been attributed to the aromatic species in these fuels. This presents a problem for synthetic fuels as they typically do not contain these aromatic species and thus may cause O-ring seals to shrink and fail. The composition of petroleum distillate fuels is extremely complex and it is not clear whether the swelling property originates from the aromatics in general, or if certain aromatics contribute more swelling character than others. Consequently, developing a general description of an efficient swelling promoter for O-rings in liquid hydrocarbon fuels will allow an unambiguous selection of candidate swelling agents for synthetic fuels. To accomplish this, a study was undertaken of the swelling of nitrile rubber (the most widely used O-ring material) in JP-5 (the jet propulsion fuel used by the U.S. Navy) and its synthetic equivalent S-5. Briefly, examining the molecular structure of nitrile rubber showed the fuel resistance of this polymer resides in the polar character of the cyano group suggesting that polar species in general, and hydrogen-bonded species in particular, should serve as efficient swelling promoters. A thorough test program utilizing a unique optical dilatometry method to provide temporal volume swell data, a GC-MS method for measuring the polymer/fuel partitioning, and a spectroscopic examination of thin nitrile rubber films confirmed this hypothesis. This program also showed that swelling character increases with decreasing molar volume which is consistent with previous work and general theories of solubility. Overall, this study showed that the most efficient aromatic swelling promoters for nitrile rubber are naphthalenes and asymmetrically substituted alkyl benzenes. However, polar species such as ketones and alcohols can be more efficient than aromatics while phenols and aromatic alcohols represent the most efficient potential swelling promoters for nitrile rubber in

  13. Radiation crosslinking of styrene-butadiene rubber containing waste tire rubber and polyfunctional monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Khan, Sara; Shafiq, Muhammad; Gill, Rohama

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) and absorbed dose on the final characteristics of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) mixed with waste tire rubber (WTR). A series of SBR/WTR blends were prepared by varying the ratios of WTR in the presence of PFMs, namely trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and crosslinked using gamma rays. The physicochemical characteristics of the prepared blends were investigated. It was observed that tensile strength, hardness and gel content of the blends increased with absorbed dose while the blends containing TMPTA showed higher tensile strength, gel content and thermal stability as compared to the blends containing TMPTMA. Higher thermal stability was observed in the blends which were crosslinked by radiation as compared to the blends crosslinked by sulfur. These blends exhibited higher rate of swelling in organic solvents, whereas negligible swelling was observed in acidic and basic environment.

  14. Recycling of Chrome Tanned Leather Dust in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Salwa H.; Mohamed, Ola A.

    2010-06-01

    Concerns on environmental waste problem caused by chrome tanned leather wastes in huge amount have caused an increasing interest in developing this wastes in many composite formation. This leather dust was used as filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) before treatment and after treatment with ammonia solution and sod. formate. Different formulations of NBR/ leather dust (untreated-treated with ammonia solution—treated with sod. formate) composites are prepared. The formed composite exhibit a considerable improvement in some of their properties such as rheometric characteristics especially with composites loaded with treated leather dust. Tensile strength, modulus at 100% elongation, hardness and youngs modulus were improved then by further loading start to be steady or decrease. Cross linking density in toluene were increased by incorporation of leather dust treated or untreated resulting in decreases in equilibrium swelling. Distinct increase in the ageing coefficient of both treated and untreated leather with drop in NBR vulcanizates without leather dust. Addition of leather dust treated or untreated exhibit better thermal stability.

  15. About the cure kinetics in natural rubber/styrene Butadiene rubber blends at 433 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    Vulcanized blends of elastomers are employed in several goods mainly to improve physical properties and reduce costs. One of the most used blends of this kind is that composed by natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). The cure kinetic of these blends depends mainly on the compound formulation and the cure temperature and time. The preparation method of the blends can influence the mechanical properties of the vulcanized compounds. In this work the cure kinetic at 433 K of NR/SBR blends vulcanized with the system sulfur/TBBS (N-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) is analyzed in samples prepared by mechanical mixing and solution blending. The two methods produce elastomer domains of NR and SBR, which present different microstructure due to the cure level attained during vulcanization. The cure kinetics is studied by means of rheometer tests and the model proposed by Kamal and Sourour. The analysis of the cure rate is presented and is related to the structure obtained during the vulcanization process.

  16. Tear energy and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber/styrene-butadiene rubber blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, F.; Akabori, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kawazura, T.; Kawahara, S.

    2009-08-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR), dispersed in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), was investigated in relation to dimensional feature of a dispersoid and crosslink density of NR by measuring tear energy (G) of crosslinked NR/SBR blends. The crosslinked NR/SBR blends in ratios of 1/9 and 3/7 by weight were prepared by mixing masticated NR and SBR with an internal mixer at a rotor speed of 30 rpm, followed by crosslinking with dicumyl peroxide on a hot press at 444 K for 60 min. The G, measured in wide-ranges of temperature and tear rate, was superposed into a master curve with a Williams-Landel-Ferry shift factor. The G of the NR/SBR(3/7) blend abruptly decreased to a level comparable to that of SBR at about melting temperature of NR crystals formed on straining. The temperature, at which the dramatic decrease in the G occurred, was associated with the dimensional feature of the NR dispersoid and the crosslink density.

  17. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and < 2% ash. This biochar was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  18. Preparation and characterization of zinc sulphide nanocomposites based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Nihmath, A.; Francis, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Rubber composite based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with nano zinc sulphide (ZnS) have been prepared via vulcanization process and characterized by several techniques. Processing characteristics such as scorch time, optimum cure time decreases with increase in concentration of nano filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Mechanical properties such as tensile and tear strength increases with increase in concentration of nano filler up to 7 phr of loading thereafter the value decreases, whereas hardness, and flame resistance increases with the dosage of fillers. These enhanced properties are due to the homogenous dispersion of nano fillers in NBR matrix, which is evidenced from the structure that evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Temperature dependence on free volume in cured natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, W.; Somoza, A.; Silva, L.; Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.; Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    A systematic study on the evolution of free volume as a function of the temperature in vulcanized at 433 K natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 NR-SBR (percent content of pure NR and SBR, respectively) blends was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. All samples were prepared with sulfur and TBBS (n-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) as accelerator. The glass transition temperatures of the samples studied were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and from lifetime data. In general, a sigmoidal-like complex behavior of the long-lived lifetime component, linked to the nanohole free volume, as a function of the temperature was found. For SBR, the slope of the ortho-positronium lifetime against temperature curves could be well-fitted using a linear function. For blends and also for NR, two different linear functions were necessary. This last behavior is explained in terms of the supercooled process involving a reconfiguration of the elastomeric chains. In the case of blends, the state of cure of NR and SBR in each NR-SBR sample was also taken into account in the discussion of the results obtained. Besides, thermal expansion coefficients of the free volumes in the transition and glassy region of all compounds were estimated. The differences observed in the values of this parameter are discussed by taking into account the morphology and formulation of each blend, the crosslink densities, and the role of the interphases formed between both NR and SBR elastomers.

  20. Charcoal byproducts as potential styrene-butadiene rubber composte filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, various renewable charcoals in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural byproducts were evaluted as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated s...

  1. Studies on gel electrolyte based on nitrile-butadiene copolymers. Final report, 1 November 1991-30 November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, A.K.; Kumar, B.; Linden, S.M.; Weissman, P.T.

    1993-06-01

    This study is concerned with the preparation of a hybrid electrolyte, suitable for solid-polymer batteries. Based on the study of ionic conductivity in the presence of LiBF4 of a number of nitrile-butadiene copolymers (NBR), hydrogenated NBR (HNBR) was selected as the host polymer. DC conductivity studies with three different lithium salts in different plasticizers showed the highest conductivity for LiBF4. Conductivity of LiBF4 in different plasticizers decreases in the order DMF > DMAC > Gamma butyrolactone > NMP > PC=gamma-valerolactone > glymes. NMP was chosen as the plasticizer for hybrid films based on its moderate conductivity, low vapor pressure, and low freezing point. Polymer electrolytes, Gel electrolytes, Ionic conductivity.

  2. Dynamic and structural correlations in nanocomposites of silica with modified surface and carboxylated nitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Sala, Renata L; Oliveira Xavier, Tatielih P; Venâncio, Tiago; Arantes, Tatiane Moraes; Paranhos, Caio M; Camargo, Emerson R

    2016-03-15

    Distinct affinities between the organic and inorganic phases were observed in nanocomposites prepared through a colloidal route with carboxylated nitrile rubber and modified silica nanoparticles, which resulted in variable mechanical properties and improved thermal stability. Nanoparticles with modified surface affected the macromolecular arrangements of the elastomeric matrix, changing the final mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite, which could be predicted by the spin-lattice relaxation time measured by solid-state NMR. It was also possible to identify how each different nanoparticle affected the molecular dynamic of nanocomposite, correlating the dynamic-mechanical analysis with the NMR data of the saturated carbons of the elastomer. PMID:26745740

  3. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  4. Evaluating corn starch and corn stover biochar as renewable filler in carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn starch, corn flour, and corn stover biochar were evaluated as potential renewable substitutes for carbon black as filler in rubber composites using carboxylated styrene-butadiene as the rubber matrix. Previous work has shown that starch-based fillers have very good reinforcement properties at t...

  5. Survey of sulfur-containing rubber accelerator levels in latex and nitrile exam gloves.

    PubMed

    Depree, G J; Bledsoe, T A; Siegel, P D

    2005-08-01

    2-Mercaptobenzothiazole and zinc dialkyldithiocarbamates are commonly used sulfur-containing rubber vulcanization accelerators known to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Exposure to these agents occurs through clothing such as undergarments and shoes, latex medical devices and latex and nitrile gloves. A simple, inexpensive screening method for total sulfur accelerator and a high performance liquid chromatographic speciation method were developed in the present study. These methods were applied to screen and quantify the sulfur accelerator content from 38 brands of 'off-the-shelf' latex and nitrile gloves obtained from commercial vendors. It was found that accelerator levels ranged from not detectable to 7.35 mg/g in the gloves analysed. Brands were found to contain single and multiple accelerator species within the glove. Powdered gloves had significantly higher accelerator levels than powder-free gloves from the same manufacturer; however, these chemical accelerators do not preferentially partition to the powder. The present analytical methodology is suitable for both manufacturing quality validation purposes, as well as for accelerator allergy research. PMID:16033405

  6. Effect of crosslink density on some properties of electron beam-irradiated styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingguo; Wang, Fenlan; Cheng, Kuo

    2009-11-01

    Crosslink densities of electron beam (EB)-irradiated styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) samples were measured by using a novel magnetic resonance crosslink density spectrometer (MRCDS). With 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) loading increasing, the crosslink density of EB-irradiated SBR increases up to a certain level, and then decreases in the irradiation dose range 50-200 kGy. Tensile strength, elongation at break, thermal stability and pyrolysis products of the EB-irradiated SBR samples with different crosslink densities were also studied in this paper.

  7. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  8. Electrical and optical properties of nitrile rubber modified by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    S, Najidha; Predeep, P.

    2014-10-15

    Implantation of N{sup +} ion beams are performed on to a non-conjugated elastomer, acrylonirtle butadiene rubber (NBR) with energy 60 keV in the fluence range of 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. A decrease in the resistivity of the sample by about eight orders of magnitude is observed in the implanted samples along with color changes. The ion exposed specimens were characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy which shows a shift in the absorption edge value for the as deposited polymer towards higher wavelengths. The band gap is evaluated from the absorption spectra and is found to decrease with increasing fluence. This study can possibly throw light on ion induced changes in the polymer surface.

  9. Electrical and optical properties of nitrile rubber modified by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Najidha; Predeep, P.

    2014-10-01

    Implantation of N+ ion beams are performed on to a non-conjugated elastomer, acrylonirtle butadiene rubber (NBR) with energy 60 keV in the fluence range of 1014 to 1016 ions/cm2. A decrease in the resistivity of the sample by about eight orders of magnitude is observed in the implanted samples along with color changes. The ion exposed specimens were characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy which shows a shift in the absorption edge value for the as deposited polymer towards higher wavelengths. The band gap is evaluated from the absorption spectra and is found to decrease with increasing fluence. This study can possibly throw light on ion induced changes in the polymer surface.

  10. Fracture morphologies of carbon-black-loaded SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber) subjected to low-cycle, high-stress fatigue. [Styrene-butadiene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Patt, J.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results, together with an analytical model, related to the loss in tensile strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with carbon black (CB) that had been subjected to low-cycle, high-stress fatigue tests were presented in a prior paper. The drop in tensile strength relative to that of a virgin sample was considered to be a measure of damage induced during the fatigue test. The present paper is a continuation of this study dealing with the morphological interpretations of the fractured surfaces, whereby the cyclic-tearing behavior, resulting in the damage, is related to the test and material parameters. It was found that failure is almost always initiated in the bulk of a sample at a material flaw. The size and definition of a flaw increase with an increase in carbon-black loading. Initiation flaw sites are enveloped by fan-shaped or penny-shaped regions which develop during cycling. The size and morphology of a fatigue-tear region appears to be independent of the fatigue load or the extent of the damage (strength loss). By contrast, either an increase in cycling load or an increase in damage at constant load increases the definition of the fatigue-region morphology for all formulations of carbon-black. On the finest scale, the morphology can be described in terms of tearing of individual groups of rubber strands, collapsing to form a cell-like structure. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Industrywide studies report of an in-depth survey at Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, E.R.; Fajen, J.M.

    1987-05-08

    An in depth industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The facility produced styrene-butadiene rubber and nitrile-butadiene rubber by continuous emulsion polymerization. The ultimate use of this product was for the manufacture of tire and rubber products. The authors recommend that leaking pumps which can present a potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure in the tank farm and recovery areas should be controlled through the use of dual mechanical seals. Employees assigned to maintenance tasks should use respirators with organic vapor cartridges.

  12. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  13. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  14. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  15. Correlation of mass fractal dimension and cluster size of silica in styrene butadiene rubber composites.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gerald Johannes; Vollnhals, V; Brandt, K; Roth, S V; Göritz, D

    2010-09-01

    The morphology of the precipitated silica VN3 filled in styrene butadiene rubber was studied as a function of the volume fraction Φ by means of small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. The wide q-range of 0.008 nm(-1)

  16. Laser heating effect on Raman spectra of styrene-butadiene rubber/multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinlei; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Sato, Harumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Han, Xiaoxia; Itoh, Tamitake; Bokobza, Liliane; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    The laser heating effect on MWCNTs in styrene-butadiene rubber/multiwalled carbon nanotube (SBR/MWCNT) composites were studied by Raman spectra. The intensity ratio of the D band to G band (ID/IG) of SBR/MWCNT composites largely decreased with temperature. This indicates the self-rearranging behavior of MWCNTs in the SBR/MWCNTs system during temperature increase. In addition, the temperature-dependent downward shift of the G band of SBR/MWCNT composites was smaller than that of MWCNTs samples. The self-rearrangement of MWCNTs in SBR/MWCNT composites and a mechanical compression were explained as two possible reasons for the different behavior of the G band shift.

  17. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber latex

    PubMed Central

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M.; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  18. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML) and maximum torque (MH) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  19. Styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites modified by sorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baochun; Chen, Feng; Lei, Yanda; Liu, Xiaoliang; Wan, Jingjing; Jia, Demin

    2009-05-01

    Sorbic acid (SA) was used to improve the performance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) nanocomposites by direct blending. The detailed mechanisms for the largely improved performance were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), porosity analysis and crosslink density determination. The strong interfacial bonding between HNTs and rubber matrix is resulted through SA intermediated linkages. SA bonds SBR and HNTs through grafting copolymerization/hydrogen bonding mechanism. Significantly improved dispersion of HNTs in virtue of the interactions between HNTs and SA was achieved. Formation of zinc disorbate (ZDS) was revealed during the vulcanization of the composites. However, in the present systems, the contribution of ZDS to the reinforcement was limited. Effects of SA content on the vulcanization behavior, morphology and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Promising mechanical properties of SA modified SBR/HNTs nanocomposites were obtained. The changes in vulcanization behavior, mechanical properties and morphology were correlated with the interactions between HNTs and SA and the largely improved dispersion of HNTs.

  20. Styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites modified by methacrylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baochun; Lei, Yanda; Chen, Feng; Liu, Xiaoliang; Du, Mingliang; Jia, Demin

    2008-12-01

    Methacrylic acid (MAA) was used to improve the performance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) nanocomposites by direct blending. The detailed interaction mechanisms of MAA and the in situ formed zinc methacrylate (ZDMA) were revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area and porosity analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) together with crosslink density determination. The strong interfacial bonding between HNTs and rubber matrix is resulted through ZDMA and MAA intermediated linkages. ZDMA connects SBR and HNTs via grafting/complexation mechanism. MAA bonds SBR and HNTs through grafting/hydrogen bonding mechanism. Significantly improved dispersion of HNTs in virtue of the interactions between HNTs and MAA or ZDMA was achieved. Effects of MAA content on the vulcanization behavior, morphology and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Promising mechanical properties of MAA modified SBR/HNTs nanocomposites were obtained. The changes in vulcanization behavior, mechanical properties and morphology were correlated with the interactions between HNTs and MAA or ZDMA and the largely improved dispersion of HNTs.

  1. Effect of strain on the electrical conductivity of a styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Hee; Lim, Jee Young; Jose, Jobin; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Gi-Bbeum; Gent, Alan N.; Nah, Changwoon

    2010-04-01

    When the carbon black-filled rubbers are stretched, the electrical resistivity increases at lower extension ranges, and then it decreases with further extension. This complex behavior is attributed to the morphology changes of carbon black particles during extension, i.e., breaking and forming conducting paths. In this study, highly conductive carbon blacks were compounded with high styrene content SBR matrix with contents varying from 5phr, 10phr, 15phr and 20phr. All the compounds measured the electrical resistance at room temp., 40°C, 80°C, respectively. The electrical resistances are decreased as the conductive carbon blacks are higher and temperature is increased. The electrical resistivity and tensile behaviors were investigated as a function of stretching at 80°C. The conductive carbon black-filled a styrene-butadiene rubber vulcanizate showed much higher conductivity and the electrical resistivity is more stable by increase of contents. In tensile behaviors, as the contents of conductive carbon blacks increase, it shows the increase of strength.

  2. Cavitation in Filled Styrene-butadiene Rubber: A Real Time SAXS Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Scholz, Arthur K.; Vion-Loisel, Fabien; Kramer, Edward J.; Creton, Costantino

    2011-03-01

    Cavitation of filled and unfilled elastomers under confinement at the macroscopic scale has been experimentally reported and theoretically modeled. However, cavitation occurring at the nanometer length scale has not yet been demonstrated conclusively in rubbers. Real time SAXS with synchrotron radiation was employed to probe the structure changes in carbon black filled styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) under uniaxial loading. The scattering invariant was calculated and increased sharply at a critical extension depending on both filler content and crosslinking density around q = 0.1 nm-1, which we attributed to the formation of voids. At very large strains, a sharp and wide streak developed perpendicular to the tensile axis in reciprocal space, suggesting the deformation of the voids in elliptical voids along the tensile direction. In step cycle test, we observed that voids only appeared when the current strain exceeded the maximum historical strain (Mullins effect) and attributed the increase of the scattering invariant outside the Mullins region to the creation of new voids rather than to the reopening of old ones.

  3. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  4. Improved mechanical properties and ozone resistance of radiation-cured SBR. Final report, Dec 88-Jun 91. [Styrene Butadiene Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Basfar, A.A.; Silverman, J.

    1991-08-01

    This report is a continuation and extension of the work of the earlier Army contract, where the superiority of the electron beam cured styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) tank pads to the sulfur cured pads was demonstrated. The focus of the present study is the investigation of the extraordinary ozone resistance of our radiation cured SBR, and also on possible alternatives for SBR, butadiene rubber (BR) in particular, as a tank pad compound. Base formulations of a fully sulfur cured system were established with 5% reproducibility, and results were confirmed by mechanical properties measurements on identical formulations from Belvoir Research Development and Engineering Center (BRDEC). Constant mechanical properties as a function of exposure to ozone indicate either competitive cross-linking and scissioning reactions or a 'protective' effect caused by higher terminal vinyl concentrations in the radiation cured formulations.

  5. The filler-rubber interface in styrene butadiene nanocomposites with anisotropic silica particles: morphology and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Tadiello, L; D'Arienzo, M; Di Credico, B; Hanel, T; Matejka, L; Mauri, M; Morazzoni, F; Simonutti, R; Spirkova, M; Scotti, R

    2015-05-28

    Silica-styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) nanocomposites were prepared by using shape-controlled spherical and rod-like silica nanoparticles (NPs) with different aspect ratios (AR = 1-5), obtained by a sol-gel route assisted by a structure directing agent. The nanocomposites were used as models to study the influence of the particle shape on the formation of nanoscale immobilized rubber at the silica-rubber interface and its effect on the dynamic-mechanical behavior. TEM and AFM tapping mode analyses of nanocomposites demonstrated that the silica particles are surrounded by a rubber layer immobilized at the particle surface. The spherical filler showed small contact zones between neighboring particles in contact with thin rubber layers, while anisotropic particles (AR > 2) formed domains of rods preferentially aligned along the main axis. A detailed analysis of the polymer chain mobility by different time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) techniques evidenced a population of rigid rubber chains surrounding particles, whose amount increases with the particle anisotropy, even in the absence of significant differences in terms of chemical crosslinking. Dynamic measurements demonstrate that rod-like particles induce stronger reinforcement of rubber, increasing with the AR. This was related to the self-alignment of the anisotropic silica particles in domains able to immobilize rubber. PMID:25899456

  6. Application of Composite Powders Recycled from Graphite Tailings in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Yun; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng; Qin, Faxiang; Mei, Lefu; Wei, Yaozu

    2015-11-01

    With styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) as matrix and composite powders recycled from graphite tailings as fillers, the influence of the particle size and content of the composite powders on the tensile strength and electrical conductivity of the composite powder-filled SBR were studied. The results showed that composite powder recycled from graphite tailings could reinforce SBR, whose tensile strength was significantly increased with reducing the particle size of the composite powder, but it had little effect on the conductivity of the system. With composite powders as fillers in conjunction with conductive carbon black, the tensile strength and electrical conductivity of the system were greatly improved. The maximum tensile strength of the SBR filled with composite powder and conductive carbon black increased by 47% compared to that of the single composite powder-filled SBR. When the filling content of conductive carbon black was 10 phr and that of composite powder was above 30 phr, the volume resistivity of SBR showed a sharp decline, reaching a minimum about 106 Ω cm at 40 phr. All the results indicated that composite powder recycled from graphite tailings can be applied effectively as filler in SBR. It has great economic and environmental benefits.

  7. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  8. Preparation and properties of carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber/cellulose nanocrystals composites.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodong; Xu, Chuanhui; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Yukun

    2013-01-30

    A series of carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber (XSBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) latex composites were successfully prepared. The vulcanization process, morphology, dynamic viscoelastic behavior, dynamic mechanical property, thermal and mechanical performance of the XSBR/CNs composites were investigated in detail. The results revealed that CNs were dispersed uniformly in the XSBR matrix and formed a strong filler-filler network. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of XSBR matrix was shifted from 48.45 to 50.64 °C with 3 phr CNs, but decreased from 50.64 to 46.28 °C when further increasing CNs content up to 15 phr. The composites exhibited a significant enhancement in tensile strength (from 16.9 to 24.1 MPa) and tear strength (from 43.5 to 65.2 MPa) with loading CNs from 0 to 15 phr. In addition, the thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the temperature at 5% weight loss of the XSBR/CNs composites decreased slightly with an increase of the CNs content. PMID:23218267

  9. Performance of Styrene Butadiene Rubber as a Concrete Repair Material in tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Prakash, V. Syam; Thampan, C. K.; Varma, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Deterioration of Concrete due to variety of reasons like corrosion of steel, inferior quality of materials as well as workmanship and exposure to aggressive environment like thermal cycling affect the performance or damage a number of Reinforced cement concrete structures. In order to repair these structures for enhancing the service life, number of methods and materials are available. But the degree of success of any repair in concrete depends mainly on the correct choice and the method of application of repair materials. This paper discusses the details of an experimental investigation on the performance of Styrene ñ Butadiene Rubber (SBR) as a concrete repair material in tropical climatic conditions. Resistance to water penetration and tensile cracking are two important performance criteria for any repair material. Cement mortar cubes of mix proportion 1:3 with SBR added at the rate of 20% of the weight of cement, and control specimens without SBR were made. Compressive strength and sorptivity values of the cubes were determined. Shear Bond strength (by slant shear test) and splitting tensile strength of the repaired cylinder specimens of standard dimensions, in which SBR used as a bonding agent were determined. These values were compared with the values obtained for the similar specimens, in which the bonding agent applied was conventional cement slurry. The influence of thermal cycling on the properties of repaired concrete specimens were also studied. A comparison has also been made with the values required to meet the standard specifications of a repair material.

  10. Molecular characterization of solution styrene-butadiene rubber: thermal field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Jin; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Seung Hwa; Kim, A-Ju; Kwag, Gwanghoon; Lee, Seungho

    2013-11-01

    Solution styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR) is mainly constituted of a random copolymer of styrene and butadiene. SSBR usually contains microgels, having ultrahigh molecular weight (M>10(7)g/mol), affecting rheological properties of the rubber. Thus, determinations of M and size distribution of these microgels are critical in performance evaluation and control for SSBR. We employ thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF), combined with online multi-angle light scattering (MALS), as most suited for characterization of solutions containing the microgels since they can be characterized in toto without removing the microgels from the solution. ThFFF-MALS was applied for characterization of linear and branched SBR materials from various commercial sources, and the results were compared to those from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). ThFFF provides higher resolution than SEC for high molecular fractions and allowed gel content to be measured. The gel content was determined by subtracting the amount of sol from total injection mass, and was measured to be 10-15%. We infer from the characterization results that the microgel content may not be correlated to the microstructure, the styrene and vinyl content of butadiene but to the fraction of high molecular weight in SSBR. Finally, the macromolecular structure and the content of microgel (larger than about 100nm) were found to significantly affect various rheological parameters such as viscosity, mechanical and dynamic properties. PMID:24063984

  11. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  12. Features of rubber swelling in transformer oil, according to NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavin, R. R.; Fursov, D. I.; Vasil'ev, S. G.; Tarasov, V. P.; Zabrodin, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy, NMR relaxation, and NMR with a pulsed magnetic field gradient methods are used to study the swelling of the elastomers based on ethylene-propylene rubber, butadiene-nitrile rubber, and fluororubber SKF-26 in transformer oil. Components corresponding to the fractions of oil and polymer network are identified. It is shown that the affinity of the polymers toward transformer oil displays an increase in the orderly sequence of ethylene-propylene rubber, fluororubber, and butadiene-nitrile rubber; the stability of the polymers towards carbon tetrachloride falls in the same sequence. Based on an analysis of the spin-spin relaxation time depending on the degree of swelling, it is found that fluororubber elastomers are characterized by the formation of a polymer network that prevents further sorption, In contrast, elastomer based on ethylene-propylene rubber gives no indication of the formation of a rigid polymer network.

  13. Glass Transition and Molecular Mobility in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber Modified Asphalt.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-11-01

    Asphalt, a soft matter consisting of more than a thousand chemical species, is of vital importance for the transportation infrastructure, yet it poses significant challenges for microscopic theory and modeling approaches due to its multicomponent nature. Polymeric additives can potentially enhance the thermo-mechanical properties of asphalt, thus helping reduce the road repair costs; rational design of such systems requires knowledge of the molecular structure and dynamics of these systems. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the volumetric, structural, and dynamic properties of the neat asphalt as well as styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt systems. The volume-temperature behavior of the asphalt systems exhibited a glass transition phenomenon, akin to that observed in experiments. The glass transition temperature, room temperature density, and coefficient of volume thermal expansion of the neat asphalt systems so evaluated were in agreement with experimental data when the effect of the high cooling rate used in simulations was accounted for. While the volumetric properties of SBR modified asphalt were found to be insensitive to the presence of the SBR additive, the addition of SBR led to an increase in the aggregation of asphaltene molecules. Furthermore, addition of SBR caused a reduction in the mobility of the constituent molecules of asphalt, with the reduction being more significant for the larger constituent molecules. Similar to other glass forming liquids, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the selected molecules was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) behavior as a function of temperature. These results suggest the potential for using polymeric additives for enhancing the dynamic mechanical properties of asphalt without affecting its volumetric properties. PMID:26451630

  14. Effect of crosslinking density on biaxial relaxation of SBR by using reduced variables. [Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of reduced variables to account for the effect of crosslinking density in a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) system is demonstrated for general biaxial stress states. Recently published results from stress relaxation tests on five SBR vulcanizates crosslinked to different degrees by tetramethylthiuram disulfide were superposed by using the crosslinking density as a reduction variable. The equilibrium shear modulus calculated from the master relaxation curve at long reduced times was in satisfactory agreement with other results for SBR. The time-axis shifts were related in a linear logarithmic manner to the crosslinking density but had a slope slightly less than values previously reported for elastomer systems.

  15. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  16. Butadiene production process overview.

    PubMed

    White, Wm Claude

    2007-03-20

    Over 95% of butadiene is produced as a by-product of ethylene production from steam crackers. The crude C4 stream isolated from the steam cracking process is fed to butadiene extraction units, where butadiene is separated from the other C4s by extractive distillation. The amount of crude C4s produced in steam cracking is dependent on the composition of the feed to the cracking unit. Heavier feeds, such as naphtha, yield higher amounts of C4s and butadiene than do lighter feeds. Crackers using light feeds typically produce low quantities of C4s and do not have butadiene extraction units. Overall butadiene capacity is determined by ethylene cracker operating rates, the type of feed being cracked, and availability of butadiene extraction capacity. Global butadiene capacity is approximately 10.5 million metric tons, and global production is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Crude C4s are traded globally, with the United States being the only significant net importer. Finished butadiene is also traded globally, with the largest exporters being Canada, Western Europe, Saudi Arabia and Korea. The largest net importers are Mexico, the United States and China. The global demand for butadiene is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Production of styrene-butadiene rubber and polybutadiene rubber accounts for about 54% of global butadiene demand, with tire production being the single most important end use of butadiene synthetic rubbers. Other major butadiene derivatives are acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and styrene butadiene latex (about 24% of demand combined). PMID:17324391

  17. Surface modification of halloysite nanotubes by vulcanization accelerator and properties of styrene-butadiene rubber nanocomposites with modified halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bangchao; Jia, Zhixin; Hu, Dechao; Luo, Yuanfang; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2016-03-01

    Vulcanization accelerant N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide (CZ) was used as a surface modifier and chemically grafted on the surface of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) to obtain CZ-functionalized HNTs (HNTs-s-CZ). It was found that HNTs-s-CZ could be homogeneously dispersed into styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The grafted CZ molecules, exactly located at the filler-rubber interface, reduced the activation energy of vulcanization of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ compounds. Besides, the density of chain segments introduced by the interfacial phase of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites was higher than the other nanocomposites with silane-modified HNTs (m-HNTs) or pristine HNTs, manifesting an indication of enhanced filler-rubber interfacial interaction in SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites. Consequently, SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites showed excellent mechanical properties. The tensile strength could be enhanced by as much as 38.6% and 102.5% compared to those of SBR/m-HNTs and SBR/HNTs nanocomposites, respectively, though containing equivalent accelerant component. The value of this work lies in the fact that apparent properties improvement of elastomer composites has been achieved by the incorporation of vulcanization accelerant-functionalized HNTs, which may be fruitful for the rational design of filler surface treatment and offer new scientific and technological opportunities for the preparation of high performance elastomer composites.

  18. Radiation preparation of nano-powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and its toughening effect for polystyrene and high-impact polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daishuang; Xia, Haibing; Peng, Jing; Zhai, Maolin; Wei, Genshuan; Li, Jiuqiang; Qiao, Jinliang

    2007-11-01

    Nano-powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (NPSBR) was synthesized based on the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex via gamma radiation crosslinking followed by spray drying. Two functional monomers, 2-ethyl hexyl acrylate (2-EHA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) were used as crosslinking agents. It was found that both 2-EHA and TMPTA can improve the radiation crosslinking of SBR latex. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the NPSBR has a particle size similar to that of SBR latex with a diameter of 100 nm due to the high degree of crosslinking of SBR. Mechanical testing results showed that NPSBR could toughen polystyrene (PS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) effectively. In addition, NPSBR is more suitable to toughen HIPS than PS at low rubber content.

  19. Observations made during stretching, tearing and failure of NR (natural rubber) and SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber) loaded with various amounts of carbon black

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Patt, J.

    1988-02-01

    In order to effectively utilize fractography as an aid in identifying the influence of material and service (or test) parameters on material properties, one must first understand the origin of the morphological features developed during the tearing and fracturing of these elastomers. At our laboratory, we have made extensive fractographic studies while evaluating the effects of material formulations, temperature, and loading rates on the loading response, tearing energy, induced damage, and tearing phenomena in SBR (Styrene Butadiene Rubber) containing different amounts of CB (Carbon Black) filler. We have also examined failures in tank track pads, as well as laboratory-tested samples cut from new track pads. In this paper we report on observations made during the actual stretching, tearing and failure of elastomeric samples pulled in tension at a constraint stroke-diplacement rate. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Radiation-induced graft polymerization of maleic acid and maleic anhydride onto ultra-fine powdered styrene butadiene rubber (UFSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jing; Xia, Haibing; Zhai, Maolin; Li, Jiuqiang; Qiao, Jinliang; Wei, Genshuan

    2007-11-01

    The functionalization of ultra-fine powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (UFSBR) was carried out using gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of maleic acid (MA) and maleic anhydride (MAH), respectively. It was found that the graft yield of MA onto UFSBR increased rapidly up to the peak and then decreased with increasing MA content. Moreover, the peak shifted to the direction of lower MA content with increasing absorbed dose. Similarly, there was the peak of graft yield with increasing MAH content for grafting of MAH onto UFSBR, whereas the peak of graft yield was achieved at 10 wt% MAH content at different absorbed doses. On the other hand, increasing absorbed dose and decreasing monomer contents are useful to improve the graft efficiency of MA and MAH. At high dose and low monomer content, the graft yield of MAH onto UFSBR is higher than that of MA. FTIR spectra confirmed that both MA and MAH can be grafted successfully onto the UFSBR under gamma irradiation, respectively. Comparing with maleation of rubber by melt grafting, the graft yield of MAH on UFSBR is higher, which can be attributed to the network structure and nanometer size of UFSBR as well as high energy provided by radiation.

  1. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  2. US rubber markets recover

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.

    1993-02-03

    Synthetic rubber markets in North America bounced back in no uncertain terms last year, with demand climbing an impressive 9.5%, to 2.97 million m.t.; and, according to the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IIS-RP; Houston) latest five-year forecast, producers can look forward to a 3.3% increase in demand during 1993. This growth rate outpaced out 1992 forecast and demonstrates the resilience of the synthetic rubber industry, says William E. Tessemer, managing director of IISRP. We expect demand in 1993 to surpass 1992 and level off at a 2%/year growth rate for synthetic rubber - 2.5% including thermoplastic elastomers [TPEs]-over the 1993-97 period. The improvement reflects signs of a recovery in North America, especially the pickup in the auto and tire industry. The two major tire rubbers - styrene butadiene and polybutadiene rubber - notched up double-digit gains, and other materials that have autos uses, such as nitrile rubber and many of the specialty elastomers, also advanced strongly.

  3. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    PubMed

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications. PMID:24734968

  4. Environmental epidemiologic investigations in the styrene-butadiene rubber production industry.

    PubMed Central

    Lemen, R A; Meinhardt, T J; Crandall, M S; Fajen, J M; Brown, D P

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature and an update that is in progress of a previous retrospective cohort mortality study of the styrene-1,3-butadiene industry are discussed. The follow-up has now been extended from April 1, 1976, through December 31, 1981, for plant B and December 31, 1982, for plant A. The person-years at risk of death have gone from 34,187 to 43,341 in plant A and from 19,742 to 26,314 in plant B. Among the death certificates received to date, observed deaths have increased in both plants, with increases in cancers of the trachea, bronchus and lung and in lymphosarcomas, reticulosarcomas, and cancers of the overall lymphatic and hematopoietic system. PMID:2205482

  5. Characterization on the phase separation behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/organoclay ternary blends under oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianggui; Dong, Xia; Liu, Wei; Xing, Qian; Zou, Fasheng; Han, Charles C; Wang, Dujin; Liang, Aimin; Li, Chuanqing; Xie, Ximing

    2015-09-21

    The present work investigated the influence of organoclay (organo-montmorillonite, OMMT) on the phase separation behavior and morphology evolution of solution polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR)/low vinyl content polyisoprene (LPI) blends with rheological methodology. It was found that the incorporation of OMMT not only reduced the droplet size of the dispersion phase, slowed down the phase separation kinetics, also enlarged the processing miscibility window of the blends. The determination on the wetting parameters indicated that due to the oscillatory shear effect, the OMMT sheets might localize at the interface between the two phases and act as compatibilizer or rigid barrier to prevent domain coarsening, resulting in slow phase separation kinetics, small droplet size, and stable morphology. The analysis of rheological data by the Palierne model provided further confirmation that the addition of OMMT can decrease the interfacial tension and restrict the relaxation of melt droplets. Therefore, a vivid "sea-fish-net" model was proposed to describe the effect of OMMT on the phase separation behavior of SSBR/LPI blends, in which the OMMT sheets acted as the barrier (net) to slow down the domain coarsening/coalescence in phase separation process of SSBR/LPI blends. PMID:26395734

  6. Characterization on the phase separation behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/organoclay ternary blends under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianggui; Dong, Xia; Liu, Wei; Xing, Qian; Zou, Fasheng; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin; Liang, Aimin; Li, Chuanqing; Xie, Ximing

    2015-09-01

    The present work investigated the influence of organoclay (organo-montmorillonite, OMMT) on the phase separation behavior and morphology evolution of solution polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR)/low vinyl content polyisoprene (LPI) blends with rheological methodology. It was found that the incorporation of OMMT not only reduced the droplet size of the dispersion phase, slowed down the phase separation kinetics, also enlarged the processing miscibility window of the blends. The determination on the wetting parameters indicated that due to the oscillatory shear effect, the OMMT sheets might localize at the interface between the two phases and act as compatibilizer or rigid barrier to prevent domain coarsening, resulting in slow phase separation kinetics, small droplet size, and stable morphology. The analysis of rheological data by the Palierne model provided further confirmation that the addition of OMMT can decrease the interfacial tension and restrict the relaxation of melt droplets. Therefore, a vivid "sea-fish-net" model was proposed to describe the effect of OMMT on the phase separation behavior of SSBR/LPI blends, in which the OMMT sheets acted as the barrier (net) to slow down the domain coarsening/coalescence in phase separation process of SSBR/LPI blends.

  7. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of styrene-butadiene rubber at low heating rates in nitrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Yeh, R.Z.; Chang, Y.R.

    1997-03-01

    The kinetics of thermal decomposition of styrene-butadiene rubber have been investigated thermogravimetrically under various heating rates either in nitrogen or mixed with 5--25% oxygen in nitrogen. The results show that in pure nitrogen the reaction involves only one stage, with an initial reaction temperature of 622--661 K and an apparent activation energy at 211 {+-} 15 kJ/mol. The initial reaction temperature decreases, but the reaction rate and its temperature range increase when the heating rate is increased. When oxygen is present, the reaction involves two parallel steps. The fractional conversion at the end of the first reaction is 0.83--0.87, depending on the oxygen concentration. Although the presence of oxygen somewhat delays the start of the initial reaction, the activation energy is reduced significantly, so that its rate becomes faster once reaction commences. The complete rate equation for both stages of reaction was obtained by summing the individual weighted rate equations; the weighting factors were determined from the fractional conversion at the end of the first reaction.

  8. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Abstract Service Number. BR = Butyl Rubber. EPI = Epichlorohydrin Rubber. EPR = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HBR = Halobutyl Rubber. HYP = Hypalon TM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. PBR/SBRS = Polybutadiene and Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Solution. PSR =...

  9. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP. PMID:27060197

  10. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  11. Hyundai plans rubber unit despite overcapacity

    SciTech Connect

    Hyoungjin Kim

    1993-02-24

    Despite the oversupply of synthetic rubber in South Korea, the government has granted approval to Hyundai Petrochemical (Seoul) to build the country's second synthetic rubber unit, to be located alongside its petrochemical complex at Daesan. The plant is due for startup during second-half 1995, when the local market is expected to be in better balance. Hyundai will use Goodyear Tire Rubber technology for the plant, which will have annual capacities for 40,000 m.t. of polybutadiene rubber (BR), 30,000 m.t. of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and 12,000 m.t. of nitrile rubber (NBR). Styrene and butadiene requirements will be met from Hyundai's own production at Daesan. The current local producer of synthetic rubber is Korea Kumho Petrochemicals (Seoul), which has annual capacities for 150,000 m.t. of SBR, 95,000 m.t. of BR, and 10,000 m.t. of NBR. Korean SBR demand is about 141,000 m.t./year but is expected to increase to 161,000 m.t./year by 1996 and reach 194,000 m.t./year by the end of the decade.

  12. The industrial production and use of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, N L

    1990-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief overview of the production and use of 1,3-butadiene in the United States. Starting as a coproduct of ethylene, the 1,3-butadiene monomer is extracted and purified, then transferred to consumers. Major uses of 1,3-butadiene include the manufacture of styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene rubber, and adiponitrile. PMID:2205493

  13. Facilities, testing, and continuing studies on carbon-black loaded styrene-butadiene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Sanchez, R.J.; LeMay, J.D.; Patt, J.

    1988-09-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been involved with investigations dealing with the response of the rubber in tank track pads to various loading scenarios, both in the field and in the laboratory. In the laboratory, numerous studies were also performed on a number of other rubber formulations primarily involving a range of carbon-black loadings in SBR and NR. Reference is made to reports and papers addressing each of the studies involved in this program. Work performed during the final stages of this program is described. These studies were directed primarily at developing an understanding of the effects of cycling and notching histories, notch radius, notch depth, and specimen thickness on the deformation behavior, strain distributions, hysteresis, and residual strength of SBR containing various amounts of carbon black. Significant improvements were realized in our testing methodology, computer-controlled facilities, and data-acquisition system, and in our ability to obtain continuous photomicrographic documentation in ''real time'' of the tearing improvements, as they relate to the various studies, are detailed in this document. Results obtained in these studied involve (1) the fabrication and testing of thick tensile specimens, (2) the effect of notching under load on the residual strength, (3) the effect of cycling on residual strength of notched and notch-free specimens, (4) the effect of cycling on hysteresis, (5) the effect of notch radius for various notch depths on loss of strength, and (6) evaluation of strain at a notch tip and remote from the notch tip at various specimen extensions by analyzing the specimen grid markings, which were obtained with the microscope-video-Polaroid system. 15 refs., 27 figs.

  14. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... No. = Chemical Abstract Service Number. BR = Butyl Rubber. EPI = Epichlorohydrin Rubber. EPR = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. PBR/SBRS = Polybutadiene and Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Solution. PSR =...

  15. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... No. = Chemical Abstract Service Number. BR = Butyl Rubber. EPI = Epichlorohydrin Rubber. EPR = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. PBR/SBRS = Polybutadiene and Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Solution. PSR =...

  16. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... No. = Chemical Abstract Service Number. BR = Butyl Rubber. EPI = Epichlorohydrin Rubber. EPR = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. PBR/SBRS = Polybutadiene and Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Solution. PSR =...

  17. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... No. = Chemical Abstract Service Number. BR = Butyl Rubber. EPI = Epichlorohydrin Rubber. EPR = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. PBR/SBRS = Polybutadiene and Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Solution. PSR =...

  18. Radiation-induced copolymerization of styrene/ n-butyl acrylate in the presence of ultra-fine powdered styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo; Peng, Jing; Zhai, Maolin; Li, Jiuqiang; Wei, Genshuan; Qiao, Jinliang

    2007-11-01

    Styrene (St)/ n-butyl acrylate (BA) copolymers were prepared by two-stage polymerization: St/BA was pre-polymerized to a viscous state by bulk polymerization with initiation by benzoyl peroxide (BPO) followed by 60Co γ-ray radiation curing. The resultant copolymers had higher molecular weight and narrower molecular weight distribution than conventional methods. After incorporation of ultra-fine powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (UFSBR) with a particle size of 100 nm in the monomer, the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of St-BA copolymer increased at low rubber content. Both the St-BA copolymer and the St-BA copolymer/UFSBR composites had good transparency at BA content below 40%.

  19. 1,3-Butadiene, styrene and lymphohematopoietic cancer among male synthetic rubber industry workers--Preliminary exposure-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Sathiakumar, Nalini; Brill, Ilene; Leader, Mark; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    We updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers to include follow-up from 1944 through 2009, adding 11 years of mortality data to previous investigations. The present analysis used Cox regression to examine the exposure-response relationship between 1,3-butadiene (BD) and styrene (STY) parts per million (ppm)-years and leukemia (N = 114 deaths), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (N = 89) and multiple myeloma (MM) (N = 48). A pattern of largely monotonically increasing rate ratios across deciles of BD ppm-years and a positive, statistically significant exposure-response trend were observed for BD ppm-years and leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (β) adjusted only for age was 2.6 × 10(-4) (p < 0.01); the regression coefficient adjusted for age, year of birth, race and plant was 2.9 × 10(-4) (p < 0.01). STY ppm-years also displayed a positive exposure-response association with leukemia. STY and BD were strongly correlated, and the separate effects of these two agents could not be estimated. For NHL, a pattern of approximately monotonically increasing rate ratios across deciles of exposure was seen for STY but not for BD; the test of trend was statistically significant in one of five models that used different STY exposure metrics and adjusted for age and other covariates. BD ppm-years and STY ppm-years were not associated with MM. The present analyses indicated a positive exposure-response relationship between BD cumulative exposure and leukemia. This result along with other research and biological information support an interpretation that BD causes leukemia in humans. STY exposure also was positively associated with leukemia, but its independent effect could not be delineated because of its strong correlation with BD, and there is no external support for a STY-leukemia association. STY, but not BD, was associated positively with NHL. The interpretation of this result is

  20. HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF 1,3-BUTADIENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment was conducted to review the new information that has become available since EPA's 1985 health assessment of 1,3-butadiene.

    1,3-Butadiene is a gas used commercially in the production of styrene-butadiene rubber, plastics, and thermoplastic resins. The major...

  1. On the form of the strain energy function for a family of SBR materials. [Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene materials with varying crosslink densities are analyzed through use of a strain energy function of the type introduced by Valanis and Landel (1967). A form of the strain energy function derived from strip biaxial tests proves to be accurate when checked against uniaxial and other biaxial test results.

  2. Mechanical properties of melt-processed polymer blend of amorphous corn flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn flour composite fillers were prepared by blending corn flour with rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders, which were then melt-blended with rubber polymers in an internal mixer to form composites with enhanced mechanical properties. The composites prepared with melt-blen...

  3. Comparative study of the effect of untreated, silanized and grafted alumina nanoparticles on thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of the styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Rymma; Baller, Joerg; Filimon, Marlena; Sanctuary, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Elastomers filled with hard nanoparticles are of great technical importance for the rubber industry. In general, fillers improve mechanical properties of polymer materials, e.g. elastic moduli, tensile strength etc. The smaller the size of the particles the larger is the interface where interactions between polymer molecules and fillers can generate new properties. Using Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TMDSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), we investigated the properties of the pure styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), SBR/ alumina nanoparticles, SBR/silanized alumina and SBR/alumina grafted to polymer chains. Beside a general reinforcement effect seen in the complex elastic moduli, the studies revealed that: i) small concentrations of nanoparticles (of 1.5-2 wt%) lead to a minimum in the glass transition temperature as a function of nanoparticle content; ii) for the grafted nanocomposites increasing the nanoparticle concentration beyond 4 wt% yields an increase of Tg by 4 K; iii) DMA mastercurves showed that in case of untreated and silanized alumina mechanical behaviour of the composite systems is rather near to the one of the SBR matrix, but the grafting of elastomer molecules to the silanized fillers induces a quasi-solid like response of the system in the low frequency regime.

  4. Rubber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishen, Anoop

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods for identification, characterization, and determination of rubber and materials in rubber. Topics include: general information, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal methods, gel permeation chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, analysis related to safety and health, and…

  5. Influence of lubricant additives on rubber properties in conditions similar to the field

    SciTech Connect

    Dinzburg, B.N.

    1995-10-01

    Using FTIR spectroscopy, an investigation was performed to establish the oil degradation in a car engine under field conditions. This investigation was used as a baseline to create the laboratory rubber immersion in oil test with aeration. Aeration is required to improve the correlation of the laboratory immersion test with field conditions. The effects of dispersants, corrosion inhibitors and oxidation inhibitors containing amine groups on rubber compounds were evaluated in oil with and without aeration. Two rubber base compounds were tested: highly saturated butadiene-nitrile (HNBR) and fluoroelastomer (FKM). The aggressiveness of the inhibitors containing amines was varied and was affected to differing degrees by aeration, water, and type of rubber. 35 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Modeling the low-cycle fatigue behavior of visco-hyperelastic elastomeric materials using a new network alteration theory: Application to styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, G.; Zaïri, F.; Naït-Abdelaziz, M.; Gloaguen, J. M.

    2011-02-01

    Although several theories were more or less recently proposed to describe the Mullins effect, i.e. the stress-softening after the first load, the nonlinear equilibrium and non-equilibrium material response as well as the continuous stress-softening during fatigue loading need to be included in the analysis to propose a reliable design of rubber structures. This contribution presents for the first time a network alteration theory, based on physical interpretations of the stress-softening phenomenon, to capture the time-dependent mechanical response of elastomeric materials under fatigue loading, and this until failure. A successful physically based visco-hyperelastic model is revisited by introducing an evolution law for the physical material parameters affected by the network alteration. The general form of the model can be basically represented by two parallel networks: a nonlinear equilibrium response and a time-dependent deviation from equilibrium, in which the network parameters become functions of the damage rate (defined as the ratio of the applied cycle over the applied cycle to failure). The mechanical behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber was experimentally investigated, and the main features of the constitutive response under fatigue loading are highlighted. The experimental results demonstrate that the evolution of the normalized maximum stress only depends on the damage rate endured by the material during the fatigue loading history. The average chain length and the average chain density are then taken as functions of the damage rate in the proposed network alteration theory. The new model is found to adequately capture the important features of the observed stress-strain curves under loading-unloading for a large spectrum of strain and damage levels. The model capabilities to predict variable amplitude tests are critically discussed by comparisons with experiments.

  7. Prediction of Flexural Strength of Concretes Containing Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) with an Empirical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafieyzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the flexural test, the theoretical maximum tensile stress at the bottom fiber of a test beam is known as the modulus of rupture or flexural strength. This work deals with the effects of Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Latex (SBR) on flexural strength of concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out to determine the effects of silica fume and SBR on flexural strength of concrete. Two water-binder ratios and several percentages of silica fume and SBR were considered. Abrams' Law, which was originally formulated for conventional concrete containing cement as the only cementations material, is used for prediction of flexural strength of these concretes. The aim of this work is to construct an empirical model to predict the flexural strength of silica fume-SBR concretes using concrete ingredients and time of curing in water. Also, the obtained results for flexural strength tests have been compared with predicted results.

  8. Effects of aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) on tensile properties and morphology of polypropylene (PP), recycle acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiagoo, Ragunathan; Omar, Latifah; Zainal, Mustaffa; Ting, Sam Sung; Ismail, Hanafi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of sugarcane baggase (SCB) treated with γ-APS filled polypropylene (PP)/recycled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) biocomposites were investigated. The composites with different filler loading ranging from 5 to 30 wt % were prepared using heated two roll mill by melt mixing at temperature of 180 °C. Tensile properties of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites which is tensile strength, Young Modulus and elongation at break were investigated. Increasing of treated SCB filler loading in PP/NBRr/SCB composites have increased the Young modulus however decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites. From the results, γ-APS treated SCB composites shown higher tensile strength and Young Modulus but lower elongation at break when compared to the untreated SCB composites. This is due to the stronger bonding between γ-APS treated SCB with PP/NBRr matrices. These findings was supported by micrograph pictures from morphological study. SCB filler treated with γ-APS has improved the adhesion as well as gave strong interfacial bonding between SCB filler and PP/NBRr matrices which results in good tensile strength of PP/NBRr/SCB composites.

  9. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer. PMID:11863549

  10. Damage development during low cycle fatigue of carbon-black loaded SBR. [Styrene butadiene rubber containing 0, 15, 25, and 35 wt % carbon black

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Goldberg, A.; Hiromoto, D.; Patt, J.

    1984-06-18

    Fatigue of elastomers is a subject that has received considerable study over the years. This paper explores the problem of damage accumulation in a series of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) based compounds containing 0, 15, 25, and 35 wt % carbon-black under conditions in which a limited number of higher stress cycles have been applied to the material (referred to here as low cycle fatigue). Damage development in elastomers can take many forms. Generally speaking, one can classify the degradation as mechanical or chemical in origin. The most obvious form of mechanical damage is flaw or cut growth, while typical examples of chemical damage include chain scission or thermal oxidation. The fatigue crack growth relationship given in Equation 1 obviously only applies to flaw growth. However, it does an excellent job of following the data and exhibits the threshold behavior observed in both SBR and SBR-35 at room temperature. At higher temperatures, the damaged material shows an increasing deviation from threshold behavior. The obvious implication is that some thermally activated damage mechanism is degrading the material. In previous work, carbon-black loaded SBR subjected to a high temperature, high stress environment was shown to undergo a thermal-mechanical oxidation process. Certainly, this process is a candidate for a damage mechanism in these studies. 6 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  11. Water soluble styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose binder for ZnFe2O4 anode electrodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongyu; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Dong; Qiu, Hailong; Fu, Qiang; Na, Hui; Guo, Zhendong; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang; Wei, Yingjin

    2015-07-01

    ZnFe2O4 nano particles as an anode material for lithium ion batteries are prepared by the glycine-nitrate combustion method. The mixture of styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (SBR/CMC) with the weight ratio of 1:1 is used as the binder for ZnFe2O4 electrode. Compared with the conventional polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) binder, the SBR/CMC binder is much cheaper and environment benign. More significantly, this water soluble binder significantly improves the rate capability and cycle stability of ZnFe2O4. A discharge capacity of 873.8 mAh g-1 is obtained after 100 cycles at the 0.1C rate, with a very little capacity fading rate of 0.06% per cycle. Studies show that the SBR/CMC binder enhances the adhesion of the electrode film to the current collector, and constructs an effective three-dimensional network for electrons transport. In addition, the SBR/CMC binder helps to form a uniform SEI film thus prohibiting the formation of lithium dendrite. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that the SBR/CMC binder lowers the ohmic resistance of the electrode, depresses the formation of SEI film and facilitates the charge transfer reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. These advantages highlight the potential applications of SBR/CMC binder in lithium ion batteries.

  12. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  13. Utilizing carbon dioxide as a reaction medium to mitigate production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the thermal decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-10-01

    The CO(2) cofeed impact on the pyrolysis of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The direct comparison of the chemical species evolved from the thermal degradation of SBR in N(2) and CO(2) led to a preliminary mechanistic understanding of the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C(1-4)), aromatic derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), clarifying the role of CO(2) in the thermal degradation of SBR. The identification and quantification of over 50 major and minor chemical species from hydrogen and benzo[ghi]perylene were carried out experimentally in the temperature regime between 300 and 500 °C in N(2) and CO(2). The significant amounts of benzene derivatives from the direct bond dissociation of the backbone of SBR, induced by thermal degradation, provided favorable conditions for PAHs by the gas-phase addition reaction at a relatively low temperature compared to that with conventional fuels such as coal and petroleum-derived fuels. However, the formation of PAHs in a CO(2) atmosphere was decreased considerably (i.e., ∼50%) by the enhanced thermal cracking behavior, and the ultimate fates of these species were determined by different pathways in CO(2) and N(2) atmospheres. Consequently, this work has provided a new approach to mitigate PAHs by utilizing CO(2) as a reaction medium in thermochemical processes. PMID:22950720

  14. Effect of plasma treatments on the steam-sour gas resistance and lubricity of elastomers. [Rubbers used: copoly(ethene-propene); copoly(1,1-difluoroethane-hexafluoropropene); copoly(2-propenenitrile-1,3 butadiene); plasma polymerized tetrafluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Bieg, K.W.; Cuthrell, R.E.; Nelson, G.C.

    1982-03-01

    Elastomers are widely used in drilling and logging applications as static seals such as casing packers and dynamic seals such as o-rings for drill bits. Static seals often fail in service because of thermochemical degradation due to the combined effects of steam and sour gas at elevated temperatures that are characteristic of deep wells. Dynamic seals frequently fail because of abrasive wear that occurs even at the low temperatures that prevail in shallow wells. We have shown that improved steam-sour gas resistance of a fully formulated ethylene-propylene rubber at elevated temperatures can be achieved by coating the rubber with a thin film of plasma polymerized tetrafluoroethylene. Thus, no change in the mechanical properties of the coated rubber was observed after exposure to steam and sour gas at 275/sup 0/C for 48 h. In contrast, the shear modulus of the upcoated rubber increased by 96% after the same exposure. While the effectiveness of the fluorocarbon coating decreased at longer exposure times, short-term protection of elastomers could be beneficial in certain logging operations. It was also found that the coefficient of friction of a nitrile rubber (Buna N) was reduced by 20% after treatment with a carbon tetrafluoride plasma. This enhanced lubricity could lead to better wear characteristics in conventional drill bits where the seal is in contact with a moving metal surface. The surfaces of the plasma treated elastomers were characterized by water contact angle, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  15. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston Chemical Plant, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-04-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston, Texas in November, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on production processes for styrene/butadiene rubber, styrene/butadiene latex and acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber, and to evaluate the potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  16. Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, D. F.

    The word "rubber" immediately brings to mind materials that are highly flexible and will snap back to their original shape after being stretched. In this chapter a variety of materials are discussed that possess this odd characteristics. There will also be a discussion on the mechanism of this "elastic retractive force." Originally, rubber meant the gum collected from a tree growing in Brazil. The term "rubber" was coined for this material by the English chemist Joseph Priestley, who noted that it was effective for removing pencil marks from paper. Today, in addition to Priestley's natural product, many synthetic materials are made that possess these characteristics and many other properties. The common features of these materials are that they are made up of long-chain molecules that are amorphous (not crystalline), and the chains are above their glass transition temperature at room temperature.

  17. High damping properties of magnetic particles doped rubber composites at wide frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Liu, Yaqing; He, Minhong; Zhao, Guizhe; Sun, Youyi

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A new kind of permanent magnetic rubber was prepared. ► The microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. ► The mechanical and damping properties were discussed. ► The new material is expected to be an isolator material to a changed frequency. - Abstract: A new kind of rubber composite was prepared by doping SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles coated with silane coupling agents (Si-69) into nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) matrix, which was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles were well dispersed in rubber matrix. Furthermore, the mechanical and magnetic properties of the rubber composites were investigated, in which the high tensile strength (15.8 MPa) and high saturation magnetization (22.9 emu/g) were observed. What is more, the high loss factor of the rubber composites was also obtained in a wide frequency range (0–100 Hz) at high loading (80 phr). The result is attributed to that the permanent magnetic field in rubber nanocomposites can absorb shock energy. These results indicate that the new kind of permanent magnetic rubber is expected to be a smart isolator material, in which the isolator will be able to adapt to a changed frequency.

  18. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

  19. A comparison between the effects of gamma radiation and sulfur cure system on the microstructure and crosslink network of (styrene butadiene rubber/ethylene propylene diene monomer) blends in presence of nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari Zadeh Naseri, Aida; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2015-10-01

    Rubber blends based on (styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)) with and without organoclay (OC) were prepared through a melt mixing process. The concentration ratio of the rubber phases (EPDM/SBR; 50/50 wt%) and the amount of the OC were kept constant. The samples were then vulcanized by means of gamma radiation using a Co-60 gamma source as well as sulfur cure system. The effect of absorbed dose on the formation of the crosslinks was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of absorbed dose, sulfur cure system and OC on the gel content, and crosslink density were evaluated by the chemical tests. Applying the Charlesby-Pinner equation to estimate the radiation chemical yield, revealed that the use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. Employing the swelling test data, some thermodynamic parameters were determined. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate microstructure of the samples revealed a more homogeneous structure and also an increase in compatibility of the blend components in the sample cured by the irradiation in comparison to that cured by the sulfur curing system.

  20. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, Robert J.; Link, Dirk D.; Baltrus, John P.; Zandhuis, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

  1. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

  2. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-03-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at the Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana in July, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene polymer manufacturing process and evaluate exposure potential. Bulk samples of vinylpyridine latex, styrene/butadiene rubber, and polybutadiene rubber were analyzed for residual 1,3-butadiene.

  3. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  4. Thermal cracking of butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Duisters, H.A.M. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the thermal cracking of butadiene in a pilot plant, under conditions representative of industrial operation. The product distribution of pure-butadiene cracking is shown. Results from cocracking experiments in naphtha and C[sub 4]-raffinate are also presented. It is shown that butadiene cracking can be an interesting outlet for the increasing butadiene overcapacity in steam crackers. Some aspects of coke formation during butadiene pyrolysis are addressed as well.

  5. Carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Shackelford, C C; Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a high-production volume chemical used largely in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, is a multiple organ carcinogen in rats and mice. In inhalation studies conducted in mice by the National Toxicology Program, high rates of early lethal lymphomas occurring at exposure levels of 625 ppm or higher reduced the development and expression of later developing tumors at other sites. Use of survival-adjusted tumor rates to account for competing risk factors provided a clearer indication of the dose responses for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplasms. An increase in lung tumors in female mice was observed at exposure concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm, the lowest concentration ever used in a long-term carcinogenicity study of this gas. Human exposures to 1,3-butadiene by workers employed at facilities that produce this chemical and at facilities that produce styrene-butadiene rubber have been measured at levels higher than those that cause cancer in animals. Furthermore, epidemiology studies have consistently revealed associations between occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene and excess mortality due to lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers. In response to the carcinogenicity findings for 1,3-butadiene in animals and in humans, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has proposed lowering the occupational exposure standard for this chemical from 1000 ppm to 2 ppm. Future work is needed to understand the mechanisms of tumor induction by 1,3-butadiene; however, the pursuit of this research should not delay the reduction of human exposure to this chemical. PMID:8354171

  6. Analysis of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, and related compounds in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the residual levels of acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), and their related compounds containing propionitrile (PN) and 4-vinyl-1-cyclohexene (4-VC) in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide and an internal standard were added in a sealed headspace vial. The vial was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C and the headspace gas was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The recovery rates of the analytes were 93.3-101.8% and the coefficients of variation were 0.3-6.5%. In ABS copolymers, the levels were 0.3-50.4 microg/g for AN, ND-4.5 microg/g for PN, 0.06-1.58 microg/g for 1,3-BD, and 1.1-295 microg/g for 4-VC. The highest level was found for 4-VC, which is a dimer of 1,3-BD, and the next highest was for AN, which is one of the monomers of the ABS copolymer. Furthermore, the method was also applied to acrylonitrile-styrene (AS) copolymers and polystyrenes (PS) for kitchen utensils, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves. In AS copolymers, AN and PN were detected at 16.8-54.5 and 0.8-6.9 microg/g, respectively. On the other hand, the levels in PS and NBR samples were all low. PMID:21313827

  7. ODC-Free Solvent Implementation Issues for Vulcanized Rubber and Bond Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, James R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion has worked extensively to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) with ozone depleting chemicals (ODC)-free solvents for use in the manufacture of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for the Space Shuttle Program. As Thiokol has transitioned from sub-scale to full-scale testing and implementation of these new solvents, issues have been discovered which have required special attention. The original intent of Thiokol's solvent replacement strategy was to replace TCA with a single drop-in solvent for all equivalent applications. We have learned that a single candidate does not exist for replacing TCA. Solvent incompatibility with process materials has caused us to seek for niche solvents and/or processing changes that provide an ODC-free solution for special applications. This paper addresses some of the solvent incompatibilities, which have lead to processes changes and possible niche solvent usage. These incompatibilities were discovered during full-scale testing of ODC-free solvents and relate to vulcanized rubber and bond systems in the RSRM. Specifically, the following items are presented: (1) Cure effects of d-limonene based solvents on Silica Filled Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (SF-EPDM) rubber. During full-scale test operations, Thiokol discovered that d-limonene (terpene) based solvents inhibit the cure of EPDM rubber. Subsequent testing showed the same issue with Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR). Also discussed are efforts to minimize uncured rubber exposure to solvents; and (2) Cured bond system sensitivity to ODC-free solvents. During full scale testing it was discovered that a natural rubber to steel vulcanized bond could degrade after prolonged exposure to ODC-free solvents. Follow on testing showed that low vapor pressure and residence time seemed to be most likely cause for failure.

  8. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  9. Titan Nitriles Awaiting Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2003-05-01

    The nitrogen-methane haze of Titan is known to harbor at least four molecules containing a nitrile (-CN) group: H-CN, NC-CN, CH3-CN, and HCC-CN. The low-temperature reaction chemistry of these molecules is of interest as the Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe approach the Saturnian system. As part of our preparation for Cassini-Huygens results we have undertaken an experimental study of the dominant chemical changes of nitrile molecules. Our results point to isomerization products formed by both low-temperature photochemistry and radiation chemistry. Among the new molecules we can predict are isonitriles (e.g. CH3-NC) and enimines (e.g. H2C=C=NH). We also expect, depending on the amount of H2O present, that cyanate ions (OCN-) can form on Titan. This presentation will include our latest results for Titan nitriles, as well a few nitriles not yet detected on Titan but present in either cometary comae or the interstellar medium. Since nitriles can form biological molecules, such as alpha-amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines, our results may also have astrobiological implications. -- The authors acknowledge NASA funding through the SARA and Planetary Atmospheres programs. RLH acknowledges support from NASA grant NAG-5-1843.

  10. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of 1,3-Butadiene (CAS No. 106-99-0) in B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    PubMed

    1984-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene is used as an intermediate in the production of elastomers, polymers, and other chemicals. Of the 1,3-butadiene used in 1978, 44% was used to manufacture styrene-butadiene rubber (a substitute for natural rubber, produced by copolymerization of 1,3-butadiene with styrene), and 19% was used to produce polybutane elastomer (a substance that increases resistance of tire products to wear, heat degradation, and blowouts). Chloroprene monomer, derived from 1,3-butadiene, is used exclusively to manufacture neoprene elastomers for non-tire and latex applications. Commercial nitrile rubber, used largely in rubber hoses, seals, and gaskets for automobiles, is a copolymer of 1,3-butadiene and acrylonitrile. Acrylonitrile- butadiene- styrene resins, usually containing 20%-30% 1,3-butadiene by weight, are used to make parts for automobiles and appliances. Other polymer uses include specialty polybutadiene polymers, thermoplastic elastomers, nitrile barrier resins, and K resins(R). 1,3-Butadiene is used as an intermediate in the production of a variety of industrial chemicals, including two fungicides, captan and captofol. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the production of adhesives used in articles for packaging, transporting, or holding food; in components of paper and paperboard that are in contact with dry food; and as a modifier in the production of semigrid and rigid vinyl chloride plastic food-contact articles. No information was located on the levels of monomer or on its elution rate from any of the commercially available polymers. It is not known if unreacted 1,3-butadiene migrated from packaging materials. Male and female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to air containing 1,3-butadiene (greater than 99% pure) at concentrations of 0-8,000 ppm in 15-day and 14-week inhalation studies. In the 15-day studies, survival was unaffected by dose, and no pathologic effects were observed; slight decreases in mean body weight occurred at the

  11. Ambient concentrations of 1,3-butadiene in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dollard, G J; Dore, C J; Jenkin, M E

    2001-06-01

    This paper assesses the current knowledge of 1,3-butadiene as an atmospheric pollutant, considers measurement techniques and reviews available data on 1,3-butadiene monitoring and emissions estimates. Atmospheric chemistry, sources of emission, current legislation, measurement techniques and monitoring programmes for 1,3-butadiene are reviewed. There have been comparatively few studies of the products of oxidation of 1,3-butadiene in the atmosphere. However, on the basis of the available information, and by analogy with the oxidation mechanism for the widely-studied and structurally similar natural hydrocarbon isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), it is possible to define some features of the likely oxidation pathways for 1,3-butadiene. The total UK 1,3-butadiene emission to the atmosphere for 1996 has been estimated at 10.60 kTonnes. 1,3-Butadiene is a product of petrol and diesel combustion; consequently this total is dominated by road transport exhaust emissions (accounting for some 68% of the total). Off-road vehicles and machinery are responsible for 14% of the total UK emission. 1,3-Butadiene is used in the manufacture of numerous rubber compounds, and consequently emissions arise from both the manufacture and use of 1,3-butadiene in industrial processes. Emissions from the chemical industry account for 18% of the UK total emission- 8% from 1,3-butadiene manufacture and 10% from 1,3-butadiene use. The United Kingdom Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards (EPAQS) has published a report on 1,3-butadiene, and recommended a national air quality standard of 1.0 ppb (expressed as an annual rolling mean). This was adopted by the Government as part of the National Air Quality Strategy (NAQS) in 1997, and a target of compliance by 2005 was set. Work conducted for the review of the NAQS (1999) indicated that it was likely that all locations would be compliant with the national standard by the end of 2003. As a result, the review updated the air quality objective for 1

  12. Predicting the glass transition temperature as function of crosslink density and polymer interactions in rubber compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Escamard, Gabriella; De Rosa, Claudio; Auriemma, Finizia

    2016-05-01

    Crosslink sulfur density in rubber compounds and interactions in polymer blends are two of the composition elements that affect the rubber compound properties and glass transition temperature (Tg), which is a marker of polymer properties related to its applications. Natural rubber (NR), butadiene rubber (BR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) compounds were investigated using calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that the Di Marzio's and Schneider's Models predict with accuracy the dependence of Tg on crosslink density and composition in miscible blends, respectively, and that the two model may represent the base to study the relevant "in service" properties of real rubber compounds.

  13. Optical and Thermal Stability of Oligofluorene/Rubber Luminescent Blend.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Camila G; Faez, Roselena; Péres, Laura O

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes to obtain homogeneous and stable blends of oligo(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-co-phenylene (OF), a conjugated oligomer with strong tendency of formation of excimers in the solid state, and nitrile rubber (NBR). This rubber protection reduces the formation of polymer excimers in the films. The fluorene oligomer was synthesized via Suzuki reaction and incorporated in the nitrile rubber. The films were formed by spin coating and casting techniques on the proportions of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 % (w/w) of OF in the nitrile rubber (NBR). The structural, optical and thermal properties of the films were evaluated with infrared, UV-Vis, fluorescence and thermogravimetry, respectively. The nitrile rubber proved to be essential for the preparation of homogeneous and stable films, since it was not possible to obtain films with only fluorene using the above-mentioned techniques. Furthermore, luminescent properties of OF are unchanged and the excimers formation in the solid state decrease suggesting the efficiency of nitrile rubber as the matrix for making films. PMID:27351668

  14. Assessment of 1,3-butadiene epidemiology studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, M G

    1990-01-01

    Positive carcinogenicity studies in mice and rats have led to concerns that 1,3-butadiene may be carcinogenic in humans under exposure conditions that have existed in occupational settings and perhaps exist today. The principal settings of interest are the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) manufacturing industry, which uses large quantities of 1,3-butadiene, and the 1,3-butadiene monomer industry. The potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure is highest during monomer transfer operations and is lowest in finishing areas of polymerization plants where the polymer products are processed. Three large cohort mortality studies have been conducted in the SBR and monomer producing industries since 1980. These studies, which examined the mortality experience of over 17,000 men employed in one monomer and 10 SBR facilities, are the subject of this review. All but one of the facilities began operations during the early 1940s. The mortality experience observed within these employee cohorts is comparable to that seen in other long-term studies of men employed in the petroleum, chemical, and rubber industries for all causes of death, total malignant neoplasms, and for the specific cancers seen in excess in the toxicologic studies. This paper discusses discrepant findings observed in more detailed analyses within individual cohorts and among employment subgroups, as well as selected limitations of the particular studies. Additional efforts to refine 1,3-butadiene exposure categories are needed. Within the context of sample size limitations inherent in these studies, there is currently inadequate evidence to establish a relationship between cancer mortality outcomes and 1.3-butadiene exposure in humans. PMID:2205483

  15. Evaluating Waste Charcoal as Potential Rubber Composite Filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, charcoal in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural products was evaluated as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated styrene-butadiene lat...

  16. Biochemical markers in butadiene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1994-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is used to manufacture a wide range of polymers and copolymers including styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene, and acrylonitrile-butadiene-syrene resins. The carcinogenicity of BD has been determined in life-span inhalation studies in both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. Results suggest a marked species difference in the carcinogenic effects of BD. For example, female mice exposed to as low as 6.25 ppm BD exhibited increased alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms. In contrast, BD was only a weak carcinogen in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were observed to have an increase only in mammary tumors after exposure to 1000 ppm. A biochemical study of highly exposed BD workers and unexposed controls is providing valuable information on BD metabolism in humans, and how this relates to the development of intermediate biologic effects. A group of heavily exposed workers were identified in a BD production facility in China. The purpose of this paper is to report the initial results from the sampling trip in the first quarter of 1994.

  17. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Toxicokinetics of inhaled 1,3-butadiene in monkeys: Comparison to toxicokinetics in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Sun, J.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Bond, J.A.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Mauderly, J.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Sabourin, P.J.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1991-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weaker carcinogen in rats. People are exposed to butadiene through its industrial use--largely in rubber production (over 3 billion pounds of butadiene were produced in 1989)--and because it is common in the environment, occurring in cigarette smoke, gasoline vapor and in the effluents from fossil fuel incineration. Epidemiological studies have provided some evidence for butadiene carcinogenicity in people. Differences in the uptake and metabolism of inhaled butadiene between rodents and primates, including people, might be reflected in differences in its toxicity. In order to compare uptake and metabolism in primates to that in rodents--for which data were already available--the authors exposed cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to 14C-labeled butadiene at concentrations of 10.1, 310 or 7760 ppm for 2 hr. Exhaled air and excreta were collected during exposure and for 96 hr after exposure. The uptake of butadiene as a result of metabolism was much lower in monkeys than in rodents. For equivalent inhalation exposures, the concentrations of total butadiene metabolites in the blood were 5-50 times lower in monkey than in the mouse, the more sensitive rodent species, and 4-14 times lower than in the rat. If the toxicokinetics of butadiene in people is more like that of the monkey than that of rodents, then our data suggest that people will receive lower doses of butadiene and its metabolites than rodents following equivalent inhalation exposures to butadiene. This has important implications for assessing the risk to humans of butadiene exposure based on animal studies.

  19. Overview of the rubber industry and tire manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    The production of rubber and rubber products is a large and diverse industry. Natural rubber, obtained from plantations in Africa and Asia, accounts for only about 25% of the rubber used in industry. Synthetic alternatives, developed during World War II, are the primary sources of raw materials today. Health hazards in synthetic rubber production are primary related to exposure to monomers. An excess incidence of leukemia has been observed in styrene/butadiene rubber production, attributed to exposure to 1,3-butadiene. Excesses of cancer and respiratory disease have been reported, although specific causative agents are rarely identified. Exposures have varied greatly over the years, based on changes in materials used, work practices, and ventilation. In modern industry, exposures to noise, skin and respiratory irritants, and ergonomic stressors remain important. The tire industry, in particular, has been studied extensively over the past 50 years. PMID:10495481

  20. Gender differences in the metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to butadiene diepoxide in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Dahl, A.R.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a gaseous compound used in the production of rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weak carcinogen in rats. The mechanism of BD-induced carcinogenicity is thought to involve genotoxic effects of its reactive epoxide metabolites butadiene monoepoxide (BDO) and butadiene diepoxide (BDO{sub 2}). Studies in our laboratory have shown that levels of the epoxides, particularly BDO{sub 2}, are greater in mice-the more sensitive species-than rats. While both epoxides are genotoxic in a number of assays, BDO{sub 2} is mutagenic in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than BDO. Species differences in carcinogenicity of BD have posed a dilemma to investigators deciding which animal model is most appropriate for BD risk assessment.

  1. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Labib, M.E.; Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  2. 1,3-Butadiene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Butadiene ; CASRN 106 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  3. Tough Rubber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Sue

    1994-01-01

    Describes the benefits of using rubber floor coverings in a gym's free-weight and cardiovascular equipment areas. Tips on purchasing a rubber floor are highlighted as is an annotated list of suppliers and their rubber flooring products. (GR)

  4. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  5. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 64 to 69 parts by weight of... to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16 to 20 parts of butadiene/styrene...) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the same composition range as the matrix...

  6. Analysis of butadiene monoepoxide and butadiene diepoxide in various tissues of sprague-dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice following low-level exposures to 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Bechtold, W.E.; Dahl, A.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1994-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is used extensively in the production of styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene elastomers, and other polymers. Occupational exposures of workers in areas with concentrations of up to 374 ppm BD have been documented in U.S. plants. Additionally, BD is present in cigarette smoke, gasoline vapors, and automobile exhaust resulting in exposures of this chemical to most of the U.S. population. Epidemiological studies have revealed increased incidences of mortality due to lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers among rubber industry workers exposed to BD. However, because these workers were most likely exposed to a wide variety of potentially harmful compounds, the contribution of BD to increased carcinogenic risk is uncertain. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the production and disposition of BDO and BDO{sub 2} in several target tissues in rats and mice during and following 4-h exposures to a low-level (62.5 ppm) of BD.

  7. Chemocatalytic conversion of ethanol into butadiene and other bulk chemicals.

    PubMed

    Angelici, Carlo; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2013-09-01

    The development of new and improved processes for the synthesis of bio-based chemicals is one of the scientific challenges of our time. These new discoveries are not only important from an environmental point of view, but also represent an important economic opportunity, provided that the developed processes are selective and efficient. Bioethanol is currently produced from renewable resources in large amounts and, in addition to its use as biofuel, holds considerable promise as a building block for the chemical industry. Indeed, further improvements in production, both in terms of efficiency and feedstock selection, will guarantee availability at competitive prices. The conversion of bioethanol into commodity chemicals, in particular direct 'drop-in' replacements is, therefore, becoming increasingly attractive, provided that the appropriate (catalytic) technology is in place. The production of green and renewable 1,3-butadiene is a clear example of this approach. The Lebedev process for the one-step catalytic conversion of ethanol to butadiene has been known since the 1930s and has been applied on an industrial scale to produce synthetic rubber. Later, the availability of low-cost oil made it more convenient to obtain butadiene from petrochemical sources. The desire to produce bulk chemicals in a sustainable way and the availability of low-cost bioethanol in large volumes has, however, resulted in a renaissance of this old butadiene production process. This paper reviews the catalytic aspects associated with the synthesis of butadiene via the Lebedev process, as well as the production of other, mechanistically related bulk chemicals that can be obtained from (bio)ethanol. PMID:23703747

  8. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  9. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period. PMID:22139094

  10. Hardness and compression resistance of natural rubber and synthetic rubber mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, J. M.; Santos, A.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to mechanically characterize through compression resistance and shore hardness tests, the mixture of hevea brasiliensis natural rubber with butadiene synthetic rubber (BR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer rubber (EPDM). For each of the studied mixtures were performed 10 tests, each of which increased by 10% the content of synthetic rubber in the mixture; each test consisted of carrying out five tests of compression resistance and five tests of shore hardness. The specimens were vulcanized on a temperature of 160°C, during an approximate time of 15 minutes, and the equipment used in the performance of the mechanical tests were a Shimadzu universal machine and a digital durometer. The results show that the A shore hardness increases directly proportional, with a linear trend, with the content of synthetic BR, SBR or EPDM rubber present in the mixture, being the EPDM the most influential. With respect to the compression resistance is observed that the content of BR or SBR increase this property directly proportional through a linear trend; while the EPDM content also increases but with a polynomial trend.

  11. Crude butadiene to styrene process

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, R.S.; Murchison, C.B.

    1994-12-31

    One of the natural by-products of ethylene manufacture is a mixture of C4`s containing butadiene, butenes and butane. This C4 stream is the predominant feed stock for producing pure butadiene by an extraction process. The demand growth for ethylene far exceeds that for butadiene resulting in a world wide surplus of butadiene. The ethylene producer has a number of options available to process the crude C4 stream if the market price does not justify isolation of the pure butadiene. The first option is recycle the crude C4 stream back to the ethylene cracker and co-crack with fresh feed. A second option that has become popular in the last few years has been the partial or complete hydrogenation of the butadiene and butenes in the crude C4 stream. Partial or selective hydrogenation is preferred when there is a market for iso-butene which finds use in MTBE manufacture. Full hydrogenation is used when cracker feed stock is limited, there is excess hydrogen and no cost effective outlets exist for butenes. Full hydrogenation produces butanes that are excellent crack feed stock. Both selective and full hydrogenation require low to moderate capital expenditure. Both of these options are currently being practiced to remove excess butadiene from the market. The crude C4 to styrene process developed by Dow offers an attractive, high value alternative to an olefins producer. This process selectively upgrades butadiene in C4 streams to styrene monomer and produces raffinate-1 as a by-product. The process is currently being operated at the 18--40 lb/hr scale in a Dow Texas pilot plant.

  12. Iron-Catalyzed Dehydration of Aldoximes to Nitriles Requiring Neither Other Reagents Nor Nitrile Media.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kengo; Kitagawa, Saki; Yamazaki, Masayuki; Uchida, Kingo

    2016-05-01

    The dehydration of aldoximes is an environmentally benign reaction affording the desired nitrile and water as a by-product. However, most of the reported catalytic dehydration reactions of aldoximes require a solvent containing nitrile to synthesize the corresponding nitrile compounds. Inspired by recent reports on the enzymatic synthesis under nitrile-free conditions, we here describe that a simple iron salt catalyzes the dehydration of aldoximes requiring neither other reagents nor nitrile media. Our method can be applied to the one-pot synthesis of nitiriles from aldehydes. PMID:26910510

  13. Chemical characterization of CTBN (carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile) and its epoxy adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of carbonxyl-terminated butadiene (CTB), carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile (CTBN), and a CTBN adduct prepared by reaction with Epon 828. Data from gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and ion chromatography are presented and discussed. Quantitative methods based on carbon-13 and proton NMR for analyzing CTBN are described. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have an abnormal amount of CTBN protons. One such lot exhibited a phase separation of a polybutadiene impurity. Carbon-13 NMR was found to be capable of determining nitrile content directly. Carbon-13 NMR had a relative standard deviation of 8.3% and a proton NMR of 3.9%. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have 5% more CTBN protons than other lots. 3 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer containing 77-82 parts by weight of... by the method titled, “Determination of β-Dodecyl-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is... infrared spectro-photo-metric method titled “Infrared Spectro-photo-metric Determination of...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer...-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the Center for... Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210 Resin Pellets,” which is incorporated by reference....

  16. Effect of strain rate on mechanical properties of melt-processed soy flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dispersion of soy flour with styrene-butadiene rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders. Upon crosslinking, th...

  17. Rubber Reclamation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2007-01-01

    The safety and health hazards related to recycling of used rubber, due to the scarcity and high price of virgin rubber are reported. Various threats like stagnant water pools trapped in tires leading to diseases and ignited tires, which become very difficult to extinguish and generating smoke that is extremely detrimental to the environment, have…

  18. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  19. Folpet permeation through nitrile gloves.

    PubMed

    Zainal, H; Que Hee, Shane S

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether two different brands of unsupported and unlined nitrile gloves protected against aqueous emulsions of a Folpet wettable powder (50% Folpet) using an ASTM type-I-PTC 600 permeation cell at 30.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C held in a shaking water bath. An analytical method to determine Folpet using the internal standard method was first developed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). A novel pyrolysis GC-ECD technique that quantified the thermal degradation product phthalimide had pg sensitivity suitable to detect the trace amounts of Folpet that permeated. The on-column conversion was (68.0 +/- 9.5) percent at 170 degrees C over the folpet injected mass range of 3 to 148 pg. The challenge solution in the permeation cell was 1.4 mg/mL aqueous emulsion of Folpet wettable powder, and 2-propanol was the collection solvent. After evaporation of the collection solvent, the time weighted average rate of permeation of Folpet through SafeSkin nitrile (an exams type of glove) after 8 hours was (42.1 +/- 2.9) ng/cm(2)/min compared with (2.04 +/- 0.69) ng/cm(2)/min for the Sol-Vex nitrile (industrial chemical resistant), the latter being about 21 times more protective and also near the limits of detection. The respective values after 4 hours of exposure were (28.4 +/- 1.2) and (0.65 +/- 0.36) ng/cm(2)/min. Diagnostic reflectance infrared minima of both challenge and collection sides of the gloves showed small changes in wave number and intensity values after 8 hours of exposure, with Folpet being detected in dried spots on the challenge side. GC-ECD-based permeation and IR reflectance data indicated high chemical resistance of the Sol-Vex gloves to an aqueous emulsion of Folpet. PMID:12909534

  20. In vitro metabolism of aromatic nitriles.

    PubMed

    Markus, B; Kwon, C H

    1994-12-01

    Studies on the metabolic fate of aromatic nitriles, in contrast to their aliphatic counterparts, have been minimal and the subject of controversy. The in vitro metabolic fate of several aromatic nitriles with varying substituents was investigated by using rat liver subcellular fractions, with a particular emphasis on the nitrile moiety. Benzonitriles and 4-cyanophenols underwent oxidative metabolism to produce ring-hydroxylated metabolites. On the other hand, 2-cyanophenol was resistant to metabolism. o-Tolunitrile was metabolized and produced o-cyanobenzyl alcohol and phthalide. Phthalide, however, was chemically derived from o-cyanobenzyl alcohol, the initial metabolite. 4-Nitrobenzonitrile was resistant to oxidation on the ring, but was readily reduced to the corresponding amine metabolite under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Nitroxynil (3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzonitrile) was metabolized to produce 3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzamide and 3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid. The enzyme(s) responsible for this hydrolytic metabolism was primarily localized in the cytosol. Among the nitriles tested, o-tolunitrile and nitroxynil produced metabolites in which the nitrile moiety was modified. Nitroxynil, however, was the only compound that was directly metabolized on the nitrile moiety by the rat liver enzyme(s). PMID:7891302

  1. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  2. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  3. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. PMID:25746475

  4. Nitrile Compounds Observed on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marten, A.; Moreno, R.

    2003-05-01

    Heterodyne millimeter observations were performed on Titan with the IRAM Plateau-de-Bure Interferometer array in February-March 2003 near greatest eastern elongations. The most extended configuration of the array was used. The Titan's angular diameter, corresponding to the solid body value, was 0.8 arc sec. However, a larger diameter of about 1 arc sec needs to be considered in the analysis of emitted flux measurements. Two dual frequency receivers were utilized at 3- and 1.2-mm wavelengths, giving access to the 82-116 and 210-245 GHz spectral ranges. Therefore, to optimize our mapping program, observations were carried out in the HCN(1-0), HC3N(12-11), CH3CN(12-11), HC3N(25-24) and CO(2-1) transitions, near 88.6, 109.2, 220.7, 227.4 and 230.5 GHz, respectively. An angular resolution of 0.6 arc sec was obtained at shorter wavelengths, yielding disk-resolved spectra of Titan. Most of the HCN(1-0) and HC3N(12-11) data correspond to full-disk measurements since the equivalent synthesized beam of the array was larger than 1.3 arc sec at longer wavelengths. Narrow isolated lines of HC3N and CH3CN as well as the three components of HCN(1-0) were analyzed at a very high spectral resolution of 40 kHz. Lower values of 160 kHz and 2.5 MHz were chosen for recording broad-band spectra of HCN, CH3CN and CO. Disk-averaged spectra taken at the same frequencies with the IRAM single-dish 30-m telescope (Marten et al., 2002, Icarus, 158, 532) have been used for comparison. The vertical distributions of nitrile abundances inferred from those data served as a preliminary basis for radiative transfer computations considering a spherical geometry for Titan's atmosphere and an elliptical gaussian synthesized beam. Numerical calculations of HCN and CO spectra are found in remarkable agreement with the interferometric data. Significant differences exist for HC3N in the northern latitudes and CH3CN in midlatitude regions. Measured maps are presented at all observing frequencies along with

  5. Species differences in metabolism of 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.

    1995-02-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a 4-carbon gaseous compound with two double bonds. Used in high tonnage to make styrene-butadiene polymers in the rubber industry. Because of large amounts in use, BD was tested for toxicity in 2-year inhalation exposures of both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. The results of the two-species studies were dramatically different. In the initial study in mice, BD was shown to be a potent multiple-site carcinogen at exposure levels of 625 and 1250 ppM. There were increased incidences of neoplasia in the heart, lung, mammary gland, and ovary; malignant lymphomas resulted in early deaths of the mice so that the planned 2-year study was stopped after only 61 weeks of exposure. The second study in mice was conducted at much lower exposure concentrations (6.25, 20, 62.5, 200, and 625 ppM) and lasted 104 weeks. Increased incidences of hemangiosarcomas of the heart and lung neoplasia were observed in males exposed to 62.5 ppM BD, while females had increased lung neoplasia even at the 6.25 ppM exposure level. Early deaths from lymphomas were again observed at the high exposure concentration (625 ppm). A noncancer toxicity observed in mice was a macrocytic, megaloblastic anemia.

  6. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  7. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  8. Nitrile glove permeation of benomyl.

    PubMed

    Zainal, H; Hee, S S Que

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate permeation of the fungicide benomyl at its highest field application concentration (0.70 mg/mL) in Benlate 50 WP aqueous solution (1.4 mg/mL) through two types of unsupported and unlined nitrile gloves--a disposable latex glove (Safeskin) and an industrial chemical-resistant glove (Solvex)--using an American Society for Testing and Materials (ATSM)-type permeation cell with isopropanol collection medium. The permeation cell was contained in a moving-tray water bath at 30.0 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C. The collection medium was evaporated and the residue derivatized with an optimized method (2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoro)benzyl bromide to form the disubstituted derivative of carbendazim (CARB), CARB.2PFB. The latter in isooctane was then quantified by gas chromatography- 63Ni-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) by the internal standard method. GC-ECD, GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and reflectance infrared investigations showed that little degradation of benomyl occurred in the challenge solution of aqueous Benlate during an 8-hour exposure period. Benomyl was collected as a mixture of CARB and benomyl as shown by the presence of a diagnostic chromatographic peak identified by GC-MS. The amounts permeated during the same time period were always higher for Safeskin than for Solvex gloves, with the latter being approximately 18 times more protective than the former after 8 hours of continuous exposure. Although the Solvex gloves were safe to wear at least for 4 hours and for almost 8 hours, the ASTM breakthrough threshold was used as reference and thus ignored carcinogenic effects. Reflectance infrared investigations detected benomyl and CARB on the glove challenge surface after drying and confirmed that the cleaned glove surfaces after permeation experiments did not differ in infrared reflectance spectra from the corresponding surfaces just before the permeation experiments. PMID:16446997

  9. FLOW PROPERTIES OF NATURAL RUBBER COMPOSITES FILLED WITH DEFATTED SOY FLOUR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, defatted soy flour (DSF) in a styrene-butadiene matrix has been shown to have a significant reinforcement effect. In this study, the objective is to investigate the flow properties of composites in natural rubber to understand their processing characteristics. Composites with 10 to 30 ...

  10. A moving robotic hand system for whole-glove permeation and penetration: captan and nitrile gloves.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert; Hee, Shane Que

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robotic hand to test the influence of hand movement on the permeation/penetration of captan through disposable nitrile rubber gloves. An available robotic hand was modified to within one standard deviation of the anthropometric 50th percentile male hand. Permeation tests used a nylon inspection glove interposed between medium-size outer and inner nitrile gloves, the latter protected the hand. Permeation of an aqueous emulsion (217 mg/mL) of captan was conducted at 35 degrees C +/- 0.7 degrees C. A new surface wipe technique facilitated collection of captan from the inner surface of the exposed nitrile gloves, a technique favored above rinse methods that extracted captan from within the glove. With hand movement, the permeated mass of captan collected after 8 hr ranged from 1.6 to 970 microg (Brand A) and 8.6 +/- 1.2 microg (Brand B). Without hand movement, the corresponding masses ranged from 1.4 to 8.4 microg (Brand A) and 11 +/- 3 mg (Brand B). These results were not significantly different at p < or = 0.05 using parametric and nonparametric statistical tests but indicated that hand movement could influence the precision of permeation (F-test p < or = 0.05). One glove exhibited failure after 2 hr with movement, in comparison with 0.5 to 9.9 microg captan with no movement. Hand movement did not appear to significantly affect the permeation of captan through nitrile gloves. However, hand movement did influence physical and/or chemical degradation, resulting in glove failures. The robotic hand simulated normal hand motions, was reliable, and could be used to assess the influence of hand movement on the permeation of nonvolatile components through gloves. Future research should continue to investigate the influence of hand movement and additional work factors on the permeation, penetration, and physical integrity of protective gloves. PMID:18286423

  11. A numerical investigation on mechanical property improvement of styrene butadine rubber by static straight blade indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyana, B.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; Schipper, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical property improvement of rubber is widely carried out by adding carbon black or silica as a filler in rubber. In general, this improvement aims on the increase of stiffness and abrasion resistance. By means of the static straight blade indentation technique, this paper studies the mechanical properties of Unfilled Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR-0) and Filled Styrene Butadiene Rubber that is compounded with carbon black (SBR-25). The numerical method applied was Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in which the rubber was modeled as a hyper-elastic material and indented by a blade indenter with various wedge angles i.e. 30, 45 and 60 degrees. At the same depth of indentation, the results showed that there was an increase in both rubber stiffness and maximum stress if the rubber was compounded. However, it is found that the rubber stiffness showed a regular slight increase, while the maximum stress experienced an irregularly significant increase. Especially for the 30 degree wedge angle, the maximum stress extremely increased at a certain depth of indentation.

  12. Styrene-Butadiene Co-Polymer Based Highly Conducting and Flexible Polymer Composite Film with Low Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Anisha Mary; Neena, P.

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymer composites are finding novel applications in various fields especially in device technology. In this work an effort has been made to synthesize polyaniline-synthetic rubber (Styrene-butadiene rubber) composite via ex-situ technique and its electrochemical properties are investigated. Highly conducting emeraldine form of polyaniline (20 S/cm) is prepared by the oxidative polymerization of aniline in aqueous acidic (CSA) media using ammonium peroxydisulfate as oxidizing agent. These composite films are characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy to investigate their optical properties. The dc conductivity studies indicate that these composite films show extremely low percolation threshold.

  13. An update of nitrile photochemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons are undertaken between laboratory kinetics experiments and Voyager observations in order to shed light on possible chemical reaction pathways to the generation of cyanogen and dicyanoacetylene in Titan's upper atmosphere. The predicted concentrations of the simple nitrile compounds are found to be of a magnitude realistically corresponding to the Voyager observations.

  14. Burning rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Mario Andretti, look out You are about to be surpassed in the burning rubber category by a joint venture between Oxford Energy Company and General Electric. The two companies are building the first whole tire-to-energy facility in the US in Modesto, California. This $41 million facility does not require tires to be shredded prior to incineration; it has the capacity to burn 700 tires per minute. The electricity generated will be provided to a utility company. Oxford says there are two billion waste tires on the ground and this number is increasing by 220 million a year. Of that amount, only 18 million a year are recycled.

  15. Inhalation toxicology and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice following 65 weeks of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Huff, J E; Roycroft, J H; Chou, B J; Miller, R A

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a large-production volume chemical used mainly in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, was found to induce multiple-organ carcinogenicity in male and female B6C3F1 mice at exposure concentrations (625 and 1250 ppm) equivalent to and below the OSHA standard of 1000 ppm. Since this study was terminated after 60 weeks of exposure because of reduced survival due to fatal tumors, and because dose-response relationships for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions were not clearly established, a second long-term inhalation study of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice was conducted at lower exposure concentrations, ranging from 6.25 to 625 ppm. Both the histopathological findings from animals dying through week 65 and the results of evaluations of animals exposed for 40 and 65 weeks are presented in this report. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene caused a regenerative anemia at concentrations of 62.5 ppm and higher. Testicular atrophy was induced at 625 ppm, and ovarian atrophy was observed at 20 ppm and higher. During the first 50 weeks of the study, lymphocytic lymphoma was the major cause of death of mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene. Neoplasms of the heart, forestomach, lung, Harderian gland, mammary gland, ovary, and liver were frequently observed in 1,3-butadiene-exposed mice that died between week 40 and week 65 of the study. Studies in which exposure to 1,3-butadiene was stopped after limited periods were also included to assess the relationship between exposure levels and duration of exposures on the outcome of 1,3-butadiene-induced carcinogenicity. In these studies, lymphocytic lymphomas were induced in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for only 13 weeks. The incidence of lymphocytic lymphoma in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for 26 weeks was two times that in mice exposed to 625 ppm for 13 weeks. However, when the exposure concentration was reduced by half to 312 ppm and the exposure duration extended to 52 weeks, the

  16. Study on Nanomorphology of High-Structure Carbon Black and its Bound Rubber by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Jin, Yongzhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Wu, Yafeng; Meng, Chuncai

    2012-02-01

    Bound rubber in carbon black (CB) filled rubber (natural rubber (NR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBS)) was prepared by the solvent method. The nanomorphology of CB and rubber/CB soluble rubber was observed by atomic force microscope. The results show that high-structure CB DZ13 has a "grape cluster" structure which consists of many original particles with the grain size of about 30-50 nm. Graphitizing process of CB decreases the amount of bound rubber. The NR/DZ13 soluble rubber with island-rim structure has been obtained, where the islands are DZ13 particles and the rims around the islands are occupied by NR film. But when the graphitized DZ13 particles were used as fillers of rubber, we have only observed that some graphitized DZ13 particles were deposited on the surface of the globular-like NR molecular chains, instead of the spreading of NR molecular chains along the surface of DZ13 particles, indicating that graphitized DZ13 has lower chemical activity than ungraphitized DZ13. Especially, we have already observed an interesting unusual bound rubber phenomenon, the blocked "bracelet" structure with the diameter of about 600 nm in which CB particles were blocked in ring-shaped SBS monomer.

  17. Adhesion strength study between plasma treated polyester fibres and a rubber matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krump, H.; Šimor, M.; Hudec, I.; Jaššo, M.; Luyt, A. S.

    2005-02-01

    In this work, the adhesion strength between poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibres and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) was studied. The effects of atmospheric plasma treatment, used to increase adhesion strength between PET fibres and the rubber matrix, were investigated and compared. It was confirmed that lubricants on the fibres caused a decrease in adhesion strength between the plasma treated reinforcing PET fibres and the SBR rubber matrix. These lubricants can be removed by acetone. When washed and treated in plasma, a substantial improvement in adhesion strength was observed. No ageing in air before combination with the rubber matrix was observed. This confirmed that the plasma streamers caused the creation of a new, relatively stable chemical species on the polymer surface. It suggests that the surface modification of PET fibres by plasma treatment at atmospheric gas pressure is a suitable and technologically applicable method for the improvement of adhesion strength of polyester reinforcing materials to rubber.

  18. Mortality study of workers in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1995-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, we conducted a cohort mortality study among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation, which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston, West Virginia and Institute, West Virginia, plants all products, by-products, and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% CI = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7556014

  19. Gas-chromatographic determination of 1,3-butadiene trimers in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drugov, Yu.S.; Murav`eva, G.V.; Shlyakhov, A.F.

    1992-02-10

    In the catalytic polymerization of 1,3-butadiene during the manufacture of SKD-1 rubber (with titanium and aluminum compounds as catalysts) the toxic oligomers (1,3-butadiene trimers) t,t,t-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (I), t,t,c-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (II), n-2,4,6,10-dodecatetraene (III), n-1,3,6,10-dodecatertraine (IV), and others end up in the atmosphere and the manufacture of cyclododecane. In the content of the oligomers in the air used for drying the rubber was determined by passing it through active carbon and desorbing the trapped substances with water vapor. However, aspects of the concentration of the microimpurities during their determination in the atmosphere were not considered. The aim of the present work was to develop a gas-chromatographic procedure for the determination of small amounts of compounds in the atmosphere. The tentative safe level amounts to 0.008 mg/m{sup 3} for (I) and 0.01 mg/m{sup 3} for (II, III). In air these oligomers are present in the form of vapor and aerosols. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Inhibition of deterioration of rubbers by hydroaromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi )

    1993-03-01

    Based on the results obtained from previous works, which concluded that hydrogen donating hydroaromatics can be available as radical scavengers in inhibiting the deterioration of hydrocarbon products at lower oxygen partial pressure, a hydroaromatic type inhibitor which contains various hydroaromatics as its main components produced from coal tar fraction was examined by adding it to natural rubber (NR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). It was found that the inhibitor was as effective as the conventional amine-type inhibitor. From practical viewpoint, heavy hydroaromatics from petroleum (HHAP) was produced by the hydrogenation of the highly aromatic oil from the heavy fraction of petroleum to improve the physical properties of the previous inhibitor from coal tar fraction. From the deterioration tests for NR, SBR, and chloroprene (CR), the following results could be obtained: (1) HHAP showed excellent inhibiting abilities toward NR and CR, exceeding the conventional inhibitor; (2) inhibiting effect toward SBR could be recognized, viscosity and flex cracking were improved by the addition of HHAP. From these results, the hydrogen donation from hydroaromatic is considered to be effective in inhibiting the deterioration of rubbers.

  1. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted nitrile (generic name). 721.5350 Section 721.5350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted nitrile (generic name). 721.5350 Section 721.5350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34638,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted nitrile (generic name). 721.5350 Section 721.5350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted nitrile (generic name). 721.5350 Section 721.5350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted nitrile (generic name). 721.5350 Section 721.5350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  6. Superelectrophilic chemistry of amino-nitriles and related substrates

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erum K.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The superacid-promoted Houben-Hoesch reactions of amino-nitriles and related compounds have been studied. The nitriles form dicationic electrophiles and react with benzene in fair to good yields (12-95%). The intermediate iminium ions may also be reduced to the benzylic amines by NaBH4 or H2. PMID:21666850

  7. Mortality of workers in styrene-butadiene polymer production

    SciTech Connect

    Matanoski, G.M.; Schwartz, L.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 13,920 males who had worked in eight styrene-butadiene rubber polymer manufacturing plants in the US and Canada for at least 1 year were followed for deaths from 1943 when the industry began to 1979. Mortality ratios standardized for age, race, and calendar time using US male rates as a comparison revealed no excess mortality in this population for any cause of death. The overall standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes was 0.81. Only the SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease among black males showed a significant excess (SMR = 1.28). Examination of risks by major work areas such as production, utilities, maintenance, and other jobs, as well as by salaried and hourly pay grade, revealed no significant differences in cancer mortality by specific sites. Because the ratios for selected digestive cancers were above the all-cause SMR, this group of neoplasms is under further investigation as is the exposure profile of specific jobs within the industry.

  8. Relative toxicity of pyrolysis products of some elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    Ten samples comprising seven generic types of elastomers were evaluated for relative toxicity using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. The nitrile rubber samples appeared to generally exhibit greater toxicity than the samples of polyisoprene, styrene butadiene, and chlorinated polyethylene rubber. Carbon monoxide was present in sufficient concentration in the blood of the test animals to be the principal cause of death in the case of polyisoprene and styrene butadiene rubber.

  9. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  10. Effect of Applied Potential on the Electrochemical Deposition of Styrene-Butadiene Co-Polymer Based Conducting Polymer Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Anisha Mary; Neena, P.

    2011-10-01

    Homogeneous conducting polymer composite films with improved electrical properties are synthesized via electrochemical polymerization of polyaniline on Styrene butadiene rubber coated steel electrode. The electrochemical polymerization is carried out by potentiostatic method using an aqueous solution of 0.2 M aniline and 1.5 M sulphuric acid as electrolyte in a single compartment electrochemical cell. The optical studies show successful incorporation of polyaniline into the matrix polymer film. The effect of applied potential on the electrodeposition of composite is studied by cyclic voltammetry and by impedance spectroscopic measurements.

  11. Permeation of captan through disposable nitrile glove.

    PubMed

    Phalen, R N; Que Hee, Shane S

    2003-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the permeation of an aqueous emulsion of the pesticide, captan, as a wettable powder (48.9% captan) through a disposable nitrile glove material using an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)-type I-PTC-600 permeation cell. The goal was to investigate the protective capability of the gloves against dermatitis. The analytical method was based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The least quantifiable limit (LQL) was 6 ng for GC-ECD and 30 ng for GC-MS. Testing was conducted using the ASTM F739 closed-loop permeation method and a worst-case aqueous concentration 217 mg/ml of captan 50-WP. The average permeation rates were low, with 12+/-5 ng/(cm(2)min) after 2h, 50+/-25 ng/(cm(2)min) after 4h, and 77+/-58 ng/(cm(2)min) after 8h. The calculated diffusion coefficient was (1.28+/-0.10) x 10(-5)cm(2)/h. No significant swelling or shrinkage occurred at Pnitrile glove showed excellent resistance to a highly concentrated aqueous emulsion of captan. Because the ASTM normalized breakthrough detection time of 250 ng/cm(2) was <2h, these gloves should not be reused once worn, and decontamination is not advised. Protection is also advised for agricultural reentry field workers, because captan has been shown to persist on crops with a half-life greater than the current reentry intervals of 1-4 days. PMID:12835015

  12. Comparative carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, and chloroprene in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Melnick, R L; Sills, R C

    2001-06-01

    1,3-Butadiene, isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), and chloroprene (2-chloro-1,3-butadiene) are high-production-volume chemicals used mainly in the manufacture of synthetic rubber. Inhalation studies have demonstrated multiple organ tumorigenic effects with each of these chemicals in mice and rats. Sites of tumor induction by these epoxide-forming chemicals were compared to each other and to ethylene oxide, a chemical classified by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogenic to humans. For this group of chemicals, there are substantial species differences in sites of neoplasia; neoplasia of the mammary gland is the only common tumorigenic effect in rats and mice. Within each species, there are several common sites of tumor induction; these include the hematopoietic system, circulatory system, lung, liver, forestomach, Harderian gland, and mammary gland in mice, and the mammary gland and possibly the brain, thyroid, testis, and kidney in rats. For studies in which individual animal data were available, mortality-adjusted tumor rates were calculated, and estimates were made of the shape of the exposure-response curves and ED10 values (i.e. exposure concentrations associated with an excess risk of 10% at each tumor site). Most tumorigenic effects reported here were consistent with linear or supralinear models. For chloroprene and butadiene, the most potent response was for the induction of lung neoplasms in female mice, with ED10 values of 0.3 ppm. Based on animal cancer data, isoprene and chloroprene are listed in the NTP's Report on Carcinogens (RoC) as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen. Butadiene is listed in the RoC as known to be a human carcinogen 'based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in humans, including epidemiological and mechanistic information', with support from experimental studies in laboratory animals. Epidemiology data for isoprene and

  13. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  14. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  15. Characterization of hemoglobin adduct formation in mice and rats after administration of ( sup 14 C)butadiene or ( sup 14 C)isoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.D.; Dahl, A.R.; Bond, J.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Occupational exposures to 1,3-butadiene or isoprene occur through their use in the manufacture of rubber and other related polymer products. The purpose of this study was to determine if butadiene or isoprene administration would result in the formation of adducts with blood hemoglobin (Hb), and if such adducts can be used as a measure of previous exposure(s). Male B6C3F1 mice and male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1, 10, 100, or 1000 mumol (14C)butadiene or 0.3, 3.0, 300, 1000, or 3000 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body weight. Animals were killed 24 hr later. Globin was isolated from blood samples and was analyzed for 14C by liquid scintillation spectroscopy. Hb adduct formation was linearly related to administered doses up to 100 mumol (14C)butadiene or 500 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body weight for mice and rats, respectively. For (14C)butadiene, the efficiency of Hb adduct formation in mice and rats within the linear response range was 0.177 +/- 0.003 and 0.407 +/- 0.019 (pmol of 14C-adducts/mg globin)/(mumol of retained (14C)butadiene/kg body wt), respectively (mean +/- SE; n = 18). For (14C)isoprene, these values for mice and rats were 0.158 +/- 0.035 and 0.079 +/- 0.016 (pmol of 14C-adducts/mg globin)/(mumol of retained (14C)isoprene/kg body wt), respectively (mean +/- SE; n = 12). Hb adducts also accumulated linearly after repeated daily administration of 100 mumol (14C)butadiene or 500 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body wt to mice and rats, respectively, for 3 days. (14C)Butadiene-derived Hb adducts in blood showed lifetimes of approximately 24 and approximately 65 days for mice and rats, respectively, which correlate with the reported lifetimes for red blood cells in these rodent species. Thus, levels of butadiene- or isoprene-derived adducts on Hb in circulating blood may be a useful measure of prior repeated exposures to these compounds.

  16. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  17. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  18. Polybutadiene (Jumping Rubber)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory procedure starts with a violet suspension of an 'alfin' catalyst being added to a bottle containing a solution of 1,3-butadiene in pentane. The bottle is corked and shaken for several seconds. The mixture sets to a gel, and within 2 minutes the contents erupt from the bottle.

  19. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  20. Nitrile Bonds as Infrared Probes of Electrostatics in Ribonuclease S

    PubMed Central

    Fafarman, Aaron; Boxer, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, para-cyanophenylalanine, meta-cyanophenylalanine and S-cyano homocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semi-synthetic enzyme Ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber ′99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins. PMID:20883003

  1. [Destruction of the solid-cast rubber tyres by microscopic fungi].

    PubMed

    Chuienko, A I; Subbota, A H; Zhdanova, N M

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to the action of standard test-cultures of fungi (in accordance with GOST 9.049-91 of the former U.S.S.R.) and species, isolated from rubber substrates of two types of the poured rubber tyres, which contained natural and synthetic plasticizer, have been investigated. It has been shown that the strains, isolated from rubber materials have an ability to deteriorate rubber tyres of two types, in contrast to standard species, which caused deterioration only to the tyres, containing the synthetic plasticizer. It has been described in our investigations that fungal resistance of studied tyres decrease with time (on the 28th and 365th day, accordingly), that is shown in full overgrowing of tyre samples, in destruction of their surfaces and in changing of their hardness. Such changes are accompanied by processes of oxidation of rubber, degradation of plasticizer, and by deleaching of such inorganic components of rubber as calcium carbonate, kaolin and zeolite. This information is presented on IR-spectrograms of investigated samples as the absence or presence of absorption frequencies of different intensity that corresponded to aromatic, hydroxyl, ester, alcohol, nitrile and inorganic groups. The paper is presented in Ukrainian. PMID:21117295

  2. Failure studies on rubber and rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhenghong

    A research study has been conducted to investigate selected failure processes in rubber and rubbery composites. Specific failure modes and materials considered included mechanical tearing of rubber-coated fabrics and mechanical/thermal fatigue of carbon black-filled elastomers. Experimental efforts developed novel evaluation techniques that were used to access failure resistance of the materials, as well as to elucidate molecular structure/physical properties relationships. Results are presented in multi-monograph format consisting of a series of four interdependent papers published in peer-reviewed journals. The first monograph measures the tear resistance of a series of polyester fabrics, of controlled fill-yarn size, coated with a compounded butyl rubber resin. A constrained trouser tear test is used to quantify the role of yarn mobility on crack-tip development and the resultant tear strength. As the area around a propagating crack is constrained, tear strength decreases by several orders of magnitude, indicating that the ability of the composite structure to dissipate energy away from the crack tip contributes more to tear resistance than the intrinsic strength of the concomitant materials. Monograph number two continues the work of the first by developing a novel cutting technique to monitor the role of the fiber/rubber interphase during tear propagation. This approach was applied to five different elastomers coated onto one of the polyester yarns. These data show a threefold increase in strength is possible by proper optimization of the fiber/rubber bond. In the third monograph, five different rubber bushing compounds were evaluated for mechanical/thermal fatigue resistance. Samples were dynamically excited in combined compression and shear loadings using a specially designed test fixture. Results indicated that heat build-up was a major contributing factor to the eventual failure of the materials via a complex fracture mechanism, with epoxidized natural

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  4. MUTAGENICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY ASSESSMENT OF 1,3-BUTADIENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene has been shown to be an indirect mutage in bacteria. Two of its potential metabolites, 3,4- epoxybutene and diepoxybutane, are genotoxic in prokaryote as well as eukaryote test systems. Exposure of rodents to 1,3-butadiene results in ovarian tumors in mice and testi...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1051 - 1,3-Butadiene. =

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1,3-Butadiene. = 1910.1051 Section 1910.1051 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1051 1,3-Butadiene.= (a) Scope and...

  6. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BUTADIENE AT A NEOPRENE PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document details a field study to validate a method for the sampling and analysis of butadiene emissions from a plant manufacturing neoprene from butadiene/chlorine mixtures. aseous samples were collected from the process vent of one such plant using a modification of the ev...

  7. Structure factors of dispersible units of carbon black filler in rubbers.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tadanori; Takenaka, Mikihito; Aizawa, Kazuya; Nakamura, Masao; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2005-11-22

    We report the structures of dispersible units, a most fundamental but minimal dispersible structural unit of a carbon black (CB) filler that is formed in two kinds of rubber (polyisoprene and styrene-butadiene random copolymer) matrices under a given processing condition. The results obtained from various small-angle scattering techniques showed that the CB aggregates, as observed after the sonification of a CB/toluene solution, were a spherical shape composed of approximately nine primary CB particles fused together. In the rubber matrices, the aggregates clustered into higher order structures defined in this work as the dispersible units, which are the fundamental structural elements (or the "lower cutoff structures") that build up a higher order mass-fractal structure. Furthermore, we found that the morphology of the dispersible units strongly depended on the rubber matrix, although the mass-fractal dimensions remained unchanged. PMID:16285818

  8. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  9. Hydratases involved in nitrile conversion: screening, characterization and application.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Shimizu, S; Kobayashi, M

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of new enzymes with greater activity and specificity opens new, simple routes for synthetic processes, and consequently, new methods to solve environmental problems. A number of nitrile-related enzymes have been screened over the past few years for use in developing synthetic applications. Microbial nitrile hydratase (NHase) has great potential as a catalyst in organic chemical processing because the enzyme can convert nitriles to the corresponding higher value amides under mild conditions, and has now been applied to the industrial productions of acrylamide and nicotinamide. Particularly, the former production is the first successful example of a bioconversion process for the manufacture of a commodity chemical. The characterization of the enzyme at the molecular level has provided new insights into how the molecular structure determines the enzyme function, and how the regulatory system controls the expression of the enzyme genes to improve the enzyme and the NHase-dependent process. PMID:11893064

  10. Industrial emissions of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, J A

    1990-01-01

    Sources of industrial emissions of 1,3-butadiene are discussed both by process (production, consumers) and type (equipment leaks, point sources). Quantification of the emissions are presented, as reported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1986. The reported emissions attributed to equipment leaks (also known as fugitive emissions) range from about 50 to 95% of the total, depending on the specific production process used. The methods by which these emissions were estimated are discussed, with particular emphasis on the fugitive sources. Industry studies to better quantify the fugitive emissions are described. PMID:2401277

  11. Reactions in water: alkyl nitrile coupling reactions using Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher L; Dalessandro, James D; Hotz, Richard P; Pinhas, Allan R

    2008-05-01

    The coupling reaction of water-soluble alkyl nitriles using Fenton's reagent (Fe(II) and H2O2) is described. The best metal for the reaction is iron(II), and the greatest yields are obtained when the concentration of the metal is kept low. Hydrogen-atom abstraction is selective, preferentially producing the radical alpha to the nitrile. In order to increase the production of dinitrile, in situ reduction of iron(III) to iron(II), using a variety of reducing agents, was investigated. PMID:18363368

  12. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... content is in the range 16.5-19 percent as determined by Kjeldahl analysis. (ii) Intrinsic viscosity in... Test Method for Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  17. Determination of microstructure and composition in butadiene and styrene-butadiene polymers by near-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.E.; Eichinger, B.E. ); Gurley, T.W.; Hermiller, J.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Transmission spectroscopy in the near-infrared region (1,100-2,500 nm) is used to determine the microstructure and the composition of poly(butadiene) (PBD) polymers and styrene-butadiene (SBR) copolymers in bulk and in carbon tetrachloride solution. The multivariate method of classical least squares (CLS) is used to analyze near-infrared spectra of polymers with NMR-determined microstructures and compositions. Although the near-infrared spectra of the pure analytes (cis-1,4-butadiene, trans-1,4-butadiene, 1,2-butadiene, and styrene) are highly overlapped, the CLS method provides accurate predictions of analyte concentrations, because all available spectral frequencies are used for quantitation. The sensitivity of near-infrared spectroscopy to intermolecular interactions and neighboring-group effects in these polymers is demonstrated.

  18. Ericameria Nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush): a complementary rubber feedstock to augment the guayule rubber production stream

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ericameria nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush) is a highly prolific desert shrub that produces high quality natural rubber. Over the past several years we have investigated rabbitbrush’s potential as a commercial rubber feedstock. Like guayule, rabbitbrush produces natural rubber within its bark tissues a...

  19. Strategies to improve the adhesion of rubbers to adhesives by means of plasma surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, J. M.; Romero-Sánchez, M. D.

    2006-05-01

    The surface modifications produced by treatment of a synthetic sulfur vulcanized styrene-butadiene rubber with oxidizing (oxygen, air, carbon dioxide) and non oxidizing (nitrogen, argon) RF low pressure plasmas, and by treatment with atmospheric plasma torch have been assessed by ATR-IR and XPS spectroscopy, SEM, and contact angle measurements. The effectiveness of the low pressure plasma treatment depended on the gas atmosphere used to generate the plasma. A lack of relationship between surface polarity and wettability, and peel strength values was obtained, likely due to the cohesive failure in the rubber obtained in the adhesive joints. In general, acceptable adhesion values of plasma treated rubber were obtained for all plasmas, except for nitrogen plasma treatment during 15 minutes due to the creation of low molecular weight moieties on the outermost rubber layer. A toluene wiping of the N{2 } plasma treated rubber surface for 15 min removed those moieties and increased adhesion was obtained. On the other hand, the treatment of the rubber with atmospheric pressure by means of a plasma torch was proposed. The wettability of the rubber was improved by decreasing the rubber-plasma torch distance and by increasing the duration because a partial removal of paraffin wax from the rubber surface was produced. The rubber surface was oxidized by the plasma torch treatment, and the longer the duration of the plasma torch treatment, the higher the degree of surface oxidation (mainly creation of C O moieties). However, although the rubber surface was effectively modified by the plasma torch treatment, the adhesion was not greatly improved, due to the migration of paraffin wax to the treated rubber-polyurethane adhesive interface once the adhesive joint was produced. On the other hand, the extended treatment with plasma torch facilitated the migration of zinc stearate to the rubber-adhesive interface, also contributing to deteriorate the adhesion in greater extent. Finally

  20. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state. PMID:25397591

  1. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96-1674 and P-96-1675) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described.... (1) Recordkeeping. Recordkeeping requirements as specified in § 721.125 (a), (b), (c), (d), (h),...

  2. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96-1674 and P-96-1675) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described.... (1) Recordkeeping. Recordkeeping requirements as specified in § 721.125 (a), (b), (c), (d), (h),...

  3. Oxidant-free conversion of primary amines to nitriles.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuei-Nin T; Rizzi, Andrew M; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2013-11-01

    An amide-derived NNN-Ru(II) hydride complex catalyzes oxidant-free, acceptorless, and chemoselective dehydrogenation of primary and secondary amines to the corresponding nitriles and imines with liberation of dihydrogen. The catalyst system tolerates oxidizable functionality and is selective for the dehydrogenation of primary amines (-CH2NH2) in the presence of amines without α-CH hydrogens. PMID:24144014

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the properties of natural rubber (NR)/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshaie, R.; Nouri Khorasani, S.; Jahanbani Veshare, S.; Rezaei Abadchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physico-mechanical properties of NR/SBR blends cured by electron beam irradiation and sulfur were compared. The NR/SBR blends were prepared using a two-roll mill. Electron beam irradiations of 100-400 kGy were applied to cure the blends and changes in physico-mechanical properties were studied as a function of irradiation. Also, oil resistance and the effect of thermal ageing on mechanical properties of the blends were investigated. The results show that the irradiated blends have better mechanical properties than those cured by sulfur system. The irradiation cured samples also exhibited better heat stability than the sulfur cured samples. The blend cured by the highest dose shows the lowest swelling and high oil resistance compared with the other samples cured by irradiation.

  5. A study of the influence of micro and nano phase morphology on the mechanical properties of a rubber-modified epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Bobby Glenn

    Epoxy resins are thermosets with extraordinary adhesion; high strength; good resistance to creep, heat, and chemicals; and they have low shrinkage. Conversely, these polymers are brittle, they are sensitive to moisture, and they exhibit poor toughness. To improve their toughness, they are often modified by introducing dispersed rubber particles in the primary phase. In this study, the epoxy resin was modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN), liquid-reactive rubbers. The initiator concentration, percent acrylonitrile in the CTBN rubber, and cure temperatures were altered to give varying materials properties. Statistical analysis of the morphology data showed that the percentage of rubber acrylonitrile had an effect on both the rubber particle size and volume fraction. The cure temperature had an effect on the rubber particle volume and modulus. Plots of the rubber particle size, volume fraction, and modulus versus bulk elastic storage modulus and fracture toughness revealed that rubber particle size had no effect on bulk properties, volume fraction and rubber particle modulus had an effect on both the bulk storage elastic modulus and fracture toughness.

  6. Microwave treatment of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Folz, Diane C.

    2002-07-16

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds broken by microwave radiation. The direct application of microwaves in combination with uniform heating of the crumb rubber renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger particle sizes and/or loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures to produce recycled composite products with good properties.

  7. Reactivity of sulfide-containing silane toward boehmite and in situ modified rubber/boehmite composites by the silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tengfei; Zhu, Lixin; Chen, Weiwei; Wu, Siwu; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2013-09-01

    The silanization reaction between boehmite (BM) nanoplatelets and bis-[3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl]-tetrasulfide (TESPT) was characterized in detail. Via such modification process, the grafted sulfide moieties on the BM endow reactivity toward rubber and substantially improved hydrophobicity for BM. Accordingly, TESPT was employed as in situ modifier for the nitrile rubber (NBR)/BM compounds to improve the mechanical properties of the reinforced vulcanizates. The effects of BM content and in situ modification on the mechanical properties, curing characteristics and morphology were investigated. BM was found to be effective in improving the mechanical performance of NBR vulcanizates. The NBR/BM composites could be further strengthened by the incorporation of TESPT. The interfacial adhesion of NBR/BM composites was obviously improved by the addition of TESPT. The substantially improved mechanical performance was correlated to the interfacial reaction and the improved dispersion of BM in rubber matrix.

  8. Nitrile/Buna N Material Failure Assessment for an O-Ring used on the Gaseous Hydrogen Flow Control Valve (FCV) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2006-01-01

    After the rollout of Space Shuttle Discovery in April 2005 in preparation for return-to-flight, there was a failure of the Orbiter (OV-103) helium signature leak test in the gaseous hydrogen (GH2) system. Leakage was attributed to the Flow Control Valve (FCV) in Main Engine 3. The FCV determined to be the source of the leak for OV-103 is designated as LV-58. The nitrile/Buna N rubber O-ring seal was removed from LV-58, and failure analysis indicated radial cracks providing leak paths in one quadrant. Cracks were eventually found in 6 of 9 FCV O-rings among the three Shuttle Orbiters, though none were as severe as those for LV-58, OV-103. Testing by EM10 at MSFC on all 9 FCV O- rings included: laser dimensional, Shore A hardness and properties from a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and an Instron tensile machine. The following test data was obtained on the cracked quadrant of the LV-58, OV-103 O-ring: (1) the estimated compression set was only 9.5%, compared to none for the rest of the O-ring; (2) Shore A hardness for the O.D. was higher by almost 4 durometer points than for the rest of the O-ring; and (3) DMA data showed that the storage/elastic modulus E was almost 25% lower than for the rest of the O-ring. Of the 8 FCV O-rings tested on an Instron, 4 yielded tensile strengths that were below the MIL spec requirement of 1350 psi-a likely influence of rubber cracking. Comparisons were made between values of modulus determined by DNA (elastic) and Instron (Young s). Each nitrile/Buna N O-ring used in the FCV conforms to the MIL-P-25732C specification. A number of such O-rings taken from shelf storage at MSFC and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were used to generate a reference curve of DMA glass transition temperature (Tg) vs. shelf storage time ranging from 8 to 26 years. A similar reference curve of TGA onset temperature (of rubber weight loss) vs. shelf storage time was also generated. The DMA and TGA data for the used FCV O-rings were compared to the reference

  9. Dermatitis in rubber manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    White, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    This review describes the history of rubber technology and the manufacturing techniques used in rubber manufacturing industries. The important aspects of the acquisition of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis within the industry are presented for the reader.

  10. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamanna, Giuseppe Sepe, Raffaele

    2014-05-15

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers’ safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  11. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  12. Biodesulfurization of rubber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E. ); Raghavan, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in municipal waste treatment is the recycling of polymeric waste materials. The present study has demonstrated the applicability of biotechnological principles in the desulfurization of rubber using shake flask and Warburg respirometric techniques. In terms of oxygen uptake and specific rate of oxygen uptake, it was found that the mixed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans was more efficient in this process than the individual pure cultures of these bacteria. Furthermore, the mixed cultures resulted in ten times higher sulfur removals from rubber relative to those of sterile controls. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of biodesulfurization of rubber. It is expected that the development of this process may provide a solution to recycling of car tire materials. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Vulcanized Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Tosaka, A.; Tsou, A.; Datta, S.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique has revealed strain-induced crystallization and molecular orientation in vulcanized rubbers and thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) during deformation in real time. The stress-strain curves and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns in vulcanized rubbers and TPE were measured simultaneously. In-situ WAXD patterns were taken not only at different strains during uniaxial deformation but also at different temperatures at a constant strain. Results lead to several new insights. (i) Strain-induced crystallization is a common phenomenon in vulcanized rubbers, except SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber), and in TPE (with crystalline hard segments). (ii) Strain-induced crystallization decreases the stress and increases the elongation in the strained rubber. (iii) The hybrid structure of chemical networks and strain-induced crystallites is responsible to the tensile strength and elongation at break for both systems. (iiii) Some original crystal fraction (hard segment domain) in TPE is destroyed. During deformation, strain-induced crystallization increases with strain. Upon retraction even to stress zero, the majority of oriented strain-induced crystallites remains in tack with preferred orientation.

  14. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  15. Quality evaluation of rubber-to-metal bonded structures based on shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Guo, XingMing; Qi, GongJin; Zhang, DongSheng

    2015-07-01

    The quality of bonding is often a concern in rubber-to-metal bonded parts with regard to the integrity and stability of the structure. In this study, shearography has been used to detect the out-of-plane deformation of the defects caused by thermal and vacuum stresses. A sample of the vulcanized styrene-butadiene rubber bonded to steel with known artificial voids was prepared and during bonding process a region was glued with thick adhesives. The rubber surface of the sample was inspected in thermal radiation and vacuum modes respectively with a self-designed shearography device. Meanwhile, a numerical simulation was conducted to predict the out-of-plane deformation of the rubber surface in these two stress modes. Results from the numerical simulation and the experiments indicated that the debonding defects could be inspected in both loading modes. In the thermal radiation mode the region with thick adhesives could be identified successfully. This study provides a guideline for quality control of rubber-to-metal structures using an optical method.

  16. Permeation of aromatic solvent mixtures through nitrile protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Hsu, Ya-Ping; Chen, Su-Yi

    2008-05-30

    The permeation of binary and ternary mixtures of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and p-xylene through nitrile gloves were investigated using the ASTM F739 test cell. The more slowly permeating component of a mixture was accelerated to have a shorter breakthrough time than its pure form. The larger differences in solubility parameter between a solvent mixture and glove resulted in a lower permeation rate. Solubility parameter theory provides a potential approach to interpret the changes of permeation properties for BTEX mixtures through nitrile gloves. Using a one-dimensional diffusion model based on Fick's law, the permeation concentrations of ASTM F739 experiments were appropriately simulated by the estimated diffusion coefficient and solubility. This study will be a fundamental work for the risk assessment of the potential dermal exposure of workers wearing protective gloves. PMID:17977655

  17. Predicting the Reactivity of Nitrile-Carrying Compounds with Cysteine: A Combined Computational and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on a mechanistic investigation based on DFT calculations and kinetic measures aimed at determining the energetics related to the cysteine nucleophilic attack on nitrile-carrying compounds. Activation energies were found to correlate well with experimental kinetic measures of reactivity with cysteine in phosphate buffer. The agreement between computations and experiments points to this DFT-based approach as a tool for predicting both nitrile reactivity toward cysteines and the toxicity of nitriles as electrophile agents. PMID:24900869

  18. 3-Oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)propane­nitrile

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Quah, Ching Kheng; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, C8H12N2O, the piperidine ring exhibits a chair conformation and its least-squares plane (all atoms) makes a dihedral angle of 32.88 (12)° with the propane­nitrile unit (r.m.s. deviation = 0.001 Å). In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [001]. PMID:22969610

  19. A dual site catalyst for mild, selective nitrile reduction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiyao; Williams, Travis J

    2014-05-25

    We report a novel ruthenium bis(pyrazolyl)borate scaffold that enables cooperative reduction reactivity in which boron and ruthenium centers work in concert to effect selective nitrile reduction. The pre-catalyst compound [κ(3)-(1-pz)2HB(N = CHCH3)]Ru(cymene)(+) TfO(-) (pz = pyrazolyl) was synthesized using readily-available materials through a straightforward route, thus making it an appealing catalyst for a number of reactions. PMID:24409456

  20. Photocrosslinking of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) networks formed by thiol-ene reactions and their influence on cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gidon, Dogan; Aydin, Derya; Kizilel, Seda

    2015-12-01

    Styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) triblock copolymer has been conventionally used as synthetic rubber. However, the potential of SBS for biomedical applications has only been considered in limited earlier reports. Here, we demonstrate an effective approach to designing a photocrosslinked SBS network. Rheological analysis has been conducted for the investigation of the storage modulus of the resultant network. Crosslinked SBS networks were synthesized and characterized through optical and electron microscope imaging. The crosslink density of the network, calculated from swelling experiments, was 643 mol m(-3), where higher swelling in a hydrophobic medium was observed compared to the swelling measured in water. Cell survival analysis with HeLa cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts revealed that these networks are non-toxic, and that they could be considered for a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:26526076

  1. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  2. Occupational exposure of workers to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Fajen, J M; Roberts, D R; Ungers, L J; Krishnan, E R

    1990-06-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an extent-of-exposure study of the 1,3-butadiene monomer, polymer, and end-user industries to determine the size of the exposed workforce, evaluate control technologies and personal protective equipment programs, and assess occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. A new analytical method was developed for 1,3-butadiene that increased the sensitivity and selectivity of the previous NIOSH method. The new method is sensitive to 0.2 microgram per 1,3-butadiene sample. Walk-through surveys were conducted in 11 monomer, 17 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. In-depth industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at 4 monomer, 5 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. Airborne exposure concentrations of 1,3-butadiene were determined using personal sampling for each job category. A total of 692 full shift and short-term personnel and 259 area air samples were examined for the presence of 1,3-butadiene. Sample results indicated that all worker exposures were well below the current OSHA PEL of 1000 ppm. Exposures ranged from less than 0.006 ppm to 374 ppm. The average exposure for all samples was less than 2 ppm. The present American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value for 1,3-butadiene is 10 ppm. To reduce the potential for occupational exposure, it is recommended that quality control sampling be conducted using a closed loop system. Also all process pumps should be retrofitted with dual mechanical seals, magnetic gauges should be used in loading and unloading rail cars, and engineering controls should be designed for safely voiding quality control cylinders. PMID:2401251

  3. Recycling rubber products sensibly

    SciTech Connect

    Fesus, E.M.; Eggleton, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    This article examines processes for surface treating ground rubber from tires and other sources to enhance its ability to chemically bond with an uncured elastomer matrix during vulcanization. The topics discussed are environmental effects, processing and physical and chemical properties, mesh size, compounding, loading study, mineral fillers, and applications.

  4. Rubber cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... common household glue. It is often used for arts and crafts projects. Breathing in large amounts of rubber cement fumes or swallowing any amount can be extremely dangerous, especially for a small child. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  5. Reinforcement of SBR/waste rubber powder vulcanizate with in situ generated zinc dimethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. P.; Cheng, B. K.; Zhang, X.; Jia, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    Methyl acrylic acid/zinc oxide (MAA/ZnO) was introduced to modify styrene- butadiene rubber/waste rubber powder (SBR/WRP) composites by blending. The enhanced mechanical properties and processing ability were presumably originated from improved compatibility and interfacial interaction between WRP and the SBR matrix by the in situ polymerization of zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA). A refined interface of the modified SBR/WRP composite was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The formation of ZDMA significantly increased the ionic bond content in the vulcanizate, resulting in exceptional mechanical performance. The comprehensive mechanical properties including tensile strength, tear strength and dynamic heat-building performance reached optimum values with 16 phr MAA.

  6. Heparinized styrene-butadiene-styrene elastomers.

    PubMed

    Goosen, M F; Sefton, M V

    1979-05-01

    A heparinized high-strength elastomer has been developed which is potentially useful as a nonthrombogenic vascular prosthesis. A surface hydroxylated styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer with at least 40% extent of reaction after glow-discharge cleaning was coated with a 20% acetylated polyvinyl alcohol/heparin mixture containing glutaraldehyde and magnesium chloride. After curing at 80 degrees C for 100 min, the polyvinyl alcohol, heparin, and hydroxylated SBS were covalently bound to each other by acetal bridges. The effects of the various substrate and coating parameters were optimized to achieve very strong adhesion between the coating layer and the surface hydroxylated SBS. Heparin was not leached from the surface of the new material using 3M saline at pH 7.4 despite a detection limit of 10(-5) micrograms heparin/cm2 min. Prolonged partial thromboplastin times of greater than 1200 sec were observed (control: PTT = 120 sec). Preliminary ex vivo testing using a simple arteriovenous shunt in the leg of a rabbit showed good thromboresistance. The heparinized SBS shunt chamber remained patent for more than two hours without desorption of heparin. It was concluded that surface hydroxylated SBS heparinized by acetal coupling owed its thromboresistance to the heparin covalently bound to the surface and not to a microenvironment of heparin in solution at the blood/material interface. PMID:438224

  7. Inhalation exposure to 1,3-butadiene and styrene in styrene-butadiene copolymer production.

    PubMed

    Anttinen-Klemetti, Tiina; Vaaranrinta, Raija; Mutanen, Pertti; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2006-03-01

    This study assessed personal exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) and styrene in three plants manufacturing styrene-butadiene (SB) copolymers. Air samples were collected from the breathing zone of 28 workers over 4 months in three SB plants using diffusive samplers. The total number of samples was 885 with the number of samples per participant varying from 19 to 39. Samples were collected by use of 3M 3500 passive monitors and analyzed with a gas chromatograph (GC). Sampling proved to be simple and inexpensive and laboratory analysis of BD could detect 0.01 and 0.007 part per millions (ppm) of styrene in the 8h samples. In the case of BD, 624 samples were below the limit of quantification (LOQ), 240 samples were between the LOQ and 1 ppm, and 21 samples exceeded the threshold limit value (TLV). In the case of styrene 336 samples were below the LOQ, 548 samples were between the LOQ and 20 ppm. The TLV was exceeded once. The data gives a comprehensive picture of personal exposure of workers in modern SB latex manufacturing plants. The study illustrates also how the new TLV of BD is being implemented. PMID:16503301

  8. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...