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Sample records for nitrogen 16 target

  1. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  2. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  3. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelqvist, E.; Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  4. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  5. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  7. Indirect detection of nitrogen spins in ammonia target at superlow temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Yu.; Doshita, N.; Gautheron, F.; Kondo, K.; Meyer, W.

    2013-05-01

    The COMPASS polarized target at CERN operates with irradiated ammonia (NH3) as a material having a reasonable content of polarizable nucleons and the highest resistance against radiation damages. We study the magnetic structure of ammonia polarized by the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) method at 0.2 K and 2.5 T. In this material, electron spins, induced by ionizing radiation, couple proton and nitrogen nuclear spins by indirect J-interactions. This coupling and the dipole-dipole interactions between nuclear spins produce an asymmetry in the proton NMR line shape depending on the value of nitrogen polarization. We consider the asymmetry as an indirect imaging of the actual nitrogen spectra, useful for research developments and, in practice, for monitoring of nitrogen polarization in the long target, instead of a complicated analysis of NMR nitrogen spectra.

  8. Neutron diffraction study of a nitrogen martensitic steel 0Kh16N4AB under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, V. V.; Papushkin, I. V.; Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Lukáš, P.

    2008-01-01

    An austenitic-martensitic nitrogen steel 0Kh16N4AB has been studied under load using high-resolution neutron diffraction analysis on an FSD neutron diffractometer at an IBR-2 reactor (Dubna) and on a diffractometer with a focusing monochromator on a reactor of the Nuclear Physics Institute (Czech Republic). Young's moduli calculated from different reflections of the martensite and austenite phases have been obtained. It has been found that the yield strength σ0.2 corresponding to the slip plane (111) of the austenite phase is anomalously low and that with increasing degree of uniaxial tension the width of lines (111)γ strongly grows. In the steel under consideration the plane (111) of the austenite phase appears to be an easy-slip plane that ensures the enhanced properties of the steel, i.e., the combination of a high ultimate strength (1600 MPa) with a high plasticity (δ = 16%).

  9. Comparative analysis of anodized, implanted and sputtered tantalum oxide targets for the study of 16O+16O fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Cruz, J.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Santos, C.; Fonseca, M.; Luis, H.; Jesus, A. P.

    2014-07-01

    Measuring the total cross section of a fusion reaction in the region of astrophysical interest, such as the 16O+16O fusion reaction, is a real challenge due the very small cross sections involved and the large number of possible exit channels. Taking into account these difficulties, the use of targets with known thickness, stoichiometry and minimal contamination that can withstand high beam currents is required. In this study, we report the comparison between three different types of targets for the study of this fusion reaction, such as anodized, implanted and sputtered tantalum oxide targets and the results show that the anodized and sputtered targets are more suitable for this study due to their higher oxygen density and to the formation of a stable oxide compound, tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5).

  10. Corrosion Behavior of High Nitrogen Nickel-Free Fe-16Cr-Mn-Mo-N Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. L.; Liao, H. Y.; Shyue, J. J.; Lian, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study is to develop austenitic nickel-free stainless steels with lower chromium content and higher manganese and nitrogen contents. In order to prevent nickel-induced skin allergy, cobalt, manganese, and nitrogen were used to substitute nickel in the designed steel. Our results demonstrated that manganese content greater than 14 wt pct results in a structure that is in full austenite phase. The manganese content appears to increase the solubility of nitrogen; however, a lower corrosion potential was found in steel with high manganese content. Molybdenum appears to be able to increase the pitting potential. The effects of Cr, Mn, Mo, and N on corrosion behavior of Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were evaluated with potentiodynamic tests and XPS surface analysis. The results reveal that anodic current and pits formation of the Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were smaller than those of lower manganese and nitrogen content stainless steel.

  11. Equilibrium thickness of carbon target interacting with nitrogen and neon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkova, Yu. A.; Novikov, N. V.; Teplova, Ya. A.

    2016-04-01

    The method for calculation of the target thickness which is required for the formation of equilibrium charge distribution of ions is proposed. The description of nonequilibrium processes is based on empirical estimations of charge-exchange cross sections, taking the density effect for solids into account. The variation of the average charge and the width of the nonequilibrium charge distribution as a function of the target thickness is analyzed. The results of calculations for nitrogen and neon ions in carbon are compared with experimental data.

  12. What plant and soil testing from 16 sites in eight midwestern states tells us about split nitrogen applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is hypothesized that split-nitrogen (N) relative to single near-planting applications improve corn (Zea mays L.) production, N recovery efficiency, and lessen environmental impacts of fertilization. However, these hypotheses have not been fully tested. A 16-site study across eight US Midwestern s...

  13. Karyopherin {beta}3: A new cellular target for the HPV-16 E5 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Hanover, John A.; Schlegel, Richard; Suprynowicz, Frank A.

    2008-07-11

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer worldwide, and that HPV-16 is associated with more than half of these cases. In addition to the well-characterized E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-16, recent evidence increasingly has implicated the HPV-16 E5 protein (16E5) as an important mediator of oncogenic transformation. Since 16E5 has no known intrinsic enzymatic activity, its effects on infected cells are most likely mediated by interactions with various cellular proteins and/or its documented association with lipid rafts. In the present study, we describe a new cellular target that binds to 16E5 in COS cells and in stable human ectocervical cell lines. This target is karyopherin {beta}3, a member of the nuclear import receptor family with critical roles in the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins and in the secretory pathway.

  14. 48 CFR 52.216-16 - Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target. 52.216-16 Section 52.216-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... liquidation of progress payments, then that portion may, instead of being refunded, be added to...

  15. Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) by bare fluorine ions on a nitrogen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, Nuwan; La Mantia, David; Kayani, Asghar; Simon, Anna; Tanis, John

    2016-05-01

    Unlike radiative electron capture (REC), in which a single photon is emitted due to capture of a single electron from the target to the projectile, radiative double electron capture (RDEC) involves two electrons accompanied by the emission of a single photon. Hence, RDEC can be considered as the inverse of double photoionization and used to study the role of electron correlation in causing the process. We report recent results obtained for 40 MeV F9+ ions incident on a nitrogen target, in which counts were observed in the calculated RDEC region (2.8-4.4 keV) for the system. Based on these observations an approximate value for the total RDEC cross section was estimated. Compared with the data obtained for 38 MeV O8+ ions incident on a carbon foil target, the present value is considerably smaller than the value found for carbon, but in better agreement with recent theory. Supported in part by NSF.

  16. Holmium target fragmentation induced by intermediate energy /sup 12/C and /sup 16/O ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Target fragment (40 < A < 180) production cross sections were measured using off-line gamma-ray spectroscopy for the interaction of 208 MeV /sup 12/C, 272 MeV /sup 16/O, 442 MeV/sup 12/C, 1020 MeV /sup 12/C, and 1635 MeV /sup 16/O with /sup 165/Ho. Target fragment isobaric yields were deduced from these measurements. Trans-target nuclides were identified for all reaction systems. Nuclides up to 4 Z-units above the target were identified for 208 MeV /sup 12/C and 272 MeV /sup 16/O induced reactions, to 3 Z-units above the target for 442 MeV /sup 12/C and 1020 MeC /sup 12/C induced reactions, and to 2 Z-units above the target for 1635 MeV /sup 16/O induced reactions. Fission was observed to decrease between 17 MeV/A and 37 MeV/A from 13% of the reaction cross section to 4% for /sup 12/C induced reactions. No fission contribution was observed for 1020 MeV /sup 12/C and 1635 MeV /sup 16/O induced interactions.

  17. Scanning of 16S Ribosomal RNA for Peptide Nucleic Acid Targets.

    PubMed

    Górska, Anna; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Równicki, Marcin; Trylska, Joanna

    2016-08-25

    We have designed a protocol and server to aid in the search for putative binding sites in 16S rRNA that could be targeted by peptide nucleic acid oligomers. Various features of 16S rRNA were considered to score its regions as potential targets for sequence-specific binding that could result in inhibition of ribosome function. Specifically, apart from the functional importance of a particular rRNA region, we calculated its accessibility, flexibility, energetics of strand invasion by an oligomer, as well as similarity to human rRNA. To determine 16S rRNA flexibility in the ribosome context, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 30S subunit in explicit solvent. We proposed a few 16S RNA target sites, and one of them was tested experimentally to verify inhibition of bacterial growth by a peptide nucleic acid oligomer. PMID:27105576

  18. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  19. Towards understanding the lifespan extension by reduced insulin signaling: bioinformatics analysis of DAF-16/FOXO direct targets in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Gai-Gai

    2016-01-01

    DAF-16, the C. elegans FOXO transcription factor, is an important determinant in aging and longevity. In this work, we manually curated FOXODB http://lyh.pkmu.cn/foxodb/, a database of FOXO direct targets. It now covers 208 genes. Bioinformatics analysis on 109 DAF-16 direct targets in C. elegans found interesting results. (i) DAF-16 and transcription factor PQM-1 co-regulate some targets. (ii) Seventeen targets directly regulate lifespan. (iii) Four targets are involved in lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction. And (iv) DAF-16 direct targets might play global roles in lifespan regulation. PMID:27027346

  20. Kernel number as a positive target trait for prediction of hybrid performance under low-nitrogen stress as revealed by diallel analysis under contrasting nitrogen conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuxiu; Sun, Zhen; Xu, Xiaojie; Li, Wen-Xue; Zou, Cheng; Wang, Shanhong; Xu, Yunbi; Xie, Chuanxiao

    2014-01-01

    Environmental sustainability concerns make improving yield under lower N input a desirable breeding goal. To evaluate genetic variation and heterosis for low-N tolerance breeding, 28 F1 hybrids from a diallel scheme, along with their eight parental lines, were tested for agronomic traits including kernel number per ear (KNE) and grain yield per plant (GY), in replicated plots over two years under low-nitrogen (LN, without nitrogen application) and normal-nitrogen (NN, 220 kg N ha−1) conditions. Taken together the heritability in this and our previous studies, the correlation with grain yield, and the sensitivity to the stress for target trait selection, KNE was a good secondary target trait for LN selection in maize breeding. KNE also showed much higher mid-parent heterosis than hundred-kernel weight under both nitrogen levels, particularly under LN, indicating that KNE contributed the majority of GY heterosis, particularly under LN. Therefore, KNE can be used as a positive target trait for hybrid performance prediction in LN tolerance breeding. Our results also suggest that breeding hybrids for LN tolerance largely relies on phenotypic evaluation of hybrids under LN condition and yield under LN might be improved more by selection for KNE than by direct selection for GY per se. PMID:25914594

  1. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403-2... (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset: (i... adjustment under other contract clauses providing for equitable adjustment or other revision of the...

  2. Sensitivity of some nitrogen fixers and the target pest Fusarium oxysporum to fungicide thiram.

    PubMed

    Osman, Awad G; Sherif, Ashraf M; Elhussein, Adil A; Mohamed, Afrah T

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the toxic effects of the fungicide thiram (TMTD) against five nitrogen fixers and the thiram target pest Fusarium oxysporum under laboratory conditions. Nitrogen fixing bacteria Falvobacterium showed the highest values of LD(50) and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide followed by Fusarium oxysporum, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca was the most affected microorganism. LD(50) values for these microorganisms were in 2-5 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with LD(50) value for Fusarium oxysporum. Thiram was most toxic to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium. The slope of the curve for Azomonas, Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium is more steep than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. Thiram was more selective to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum, Rhizobium meliloti and Azomonas. The lowest selectivity index of the fungicide was recorded for Falvobacterium followed by Fusarium oxysporum. The highest safety coefficient of the fungicide was assigned for Flavobacterium, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca showed the lowest value. PMID:22783146

  3. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  4. MicroRNA-16 suppresses the activation of inflammatory macrophages in atherosclerosis by targeting PDCD4

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, XUE; XU, ZHAO; YUAN, MENG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHAO, BO; WANG, JUNQIAN; ZHANG, AIXUE; LI, GUANGPING

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is involved in a number of bioprocesses, such as apoptosis and inflammation. However, its regulatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanisms of action of PDCD4 in high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice and in foam cells (characteristic pathological cells in atherosclerotic lesions) derived from ox-LDL-stimulated macrophages. MicroRNA (miR)-16 was predicted to bind PDCD4 by bioinformatics analysis. In the mice with atherosclerosis and in the foam cells, PDCD4 protein expression (but not the mRNA expression) was enhanced, while that of miR-16 was reduced. Transfection with miR-16 mimic decreased the activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of PDCD4 in the macrophage-derived foam cells. Conversely, treatment with miR-16 inhibitor enhanced the luciferase activity. However, by introducing mutations in the predicted binding site located in the 3′UTR of PDCD4, the miR-16 mimic and inhibitor were unable to alter the level of PDCD4, suggesting that miR-16 is a direct negative regulator of PDCD4 in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, transfection wtih miR-16 mimic and siRNA targeting PDCD4 suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas it enhanced the secretion and mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-10. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor exerted the opposite effects. In addition, the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were altered by miR-16. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the targeting of PDCD4 by miR-16 may suppress the activation of inflammatory macrophages though mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling in atherosclerosis; thus, PDCD4 may prove to be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of

  5. Weldability of corrosion-resistant high-nitrogen austenitic Kh22AG16N8M-type steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Blinov, E. V.; Zvereva, T. N.

    2007-10-01

    The influence of thermal treatment on the structures and mechanical properties of welds of corrosion-resistant high-nitrogen austenitic 05Kh22AG16N8M-type steels is studied. In these steels, austenite is found to be highly resistant to discontinuous precipitation and the formation of σ phase and δ ferrite upon cooling regardless of the temperature of heating for quenching (from 900 to 1250°C) and the cooling conditions (water, air, furnace). Welding of these steels can produce high-strength welds with an enhanced impact toughness.

  6. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Carmona, F Javier; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; Oord, Joost van den; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  7. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Javier Carmona, F; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; van den Oord, Joost; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  8. CD16 polymorphisms and NK activation induced by monoclonal antibody-coated target cells.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Julie A; Weiner, George J

    2005-09-01

    CD16 and natural killer (NK) cells appear to play a central role in mediating the anti-tumor effects of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy, yet little is known about changes in NK cells that result from interaction of the NK cells with mAb-coated tumor cells under physiologic conditions. We developed a system using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and either transformed B cells or breast cancer cells to assess how mAbs impact on NK cell phenotype. Rituximab, apolizumab and trastuzumab induced modulation of CD16 and upregulation of CD54 on NK cells when the appropriate target cells were present. Higher concentrations of mAb were needed to induce these changes on NK cells from subjects with the lower affinity CD16 polymorphism. Phenotypic changes were greater in NK cells from subjects with the higher affinity polymorphism even when saturating concentrations of mAb were used, demonstrating increased concentration of mAb can overcome some, but not all, of the influence CD16 polymorphisms have on NK activation. These studies provide a straightforward and easily reproducible technique to measure the ability of mAb-coated tumor cells to activate NK cells in vitro which should be particularly useful as mAbs with varying affinity for both target antigen and Fc receptor (FcR) are developed. PMID:16109421

  9. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  10. REVISED STELLAR PROPERTIES OF KEPLER TARGETS FOR THE QUARTER 1-16 TRANSIT DETECTION RUN

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Gaidos, Eric; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoit; Torres, Guillermo; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Basu, Sarbani; Bedding, Timothy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Fleming, Scott W.; and others

    2014-03-01

    We present revised properties for 196,468 stars observed by the NASA Kepler mission and used in the analysis of Quarter 1-16 (Q1-Q16) data to detect and characterize transiting planets. The catalog is based on a compilation of literature values for atmospheric properties (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) derived from different observational techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, asteroseismology, and exoplanet transits), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth stellar isochrones. We use broadband photometry and asteroseismology to characterize 11,532 Kepler targets which were previously unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We report the detection of oscillations in 2762 of these targets, classifying them as giant stars and increasing the number of known oscillating giant stars observed by Kepler by ∼20% to a total of ∼15,500 stars. Typical uncertainties in derived radii and masses are ∼40% and ∼20%, respectively, for stars with photometric constraints only, and 5%-15% and ∼10% for stars based on spectroscopy and/or asteroseismology, although these uncertainties vary strongly with spectral type and luminosity class. A comparison with the Q1-Q12 catalog shows a systematic decrease in radii of M dwarfs, while radii for K dwarfs decrease or increase depending on the Q1-Q12 provenance (KIC or Yonsei-Yale isochrones). Radii of F-G dwarfs are on average unchanged, with the exception of newly identified giants. The Q1-Q16 star properties catalog is a first step toward an improved characterization of all Kepler targets to support planet-occurrence studies.

  11. Revised Stellar Properties of Kepler Targets for the Quarter 1-16 Transit Detection Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Daniel; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Gaidos, Eric; García, Rafael A.; Hekker, Saskia; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoit; Torres, Guillermo; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Basu, Sarbani; Bedding, Timothy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Fleming, Scott W.; Guo, Zhao; Mann, Andrew W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Serenelli, Aldo M.; Smith, Myron A.; Stello, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    We present revised properties for 196,468 stars observed by the NASA Kepler mission and used in the analysis of Quarter 1-16 (Q1-Q16) data to detect and characterize transiting planets. The catalog is based on a compilation of literature values for atmospheric properties (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) derived from different observational techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, asteroseismology, and exoplanet transits), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth stellar isochrones. We use broadband photometry and asteroseismology to characterize 11,532 Kepler targets which were previously unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We report the detection of oscillations in 2762 of these targets, classifying them as giant stars and increasing the number of known oscillating giant stars observed by Kepler by ~20% to a total of ~15,500 stars. Typical uncertainties in derived radii and masses are ~40% and ~20%, respectively, for stars with photometric constraints only, and 5%-15% and ~10% for stars based on spectroscopy and/or asteroseismology, although these uncertainties vary strongly with spectral type and luminosity class. A comparison with the Q1-Q12 catalog shows a systematic decrease in radii of M dwarfs, while radii for K dwarfs decrease or increase depending on the Q1-Q12 provenance (KIC or Yonsei-Yale isochrones). Radii of F-G dwarfs are on average unchanged, with the exception of newly identified giants. The Q1-Q16 star properties catalog is a first step toward an improved characterization of all Kepler targets to support planet-occurrence studies.

  12. Intramuscular Therapeutic Vaccination Targeting HPV16 Induces T Cell Responses That Localize in Mucosal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jotova, Iveta; Wu, T. C.; Wang, Chenguang; Desmarais, Cindy; Boyer, Jean D.; Tycko, Benjamin; Robins, Harlan S.; Clark, Rachael A.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2014-01-01

    About 25% of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN2/3) caused by human papillomavirus serotype 16 (HPV16) undergo complete spontaneous regression. However, to date, therapeutic vaccination strategies for HPV disease have yielded limited success when measured by their ability to induce robust peripheral blood T cell responses to vaccine antigen. We report marked immunologic changes in the target lesion microenvironment after intramuscular therapeutic vaccination targeting HPV16 E6/E7 antigens, in subjects with CIN2/3 who had modest detectable responses in circulating T lymphocytes. Histologic and molecular changes, including markedly (average threefold) increased intensity of CD8+ T cell infiltrates in both the stromal and epithelial compartments, suggest an effector response to vaccination. Postvaccination cervical tissue immune infiltrates included organized tertiary lymphoid-like structures in the stroma subjacent to residual intraepithelial lesions and, unlike infiltrates in unvaccinated lesions, showed evidence of proliferation induced by recognition of cognate antigen. At a molecular level, these histologic changes in the stroma were characterized by increased expression of genes associated with immune activation (CXCR3) and effector function (Tbet and IFNβ), and were also associated with an immunologic signature in the overlying dysplastic epithelium. High-throughput T cell receptor sequencing of unmanipulated specimens identified clonal expansions in the tissue that were not readily detectable in peripheral blood. Together, these findings indicate that peripheral therapeutic vaccination to HPV antigens can induce a robust tissue-localized effector immune response, and that analyses of immune responses at sites of antigen are likely to be much more informative than analyses of cells that remain in the circulation. PMID:24477000

  13. Intramuscular therapeutic vaccination targeting HPV16 induces T cell responses that localize in mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Leonel; Teague, Jessica E; Morrow, Matthew P; Jotova, Iveta; Wu, T C; Wang, Chenguang; Desmarais, Cindy; Boyer, Jean D; Tycko, Benjamin; Robins, Harlan S; Clark, Rachael A; Trimble, Cornelia L

    2014-01-29

    About 25% of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN2/3) caused by human papillomavirus serotype 16 (HPV16) undergo complete spontaneous regression. However, to date, therapeutic vaccination strategies for HPV disease have yielded limited success when measured by their ability to induce robust peripheral blood T cell responses to vaccine antigen. We report marked immunologic changes in the target lesion microenvironment after intramuscular therapeutic vaccination targeting HPV16 E6/E7 antigens, in subjects with CIN2/3 who had modest detectable responses in circulating T lymphocytes. Histologic and molecular changes, including markedly (average threefold) increased intensity of CD8(+) T cell infiltrates in both the stromal and epithelial compartments, suggest an effector response to vaccination. Postvaccination cervical tissue immune infiltrates included organized tertiary lymphoid-like structures in the stroma subjacent to residual intraepithelial lesions and, unlike infiltrates in unvaccinated lesions, showed evidence of proliferation induced by recognition of cognate antigen. At a molecular level, these histologic changes in the stroma were characterized by increased expression of genes associated with immune activation (CXCR3) and effector function (Tbet and IFNβ), and were also associated with an immunologic signature in the overlying dysplastic epithelium. High-throughput T cell receptor sequencing of unmanipulated specimens identified clonal expansions in the tissue that were not readily detectable in peripheral blood. Together, these findings indicate that peripheral therapeutic vaccination to HPV antigens can induce a robust tissue-localized effector immune response, and that analyses of immune responses at sites of antigen are likely to be much more informative than analyses of cells that remain in the circulation. PMID:24477000

  14. Temperature- and nitrogen source-dependent regulation of GlnR target genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Daniela; Auer, Franziska; Schardt, Jakob; Schindele, Franziska; Ospina, Alberto; Held, Claudia; Ehrenreich, Armin; Scherer, Siegfried; Müller-Herbst, Stefanie

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitous pathogen Listeria monocytogenes lives either saprophytically in the environment or within cells in a vertebrate host, thus adapting its lifestyle to its ecological niche. Growth experiments at 24 and 37 °C (environmental and host temperature) with ammonium or glutamine as nitrogen sources revealed that ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source of L. monocytogenes. Reduced growth on glutamine is more obvious at 24 °C. Global transcriptional microarray analyses showed that the most striking difference in temperature-dependent transcription was observed for central nitrogen metabolism genes, glnR (glutamine synthetase repressor GlnR), glnA (glutamine synthetase GlnA), amtB (ammonium transporter AmtB), glnK (PII regulatory protein GlnK), and gdh (glutamate dehydrogenase) when cells were grown on glutamine. When grown on ammonium, both at 24 and 37 °C, the transcriptional level of these genes resembles that of cells grown with glutamine at 37 °C. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay studies and qPCR analyses in the wild-type L. monocytogenes and the deletion mutant L. monocytogenes ∆glnR revealed that the transcriptional regulator GlnR is directly involved in temperature- and nitrogen source-dependent regulation of the respective genes. Glutamine, a metabolite known to influence GlnR activity, seems unlikely to be the (sole) intracellular signal mediating this temperature-and nitrogen source-dependent metabolic adaptation. PMID:24801548

  15. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of miRNA Targets under Nitrogen Deficiency in Populus tomentosa Using Degradome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Bao, Hai; Wu, Qiuming; Wang, Yanwei

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs with important regulatory roles in stress responses. Nitrogen (N) is an indispensable macronutrient required for plant growth and development. Previous studies have identified a variety of known and novel miRNAs responsive to low N stress in plants, including Populus. However, miRNAs involved in the cleavage of target genes and the corresponding regulatory networks in response to N stress in Populus remain largely unknown. Consequently, degradome sequencing was employed for global detection and validation of N-responsive miRNAs and their targets. A total of 60 unique miRNAs (39 conserved, 13 non-conserved, and eight novel) were experimentally identified to target 64 mRNA transcripts and 21 precursors. Among them, we further verified the cleavage of 11 N-responsive miRNAs identified previously and provided empirical evidence for the cleavage mode of these miRNAs on their target mRNAs. Furthermore, five miRNA stars (miRNA*s) were shown to have cleavage function. The specificity and diversity of cleavage sites on the targets and miRNA precursors in P. tomentosa were further detected. Identification and annotation of miRNA-mediated cleavage of target genes in Populus can increase our understanding of miRNA-mediated molecular mechanisms of woody plants adapted to low N environments. PMID:26096002

  16. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor),...

  17. Identification of Cold-Responsive miRNAs and Their Target Genes in Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Senlei; Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    As a warm climate species, soybean is highly sensitive to chilling temperatures. Exposure to chilling temperatures causes a significant reduction in the nitrogen fixation rate in soybean plants and subsequent yield loss. However, the molecular basis for the sensitivity of soybean to chilling is poorly understood. In this study, we identified cold-responsive miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing nodules of soybean. Upon chilling, the expression of gma-miR397a, gma-miR166u and gma-miR171p was greatly upregulated, whereas the expression of gma-miR169c, gma-miR159b, gma-miR319a/b and gma-miR5559 was significantly decreased. The target genes of these miRNAs were predicted and validated using 5' complementary DNA ends (5'-RACE) experiments, and qPCR analysis identified putative genes targeted by the cold-responsive miRNAs in response to chilling temperatures. Taken together, our results reveal that miRNAs may be involved in the protective mechanism against chilling injury in mature nodules of soybean. PMID:25100171

  18. Identification of Cold-Responsive miRNAs and Their Target Genes in Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules of Soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Senlei; Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    As a warm climate species, soybean is highly sensitive to chilling temperatures. Exposure to chilling temperatures causes a significant reduction in the nitrogen fixation rate in soybean plants and subsequent yield loss. However, the molecular basis for the sensitivity of soybean to chilling is poorly understood. In this study, we identified cold-responsive miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing nodules of soybean. Upon chilling, the expression of gma-miR397a, gma-miR166u and gma-miR171p was greatly upregulated, whereas the expression of gma-miR169c, gma-miR159b, gma-miR319a/b and gma-miR5559 was significantly decreased. The target genes of these miRNAs were predicted and validated using 5' complementary DNA ends (5'-RACE) experiments, and qPCR analysis identified putative genes targeted by the cold-responsive miRNAs in response to chilling temperatures. Taken together, our results reveal that miRNAs may be involved in the protective mechanism against chilling injury in mature nodules of soybean. PMID:25100171

  19. Production of Hydrogen, Nitrogen and Argon Pellets with the MOSCOW-JÜLICH Pellet Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.; Boukharov, A.; Semenov, A.; Gerasimov, A.; Chernetsky, V.; Fedorets, P.

    Targets of frozen droplets ("pellets") from various liquefiable gases like H2, D2, N2, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe are very promising for high luminosity experiments with a 4π detector geometry at storage-rings. High effective target densities (> 1015 atoms/cm2), a small target size (⊘ ≈ 20-30 μm), a low gas load and a narrow pellet beam are the main advantages of such targets. Pioneering work on pellet targets has been made at Uppsala, Sweden.1 A next generation target has been built at the IKP of FZJ in collaboration with two institutes (ITEP and MPEI) from Moscow, Russia. It is a prototype for the future pellet target at the PANDA experiment at FAIR/HESR (supported by INTAS 06-1000012-8787, 2007/08) and makes use of a new cooling and liquefaction method, based on cryogenic liquids instead of cooling machines.2 The main advantages of this method are the vibration-free cooling and the possibility for cryogenic jet production from various gases in a wide range of temperatures. Different regimes of pellet production from H2, N2 and Ar have been observed and their parameters have been measured.3 For the first time, mono-disperse and satellite-free droplet production was achieved for cryogenic liquids from H2, N2 and Ar.

  20. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co84Zr16)Nx nano-composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Shukla, Rishabh; Bagri, Anita; Dhaka, Rajendra S.; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co84Zr16)Nx or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (Ms) with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331) and fcc(422) phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  1. Dimuon production from 16 and 22 GeV pions on copper and carbon targets

    SciTech Connect

    McCal, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive muon pair production from 16 and 22 GeV pions on Copper and Carbon targets was studied in the muon pair mass range 1.4 GeV/c/sup 2/ to 4.0 GeV/c/sup 2/. The purpose of the experiment was to study J/psi production near threshold and to study the continuum muon pair production as a probe of the parton structure of hadrons. The experimental apparatus was situated in the AGS Cl line at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It consisted of a magnetic spectrometer instrumented with a 7600 wiere MWP C system which was triggered by scintillation hodoscopes. The experiment was monitored by a time shared PDP10 and data was stored by a Honeywell DDP516. From the off-line analysis a differential cross-section in the Feynman x and a total cross-section were determined for the J/psi. In the study of the continuum a separation of ..mu..-pair production via the Drell-Yan mechanism from ..mu..-pair production of a hadronic (i.e., charge independent) nature was obtained. This allowed the measurement of a pion structure function: x/sub 1/f(x/sub 1/) = (0.69 +- 0.03) ..sqrt.. x/sub 1/ (l-x/sub 1/)(/sup 0/ /sup 47/ /sup + -/ /sup 0/ /sup 03/) at an average mass of 1.78 GeV/c/sup 2/. The distributions d sigma/dXdM/..delta..M and d sigma/dp/sup 2//sub T/dM/..delta..M are presented along with

    as a function of M. A study of A-dependence as a function of mass is presented and explained in terms of the charge independence assumed above.

  2. Proton induced gamma-ray production cross sections and thick-target yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions for the reactions 14N(p,p‧γ)14N, 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si and 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si were measured at an angle of 55° by bombarding a thin Si3N4 target with protons in the energy range of 3.6-6.9 MeV. The deduced γ-ray production cross section data is compared with available literature data relevant for ion beam analytical work. Thick-target γ-ray yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon were measured at 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 MeV proton energies utilizing thick BN and Si3N4 targets. The measured yield values are put together with available yield data found in the literature. The experimental yield data has been used to cross-check the γ-ray production cross section values by comparing them with calculated thick-target yields deduced from the present and literature experimental excitation curves. All values were found to be in reasonable agreement taking into account the experimental uncertainties.

  3. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  4. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5′UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus NH4+ assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  5. Nitrogen and sulfur deprivation differentiate lipid accumulation targets of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Turgay; Angun, Pinar; Ozkan, Alper D; Cakmak, Zeynep; Olmez, Tolga T; Tekinay, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) have inter-related and distinct impacts on microalgal metabolism; with N starvation having previously been reported to induce elevated levels of the biodiesel feedstock material triacylglycerol (TAG), while S deprivation is extensively studied for its effects on biohydrogen production in microalgae. ( 1) (,) ( 2) We have previously demonstrated that N- and S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii display different metabolic trends, suggesting that different response mechanisms exist to compensate for the absence of those two elements. ( 3) We used C. reinhardtii CC-124 mt(-) and CC-125 mt(+) strains to test possible metabolic changes related to TAG accumulation in response to N and S deprivation, considering that gamete differentiation in this organism is mainly regulated by N. ( 4) Our findings contribute to the understanding of microalgal response to element deprivation and potential use of element deprivation for biodiesel feedstock production using microalgae, but much remains to be elucidated on the precise contribution of both N and S starvation on microalgal metabolism. PMID:22892589

  6. Nitrogen and sulfur deprivation differentiate lipid accumulation targets of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Turgay; Angun, Pinar; Ozkan, Alper D.; Cakmak, Zeynep; Olmez, Tolga T.; Tekinay, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) have inter-related and distinct impacts on microalgal metabolism; with N starvation having previously been reported to induce elevated levels of the biodiesel feedstock material triacylglycerol (TAG), while S deprivation is extensively studied for its effects on biohydrogen production in microalgae.1,2 We have previously demonstrated that N- and S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii display different metabolic trends, suggesting that different response mechanisms exist to compensate for the absence of those two elements.3 We used C. reinhardtii CC-124 mt(-) and CC-125 mt(+) strains to test possible metabolic changes related to TAG accumulation in response to N and S deprivation, considering that gamete differentiation in this organism is mainly regulated by N.4 Our findings contribute to the understanding of microalgal response to element deprivation and potential use of element deprivation for biodiesel feedstock production using microalgae, but much remains to be elucidated on the precise contribution of both N and S starvation on microalgal metabolism. PMID:22892589

  7. Chemical investigations of isotope separation on line target units for carbon and nitrogen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fraanberg, H.; Ammann, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Koester, U.

    2006-03-15

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) are of significant interest in a number of applications. Isotope separation on line (ISOL) facilities provide RIB with high beam intensities and good beam quality. An atom that is produced within the ISOL target will first diffuse out from the target material. During the effusion towards the transfer line and into the ion source the many contacts with the surrounding surfaces may cause unacceptable delays in the transport and, hence, losses of the shorter-lived isotopes. We performed systematic chemical investigations of adsorption in a temperature and concentration regime relevant for ISOL targets and ion source units, with regard to CO{sub x} and NO{sub x} on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. These materials are potential construction materials for the above-mentioned areas. Off-line and on-line tests have been performed using a gas thermochromatography setup with radioactive tracers. The experiments were performed at the production of tracers for atmospheric chemistry (PROTRAC) facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland.

  8. miR-16 Targets Transcriptional Corepressor SMRT and Modulates NF-kappaB-Regulated Transactivation of Interleukin-8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways associated with the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) are essential to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, as well as initiating innate epithelial immune responses. The TLR/NF-κB signaling pathways must be stringently controlled through an intricate network of positive and negative regulatory elements. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs that regulate the stability and/or translation of protein-coding mRNAs. Herein we report that miR-16 promotes NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene by suppression of the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). LPS stimulation activated miR-16 gene transcription in human monocytes (U937) and biliary epithelial cells (H69) through MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Transfection of cells with the miR-16 precursor promoted LPS-induced production of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1α, without a significant effect on their RNA stability. Instead, an increase in NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene was confirmed in cells following transfection of miR-16 precursor. Importantly, miR-16 targeted the 3′-untranslated region of SMRT and caused translational suppression of SMRT. LPS decreased SMRT expression via upregulation of miR-16. Moreover, functional manipulation of SMRT altered NF-κB-regulated transactivation of LPS-induced IL-8 expression. These data suggest that miR-16 targets SMRT and modulates NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene. PMID:22292036

  9. Nitrogen isotopes in the recent solar wind from the analysis of genesis targets: evidence for large scale isotope heterogeneity in the nascent solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger C; Marty, Bernard; Zimmermann, Laurent; Burnard, Peter G; Burnett, Donald L; Heber, Veronika S; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen, the fifth most abundant element in the universe, displays the largest stable isotope variations in the solar system reservoirs after hydrogen. Yet the value of isotopic composition of solar nitrogen, presumably the best proxy of the protosolar nebula composition, is not known. Nitrogen isotopes trapped in Genesis spacecraft target material indicate a 40 % depletion of {sup 15}N in solar wind N relative to inner planets and meteorites, and define a composition for the present-day Sun undistinguishable from that of Jupiter's atmosphere. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of of nitrogen in the outer convective zone of the Sun (OCZ) has not changed through time, and is representative of the protosolar nebula. Large {sup 15}N enrichments during e.g., irradiation, or contributions from {sup 15}N-rich presolar components, are required to account for planetary values.

  10. [Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the fluorescence quantitative PCR assay targeting 16S rDNA].

    PubMed

    Xue, Li-Jun; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Ren, Hao; Tong, Yi-Min; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2006-09-01

    The 16S rDNA specific primers were designed for rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) by the fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) assay, based upon multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis of the 16S rDNAs of over 20 bacteria. After extraction of PA genomic DNA, the target 16S rDNA fragment was amplified by PCR with specific primers, and used to construct recombinant pMDT-Pfr plasmid, the dilution gradients of which were subjected to the standard quantitation curve in FQ-PCR assay. Different concentrations of PA genomic DNA were detected by FQ-PCR in a 20microL of reaction system with SYBR Green I. At the same time, various genomic DNAs of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as negative controls to confirm specificity of the FQ-PCR detection assay. Results demonstrated that the predicted amplified product of designed primers was of high homology only with PA 16S rDNA, and that sensitivity of the FQ-PCR assay was of 3.6pg/microL of bacterial DNA or (2.1 x 10(3) +/- 3.1 x 10(2)) copies/microL of 16S rDNA, accompanied with high specificity, and that the whole detection process including DNA extraction could be completed in about two hours. In contrast to traditional culture method, the FQ-PCR assay targeting 16S rDNA gene can be used to detect PA rapidly, which exhibits perfect application prospect in future. PMID:17037203

  11. Synergistic active targeting of dually integrin αvβ3/CD44-targeted nanoparticles to B16F10 tumors located at different sites of mouse bodies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sanjun; Zhou, Min; Li, Xin; Hu, Min; Li, Chenwen; Li, Min; Sheng, Fangfang; Li, Zhuoheng; Wu, Guolin; Luo, Minghe; Cui, Huanhuan; Li, Ziwei; Fu, Ruoqiu; Xiang, Mingfeng; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Laichun

    2016-08-10

    Conventional enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mediates the effects of many drugs, including the accumulation of nanocarriers at tumor sites, but its efficiency remains low. In this study, this limitation was overcome by developing a dual-targeting delivery system based on hyaluronan (HA, a major ligand of CD44) and tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac, a specific ligand of αvβ3), which was exploited to carry docetaxel (DTX) for the synergistic active targeting to tumors. First, a tetrac-HA (TeHA) conjugate was synthesized and grafted onto the surfaces of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) (TeHA-SLNs/DTX), with a high encapsulation efficiency of >91.6%. The resulting SLNs exhibited an approximately toroid morphology revealed using TEM. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of various formulations on CD44/αvβ3-enriched B16F10 cells were then assessed, and both results confirmed the selective uptake and high cytotoxicity of the TeHA-SLNs/DTX in a TeHA-dependent manner. In vivo imaging and vessel distribution tests revealed the efficiency of synergistic active targeting was higher than that of EPR-mediated passive targeting by the TeHA-SLNs to αvβ3-expressing tumor blood vessels and CD44-expressing tumor cells via selective targeting. Finally, in both xenograft tumor mice and in situ lung metastasis tumor mice, tumor growth was significantly inhibited by TeHA-SLNs/DTX. Therefore, TeHA-SLNs are an efficient system for the dual-targeted delivery of drugs to treat cancer in vivo. PMID:27235150

  12. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future. PMID:25062098

  13. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Picciotto, A.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-15

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  14. Non-target effects of repeated chlorothalonil application on soil nitrogen cycling: The key functional gene study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manyun; Xu, Zhihong; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Wang, Jun; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Li, Zhengao

    2016-02-01

    The widespread and increasing application of chlorothalonil (CTN) raises concerns about its non-target impacts, but little information is available on the effect of CTN on the key functional genes related to soil nitrogen (N) cycling, especially in the case of repeated applications. In the present study, a microcosm incubation was conducted to determine CTN residues and the impacts on the abundances of key functional genes related to N cycling after repeated CTN applications. The results demonstrated that repeated CTN applications at the recommended application rate and five times the recommended rate led to the accumulation of CTN residue in soil at concentrations of 5.59 and 78.79 mg kg(-1), respectively, by the end of incubation. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that repeated CTN applications had negative effects on the chiA and aprA gene abundances. There were significantly negative correlations between CTN residues and abundances of AOA and AOB genes. In addition, the abundances of key functional genes involved in soil denitrification were declined by repeated CTN applications with the sole exception of the nosZ gene. This study suggests that repeated CTN applications could lead to the accumulation of CTN residue and generate somewhat inconsistent and erratic effects on the abundances of key functional genes related to soil N cycling. PMID:26613517

  15. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P.; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W.; Martin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  16. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W; Martin, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  17. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Revised stellar properties of Q1-16 Kepler targets (Huber+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Matthews, J. M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Gaidos, E.; Garcia, R. A.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Torres, G.; Bastien, F. A.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Demory, B.-O.; Fleming, S. W.; Guo, Z.; Mann, A. W.; Rowe, J. F.; Serenelli, A. M.; Smith, M. A.; Stello, D.

    2014-04-01

    We present revised properties for 196468 stars observed by the NASA Kepler mission and used in the analysis of Quarter 1-16 (Q1-16; May 2009 to Dec 2012) data to detect and characterize transiting planets. The catalog is based on a compilation of literature values for atmospheric properties (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) derived from different observational techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, asteroseismology, and exoplanet transits), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth stellar isochrones. We use broadband photometry and asteroseismology to characterize 11532 Kepler targets which were previously unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We report the detection of oscillations in 2762 of these targets, classifying them as giant stars and increasing the number of known oscillating giant stars observed by Kepler by ~20% to a total of ~15500 stars. Typical uncertainties in derived radii and masses are ~40% and ~20%, respectively, for stars with photometric constraints only, and 5%-15% and ~10% for stars based on spectroscopy and/or asteroseismology, although these uncertainties vary strongly with spectral type and luminosity class. A comparison with the Q1-Q12 catalog shows a systematic decrease in radii of M dwarfs, while radii for K dwarfs decrease or increase depending on the Q1-Q12 provenance (KIC or Yonsei-Yale isochrones). Radii of F-G dwarfs are on average unchanged, with the exception of newly identified giants. The Q1-Q16 star properties catalog is a first step toward an improved characterization of all Kepler targets to support planet-occurrence studies. (3 data files).

  19. CDKN2A/p16 loss implicates CDK4 as a therapeutic target in imatinib-resistant dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Grant; Czaplinski, Jeffrey T.; Mayeda, Mark; Bahri, Nacef; Tao, Derrick; Zhu, Meijun; Hornick, Jason L.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Sicinska, Ewa; Wagner, Andrew J.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Mariño-Enriquez, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an aggressive PDGFB-dependent cutaneous sarcoma characterized by infiltrative growth and frequent local recurrences. Some DFSP progress to a higher-grade fibrosarcomatous form, with rapid growth and increased risk of metastasis. Imatinib provides clinical benefit in ~50% of patients with unresectable or metastatic DFSP. However, efficacious medical therapies have not been developed for imatinib-resistant DFSP. We established a model of imatinib-resistant DFSP, and evaluated CDK4/6 inhibition as a genomically-credentialed targeted therapy. DFSP105, an imatinib-resistant human cell line, was established from a fibrosarcomatous DFSP (FS-DFSP), and was studied by SNP arrays and sequencing to identify targetable genomic alterations. Findings were validated in vitro and in vivo, and confirmed in a series including 12 DFSP and 6 FS-DFSP. SNP analysis of DFSP105 revealed a homozygous deletion encompassing CDKN2A and CDKN2B. The resultant p16 loss implicated CDK4/6 as a potential therapeutic target in DFSP. We further demonstrated CDKN2A homozygous deletion in 1/12 conventional DFSP and 2/6 FS-DFSP, while p16 expression was lost in 4/18 DFSP. In vitro treatment of DFSP105 with two structurally distinct selective CDK4/6 inhibitors, PD-0332991 and LEE011, led to inhibition of RB1 phosphorylation and inhibition of proliferation (GI50 160nM and 276nM, respectively). In vivo treatment of DFSP105 with PD-0332991 (150mg/kg) inhibited xenograft growth in mice, in comparison with imatinib-treated or untreated tumors. In conclusion, CDKN2A deletion can contribute to DFSP progression. CDK4/6 inhibition is a preclinically effective treatment against p16-negative, imatinib-resistant FS-DFSP, and should be evaluated as a therapeutic strategy in patients with unresectable or metastatic imatinib-resistant DFSP. PMID:25852058

  20. G protein-coupled receptors: from ligand identification to drug targets. 14-16 October 2002, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Chantry, David

    2003-05-01

    IBC advertised their seventh annual symposium on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) under the heading 'GPCRs still the best drug targets' and, at the end of the 3-day meeting which took place at the Hilton San Diego Resort (October 14-16 2002), it seemed like an appropriate description. The meeting brought together researchers from a wide range of disciplines, and from both academia and industry, to discuss recent advances in GPCR biology, pharmacology and drug design. This review will cover the main themes that emerged during the meeting, with an emphasis on those areas that impact drug discovery. PMID:14610927

  1. Novel 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones as potential anticancer agents targeting Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Montoir, David; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Tonnerre, Alain; Juin, Philippe; Duflos, Muriel; Bazin, Marc-Antoine

    2016-08-25

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent chaperone known to be overexpressed in many cancers. This way, Hsp90 is an important target for drug discovery. Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, was reported to inhibit Hsp90 targeting C-terminal domain, and showed anti-proliferative properties, leading to the development of new and more active compounds. Consequently, a new set of novobiocin analogs derived from 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold was designed, synthesized and evaluated against two breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were conducted on best candidates, finally Western Blot analysis was performed to measure their ability to induce degradation of Hsp90 client proteins. PMID:27153346

  2. Nitrogen source activates TOR (target of rapamycin) complex 1 via glutamine and independently of Gtr/Rag proteins.

    PubMed

    Stracka, Daniele; Jozefczuk, Szymon; Rudroff, Florian; Sauer, Uwe; Hall, Michael N

    2014-09-01

    The evolutionary conserved TOR complex 1 (TORC1) activates cell growth in response to nutrients. In yeast, TORC1 responds to the nitrogen source via a poorly understood mechanism. Leucine, and perhaps other amino acids, activates TORC1 via the small GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2, orthologs of the mammalian Rag GTPases. Here we investigate the activation of TORC1 by the nitrogen source and how this might be related to TORC1 activation by Gtr/Rag. The quality of the nitrogen source, as defined by its ability to promote growth and glutamine accumulation, directly correlates with its ability to activate TORC1 as measured by Sch9 phosphorylation. Preferred nitrogen sources stimulate rapid, sustained Sch9 phosphorylation and glutamine accumulation. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis reduces TORC1 activity and growth. Poor nitrogen sources stimulate rapid but transient Sch9 phosphorylation. A Gtr1 deficiency prevents the transient stimulation of TORC1 but does not affect the sustained TORC1 activity in response to good nitrogen sources. These findings suggest that the nitrogen source must be converted to glutamine, the preferred nitrogen source in yeast, to sustain TORC1 activity. Furthermore, sustained TORC1 activity is independent of Gtr/Rag. Thus, the nitrogen source and Gtr/Rag activate TORC1 via different mechanisms. PMID:25063813

  3. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed. PMID:12841206

  4. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  5. Proteomic profiling of 16 cereal grains and the application of targeted proteomics to detect wheat contamination.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Goswami, Hareshwar; Byrne, Keren; Blundell, Malcolm; Howitt, Crispin A; Tanner, Gregory J

    2015-06-01

    Global proteomic analysis utilizing SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and LC-MS/MS of total protein and gluten-enriched extracts derived from 16 economically important cereals was undertaken, providing a foundation for the development of MS-based quantitative methodologies that would enable the detection of wheat contamination in foods. The number of proteins identified in each grain correlated with the number of entries in publicly available databases, highlighting the importance of continued advances in genome sequencing to facilitate accurate protein identification. Subsequently, candidate wheat-specific peptide markers were evaluated by multiple-reaction monitoring MS. The selected markers were unique to wheat, yet present in a wide range of wheat varieties that represent up to 80% of the bread wheat genome. The final analytical method was rapid (15 min) and robust (CV < 10%), showed linearity (R(2) > 0.98) spanning over 3 orders of magnitude, and was highly selective and sensitive with detection down to 15 mg/kg in intentionally contaminated soy flour. Furthermore, application of this technology revealed wheat contamination in commercially sourced flours, including rye, millet, oats, sorghum, buckwheat and three varieties of soy. PMID:25873154

  6. Aberrant epilepsy-associated mutant Nav1.6 sodium channel activity can be targeted with cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Patel, Reesha R; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Cummins, Theodore R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in brain isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels have been identified in patients with distinct epileptic phenotypes. Clinically, these patients often do not respond well to classic anti-epileptics and many remain refractory to treatment. Exogenous as well as endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to target voltage-gated sodium channels and cannabidiol has recently received attention for its potential efficacy in the treatment of childhood epilepsies. In this study, we further investigated the ability of cannabinoids to modulate sodium currents from wild-type and epilepsy-associated mutant voltage-gated sodium channels. We first determined the biophysical consequences of epilepsy-associated missense mutations in both Nav1.1 (arginine 1648 to histidine and asparagine 1788 to lysine) and Nav1.6 (asparagine 1768 to aspartic acid and leucine 1331 to valine) by obtaining whole-cell patch clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney 293T cells with 200 μM Navβ4 peptide in the pipette solution to induce resurgent sodium currents. Resurgent sodium current is an atypical near threshold current predicted to increase neuronal excitability and has been implicated in multiple disorders of excitability. We found that both mutations in Nav1.6 dramatically increased resurgent currents while mutations in Nav1.1 did not. We then examined the effects of anandamide and cannabidiol on peak transient and resurgent currents from wild-type and mutant channels. Interestingly, we found that cannabidiol can preferentially target resurgent sodium currents over peak transient currents generated by wild-type Nav1.6 as well as the aberrant resurgent and persistent current generated by Nav1.6 mutant channels. To further validate our findings, we examined the effects of cannabidiol on endogenous sodium currents from striatal neurons, and similarly we found an inhibition of resurgent and persistent current by cannabidiol. Moreover, current clamp recordings show that cannabidiol reduces

  7. Nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films by use of laser ablation of ZnO(1-x)Nx targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okato, Takeshi; Osada, Takenori; Obara, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    ZnO is inherently a strong n-type semiconductor due to its intrinsic defects. Among the group V elements (N, As, P, Sb), nitrogen is considered as teh most hopeful dopant for p-type ZnO, because substitute N (N0) is a relatively shallow acceptor. However, technical issues of the low solubility for the desirable defect and compensations from undesirable donor-like defects are imposed on the development of high mobility and low resistivity p-type ZnO. Breaking through these issues is accompanied by the optimization of dopant concentration and reduction of intrinsic defects. In this study, we have investigated the dependence of the nitrogen concentration on its electrical properties. Home-made ZnO1-xNx targets were prepared and used for KrF excimer pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) at precisely controlled growth conditions. Thin films were deposited on c-cut sapphire substrates. The nitrogen concentration was tuned by adjusting the amount of nitrogen in the ablation targets. The film properties were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The electrical properties were measured by van der Pauw method. The as-grown ZnO:N films showed n-type conductivity, however, they were converted to p-type upon post-deposition thermal treatment. Further improvement was demonstrated by introducing a ZnO low-temperature buffer layer which realized the lattice mismatch relaxation.

  8. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2.

  9. Designation of Streptomycete 16S and 23S rRNA-based target regions for oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Stackebrandt, E; Witt, D; Kemmerling, C; Kroppenstedt, R; Liesack, W

    1991-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA of various Streptomyces species were partially sequenced and screened for the presence of stretches that could define all members of the genus, groups of species, or individual species. Nucleotide 929 (Streptomyces ambofaciens nomenclature [J.L. Pernodet, M.T. Alegre, F. Boccard, and M. Guerineau, Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) is a nucleotide highly unique to Streptomyces species which, in combination with flanking regions, allowed the designation of a genus-specific probe. Regions 158 through 203 of the 16S rRNA and 1518 through 1645 of the 23S rRNA (helix 54 [Pernodet et al., Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) have a high potential to define species, whereas the degree of variation in regions 982 through 998 and 1102 through 1122 of the 16S rRNA is less pronounced but characteristic for at least certain species. Alone or in combination with each other, these regions may serve as target sites for synthetic oligonucleotide probes and primers to be used in the determination of pure cultures and in the characterization of community structures. The specificity of several probes is demonstrated by dot blot hybridization. Images PMID:1854202

  10. Identification of planctomycetes with order-, genus-, and strain-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes.

    PubMed

    Gade, D; Schlesner, H; Glöckner, F O; Amann, R; Pfeiffer, S; Thomm, M

    2004-04-01

    A specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe (PIR1223) for the genus Pirellula and a species-specific probe (RB454) for Pirellula sp. strain SH1 have been designed and optimized. Together with the already existing order-specific probe PLA886, the two newly designed probes were used to detect and identify planctomycetes, pirellulae, and close relatives of Pirellula sp. strain SH1 in different habitats. With the help of these probes for detection and identification, bacteria of the genus Pirellula were detected and cultivated from tissue of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba and from the water column of the Kiel Fjord. An unexpected result was the close phylogenetic relationship of the isolate from the sponge and the brackish water habitat Kiel Fjord as revealed by DNA/DNA hybridization. PMID:14994173

  11. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  12. Reassessment of PCR primers targeting 16S rRNA genes of the organohalide-respiring genus Dehalogenimonas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2014-09-01

    Representatives from the genus Dehalogenimonas have the metabolic capacity to anaerobically transform a variety of environmentally important polychlorinated aliphatic compounds. In light of the recent isolation of additional strains, description of a new species, and an expanded number of uncultured DNA sequences, PCR primers and protocols intended to uniquely target members of this organohalide-respiring genus were reevaluated. Nine of fourteen primer combinations reported previously as genus-specific failed to amplify 16S rRNA genes of recently isolated Dehalogenimonas strains. Use of alternative combinations or modified genus-specific primers, however, allowed detection of all presently known Dehalogenimonas strains. Use of a modified primer set in qPCR revealed an approximately two-order of magnitude increase in concentration of Dehalogenimonas 16S rRNA gene copies following subsurface injection of electron donors at a Louisiana Superfund site, demonstrating the utility of the newly developed protocol and suggesting that the genus Dehalogenimonas can respond to biostimulation remediation strategies in a manner similar to that previously reported for other dechlorinating genera such as Dehalococcoides. PMID:24989478

  13. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach. PMID:24989343

  14. MicroRNA-133 Controls Brown Adipose Determination in Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells by Targeting Prdm16

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Pasut, Alessandra; Soleimani, Vahab D.; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Antoun, Ghadi; Thorn, Stephanie; Seale, Patrick; Fernando, Pasan; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank; Dekemp, Robert A.; Boushel, Robert; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an energy-dispensing thermogenic tissue that plays an important role in balancing energy metabolism. Lineage-tracing experiments indicate that brown adipocytes are derived from myogenic progenitors during embryonic development. However, adult skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) have long been considered uniformly determined toward the myogenic lineage. Here, we report that adult satellite cells give rise to brown adipocytes and that microRNA-133 regulates the choice between myogenic and brown adipose determination by targeting the 3′UTR of Prdm16. Antagonism of microRNA-133 during muscle regeneration increases uncoupled respiration, glucose uptake, and thermogenesis in local treated muscle and augments whole-body energy expenditure, improves glucose tolerance, and impedes the development of diet-induced obesity. Finally, we demonstrate that miR-133 levels are downregulated in mice exposed to cold, resulting in de novo generation of satellite cell-derived brown adipocytes. Therefore, microRNA-133 represents an important therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23395168

  15. Gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP, an integrin-targeted therapy, has antitumor and antiangiogenic action in murine B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, M; Dolinsek, T; Cemazar, M; Kranjc, S; Blagus, T; Markelc, B; Stimac, M; Zavrsnik, J; Kamensek, U; Heller, L; Bouquet, C; Turk, B; Sersa, G

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy with Plasmid AMEP (antiangiogenic metargidin peptide) has recently been studied as a potential targeted therapy for melanoma. This plasmid is designed to downregulate α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins. In our study, electroporation was used as a nonviral delivery system. We investigated the antiangiogenic and direct antitumor effectiveness of this gene therapy on low and highly metastatic B16 melanoma variants. In vitro, the antiangiogenic effectiveness as determined by tube formation assay on endothelial cells was predominantly dependent on AMEP expression levels. In vivo, antitumor effectiveness was mediated by the inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of melanoma cells and correlated with the expression of integrins on tumor cells after intratumor delivery. In addition, reduced metastatic potential was shown. Intramuscular gene electrotransfer of Plasmid AMEP, for AMEP systemic distribution, had no antitumor effect with this specific preventive treatment protocol, confirming that direct tumor delivery was more effective. This study confirms our previous in vitro data that the expression levels of integrins on melanoma cells could be used as a biomarker for antitumor effectiveness in integrin-targeted therapies, whereas the expression levels of AMEP peptide could be a predictive factor for antiangiogenic effectiveness of Plasmid AMEP in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25781650

  16. Npr2, Yeast Homolog of the Human Tumor Suppressor NPRL2, Is a Target of Grr1 Required for Adaptation to Growth on Diverse Nitrogen Sources ▿

    PubMed Central

    Spielewoy, Nathalie; Guaderrama, Marisela; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Ashe, Mabelle; Yates, John R.; Wittenberg, Curt

    2010-01-01

    Npr2, a putative “nitrogen permease regulator” and homolog of the human tumor suppressor NPRL2, was found to interact with Grr1, the F-box component of the SCFGrr1 (Skp1–cullin–F-box protein complex containing Grr1) E3 ubiquitin ligase, by mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology. Npr2 has two PEST sequences and has been previously identified among ubiquitinated proteins. Like other Grr1 targets, Npr2 is a phosphoprotein. Phosphorylated Npr2 accumulates in grr1Δ mutants, and Npr2 is stabilized in cells with inactivated proteasomes. Phosphorylation and instability depend upon the type I casein kinases (CK1) Yck1 and Yck2. Overexpression of Npr2 is detrimental to cells and is lethal in grr1Δ mutants. Npr2 is required for robust growth in defined medium containing ammonium or urea as a nitrogen source but not for growth on rich medium. npr2Δ mutants also fail to efficiently complete meiosis. Together, these data indicate that Npr2 is a phosphorylation-dependent target of the SCFGrr1 E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a role in cell growth on some nitrogen sources. PMID:20154027

  17. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 10(7) erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25-30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 10(17)/cm(2). PMID:27145983

  18. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2. PMID:27145983

  19. Food Targeting: A Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting 16S rDNA for Direct Quantification of Alicyclobacillus spp. Spores after Aptamer-Based Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Hünniger, Tim; Felbinger, Christine; Wessels, Hauke; Mast, Sophia; Hoffmann, Antonia; Schefer, Anna; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Fischer, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Spore-forming Alicyclobacillus spp. are able to form metabolites that induce even in small amounts an antiseptical or medicinal off-flavor in fruit juices. Microbial contaminations could occur by endospores, which overcame the pasteurization process. The current detection method for Alicyclobacillus spp. can take up to 1 week because of microbiological enrichment. In a previous study, DNA aptamers were selected and characterized for an aptamer-driven rapid enrichment of Alicyclobacillus spp. spores from orange juice by magnetic separation. In the present work, a direct quantification assay for Alicyclobacillus spp. spores was developed to complete the two-step approach of enrichment and detection. After mechanical treatment of the spores, the isolated DNA was quantified in a real-time PCR-assay targeting 16S rDNA. The assay was evaluated by the performance requirements of the European Network of Genetically Modified Organisms Laboratories (ENGL). Hence, the presented method is applicable for direct spore detection from orange juice in connection with an enrichment step. PMID:25880790

  20. Influence of deformation on the structure and mechanical and corrosion properties of high-nitrogen austenitic 07Kh16AG13M3 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Khadyev, M. S.; Merkushkin, E. A.; Sokolovskaya, Yu. A.

    2013-11-01

    The correlation has been studied between the structure of a high-nitrogen austenitic Cr-Mn-N steel formed in the process of combined hardening treatment, including cold plastic deformation (CPD), and its mechanical and corrosion properties. The structure and properties of commercial high-nitrogen (0.8% N) 07Kh16AG13M3 steel is analyzed after rolling by CPD and aging at 500 and 800°C. It is shown that CPD of the steel occurs by dislocation slip and deformation twinning. Deformation twinning and also high resistance of austenite to martensitic transformations at true strains of 0.2 and 0.4 determine the high plasticity of the steel. The contribution of the structure imperfection parameters to the broadening of the austenite lines during CPD is estimated by X-ray diffraction. The main hardening factor is stated to be lattice microdistortions. Transmission electron microscopy study shows that heating of the deformed steel to 500°C leads to the formation of the intermediate CrN phase by a homogeneous mechanism, and the intermtallic χ phase forms along the austenite grain boundaries in the case of heating at 800°C. After hardening by all investigated technological schemes, exception for aging at 800°C, the steel does not undergo pitting corrosion and is slightly prone to a stress corrosion cracking during static bending tests, while aging at 800°C causes pitting corrosion at a pitting formation potential E pf = -0.25 V.

  1. A feasibility study of non-targeted adulterant screening based on NIRM spectral library of soybean meal to guarantee quality: The example of non-protein nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanghui; Fan, Xia; Yang, Zengling; Han, Lujia

    2016-11-01

    The quality and safety of soybean meal is a key matter for the livestock breeding and food industries, since it is one of the most important and widely used protein feed raw materials. As driven by commercial interests, new illegal adulterants which are unknown to consumers and regulators emerge constantly. In order to make up for the inadequacy of traditional detection methods, a novel non-targeted adulterant screening method based on a near-infrared microscopy spectral library of soybean meal is proposed. This study focused on the feasibility of non-targeted screening methods for the detection of adulteration in soybean meal. Six types of non-protein nitrogen were taken as examples and partial least squares discriminant analysis was employed to verify the feasibility of this novel method. The results showed that the non-targeted screening method could screen out adulterations in soybean meal with satisfactory results. PMID:27211617

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the aging and tempering of high nitrogen quenched Fe-N alloys: Kinetics of formation of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} nitride by interstitial ordering in martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, I.; Genin, J.M.R. |

    1996-08-01

    The distribution of nitrogen atoms in austenite and during the different stages of aging and tempering of martensite is studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) are used for studying the austenite phase where the distribution of nitrogen atoms is found to depend on the nitriding method, gas nitriding in the authors` case, or ion implantation. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, which concerns a depth predominantly less than 200 nm, reveals a nitrogen atom distribution different from that found in the bulk by TMS. The identification and kinetics of the stages of aging and tempering of martensite are followed by TMS measurements, and the phase characterization is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and TEM. The major stages are the early ordering of nitrogen atoms, which leads to small coherent precipitates of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}; the passage by thickening to semicoherent precipitates of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}; the dissolution of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} with the concomitant formation of {gamma}-Fe{sub 4}N; and the decomposition of retained austenite by tempering. The three first stages correspond to activation energies of 95, 126, and 94 kJ/mole, respectively, consistent with the nitrogen diffusion for the first and third stages and the dislocation pipe diffusion of iron for the second.

  3. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, P.; Vrbova, M.; Zakharov, S. V.

    2014-07-15

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88 nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s{sup 2} → 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72 mm thickness, 1 bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7 ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  4. Development of Water Target for Radioisotope Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Ongoing studies of plant physiology at TUNL require a supply of nitrogen-13 for use as a radiotracer. Production of nitrogen-13 using a water target and a proton beam follows the nuclear reaction 16-O(p,a)13-N. Unfortunately the irradiation of trace amounts of oxygen-18 within a natural water target produces fluorine-18 by the reaction 18-O(p, n)18-F. The presence of this second radioisotope reduces the efficacy of nitrogen-13 as a radiotracer. Designing a natural water target for nitrogen-13 production at TUNL required the design of several new systems to address the problems inherent in nitrogen-13 production. A heat exchanger cools the target water after irradiation within the target cell. The resulting improved thermal regulation of the target water prevents the system from overheating and minimizes the effect of the cavitations occurring within the target. Alumina pellets within a scrubbing unit remove the fluorine-18 contamination from the irradiated water. The modular design of the water target apparatus makes the system highly adaptable, allowing for easy reuse and adaptation of the different components into future projects. The newly designed and constructed water target should meet the current and future needs of TUNL researchers in the production of nitrogen-13. This TUNL REU project was funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) NSF-PHY-08-51813.

  5. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition for protection of acid sensitive aquatic resources in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; McDonnell, T.C.; Herlihy, A.T.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic watershed acid-base chemistry model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC) was used to calculate target loads (TLs) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition expected to be protective of aquatic health in lakes in the Adirondack ecoregion of New York. The TLs were calculated for two future dates (2050 and 2100) and three levels of protection against lake acidification (acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 0, 20, and 50 eq L -1). Regional sulfur and nitrogen deposition estimates were combined with TLs to calculate exceedances. Target load results, and associated exceedances, were extrapolated to the regional population of Adirondack lakes. About 30% of Adirondack lakes had simulated TL of sulfur deposition less than 50 meq m -2 yr to protect lake ANC to 50 eq L -1. About 600 Adirondack lakes receive ambient sulfur deposition that is above this TL, in some cases by more than a factor of 2. Some critical criteria threshold values were simulated to be unobtainable in some lakes even if sulfur deposition was to be decreased to zero and held at zero until the specified endpoint year. We also summarize important lessons for the use of target loads in the management of acid-impacted aquatic ecosystems, such as those in North America, Europe, and Asia. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Genus- and Species-Specific PCR-Based Detection of Dairy Propionibacteria in Environmental Samples by Using Primers Targeted to the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Franca; Torriani, Sandra; Dellaglio, Franco

    1999-01-01

    PCR assays with primers targeted to the genes encoding 16S rRNA were developed for detection of dairy propionibacteria. Propionibacterium thoenii specific oligonucleotide PT3 was selected after partial resequencing. Tests allowed the detection of less than 10 cells per reaction from milk and cheese and 102 cells per reaction from forage and soil. PMID:10473444

  7. Ecologically based targets for bioavailable (reactive) nitrogen discharge from the drainage basins of the Wet Tropics region, Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Scott A; Brodie, Jon E; Kroon, Frederieke J; Turner, Ryan D R

    2015-08-15

    A modelling framework is developed for the Wet Tropics region of the Great Barrier Reef that links a quantitative river discharge parameter (viz. dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentration, DIN) with an eutrophication indicator within the marine environment (viz. chlorophyll-a concentration, chl-a). The model predicts catchment-specific levels of reduction (%) in end-of-river DIN concentrations (as a proxy for total potentially reactive nitrogen, PRN) needed to ensure compliance with chl-a 'trigger' guidelines for the ecologically distinct, but PRN-related issues of crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) outbreaks, reef biodiversity loss, and thermal bleaching sensitivity. The results indicate that even for river basins dominated by agricultural land uses, quite modest reductions in end-of-river PRN concentrations (∼20-40%) may assist in mitigating the risk of primary COTS outbreaks from the mid-shelf reefs of the Wet Tropics. However, more significant reductions (∼60-80%) are required to halt and reverse declines in reef biodiversity, and loss of thermal bleaching resistance. PMID:26072049

  8. Effect of heat treatment on the structure and the mechanical and technological properties of corrosion-resistant nitrogen-bearing 0Kh16N4AFD steel for high-strength welding constructions of railway engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, E. V.; Rigina, L. G.

    2015-07-01

    The problems of applying a new nitrogen-alloyed martensitic corrosion-resistant 0Kh16N4AFD steel as a promising material for manufacturing car bodies are considered. The microstructure and properties of the steel after various heat treatments have been studied. It is shown that the steel is not behind 12Kh18N9T steel in the characteristics of ductility and corrosion resistance and significantly exceeds it in the static and cyclic strengths.

  9. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiaxing; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression in various biological processes. However, the interactions between miRNAs and their targets are largely unknown in plants. As a powerful tool for identification of variation associated with traits, association genetics provides another strategy for exploration of interactions between miRNAs and their targets. Here, we conducted expression analysis and association mapping to evaluate the interaction between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16 in Populus tomentosa. By examining the expression patterns of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, we identified a significant, negative correlation between their expression levels, indicating that Pto-miR160a may affect the expression of Pto-ARF16. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in this study, one common SNP in the pre-miRNA region of Pto-miR160a altered its predicted secondary structure while another common SNP in the predicted miRNA target site changed the binding affinity of Pto-miR160a. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed low LD levels of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, indicating that they are suitable for candidate gene-based association analysis. Single SNP-based association analysis identified 19 SNPs (false discovery rate Q < 0.05) in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with three phenotypic traits. Epistasis analysis further identified 36 SNP-SNP interactions between SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and SNPs in Pto-ARF16, reflecting the possible genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16. Taking these results together, our study identified SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with tree growth and wood properties, providing SNPs with potential applications in marker-assisted breeding and evidence for the genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16. PMID:26732268

  10. High blood sugar levels significantly impact the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients through down-regulation of microRNA-16 by targeting Myb and VEGFR2.

    PubMed

    Yang, I-Ping; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Miao, Zhi-Feng; Chang, Se-Fen; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in colorectal cancer patients is a crucial public health issue worldwide. The deregulation of microRNAs has been shown to be associated with the progression of CRC; however, the effects of high blood sugar levels on miR deregulation and, in turn, CRC remain unexplored. In this study, 520 CRC patients were classified into two groups according to their blood sugar levels (≧110 or <110 mg/dL). Clinicopathologic features, clinical outcomes, and serum miR-16 levels of the two groups were then analyzed, while cell cycles, cell proliferation, migration, and cellular miR-16 expression were investigated via D-(+)-glucose administration. Additionally, the target genes of miR-16 were identified. Through multivariate analysis, both the disease-free survival and overall survival of the CRC patients were found to be associated with the UICC stage, perineural invasion, and blood glucose levels (P < 0.05). Serum miR-16 levels were significantly lower in the high blood glucose patients than in the normal blood glucose patients (P = 0.0329). With D-(+)-glucose administration, the proliferation and migration of CRC cells in vitro increased remarkably (P < 0.05), while their accumulation in the G1 phase decreased significantly. Cellular miR-16 expression was suppressed by D-(+)-glucose administration. The expression levels of two target genes, Myb and VEGFR2, were affected significantly by miR-16, while glucose administration inhibited miR-16 expression and enhanced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Hyperglycemia can impact the clinical outcomes of CRC patients, likely by inhibiting miR-16 expression and the expression of its downstream genes Myb and VEGFR2. PMID:26934556

  11. High blood sugar levels significantly impact the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients through down-regulation of microRNA-16 by targeting Myb and VEGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Wen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Miao, Zhi-Feng; Chang, Se-Fen; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in colorectal cancer patients is a crucial public health issue worldwide. The deregulation of microRNAs has been shown to be associated with the progression of CRC; however, the effects of high blood sugar levels on miR deregulation and, in turn, CRC remain unexplored. In this study, 520 CRC patients were classified into two groups according to their blood sugar levels (≧110 or <110 mg/dL). Clinicopathologic features, clinical outcomes, and serum miR-16 levels of the two groups were then analyzed, while cell cycles, cell proliferation, migration, and cellular miR-16 expression were investigated via D-(+)-glucose administration. Additionally, the target genes of miR-16 were identified. Through multivariate analysis, both the disease-free survival and overall survival of the CRC patients were found to be associated with the UICC stage, perineural invasion, and blood glucose levels (P < 0.05). Serum miR-16 levels were significantly lower in the high blood glucose patients than in the normal blood glucose patients (P = 0.0329). With D-(+)-glucose administration, the proliferation and migration of CRC cells in vitro increased remarkably (P < 0.05), while their accumulation in the G1 phase decreased significantly. Cellular miR-16 expression was suppressed by D-(+)-glucose administration. The expression levels of two target genes, Myb and VEGFR2, were affected significantly by miR-16, while glucose administration inhibited miR-16 expression and enhanced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Hyperglycemia can impact the clinical outcomes of CRC patients, likely by inhibiting miR-16 expression and the expression of its downstream genes Myb and VEGFR2. PMID:26934556

  12. The Use of Recombinant Pseudotype Virus-Like Particles Harbouring Inserted Target Antigen to Generate Antibodies against Cellular Marker p16INK4A

    PubMed Central

    Lasickienė, Rita; Gedvilaite, Alma; Norkiene, Milda; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Sezaite, Indre; Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Shikova, Evelina; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering provides an opportunity to generate new immunogens with desired features. Previously, we have demonstrated that hamster polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly immunogenic and can be employed for the insertion of foreign epitopes at certain surface-exposed positions. In the current study, we have designed pseudotype VLPs consisting of an intact VP1 protein and VP2 protein fused with the target antigen—cellular marker p16INK4A—at its N terminus. Both proteins coexpressed in yeast were self-assembled to pseudotype VLPs harbouring the inserted antigen on the surface. The pseudotype VLPs were used for generation of antibodies against p16INK4A that represents a potential biomarker for cells transformed by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The pseudotype VLPs induced in immunized mice a strong immune response against the target antigen. The antisera raised against pseudotype VLPs showed specific immunostaining of p16INK4A protein in malignant cervical tissue. Spleen cells of the immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies against p16INK4A protein. The specificity of antibodies was proven by the immunostaining of HPV-transformed cells. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates the potential of pseudotype VLPs with inserted target antigen as a new type of immunogens to generate antibodies of high diagnostic value. PMID:22629125

  13. Direct Solvent-Derived Polymer-Coated Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanodots with High Water Solubility for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer imaging requires biocompatible and bright contrast-agents with selective and high accumulation in the tumor region but low uptake in normal tissues. Herein, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP)-derived polymer-coated nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (pN-CNDs) with a particle size in the range of 5-15 nm are prepared by a facile direct solvothermal reaction. The as-prepared pN-CNDs exhibit stable and adjustable fluorescence and excellent water solubility. Results of a cell viability test (CCK-8) and histology analysis both demonstrate that the pN-CNDs have no obvious cytotoxicity. Most importantly, the pN-CNDs can expediently enter glioma cells in vitro and also mediate glioma fluorescence imaging in vivo with good contrast via elevated passive targeting. PMID:25808813

  14. Comparative phenomics and targeted use of genomics reveals variation in carbon and nitrogen assimilation among different Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, S; Van Assche, A; de Jonge, R; Borneman, A R; Verreth, C; Troels, P; De Samblanx, G; Marchal, K; Van de Peer, Y; Willems, K A; Verstrepen, K J; Curtin, C D; Lievens, B

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested a correlation between genotype groups of Brettanomyces bruxellensis and their source of isolation. To further explore this relationship, the objective of this study was to assess metabolic differences in carbon and nitrogen assimilation between different B. bruxellensis strains from three beverages, including beer, wine, and soft drink, using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays. While some similarities of physiology were noted, many traits were variable among strains. Interestingly, some phenotypes were found that could be linked to strain origin, especially for the assimilation of particular α- and β-glycosides as well as α- and β-substituted monosaccharides. Based upon gene presence or absence, an α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase were found explaining the observed phenotypes. Further, using a PCR screen on a large number of isolates, we have been able to specifically link a genomic deletion to the beer strains, suggesting that this region may have a fitness cost for B. bruxellensis in certain fermentation systems such as brewing. More specifically, none of the beer strains were found to contain a β-glucosidase, which may have direct impacts on the ability for these strains to compete with other microbes or on flavor production. PMID:26135985

  15. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  16. ZBTB16 as a Downstream Target Gene of Osterix Regulates Osteoblastogenesis of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Satoru; Iwata, Takanori; Park, Sung-Joon; Nakai, Kenta; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) possess the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, and they can be utilized as a source for bone regenerative therapy. Osteoinductive pretreatment, which induces the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro, has been widely used for bone tissue engineering prior to cell transplantation. However, the molecular basis of osteoblastic differentiation induced by osteoinductive medium (OIM) is still unknown. Therefore, we used a next-generation sequencer to investigate the changes in gene expression during the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs. The hMSCs used in this study possessed both multipotency and self-renewal ability. Whole-transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) was significantly increased during the osteoblastogenesis of hMSCs. ZBTB16 mRNA and protein expression was enhanced by culturing the hMSCs with OIM. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing of ZBTB16 decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP); the expression of osteogenic genes, such as osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP), and the mineralized nodule formation induced by OIM. siRNA-mediated gene silencing of Osterix (Osx), which is known as an essential regulator of osteoblastic differentiation, markedly downregulated the expression of ZBTB16. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Osx associated with the ZBTB16 promoter region containing the GC-rich canonical Sp1 sequence, which is the specific Osx binding site. These findings suggest that ZBTB16 acts as a downstream transcriptional regulator of Osx and can be useful as a late marker of osteoblastic differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2423-2434, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27335174

  17. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  18. Nitrogen dioxide effects on progression of mouse lymphoma, a blood cell malignancy. Final report, 17 July 1986-16 April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Richters, A.

    1988-03-08

    Earlier studies employing the injection of cancer cells into mice indicated that nitrogen dioxide facilitated the spread and establishment of cancer. The study was initiated to verify that finding, using an animal model that has more similarities to human cancer. The model used was a strain of mouse (AKR/cum) that develops a spontaneous blood-cell malignancy. The results of the study showed that the malignancy tended to develop later and spread less extensively while the percentage of specific T-lymphocytes was reduced in mice exposed to 0.25-ppm nitrogen dioxide when compared to mice held in clean air. Mortality due to cancer in the exposed mice was also reduced. The investigators noted that the result is consistent with exposure causing impairment of immune cells, the T-lymphocytes that participate in the malignancy. These results suggest that, at least in the strain of mouse studied, ambient levels of nitrogen dioxide may affect the immune system.

  19. miR-15a/16 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting the TLR1/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Fengming; Yue, Xiao; Ren, Gang; Li, Hongqi; Ping, Li; Wang, Yingjie; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many miRNAs have been identified as essential issues and core determining factors in tumor radiation. Recent reports have demonstrated that miRNAs and Toll-like receptors could exert reciprocal effects to control cancer development in various ways. However, a novel role of miR-15a/16 in enhancing radiation sensitivity by directly targeting TLR1 has not been reported, to our knowledge. Methods and Materials: Bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, biochemical assays, and subcutaneous tumor establishment were used to characterize the signaling pathways of miRNA-15a/16 in response to radiation treatment. Results: First, an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-15a/16 and TLR1 protein was revealed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and normal lung tissues. Next, we corroborated that miR-15a/16 specifically bound to TLR1 3′UTR and inhibited the expression of TLR1 in H358 and A549 cells. Furthermore, miR-15a/16 downregulated the activity of the NF-κB signaling pathway through TLR1. In addition, overexpression of miR-15a/16 inhibited survival capability and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in H358 and A549 cells. Finally, subcutaneous tumor bearing NSCLC cells in a nude mice model was established, and the results showed that combined groups (miR-15a/16 + radiation) inhibited tumor growth more significantly than did radiation alone. Conclusions: We mainly elucidate that miRNA-15a/16 can enhance radiation sensitivity by regulating the TLR1/NF-κB signaling pathway and act as a potential therapeutic approach to overcome radioresistance for lung cancer treatment.

  20. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein Can Down-Regulate p53 Activity by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator CBP/p300

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Holger; Degenkolbe, Roland; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; O’Connor, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    The transforming proteins of the small DNA tumor viruses, simian virus 40 (SV40), adenovirus, and human papillomavirus (HPV) target a number of identical cellular regulators whose functional abrogation is required for transformation. However, while both adenovirus E1A and SV40 large T transforming properties also depend on the targeting of the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300, no such interaction has been described for the HPV oncoprotein E6 or E7. Here, we demonstrate that the HPV-16 E6 protein, previously shown to facilitate the degradation of p53 in a complex with E6-associated protein (E6AP), also targets CBP/p300 in an interaction involving the C-terminal zinc finger of E6 and CBP residues 1808 to 1826. Furthermore, this interaction is limited to E6 proteins of high-risk HPVs associated with cervical cancer that have the capacity to repress p53-dependent transcription. An HPV-16 E6 mutant (L50G) that binds CBP/p300, but not E6AP, is still capable of down-regulating p53 transcriptional activity. Thus, HPV E6 proteins possess two distinct mechanisms by which to abrogate p53 function: the repression of p53 transcriptional activity by targeting the p53 coactivator CBP/p300, and the removal of cellular p53 protein through the proteosome degradation pathway. PMID:10400710

  1. Molecular basis of the targeting of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage by VP16 derivatives conjugated to triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Duca, Maria; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Oussedik, Kahina; Halby, Ludovic; Garbesi, Anna; Dauzonne, Daniel; Monneret, Claude; Osheroff, Neil; Giovannangeli, Carine; Arimondo, Paola B

    2006-01-01

    Human topoisomerase II (topo II) is the cellular target for a number of widely used antitumor agents, such as etoposide (VP16). These agents 'poison' the enzyme and induce it to generate DNA breaks that are lethal to the cell. Topo II-targeted drugs show a limited sequence preference, triggering double-stranded breaks throughout the genome. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that some of these breaks induce chromosomal translocations that lead to specific types of leukaemia (called treatment-related or secondary leukaemia). Therefore, efforts are ongoing to decrease these secondary effects. An interesting option is to increase the sequence-specificity of topo II-targeted drugs by attaching them to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) that bind to DNA in a highly sequence-specific manner. Here five derivatives of VP16 were attached to TFOs. The active topo II poisons, once linked, induced cleavage 13-14 bp from the triplex end where the drug was attached. The use of triple-helical DNA structures offers an efficient strategy for targeting topo II-mediated cleavage to DNA specific sequences. Finally, drug-TFO conjugates are useful tools to investigate the mechanistic details of topo II poisoning. PMID:16598074

  2. Molecular basis of the targeting of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage by VP16 derivatives conjugated to triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Duca, Maria; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Oussedik, Kahina; Halby, Ludovic; Garbesi, Anna; Dauzonne, Daniel; Monneret, Claude; Osheroff, Neil; Giovannangeli, Carine; Arimondo, Paola B.

    2006-01-01

    Human topoisomerase II (topo II) is the cellular target for a number of widely used antitumor agents, such as etoposide (VP16). These agents ‘poison’ the enzyme and induce it to generate DNA breaks that are lethal to the cell. Topo II-targeted drugs show a limited sequence preference, triggering double-stranded breaks throughout the genome. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that some of these breaks induce chromosomal translocations that lead to specific types of leukaemia (called treatment-related or secondary leukaemia). Therefore, efforts are ongoing to decrease these secondary effects. An interesting option is to increase the sequence-specificity of topo II-targeted drugs by attaching them to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) that bind to DNA in a highly sequence-specific manner. Here five derivatives of VP16 were attached to TFOs. The active topo II poisons, once linked, induced cleavage 13–14 bp from the triplex end where the drug was attached. The use of triple-helical DNA structures offers an efficient strategy for targeting topo II-mediated cleavage to DNA specific sequences. Finally, drug–TFO conjugates are useful tools to investigate the mechanistic details of topo II poisoning. PMID:16598074

  3. Targeted mutagenesis of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 transactivation domain reveals separable transcriptional activation and DNA replication functions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Yasugi, T; Benson, J D; Dowhanick, J J; Howley, P M

    1996-03-01

    The E2 gene products of papillomavirus play key roles in viral replication, both as regulators of viral transcription and as auxiliary factors that act with E1 in viral DNA replication. We have carried out a detailed structure-function analysis of conserved amino acids within the N-terminal domain of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E2 protein. These mutants were tested for their transcriptional activation activities as well as transient DNA replication and E1 binding activities. Analysis of the stably expressed mutants revealed that the transcriptional activation and replication activities of HPV16 E2 could be dissociated. The 173A mutant was defective for the transcriptional activation function but retained wild-type DNA replication activity, whereas the E39A mutant wild-type transcriptional activation function but was defective in transient DNA replication assays. The E39A mutant was also defective for HPV16 E1 binding in vitro, suggesting that the ability of E2 protein to form a complex with E1 appears to be essential for its function as an auxiliary replication factor. PMID:8627680

  4. Preferential Targeting of Nav1.6 Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels to the Axon Initial Segment during Development

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Elizabeth J.; Solé, Laura; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    During axonal maturation, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels accumulate at the axon initial segment (AIS) at high concentrations. This localization is necessary for the efficient initiation of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying channel trafficking to the AIS during axonal development have remained elusive due to a lack of Nav reagents suitable for high resolution imaging of channels located specifically on the cell surface. Using an optical pulse-chase approach in combination with a novel Nav1.6 construct containing an extracellular biotinylation domain we demonstrate that Nav1.6 channels are preferentially inserted into the AIS membrane during neuronal development via direct vesicular trafficking. Single-molecule tracking illustrates that axonal channels are immediately immobilized following delivery, while channels delivered to the soma are often mobile. Neither a Nav1.6 channel lacking the ankyrin-binding motif nor a chimeric Kv2.1 channel containing the Nav ankyrinG-binding domain show preferential AIS insertion. Together these data support a model where ankyrinG-binding is required for preferential Nav1.6 insertion into the AIS plasma membrane. In contrast, ankyrinG-binding alone does not confer the preferential delivery of proteins to the AIS. PMID:25874799

  5. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  6. An RNA Aptamer Provides a Novel Approach for the Induction of Apoptosis by Targeting the HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Forrest, Sophie; Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Bunka, David H. J.; Blair, G. Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus, which is a major causative agent of cervical cancer. Cellular transformation is associated with deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E7 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including the cell cycle control protein pRb. In this study, RNA aptamers (small, single-stranded oligonucleotides selected for high-affinity binding) to HPV16 E7 were employed as molecular tools to further investigate these protein-protein interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is focused on one aptamer (termed A2). Transfection of this molecule into HPV16-transformed cells resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation (shown using real-time cell electronic sensing and MTT assays) due to the induction of apoptosis (as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining). GST-pull down and bead binding assays were used to demonstrate that the binding of A2 required N-terminal residues of E7 known to be involved in interaction with the cell cycle control protein, pRb. Using a similar approach, A2 was shown to disrupt the interaction between E7 and pRb in vitro. Furthermore, transfection of HPV16-transformed cells with A2 appeared to result in the loss of E7 and rise in pRb levels, as observed by immunoblotting. Conclusions/Significance This paper includes the first characterisation of the effects of an E7 RNA aptamer in a cell line derived from a cervical carcinoma. Transfection of cells with A2 was correlated with the loss of E7 and the induction of apoptosis. Aptamers specific for a number of cellular and viral proteins have been documented previously; one aptamer (Macugen) is approved for clinical use and several others are in clinical trials. In addition to its role as a molecular tool, A2 could have further applications in the future. PMID:23738000

  7. Endogenous target mimics down-regulate miR160 mediation of ARF10, -16, and -17 cleavage during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Lai, Zhongxiong; Tian, Qilin; Lin, Lixia; Lai, Ruilian; Yang, Manman; Zhang, Dongmin; Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Zihao

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA160 plays a critical role in plant development by negatively regulating the auxin response factors ARF10, -16, and -17. However, the ways in which miR160 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level, and how miR160 interacts with its targets during plant embryo development, remain unknown. Here, we studied the regulatory relationships among endogenous target mimics (eTMs), and miR160 and its targets, and their involvement in hormone signaling and somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Dimocarpus longan. We identified miR160 family members and isolated the miR160 precursor, primary transcript, and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, salicylic acid (SA) and heat stress. The pri-miR160 was down-regulated in response to SA but up-regulated by gibberellic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate treatment, suggesting that pri-miR160 was associated with hormone transduction. Dlo-miR160a, -a∗ and -d∗ reached expression peaks in torpedo-shaped embryos, globular embryos and cotyledonary embryos, respectively, but were barely detectable in friable-embryogenic callus. This suggests that they have expression-related and functional diversity, especially during the middle and later developmental stages of SE. Four potential eTMs for miR160 were identified. Two of them, glucan endo-1,3-beta- glucosidase-like protein 2-like and calpain-type cysteine protease DEK1, were confirmed to control the corresponding dlo-miR160a∗ expression level. This suggests that they may function to abolish the binding between dlo-miR160a∗ and its targets. These two eTMs also participated in 2,4-D and ABA signal transduction. DlARF10, -16, and -17 targeting by dlo-miR160a was confirmed; their expression levels were higher in friable-embryogenic callus and incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures and responded to 2,4-D, suggesting they may play a major role in the early stages of longan SE dependent on 2,4-D. The eTMs, mi

  8. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method. PMID:27112927

  9. 21-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone: synthesis and target tissue selective uptake of a progestin receptor based radiotracer for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pomper, M.G.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Welch, M.J.; Brodack, J.W.; Mathias, C.J.

    1988-07-01

    We have synthesized 21-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone (FENP), a high affinity ligand for the progesterone receptor, labeled with the positron-emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 110 min). The synthesis proceeds in two steps from 21-hydroxy-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone and involves (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion displacement of the 21-trifluoromethanesulfonate (21-triflate). This material is purified by HPLC and is obtained in 4-30% overall yield (decay corrected) within 40 min after the end of bombardment to produce (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The effective specific activity, determined by competitive radioreceptor binding assays, is 700-1400 Ci/mmol. In vivo, (/sup 18/F)FENP demonstrates highly selective, receptor-mediated uptake by the uterus of estrogen-primed rats; the uterus to blood and uterus to muscle ratios were respectively 26 and 16 at 1 h and 71 and 41 at 3 h after injection. The high target tissue selectivity of this uptake suggests that this compound may be useful for the in vivo imaging of progestin target tissues and receptor-rich tumors (such as human breast tumors) by positron emission tomography.

  10. Melanoma-targeted delivery system (part 2): Synthesis, radioiodination and biological evaluation in B16F0 bearing mice.

    PubMed

    El Aissi, Radhia; Miladi, Imen; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Chavignon, Olivier; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Moreau, Emmanuel

    2016-09-14

    Here we report the synthesis and radiolabelling with iodine-125 of a melanoma-selective prodrug (17a*) and its parent drug IUdR. The in vivo and ex vivo biodistributions of [(125)I](17a*) and [(125)I]IUdR were evaluated in a model of melanoma B16F0-bearing mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of [(125)I](17a*) suggests rapid release of the active drug [(125)I]IUdR after i.v. administration of [(125)I](17a*). Preliminary metabolism studies in dedicated compartments (i.e. blood, urine and tumour) yielded results consistent with this hypothesis. PMID:27214141

  11. Sampling of intestinal microbiota and targeted amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes for microbial ecologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Maomeng; Jacobs, Jonathan P.; McHardy, Ian H.; Braun, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Dysbiosis of host-associated commensal microbiota is emerging as an important factor in risk and phenotype of immunologic, metabolic, and behavioral diseases. Appropriate collection and pre-processing of biospecimens from humans or mice is necessary for accurate analysis of microbial composition and functional state. Methods to sample intestinal luminal and mucosal microbiota from humans and mice, and to profile microbial phylogenetic composition using 16S rRNA sequencing are presented here. Data generated using this protocol can be used for downstream quantitative analysis of microbial ecology. PMID:25367129

  12. Low density lipoprotein for cytotoxic drug targeting: improved activity of elliptinium derivative against B16 melanoma in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Samadi-Baboli, M.; Favre, G.; Canal, P.; Soula, G.

    1993-01-01

    Significant low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by tumour cells led to the use of LDL as a discriminatory vehicle for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs. In the current study, the lipophilic elliptinium derivative, elliptinium-oleate (OL-NME), was incorporated into LDL to reach an incorporation level of 400 molecules per LDL particle. The OL-NME-LDL complex showed cytotoxic effects on normal human fibroblasts while the cytotoxicity was not observed on receptor-defective human fibroblasts, indicating the ability of the complex to be preferentially metabolised by the LDL receptor. In vivo metabolism of the complex was related to the LDL receptor pathway. The metabolic clearance was the same for native LDL (17.1 ml h-1) and OL-NME-LDL complex (16.2 ml h-1). LDL incorporated OL-NME enhanced the anti-tumour activity against murine B16 melanoma model; this resulted from increased efficacy for OL-NME-LDL at doses equal to free 9-OH-NME (157 vs 76 of Increase Life Span (ILS) (%) values after intraperitoneal (i.p.) drug injection on i.p. implanted tumour model and 45 vs -2 ILS (%) values after intravenous drug injection on subcutaneous implanted tumour model). These data suggest that LDL improves the potency of lipophilic cytotoxic drugs against tumours that express LDL receptor activity. PMID:8347487

  13. Reversal of dendritic phenotypes in 16p11.2 microduplication mouse model neurons by pharmacological targeting of a network hub.

    PubMed

    Blizinsky, Katherine D; Diaz-Castro, Blanca; Forrest, Marc P; Schürmann, Britta; Bach, Anthony P; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G; Duan, Jubao; Penzes, Peter

    2016-07-26

    The architecture of dendritic arbors contributes to neuronal connectivity in the brain. Conversely, abnormalities in dendrites have been reported in multiple mental disorders and are thought to contribute to pathogenesis. Rare copy number variations (CNVs) are genetic alterations that are associated with a wide range of mental disorders and are highly penetrant. The 16p11.2 microduplication is one of the CNVs most strongly associated with schizophrenia and autism, spanning multiple genes possibly involved in synaptic neurotransmission. However, disease-relevant cellular phenotypes of 16p11.2 microduplication and the driver gene(s) remain to be identified. We found increased dendritic arborization in isolated cortical pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of 16p11.2 duplication (dp/+). Network analysis identified MAPK3, which encodes ERK1 MAP kinase, as the most topologically important hub in protein-protein interaction networks within the 16p11.2 region and broader gene networks of schizophrenia-associated CNVs. Pharmacological targeting of ERK reversed dendritic alterations associated with dp/+ neurons, outlining a strategy for the analysis and reversal of cellular phenotypes in CNV-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27402753

  14. Targeting Species-Specific Low-Affinity 16S rRNA Binding Sites by Using Peptide Nucleic Acids for Detection of Legionellae in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sandra A.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect bacterial groups has several inherent limitations. DNA probes are generally used, targeting sites on the 16S rRNA. However, much of the 16S rRNA is highly conserved, with variable regions often located in inaccessible areas where secondary structures can restrict probe access. Here, we describe the use of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes as a superior alternative to DNA probes, especially when used for environmental samples. A complex bacterial genus (Legionella) was studied, and two probes were designed, one to detect all species and one targeted to Legionella pneumophila. These probes were developed from existing sequences and are targeted to low-binding-affinity sites on the 16S rRNA. In total, 47 strains of Legionella were tested. In all cases, the Legionella spp. PNA probe labeled cells strongly but did not bind to any non-Legionella species. Likewise, the specific L. pneumophila PNA probe labeled only strains of L. pneumophila. By contrast, the equivalent DNA probes performed poorly. To assess the applicability of this method for use on environmental samples, drinking-water biofilms were spiked with a known concentration of L. pneumophila bacteria. Quantifications of the L. pneumophila bacteria were compared using PNA hybridization and standard culture methods. The culture method quantified only 10% of the number of L. pneumophila bacteria found by PNA hybridization. This illustrates the value of this method for use on complex environmental samples, especially where cells may be in a viable but noncultivable state. PMID:16885298

  15. Discovery of indole-derived pyridopyrazine-1,6-dione γ-secretase modulators that target presenilin.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Martin; Johnson, Douglas S; Humphrey, John M; Am Ende, Christopher W; Evrard, Edelweiss; Efremov, Ivan; Kauffman, Gregory W; Stepan, Antonia F; Stiff, Cory M; Xie, Longfei; Bales, Kelly R; Hajos-Korcsok, Eva; Murrey, Heather E; Pustilnik, Leslie R; Steyn, Stefanus J; Wood, Kathleen M; Verhoest, Patrick R

    2015-02-15

    Herein we describe design strategies that led to the discovery of novel pyridopyrazine-1,6-dione γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) incorporating an indole motif as a heterocyclic replacement for a naphthyl moiety that was present in the original lead 9. Tactics involving parallel medicinal chemistry and in situ monomer synthesis to prepare focused libraries are discussed. Optimized indole GSM 29 exhibited good alignment of in vitro potency and physicochemical properties, and moderate reduction of brain Aβ42 was achieved in a rat efficacy model when dosed orally at 30mg/kg. Labeling experiments using a clickable, indole-derived GSM photoaffinity probe demonstrated that this series binds to the presenilin N-terminal fragment (PS1-NTF) of the γ-secretase complex. PMID:25582600

  16. Solar nitrogen: evidence for a secular increase in the ratio of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, J F

    1975-04-11

    Solar wind nitrogen, implanted in lunar soil samples, exhibits isotopic variations that are related to the time, although not to the duration, of implantation, with earlier samples characterized by lower ratios of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14. An increase in the solar nitrogen-15 content during the lifetime of the lunar regolith is probably caused by spallation of oxygen-16 in the surface regions of the sun. PMID:17813736

  17. Proton-helium correlation in 94 MeV/nucleon sup 16 O-induced reactions on Al, Ni, and Au targets

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S. ); Riggi, F. ); Bizard, G.; Durand, D.; Laville, J.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Azimuthal distributions of helium ions have been measured in coincidence with high-energy protons in reactions induced by {sup 16}O at 94 MeV/nucleon on {sup 27}Al, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 197}Au. Helium ions have been detected in a large area multidetector. Protons have been observed at 90{degree}. Mean multiplicities of light charged particles (H and He) are found slightly dependent on the target mass. Strong azimuthal asymmetries whose intensity is larger for the Al target and vanishes with the increasing of the target mass are observed in the He distributions. Experimental data are discussed in the framework of the participant-spectator picture of a modified fireball model, taking into account intermediate energy corrections. In this framework the behavior of the azimuthal asymmetries, as a function of the target mass, indicates a strong final-state interaction between participant and spectator fragments. Such a result is found in agreement with interaction time predictions of a microscopical calculation based on the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov equation.

  18. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". PMID:24269475

  19. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 targets and restrains mouse B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast tumors through expression of azurin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlei; Zhang, Youming; Xia, Liqiu; Zhang, Xiangli; Ding, Xuezhi; Yan, Fu; Wu, Feng

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered bacteria can target and proliferate in solid tumors and then quickly be released from other organs. Here, we employed the tumor-targeting property of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to inhibit mouse B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast tumors through the expression of azurin protein. For this purpose, recombinant azurin-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 was developed. The levels of in vitro and in vivo azurin secretion in the engineered bacterium were determined by immunochemistry. Our results demonstrated that B16 melanoma and orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor growth were remarkably restrained and pulmonary metastasis was prevented in immunocompetent mice. It is worth noting that this therapeutic effect partially resulted from the antitumor activity of neutrophils and lymphocytes due to inflammatory responses caused by bacterial infections. No toxicity was observed in the animal during the experiments. This study indicates that E. coli Nissle 1917 could be a potential carrier to deliver antitumor drugs effectively for cancer therapy. PMID:22923405

  20. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Targets and Restrains Mouse B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Tumors through Expression of Azurin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Xiangli; Ding, Xuezhi; Yan, Fu; Wu, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered bacteria can target and proliferate in solid tumors and then quickly be released from other organs. Here, we employed the tumor-targeting property of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to inhibit mouse B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast tumors through the expression of azurin protein. For this purpose, recombinant azurin-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 was developed. The levels of in vitro and in vivo azurin secretion in the engineered bacterium were determined by immunochemistry. Our results demonstrated that B16 melanoma and orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor growth were remarkably restrained and pulmonary metastasis was prevented in immunocompetent mice. It is worth noting that this therapeutic effect partially resulted from the antitumor activity of neutrophils and lymphocytes due to inflammatory responses caused by bacterial infections. No toxicity was observed in the animal during the experiments. This study indicates that E. coli Nissle 1917 could be a potential carrier to deliver antitumor drugs effectively for cancer therapy. PMID:22923405

  1. Comparison of two poultry litter qPCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Elk, Michael; Khan, Izhar U H; Harwood, Valerie J; Molina, Marirosa; Edge, Thomas A; Domingo, Jorge Santo

    2014-01-01

    Chicken feces commonly contain human pathogens and are also important sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. Consequently, methods that can detect chicken fecal pollution are needed in public health and environmental monitoring studies. In this study, we compared a previously developed SYBR green qPCR assay (LA35) to a novel TaqMan qPCR assay (CL) for the environmental detection of poultry-associated fecal pollution. We tested both assays against chicken litter (n = 40), chicken fecal samples (n = 186), non-chicken fecal sources (n = 484), and environmental water samples (n = 323). Most chicken litter samples (i.e., ≥ 98%) were positive for both assays with relatively high signal intensities, whereas only 23% and 12% of poultry fecal samples (n = 186) were positive with the LA35 and the CL assays, respectively. Data using fecal samples from non-target animal species showed that the assays are highly host-associated (≥ 95%). Bayesian statistical models showed that the two assays are associated with relatively low probability of false-positive and false-negative signals in water samples. The CL marker had a lower prevalence than the LA35 assay when tested against environmental water samples (i.e., 21% vs. 31% positive signals). However, by combining the results from the two assays the detection levels increased to 41%, suggesting that using multiple assays can improve the detection of chicken-fecal pollution in environmental waters. PMID:24169514

  2. A new lipid-rich microalga Scenedesmus sp. strain R-16 isolated using Nile red staining: effects of carbon and nitrogen sources and initial pH on the biomass and lipid production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production from oleaginous microalgae shows great potential as a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuels. Currently, most research focus on algal biomass production with autotrophic cultivation, but this cultivation strategy induces low biomass concentration and it is difficult to be used in large-scale algal biomass production. By contrast, heterotrophic algae allows higher growth rate and can accumulate higher lipid. However, the fast-growing and lipid-rich microalgae that can be cultivated in heterotrophic system for the industrial application of biodiesel production are still few. Traditional solvent extraction and gravimetric determination to detect the microalgal total lipid content is time-consuming and laborious, which has become a major limiting factor for selecting large number of algae specimens. Thus, it is critical to develop a rapid and efficient procedure for the screening of lipid-rich microalgae. Results A novel green microalga Scenedesmus sp. strain R-16 with high total lipid content was selected using the Nile red staining from eighty-eight isolates. Various carbon sources (fructose, glucose and acetate) and nitrogen sources (nitrate, urea, peptone and yeast extract) can be utilized for microalgal growth and lipid production, and the optimal carbon and nitrogen sources were glucose (10 g L-1) and nitrate (0.6 g L-1), respectively. Compared to autotrophic situation, the strain R-16 can grow well heterotrophically without light and the accumulated total lipid content and biomass reached 43.4% and 3.46 g L-1, respectively. In addition, nitrogen deficiency led to an accumulation of lipid and the total lipid content was as high as 52.6%, and it was worth noting that strain R-16 exhibited strong tolerance to high glucose (up to 100 g L-1) and a wide range of pH (4.0-11.0). Conclusions The newly developed ultrasonic-assisted Nile red method proved to be an efficient isolation procedure and was successfully used in

  3. The oncofusion protein FUS-ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-04-14

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS-ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS-ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS-ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS-ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS-ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  4. HPV16 E2 enhances the expression of NF-κB and STAT3 target genes and potentiates NF-κB activation by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathy, Devan; Vijayalakshmi, Ramprasath; Kanchana, M Padhmanaban; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2014-01-01

    HPV-transformed cells exhibit activation of NF-κB and STAT3 (mediators of inflammation), but very little is known about their regulation under inflammatory conditions before HPV integration. This study reports that cervical tissues with stromal inflammation and intact HPV16 E2 gene show increased expression of target genes of NF-κB and/or STAT3 which can regulate cell survival (cyclin D1, c-Myc, survivin and Bcl2) and inflammatory responses (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and CCR2). Increased expression of RelA, p-IκBα, STAT3, p-STAT3 (Ser727), Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase) and MCM2 in the squamous epithelia of cervices with stromal inflammation supports early activation of NF-κB-STAT3. Furthermore, HPV16 E2 potentiated NF-κB activation induced by inflammatory mediators, IL-1β and SDF-1α, in HEK293 cells. These results reveal a novel role for E2 in regulating the activities of NF-κB and STAT3 that may have implications in carcinogenic progression of HPV16-infected cells under conditions of stromal inflammation. PMID:25460081

  5. The oncofusion protein FUS–ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-01-01

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS–ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS–ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS–ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS–ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS–ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  6. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 – that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein

  7. Effects of nitrogen monoxide and carbon monoxide on molecular and cellular iron metabolism: mirror-image effector molecules that target iron.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ralph N; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R

    2003-01-01

    Many effector functions of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are mediated through their high-affinity for iron (Fe). In this review, the roles of NO and CO are examined in terms of their effects on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in Fe metabolism. Both NO and CO avidly form complexes with a plethora of Fe-containing molecules. The generation of NO and CO is mediated by the nitric oxide synthase and haem oxygenase (HO) families of enzymes respectively. The effects of NO on Fe metabolism have been well characterized, whereas knowledge of the effects of CO remains within its infancy. In terms of the role of NO in Fe metabolism, one of the best characterized interactions includes its effect on the iron regulatory proteins. These molecules are mRNA-binding proteins that control the expression of the transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, molecules that are involved in Fe uptake and storage respectively. Apart from this, activated macrophages impart their cytotoxic activity by generating NO, which results in marked Fe mobilization from tumour-cell targets. This deprives the cell of the Fe that is required for DNA synthesis and energy production. Considering that HO degrades haem, resulting in the release of CO, Fe(II) and biliverdin, it is suggested that a CO-Fe complex will form. This may account for the rapid Fe mobilization observed from macrophages after haemoglobin catabolism. Intriguingly, overexpression of HO results in cellular Fe mobilization, suggesting that CO has a similar effect to NO on Fe trafficking. Preliminary evidence suggests that, like NO, CO plays important roles in Fe metabolism. PMID:12423201

  8. Trends and implications for achieving VISION 2020 human resources for eye health targets in 16 countries of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2020

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of human resources for eye health (HReH) is a major global eye health strategy to reduce the prevalence of avoidable visual impairment by the year 2020. Building on our previous analysis of current progress towards key HReH indicators and cataract surgery rates (CSRs), we predicted future indicator achievement among 16 countries of sub-Saharan Africa by 2020. Methods Surgical and HReH data were collected from national eye care programme coordinators on six practitioner cadres: ophthalmologists, cataract surgeons, ophthalmic clinical officers, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists and ‘mid-level refractionists’ and combined them with publicly available population data to calculate practitioner-to-population ratios and CSRs. Data on workforce entry and exit (2008 to 2010) was used to project practitioner population and CSR growth between 2011 and 2020 in relation to projected growth in the general population. Associations between indicator progress and the presence of a non-physician cataract surgeon cadre were also explored using Wilcoxon rank sum tests and Spearman rank correlations. Results In our 16-country sample, practitioner per million population ratios are predicted to increase slightly for surgeons (ophthalmologists/cataract surgeons, from 3.1 in 2011 to 3.4 in 2020) and ophthalmic nurses/clinical officers (5.8 to 6.8) but remain low for refractionists (including optometrists, at 3.6 in 2011 and 2020). Among countries that have not already achieved target indicators, however, practitioner growth will be insufficient for any additional countries to reach the surgeon and refractionist targets by year 2020. Without further strategy change and investment, even after 2020, surgeon growth is only expected to sufficiently outpace general population growth to reach the target in one country. For nurses, two additional countries will achieve the target while one will fall below it. In 2011, high surgeon practitioner ratios were associated with

  9. Development of a universal microarray based on the ligation detection reaction and 16S rrna gene polymorphism to target diversity of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Bianca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Frosini, Andrea; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Rantala, Anne; Mugnai, Maria Angela; Ventura, Stefano; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Consolandi, Clarissa; Bordoni, Roberta; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes of significant ecological and biotechnological interest, since they strongly contribute to primary production and are a rich source of bioactive compounds. In eutrophic fresh and brackish waters, their mass occurrences (water blooms) are often toxic and constitute a high potential risk for human health. Therefore, rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacterial species in complex environmental samples is important. Here we describe the development and validation of a microarray for the identification of cyanobacteria in aquatic environments. Our approach is based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array. Probes were designed for detecting 19 cyanobacterial groups including Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermopsis, Cylindrospermum, Gloeothece, halotolerants, Leptolyngbya, Palau Lyngbya, Microcystis, Nodularia, Nostoc, Planktothrix, Antarctic Phormidium, Prochlorococcus, Spirulina, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Trichodesmium, and Woronichinia. These groups were identified based on an alignment of over 300 cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences. For validation of the microarrays, 95 samples (24 axenic strains from culture collections, 27 isolated strains, and 44 cloned fragments recovered from environmental samples) were tested. The results demonstrated a high discriminative power and sensitivity to 1 fmol of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Accurate identification of target strains was also achieved with unbalanced mixes of PCR amplicons from different cyanobacteria and an environmental sample. Our universal array method shows great potential for rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacteria. It can be easily adapted to future development and could thus be applied both in research and environmental monitoring. PMID:15574913

  10. SOD2 V16A SNP in the Mitochondrial Targeting Sequence is Associated with Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Chinese Workers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Min; Li, Xu-Dong; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Bin; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ding, Yuan-Lin; Rao, Shao-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) underlie the susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Methods: Audiometric data from 2400 Chinese Han workers who exposed to occupational noise were analyzed. DNA samples were collected from the 10% most susceptible and the 10% most resistant individuals, and five SNPs (SOD2 rs2842980, rs5746136, rs2758331, rs4880 and rs5746092) were genotyped by Taqman SNP Genotyping Kits. The SNP main effects and interactions between noise exposure and SNP were analyzed using logistic regression. Haplotypes were analyzed by using Haploview software. Results: The CT genotype of rs4880 (SOD2 V16A SNP) was associated with a higher risk of NIHL (covariates-adjusted OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.34–3.54, P = 0.002). Haplotype analysis revealed that the frequency of AGCCG at the five SNP loci was significantly higher in the susceptible group (P = 0.020). With AGCTG as the reference, the OR (95% CI) was 2.63 (1.14, 6.06). The rs4880 polymorphisms imposed larger effects when the carriers were exposed to higher levels of noise, indicating the interaction between SNP and noise exposure. Conclusions: Our results suggest that SOD2 V16A SNP in the mitochondrial targeting sequence is associated with noise induced hearing loss in Chinese workers, and this effect was enhanced by higher levels of noise exposure. PMID:20534900

  11. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  12. Single and double electron capture from He by Ar{sup 16+} studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, M.A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H.E.; Kamber, E.Y.; Stoeckli, M.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Single and double electron capture from He targets by Ar{sup 16+} ions have been studied at projectile velocities from 0.3 to 1.5 a.u. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy was used to record the energy gain and scattering angle simultaneously. For single capture, the reaction window is found to spread in width approximately as the square root of the projectile velocity and to shift slightly toward smaller energy-gain values as the velocity increases. The angular distributions center at the half Coulomb angle over most of the velocity range covered, but differ in shape from multichannel Landau-Zener model results. For double capture, transfer ionization dominates and feeds primarily n-symmetric states, where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. True double capture feeds mainly n-asymmetric states. The angular distributions for double capture lie outside the half Coulomb angle, indicating the importance of two-step processes in populating doubly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. The evolution of nitrogen cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    The energetics of nitrogen transformation reactions and the evolution of nitrogen cycling are examined. It is suggested that meteor impact-produced fixed nitrogen could have caused the entire reservoir of the earth's N2 to convert into fixed nitrogen at the end of accretion. The abiotic fixation rate on the early earth by lightning is estimated at about 1-3 X 10 to the 16th molecules of NO/J. It is found that biological nitrogen fixation may have evolved after the development of an aerobic atmosphere. It is shown that HNO could eventually become NO2(-) and NO3(-) after reaching the earth's surface. It is concluded that the evolutionary sequence for the biological transformation of nitrogen compounds is ammonification - denitrification - nitrification - nitrogen fixation.

  14. Targeted expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus type 16 in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits generalized epidermal hyperplasia involving autocrine factors.

    PubMed Central

    Auewarakul, P; Gissmann, L; Cid-Arregui, A

    1994-01-01

    The E6 and E7 early genes of human papillomavirus type 16 have been shown in vitro to play a central role in the transforming capability of this virus. To explore their effects on differentiating epithelial cells in vivo, we used a bovine cytokeratin 10 (K10) promoter to target the expression of E6 and E7 to the suprabasal layers of the epidermis of transgenic mice. In two different lines of mice efficiently expressing the transgene, animals displayed generalized epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis in the skin and the forestomach, both known to be sites of K10 expression. Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed high levels of E6 and E7 transcripts, and in situ hybridizations localized these transcripts to the suprabasal strata of epidermis. In vivo labeling of proliferating cells showed two distinct effects of E6 and E7 expression in the epidermis: (i) an increase in the number of growing cells in the undifferentiated basal layer and (ii) abnormal proliferation of differentiated cells in the suprabasal strata. The expression of c-myc in the skin of transgenics was higher than that in control animals. The induction of c-myc transcription by topical application of tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate was prevented by simultaneous treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 in nontransgenic skin but not in transgenic skin. In addition, transforming growth factor alpha was found to be overexpressed in the suprabasal layers of the transgenic epidermis. These findings suggest that autocrine mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of epidermal hyperplasia. Animals of both lines developed papillomas in skin sites exposed to mechanical irritation and wounding, suggesting that secondary events are necessary for progression to neoplasia. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the tumor promoter activities of human papillomavirus type 16 in epithelial cells in vivo. Images PMID:7969162

  15. New Degenerate Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides-Specific 16S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes Reveal High Bacterial Diversity in River Taff Epilithon

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Louise A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Fry, John C.

    2002-01-01

    River microbial communities play an important role in global nutrient cycles, and aggregated bacteria such as those in epilithic biofilms may be major contributors. In this study the bacterial diversity of River Taff epilithon in South Wales was investigated. A 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone library was constructed and analyzed by partial sequencing of 76 of 347 clones and hybridization with taxon-specific probes. The epilithon was found to be very diverse, with an estimated 59.6% of the bacterial populations not accounted for by these clones. Members of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides division (CFBs) were most abundant in the library, representing 25% of clones, followed by members of the α subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (α-Proteobacteria), γ-Proteobacteria, gram-positive bacteria, Cyanobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, δ-Proteobacteria, and the Prosthecobacter group. This study concentrated on the epilithic CFB populations, and a new set of degenerate 16S rDNA probes was developed to enhance their detection, namely, CFB560, CFB562, and CFB376. The commonly used probe CF319a/b may frequently lead to the underestimation of CFB populations in environmental studies, because it does not fully detect members of the division. CFB560 had exact matches to 95.6% of CFBs listed in the Ribosomal Database Project (release 8.0) small-subunit phylogenetic trees, compared to 60% for CF319a/b. The CFB probes detected 66 of 347 epilithon TAF clones, and 60 of these were partially sequenced. They affiliated with the RDP-designated groups Cytophaga, Sphingobacterium, Lewinella, and Cytophaga aurantiaca. CFB560 and CF319a/b detected 94% (62 of 66) and 48.5% (32 of 66) of clones, respectively, and therefore CFB560 is recommended for future use. Probe design in this study illustrated that multiple degenerate positions can greatly increase target range without adversely effecting specificity or experimental performance. PMID:11772628

  16. Genus-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene for PCR detection of members of the genus Verrucosispora.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingyi; Hong, Kui; Goodfellow, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the genus Verrucosispora though it does contain organisms which produce novel antibiotics. A set of genus-specific oligonucleotide primers was generated to gain an insight into the presence, distribution and taxonomic diversity of members of this genus in diverse samples taken from marine habitats. In silico and pure culture studies showed that the primers matched perfectly with target sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives of the genus Verrucosispora. The primers, designated S-G-Verr-0195-a-S-20 and S-G-Verr-1152-a-A-18, amplified an ≈960 bp stretch of the 16S rRNA genes of Verrucosispora strains but not those of representatives of other genera classified in the family Micromonosporaceae. Genus-specific amplicons were detected from 17 out of 20 community DNA samples prepared from diverse marine sediments and coastal soils. Phylogenetic analysis of over 40% of clones derived from five of the samples indicated they belonged to novel Verrucosispora species. The primers were also used to confirm the identity of Verrucosispora-like strains isolated from two of the environmental samples. The primers can be used to facilitate the isolation of novel Verrucosispora strains by allowing prescreening of environmental samples and the subsequent identification of verrucosisporae on selective isolation plates. For this purpose, a novel medium facilitating the recovery of Verrucosispora strains was formulated and used to recover novel isolates validated using the novel PCR primers. This medium may be useful as the basis for development of a selective medium. PMID:21374042

  17. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  18. Whole-Cell versus Total RNA Extraction for Analysis of Microbial Community Structure with 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes in Salt Marsh Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Frischer, Marc E.; Danforth, Jean M.; Healy, Michele A. Newton; Saunders, F. Michael

    2000-01-01

    rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes have become powerful tools for describing microbial communities, but their use in sediments remains difficult. Here we describe a simple technique involving homogenization, detergents, and dispersants that allows the quantitative extraction of cells from formalin-preserved salt marsh sediments. Resulting cell extracts are amenable to membrane blotting and hybridization protocols. Using this procedure, the efficiency of cell extraction was high (95.7% ± 3.7% [mean ± standard deviation]) relative to direct DAPI (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole) epifluorescence cell counts for a variety of salt marsh sediments. To test the hypothesis that cells were extracted without phylogenetic bias, the relative abundance (depth distribution) of five major divisions of the gram-negative mesophilic sulfate-reducing delta proteobacteria were determined in sediments maintained in a tidal mesocosm system. A suite of six 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were utilized. The apparent structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria communities determined from whole-cell and RNA extracts were consistent with each other (r2 = 0.60), indicating that the whole-cell extraction and RNA extraction hybridization approaches for describing sediment microbial communities are equally robust. However, the variability associated with both methods was high and appeared to be a result of the natural heterogeneity of sediment microbial communities and methodological artifacts. The relative distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria was similar to that observed in natural marsh systems, providing preliminary evidence that the mesocosm systems accurately simulate native marsh systems. PMID:10877803

  19. Comparison of Gull Feces-Specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Griffith, John F.; Khan, Izhar U. H.; Hill, Stephen; Edge, Thomas A.; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Gonzalez-Nieves, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Two novel gull-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR green assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (gull3) and a hydrolysis TaqMan assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (gull4). The objectives of this study were to compare the host specificity of a previous C. marimammalium qPCR assay (gull2) with that of the new markers and to examine the presence of the three gull markers in environmental water samples from different geographic locations. Most of the gull fecal samples tested (n = 255) generated positive signals with the gull2 and gull4 assays (i.e., >86%), whereas only 28% were positive with gull3. Low prevalence and abundance of tested gull markers (0.6 to 15%) were observed in fecal samples from six nonavian species (n = 180 fecal samples), whereas the assays cross-reacted to some extent (13 to 31%) with other (nongull) avian fecal samples. The gull3 assay was positive against fecal samples from 11 of 15 avian species, including gull. Of the presumed gull-impacted water samples (n = 349), 86%, 59%, and 91% were positive with the gull2, the gull3, and the gull4 assays, respectively. Approximately 5% of 239 non-gull-impacted water samples were positive with the gull2 and the gull4 assays, whereas 21% were positive witg the gull3 assay. While the relatively high occurrence of gull2 and gull4 markers in waters impacted by gull feces suggests that these assays could be used in environmental monitoring studies, the data also suggest that multiple avian-specific assays will be needed to accurately assess the contribution of different avian sources in recreational waters. PMID:22226950

  20. Comparison of gull feces-specific assays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Griffith, John F; Khan, Izhar U H; Hill, Stephen; Edge, Thomas A; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Gonzalez-Nieves, Joel; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    Two novel gull-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR green assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (gull3) and a hydrolysis TaqMan assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (gull4). The objectives of this study were to compare the host specificity of a previous C. marimammalium qPCR assay (gull2) with that of the new markers and to examine the presence of the three gull markers in environmental water samples from different geographic locations. Most of the gull fecal samples tested (n = 255) generated positive signals with the gull2 and gull4 assays (i.e., >86%), whereas only 28% were positive with gull3. Low prevalence and abundance of tested gull markers (0.6 to 15%) were observed in fecal samples from six nonavian species (n = 180 fecal samples), whereas the assays cross-reacted to some extent (13 to 31%) with other (nongull) avian fecal samples. The gull3 assay was positive against fecal samples from 11 of 15 avian species, including gull. Of the presumed gull-impacted water samples (n = 349), 86%, 59%, and 91% were positive with the gull2, the gull3, and the gull4 assays, respectively. Approximately 5% of 239 non-gull-impacted water samples were positive with the gull2 and the gull4 assays, whereas 21% were positive witg the gull3 assay. While the relatively high occurrence of gull2 and gull4 markers in waters impacted by gull feces suggests that these assays could be used in environmental monitoring studies, the data also suggest that multiple avian-specific assays will be needed to accurately assess the contribution of different avian sources in recreational waters. PMID:22226950

  1. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission shall not compensate advisory...

  2. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  3. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  4. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  5. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  6. 40 CFR 185.4400 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    1999-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 1999-07-01 1999-07-01 false Nitrogen. 185.4400 Section 185.4400... PESTICIDES IN FOOD Food Additives Permitted in Food for Human Consumption § 185.4400 Nitrogen. The food additive nitrogen may be safely used after harvest in modified atmospheres for stored product...

  7. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera. PMID:9097423

  8. Influence of DNA extraction method, 16S rRNA targeted hypervariable regions, and sample origin on microbial diversity detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine chemosynthetic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2014-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  9. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  10. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  11. Targeted enhancement of glutamate-to-γ-aminobutyrate conversion in Arabidopsis seeds affects carbon-nitrogen balance and storage reserves in a development-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-11-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca(2+)-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation. PMID:21921115

  12. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Norris, D A; Cooper, D M; Mills, G; Steinnes, E; Kubin, E; Thöni, L; Aboal, J R; Alber, R; Carballeira, A; Coşkun, M; De Temmerman, L; Frolova, M; González-Miqueo, L; Jeran, Z; Leblond, S; Liiv, S; Maňkovská, B; Pesch, R; Poikolainen, J; Rühling, A; Santamaria, J M; Simonèiè, P; Schröder, W; Suchara, I; Yurukova, L; Zechmeister, H G

    2011-10-01

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations (≥ 1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km × 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r(2) = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. PMID:21620544

  13. MicroRNA-16 is putatively involved in the NF-κB pathway regulation in ulcerative colitis through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) mRNA targeting

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Xiao; Ye, Shicai; Wang, Hao; Wu, Weiyun; Tan, Wenkai; Yu, Caiyuan; Hu, Juxiang; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Zonghao; Pei, Xinyu; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by targeting the 3′-untranslated region of their target genes. Altered expression of miR-16 is reported in human ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Adenosine through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) could inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in inflammation. Here we identified overexpression of miR-16 and down-regulation of A2aAR in the colonic mucosa of active UC patients. We demonstrated that miR-16 negatively regulated the expression of the A2aAR at the post-transcriptional level. Furthermore, transfection of miR-16 mimics promoted nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 protein and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-8 in colonic epithelial cells. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor could reverse these effects in cells. The A2aAR-mediated effects of miR-16 on the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway were confirmed by the A2aAR knockdown assay. Our results suggest that miR-16 regulated the immune and inflammatory responses, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of the A2aAR to control the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27476546

  14. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  15. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  16. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  17. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  18. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  19. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  20. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  1. Direct Screening of Blood by PCR and Pyrosequencing for a 16S rRNA Gene Target from Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit Patients Being Evaluated for Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M. S.; McCarroll, M. G.; McCann, C. D.; May, L.; Younes, N.

    2015-01-01

    Here we compared the results of PCR/pyrosequencing to those of culture for detecting bacteria directly from blood. DNA was extracted from 1,130 blood samples from 913 patients suspected of bacteremia (enrollment criteria were physician-ordered blood culture and complete blood count [CBC]), and 102 controls (healthy blood donors). Real-time PCR assays for beta-globin and Universal 16S rRNA gene targets were performed on all 1,232 extracts. Specimens identified by Universal 16S rRNA gene PCR/pyrosequencing as containing staphylococci, streptococci, or enteric Gram-negative rods had target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing performed. Amplifiable beta-globin (melting temperature [Tm], 87.2°C ± 0.2°C) occurred in 99.1% (1,120/1,130) of patient extracts and 100% (102/102) of controls. Concordance between PCR/pyrosequencing and culture was 96.9% (1,085/1,120) for Universal 16S rRNA gene targets, with positivity rates of 9.4% (105/1,120) and 11.3% (126/1,120), respectively. Bacteria cultured included staphylococci (59/126, 46.8%), Gram-negative rods (34/126, 27%), streptococci (32/126, 25.4%), and a Gram-positive rod (1/126, 0.8%). All controls screened negative by PCR/pyrosequencing. Clinical performance characteristics (95% confidence interval [CI]) for Universal 16S rRNA gene PCR/pyrosequencing included sensitivity of 77.8% (69.5 to 84.7), specificity of 99.3% (98.6 to 99.7), positive predictive value (PPV) of 93.3% (86.8 to 97.3), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.2% (96.0 to 98.2). Bacteria were accurately identified in 77.8% (98/126) of culture-confirmed sepsis samples with Universal 16S PCR/pyrosequencing and in 76.4% (96/126) with follow-up target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing. The initial PCR/pyrosequencing took ∼5.5 h to complete or ∼7.5 h when including target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing compared to 27.9 ± 13.6 h for Gram stain or 81.6 ± 24.0 h for phenotypic identification. In summary, this molecular approach detected the causative bacteria in over

  2. T-box binding protein type two (TBX2) is an immediate early gene target in retinoic-acid-treated B16 murine melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2004-05-01

    Retinoic acid induces growth arrest and differentiation in B16 mouse melanoma cells. Using gene arrays, we identified several early response genes whose expression is altered by retinoic acid. One of the genes, tbx2, is a member of T-box nuclear binding proteins that are important morphogens in developing embryos. Increased TBX2 mRNA is seen within 2 h after addition of retinoic acid to B16 cells. The effect of retinoic acid on gene expression is direct since it does not require any new protein synthesis. We identified a degenerate retinoic acid response element (RARE) between -186 and -163 in the promoter region of the tbx2 gene. A synthetic oligonucleotide spanning this region was able to drive increased expression of a luciferase reporter gene in response to retinoic acid; however, this induction was lost when a point mutation was introduced into the RARE. This oligonucleotide also specifically bound RAR in nuclear extracts from B16 cells. TBX2 expression and its induction by retinoic acid was also observed in normal human and nonmalignant mouse melanocytes. PMID:15093729

  3. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia. PMID:26111599

  4. Characterisation of caecum and crop microbiota of Indian indigenous chicken targeting multiple hypervariable regions within 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Saxena, V K; Tomar, S; Sapcota, D; Gonmei, G

    2016-06-01

    A comparative analysis of caecum and crop microbiota of chick, grower and adult stages of Indian indigenous chickens was conducted to investigate the role of the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract, which play an important role in host performance, health and immunity. High-throughput Illumina sequencing was performed for V3, V4 and V4-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. M5RNA and M5NR databases under MG-RAST were used for metagenomic datasets annotation. In the crop, Firmicutes (~78%) and Proteobacteria (~16%) were the predominant phyla whereas in the caecum, Firmicutes (~50%), Bacteroidetes (~29%) and Actinobacteria (~10%) were predominant. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index suggested that sample richness and diversity increased as the chicken aged. For the first time, the presence of Lactobacillus species such as L. frumenti, L. antri, L. mucosae in the chicken crop along with Kineococcus radiotolerans, Desulfohalobium retbaense and L. jensenii in the caecum are reported. Many of these bacterial species have been found to be involved in immune response modulation and disease prevention in pigs and humans. The gut microbiome of the indigenous chicken was enriched with microbes having probiotic potential which might be essential for their adaptability. PMID:26962896

  5. A pixel unit-cell targeting 16 ns resolution and radiation hardness in a column read-out particle vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.; Millaud, J.; Nygren, D.

    1992-10-01

    A pixel unit cell (PUC) circuit architecture, optimized for a column read out architecture, is reported. Each PUC contains an integrator, active filter, comparator, and optional analog store. The time-over-threshold (TOT) discriminator allows an all-digital interface to the array periphery readout while passing an analog measure of collected charge. Use of (existing) radiation hard processes, to build a detector bump-bonded to a pixel readout array, is targeted. Here, emphasis is on a qualitative explanation of how the unique circuit implementation benefits operation for Super Collider (SSC) detector application.

  6. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  7. miR-2861 acts as a tumor suppressor via targeting EGFR/AKT2/CCND1 pathway in cervical cancer induced by human papillomavirus virus 16 E6

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junfen; Wan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xiaojing; Fang, Yifeng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Xie, Xing; Lu, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus viruses (HPVs) is a casual factor for cervical cancer and its precursors, and the abnormal constitutive expression of viral oncoprotein E6 is a key event during the malignant transformation. Here, we performed miRNA microarray to identify changes of miRNAs following ectopic HPV16 E6 overexpression in HEK293T cells and found miR-2861 was greatly decreased in both HEK293T and HaCaT cells expressing HPV16 E6 compared to vector control. Further, we demonstrated a biological link among HPV16 E6, miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. We showed that miR-2861 was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and negatively correlated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of miR-2861 suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion and enhanced apoptosis. Subsequent investigation revealed that EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 were all the direct targets of miR-2861. Importantly, silencing EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 recapitulated the cellular effects seen upon miR-2861 overexpression. Restoration of EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 counteracted the effects of miR-2861 expression. Thus, we identified a new pathway employing miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 that may mediate HPV16 E6 induced initiation and progression of cervical cancer. PMID:27364926

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Lymphocytes Transduced with a Human CD16 or with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Reveals Potential Off-Target Interactions due to the IgG2 CH2-CH3 CAR-Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Clémenceau, Béatrice; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Jallas, Anne-Catherine; Vivien, Régine; Rousseau, Raphaël; Marabelle, Aurélien; Caux, Christophe; Vié, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to compare two mechanisms of cellular recognition based on Ab specificity: firstly, when the anti-HER2 mAb trastuzumab bridges target cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a Fc receptor (ADCC) and, secondly, when HER2 positive target cells are directly recognized by cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). To compare these two mechanisms, we used the same cellular effector (NK-92) and the same signaling domain (FcεRIγ). The NK-92 cytotoxic cell line was transfected with either a FcγRIIIa-FcεRIγ (NK-92CD16) or a trastuzumab-based scFv-FcεRIγ chimeric receptor (NK-92CAR). In vitro, the cytotoxic activity against HER2 positive target cells after indirect recognition by NK-92CD16 was always inferior to that observed after direct recognition by NK-92CAR. In contrast, and somehow unexpectedly, in vivo, adoptive transfer of NK-92CD16 + trastuzumab but not of NK-92CAR induced tumor regression. Analysis of the in vivo xenogeneic system suggested that the human CH2-CH3 IgG2 used as a spacer in our construct was able to interact with the FcR present at the cell surface of the few NSG-FcR+ remaining immune cells. This interaction, leading to blockage of the NK-92CAR in the periphery of the engrafted tumor cells, stresses the critical role of the composition of the spacer domain. PMID:26665156

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Lymphocytes Transduced with a Human CD16 or with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Reveals Potential Off-Target Interactions due to the IgG2 CH2-CH3 CAR-Spacer.

    PubMed

    Clémenceau, Béatrice; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Jallas, Anne-Catherine; Vivien, Régine; Rousseau, Raphaël; Marabelle, Aurélien; Caux, Christophe; Vié, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to compare two mechanisms of cellular recognition based on Ab specificity: firstly, when the anti-HER2 mAb trastuzumab bridges target cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a Fc receptor (ADCC) and, secondly, when HER2 positive target cells are directly recognized by cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). To compare these two mechanisms, we used the same cellular effector (NK-92) and the same signaling domain (FcεRIγ). The NK-92 cytotoxic cell line was transfected with either a FcγRIIIa-FcεRIγ (NK-92(CD16)) or a trastuzumab-based scFv-FcεRIγ chimeric receptor (NK-92(CAR)). In vitro, the cytotoxic activity against HER2 positive target cells after indirect recognition by NK-92(CD16) was always inferior to that observed after direct recognition by NK-92(CAR). In contrast, and somehow unexpectedly, in vivo, adoptive transfer of NK-92(CD16) + trastuzumab but not of NK-92(CAR) induced tumor regression. Analysis of the in vivo xenogeneic system suggested that the human CH2-CH3 IgG2 used as a spacer in our construct was able to interact with the FcR present at the cell surface of the few NSG-FcR+ remaining immune cells. This interaction, leading to blockage of the NK-92(CAR) in the periphery of the engrafted tumor cells, stresses the critical role of the composition of the spacer domain. PMID:26665156

  10. Stopping powers of MeV-energy ions 7LI, 12C, 16O and 28Si in some common target materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. K.; Sun, H. L.; Yu, Y. C.; Wang, C. W.; Liu, T. Y.; Chiou, J. W.; Lee, C. S.

    1997-02-01

    Stopping powers for 0.4-8.5 MeV 7Li-ions, 0.4-10 MeV 12C-ions, 0.3-14 MeV 16O-ions and 0.5-11.5 MeV 28Si ions in four commonly used materials (Al, Cu, Ag and Au) have been determined by using the backscattering method. Elastic backscattering spectra were measured at a laboratory detection angle 170° using a passivated implanted planar Si (PIPS) detector. Energy dependence of stopping powers were obtained and compared to the semiempirical model (TRIM-91 and SRIM-96) predictions. The SRIM-96 calculations generally reproduce the experimental data more closely and lead to a significant improvement of the agreement of the 7Li data when compared to TRIM-91.

  11. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications. PMID:26450835

  12. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  13. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  14. Development and application of 16S rRNA-targeted probes for detection of iron- and manganese-oxidizing sheathed bacteria in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes from several Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus strains led to the design of an oligonucleotide probe (PS-1) based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 1 specific for four Leptothrix strains and for one of the four Sphaerotilus natans strains examined. Another probe (PSP-6) was based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 2. PSP-6 was specific for one of the two evolutionary lineages previously described for Leptothrix spp. (P. L. Siering and W. C. Ghiorse, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 46:173-182, 1996). Fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probes were synthesized, and their specificity for fluorescence in situ hybridization identification was confirmed by a laser scanning microscopy technique (W. C. Ghiorse, D. N. Miller, R. L. Sandoli, and P. L. Siering, Microsc. Res. Tech. 33:73-86, 1996) to compare whole-cell hybridizations of closely related bacteria. Probe specificity was also tested in dot blot against total RNA isolated from four Leptothrix strains, four Sphaerotilus strains, and 15 other members of the class Proteobacteria. When the probes were tested on samples from the Sapsucker Woods wetland habitat where Leptothrix spp. are thought to play a role in manganese and iron oxidation, positive signals were obtained from several sheathed filamentous bacteria including some that were morphologically similar to previously isolated strains of "Leptothrix discophora." Other unknown filamentous sheathed bacteria also gave strong positive signals. This work provides a foundation for future studies correlating the presence of members of the Leptothrix-Sphaerotilus group of sheathed bacteria with manganese and iron oxidation activity in habitats where biological iron and manganese oxidation are important environmental processes. PMID:9023942

  15. Development and application of 16S rRNA-targeted probes for detection of iron- and manganese-oxidizing sheathed bacteria in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-02-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes from several Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus strains led to the design of an oligonucleotide probe (PS-1) based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 1 specific for four Leptothrix strains and for one of the four Sphaerotilus natans strains examined. Another probe (PSP-6) was based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 2. PSP-6 was specific for one of the two evolutionary lineages previously described for Leptothrix spp. (P. L. Siering and W. C. Ghiorse, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 46:173-182, 1996). Fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probes were synthesized, and their specificity for fluorescence in situ hybridization identification was confirmed by a laser scanning microscopy technique (W. C. Ghiorse, D. N. Miller, R. L. Sandoli, and P. L. Siering, Microsc. Res. Tech. 33:73-86, 1996) to compare whole-cell hybridizations of closely related bacteria. Probe specificity was also tested in dot blot against total RNA isolated from four Leptothrix strains, four Sphaerotilus strains, and 15 other members of the class Proteobacteria. When the probes were tested on samples from the Sapsucker Woods wetland habitat where Leptothrix spp. are thought to play a role in manganese and iron oxidation, positive signals were obtained from several sheathed filamentous bacteria including some that were morphologically similar to previously isolated strains of "Leptothrix discophora." Other unknown filamentous sheathed bacteria also gave strong positive signals. This work provides a foundation for future studies correlating the presence of members of the Leptothrix-Sphaerotilus group of sheathed bacteria with manganese and iron oxidation activity in habitats where biological iron and manganese oxidation are important environmental processes. PMID:9023942

  16. Evaluation of the effects of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on newborn intestinal microbiota using a sequencing approach targeted to multi hypervariable 16S rDNA regions.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Irene; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Luiselli, Donata; De Filippo, Carlotta; Albanese, Davide; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Di Gioia, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Different factors are known to influence the early gut colonization in newborns, among them the perinatal use of antibiotics. On the other hand, the effect on the baby of the administration of antibiotics to the mother during labor, referred to as intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP), has received less attention, although routinely used in group B Streptococcus positive women to prevent the infection in newborns. In this work, the fecal microbiota of neonates born to mothers receiving IAP and of control subjects were compared taking advantage for the first time of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. Seven different 16S rDNA hypervariable regions (V2, V3, V4, V6 + V7, V8, and V9) were amplified and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The results obtained showed significant differences in the microbial composition of newborns born to mothers who had received IAP, with a lower abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as an overrepresentation of Proteobacteria. Considering that the seven hypervariable regions showed different discriminant ability in the taxonomic identification, further analyses were performed on the V4 region evidencing in IAP infants a reduced microbial richness and biodiversity, as well as a lower number of bacterial families with a predominance of Enterobacteriaceae members. In addition, this analysis pointed out a significant reduction in Bifidobacterium spp. strains. The reduced abundance of these beneficial microorganisms, together with the increased amount of potentially pathogenic bacteria, may suggest that IAP infants are more exposed to gastrointestinal or generally health disorders later in age. PMID:26971496

  17. miR-29c-3p promotes senescence of human mesenchymal stem cells by targeting CNOT6 through p53-p21 and p16-pRB pathways.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Li, Jie; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important seed cells for tissue engineering and are promising targets for cell-based therapies. However, the replicative senescence of MSCs during in vitro culture limits their research and clinical applications. The molecular mechanisms underlying the replicative senescence of MSCs are not fully understood. Evidence suggests that miRNAs play important roles in replicative senescence. A microarray analysis found that the miR-29c-3p level was significantly increased during the MSC senescence process. In our study, we investigated the roles of miR-29c-3p in senescence of MSCs. We cultured MSCs for long periods of time, up and down-regulated the miR-29c-3p expression in MSCs, and examined the senescent phenotype changes. The over-expression of miR-29c-3p led to enhanced senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP), senescence associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF), reduced proliferation ability, retarded osteogenic differentiation and corresponding changes in senescence markers, whereas the miR-29c-3p down-regulation had the opposite results. Dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that CNOT6 is the target gene of miR-29c-3p. Knockdown of CNOT6 confirmed its inhibitory effects on the senescence of MSCs. In addition, Western blot results showed that both the p53-p21 and the p16-pRB pathways were activated during the miR-29c-3p-induced senescence of MSCs. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that miR-29c-3p promotes the senescence of MSCs by targeting CNOT6 through p53-p21 and p16-pRB pathways and highlight the contribution of post-transcriptional regulation to stem cell senescence. PMID:26792405

  18. DFRC F-16 fleet 1995 - F-16A, F-16XL, AFTI F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Photographed outside their hangar at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, part of Dryden's F-16 fleet is, left to right; an F-16A, the F-16XL no. 1, and the F-16 AFTI. The F-16A (NASA 516), the only civil registered F-16 in existence, was transferred to Dryden from Langley, and is primarily used in engine tests and for parts. Although it is flight-worthy, it is not currently flown at Dryden. The single-seat F-16XL no. 1 (NASA 849) was most recently used in the Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP) to test boundary layer pressures and distribution. Previously it had been used in a program to investigate the characteristics of sonic booms for NASA's High Speed Research Program. Data from the program will be used in the development of a high speed civilian transport. During the series of sonic boom research flights, the F-16XL was used to probe the shock waves being generated by a NASA SR-71 and record their shape and intensity. The Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16 was used to develop and demonstrate technologies to improve navigation and a pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. Earlier research in the joint NASA-Air Force AFTI F-16 program demonstrated voice actuated controls, helmet-mounted sighting and integration of forward-mounted canards with the standard flight control system to achieve uncoupled flight.

  19. Thermal stability of partially ordered Fe16N2 film on non-magnetic Ag under layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Yang, Meiyin; Jiang, Yanfeng; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Partially ordered Fe16N2 thin film with (001) texture is successfully grown on a Ag under layer using a facing target sputtering system. Fe16N2 phase is formed after post-annealing, which is detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). High saturation magnetization (Ms) of Fe16N2 thin films is observed by vibrating sample magnetometry. It is found that Fe16N2 phase can be stable up to 225 °C, which is demonstrated by the Fe16N2 finger print peak (002) in XRD. After heating to 250 °C, the Fe16N2 phase decomposes, which leads to low Ms and soft magnetic behavior. To further study Fe16N2 decomposition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is performed to detect the binding energy of nitrogen atoms. Differences of binding energy corresponding to before and after heat treatment show the variation of nitrogen atom in electronic state with surrounding Fe atoms, indicating nitrogen atomic migration during heat treatment.

  20. Nitrogen Supply Uses Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine dissociated and residual gas removed to produce almost pure nitrogen. Nitrogen-generation module catalytically dissociates liquid hydrazine then dissociates and separates product gases to yield almost pure nitrogen.

  1. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Searchinger, Timothy D; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them. PMID:26595273

  2. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Searchinger, Timothy D.; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  3. A tradeoff frontier for global nitrogen use and cereal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Nathaniel D.; West, Paul C.; Gerber, James S.; MacDonald, Graham K.; Polasky, Stephen; Foley, Jonathan A.

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer use across the world’s croplands enables high-yielding agricultural production, but does so at considerable environmental cost. Imbalances between nitrogen applied and nitrogen used by crops contributes to excess nitrogen in the environment, with negative consequences for water quality, air quality, and climate change. Here we utilize crop input-yield models to investigate how to minimize nitrogen application while achieving crop production targets. We construct a tradeoff frontier that estimates the minimum nitrogen fertilizer needed to produce a range of maize, wheat, and rice production levels. Additionally, we explore potential environmental consequences by calculating excess nitrogen along the frontier using a soil surface nitrogen balance model. We find considerable opportunity to achieve greater production and decrease both nitrogen application and post-harvest excess nitrogen. Our results suggest that current (circa 2000) levels of cereal production could be achieved with ˜50% less nitrogen application and ˜60% less excess nitrogen. If current global nitrogen application were held constant but spatially redistributed, production could increase ˜30%. If current excess nitrogen were held constant, production could increase ˜40%. Efficient spatial patterns of nitrogen use on the frontier involve substantial reductions in many high-use areas and moderate increases in many low-use areas. Such changes may be difficult to achieve in practice due to infrastructure, economic, or political constraints. Increases in agronomic efficiency would expand the frontier to allow greater production and environmental gains.

  4. MicroRNA-27b up-regulated by human papillomavirus 16 E7 promotes proliferation and suppresses apoptosis by targeting polo-like kinase2 in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Mao, Xinru; Huang, Jinlan; Wu, Zixian; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The infection with high-risk human papillomavirus is linked to cervical cancer, nevertheless, the role of miRNAs regulated by HPV oncogenes in cancer progression remain largely unknown. Here, we knocked down endogenous E6/E7 in HPV16-positive CaSki cell lines, screened differences in miRNA expression profile with control using miRNA array. 38 miRNAs were down-regulated and 6 miRNAs were up-regulated in the E6/E7 silenced CaSki cells (>2-fold changes with P <0.05). The levels of miR-27b, miR-20a, miR-24, miR-93, and miR-106b were verified by qPCR in E6/E7 silenced CaSki and SiHa cells. MiR-27b, up-regulated by E7, promoted CaSki and SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, inhibit paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Dual-luciferase experiment confirmed miR-27b down-regulated its target gene PLK2 through the “seed regions”. The tumor suppressor PLK2 inhibited SiHa cell proliferation, reduced cell viability, and promoted paclitaxel/cisplatin -induced apoptosis. Furthermore, DGCR8 was found to mediate the up-regulation of miR-27b by HPV16 E7. Our study demonstrated that HPV16 E7 could increase DGCR8 to promote the generation of miR-27b, which accelerated cell proliferation and inhibited paclitaxel-induced cell apoptosis through down-regulating PLK2. These findings provide an insight into the interaction network of viral oncogene, miR-27b and PLK2, and support the potential strategies using antisense nucleic acid of miR-27b for therapy of cervical cancer in the future. PMID:26910911

  5. Study of 232Th(n, γ) and 232Th(n,f) reaction rates in a graphite moderated spallation neutron field produced by 1.6 GeV deuterons on lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asquith, N. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Westmeier, W.; Zhuk, I.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Adam, J.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma-3 assembly of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum of a thermal Accelerator Driven System (ADS). It consists of a lead spallation target surrounded by reactor grade graphite. The target was irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron accelerator and the neutron capture and fission rate of 232Th in several locations within the assembly were experimentally measured. 232Th is a proposed fuel for envisaged Accelerator Driven Systems and these two reactions are fundamental to the performance and feasibility of 232Th in an ADS. The irradiation of the Gamma-3 assembly was also simulated using MCNPX 2.7 with the INCL4 intra-nuclear cascade and ABLA fission/evaporation models. Good agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated reaction rates was found. This serves as a good validation for the computational models and cross section data used to simulate neutron production and transport of spallation neutrons within a thermal ADS.

  6. Breakup of the projectile in [sup 16]O-induced reactions on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets around 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S. ); Riggi, F. Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania )

    1993-08-01

    The spatial correlation among the four He ions coming from the disassembly of the [sup 16]O projectile on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets has been studied at 94 MeV/nucleon. Charged particles have been detected by a multielement array of plastic scintillators covering the angular domain between 3[degree] and 150[degree]. Standard relativistic kinematics has been used to reconstruct the excitation energy of the primary projectilelike nucleus ([ital E][sub PLN][sup *]). Mean values of this quantity are found independent of the target mass and the comparison with existing similar data taken at lower bombarding energies shows a saturation of [ital E][sub PLN][sup *] around 3 MeV/nucleon. An event-by-event analysis has been performed in order to study the distributions of some global variables such as coplanarity, sphericity, and relative angle, helpful in the understanding of the topological characteristics of the process and in the evaluation of its time scale. Experimental data have also been compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations based on different reaction mechanisms and it is possible to conclude that sequential emission of the fragments is preferred.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES, AQUAPOINT, INC. BIOCLERE MODEL 16/12 - 02/02/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Aquapoint, Inc. (AQP) BioclereTM Model 16/12 was conducted over a thirteen month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC), located at Otis Air National Guard Base in Bourne, Massachusetts. Sanitary sewerage from the ba...

  8. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. Methods: The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, ''virtual positron emitter nuclei'' was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data

  9. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells.

  10. The influence of atomic nitrogen flux on the composition of carbon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Merel, P.; Chaker, M.; Tabbal, M.; Moisan, M.

    1997-12-01

    Carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films have been deposited using a hybrid system combining pulsed laser deposition of graphite with the surface-wave discharge atomic nitrogen source (3{percent} N{sub 2} in Ar). Using this system, an experiment is designed to study the influence of the atomic nitrogen flux on the composition of the CN{sub x} thin films at various laser intensities. The nitrogen percentage in the thin films is positively correlated with the N atom flux impinging on the substrate surface but it is counter-productive to use excessively high values of laser intensities on the graphite target. For a laser intensity of 6{times}10{sup 8}W/cm{sup 2}, the nitrogen percentage increases with the N atom flux and saturates at only about 16 at.{percent}. On the other hand, a maximum nitrogen percentage of 30 at.{percent} is obtained at the much lower laser intensity of 5{times}10{sup 7}W/cm{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. PMID:25661171

  12. Determination of the partial benzodiazepine receptor agonist Ro 16-6028 in plasma by capillary gas chromatography with nitrogen-selective detection after conversion into the ethyl ester derivative.

    PubMed

    Timm, U; Fischer, G; Zell, M; Zumbrunnen, R

    1989-09-29

    A highly sensitive capillary gas chromatographic method was developed to determine plasma levels of a novel partial benzodiazepine receptor agonist in man following the very low therapeutic doses required for anxiolysis. The compound was isolated from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction at basic pH, converted into the ethyl ester analogue by a two-step procedure, separated from plasma constituents by capillary gas chromatography and quantified by means of nitrogen-selective detection. Because of the thermolabile tert.-butyl ester function, the agonist could not be gas chromatographed without degradation. Formation of the far more stable ethyl ester analogue was achieved by treatment with hydrogen chloride in ethanol, followed by an ethylation step with diazoethane. The high sensitivity of the new method (about 100 pg/ml, using 1-ml plasma specimens) allowed the monitoring of plasma levels of the agonist for up to 8 h (about three elimination half-lives) after a single 0.1-mg oral dose to human volunteers. The practicability of the procedure was demonstrated by the analysis of more than 600 plasma samples from clinical studies performed with human volunteers. PMID:2573608

  13. Excitation of atomic nitrogen by electron impact.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of the absolute cross sections for the excitation of a number of N I multiplets by electron impact on atomic nitrogen. Two of these cross sections - 1134 and 1200 A - are found to be large, reaching 2.0 x 10 to the minus 16th and 2.5 x 10 to the minus 16th sq cm at their peaks, respectively. The presence of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the discharged gas is confirmed, and its effect on the measurements is discussed. The ratio of the oscillator strengths of the 1200- and 1134-A resonance transitions is measured to be 2.6 plus or minus 0.3.

  14. Woody encroachment by nitrogen-fixing species: impacts on nitrogen biogeochemistry expressed through nitrogen trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, J. P.; West, J. B.; Boutton, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally important vegetation change that continues to transform former grasslands or savannas into woodlands. This dramatic and geographically widespread phenomenon appears to be driven primarily by human land use changes, including reduced fire frequency and heavy livestock grazing. Observed effects of increased woody plant abundance in grasslands generally include alterations of above- and belowground productivity, changes in the chemistry of litter inputs, modifications to rooting depths and distributions, altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes, and changes in microclimate and energy balance. These changes to fundamental ecosystem characteristics have strong, but relatively poorly understood, potential to modify biogeochemical processes that can themselves influence regional and global climate through biogeochemistry-climate feedbacks. In addition, in South Texas woody encroachment has occurred across a complex landscape differing in soil type and water retention. This work tests the hypothesis that woody encroachment, in addition to increasing total nitrogen stocks in the system, has increased nitrogen losses due to increased rates of nitrogen soil gas efflux. Under dry soil conditions and in contrast to this hypothesis, reactive nitrogen soil efflux (NO + NOy + NH3) was 21.53 ± 3.4 ng N m-2 s-1 in intact grasslands compared to 6.23 ± 1.6 ng N m-2 s-1 in woodlands on the same soil type. The non-reactive nitrogen gas, nitrous oxide, was similar in magnitude between the grassland and encroached sites (~ 7 ng N m-2 s-1). Under moist soil conditions, the magnitude of flux increased and order of magnitude, but did not change the relative ranking. Measurements of soil respiration rate and microbial biomass suggest higher microbial activity in the encroached environment and potentially higher rates of immobilization by plants and microbes. Landscape position had a large overall effect on soil nitrogen trace gas efflux with

  15. Thermal stability of partially ordered Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} film on non-magnetic Ag under layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Meiyin; Jiang, Yanfeng; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2014-05-07

    Partially ordered Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} thin film with (001) texture is successfully grown on a Ag under layer using a facing target sputtering system. Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase is formed after post-annealing, which is detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). High saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} thin films is observed by vibrating sample magnetometry. It is found that Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase can be stable up to 225 °C, which is demonstrated by the Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} finger print peak (002) in XRD. After heating to 250 °C, the Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase decomposes, which leads to low M{sub s} and soft magnetic behavior. To further study Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} decomposition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is performed to detect the binding energy of nitrogen atoms. Differences of binding energy corresponding to before and after heat treatment show the variation of nitrogen atom in electronic state with surrounding Fe atoms, indicating nitrogen atomic migration during heat treatment.

  16. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  17. Nitrogen segregation in nanocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Erbahar, D; Wagner, Ph; Rocquefelte, X; Arenal, R; Pochet, P; Rayson, M; Scardamaglia, M; Bittencourt, C; Briddon, P

    2014-01-01

    We explore the behaviour of nitrogen doping in carbon nanomaterials, notably graphene, nanotubes, and carbon thin films. This is initially via a brief review of the literature, followed by a series of atomistic density functional calculations. We show that at low concentrations, substitutional nitrogen doping in the sp(2)-C graphenic basal plane is favoured, however once the nitrogen concentration reaches a critical threshold there is a transition towards the formation of the more thermodynamically-favoured nitrogen terminated 'zigzag' type edges. These can occur either via formation of finite patches (polycyclic aromatic azacarbons), strips of sp(2) carbon with zigzag nitrogen edges, or internal nitrogen-terminated hole edges within graphenic planes. This transition to edge formation is especially favoured when the nitrogen can be partially functionalised with, e.g. hydrogen. By comparison with available literature results, notably from electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray spectroscopy, the current results suggest that much of the nitrogen believed to be incorporated into carbon nanoobjects is instead likely to be present terminating the edges of carbonaceous impurities attached to nanoobject's surface. By comparison to nitrogen-doped tetrahedrally amorphous carbon, we suggest that this transition at around 10-20% nitrogen concentration and above towards sp(2) coordination via internal nitrogen-terminated edge formation may be a general property of nitrogen-doped carbon materials. PMID:25468305

  18. Microbial nitrogen cycling on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telling, J.; Stibal, M.; Anesio, A. M.; Tranter, M.; Nias, I.; Cook, J.; Bellas, C.; Lis, G.; Wadham, J. L.; Sole, A.; Nienow, P.; Hodson, A.

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen inputs and microbial nitrogen cycling were investigated along a 79 km transect into the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) during the main ablation season in summer 2010. The depletion of dissolved nitrate and production of ammonium (relative to icemelt) in cryoconite holes on Leverett Glacier, within 7.5 km of the ice sheet margin, suggested microbial uptake and ammonification respectively. Positive in situ acetylene assays indicated nitrogen fixation both in a debris-rich 100 m marginal zone and up to 5.7 km upslope on Leverett Glacier (with rates up to 16.3 μmoles C2H4 m-2 day-1). No positive acetylene assays were detected > 5.7 km into the ablation zone of the ice sheet. Potential nitrogen fixation only occurred when concentrations of dissolved and sediment-bound inorganic nitrogen were undetectable. Estimates of nitrogen fluxes onto the transect suggest that nitrogen fixation is likely of minor importance to the overall nitrogen budget of Leverett Glacier and of negligible importance to the nitrogen budget on the main ice sheet itself. Nitrogen fixation is however potentially important as a source of nitrogen to microbial communities in the debris-rich marginal zone close to the terminus of the glacier, where nitrogen fixation may aid the colonization of subglacial and moraine-derived debris.

  19. Regulation of the central glycolytic genes in Bacillus subtilis: binding of the repressor CggR to its single DNA target sequence is modulated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thierry; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2003-03-01

    Glycolysis is one of the best and widely conserved general metabolic pathways. Bacillus subtilis enzymes catalysing the central part of glycolysis, gathering the steps of interconversion of the triose phosphates from dihydroxyacetone-phosphate to phosphoenolpyruvate, are encoded by five genes, gapA, pgk, tpi, pgm and eno. They are transcribed in a hexacistronic operon together with cggR, the first cistron, encoding the repressor of this gapA operon. Using deletion analysis, we have localized the CggR operator between the promoter and the first gene of the operon. CggR was purified and used in gel mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments to delimit its target sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo tests demonstrated that it consists of two direct-repeats (CGGGACN6TGTCN4CGGGACN6TG TC). Sequence analysis and transcriptome comparison of a wild-type and a cggR mutant strain strongly suggested that CggR regulates only the gapA operon. The presence of glycolytic carbon sources induces expression of the gapA operon. Genetic experiments allowed us to identify the metabolic steps required for the formation of the CggR effector. In vitro experiments with the suggested candidates allowed us to demonstrate that fructose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) acts as an inhibitor of CggR DNA-binding activity (10 mM for full inhibition). FBP is thus the major signal for both CcpA-dependent catabolite repression (or activation) and activation of the central glycolytic genes. Genomic sequence comparisons suggest that these results can apply to numerous low-G+C, Gram-positive bacterial species. PMID:12622823

  20. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  1. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  2. Microbial nitrogen cycling on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telling, J.; Stibal, M.; Anesio, A. M.; Tranter, M.; Nias, I.; Cook, J.; Lis, G.; Wadham, J. L.; Sole, A.; Nienow, P.; Hodson, A.

    2011-10-01

    Microbial nitrogen cycling was investigated along a 79 km transect into the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) in early August 2010. The depletion of dissolved nitrate and production of ammonium (relative to icemelt) in cryoconite holes within 7.5 km of the ice sheet margin suggested microbial uptake and ammonification respectively. Nitrogen fixation (<4.2 μmoles C2H4 m-2 day-1 to 16.3 μmoles C2H4 m-2 day-1) was active in some cryoconite holes at sites up to 5.7 km from the ice sheet margin, with nitrogen fixation inversely correlated to concentrations of inorganic nitrogen. There may be the potential for the zone of nitrogen fixation to progressively extend further into the interior of the GrIS as the melt season progresses as reserves of available nitrogen are depleted. Estimated annual inputs of nitrogen from nitrogen fixation along the transect were at least two orders of magnitude lower than inputs from precipitation, with the exception of a 100 m long marginal debris-rich zone where nitrogen fixation could potentially equal or exceed that of precipitation. The average estimated contribution of nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen demand of net microbial growth at sites along the transect ranged from 0% to 17.5%.

  3. 16 CFR 16.8 - Closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.8 Closed meetings. (a) Paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) of § 16.7 of this part, which... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Closed meetings. 16.8 Section 16.8... with § 16.15 of this part....

  4. 16 CFR 16.8 - Closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.8 Closed meetings. (a) Paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) of § 16.7 of this part, which... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Closed meetings. 16.8 Section 16.8... with § 16.15 of this part....

  5. 16 CFR 16.8 - Closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.8 Closed meetings. (a) Paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) of § 16.7 of this part, which... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Closed meetings. 16.8 Section 16.8... with § 16.15 of this part....

  6. 16 CFR 16.8 - Closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.8 Closed meetings. (a) Paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) of § 16.7 of this part, which... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Closed meetings. 16.8 Section 16.8... with § 16.15 of this part....

  7. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  8. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  9. [Effects of nitrogen management on yield, quality, nitrogen accumulation and its transportation of watermelon in gravel-mulched field].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ming; Du, Shao-ping; Xue, Liang

    2015-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen management on yield, quality, nitrogen and dry matter accumulation and transportation of watermelon in sand field were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that too low or too high basal nitrogen fertilzation was unfavorable to seedling growth of watermelon in sand field, and no nitrogen application at vine extension or fruiting stages limited the formation of 'source' or 'sink'. At the same nitrogen rate, compared with the traditional T1 treatment (30% basal N fertilizer + 70% N fertilizer in vine extension), the nitrogen and dry matter accumulation of vegetative organs of T4 treatment (30% basal N fertilizer + 30% N fertilizer in vine extension + 40% N fertilizer in fruiting) and T6 treatment (100% basal N fertilizer + NAM) were reduced significantly, but the nitrogen and dry matter accumulation of fruit were increased significantly in the flushing period. The nitrogen transportation ratio and nitrogen contribution ratio of T4 were 33.6% and 12.0%, respectively. Compared to T1, the nitrogen harvest index, nitrogen fertilizer partial factor productivity and nitrogen fertilizer recovery efficiency of T4 and T6 treatments increased by 14.1% and 12.7%, 11.6% and 12.5%, 5.3% and 8.7%, respectively, and yield of watermelon increased by 11.6% and 12.5%, the soluble sugar, effective acid, the ratio of sugar and acid, Vc content increased by 16.5% and 11.7%, 4.5% and 2.8%, 19.4% and 13.4%, 35.6% and 19.0%, respectively. Therefore, T4 and T6 treatments were the optimal nitrogen fertilizer management mode which could not only achieve high yield and quality but also obtain high nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency in sand field. T6 treatment was the best nitrogen fertilizer management mode considering reduction of fertilizing labor intensity and extending service time of gravel-mulched field. PMID:26915190

  10. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Barney, Brett M; Eberhart, Lauren J; Ohlert, Janet M; Knutson, Carolann M; Plunkett, Mary H

    2015-07-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  11. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  12. Structures, Bonding, and Energetics of Potential Triatomic Circumstellar Molecules Containing Group 15 and 16 Elements.

    PubMed

    Turner, Walter E; Agarwal, Jay; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-12-01

    The recent discovery of PN in the oxygen-rich shell of the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris points to the formation of several triatomic molecules involving oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus; these are also intriguing targets for main-group synthetic inorganic chemistry. In this research, high-level ab initio electronic structure computations were conducted on the potential circumstellar molecule OPN and several of its heavier group 15 and 16 congeners (SPN, SePN, TePN, OPP, OPAs, and OPSb). For each congener, four isomers were examined. Optimized geometries were obtained with coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] using large Dunning basis sets [aug-cc-pVQZ, aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z, and aug-cc-pVQZ-PP], and relative energies were determined at the complete basis set limit of CCSDT(Q) from focal point analyses. The linear phosphorus-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 15 congeners by at least 6 kcal mol(-1), resulting from double-triple and single-double bond resonances within the molecule. The linear nitrogen-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 16 congeners by at least 5 kcal mol(-1), due to the electronegative central nitrogen atom encouraging electron delocalization throughout the molecule. For OPN, OPP, and SPN, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and vibrationally corrected rotational constants are predicted; good agreement with available experimental data is observed. PMID:26566183

  13. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    , requires a net influx of N in feed to the state. In terms of exports, the riverine N loads are smaller than many more mesic climates. Because many of the large population centers are on the coast, N discharged directly from wastewater treatment plants into the ocean is almost four times greater than the N discharge of all of the watersheds in the state combined. Gas losses are estimated through a combination of bottom up approaches using field data, emissions inventories, and numerical models. The largest uncertainties are in emissions of N2 and NH3. Calculated by difference, groundwater N loading represents the largest loss term in the mass balance. Contamination of groundwater with nitrates is a serious concern in many areas of the state. Given the long residence time of groundwater in many aquifers like the Central Valley the current and past N inputs to groundwater pose a hazard to drinking water supplies for decades to come. These calculations along with the analysis of management and policy tools will help elucidate the spatial location or activities that would be best to target to reduce the negative consequences of human alteration of the nitrogen cycle.

  14. 16 CFR 16.14 - Amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Amendments. 16.14 Section 16.14 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.14 Amendments. (a) The charter of an advisory committee may be amended when the Commission... as necessary; and (ii) File the amended charter in accordance with the provisions of § 16.6 of...

  15. 16 CFR 16.7 - Meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 16.2(b) and are not subject to the meeting and other requirements of this part. (f) Meetings that are... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meetings. 16.7 Section 16.7 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.7 Meetings. (a) The Commission shall designate an officer or employee of the...

  16. 16 CFR 16.7 - Meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 16.2(b) and are not subject to the meeting and other requirements of this part. (f) Meetings that are... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Meetings. 16.7 Section 16.7 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.7 Meetings. (a) The Commission shall designate an officer or employee of the...

  17. 16 CFR 16.14 - Amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amendments. 16.14 Section 16.14 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.14 Amendments. (a) The charter of an advisory committee may be amended when the Commission... as necessary; and (ii) File the amended charter in accordance with the provisions of § 16.6 of...

  18. 16 CFR 16.7 - Meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 16.2(b) and are not subject to the meeting and other requirements of this part. (f) Meetings that are... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Meetings. 16.7 Section 16.7 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.7 Meetings. (a) The Commission shall designate an officer or employee of the...

  19. 16 CFR 16.14 - Amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amendments. 16.14 Section 16.14 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.14 Amendments. (a) The charter of an advisory committee may be amended when the Commission... as necessary; and (ii) File the amended charter in accordance with the provisions of § 16.6 of...

  20. 16 CFR 16.14 - Amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendments. 16.14 Section 16.14 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.14 Amendments. (a) The charter of an advisory committee may be amended when the Commission... as necessary; and (ii) File the amended charter in accordance with the provisions of § 16.6 of...

  1. 16 CFR 16.7 - Meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 16.2(b) and are not subject to the meeting and other requirements of this part. (f) Meetings that are... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Meetings. 16.7 Section 16.7 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.7 Meetings. (a) The Commission shall designate an officer or employee of the...

  2. Soil Nitrogen Budgets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) recoveries are commonly 45% to 70% for modern field-crop systems. Nitrogen budgets are a valuable tool for improving N efficiency because they assess the size of various N pools, N gains from the atmosphere, N losses to the environment, and the interactions among soil-N-cycle processes...

  3. Nitrogen trading tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  4. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  5. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  6. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  7. Apollo 16 mission: Oxidizer deservicing tank failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An explosive failure of a ground support equipment decontamination unit tank occurred during the postflight deactivation of the oxidizer (nitrogen tetroxide) portion of the Apollo 16 command module reaction control system. A discussion of the significant aspects of the incident and conclusions are included.

  8. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOEpatents

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  10. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  11. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  12. Groundbased studies of spacecraft glow and erosion caused by impact of oxygen and nitrogen beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Cohen, S. A.; Manos, D. M.; Motley, R. W.; Paul, S. F.

    1987-01-01

    To simulate surface reactions in the space environment a ground-based facility was developed that produces a very high flux 10(14) to 10(16)/sq cm/s of low energy (2 to 20 eV) neutral atoms and molecules. The neutral beams are created using a method involving neutralization and reflection of ions from a biased limiter, where the ions are extracted from a toroidal plasma source. The spectra of emission due to beam-solid interactions on targets of Chemglaze Z-306 optical paint and Kapton are presented. Erosion yields for carbon and Kapton targets with low energy (approx. 10 eV) nitrogen and oxygen beams were measured. The reaction rates and surface morphology for the erosion of Kapton are similar to those measured in experiments on STS-5.

  13. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  14. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  15. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. PMID:26859274

  17. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  18. AFTI/F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 in its final configuration, flying in the vicinity of Edwards Air Force Base, California. During this phase, the two forward infrared turrets were added ahead of the cockpit, the chin canards were removed, and the aircraft was repainted in a standard Air Force scheme. A fuel drop tank is visible below the wing. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total loss of control. The GCAS

  19. AFTI/F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 flying at high angle of attack, shown in the final configuration and paint finish. Dummy Sidewinder air-to-air missles are attached to the wing tips. The white objects visible on the wing racks represent practice bomb dispensers, used in weapon tests. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total loss of control. The GCAS was designed to take command in such emergencies and bring

  20. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-01-01

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations. PMID:26286836

  1. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-08-01

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations.

  2. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Membership selection. 1018.16 Section 1018.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Establishment of Advisory Committees § 1018.16 Membership selection. (a) Whenever new applicants are...

  3. 16 CFR 1210.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production testing. 1210.16 Section 1210.16... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.16 Production testing. (a) General... production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a production interval short enough to...

  4. 16 CFR 1212.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production testing. 1212.16 Section 1212.16... STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1212.16 Production testing. (a) General... determine the types of tests for production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a...

  5. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... production interval will meet the standard, production must cease and the faulty manufacturing process or... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16... STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production...

  6. 16 CFR 309.16 - Recordkeeping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping. 309.16 Section 309.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS LABELING... Retailers § 309.16 Recordkeeping. You must keep for one year any delivery tickets, letters of...

  7. 16 CFR 1025.16 - Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Service. 1025.16 Section 1025.16 Commercial... Pleadings, Form, Execution, Service of Documents § 1025.16 Service. (a) Mandatory service. Every document..., postage prepaid, (or by delivering in person) a copy to each on (Signature) For (f) Date of service....

  8. 16 CFR 1210.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production testing. 1210.16 Section 1210.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.16 Production testing. (a)...

  9. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production...

  10. 16 CFR 16.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 16.2 Section 16.2 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.2 Definitions. For purposes of this part: (a) Administrator means the Administrator of the... General Services Administration. (f) Sunshine Act means the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b....