Science.gov

Sample records for nitrogen ion recoil

  1. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  2. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  3. High-energy recoil-ion emission in keV heavy-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Someren, B.; Rudolph, H.; Urazgil'din, I. F.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlmans; Niehaus, A.

    1997-11-01

    For keV Xe +, Kr + and Ar + ions incident at 30° on Cu(110) we have observed the emission of negatively charged particles with energies up to about 40% of the primary energy. By time-of-flight techniques we have found that electrons are emitted with energies up to 80 eV, whereas the negatively charged high-energy particles are Cu - recoil ions. High-energy Cu + ions have also been found. Simple energy and momentum conservation arguments show that such high recoil energies are indeed possible for multiple collision events in which the primary recoil ion scatters off one or more Cu atoms.

  4. The WITCH experiment: Acquiring the first recoil ion spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. Yu.; Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Delahaye, P.; Friedag, P.; Herbane, M.; Herlert, A.; Kraev, I. S.; Tandecki, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wenander, F.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2008-10-01

    The standard model of the electroweak interaction describes β-decay in the well-known V-A form. Nevertheless, the most general Hamiltonian of a β-decay includes also other possible interaction types, e.g. scalar (S) and tensor (T) contributions, which are not fully ruled out yet experimentally. The WITCH experiment aims to study a possible admixture of these exotic interaction types in nuclear β-decay by a precise measurement of the shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum. The experimental set-up couples a double Penning trap system and a retardation spectrometer. The set-up is installed in ISOLDE/CERN and was recently shown to be fully operational. The current status of the experiment is presented together with the data acquired during the 2006 campaign, showing the first recoil ion energy spectrum obtained. The data taking procedure and corresponding data acquisition system are described in more detail. Several further technical improvements are briefly reviewed.

  5. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of {sup 21}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, Nicholas D.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Vetter, Paul A.

    2003-01-03

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions.

  6. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis set up for electronic sputtering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Sugathan, P.; Chaudhary, G. K.; Barua, P.

    2006-04-01

    Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) set up with a large solid angle (greater than or similar to 4.8 msr) Delta E - E position-sensitive telescope detector is developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre as a dedicated facility for the study of electronic sputtering of thin films under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The detector consists of a gas ionization chamber (Delta E ) and a solid-state surface barrier detector ( E ) housed in a same assembly. The electronic sputtering yield (atoms/ion) is determined by analyzing on-line fluence-dependent ERDA data obtained from a variety of thin films. Large erosion (> 10 5 atoms/ion) of carbon from a-C:H by 150 MeV Ag 13+ ions, evolution of nitrogen (greater than or similar to 880 atoms/ion) from copper nitride and depletion of oxygen (greater than or similar to 1000 atoms/ion) from copper oxide film under 200 MeV Au 15+ ion impact are studied and reported in this work. The electronic sputtering of these materials is discussed on the basis of the thermal spike model of SHI and solid interaction.

  7. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented. PMID:25933839

  8. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-04-15

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented.

  9. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  10. What Can We Learn From Proton Recoils about Heavy-Ion SEE Sensitivity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that protons cause single-event effects (SEE) in most devices through production of light-ion recoils has led to attempts to bound heavy-ion SEE susceptibility through use of proton data. Although this may be a viable strategy for some devices and technologies, the data must be analyzed carefully and conservatively to avoid over-optimistic estimates of SEE performance. We examine the constraints that proton test data can impose on heavy-ion SEE susceptibility.

  11. Transport-theory approach to ion-beam mixing and recoil implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, I. )

    1990-12-01

    Ion bombardment of an amorphous target in slab geometry is considered, and ion-beam mixing and recoil implantation evaluated in the binary-collision approximation. A fundamental equation for target-atom redistribution during ion bombardment is formulated, which relates the redistribution flux to the source function for the creation of energetic atomic recoils and their range distribution; for the analysis, this equation plays the role of the Boltzmann transport equation. Expanding the target-atom density in a power series and truncating at the second term yields a flux equation and closed expressions for coefficients of recoil implantation and of ion-beam mixing. The flux equation plays a role analogous to that of Fick's law in diffusion. Lattice relaxations are taken into account by introducing flux transformations between laboratory and marker coordinate frames. The closed expressions for the coefficients are calculated and compared with experiment. The binary-collision contribution to ion-beam mixing turns out to be larger than heretofore thought. A new mechanism for ion-beam mixing emerges, which turns out to make a very significant contribution. There are even cases where the new mechanism far outweighs the cascade-mixing mechanism, thought to be the major contributor to binary-collision ion-beam mixing.

  12. First detection and energy measurement of recoil ions following beta decay in a Penning trap with the WITCH experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Kozlov, V. Yu.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Delahaye, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herbane, M.; Herlert, A.; Kraev, I. S.; Mader, J.; Tandecki, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wenander, F.; Severijns, N.

    2011-03-01

    The WITCH experiment (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) will search for exotic interactions by investigating the β - ν angular correlation via the measurement of the recoil energy spectrum after β -decay. As a first step the recoil ions from the β-_{} -decay of 124In stored in a Penning trap have been detected. The evidence for the detection of recoil ions is shown and the properties of the ion cloud that forms the radioactive source for the experiment in the Penning trap are presented.

  13. Recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for He2+ + He electron capture reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, M.; Focke, P.; Otranto, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electron capture reactions for 3He2+ collisions on He at impact energies in the range 40 keV-300 keV have been studied using the Cold Target Recoil-Ion Momentum Spectroscopy setup which has recently became operational at the Centro Atomico Bariloche. State-selective charge exchange cross sections were obtained and in this work we present recoil-ion transverse momentum distributions. For targets with residual thermal motion, we show that the implementation of a back-projection algorithm based on the transverse momentum distribution component along a direction perpendicular to the jet direction provides results in agreement with those obtained by using previously cooled targets. Present results nicely fit the gaps in the datasets already published by other laboratories and are found to be in good agreement with classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Relativistic calculations of the nuclear recoil effect in highly charged Li-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubova, N. A.; Shabaev, V. M.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.

    2013-09-01

    Relativistic theory of the nuclear recoil effect in highly charged Li-like ions is considered within the Breit approximation. The normal mass shift (NMS) and the relativistic NMS (RNMS) are calculated by perturbation theory to zeroth and first orders in the parameter 1/Z. The calculations are performed using the dual kinetic balance method with the basis functions constructed from B-splines. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained by other methods.

  15. Warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for fragmentation of molecular hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wu, Jian; Czasch, Achim; Zeng, Heping

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for the fragmentation dynamics of the warm hydrogen molecules at room temperature. The thermal movement effect of the warm molecule is removed by using a correction algorithm in the momentum space. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional momentum vectors as well as the kinetic energy release spectra, different vibrational states of the H(2)(+) ground state are clearly visible and the internuclear separation for charge resonance enhanced ionization of the second electron is identified. The results show adequate accordance with the former experiments using other techniques. PMID:19654636

  16. Recoil-ion-momentum spectrum for few-photon double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Chao; Tong, Yao; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2014-04-01

    We provide an efficient and accurate numerical method to deduce the recoil-ion-momentum spectrum of He from the two-electron momentum distribution, which is obtained by solving the full-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We apply this method to study the ion spectra of one-photon double ionization and two-photon sequential and nonsequential double ionization of He. The present calculations agree rather well with the absolute magnitude of the recoil-ion triply differential cross sections published recently [S. A. Abdel-Naby, M. S. Pindzola, and J. Colgan, Phys. Rev. A 86, 013424 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.013424; S. A. Abdel-Naby et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 063425 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.063425]. Nevertheless, significant differences are also found in several detailed features of the spectra and straightforward physical analysis indicates that the present results appear more reasonable, which should be confirmed by future experiments or additional independent calculations.

  17. Phase and structural transformations in metallic iron under the action of heavy ions and recoil nuclei.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Novikov, D

    2014-02-01

    By the use of various modes of Mössbauer spectroscopy after effects of irradiation of metal iron with (12)C(4+) and (14)N(5+) ions of medium energies, and alpha-particles and the (208)Tl, (208,212)Pb, and (216)Po recoil from a (228)Th-source have been studied. The experimental data obtained in the study enabled various types of external and internal radiation to be compared in regard to the damage they cause, as well as to their effect on the structure-, phase composition- and corrosion resistance properties of metallic iron. Irradiation with (12)C(4+) and (14)N(5+) ions is accompanied by both structural disordering of the α-Fe lattice, and the appearance of γ-phase in the bulk metal. This is indicated by a single line which is 2 to 3-fold broadened (as compared to the lines of the magnetic sextet). This is a result of a strong local heating of the lattice in the thermal spike area with a subsequent instant cooling-down and recrystallization of this "molted" area. Irradiation of iron foils with (12)C(4+)- and (14)N(5+) ions and with recoil nuclei does provoke corrosion processes (the formation of γ-FeOOH) and is accompanied by an intensive oxidation of the metal. PMID:24378918

  18. Elastic recoil detection analysis of hydrogen with 7Li ions using a polyimide foil as a thick hydrogen reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Razpet, Alenka; Markelj, Sabina; Čadež, Iztok; Budnar, Miloš

    2005-01-01

    Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) with an absorber foil using a 4.2 MeV 7Li2+ beam was utilized for evaluation of hydrogen depth profiles. Since recoil cross-sections when using Li ions as projectiles are not well known, the energy dependent ratio between the experimental yield and the yield calculated using the Rutherford recoil cross-section was obtained from an ERDA spectrum of a thick polyimide (Kapton) sample. It was estimated that this ratio does not significantly depend on sample composition. Therefore it was used for correction of measured spectra analyzed by existing simulation and evaluation programs in which the Rutherford recoil cross-sections were applied. The correction procedure has been verified in round-robin measurements of well-characterized Si:H thin layers. Application of the method for determination of a hydrogen depth concentration profile in hydrogen-containing graphite samples is presented.

  19. Relativistic nuclear recoil, electron correlation and QED effects in highly charged Ar ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Z.; Soria Orts, R.; Lapierre, A.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Artemyev, A. N.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Jentschura, U. D.; Keitel, C. H.; Tawara, H.; Ullrich, J.; Shabaev, V. M.; Volotka, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    We have performed extensive theoretical studies on the 1s^22s^22p^2P3/2 -- ^2P1/2 M1 transition in Ar^13+ ions. Accurate radiative lifetimes are sensitive to QED corrections like the electron anomalous magnetic moment and to relativistic electron correlation effects. The lifetime of the P3/2 metastable state was determined to be 9.573(4)(5) ms (stat)(syst) [1] using the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap. Theoretical predictions cluster around a value that is significantly shorter than this high-precision experimental result. This discrepancy is presently unexplained. The wavelengths of the above transition in Ar^13+ and the 1s^22s2p ^3P1 -- ^3P2 M1 transition in Ar^14+ were compared for the isotopes ^36Ar and ^40Ar [2]. The observed mass shift has confirmed the relativistic theory of nuclear recoil effects in many-body systems. Our calculations, based on the fully relativistic recoil operator, are in excellent agreement with the measured results. [1] A. Lapierre, U.D. Jentschura, J.R. Crespo L'opez-Urrutia et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 183001 (2005); [2] R. Soria Orts, Z. Harman, J.R. Crespo L'opez-Urrutia et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 103002 (2006)

  20. Angular anisotropy parameters and recoil-ion momentum distribution in two-photon double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bray, Igor

    2007-08-15

    We present convergent-close-coupling (CCC) calculations of the angular anisotropy parameters {beta}{sub 2},{beta}{sub 4} and the recoil ion momentum distribution d{sigma}/dp in two-photon double ionization (TPDI) of helium. In a stark contrast to single-photon double ionization (SPDI), where the {beta}{sub 2} parameter varies widely changing the angular distribution from isotropic to nearly dipole for slow and fast photoelectrons, respectively, the {beta} parameters for TPDI show very little change. The angular distribution of the recoil ion is fairly isotropic in TPDI as opposed to a strong alignment with the polarization of light in SPDI.

  1. New recoil transfer chamber for thermalization of heavy ions produced in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; DeVanzo, M. J.; Sefcik, J. A.; Bennett, M. E.; Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    A new Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) has been designed, fabricated, and characterized at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The design is based on a gas stopper that was previously in routine use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This new RTC uses He gas to stop ions, and a combination of a static electric field and gas flow to maximize the extraction efficiency. In offline experiments, a 228Th source was used to produce 216Po which was successfully extracted even though it has a short half-life. In online experiments using the products of the 118Sn(40Ar, 6n)152Er reaction, an efficiency of several tens of percent was measured.

  2. Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G.; Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of {sup 7}Li, {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 27}Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V{sub B{<=}}E{<=}2.0V{sub B}). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

  3. Recoil in vacuum for Te ions: Calibration, models, and applications to radioactive-beam g-factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, A. E.; Stone, N. J.

    2007-09-15

    In the light of new g factor results for the stable isotopes between {sup 122}Te and {sup 130}Te, the calibration and modeling of the recoil-in-vacuum (RIV) interaction for Te ions is reexamined, and the recent radioactive-beam g factor measurement on {sup 132}Te by the RIV technique is reevaluated. The implications for further RIV g-factor measurements in the {sup 132}Sn region are discussed.

  4. First high-statistics and high-resolution recoil-ion data from the WITCH retardation spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, P.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Porobić, T.; Wursten, E.; Ban, G.; Beck, M.; Couratin, C.; Fabian, X.; Fléchard, X.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Knecht, A.; Kozlov, V. Y.; Liénard, E.; Soti, G.; Tandecki, M.; Traykov, E.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2016-07-01

    The first high-statistics and high-resolution data set for the integrated recoil-ion energy spectrum following the β^+ decay of 35Ar has been collected with the WITCH retardation spectrometer located at CERN-ISOLDE. Over 25 million recoil-ion events were recorded on a large-area multichannel plate (MCP) detector with a time-stamp precision of 2ns and position resolution of 0.1mm due to the newly upgraded data acquisition based on the LPC Caen FASTER protocol. The number of recoil ions was measured for more than 15 different settings of the retardation potential, complemented by dedicated background and half-life measurements. Previously unidentified systematic effects, including an energy-dependent efficiency of the main MCP and a radiation-induced time-dependent background, have been identified and incorporated into the analysis. However, further understanding and treatment of the radiation-induced background requires additional dedicated measurements and remains the current limiting factor in extracting a beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient for 35Ar decay using the WITCH spectrometer.

  5. Determination of the extraction efficiency for 233U source α-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. d. Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2015-03-01

    Following the α decay of 233U, 229Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass purification efficiency for 229Th3+ is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the 229Th α decay. A large value of (10±2)% for the combined extraction and mass purification efficiency of 229Th3+ is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1u/e. In addition to 229Th, also other α-recoil ions of the 233, 232U decay chains are addressed.

  6. Elastic recoil detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, W. M. A.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    1993-07-01

    In elastic recoil detection (ERD) one determines the yield and energy of particles ejected out of the surface region of samples under MeV ion bombardment. By application of this surface and thin film analysis technique one can obtain quantitative information concerning the depth distribution of light elements in a sample to be analysed. The quantitativity and the depth resolving power are based on knowledge of the recoil cross section and the stopping power of high-energy ions in matter. This paper reviews the fundamentals of this technique and the various experimental methods for recoil identification. Furthermore, important features for material analysis, such as detection limits, depth resolution and elemental range are discussed. Some emphasis is put on the conversion of the spectral contribution of the elements to atomic concentrations in the films for several representative cases. Throughout the review numerous examples are given to illustrate the features of ERD and to demonstrate empirically the accuracy of the quantification method.

  7. Potku - New analysis software for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arstila, K.; Julin, J.; Laitinen, M. I.; Aalto, J.; Konu, T.; Kärkkäinen, S.; Rahkonen, S.; Raunio, M.; Itkonen, J.; Santanen, J.-P.; Tuovinen, T.; Sajavaara, T.

    2014-07-01

    Time-of-flight elastic recoil detection (ToF-ERD) analysis software has been developed. The software combines a Python-language graphical front-end with a C code computing back-end in a user-friendly way. The software uses a list of coincident time-of-flight-energy (ToF-E) events as an input. The ToF calibration can be determined with a simple graphical procedure. The graphical interface allows the user to select different elements and isotopes from a ToF-E histogram and to convert the selections to individual elemental energy and depth profiles. The resulting sample composition can be presented as relative or absolute concentrations by integrating the depth profiles over user-defined ranges. Beam induced composition changes can be studied by displaying the event-based data in fractions relative to the substrate reference data. Optional angular input data allows for kinematic correction of the depth profiles. This open source software is distributed under the GPL license for Linux, Mac, and Windows environments.

  8. Implementation of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis at JANNUS-Saclay for quantitative helium depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loussouarn, T.; Beck, L.; Trocellier, P.; Brimbal, D.; Leprêtre, F.; Bordas, E.; Vaubaillon, S.; Serruys, Y.; Lefaix-Jeuland, H.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative depth profiling measurements of implanted light elements is an important issue for electronics and nuclear applications. Conventional elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) has been improved by using heavy ions as incident particles for quantitatively profiling helium in materials. A new system has been implemented on the triple beam irradiation platform JANNUS at Saclay devoted to carry out HI-ERDA measurements. This device is dedicated to helium depth profiling using a 15 MeV 16O5+ incident ion beam. Capabilities of the technique (quantitative analysis, resolution and limit of detection) were tested on samples of known composition. For the first time, 4He depth profiles in pure α-iron, as-implanted and annealed, are obtained. HI-ERDA measurements have shown that helium release in pure α-iron can be described by a succession of two steps, the first having a slow kinetics below 700 °C and the second with a fast kinetics above 700 °C.

  9. Recoil-Ion Momentum Distributions for Two-Photon Double Ionization of He and Ne by 44 eV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Foucar, L.; Havermeier, T.; Smolarski, M.; Schoessler, S.; Cole, K.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R.; Kurka, M.; Ergler, Th.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Jiang, Y. H.; Voitkiv, A.; Najjari, B.; Luedemann, S.; Schroeter, C. D.; Kheifets, A.; Duesterer, S.

    2008-08-15

    Recoil-ion momentum distributions for two-photon double ionization of He and Ne (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}=44 eV) have been recorded with a reaction microscope at FLASH (the free-electron laser at Hamburg) at an intensity of {approx}1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} exploring the dynamics of the two fundamental two-photon-two-electron reaction pathways, namely, sequential and direct (or nonsequential) absorption of the photons. We find strong differences in the recoil-ion momentum patterns for the two mechanisms pointing to the significantly different two-electron emission dynamics and thus provide serious constraints for theoretical models.

  10. Electron and recoil ion momentum imaging with a magneto-optically trapped target

    SciTech Connect

    Hubele, R.; Schuricke, M.; Goullon, J.; Lindenblatt, H.; Ferreira, N.; Laforge, A.; Brühl, E.; Globig, D.; Misra, D.; Sell, M.; Song, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S.; Jesus, V. L. B. de; Kelkar, A.; Schneider, K.; Schulz, M.; Fischer, D.

    2015-03-15

    A reaction microscope (ReMi) has been combined with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the kinematically complete investigation of atomic break-up processes. With the novel MOTReMi apparatus, the momentum vectors of the fragments of laser-cooled and state-prepared lithium atoms are measured in coincidence and over the full solid angle. The first successful implementation of a MOTReMi could be realized due to an optimized design of the present setup, a nonstandard operation of the MOT, and by employing a switching cycle with alternating measuring and trapping periods. The very low target temperature in the MOT (∼2 mK) allows for an excellent momentum resolution. Optical preparation of the target atoms in the excited Li 2{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state was demonstrated providing an atomic polarization of close to 100%. While first experimental results were reported earlier, in this work, we focus on the technical description of the setup and its performance in commissioning experiments involving target ionization in 266 nm laser pulses and in collisions with projectile ions.

  11. Elastic recoil cross section determination of deuterium by helium-4 ions at 30° with the energy range of 2.6-7.4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhibin; Hao, Wanli; Wang, Chunjie; Shi, Liqun

    2016-05-01

    The elastic recoil cross section for D(4He, D) 4He was determined at a recoil angle of 30° over an incident helium energy range from 2.6 to 7.4 MeV. A thin solid target Ta/TiDx/Si used for cross section measurement was prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering, and it was so stable to ion beam bombardment that nearly no deuterium loss (less than 0.2%) exists over the whole experiment. A relative determination method is adopted in this measurement. It can avoid the error from the beam dose and the solid angle of the detectors and it is also free to direct measurement of D content in the film. The total uncertainty in the cross section determination is less than 5%.

  12. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  13. A model for nitrogen chemisorption in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the formation of nitrogen species subject to chemisorption on ion thruster discharge chamber surfaces is presented. Molecules, atoms, atomic ions and molecular ions are identified as the important species in the analysis. Current densities of the atomic and molecular ions predicted by the model are compared to current densities measured in the beam of a SERT II thruster. The predicted and measured values of these two current densities are shown to agree within about + or - 100%. The mechanisms involved in the erosion of a surface subjected to simultaneous nitrogen chemisorption and sputter erosion by high energy ions are also discussed.

  14. Nuclear recoil and vacuum-polarization effects on the binding energies of supercritical H-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Ivan A.; Plunien, Günter; Shabaev, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    The Dirac Hamiltonian including nuclear recoil and vacuum-polarization operators is considered in a supercritical regime Z> 137. It is found that the nuclear recoil operator derived within the Breit approximation "regularizes" the Hamiltonian for the point-nucleus model and allows the ground state level to go continuously down and reach the negative energy continuum at a critical value Zcr ≈ 145. If the Hamiltonian contains both the recoil operator and the Uehling potential, the 1s level reaches the negative energy continuum at Zcr ≈ 144. The corresponding calculations for the excited states have been also performed. This study shows that, in contrast to previous investigations, a point-like nucleus can have effectively the charge Z> 137.

  15. A recoil separator for nuclear astrophysics SECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Couder, M.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Montes, F.; Rehm, K. E.; Schatz, H.; Smith, M. S.; Wiescher, M.; Wrede, C.; Zeller, A.

    2016-06-01

    A recoil separator SECAR has been designed to study radiative capture reactions relevant for the astrophysical rp-process in inverse kinematics for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We describe the design, layout, and ion optics of the recoil separator and present the status of the project.

  16. Determination of concentration profiles by elastic recoil detection with a ΔE-E gas telescope and high energy incident heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoquert, J. P.; Guillaume, G.; Hage-Ali, M.; Grob, J. J.; Ganter, C.; Siffert, P.

    1989-12-01

    The Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) method has been used to determine the profile of a wide range of elements simultaneously in a thin layer (1μm) with a depth resolution of a few hundred Å and high sensitivity. Z separation is achieved by a ΔE(gas)-E(solid) telescope. Results for 127I (up to 240 MeV) incident ions used to profile thin films of dielectrics (SiOxNyHz), amorphous semiconductors (a-GaAs: H) and superconductors (YBaCuO, BiSrCaCuO) are reported. It has been considered previously that ERD is of interest for analysis of light elements. We show that high energy heavy incident ions extend the field of application of the ERD method to all elements with an approximately constant depth resolution and sensitivity.

  17. Recoil Separators for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, J. C.

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen and helium capture reactions are important in many astrophysical environments. Measurements in inverse kinematics using recoil separators have demonstrated a particularly sensitive technique for studying low-yield capture reactions.(M. S. Smith, C. E. Rolfs, and C. A. Barnes, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. A306) (1991) 233. This approach allows a low background rate to be achieved with a high detection efficiency (about 50%) for the particles of interest using a device with only modest acceptance. Recoil separators using a variety of ion-optic configurations have been installed at numerous accelerator facilities in the past decade and have been used to measure, for example, alpha capture reactions using stable beams(D. Rogalla et al.), Eur. Phys. J. 6 (1999) 471. and proton capture reactions using radioactive ion beams.(S. Bishop et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 162501. Measurements in inverse kinematics are the only viable means for studying reactions on short-lived nuclei that are crucial for understanding stellar explosions, and a recoil separator optimized for the measurement of capture reactions with radioactive ion beams figures prominently into the design of the low energy experimental area at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The operational requirements for such a device will be outlined, and recoil separator designs and characteristics will be presented.

  18. Implantation of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus ions into metals

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Gordeeva, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The application of ion implantation for alloying offers a unique opportunity to modify the chemical composition, phase constitution, and microstructure of the surface layers of metals. The authors studied ion implantation of nitrogen and carbon into the surface layers of metallic targets. The phase composition of the implanted layers obtained on the Kh18N10T stainless steel, the refractory molybdenum alloy TsM-6, niobium, and nickel was determined according to the conventional method of recording the x-ray diffraction pattern of the specimens using monochromatic FeK/sub alpha/-radiation on a DRON-2,0 diffractometer. The targets were bombarded at room temperature in an ILU-3 ion accelerator. The implantation of metalloid ions was also conducted with the targets being bombarded with 100-keV phosphorus ions and 40-keV carbon ions.

  19. Electron-ion recombination in nuclear recoils tracks in nonpolar liquids. Calculation of the effect of external electric field on the escape probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateja, Piotr; Wojcik, Mariusz

    2016-07-01

    A computer simulation method is applied to study electron-ion recombination in tracks of low-energy nuclear recoils in nonpolar liquids in which the electron transport can be described as ideal diffusion. The electron escape probability is calculated as a function of applied electric field, both for the field parallel to the track and for the field perpendicular to the track. The dependence of escape probability on the field direction is the stronger, the longer the ionization track, with a significant effect being found already for tracks of ~100 nm length. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications of nonpolar molecular liquids as target media in directional dark matter detectors.

  20. Reactions of recoil nitrogen-13 atoms in the ethanol-water system. Formation of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} upon irradiation of water and dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol under a pressure of various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Korsakov, M.V.; Krasikova, R.N.; Fedorova, O.S.

    1995-07-01

    The influence of the nature and pressure of a gas (helium, hydrogen) contacting with a solution on radiochemical yield of the {sup 13}N-labeled products of nuclear-chemical and radiolytic reactions occurring upon irradiation of water and dilute aqueous solution of ethanol by 17-MeV protons was examined. It was shown that irradiation of water under hydrogen pressure, about 50% of recoil nitrogen-13 atoms are stabilized in the gas phase in the form of [{sup 13}N]N{sub 2}, and the main product in the liquid phase is ammonia-{sup 13}N.

  1. FeN foils by nitrogen ion-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Wang, Jian-Ping; Al Mehedi, Md; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-05-07

    Iron nitride samples in foil shape (free standing, 500 nm in thickness) were prepared by a nitrogen ion-implantation method. To facilitate phase transformation, the samples were bonded on the substrate followed by a post-annealing step. By using two different substrates, single crystal Si and GaAs, structural and magnetic properties of iron nitride foil samples prepared with different nitrogen ion fluences were characterized. α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase in iron nitride foil samples was obtained and confirmed by the proposed approach. A hard magnetic property with coercivity up to 780 Oe was achieved for the FeN foil samples bonded on Si substrate. The feasibility of using nitrogen ion implantation techniques to prepare FeN foil samples up to 500 nm thickness with a stable martensitic phase under high ion fluences has been demonstrated. A possible mechanism was proposed to explain this result. This proposed method could potentially be an alternative route to prepare rare-earth-free FeN bulk magnets by stacking and pressing multiple free-standing thick α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} foils together.

  2. Single and double electron capture from He by Ar{sup 16+} studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, M.A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H.E.; Kamber, E.Y.; Stoeckli, M.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Single and double electron capture from He targets by Ar{sup 16+} ions have been studied at projectile velocities from 0.3 to 1.5 a.u. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy was used to record the energy gain and scattering angle simultaneously. For single capture, the reaction window is found to spread in width approximately as the square root of the projectile velocity and to shift slightly toward smaller energy-gain values as the velocity increases. The angular distributions center at the half Coulomb angle over most of the velocity range covered, but differ in shape from multichannel Landau-Zener model results. For double capture, transfer ionization dominates and feeds primarily n-symmetric states, where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. True double capture feeds mainly n-asymmetric states. The angular distributions for double capture lie outside the half Coulomb angle, indicating the importance of two-step processes in populating doubly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Protein Nitrogen Determination by Kjeldahl Digestion and Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiaoling; Pampati, Nagarani; McCormick, William M; Bhattacharyya, Lokesh

    2016-06-01

    We report development and validation of a simple, rapid, and accurate method for the quantitation of protein nitrogen, which combines Kjeldahl digestion and ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection and requires nanomolar amount of nitrogen in samples (≥10 μg protein). The mechanism of suppressed conductivity detection does not permit analysis of samples containing copper (present in Kjeldahl digestion solution) and aluminum (present in many vaccines as adjuvants) due to precipitation of their hydroxides within the suppressor. We overcame this problem by including 10 μM oxalic acid in Kjeldahl digests and in the eluent (30 mM methanesulfonic acid). The chromatography is performed using an IonPac CS-16 cation exchange column by isocratic elution. The method reduces the digestion time to less than 1 h and eliminates the distillation and titration steps of the Kjeldahl method, thereby reducing the analysis time significantly and improving precision and accuracy. To determine protein nitrogen in samples containing non-protein nitrogen, proteins are precipitated by a mixture of deoxycholate and trichloroacetic acid and the precipitates are analyzed after dissolving in KOH. The method is particularly useful for biological samples that are limited and can also be applied to food, environmental, and other materials. PMID:27238484

  4. Hydrogen ion-implantation induced low resistive layer in KNbO3 bulk single crystal: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkawa, A.; Shibasaki, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.

    2016-03-01

    Origins of low resistivity in H-ion implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak ion fluence: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into KNbO3 is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The sheet resistance decreases from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.33 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted, 2.29 × 105 Ω/□ for 100 °C annealed, and 4.25 × 105 Ω/□ for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively. The ERDA experiment using the 1.5 MeV-4He+ beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to around 60 nm. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 1.5 MeV helium beam is 5.1 × 1014 cm-2 for un-implanted KNbO3 sample, 5.6 × 1014 cm-2 for as-implanted, 3.4 × 1014 cm-2 for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively, indicating that a part of hydrogen is diffused out by annealing. The low resistive layer induced in H-ion implanted KNbO3 suggests the existence of a shallow energy level related to the complex defect consisting of hydrogen interstitial and the proton induced defect such as oxygen vacancy.

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research. PMID:26931931

  6. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  7. Direct mapping of recoil in the ion-pair dissociation of molecular oxygen by a femtosecond depletion method.

    PubMed

    Baklanov, Alexey V; Janssen, Liesbeth M C; Parker, David H; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoit; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel; Gobert, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    Time-resolved dynamics of the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, O(2), via the (3)Sigma(u) (-) ion-pair state have been studied with femtosecond time resolution using a pump-probe scheme in combination with velocity map imaging of the resulting O(+) and O(-) ions. The fourth harmonic of a femtosecond titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser (lambda approximately 205 nm) was found to cause three-photon pumping of O(2) to a level at 18.1 eV. The parallel character of the observed O(+) and O(-) images allowed us to conclude that dissociation takes place on the (3)Sigma(u) (-) ion-pair state. The 815 nm fundamental of the Ti:sapphire laser used as probe was found to cause two-photon electron photodetachment starting from the O(2) ion-pair state, giving rise to (O((3)P)+O(+)((4)S)) products. This was revealed by the observed depletion of the yield of the O(-) anion and the appearance of a new O(+) cation signal with a kinetic energy E(transl)(O(+)) dependent on the time delay between the pump and probe lasers. This time-delay dependence of the dissociation dynamics on the ion-pair state has also been simulated, and the experimental and simulated results coincide very well over the experimental delay-time interval from about 130 fs to 20 ps where two- or one-photon photodetachment takes place, corresponding to a change in the R(O(+),O(-)) interatomic distance from 12 to about 900 A. This is one of the first implementations of a depletion scheme in femtosecond pump-probe experiments which could prove to be quite versatile and applicable to many femtosecond time-scale experiments. PMID:19063560

  8. The Discovery of Rhea as a Source of Nitrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel; Janzen, Paul; Johnson, Robert; Powell, Ronald; Smith, H. Todd; Wilson, Robert

    The Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) instrument made measurements of the plasma envi-ronment near Rhea when Cassini passed through the moon's wake on November 26, 2005 at a distance of 500 km, and again on August 30, 2007, at a distance of 5000 km. During both en-counters, the CAPS ion mass spectrometer (CAPS/IMS) detected an enhancement of nitrogen ions (N+ ) by a factor of two relative to the ambient environment. Compared to water group ions (O+ , OH+ , H2 O+ , H3 O+ ), this amounted to a fractional increase from 10% to 20% of the water group content. There has already been a suggestion that Rhea possesses a dust halo (Jones, et al., Science 2008) and that it is a source of O2 + (Martens et al., GRL, 2008). Our results provide further evidence that Rhea is a source of plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere. To explore the degree to which Rhea may have an active surface, modeling of the nitrogen source rate is currently under way. We will present our current results as well as composition results from the upcoming Rhea encounter on March 2, 2010, when Cassini passes within 100 km of the moon.

  9. Hydrogen interstitial in H-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Nishimura, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2015-12-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are evaluated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The maximum of the concentration of the implanted H estimated by a TRIM simulation is at 3600 nm in depth. The resistivity decreases from ∼103 Ω cm for un implanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted, 2.3 × 10-1 Ω cm for 200 °C annealed, and 3.2 × 10-1 Ω cm for 400 °C annealed samples. The ERDA measurements can evaluate the concentration of hydrogens which move to the vicinity of the surface (surface to 300 nm or 100 nm) because of the diffusion by the annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 2.0 MeV helium beam is ∼3.8 × 1013 cm-2 for annealed samples. From EPR measurements, the oxygen vacancy of +charge state (Vo+) is observed in as-implanted samples. The Vo+ related signal (g = 1.96) observed under no illumination disappears after successive illumination with a red LED and appears again with a blue light illumination. The activation energy of as-implanted, 200 °C annealed, and 400 °C annealed samples estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration lies between 29 meV and 23 meV, suggesting the existence of H interstitial as a shallow donor level.

  10. Optical waveguides fabricated by nitrogen ion implantation in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Fu, Li-Li; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Guo, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    We report on the fabrication of waveguides in fused silica using 4.5-MeV nitrogen ion implantation with a fluence of 5.0×1014 ions/cm2. The prism-coupling method was employed to measure the effective refractive indices of guiding modes at the wavelengths of 632.8 and 1539 nm. The effective refractive indices of the first few modes were higher than that of the substrate. The refractive index profiles at 632.8 and 1539 nm were reconstructed by the reflectivity calculation method. Positive index changes were induced in the waveguide layers. The end-face coupling method was used to measure the near-field light intensity distributions at the wavelength of 632.8 nm and the finite-difference beam propagation method was applied to simulate the guided mode profile at the wavelength of 1539 nm. The waveguide structures emerge as candidates for integrated photonic devices.

  11. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements.

    PubMed

    Sigaud, L; de Jesus, V L B; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E C

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell-to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact-is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed. PMID:27587105

  12. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  13. Combination of time of flight direct recoiled spectroscopy and ion scattering trajectory simulations of (Ga,Mn)N growth by chemical beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Carreno, Luz Angela; Bensaoula, Abdelhak

    2005-01-10

    In situ direct recoiled spectroscopy combined with scattering-recoiling trajectory simulations were applied to characterization of (Ga,Mn)N thin films grown by chemical beam epitaxy. Relative intensities of the scattering and recoiling signals recorded as a function of the sample azimuthal rotation allowed determination of the surface composition and periodicity. Models locating the Mn atoms at Ga sites and interstitial positions and the presence of N vacancies at percent levels were simulated. We find that most Mn atoms are located at Ga sites with a nonnegligible level going to interstitial positions; inclusion of N vacancies is also necessary to duplicate some experimental features. This agrees with the samples free carrier concentrations and photoluminescence measurements.

  14. The HERMES recoil detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  15. Recombination in liquid xenon for low-energy recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils, we calculated both initial recombination rate and volume recombination rate for keV recoils in liquid xenon. In this paper, we show the results of the calculated recombination rate as a function of recoil energy for both electronic recoils and nuclear recoils. Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils

  16. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-11

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  17. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  18. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  19. Speciation of Nitrogen-Bearing Species Using Negative and Positive Secondary Ion Spectra with Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexue; Sinha, Baerbel; Hoppe, Peter

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) can be used to differentiate different nitrogen-containing species commonly observed in atmospheric aerosol particles with micrometer or submicrometer spatial resolution, on the basis of the relative intensity of secondary ion signals, both in negative and positive secondary ion mode, without the need to chemically or physically separate the samples. Compounds tested include nitrate, nitrite, ammonium salts, urea, amino acids, sugars, organic acids, amides, triazine, imidazole, protein, and biological tissue. We show that NO2(-) secondary ions are unique to the decomposition of nitrate and nitrite salts, whereas NH4(+) secondary ions are unique to samples containing ammonium ions, with low signal intensities observed from amino groups but none from biological tissue. CN(-) signals are obtained from all nitrogen-bearing compounds, but relative signal intensities are the highest for organic nitrogen-containing compounds. We demonstrate that quantitative determination of the elemental fractions of carbon, oxygen, and nitrate in nanometer-sized aerosol samples using normalized secondary ion intensities is possible. We further demonstrate that stable isotope ratios measured on in-house standards of unknown isotopic composition using the (12)C(15)N(-)/(12)C(14)N(-) ratio (all nitrogen-containing species), the (15)N(16)O2(-)/(14)N(16)O2(-) ratio (nitrate and nitrite species), and the (15)NH4(+)/(14)NH4(+) ratio (ammonium salts, amino acids, and urea) are stable and sufficiently precise for nitrogen isotope analysis. PMID:26854563

  20. Inorganic ion and nitrogen isotopic compositions of atmospheric aerosols at Yurihonjo, Japan: Implications for nitrogen sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Kurahashi, Takahiro

    2011-11-01

    We studied the suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected in Akita Prefecture, Japan from April 2008 to January 2009 for inorganic ion composition and nitrogen isotopic ratio ( δ15N) of NH 4+ and NO 3-. The results showed an average SPM concentration of 15.6 μg m -3. The seasonal trend for SPM was higher values in the spring, lower in the winter. The major cations were Na +, NH 4+, Ca 2+ and major anions were SO 42-, NO 3-, Cl -. The annual correlation coefficient of ions indicates a very high value with NH 4+ and SO 42- ( R = 0.93), NO 3- and K + ( R = 0.65), NO 3- and Ca 2+ ( R = 0.62). The high springtime values are the apparent result of the dust stream from Asia. Average δ15N-NH 4+ and δ15N-NO 3- were 16.1‰ and -0.69‰, respectively. δ15N-NH 4+ increased slightly in summer, and δ15N-NO 3- increased considerably in winter. The trends indicated conversely. The heavy δ15N-NH 4+ in summer appears to be from agricultural sources such as animal waste and fertilizer. In addition, according to the difference in isotopes of NO x sources as the precursor of NO 3-, the dominant origin of heavy δ15N-NO 3- in winter could be NO x emitted from fossil fuel combustion at low temperature. Moreover, the average δ15N-NO 3- seemed to be made to baseline (approximately 0%) by vehicle emissions at high temperature. These results are considered to be very reasonable.

  1. Nitrogen ion utilization by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, L.K.

    1982-01-01

    Growth responses of one-year-old tulip poplar seedlings were determined for different nitrogen sources (HN/sub 4/NO/sub 3/, NH+/sub 4/, NO-/sub 3/, no nitrogen) at 336 ppm N in nutrient culture. At the end of three months, there were no significant differences in growth observed among treatments in terms of stem elongation, leaf area, and leaf size. After four months, however, seedlings of the NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) greater growth (final weight gain and stem elongation) than all other nitrogen sorces. Growth was slightly less for the NO-/sub 3/ treatment plants, but compared with NH+/sub 4/ and no nitrogen treatment, both NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ and NO-/sub 3/ treatments exhibited significantly greater growth responses. NO-/sub 3/ is recommended as the sole nitrogen source, especially for small seedlings of tulip poplar.

  2. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  3. Generation of elliptically polarized nitrogen ion laser fields using two-color femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ziting; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Qiao, Lingling; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate generation of nitrogen molecular ion () lasers with two femtosecond laser pulses at different wavelengths. The first pulse serves as the pump which ionizes the nitrogen molecules and excites the molecular ions to excited electronic states. The second pulse serves as the probe which leads to stimulated emission from the excited molecular ions. We observe that changing the angle between the polarization directions of the two pulses gives rise to elliptically polarized laser fields, which is interpreted as a result of strong birefringence of the gain medium near the wavelengths of the laser. PMID:26888182

  4. Segregation and enhanced diffusion of nitrogen in silicon induced by low energy ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, N.; Duscher, G.; Karoui, A.; Stevie, F.; Rozgonyi, G.

    2005-04-15

    A sample of nitrogen-doped, single crystal Czochralski silicon was subjected to several different surface preparations. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling has shown that prolonged glancing-angle bombardment by 3-5 kV Ar{sup +} ions significantly increases the nitrogen concentration in the near surface by up to an order of magnitude over the bulk value. Concentrations are observed to be elevated over the bulk value to a depth up to 25 {mu}m. Nitrogen-implanted samples and samples with a 1 nm surface nitride did not exhibit nitrogen segregation under the same conditions, but a sample with 100 nm of surface nitride did exhibit ion bombardment induced drive-in. In nitride-free samples, the source of the nitrogen is indicated to be a nitrogen-rich layer in the first micron of material. The diffusion behavior of nitrogen in silicon is discussed and the Crowdion mechanism for diffusion is suggested as the enabling mechanism for the enhanced low temperature diffusion.

  5. Interpreting Recoil for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of recoil is usually explained to students in the context of Newton's third law. Typically, when a projectile is fired, the recoil of the launch mechanism is interpreted as a reaction to the ejection of the smaller projectile. The same phenomenon is also interpreted in the context of the conservation of linear momentum, which is…

  6. An Auger Sputter Profiling Study of Nitrogen and Oxygen Ion Implantations in Two Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, B. D., Pope, L. E., Wittberg, T. N.

    1989-07-31

    Samples of two titanium alloys, Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3A1, were ion implanted with a combination of nitrogen (N+) and oxygen (O+). For each alloy, implantation parameters were chosen to give implanted nitrogen concentrations of approximately 10 or 50 atomic percent, from a depth of 100 nanometers to a depth of 400 nanometers. In all but one case, dual energy (200 keV and 90 keV) implantations of nitrogen were used to give a relatively uniform nitrogen concentration to a depth of 300 nanometers. In each case, oxygen was implanted at 35 keV, following the nitrogen implantation, to give an oxygen-enriched region near the surface. The implanted samples were then examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) combined with argon ion sputtering. In order to determine the stoichiometry of the nitrogen implanted regions, it was necessary to determine the N (KVV) contribution to the overlapping N (KVV) and Ti (LMM) Auger transitions. It was also necessary to correct for the ion-bombardment-induced compositional changes which have been described in an earlier study of titanium nitride thin films. The corrected AES depth profiles were in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  8. Nitrogen removal from plasma-facing components by ion cyclotron wall conditioning in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, A. G.; Wauters, T.; Petersson, P.; Drenik, A.; Rubel, M.; Crombé, K.; Douai, D.; Fortuna, E.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Möller, S.; Pisarek, M.; Vervier, M.

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency of ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) in the removal of nitrogen from plasma-facing components in TEXTOR was assessed. In two experiments the wall was loaded with nitrogen and subsequently cleaned by ICWC in deuterium and helium. The retention and removal of nitrogen was studied in-situ by means of mass spectrometry, and ex-situ by surface analysis of a set of graphite, tungsten and TZM plates installed on test limiter systems. 15N rare isotope was used as a marker. The results from the gas balance showed that about 25% of the retained nitrogen was removed after ICWC cleaning, whereas surface analysis of the plates based on ToF-HIERDA showed an increase of the deposited species after the cleaning. This indicates that during ICWC operation on carbon devices, nitrogen is not only pumped out but also transported to other locations on the wall. Additionally, deuterium surface content was studied before and after ICWC cleaning.

  9. High density nitrogen-vacancy sensing surface created via He+ ion implantation of 12C diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinsasser, Ed E.; Stanfield, Matthew M.; Banks, Jannel K. Q.; Zhu, Zhouyang; Li, Wen-Di; Acosta, Victor M.; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Itoh, Kohei M.; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a promising method for creating high-density ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers with narrow spin-resonances for high-sensitivity magnetic imaging. Practically, narrow spin-resonance linewidths substantially reduce the optical and RF power requirements for ensemble-based sensing. The method combines isotope purified diamond growth, in situ nitrogen doping, and helium ion implantation to realize a 100 nm-thick sensing surface. The obtained 1017 cm-3 nitrogen-vacancy density is only a factor of 10 less than the highest densities reported to date, with an observed 200 kHz spin resonance linewidth over 10 times narrower.

  10. Optical absorption enhancement of CdTe nanostructures by low-energy nitrogen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Asl Soleimani, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanostructures by means of RF magnetron sputtering followed by low-energy ion implantation and post-thermal treatment. We have thoroughly studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of these nanostructures. The effects of nitrogen ion bombardment on the structural parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as crystal size, microstrain, and dislocation density have been examined. From x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis it could be deduced that N+ ion fluence and annealing treatment helps to form (3 0 0) orientation in the crystalline structure of cadmium-telluride films. Fluctuations in optical properties like the optical band gap and absorption coefficient as a function of N+ ion fluences have been observed. The annealing of the sample irradiated by a dose of 1018 ions cm-2 has led to great enhancement in the optical absorption over a wide range of wavelengths with a thickness of 250 nm. The enhanced absorption is significantly higher than the observed value in the original CdTe layer with a thickness of 3 μm. Surface properties such as structure, grain size and roughness are noticeably affected by varying the nitrogen fluences. It is speculated that nitrogen bombardment and post-annealing treatment results in a smaller optical band gap, which in turn leads to higher absorption. Nitrogen bombardment is found to be a promising method to increase efficiency of thin film solar cells.

  11. Positive corona discharge ion source with IMS/MS to detect impurities in high purity Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabo, M.; Klas, M.; Wang, H.; Huang, C.; Chu, Y.; Matejčík, Š.

    2011-07-01

    We have applied the Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (IMS/MS) and the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation/Mass Spectrometry (APCI/MS) techniques to study the formation of the ions in the positive corona discharge (CD) in highly purified nitrogen with impurities at 100 ppt level. The main products observed were H3O+(H2O)n ions (reduced ion mobility of 2.15 cm2 V-1 s-1). Additionally, we have observed ions with reduced mobilities 2.42 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 2.30 cm2 V-1 s-1. The intensity of these ions was increasing with the increasing discharge current. We associated these peaks with NH4+ and NO+(H2O)n. The formation of these ions results from trace amounts of O2 and NH3 in nitrogen. The time evolution of the ions in corona discharge has been studied using the APCI/MS technique in the time windows ranging from 100 μs to 2 ms. The present work indicates the ability of the IMS technique equipped with CD ions source to detect impurities below 100 ppt level.

  12. Nitrogen mass transfer models for plasma-based low-energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Che, Honglong; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-03-15

    The nitrogen mass transfer process in plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) is theoretically and experimentally studied in order to explore the process mechanism of PBLEII and therefore to optimize the apparatus design and the process conditions. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge generates the nitrogen plasma with a high density of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}, which diffuses downstream to the process chamber along the divergent magnetic field. The nitrogen ions in the plasma implant into the surface and transport to the matrix of an austenitic stainless steel under the low negative pulsed bias of −2 kV at a process temperature of 400 °C. A global plasma model is used to simulate the ECR microwave plasma discharge for a range of working pressures and microwave powers. The fluid models are adopted to calculate the plasma downstream diffusion, the sheath expansion and the low-energy ion implantation on the surface. A nonlinear kinetic discrete model is established to describe the nitrogen transport in the austenitic stainless steel and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. Under an average implantation current density of 0.3–0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, the surface nitrogen concentration in the range from 18.5 to 29 at. % is a critical factor for the nitrogen transport in the AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by PBLEII, which accelerates the implanted nitrogen diffusion inward up to 6–12 μm during a nitriding time of 4 h.

  13. The variation of hydrophobicity of aluminum alloy by nitrogen and argon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Sang Cheol; Kim, Ki Wook; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen and argon ions were irradiated on the surface of aluminum alloy. Ion irradiation appeared to increase contact angle of the metallic specimens. In order to investigate the factors affecting the changes of contact angles, changes in the characteristics of the surfaces were examined using SEM, AFM, and X-ray diffraction. The contact angle increased due to surface composition changes and surface roughness changes.

  14. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOEpatents

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Sulfur and nitrogen reactions for cometary comae ion chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    The low pressure reactions of sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, and hydrazine with H2O+ and H3O+ were studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potentially important for sulphur chemistry in cometary comae. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels are presented.

  16. Further insight into gravitational recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2008-02-15

    We test the accuracy of our recently proposed empirical formula to model the recoil velocity imparted to the merger remnant of spinning, unequal-mass black-hole binaries. We study three families of black-hole binary configurations, all with mass ratio q=3/8 (to nearly maximize the unequal-mass contribution to the kick) and spins aligned (or counter-aligned) with the orbital angular momentum, two with spin configurations chosen to minimize the spin-induced tangential and radial accelerations of the trajectories, respectively, and a third family where the trajectories are significantly altered by spin-orbit coupling. We find good agreement between the measured and predicted recoil velocities for the first two families, and reasonable agreement for the third. We also reexamine our original generic binary configuration that led to the discovery of extremely large spin-driven recoil velocities and inspired our empirical formula, and find rough agreement between the predicted and measured recoil speeds.

  17. Ion chromatographic determination of halogens, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in coals

    SciTech Connect

    Rigin, V.I.

    1987-12-10

    A method is proposed for simultaneous determination of sulfur, nitrogen, phosphorus, and halogens in fossil coals. The method consists in autoclave combustion of the sample in oxygen, absorption of the combustion products by a mixture of potassium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide solutions, and ion chromatographic determination of the anions formed.

  18. Deconvoluting nonaxial recoil in Coulomb explosion measurements of molecular axis alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lauge; Christiansen, Lars; Shepperson, Benjamin; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    We report a quantitative study of the effect of nonaxial recoil during Coulomb explosion of laser-aligned molecules and introduce a method to remove the blurring caused by nonaxial recoil in the fragment-ion angular distributions. Simulations show that nonaxial recoil affects correlations between the emission directions of fragment ions differently from the effect caused by imperfect molecular alignment. The method, based on analysis of the correlation between the emission directions of the fragment ions from Coulomb explosion, is used to deconvolute the effect of nonaxial recoil from experimental fragment angular distributions. The deconvolution method is then applied to a number of experimental data sets to correct the degree of alignment for nonaxial recoil, to select optimal Coulomb explosion channels for probing molecular alignment, and to estimate the highest degree of alignment that can be observed from selected Coulomb explosion channels.

  19. Escape of Nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere driven by magnetospheric and pick-up ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Liu, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2003-05-01

    The nitrogen rich atmosphere of Titan is a significant source of the neutrals in Saturn's magnetosphere. As Titan does not posses an intrinsic magnetic field, energetic Kronian magnetospheric ions penetrate Titan's atmospheric exobase as can local pick-up ions (e.g. Shematovich et al. 2003). Penetration by energetic ions is described here using a 3-D Monte Carlo model. The incident ions can lead directly or indirectly to the production of fast neutrals that collide with other atmospheric neutrals. This leads to dissociation and the ejection of both atomic and molecular nitrogen. The recently calculated dissociation cross sections of N2 are used in the present model (Tully and Johnson 2002). The incident flux of slowed magentospheric N+ ions and pick-up C2H_5+ ions is estimated from the work of Brecht et al. (2000). These ions of energy less than 1.2 keV are shown to be more efficient in ejecting material from Titan's atmosphere than the higher energy corotating ions described in early estimates (Lammer et al. 1998). This incident flux of ions are used in the model and the results are used as a source of nitrogen for the Saturnian plasma torus. Acknowledgment: This work is supported by NASA:s Planetary Atmospheres Program. References Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119, 2000. Lammer, H. W. Stumptner, and S.J. Bauer, Planet. Space Sci., 46, 1207, 1998. Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael and J.G. Luhmann, J. Geophys. Res., in press, 2003. Tully, C., R.E. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 6556-6561, 2002.

  20. Magnetization suppression in Co/Pd and CoCrPt by nitrogen ion implantation for bit patterned media fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenji; Ajan, Antony; Aoyama, Nobuhide; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Miyaguchi, Yusuke; Tsumagari, Kanako; Morita, Tadashi; Nishihashi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uzumaki, Takuya

    2010-06-01

    We propose a bit patterned media fabrication method based on low energy nitrogen ion implantation. Nitrogen ion implantation of fcc-Co/Pd multilayer or hcp-CoCrPt single layer suppresses their magnetizations at room temperature. Ion implantation reduces the Curie temperature from 600 to 400 K (or lower) as a result of lattice expansion and reduced exchange interaction between the magnetic atoms in the magnetic layer. We have made media with magnetic dots of 190 to 30 nm in diameter by nitrogen ion doping through resist patterns. Writing and reading of the signal from individual dots were performed with a commercial perpendicular magnetic recording head.

  1. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  2. Corrosion behaviors of Mo coating on stainless steel 316 substrates implanted by different nitrogen ion fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Madjid; Bafandeh, Nastaran

    2014-03-01

    The molybdenum nitride coating was produced by nitrogen ion implantation of the molybdenum layer deposited on the stainless steel 316 (SS) substrates. At first, molybdenum layers were deposited on the substrates by ion beam sputtering method, then nitrogen ions with an energy of 30 keV and a fluence between 1×1017 and 12×1017 N+ cm-2 were implanted in Mo/SS system. Crystal structure and topography of the surface are investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image respectively. XRD patterns showed the formation of molybdenum nitride phases in all implanted samples. Corrosion tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the nitrogen applied fluences. A considerable improvement of corrosion performance by increasing ions fluences was observed. The lowest corrosion current density with amount of 0.1 μA/cm2 was obtained at 12×1017 ions/cm2 fluence in our case.

  3. Magnetic properties and recording performances of patterned media fabricated by nitrogen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoue, Tatsuya; Ito, Kenichi; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Toshinori; Inaba, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation was performed on CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular media with a resist mask to fabricate patterned media. Signal amplitude and autocorrelation signal-to-noise ratio of the preamble pattern were measured to evaluate the quality of the pattern fabricated by the ion implantation. The signal-to-noise ratio and the jitter were closely related to the saturation magnetization of the ion-implanted area. The remained magnetization of the ion-implanted area probably affects edge roughness of the magnetic pattern. Larger reduction of the saturation magnetization at the ion-implanted area is important for obtaining higher signal quality. Off-track profiles and 747 curves were measured for 76-nm-pitch discrete track fabricated by ion implantation. The results show that discrete track recording had advantages over recording on continuous magnetic film, which indicates that the fabricated patterns were successfully isolated. The nitrogen ion implantation was effective in fabricating isolated magnetic tracks or isolated magnetic dots for the patterned media.

  4. Microstructural investigation of alumina implanted with 30 keV nitrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikha, Deep; Jha, Usha; Sinha, S. K.; Barhai, P. K.; Sarkhel, G.; Nair, K. G. M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2007-11-01

    Among ceramics, alumina is being widely used as biomaterials now these days. It is being used as hip joints, tooth roots etc. Ion implantation has been employed to modify its surface without changing it bulk properties. 30 keV nitrogen with varying ion dose ranging from 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 to 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 is implanted in alumina. Surface morphology has been studied with optical microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). Improvement in brittleness has been observed with the increase in ion dose. Compound formation and changes in grain size have been studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD). AlN compound formation is also observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The change in the grain size is related with the nanohardness and Hall-Petch relationship is verified.

  5. Nitrogen and boron ion implantation into electrodeposited hard chrome

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Tesmer, J.R.; Scarborough, W.K.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Kern, K.T.

    1996-10-01

    Electrodeposited hard chrome was ion implanted with N alone, B alone, and a combination. Separate N and B implantation was done at 75 keV and incident doses of 2, 4, and 8x10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}. Samples with both N/B implants used 75 keV and incident dose levels of 4x10{sup 17} N- and B-at/cm{sup 2}. Beam-line system was used. Retained dose was measured using ion beam analysis, which indicated most of the incident dose was retained. Surface hardness, wear coefficient, and friction coefficient were determined by nanohardness indentation and pin-on-disk wear. At a depth of 50 nm, surface hardness increased from 18{+-}1 GPa (unimplanted) to a max of 23{+-}4 GPa for B implant and 26{+-}1 GPa for N implant. the wear coefficient was reduced by 1.3x to 7.4x, depending on implantation. N implant results in lower wear coefficients than B implant.

  6. Improving low-energy boron/nitrogen ion implantation in graphene by ion bombardment at oblique angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhitong; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically analyzing the effects of the incident angle and ion energy in determining the probabilities of six distinct types of physics that may occur in an ion bombardment event, including reflection, absorption, substitution, single vacancy, double vacancy, and transmission. By analyzing the atomic trajectories from 576 000 simulations, we identified three single vacancy creation mechanisms and four double vacancy creation mechanisms, and quantified their probability distributions in the angle-energy space. These findings further open the door for improved control of ion implantation towards a wide range of applications of graphene.Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically

  7. Making AlN(x) Tunnel Barriers Using a Low-Energy Nitrogen-Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Kleinsasser, Alan; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry; Lee, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A technique based on accelerating positive nitrogen ions onto an aluminum layer has been demonstrated to be effective in forming thin (<2 nm thick) layers of aluminum nitride (AlN(x)) for use as tunnel barriers in Nb/Al-AlN(x)/Nb superconductor/insulator/ superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions. AlN(x) is the present material of choice for tunnel barriers because, to a degree greater than that of any other suitable material, it offers the required combination of low leakage current at high current density and greater thermal stability. While ultra-thin AlN films with good thickness and stoichiometry control are easily formed using techniques such as reactive molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, growth temperatures of 900 C are necessary for the dissociative adsorption of nitrogen from either nitrogen (N2) or ammonia (NH3). These growth temperatures are prohibitively high for the formation of tunnel barriers on Nb films because interfacial reactions at temperatures as low as 200 to 300 C degrade device properties. Heretofore, deposition by reactive sputtering and nitridation of thin Al layers with DC and RF nitrogen plasmas have been successfully used to form AlN barriers in SIS junctions. However, precise control over critical current density Jc has proven to be a challenge, as is attaining adequate process reproducibility from system to system. The present ion-beam technique is an alternative to the plasma or reactive sputtering techniques as it provides a highly controlled arrival of reactive species, independent of the electrical conditions of the substrate or vacuum chamber. Independent and accurate control of parameters such as ion energy, flux, species, and direction promises more precise control of film characteristics such as stoichiometry and thickness than is the case with typical plasma processes. In particular, the background pressure during ion-beam nitride growth is 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower, minimizing the formation of

  8. Local formation of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Aloni, S.; Ogletree, D. F.; Tomut, M.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Rangelow, I. W.; Schenkel, T.

    2014-12-07

    We exposed nitrogen-implanted diamonds to beams of swift heavy ions (∼1 GeV, ∼4 MeV/u) and find that these irradiations lead directly to the formation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, without thermal annealing. We compare the photoluminescence intensities of swift heavy ion activated NV{sup −} centers to those formed by irradiation with low-energy electrons and by thermal annealing. NV{sup −} yields from irradiations with swift heavy ions are 0.1 of yields from low energy electrons and 0.02 of yields from thermal annealing. We discuss possible mechanisms of NV center formation by swift heavy ions such as electronic excitations and thermal spikes. While forming NV centers with low efficiency, swift heavy ions could enable the formation of three dimensional NV{sup −} assemblies over relatively large distances of tens of micrometers. Further, our results show that NV center formation is a local probe of (partial) lattice damage relaxation induced by electronic excitations from swift heavy ions in diamond.

  9. Plasma immersion ion implantation of nitrogen into H13 steel under moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, M.; Leandro, C.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2005-10-01

    Ion implantation of nitrogen into samples of tempered and quenched H13 steel was carried out by plasma immersion technique. A glow discharge plasma of nitrogen species was the ion source and the negative high voltage pulser provided 10-12 kV, 60 μs duration and 1.0-2.0 kHz frequency, flat voltage pulses. The temperatures of the samples remained between 300 and 450 °C, sustained solely by the ion bombardment. In some of the discharges, we used a N2 + H2 gas mixture with 1:1 ratio. PIII treatments as long as 3, 6, 9 and up to 12 h were carried out to achieve as thickest treated layer as possible, and we were able to reach over 20 μm treated layers, as a result of ion implantation and thermal (and possibly radiation enhanced) diffusion. The nitrogen depth profiles were obtained by GDOS (Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy) and the exact composition profiles by AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy). The hardness of the treated surface was increased by more than 250%, reaching 18.8 GPa. No white layer was seen in this case. A hardness profile was obtained which corroborated a deep hardened layer, confirming the high efficacy of the moderate temperature PIII treatment of steels.

  10. The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and microstructure of tantalum-coated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, S.; Hanteh Zadeh, M.; Yari, M.; Jafari-Khamse, E.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the effects of nitrogen ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and microstructure of DC magnetron sputtered tantalum-coated stainless steel were investigated. The nitrogen fluence was varied between 3-10 × 1017 ions/cm2 while the beam energy was kept constant at 30 keV. The effects of ion implantation were characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern, atomic force microscopy, and potentiodynamic corrosion test in a 0.5 MH2SO4 solution. The atomic force microscopy micrographs were quantitatively and statistically analyzed by computing the multifractal spectrum of the atomic force microscopy images. The results showed that the fluence variation strongly affected the surface roughness and formation of TaN and Ta2N phases. Increasing the nitrogen fluence up to 10 × 1017 ions/cm2 increased surface roughness. The highest corrosion resistance was obtained at 7 × 1017 ions/cm2 nitrogen fluence.

  11. Ionic recoil energies in the Coulomb explosion of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, S.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    The photoionization of metal clusters in intense femtosecond laser fields has been studied. In contrast to an experiment on atoms, the interaction in this case leads to a very efficient and high charging of the particle where tens of electrons per atom are ejected from the cluster. The recoil energy distribution of the atomic fragment ions was measured which in the case of lead clusters exceeds 180 keV. Enhanced charging efficiency which we observed earlier for specific pulse conditions is not reflected in the recoil energy spectra. Both the average and the maximum energies decrease with increasing laser pulse width. This is in good agreement with molecular dynamics calculations.

  12. Electron-Capture Cross Sections of Ground-State O2+ Recoil Ions in Slow Collisions with H2 and O2

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Asad T.; Gray, Tom J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measured total charge-transfer (electron-capture) cross sections for the ground state O2+ (X2Πg) ions with H2 and O2 molecular gases in the collision energy range between 0.50 and 2 keV. The time-of-flight technique has been used to measure the fast neutral products from O2+ charge transfer reactions. The analyzed process has cross sections that continue to increase slowly, as a function of incident energy. Measured cross sections for O2++H2, O2 systems are compared with previously available experimental and theoretical results in the literature.

  13. Direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Khayamian, T

    2008-09-15

    In this study, direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen residues in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was investigated. Pyridine was used as an alternate reagent gas to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of the method. The results indicate that the limit of detection (LOD) was about 9.2x10(-3)mugmL(-1) and the linear dynamic range was obtained from 0.03 to 2.00mugmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was about 11%. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in river and tap water samples and the results were compared with the Nessler method. The comparison of the results validates the potential of the proposed method as an alternative technique for the analysis of the ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples. PMID:18761176

  14. Influence of Temperature on Nitrogen Ion Implantation of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Zheng, Yong-zhen; Mo, Zhi-tao; Tang, De-li; Tong, Hong-hui; Geng, Man

    2001-04-01

    In order to achieve increased layer thickness, and wearing resistance, enhanced ion implantation with nitrogen has been carried out at temperatures of 100, 200, 400, and 600°C with a dose of 4×1018 ions cm-2. Using the Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) device, specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted at elevated temperatures, using the ion flux as the heating source. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), x-ray Diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness measurements and pin-on-disk wearing tester were utilized to evaluate the surface property improvements. The thickness of the implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 to 600°C. Higher surface hardness and wearing resistance was also obtained in implantation under higher temperature. XRD image showed the presence of titanium nitrides on the implanted surface.

  15. Etching and structural changes in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implanted polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Kondyurin, A.; Mizuno, K.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2006-06-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), with nitrogen ions of energy 20 keV in the fluence range of 5 × 1014-2 × 1016 ions cm-2, is used to modify 100 nm thin films of polystyrene on silicon wafer substrates. Ellipsometry is used to study changes in thickness with etching and changes in optical constants. Two distinctly different etch rates are observed as the polymer structure is modified. FTIR spectroscopy data reveals the structural changes, including changes in aromatic and aliphatic groups and oxidation and carbonisation processes, occurring in the polystyrene film as a function of the ion fluence. The transformation to a dense amorphous carbon-like material was observed to progress through an intermediate structural form containing a high concentration of Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds.

  16. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends. PMID:11233567

  17. Effects of nitrogen sources and metal ions on ethanol fermentation with cadmium-containing medium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingyun; Wu, Mengnan; Hu, Jiajun; Gao, Min-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated ethanol fermentation and its correlation with glutathione (GSH) synthesis under various cadmium-conditions with different metal ions and nitrogen sources. We found that corn steep liquor (CSL) and yeast extract have differential roles to play in GSH accumulation in cell even though both of them could alleviate the inhibition by cadmium. The different GSH accumulation in cell resulted from the different contents of metal ions in CSL and yeast extract. Intracellular GSH decreased with increasing calcium concentrations, and high calcium concentrations rendered the yeast more tolerant to cadmium stress than the nitrogen sources did. When the mole ratio of calcium to cadmium was 100:1, yeast tolerated 1000 µmol/L cadmium with no decrease in efficiency in ethanol production. As a result, the use of calcium allowed a significant saving of high-cost nutrient yeast extract with an efficient ethanol production, making the bioconversion of cadmium-containing biomass into ethanol possible. PMID:26641600

  18. Equilibrium thickness of carbon target interacting with nitrogen and neon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkova, Yu. A.; Novikov, N. V.; Teplova, Ya. A.

    2016-04-01

    The method for calculation of the target thickness which is required for the formation of equilibrium charge distribution of ions is proposed. The description of nonequilibrium processes is based on empirical estimations of charge-exchange cross sections, taking the density effect for solids into account. The variation of the average charge and the width of the nonequilibrium charge distribution as a function of the target thickness is analyzed. The results of calculations for nitrogen and neon ions in carbon are compared with experimental data.

  19. Chemistry induced by energetic ions in water ice mixed with molecular nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, Ph.; Domaracka, A.; Fulvio, D.; Langlinay, T.; Lv, X. Y.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Several molecular species have been observed as frozen gases in cold environments such as grains in the interstellar/circumstellar medium or icy objects in the outer solar system. Because N2 and O2 are homonuclear, symmetric molecules are not easily observed. It is therefore relevant to find indirect methods to prove their presence from astronomical observations. Aims: Here we investigate one of the possible indirect methods, namely the formation of specific molecules by cosmic ion bombardment of ices in astrophysical environments that contain O2 and N2. The observation of these molecules in astronomical environments could act as a trojan horse to detect the presence of frozen molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. Methods: We have conducted ion bombardment experiments of frozen O2, H2O and their mixtures with N2 at the laboratories of CIMAP-GANIL at Caen (France) and LASp at Catania (Italy). Different ions (13C2+, Ar2+ and H+) and energies (30-200 keV) have been used. Results: We have found that 13CO2 is formed when carbon ions are implanted in ices containing H2O and/or O2. Ozone and nitrogen oxides (NO, N2O, NO2) are formed in the studied ices containing O2 and N2 with different relative abundances. Conclusions: We suggest that ozone and nitrogen oxides are present and have to be searched for in some specific environments such as dense clouds in the interstellar medium and the surfaces of Pluto, Charon and Triton. Their observation could demonstrate the presence of molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. A possible interest for the observations of atmospheres in exo-planetary objects is also discussed.

  20. Short-range ordering of ion-implanted nitrogen atoms in SiC-graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Willke, P.; Druga, T.; Wenderoth, M.; Amani, J. A.; Weikert, S.; Hofsäss, H.; Thakur, S.; Maiti, K.

    2014-09-15

    We perform a structural analysis of nitrogen-doped graphene on SiC(0001) prepared by ultra low-energy ion bombardment. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that nitrogen atoms are incorporated almost exclusively as graphitic substitution in the graphene honeycomb lattice. With an irradiation energy of 25 eV and a fluence of approximately 5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, we achieve a nitrogen content of around 1%. By quantitatively comparing the position of the N-atoms in the topography measurements with simulated random distributions, we find statistically significant short-range correlations. Consequently, we are able to show that the dopants arrange preferably at lattice sites given by the 6 × 6-reconstruction of the underlying substrate. This selective incorporation is most likely triggered by adsorbate layers present during the ion bombardment. This study identifies low-energy ion irradiation as a promising method for controlled doping in epitaxial graphene.

  1. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOEpatents

    Liu, David K.; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1989-01-01

    A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

  2. Nitrogen Plasma Ion Implantation of Al and Ti alloys in the High Voltage Glow Discharge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Ueda, M.; Rossi, J. O.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.; Beloto, A. F.

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced surface properties can be attained for aluminum and its alloys (mechanical and tribological) and Ti6Al4V (mainly tribological) by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) technique. The main problem here, more severe for Al case, is the rapid oxygen contamination even in low O partial pressure. High energy nitrogen ions during PIII are demanded for this situation, in order to enable the ions to pass through the formed oxide layer. We have developed a PIII system that can operate at energies in excess of 50keV, using a Stacked Blumlein (SB) pulser which can nominally provide up to 100 kV pulses. Initially, we are using this system in the High Voltage Glow Discharge (HVGD) mode, to implant nitrogen ions into Al5052 alloy with energies in the range of 30 to 50keV, with 1.5μs duration pulses at a repetition rate of 100Hz. AES, pin-on-disc, nanoindentation measurements are under way but x-ray diffraction results already indicated abundant formation of AlN in the surface for Al5052 treated with this HVGD mode. Our major aim in this PIII experiment is to achieve this difficult to produce stable and highly reliable AlN rich surface layer with high hardness, high corrosion resistance and very low wear rate.

  3. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  4. Nitrogen incorporation in saturated aliphatic C6-C8 hydrocarbons and ethanol in low-pressure nitrogen plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    Ion/molecule reactions of saturated hydrocarbons (n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-heptane, n-octane and isooctane) in 28-Torr N2 plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source were investigated using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. It was found that the ions with [M+14](+) were observed as the major ions (M: sample molecule). The exact mass analysis revealed that the ions are nitrogenated molecules, [M+N](+) formed by the reactions of N3 (+) with M. The reaction, N3 (+) + M → [M+N](+) + N2 , were examined by the density functional theory calculations. It was found that N3 (+) abstracts the H atom from hydrocarbon molecules leading to the formation of protonated imines in the forms of R'R″CNH2 (+) (i.e. C-H bond nitrogenation). This result is in accord with the fact that elimination of NH3 is the major channel for MS/MS of [M+N](+) . That is, nitrogen is incorporated in the C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons. No nitrogenation was observed for benzene and acetone, which was ascribed to the formation of stable charge-transfer complexes benzene⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) and acetone⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) revealed by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270868

  5. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  6. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  7. Highly tunable formation of nitrogen-vacancy centers via ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sangtawesin, S.; Brundage, T. O.; Atkins, Z. J.; Petta, J. R.

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate highly tunable formation of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers using 20 keV {sup 15}N{sup +} ion implantation through arrays of high-resolution apertures fabricated with electron beam lithography. By varying the aperture diameters from 80 to 240 nm, as well as the average ion fluences from 5×10{sup 10} to 2 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}, we can control the number of ions per aperture. We analyze the photoluminescence on multiple sites with different implantation parameters and obtain ion-to-NV conversion yields of 6%–7%, consistent across all ion fluences. The implanted NV centers have spin dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} ∼ 3 μs, comparable to naturally occurring NV centers in high purity diamond with natural abundance {sup 13}C. With this technique, we can deterministically control the population distribution of NV centers in each aperture, allowing for the study of single or coupled NV centers and their integration into photonic structures.

  8. Laboratory experiments for Titan's ionosphere : the chemistry of N2+, N+, and N2++ nitrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, R.; Alcaraz, C.; Dutuit, O.; Nicolas, C.; Soldi-Lose, H.; Zabka, J.; Franceschi, P.

    Laboratory experiments for Titan's ionosphere : the chemistry of N+ , N+ , and N2+ nitrogen ions 2 2 R. Thissen (1), C. Alcaraz (1), O. Dutuit (1), C. Nicolas (2), H. Soldi-Lose (3), J. Zabka (4), P. Franceschi (5) (1) LCP, Bât. 350, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France, (2) Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, (3) Institut für Chemie, Fachgruppe Organische Chemie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin, (4) J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Dolejskova 3, CZ 18223 Praha 8 - Kobylisy, Czech Republik, (5) Dept. of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo (TN), Italy (christian.alcaraz@lcp.u-psud.fr) N2 is the major neutral componant of Titan's atmosphere, its ionisation by solar radiation and by magnetospheric electron impact is the most important production of ions in Titan's ionosphere. These primary processes not only lead to N+ molecular 2 monocations but also to N+ atomic ions and to N2+ molecular dications, which can 2 pertain some internal or translational excitation. This contribution will summarize our efforts to caracterize in gaz phase laboratory experiments the reactivity of the nitrogen ions with the most important neutral targets of the Titan's atmosphere [1-3]: • N+ + CH4 , C2 H2 , and C2 H6 2 • N+ (3 P, 1 D) + CH4 , and C2 H4 • N2+ + N2 , CH4 , and C2 H4 2 In this work, particular attention has been paid on the effect of internal and/or translational excitation of the primary nitrogen ions on the rate constant and branching ratio of these ion-molecule reactions. The results from these studies have been compared to the literature values when available and some significant differences have been found. These new values have been used as input data in 1D models of the Titan's ionosphere to show the effect on the final density profiles of the main ions [4] and to demonstrate the existence of a N2+2 dication

  9. Friction wear and auger analysis of iron implanted with 1.5-MeV nitrogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of implantation of 1.5-MeV nitrogen ions on the friction and wear characteristics of pure iron sliding against steel was studied in a pin-on disk apparatus. An implantation dose of 5 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm was used. Small reductions in initial and steady-state wear rates were observed for nitrogen-implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 15 at. % at a depth of 8 x 10 to the -7th m. A similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration, thus giving no evidence for diffusion of nitrogen beyond the implanted range.

  10. Population Redistribution Among Multiple Electronic States of Molecular Nitrogen Ions in Strong Laser Fields.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jinping; Jiang, Shicheng; Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Wu, Chengyin; Lu, Ruifeng; Li, Ziting; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yu, Chao; Wang, Zhanshan; Jiang, Hongbing; Gong, Qihuang; Cheng, Ya

    2016-04-01

    We carry out a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on the population distributions in the ground and excited states of tunnel-ionized nitrogen molecules at various driver wavelengths in the near- and midinfrared range. Our results reveal that efficient couplings (i.e., population exchanges) between the ground N_{2}^{+}(X^{2}Σ_{g}^{+}) state and the excited N_{2}^{+}(A^{2}Π_{u}) and N_{2}^{+}(B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+}) states occur in strong laser fields. The couplings result in a population inversion between the N_{2}^{+}(X^{2}Σ_{g}^{+}) and N_{2}^{+}(B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+}) states at wavelengths near 800 nm, which is verified by our experimental observation of the amplification of a seed at ∼391  nm. The result provides insight into the mechanism of free-space nitrogen ion lasers generated in remote air with strong femtosecond laser pulses. PMID:27104707

  11. Population Redistribution Among Multiple Electronic States of Molecular Nitrogen Ions in Strong Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jinping; Jiang, Shicheng; Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Wu, Chengyin; Lu, Ruifeng; Li, Ziting; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yu, Chao; Wang, Zhanshan; Jiang, Hongbing; Gong, Qihuang; Cheng, Ya

    2016-04-01

    We carry out a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on the population distributions in the ground and excited states of tunnel-ionized nitrogen molecules at various driver wavelengths in the near- and midinfrared range. Our results reveal that efficient couplings (i.e., population exchanges) between the ground N2+(X2Σg+) state and the excited N2+(A2Πu) and N2+(B2Σu+) states occur in strong laser fields. The couplings result in a population inversion between the N2+(X2Σg+) and N2+(B2Σu+) states at wavelengths near 800 nm, which is verified by our experimental observation of the amplification of a seed at ˜391 nm . The result provides insight into the mechanism of free-space nitrogen ion lasers generated in remote air with strong femtosecond laser pulses.

  12. Microstructure and oxidation behavior of high strength steel AISI 410 implanted with nitrogen ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana, Ismoyo, Agus Hadi; Sujitno, Tjipto; Dimyati, A.

    2016-04-01

    Surface treatment by implantation with nitrogen-ion was performed on the commercial feritic high strength steel AISI 410 which is termed for high temperature applications. The aim of this research was focused on the surface modification to improve its high temperature oxidation property in the early stages. Ion implantation was carried out at acceleration energy of 100 KeV and ion current 10 mA for 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The samples were subjected to the high temperature oxidation test by means of thermogravimetry in a magnetic suspension balance (MSB) at 500 °C for 5 hours. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and Vickers Hardness measurement were used for sample characterization. The formation of ferro-nitride phase after implantation did not occur, however a thin layer considered to contain nitrogen interstitials was detected. The oxidation of both samples before and after implantation followed parabolic kinetics indicating inward growth of oxide scale characteristically due to diffusion of oxygen anions towards matrix surface. After oxidation test relativelly stable oxide scales were observed. Oxidation rates decreased proportionally with the increasing of implantation time due to the formation of oxide layer which is considered to be effectiv inhibitor for the oxygen diffusion.

  13. Vibrationally state selected ion molecule experimental and computational studies of both reactant charge states of [nitrogen dioxide + ethyne]+ and HOD+ with nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Jason M.

    2011-12-01

    Ion molecule studies have not only determined reactivity of systems that would have otherwise been unavailable, but also provide a perspective that improves the understanding of the mechanisms that drive reaction. Presented here are studies of three ion molecule systems one of which is accompanied by an extensive set of direct dynamics trajectory calculations. In the first system presented, NO2+ in six different vibrational states was reacted with C2H2 over the center-of-mass energy range from 0.03 to 3.3 eV. The effects of the symmetric bend overtone (0200) excitation are particularly strong (factor of 4) while the delta overtone (0220) effects are much weaker. A large set of quasi-classical trajectories were calculated at the PBE1PBE/6-311G** level of theory, in an attempt to understand the mechanistic origins of this observation. The trajectories reproduce experiment where comparable. Analysis of these trajectories resolves the mechanistic origins of this vibrational effect. Similar experimental measurements were made for the first excited electronic state of this system where the charge is localized on the acetylene. The C 2H2+ reactant was prepared in four distinct modes. Because both reactants have one unpaired electron, collisions can occur with either singlet or triplet coupling of these unpaired electrons, and the contributions the three channels (charge, O-, and O transfer) are separated based on distinct recoil dynamics. The effects of C2H 2+ vibration are modest, but mode specific. Integral cross sections and product recoil velocity distributions were also measured for reaction of HOD+ with NO2, in which the HOD+ reactant was prepared in its ground state, and with mode-selective excitation in the 001 (OH stretch), 100 (OD stretch) and bend (010) modes. In addition, we measured the 300 K thermal kinetics in a selected ion flow tube reactor and report product branching ratios different from previous measurements. Reaction is found to occur on both the

  14. Radiolysis of Nitrogen and Water-ice Mixture by Fast Ions: Implications for Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Bergantini, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2015-09-01

    The participation of condensed nitrogen in the surface chemistry of some objects in the outer solar system, such as Pluto and Triton, is very important. The remote observation of this species using absorption spectroscopy is a difficult task because N2 is not IR active in the gas phase. Water is also among the most abundant molecules in the surface of these objects; chemical reactions between N2 and H2O induced by cosmic rays are therefore expected. Although pure N2 ice is hardly identified by IR spectroscopy, the species produced through the processing of the surface ice by cosmic rays may give relevant clues indicating how abundant the N2 is in the outside layers of the surface of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of nitrogenated species induced by cosmic-ray analogs in an ice mixture containing nitrogen and water. Experiments were performed in the GANIL Laboratory by bombarding N2:H2O (10:1) ice at 15 K with 40 MeV 58Ni11+ ions. Evolution of precursor and daughter species was monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The main produced species are the nitrogen oxides NOk (k = 1-3), N2Oj (j = 1-5), N3, and O3. Among them, the N2O and N3 are the most abundant, representing ˜61% of the total column density of the daughter molecules at 1013 ions cm-2 fluence; the current results indicate that the yield of daughter species from this mixture is low, and this may be one of the reasons why NiOj molecules are not usually observed in TNOs.

  15. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  16. Influence of crystal orientation and ion bombardment on the nitrogen diffusivity in single-crystalline austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Martinavicius, A.; Abrasonis, G.; Moeller, W.

    2011-10-01

    The nitrogen diffusivity in single-crystalline AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel (ASS) during ion nitriding has been investigated at different crystal orientations ((001), (110), (111)) under variations of ion flux (0.3-0.7 mA cm{sup -2}), ion energy (0.5-1.2 keV), and temperature (370-430 deg. C). The nitrogen depth profiles obtained from nuclear reaction analysis are in excellent agreement with fits using the model of diffusion under the influence of traps, from which diffusion coefficients were extracted. At fixed ion energy and flux, the diffusivity varies by a factor up to 2.5 at different crystal orientations. At (100) orientation, it increases linearly with increasing ion flux or energy. The findings are discussed on the basis of atomistic mechanisms of interstitial diffusion, potential lattice distortions, local decomposition, and ion-induced lattice vibrational excitations.

  17. Influence of crystal orientation and ion bombardment on the nitrogen diffusivity in single-crystalline austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinavičius, A.; Abrasonis, G.; Möller, W.

    2011-10-01

    The nitrogen diffusivity in single-crystalline AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel (ASS) during ion nitriding has been investigated at different crystal orientations ((001), (110), (111)) under variations of ion flux (0.3-0.7 mA cm-2), ion energy (0.5-1.2 keV), and temperature (370-430 °C). The nitrogen depth profiles obtained from nuclear reaction analysis are in excellent agreement with fits using the model of diffusion under the influence of traps, from which diffusion coefficients were extracted. At fixed ion energy and flux, the diffusivity varies by a factor up to 2.5 at different crystal orientations. At (100) orientation, it increases linearly with increasing ion flux or energy. The findings are discussed on the basis of atomistic mechanisms of interstitial diffusion, potential lattice distortions, local decomposition, and ion-induced lattice vibrational excitations.

  18. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets as low-cost, high-performance anode material for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng-guo; Wu, Zhong; Meng, Fan-lu; Ma, De-long; Huang, Xiao-lei; Wang, Li-min; Zhang, Xin-bo

    2013-01-01

    Between the sheets: Sodium-ion batteries are an attractive, low-cost alternative to lithium-ion batteries. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon sheets are prepared by chemical activation of polypyrrole-functionalized graphene sheets. When using the sheets as anode material in sodium-ion batteries, their unique compositional and structural features result in high reversible capacity, good cycling stability, and high rate capability. PMID:23225752

  19. Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) by bare fluorine ions on a nitrogen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, Nuwan; La Mantia, David; Kayani, Asghar; Simon, Anna; Tanis, John

    2016-05-01

    Unlike radiative electron capture (REC), in which a single photon is emitted due to capture of a single electron from the target to the projectile, radiative double electron capture (RDEC) involves two electrons accompanied by the emission of a single photon. Hence, RDEC can be considered as the inverse of double photoionization and used to study the role of electron correlation in causing the process. We report recent results obtained for 40 MeV F9+ ions incident on a nitrogen target, in which counts were observed in the calculated RDEC region (2.8-4.4 keV) for the system. Based on these observations an approximate value for the total RDEC cross section was estimated. Compared with the data obtained for 38 MeV O8+ ions incident on a carbon foil target, the present value is considerably smaller than the value found for carbon, but in better agreement with recent theory. Supported in part by NSF.

  20. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  1. Etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Acero, M.C. Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; El-Hassani, A.

    1996-03-01

    In this work the etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon is studied as a function of the processing parameters, the implantation dose and temperature, and the presence of capping layers during implantation. Etching characteristics have been probed using tetramethylammonium hydroxide or KOH solutions for different times up to 6 h. Results show that, after annealing, the minimum dose required for the formation of an efficient etch-stop layer is about 4 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2}, for an implantation energy of 75 keV. This is defined as a layer with an efficient etch selectivity in relation to Si of s {ge} 100. For larger implantation doses efficient etch selectivities larger than 100 are obtained. However, for these doses a considerable density of pits is observed in the etch-stop layer. These are related to the presence of nitrogen poor Si regions in the buried layer after annealing, due to a partial separation of silicon and silicon nitride phases during the annealing process. The influence of this separation of phases as well as nitrogen gettering in the buried layer on the etch-stop behavior is discussed as a function of the processing parameters.

  2. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  3. As-Al recoil implantation through Si 3N 4 barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godignon, P.; Morvan, E.; Montserrat, J.; Jordà, X.; Flores, D.; Rebollo, J.

    1999-01-01

    Al recoil implantation have been shown to be a possible alternative to direct Al ion implantation to avoid usual problems linked with Al sources. Poor efficiency of the recoil + annealing process is observed if no barrier or an oxyde screen layers are used. This problem can be solved using a Si 3N 4 screen layer. Then, P-N and N +/P/N structures can be obtained with deep low doped P-well with reduced thermal budget.

  4. Study of the population inversion mechanisms and superradiance on ion transitions of molecular nitrogen in the filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. G.; Losev, V. F.; Prokop'ev, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental results of the inversion population mechanisms study in the resonant electronic transition B3Πg-A3Σu+ of nitrogen ions by optically pumped of air and pure nitrogen by femtosecond laser pulse at a wavelength of 950 nm are presented. It is shown that the inversion results from selective settling of N2+(B2Σu+, v' =0) excited state by multiphoton excitation of the autoionization states of the nitrogen molecule with energy of 18.7 eV. Seed photon for superradiance at transitions of molecular nitrogen ions are photons the axial supercontinuum occurring in the filament on the respective wavelengths. The mode of the superradiance at a wavelength λ = 358.4 nm referred to the transition of the CN molecules was realized.

  5. Electronic transport and localization in nitrogen-doped graphene devices using hyperthermal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; Cress, Cory D.; Schmucker, Scott W.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; van 't Erve, Olaf M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperthermal ion implantation offers a controllable method of producing high-quality substitutionally doped graphene with nitrogen, an n -type dopant that has great potential for graphene electronics and spintronics applications where high carrier concentration, uniform doping, and minimal vacancy defect concentration is desired. Here we examine the transport properties of monolayer graphene sheets as a function of implantation beam energy and dose. We observe a transition from weak to strong localization that varies as a function of carrier concentration. For nominally equivalent doses, increased N ion energy results in an increasing magnetoresistance magnitude, reaching a value of approximately -5.5% at 5000 Oe, which we discuss in the context of dopant concentration and defect formation. We use a model for the temperature dependence of the conductivity that takes into account both temperature activation, due to the formation of a transport gap, and Mott variable-range hopping, due to the formation of defects, to further study the electronic properties of the doped films as a function of dose and N ion energy. We find that the temperature activation component dominates the behavior.

  6. Nitrogen removal from eutrophic water by floating-bed-grown water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with N(+) ion-beam implantation for removal of nutrient species from eutrophic water. The mutated water spinach was grown on floating beds, and growth chambers were used to examine the growth of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation for 14 days in simulated eutrophic water at both high and low nitrogen levels. The specific weight growth rates of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation were significantly higher than the control, and their NO(3)-N and NH(4)-N removal efficiencies were also greater than those of the control. Furthermore, compared with the control, the nitrogen contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were higher as well. PMID:17524443

  7. Formation of nitrate and ammonium ions in titanium dioxide mediated photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds containing nitrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Low, G.K.-C.; McEvoy, S.R.; Matthews, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of a related series of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines and other nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organic compounds over a UV-illuminated film of TiO{sub 2} has been studied. The compounds were as follows: n-pentylamine, piperidine, pyridine, phenylalanine, desipramine, thioridazine, penicillamine, isosorbide dinitrate, 4-nitrocatechol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, atrazine, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid, and tetrabutylammonium phosphate. Both ammonium and nitrate ions were formed. The relative concentration of the two ions depended on the nature of the nitrogen in a compound, but was also influenced by the illumination time and concentration of the solute. It was found that for n-pentylamine, piperidine and pyridine, the rate of formation of ammonium ions was n-pentylamine {much gt} pyridine > piperidine. The order of rates of nitrate formation was pyridine = piperidine {much gt} pentylamine. For n-pentylamine the rate of formation of ammonium ions was {approximately}100 times that of nitrate.

  8. Understanding the Photoluminescence Mechanism of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots by Selective Interaction with Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Ganiga, Manjunatha; Cyriac, Jobin

    2016-08-01

    Doped fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) have drawn widespread attention because of their diverse applications and attractive properties. The present report focusses on the origin of photoluminescence in nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs), which is unraveled by the interaction with Cu(2+) ions. Detailed spectroscopic and microscopic studies reveal that the broad steady-state photoluminescence emission of the NCDs originates from the direct recombination of excitons (high energy) and the involvement of defect states (low energy). In addition, highly selective detection of Cu(2+) is achieved, with a detection limit of 10 μm and a dynamic range of 10 μm-0.4 mm. The feasibility of the present sensor for the detection of Cu(2+) in real water samples is also presented. PMID:27159128

  9. Photoionization study of quasibound states of doubly charged molecular nitrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellner, L.; Besnard, M. J.; Dujardin, G.; Malinovich, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Doubly charged N 22+ ions were produced by double photoionization of neutral nitrogen molecules with the synchrotron radiation from ACO as a photon source of variable energy in the 40-70 eV range. From the double photoionization spectrum the threshold energy of the stable X 1Σ g+ state was found at 43.1 ± 0.1 eV. The D 1Σ g+ → X 1Σ g+ emission observed by using a photoion-photon of fluorescence coincidence (PIFCO) experiment. The onset energy of this emitting D 1Σ u+ state at 50.5 eV, was deduced from the variation of the fluorescence efficiency as a function of the excitation photon energy. The lifetime of this emitting state was measured to be τ = 8 ± 3 ns.

  10. Improvement of tribological behavior of a Ti Al Zr alloy by nitrogen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Zu, X. T.; He, X.; Qiu, S. Y.; Cao, J.; Huang, X. Q.

    2006-07-01

    Surface modification of a Ti-Al-Zr alloy with nitrogen implantation is considered as a method to improve its tribological properties especially wear and hardness. The implantation was carried out at fluences range from 1 × 10 16 to 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 and energy 65 keV. The tribological tests for the friction coefficients and wear were made on a pin-on-disk tribotester with the load 60 mN. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to obtain surface characterization of the implanted sample. The unimplanted and implanted samples were also annealed at 500 °C in order to understand the influence of annealing on the tribological properties of Ti-Al-Zr. The hardness showed significant improvement at the higher fluence. After annealing at 500 °C, the friction coefficient exhibited a relative decrease for the nitrogen-implanted samples. In addition, the wear rates of the implanted samples exhibited a great decrease after annealing at 500 °C. Nature of the surface and reason for the variation and improvement in wear resistance were discussed in detail.

  11. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic lake water by Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-03-01

    Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy N+ ion implantation was used for the removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus from the eutrophic Chaohu Lake, China. The biomass growth, nitrate reductase and peroxidase activities of the implanted I. aquatica were found to be higher than those of I. aquatica without ion implantation. Higher NO3-N and PO4-P removal efficiencies were obtained for the I. aquatica irradiation at 25 keV, 3.9 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2) and 20 keV 5.2 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2), respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those of the controls. I. aquatica with ion implantation was directly responsible for 51-68% N removal and 54-71% P removal in the three experiments. The results further confirm that the ion implantation could enhance the growth potential of I. aquatica in real eutrophic water and increase its nutrient removal efficiency. Thus, the low-energy ion implantation for aquatic plants could be considered as an approach for in situ phytoremediation and bioremediation of eutrophic waters. PMID:19147171

  12. Sensitivity of Nematode Life-History Groups to Ions and Osmotic Tensions of Nitrogenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Tenuta, Mario; Ferris, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Guild designation of nematodes of similar trophic function and life-history strategy provides a basis for using nematode faunal analyses in an integrative assessment of soil food web condition. Omnivorous and predaceous nematodes, categorized at the upper end of a colonizer-persister (c-p) continuum of nematode functional guilds are generally not abundant in cropped soil. These nematodes are more sensitive to heavy metal concentrations than those in other c-p groups, but whether sensitivity to agrochemicals contributes to the observed low abundance of high c-p groups in cropped soils is less well understood. An exposure assay in solution was used to compare the sensitivity of nematodes representing various guilds obtained from field soils and from laboratory culture to several nitrogen sources. Nematodes in c-p groups 4 and 5 were more sensitive to nitrogen solutions than nematodes representing lower c-p groups. There were both osmotic and specific ion effects—the latter most evident in exposure of nematodes to NaNO₂ and (NH₄)₂SO₄. The RC₅₀ (concentration resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for (NH₄)₂SO₄ was < 0.052 M-N for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to much greater values (0.34 to 0.81 M-N) for c-p groups 1 to 3. In non-ionic polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions, osmotic tensions of 0.40 to 0.43 MPa reduced the recovery of exposed nematodes by half (RT₅₀; water potential of solution resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to > 1.93 MPa for c-p groups 1 to 3. RT₅₀ values for urea solutions, also non-ionic, were greater than for PEG. Caenorhabditis elegans N2 (c-p 1) and Meloidogyne javanica (c-p 3) reared on solid medium and in hydroponic culture, respectively, were slightly more sensitive to specific ion and osmotic effects than nematodes of similar c-p groups obtained from soil. The greater sensitivity of c-p 4 and 5 nematodes to nitrogen

  13. Nitrogen-doped carbon/graphene hybrid anode material for sodium-ion batteries with excellent rate capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Jia, Mengqiu; Cao, Bin; Chen, Renjie; Lv, Xinying; Tang, Renjie; Wu, Feng; Xu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon/graphene (NCG) hybrid materials were prepared by an in-situ polymerization and followed pyrolysis for sodium-ion batteries. The NCG has a large interlayer distance (0.360 nm) and a high nitrogen content of 7.54 at%, resulting in a high reversible sodium storage capacity of 336 mAh g-1 at 30 mA g-1. The NCG shows a sandwich-like structure, i.e. nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets closely coated on both sides of graphene. The carbon nanosheets shorten the ion diffusion distance, while the sandwiched graphene with high electronic conductivity guarantees fast electron transport, making the NCG exhibit excellent rate capability (94 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1). It also exhibits good cycle stability with a capacity retention of 89% after 200 cycles at 50 mA g-1.

  14. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Goff, H.M.

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin.

  15. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lukat, G S; Goff, H M

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin. PMID:3023353

  16. Adhesive hydrophobicity of Cu2O nano-columnar arrays induced by nitrogen ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Sriparna; Manju, Unnikrishnan; Tribedi, Lokesh C; Thulasiram, K V; Fernandez, W A; Chatterjee, Shyamal

    2015-12-21

    Low energy nitrogen ions are used in this work to manipulate wetting properties of the surface of the array of Cu2O nano-columns, which yields remarkable results. The nano-columnar thin films were grown on a highly conductive silicon surface by a sputter deposition technique. The films were irradiated at two different fluences of 5 × 10(15) and 1 × 10(16) ions per cm(2), respectively. With increasing fluence the shape of column tip changes, columns are bent and porous channels between columns are clogged up. While the surface of the pristine sample is hydrophilic, the irradiated surface turns into hydrophobic but having adhesion properties. We have analysed the structural and chemical properties of the surface in detail to understand the initial and modified wetting properties. Furthermore, the temporal evolutions of different droplet parameters are investigated to realize the interactions between the water droplet, the sample surface and the atmosphere. We envisage that such modified surfaces can be beneficial for transport of a small volume of liquids with minimum loss and spectroscopic studies, where a small amount of water droplet is available for measurements. PMID:26420552

  17. Enhancement of nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic water by economic plant annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) with ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Sheng, Guo-ping; Wu, Yue-jin; Yu, Zeng-liang; Bañuelos, Gary S; Yu, Han-qing

    2014-01-01

    Severe eutrophication of surface water has been a major problem of increasing environmental concern worldwide. In the present study, economic plant annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in floating mats as an economic plant-based treatment system to evaluate its potential after ion implantation for removing nutrients in simulated eutrophic water. The specific weight growth rate of L. multiflorum with ion implantation was significantly greater than that of the control, and the peroxidase, nitrate reductase, and acid phosphatase activities of the irradiated L. multiflorum were found to be greater than those plants without ion implantation. Higher total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were obtained for the L. multiflorum irradiated with 25 keV 5.2 × 10(16) N(+) ions/cm(2) and 30 keV 4.16 × 10(16) N(+) ions/cm(2), respectively (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those in the control and were positively correlated with TN and TP supplied. L. multiflorum itself was directly responsible for 39-49 and 47-58 % of the overall N and P removal in the experiment, respectively. The research results suggested that ion implantation could become a promising approach for increasing phytoremediation efficiency of nutrients from eutrophic water by L. multiflorum. PMID:24809498

  18. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  19. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  20. Raman and morphology visualization in epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC by Nitrogen or Argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of carbon atoms that are densely packed into a honeycomb crystal lattice and is attracting tremendous interest since being discovered in 2004. Epitaxial growth of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) is an effective method to obtain high quality layers. In this work, the effects of irradiation on epitaxial SiC/graphene were studied. The samples were irradiated with Nitrogen and Argon ions at an energy of 200 keV and different fluence with 4 × 1012 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The results of Raman measurements indicate that ion beam irradiation causes defects and disorder in the graphene crystal structure, and the level of defects increases with increasing ion fluence. Surface morphology images are obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM). This work is valuable for the potential application of epitaxial graphene on SiC in the field of optoelectronics devices.

  1. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malau, Viktor; Ilman, Mochammad Noer; Iswanto, Priyo Tri; Jatisukamto, Gaguk

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten thin film deposited on surface of AISI 410 steel has been performed. Tungsten thin film produced by dc magnetron sputtering method was deposited on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel substrates, and then the nitrogen ions were implanted on tungsten thin film. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of implantation deposition time on surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of nitrogen implanted on tungsten film. Magnetron sputtering process was performed by using plasma gas of argon (Ar) to bombardier tungsten target (W) in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of 7.6 x 10-2 torr, a voltage of 300 V, a sputter current of 80 mA for sputtered time of 10 minutes. Nitrogen implantation on tungsten film was done with an initial pressure of 3x10-6 mbar, a fluence of 2 x 1017 ions/cm2, an energy of 100 keV and implantation deposition times of 0, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. The surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of the films were evaluated by surfcorder test, Vickers microhardness test, wear test and potentiostat (galvanostat) test respectively. The results show that the nitrogen ions implanted deposition time on tungsten film can modify the surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate. The minimum surface roughness, specific wear and corrosion rate can be obtained for implantation time of 20 minutes and the maximum microhardness of the film is 329 VHN (Vickers Hardness Number) for implantation time of 30 minutes. The specific wear and corrosion rate of the film depend directly on the surface roughness.

  2. The origin of the enhanced performance of nitrogen-doped MoS2 in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiuhong; Weijun, Xia; Wu, Zhenjun; Huo, Jia; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-04-29

    MoS2 with a similar layered structure to graphene has been widely applied in various areas including lithium ion batteries. However, low conductivity, capacity fading and poor rate performance are still the main challenges for MoS2 anode materials. In this work, for the first time, we prepared nitrogen-doped MoS2 (N-MoS2) nanosheets through a simple two-step method involving the preparation of MoS2 with defects by the hydrothermal method, followed by sintering in a NH3 atmosphere. Our electrochemical characterizations and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that nitrogen doping could enhance the electron conductivity and showed higher specific capacity than pristine MoS2 as anode materials of lithium ion batteries, which can be attributed to the faster transportation of electrons and ions because of nitrogen doping. This work helps us understand the origin of the enhanced performance of N-doped MoS2 in lithium ion batteries. PMID:26965193

  3. The origin of the enhanced performance of nitrogen-doped MoS2 in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuhong; Weijun, Xia; Wu, Zhenjun; Huo, Jia; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-04-01

    MoS2 with a similar layered structure to graphene has been widely applied in various areas including lithium ion batteries. However, low conductivity, capacity fading and poor rate performance are still the main challenges for MoS2 anode materials. In this work, for the first time, we prepared nitrogen-doped MoS2 (N-MoS2) nanosheets through a simple two-step method involving the preparation of MoS2 with defects by the hydrothermal method, followed by sintering in a NH3 atmosphere. Our electrochemical characterizations and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that nitrogen doping could enhance the electron conductivity and showed higher specific capacity than pristine MoS2 as anode materials of lithium ion batteries, which can be attributed to the faster transportation of electrons and ions because of nitrogen doping. This work helps us understand the origin of the enhanced performance of N-doped MoS2 in lithium ion batteries.

  4. Transport of Radioactive Material by Alpha Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The movement of high-specific-activity radioactive particles (i.e., alpha recoil) has been observed and studied since the early 1900s. These studies have been motivated by concerns about containment of radioactivity and the protection of human health. Additionally, studies have investigated the potential advantage of alpha recoil to effect separations of various isotopes. This report provides a review of the observations and results of a number of the studies.

  5. Annealing Behavior of Ion-implanted Nitrogen in D9 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Arunkumar, J.; David, C.; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Magudapathy, P.; Kennedy, John

    2011-07-15

    Nitrogen isotope N{sup 15} was implanted at the sub-surface of D9 steel. The resonance nuclear reaction analysis was used to probe the implanted nitrogen as a function of depth. The as-implanted D9 sample was isochronally annealed and by observing the broadening of nitrogen depth profile at various annealing junctures, activation energy for nitrogen diffusion in steel was deduced.

  6. Blood radicals: reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, transition metal ions, and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Darley-Usmar, V; Halliwell, B

    1996-05-01

    Free radicals, such as superoxide, hydroxyl and nitric oxide, and other "reactive species", such as hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite, are formed in vivo. Some of these molecules, e.g. superoxide and nitric oxide, can be physiologically useful, but they can also cause damage under certain circumstances. Excess production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), their production in inappropriate relative amounts (especially superoxide and NO) or deficiencies in antioxidant defences may result in pathological stress to cells and tissues. This oxidative stress can have multiple effects. It can induce defence systems, and render tissues more resistant to subsequent insult. If oxidative stress is excessive or if defence and repair responses are inadequate, cell injury can be caused by such mechanisms as oxidative damage to essential proteins, lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage and base modification, and rises in the concentration of intracellular "free" Ca(2+). Considerable evidence supports the view that oxidative damage involving both ROS and RNS is an important contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. Peroxynitrite (derived by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide) and transition metal ions (perhaps released by injury to the vessel wall) may contribute to lipid peroxidation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:8860419

  7. Mutation-Screening of Pleurotus Ferulae with High Temperature Tolerance by Nitrogen Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Henglei; Wan, Honggui; Zhang, Jun; Zeng, Xianxian

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain Pleurotus ferulae with high temperature tolerance, conidiophores of wild type strain ACK were implanted with nitrogen ions in energy of 5 ~15 keV and dose of 1.5 × 1015 ~ 1.5 × 1016 cm-2, and a mutant CGMCC1763 was isolated subsequently through thermotolerant screening method. It was found that during riper period the surface layer mycelium of the mutant in mushroom bag wasn't aging neither grew tegument even above 30° C. The mycelium endurable temperature of the mutant was increased by 5°C compared to that of the wild type strain. The fruiting bodies growth temperature of the mutant was 18 ~22°C in daytime and 8~14°C at night. The highest growth temperature of fruiting bodies of the mutant was increased about 7°C w.r.t. that of original strain. Through three generations investigations, it was found that the mutant CGMCC1763 was stable with high temperature tolerance.

  8. Amorphous Phosphorus/Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Paper for Ultrastable Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Xi; Liang, Qifeng; Liu, Xizheng; Weng, Qunhong; Liu, Jiangwei; Yang, Yijun; Dai, Zhonghua; Ding, Kejian; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Jie; Golberg, Dmitri

    2016-03-01

    As the most promising anode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), elemental phosphorus (P) has recently gained a lot of interest due to its extraordinary theoretical capacity of 2596 mAh/g. The main drawback of a P anode is its low conductivity and rapid structural degradation caused by the enormous volume expansion (>490%) during cycling. Here, we redesigned the anode structure by using an innovative methodology to fabricate flexible paper made of nitrogen-doped graphene and amorphous phosphorus that effectively tackles this problem. The restructured anode exhibits an ultrastable cyclic performance and excellent rate capability (809 mAh/g at 1500 mA/g). The excellent structural integrity of the novel anode was further visualized during cycling by using in situ experiments inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the associated sodiation/desodiation mechanism was also thoroughly investigated. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the N-doped graphene not only contributes to an increase in capacity for sodium storage but also is beneficial in regards to improved rate performance of the anode. PMID:26928163

  9. Physical properties of nitrogenated amorphous carbon films produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francois; Andre, Bernard; Veen, A. Van; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Labohm, F.; Delplancke, Marie Paule; Dunlop, Hugh; Anger, Eric

    1994-12-01

    Carbon films with up to 32 at.% N (a-C:N) have been prepared using an ion-beam-assisted magnetron, with an N2(+) beam at energies between 50 and 300 eV. The composition and density of the films vary strongly with the deposition parameters. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that these a-C:N films are mostly graphitic with up to 20% C Sp3 bonding. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling show that the density goes through a maximum as the average deposited energy per unit depth increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that nitrogen is mostly combined with carbon in triple (C(triple bond)N and double (C=N) bonds. Positron annihilation spectroscopy shows that the void concentration in the films goes through a minimum with deposited energy. These results are consistent with a densification induced by the collisions at low deposited energy, and damage-induced graphitization at high deposited energy values.

  10. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  11. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  12. Stabilization of temperature dependence of band Gap by introducing nitrogen ion into GaInNP alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Emura, Shuichi; Nonoguchi, Shogo; Kim, Kang Min

    2013-12-04

    The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of GaInNP are observed to survey the origin of the unique behavior of the band gap caused by incorporating nitrogen ions. The temperature dependence of the PL peak position is carefully analyzed. It is found that the reduction of the temperature alteration owing to the nitrogen incorporation arises from the hybridization between the nitrogen local 3s and 3p orbitals and the conduction band. In the GaInNP and host GaInP with the indium content around 50%, which has a direct band gap slightly lower than an X-valley, the band gap shrinkage with temperature is mediated by an LA phonon at X point.

  13. Determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose from smokeless gunpowders and collodions by alkaline hydrolysis and ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Alegre, Jose María Ramiro; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Torre, Mercedes

    2011-01-31

    In this work, a method to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose from gunpowders and collodions is proposed. A basic hydrolysis of nitrocellulose with 1.0% (m/v) NaOH at 150°C during 30 min was carried out for nitrocellulose from gunpowders (after its previous isolation by a protocol optimized by our research group) and from collodion samples. The concentration of nitrate and nitrite ions in the hydrolysate was determined by ion chromatography with suppression and conductimetric detection. The nitrogen content of nitrocellulose was calculated from the values of the concentration of both ions. The quantitative method was evaluated in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, robustness, limits of detection and quantification, and precision, measured as repeatability and intermediate precision. These parameters were good enough to demonstrate the validity of the method and its applicability to the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose contained in different types of gunpowders (single- and double-base gunpowders, manufactured from 1944 to 1997) and in commercial collodion samples. For gunpowders, the nitrogen content determined with the optimized method was compared with the values reported by the official label of the ammunition (obtained by a digestion/titration method) and errors, by defect, ranging from 1% to 15.2% (m/m) were calculated. The highest errors were obtained for the oldest gunpowders and could be attributed to the loss of nitro groups in the nitrocellulose molecule during aging. For collodion samples, errors could not be calculated since the real nitrogen content for these samples was not given in the label. In addition, the analysis time (2h for nitrocellulose isolation, 1.5h for nitrocellulose hydrolysis, and 0.2h for chromatographic separation) was about 10 times lower than in the digestion/titration method nowadays used for gunpowder samples. PMID:21168569

  14. Changes in the structure and wear resistance of the surface layer of copper under treatment by nitrogen ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, Victor P. E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru; Kalashnikov, Mark P. E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru; Rybalko, Evgeniya V. E-mail: alfred-1972@mail.ru E-mail: zhastas@mail.ru; Sungatulin, Alfred R. E-mail: alfred-1972@mail.ru E-mail: zhastas@mail.ru; Sergeev, Oleg V. E-mail: alfred-1972@mail.ru E-mail: zhastas@mail.ru; Zharkov, Stanislav Yu. E-mail: alfred-1972@mail.ru E-mail: zhastas@mail.ru

    2014-11-14

    The structural-phase state of the treated sample surface was investigated by TEM. It was shown by the TEM and VIMS method that the improvement of tribological properties of the copper samples can be associated with an increase of relaxation ability due to a significant increase of the nitrogen concentration in it, which is accompanied by the refinement of fcc-Cu main phase grain structure and the formation of nanopores or gas bubbles in the ion-modified surface layer. A high-dose implantation of nitrogen ions and copper samples increases the wear resistance in 1.5-4.5 times together with a counterbody from the same material in the argon environment. The microhardness of the copper samples also increases.

  15. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  16. Elastic recoil changes in early emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, G W; Petty, T L; Stanford, R E

    1980-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine if emphysema and static lung recoil were related in a group of 65 excised human lungs. We studied 23 normal lungs, 24 lungs with an emphysema score of 5 or less, and 18 lungs with an emphysema score greater than 5. A comparison of the percentage of predicted elastic recoil revealed that both emphysema groups were significantly different from normal lungs. In addition, the total lung capacities were significantly different between the three groups. In the group with an emphysema score greater than 5 we found a linear negative correlation between the extent of emphysema and percent of predicted elastic recoil at 90% total lung capacity (r = -0.696, p < 0.01). We found a negative correlation between the percentage of predicted elastic recoil and the lung volume (r = -0.612, p < 0.01). We conclude that a significant loss of elastic recoil and a significant increase in total lung capacity occurs in the early stages of emphysema. PMID:7434309

  17. Development of the RAON Recoil Spectrometer (KOBRA) and Its Applications for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jun Young; Park, Junesic; Cheoul Yun, Chong; Kwon, Young Kwan; Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tshoo, Kyoungho; Lee, Kwangbok; Jung, In-IL; Kim, Yong Hak; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    KOBRA (KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus), a new generation recoil spectrometer, has been designed at the Korean heavy-ion accelerator facility, so called RAON. It will allow many nuclear scientists to explore so-far hard but very interesting questions relevant to low-energy nuclear physics. Especially, in nuclear astrophysics where the unstable, short-lived nuclei are usually involved and the high background rejection power is required, its high performance will come into significantly important role. As a particular case to see its capability, in this article, calculational results of 12C(α, γ)16O reaction which was studied with the COSY-INFINITY is presented.

  18. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Stevens, Jim E.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materialsmore » systems.« less

  19. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Stevens, Jim E.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materials systems.

  20. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of Nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zheng; Ju, Zhicheng; Zhao, Yulong; Wan, Jialu; Zhu, Yabo; Qiang, Yinghuai; Qian, Yitai

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene has been prepared by a simple one-step hydrothermal approach using hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as single carbon and nitrogen source. In this hydrothermal process, HMTA pyrolyzes at high temperature and the N-doped graphene subsequently self-assembles on the surface of MgO particles (formed by the Mg powder reacting with H2O) during which graphene synthesis and nitrogen doping are simultaneously achieved. The as-synthesized graphene with incorporation of nitrogen groups possesses unique structure including thin layer thickness, high surface area, mesopores and vacancies. These structural features and their synergistic effects could not only improve ions and electrons transportation with nanometer-scale diffusion distances but also promote the penetration of electrolyte. The N-doped graphene exhibits high reversible capacity, superior rate capability as well as long-term cycling stability, which demonstrate that the N-doped graphene with great potential to be an efficient electrode material. The experimental results provide a new hydrothermal route to synthesize N-doped graphene with potential application for advanced energy storage, as well as useful information to design new graphene materials. PMID:27184859

  1. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of Nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zheng; Ju, Zhicheng; Zhao, Yulong; Wan, Jialu; Zhu, Yabo; Qiang, Yinghuai; Qian, Yitai

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene has been prepared by a simple one-step hydrothermal approach using hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as single carbon and nitrogen source. In this hydrothermal process, HMTA pyrolyzes at high temperature and the N-doped graphene subsequently self-assembles on the surface of MgO particles (formed by the Mg powder reacting with H2O) during which graphene synthesis and nitrogen doping are simultaneously achieved. The as-synthesized graphene with incorporation of nitrogen groups possesses unique structure including thin layer thickness, high surface area, mesopores and vacancies. These structural features and their synergistic effects could not only improve ions and electrons transportation with nanometer-scale diffusion distances but also promote the penetration of electrolyte. The N-doped graphene exhibits high reversible capacity, superior rate capability as well as long-term cycling stability, which demonstrate that the N-doped graphene with great potential to be an efficient electrode material. The experimental results provide a new hydrothermal route to synthesize N-doped graphene with potential application for advanced energy storage, as well as useful information to design new graphene materials. PMID:27184859

  2. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of Nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zheng; Ju, Zhicheng; Zhao, Yulong; Wan, Jialu; Zhu, Yabo; Qiang, Yinghuai; Qian, Yitai

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene has been prepared by a simple one-step hydrothermal approach using hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as single carbon and nitrogen source. In this hydrothermal process, HMTA pyrolyzes at high temperature and the N-doped graphene subsequently self-assembles on the surface of MgO particles (formed by the Mg powder reacting with H2O) during which graphene synthesis and nitrogen doping are simultaneously achieved. The as-synthesized graphene with incorporation of nitrogen groups possesses unique structure including thin layer thickness, high surface area, mesopores and vacancies. These structural features and their synergistic effects could not only improve ions and electrons transportation with nanometer-scale diffusion distances but also promote the penetration of electrolyte. The N-doped graphene exhibits high reversible capacity, superior rate capability as well as long-term cycling stability, which demonstrate that the N-doped graphene with great potential to be an efficient electrode material. The experimental results provide a new hydrothermal route to synthesize N-doped graphene with potential application for advanced energy storage, as well as useful information to design new graphene materials.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of electron detachment properties for {{\\text{O}_{2}^{{}}}^{-}} ions in oxygen and oxygen:nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. A.; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2015-06-01

    Electron detachment properties of {{\\text{O}2{}}-} ions in pure oxygen and oxygen:nitrogen mixtures have been studied by a Monte Carlo technique for the reduced electric fields up to 350 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V·cm2). Swarm parameters were calculated for unexcited and vibrationally excited \\text{O}{{{}2}-} ions taking into account vibrational transfer and relaxation, charge transfer and electron detachment. The cross sections for vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between {{\\text{O}2{}}-} ions and O2 molecules were calculated on the basis of the statistical approach that had been successfully used in our previous work to simulate the effect of vibrational excitation and the effect of electric field on electron detachment. Good agreement between the calculated detachment rate and available measurements in oxygen were obtained over a wide range of reduced electric fields without using adjusted parameters. The method was used to calculate detachment rates in air and in some other oxygen:nitrogen mixtures and to study the effect of gas temperature on electron detachment.

  4. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  5. Synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus doped carbon dots for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Karmakar, Parimal; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus-doped carbon dots with a quantum yield 59% have been successfully synthesized from citric acid and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate by single step hydrothermal method. The synthesized carbon dots have high solubility as well as stability in aqueous medium. The as-obtained carbon dots are well monodispersed with particle sizes 1.5-4 nm. Owing to a good tunable fluorescence property and biocompatibility, the carbon dots were applied for intercellular sensing of Fe(3+) ions as well as cancer cell imaging. PMID:25964146

  6. Improvements of the DRAGON recoil separator at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Chen, A. A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C. A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Ouellet, C. O.; Parikh, A.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Zylberberg, J.

    2008-10-01

    The DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) is used to measure radiative proton and alpha capture reaction rates involving both stable and radioactive, heavy-ion reactants at the TRIUMF-ISAC high intensity radioactive beam facility. Completed in 2001 it has been used for several challenging studies for nuclear astrophysics, e.g. 12C(α, γ)16O, 21Na(p, γ)22Mg, 26gAl(p, γ)27Si and 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Since initial operation, a number of improvements have been incorporated which are described here. These include a beam centering monitor based on a CCD camera, a mechanical iris to skim of beam halo, a solid state stripper acting as a charge state booster for beams with A ≳ 30, beta and gamma detectors to monitor beam intensity and to determine beam contamination in experiments with radioactive beam and the ionization chamber for both recoil identification and isobar separation.

  7. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g(-1) in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s(-1). Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g(-1). PMID:27404086

  8. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Embedded MoS2 Microspheres as Advanced Anodes for Lithium- and Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dong; Xia, Xinhui; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Donghuang; Zhong, Yu; Tang, Wangjia; Wang, Xiuli; Tu, Jiangping

    2016-08-01

    Rational design and synthesis of advanced anode materials are extremely important for high-performance lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries. Herein, a simple one-step hydrothermal method is developed for fabrication of N-C@MoS2 microspheres with the help of polyurethane as carbon and nitrogen sources. The MoS2 microspheres are composed of MoS2 nanoflakes, which are wrapped by an N-doped carbon layer. Owing to its unique structural features, the N-C@MoS2 microspheres exhibit greatly enhanced lithium- and sodium-storage performances including a high specific capacity, high rate capability, and excellent capacity retention. Additionally, the developed polyurethane-assisted hydrothermal method could be useful for the construction of many other high-capacity metal oxide/sulfide composite electrode materials for energy storage. PMID:27355199

  9. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g−1 in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s−1. Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g−1. PMID:27404086

  10. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g‑1 in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s‑1. Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g‑1.

  11. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  12. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots for highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Yu, Bin; You, Tianyan

    2015-12-15

    Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots (N,S/C-dots) with high fluorescence quantum yields (FLQY, 25%) was successfully synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted method. In comparison with nitrogen doped C-dots (N/C-dots) prepared using the same method, the resulting N,S/C-dots featured small particle size, uniform surface state, insensitive FL properties to excitation wavelengths and environmental conditions, negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. Simultaneous doping of N and S effectively promoted electron-transfer and coordination interaction between N,S/C-dots and Hg(2+). Thus, when used as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) label-free detection, the resulting N,S/C-dots showed good detection sensitivity and ion selectivity. The limit of detection was 2 μM; among 15 metal ions investigated, only Fe(3+) showed interference to the Hg(2+) detection. Fortunately, this interference could be effectively shielded using a chelating agent sodium hexametaphoshpate. The applicability of N,S/C-dots as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) detection in lake water and tap water was demonstrated. Finally, based on its favorable features of negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the N,S/C-dots were successfully applied to probe Hg(2+) in living cells, which broaden its application in biological system. PMID:26143466

  13. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings. PMID:26120236

  14. Recoil Based Fuel Breeding Fuel Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Popa-Simil, Liviu

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear transmutation reactions are based on the absorption of a smaller particle as neutron, proton, deuteron, alpha, etc. The resulting compound nucleus gets out of its initial lattice mainly by taking the recoil, also with help from its sudden change in chemical properties. The recoil implantation is used in correlation with thin and ultra thin materials mainly for producing radiopharmaceuticals and ultra-thin layer radioactive tracers. In nuclear reactors, the use of nano-particulate pellets could facilitate the recoil implantation for breeding, transmutation and partitioning purposes. Using enriched {sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th leads to {sup 239}Pu and {sup 233}U production while using other actinides as {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am etc. leads to actinide burning. When such a lattice is immersed into a radiation resistant fluid (water, methanol, etc.), the recoiled product is transferred into the flowing fluid and removed from the hot area using a concentrator/purifier, preventing the occurrence of secondary transmutation reactions. The simulation of nuclear collision and energy transfer shows that the impacted nucleus recoils in the interstitial space creating a defect or lives small lattices. The defect diffuses, and if no recombination occurs it stops at the lattices boundaries. The nano-grains are coated in thin layer to get a hydrophilic shell to be washed by the collection liquid the particle is immersed in. The efficiency of collection depends on particle magnitude and nuclear reaction channel parameters. For {sup 239}Pu the direct recoil extraction rate is about 70% for {sup 238}UO{sub 2} grains of 5 nm diameters and is brought up to 95% by diffusion due to {sup 239}Neptunium incompatibility with Uranium dioxide lattice. Particles of 5 nm are hard to produce so a structure using particles of 100 nm have been tested. The particles were obtained by plasma sputtering in oxygen atmosphere. A novel effect as nano-cluster radiation damage robustness and cluster

  15. Synthesis of silicon oxynitride by ion beam sputtering and the effects of nitrogen ion-assisted bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrinos, M. F.; Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J. S.

    1997-05-01

    Thin silicon oxynitride (SiO xN y) films were synthesised without substrate heating by means of N 2+ ion-beam sputtering of a silicon nitride target at an energy of 1000 eV in a N 2 and O 2 ambient with and without 200 eV N 2+ ion assistance. Unassisted films were deposited in a controlled O 2 partial pressure ranging from ambient to 5.0 × 10 -3 Pa whereas assisted films were deposited at a fixed O 2 partial pressure of 1.0 × 10 -3 Pa. The O/(O+N) atomic fraction and the SiO xN y asymmetric stretch mode IR absorption peak wavenumber of unassisted films increased almost linearly with increasing O 2 partial pressure, from 0.2 to 1.0 and 860 cm -1 to 1050 cm -1, respectively, while their refractive indices decreased from 1.92 to 1.46. The behaviour of the SiO xN y film refractive index with the SiO 2 fraction has been compared to that predicted by Drude, Lorentz-Lorenz and Bruggeman models under the assumption that the film is a mixture of SiO 2 and Si 3N 4 phases. For a fixed O 2 partial pressure, the O content of the N 2+ ion-assisted films increased with an increase in the N + ion to Si atom arrival ratio from 0 to 3. This increase in O content correlate with changes in the film refractive index and SiO xN y asymmetric stretch mode absorption peak position, from 1.56 to 1.43 and 1014 cm -1 to 1054 cm -1, respectively, indicating that the O/N atomic ratio increases with increasing N + ion to Si atom ratio until film properties consistent with stoichiometric SiO 2 are obtained.

  16. α -decay chains of recoiled superheavy nuclei: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic theoretical study of α -decay half-lives in the superheavy mass region of the periodic table of elements is carried out by extending the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory based on the preformed cluster model (PCM) to include temperature (T ) dependence in its built-in preformation and penetration probabilities of decay fragments. Earlier, the α -decay chains of the isotopes of Z =115 were investigated by using the standard PCM for spontaneous decays, with"hot-optimum" orientation effects included, which required a constant scaling factor of 104 to approach the available experimental data. In the present approach of the PCM (T ≠0 ), the temperature effects are included via the recoil energy of the residual superheavy nucleus (SHN) left after x -neutron emission from the superheavy compound nucleus. The important result is that the α -decay half-lives calculated by the PCM (T ≠0 ) match the experimental data nearly exactly, without using any scaling factor of the type used in the PCM. Note that the PCM (T ≠0 ) is an equivalent of the dynamical cluster-decay model for heavy-ion collisions at angular momentum ℓ =0 . The only parameter of model is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which for the calculated half-lives of α -decay chains of various isotopes of Z =113 to 118 nuclei formed in "hot-fusion" reactions is found to be nearly constant, i.e., Δ R ≈0.95 ±0.05 fm for all the α -decay chains studied. The use of recoiled residue nucleus as a secondary heavy-ion beam for nuclear reactions has also been suggested in the past.

  17. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling. PMID:22767925

  18. Characteristics of Pickup Ions in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Escape of Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2004-11-01

    The distribution of 14 amu and 28-29 amu pickup ions with depth into Titan's atmosphere have calculated by Ledvina et al. (2004) and Brecht et al. (2000). Here we study the interaction of these ions with molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. As its environment is highly variable, Titan can be within Saturn's magnetosphere or can interact directly with the solar wind. These pickup ions follow the corresponding magnetic field as they penetrate into the atmosphere. The magnetic field strength considered here are 5.1 nT and 0.5 nT when Titan is inside the magnetosphere and in the solar wind respectively. The incident pick up ions collide with atmospheric neutrals. After they charge exchange, they are tracked under the influence of Titan's gravitational field. The energetic ions and neutral impart energy to the molecules in the Titan's atmosphere causing ejection, bond breaking and heating. Predictions will be made for the Cassini Titan flyby. The model described is flexible to incorporate that data as it becomes available. References Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, Simulation of the Saturnian magnetospheric interaction with Titan, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119-13130, 2000. Ledvina, S.A., S.H. Brecht, J.G. Luhmann, Ion distribution of 14 amu pickup ions associated with Titan's plasma interaction, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L17S10, 10.1029/2004GL019861, 2004.

  19. [Ion-exchange substrate as a source of nitrogen mobile forms in the conveyor method of vegetables cultivation on artificial soil].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V V; Ushakova, S A; Tikhomirov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The investigation had the objective to evaluate the applicability of ion-exchange substrate to maintaining the mobile nitrogen content in irrigation solution and artificial coil during cultivation of a mixed (in term of age) vegetable container. Objects of the investigation were radishes and leaf cabbage crops with the period of vegetation of 28 days. A 120-day experiment showed that single introduction of the ion-exchange substrate promoted nitrogen stabilization in the irrigation solution and, consequently, yielding of higher crops as compared with the control. PMID:25365879

  20. Studies of (p, γ) reactions with the Daresbury Recoil Separator at ORNL'S HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R.; Abbotoy, E.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Champagne, A. E.; Chen, A. A.; Greife, U.; Hill, D. W.; James, A. N.; Kozub, R. L.; Lewis, T. A.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Mahan, S. L.; McConnell, J. W.; Milner, W. T.; Moazen, B. H.; Parker, P. D.; Pierce, D. E.; Roettger, M. E.; Sahin, L.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Strieder, F.; Swartz, K. B.; Thomas, J. S.; Visser, D. W.

    2005-02-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei is important in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts and for the production of neutrinos in the sun. The Daresbury Recoil Separator and a windowless gas target system have been installed at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for measurements of proton capture reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The performance of the system has been characterized with a number of experiments using stable ion beams. We report on results from these commissioning measurements and plans for measurements of the 1H(17F,18Ne) and 1H(7Be,8B) reactions.

  1. Change in Uptake, Transport and Accumulation of Ions in Nerium oleander (Rosebay) as Affected by Different Nitrogen Sources and Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Abdolzadeh, Ahmad; Shima, Kazuto; Lambers, Hans; Chiba, Kyozo

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The source of nitrogen plays an important role in salt tolerance of plants. In this study, the effects of NaCl on net uptake, accumulation and transport of ions were investigated in Nerium oleander with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source in order to analyse differences in uptake and cycling of ions within plants. Methods Plants were grown in a greenhouse in hydroponics under different salt treatments (control vs. 100 mm NaCl) with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source, and changes in ion concentration in plants, xylem sap exuded from roots and stems, and phloem sap were determined. Key Results Plant weight, leaf area and photosynthetic rate showed a higher salt tolerance of nitrate-fed plants compared with that of ammonium-fed plants. The total amount of Na+ transported in the xylem in roots, accumulated in the shoot and retranslocated in the phloem of ammonium-fed plants under salt treatment was 1·8, 1·9 and 2·7 times more, respectively, than that of nitrate-treated plants. However, the amount of Na+ accumulated in roots in nitrate-fed plants was about 1·5 times higher than that in ammonium-fed plants. Similarly, Cl− transport via the xylem to the shoot and its retranslocation via the phloem (Cl− cycling) were far greater with ammonium treatment than with nitrate treatment under conditions of salinity. The uptake and accumulation of K+ in shoots decreased more due to salinity in ammonium-fed plants compared with nitrate-fed plants. In contrast, K+ cycling in shoots increased due to salinity, with higher rates in the ammonium-treated plants. Conclusions The faster growth of nitrate-fed plants under conditions of salinity was associated with a lower transport and accumulation of Na+ and Cl− in the shoot, whereas in ammonium-fed plants accumulation and cycling of Na+ and Cl− in shoots probably caused harmful effects and reduced growth of plants. PMID:18772147

  2. A study of interface and adhesion of c-BN film on Si(1 0 0) modified by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Jingze; Zhang Qing; Xia Lifang; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Byon, E.S.; Zhou, Q.; Wang, S.G.; Li, J.Q.; Yang, D.J

    2004-06-08

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were deposited on Si substrate with poor adhesion using magnetically enhanced active reaction evaporation (ME-ARE). An attempt has been made to enhance the adhesion strength between c-BN film and substrate by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation (PBII) into c-BN film. Nitrogen ion doses range from 5x10{sup 16} to 1x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} at an implant voltage of 50 kV. The nitrogen ion implanted c-BN films were analyzed using FTIR, scratch test, and XPS to investigate the change of structure, adhesion strength of c-BN film, and interfacial mixing between the initial turbostratic BN (t-BN) film layer and substrate caused by nitrogen ion implantation. FTIR spectra showed little change of c-BN phase content in the films under the above implantation conditions but XPS depth elemental profile of N{sup +}-implanted boron nitride films displayed a mixed layer consisting of elements from film and substrate formed at interface. A highly optimized dynamic Monte Carlo program TAMIX was used to simulate the PBII process in a good agreement with above measured depth elemental profile. The scratch test showed that the adhesion strength evaluated in terms of the critical load of N{sup +}-implanted c-BN film was 1.4 times higher than that of as deposited c-BM film.

  3. Reaction mechanisms in the system {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho: Measurement and analysis of forward recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2009-05-15

    Keeping in view the study of complete and incomplete fusion of heavy ions with a target, the forward recoil range distributions of several evaporation residues produced at 164 MeV {sup 20}Ne-ion beam energy have been measured for the system {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho. The recoil catcher activation technique followed by off-line gamma spectroscopy has been employed. Measured forward recoil range distributions of these evaporation residues show evidence of several incomplete fusion channels in addition to complete fusion. The entire and partial linear momentum transfers inferred from these recoil range distributions were used to identify the evaporation residues formed by complete and incomplete fusion mechanisms. The results indicate the occurrence of incomplete fusion involving the breakup of {sup 20}Ne into {sup 4}He+{sup 16}O and/or {sup 8}Be+{sup 12}C followed by fusion of one of the fragments with target nucleus {sup 165}Ho. Complete and incomplete fusion reaction channels have been identified in the production of various evaporation residues and an attempt has been made to separate out relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured recoil range distribution data. The total contribution of complete and incomplete fusion channels has also been estimated.

  4. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  5. High-performance tin oxide-nitrogen doped graphene aerogel hybrids as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chunhui; Cao, Jing; Khattak, Abdul Muqsit; Cai, Feipeng; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Gai; Hu, Suqin

    2014-12-01

    Tin dioxide nanoparticles on nitrogen doped graphene aerogel (SnO2-NGA) hybrid are synthesized by one-step hydrothermal method and successfully applied in lithium-ion batteries as a free-standing anode. The electrochemical performance of SnO2-NGA hybrid is investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling, rate capability test, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the SnO2-NGA hybrid with freestanding spongy-like structure exhibit remarkable lithium storage capacity (1100 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles), good cycling stability and high rate capability. The outstanding performance is attributed to the uniform SnO2 nanoparticles, unique spongy-like structure and N doping defect for Li+ diffusion.

  6. Collision integrals for the interaction of the ions of nitrogen and oxygen in a plasma at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, E.

    1992-01-01

    The corrections to the transport cross-sections and collision integrals for Coulomb interactions arising from the application of realistic interaction energies of the ions of nitrogen and oxygen are investigated. Accurate potential-energy curves from an ab initio electronic-structure calculation and a semiclassical description of the scattering are used to determine the difference between the cross-sections for the real interaction forces and a Coulomb force for large values of the Debye shielding parameter. Graphs of the correction to the diffusion and viscosity-collision integrals are presented for temperatures from about 10,000 K to 150,000 K. This correction can be combined with tabulations of the collision integrals for shielded Coulomb potentials to determine the contribution of N(+)-N(+), N(+)-O(+), and O(+)-O(+) interactions to the transport properties of high-temperature air. Analytical forms are fitted to the calculated results to assist this application.

  7. Organic carbon, total nitrogen, and water-soluble ions in clouds from a tropical montane cloud forest in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Gabriel J.; Gioda, Adriana; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Collett, Jeff

    Chemical characterization to determine the organic and nitrogen fractions was performed on cloud water samples collected in a mountaintop site in Puerto Rico. Cloud water samples showed average concentrations of 1.09 mg L -1 of total organic carbon (TOC), of 0.85 mg L -1 for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and of and 1.25 mg L -1 for total nitrogen (TN). Concentrations of organic nitrogen (ON) changed with the origin of the air mass. Changes in their concentrations were observed during periods under the influence of African dust (AD). The ON/TN ratios were 0.26 for the clean and 0.35 for the AD periods. Average concentrations of all these species were similar to those found in remote environments with no anthropogenic contribution. In the AD period, for cloud water the concentrations of TOC were 4 times higher and TN were 3 times higher than during periods of clean air masses associated with the trade winds. These results suggest that a significant fraction of TOC and TN in cloud and rainwater is associated to airborne particulate matter present in dust. Functional groups were identified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) spectroscopy. This characterization led to the conclusion that water-soluble organic compounds in these samples are mainly aliphatic oxygenated compounds, with a small amount of aromatics. The ion chromatography results showed that the ionic species were predominantly of marine origin, for air masses with and without African dust influence, with cloud water concentrations of NO 3- and NH 4+ much lower than from polluted areas in the US. An increase of such species as SO 42-, Cl -, Mg 2+, K + and Ca 2+ was seen when air masses originated from northwest Africa. The changes in the chemical composition and physical properties of clouds associated with these different types of aerosol particles could affect on cloud formation and processes.

  8. Plasma-assisted Recoil Implantation for Shallow Boron Doping in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. L.; Gearhart, S. S.; Booske, J. H.; Wang, W.

    1997-10-01

    An ion beam mixing technique is used to fabricate ultra-shallow p+/n junctions for the application of sub-micron CMOS source/drain formation. In this method, a thin boron layer is first sputtered onto the Si wafer. Then -3kV argon Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) drives the boron atoms into the Si substrate by means of ion beam mixing. This process avoids the hazardous toxic gases, undesirable F co-implantation and F etching effects. Sub-100nm deep p+/n junctions have been formed with this method. Numerical simulations were performed to predict the recoiled boron profiles, which are in agreement with the experimental data. The boron sputter deposition process has been optimized. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) confirms high purity of the deposited boron films. Numerical Simulations show that the B films with thickness ranging from 5nm to 10nm result in very similar recoiled B profiles. The thickness of 7.5nm is chosen for the deposited B layer to make the entire process more reproducible. Moreover, a part of the implantation damage will be contained in the B layer, which will be removed prior to the annealing step. This should help to alleviate the transient enhanced B diffusion. The research for the recoil implantation of 7.5nm thick B layer is currently underway.

  9. Quantify the loss of major ions induced by CO2 enrichment and nitrogen addition in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Li, Yuelin; Liu, Shizhong

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that atmospheric CO2 enrichment would increase the ion concentrations in the soil water. However, none of these studies could exactly quantify the amount of ion changes in the soil water induced by elevated CO2 and all of these experiments were carried out only in the temperate areas. Using an open-top chamber design, we studied the effects of CO2 enrichment alone and together with nitrogen (N) addition on soil water chemistry in the subtropics. Three years of exposure to an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 700 ppm resulted in accelerated base cation loss via leaching water below the 70 cm soil profile. The total of base cation (K+ + Na+ + Ca2+ + Mg2+) loss in the elevated CO2 treatment was higher than that of the control by 220%, 115%, and 106% in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. The N treatment decreased the effect of high CO2 treatment on the base cation loss in the leachates. Compared to the control, N addition induced greater metal cation (Al3+ and Mn2+) leaching loss in 2008 and net Al3+ and Mn2+ loss in the high N treatment increased by 100% and 67%, respectively. However, the CO2 treatment decreased the effect of high N treatment on the metal cation loss. Changes of ion export followed by the exposure to the elevated CO2, and N treatments were related to both ion concentrations and leached water amount. We hypothesize that forests in subtropical China might suffer from nutrient limitation and some poisonous metal activation in plant biomass under future global change.

  10. Sub-5 nm graphene nanopore fabrication by nitrogen ion etching induced by a low-energy electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Daniel S.; Maguire, Pierce; Zhou, Yangbo; Rodenburg, Cornelia; O’Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    A flexible and efficient method to fabricate nanopores in graphene has been developed. A focused, low-energy (5 keV) electron beam was used to locally activate etching of a graphene surface in a low pressure (0.3 Pa) N2 environment. Nanopores with sub-5 nm diameters were fabricated. The lattice structure of the graphene was observed to recover within 20 nm of the nanopore edge. Nanopore growth rates were investigated systematically. The effects of nitrogen pressure, electron beam dwell time and beam current were characterised in order to understand the etching mechanism and enable optimisation of the etching parameters. A model was developed which describes how the diffusion of ionised nitrogen affects the nanopore growth rate. Etching of other two-dimensional materials was attempted as demonstrated with MoS2. The lack of etching observed supports our model of a chemical reaction-based mechanism. The understanding of the etching mechanism will allow more materials to be etched by selection of an appropriate ion species.

  11. Sub-5 nm graphene nanopore fabrication by nitrogen ion etching induced by a low-energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel S; Maguire, Pierce; Zhou, Yangbo; Rodenburg, Cornelia; O'Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-05-13

    A flexible and efficient method to fabricate nanopores in graphene has been developed. A focused, low-energy (5 keV) electron beam was used to locally activate etching of a graphene surface in a low pressure (0.3 Pa) N2 environment. Nanopores with sub-5 nm diameters were fabricated. The lattice structure of the graphene was observed to recover within 20 nm of the nanopore edge. Nanopore growth rates were investigated systematically. The effects of nitrogen pressure, electron beam dwell time and beam current were characterised in order to understand the etching mechanism and enable optimisation of the etching parameters. A model was developed which describes how the diffusion of ionised nitrogen affects the nanopore growth rate. Etching of other two-dimensional materials was attempted as demonstrated with MoS2. The lack of etching observed supports our model of a chemical reaction-based mechanism. The understanding of the etching mechanism will allow more materials to be etched by selection of an appropriate ion species. PMID:27040079

  12. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon hollow spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Kaifu; An, Weili; Fu, Jijiang; Gao, Biao; Wang, Lei; Peng, Xiang; Cheng, Gary J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon hollow spheres (N-MCHSs) were prepared using mesoporous silica hollow spheres as template and dopamine as carbon precursor. The N-MCHSs demonstrate high specific surface area and vegetable sponge-like mesoporous shell with interconnected "carbon bridges", facilitating continuous electron transport and Li ion diffusion, and making the whole structure more stable. The influence of N contents and N-bonding configuration on the Li storage of N-MCHSs is discussed. The N-MCHSs carbonized at 800 °C demonstrate high reversible capacity and excellent rate performance, delivering a capacity of 485 mAh g-1 at a current of 0.5 A g-1 after 1,100 cycles. Even up to 4.0 A g-1, a high capacity of 214 mAh g-1 can be remained. The high electrochemical performance of N-MCHSs can be ascribed to mesoporous carbon hollow spheres structure and high level pyridinic nitrogen doping.

  13. Freeze-drying for sustainable synthesis of nitrogen doped porous carbon cryogel with enhanced supercapacitor and lithium ion storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zheng; Yu, Chang; Fan, Xiaoming; Liu, Shaohong; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Mengdi; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-09-01

    A chitosan (CS) based nitrogen doped carbon cryogel with a high specific surface area (SSA) has been directly synthesized via a combined process of freeze-drying and high-temperature carbonization without adding any activation agents. The as-made carbon cryogel demonstrates an SSA up to 1025 m2 g-1 and a high nitrogen content of 5.98 wt%, while its counterpart derived from CS powder only shows an SSA of 26 m2 g-1. Freeze-drying is a determining factor for the formation of carbon cryogel with a high SSA, where the CS powder with a size of ca. 200 μm is transformed into the sheet-shaped cryogel with a thickness of 5-8 μm. The as-made carbon cryogel keeps the sheet-shaped structure and the abundant pores are formed in situ and decorated inside the sheets during carbonization. The carbon cryogel shows significantly enhanced performance as supercapacitor and lithium ion battery electrodes in terms of capacity and rate capability due to its quasi two-dimensional (2D) structure with reduced thickness. The proposed method may provide a simple approach to configure 2D biomass-derived advanced carbon materials for energy storage devices.

  14. Freeze-drying for sustainable synthesis of nitrogen doped porous carbon cryogel with enhanced supercapacitor and lithium ion storage performance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zheng; Yu, Chang; Fan, Xiaoming; Liu, Shaohong; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Mengdi; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-09-18

    A chitosan (CS) based nitrogen doped carbon cryogel with a high specific surface area (SSA) has been directly synthesized via a combined process of freeze-drying and high-temperature carbonization without adding any activation agents. The as-made carbon cryogel demonstrates an SSA up to 1025 m(2) g(-1) and a high nitrogen content of 5.98 wt%, while its counterpart derived from CS powder only shows an SSA of 26 m(2) g(-1). Freeze-drying is a determining factor for the formation of carbon cryogel with a high SSA, where the CS powder with a size of ca. 200 μm is transformed into the sheet-shaped cryogel with a thickness of 5-8 μm. The as-made carbon cryogel keeps the sheet-shaped structure and the abundant pores are formed in situ and decorated inside the sheets during carbonization. The carbon cryogel shows significantly enhanced performance as supercapacitor and lithium ion battery electrodes in terms of capacity and rate capability due to its quasi two-dimensional (2D) structure with reduced thickness. The proposed method may provide a simple approach to configure 2D biomass-derived advanced carbon materials for energy storage devices. PMID:26314370

  15. A Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Quantitative Analysis of Nitrogen-Purged Compartments within the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Yost, Richard A.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To enter orbit, the Space Shuttle burns 1.8 million liters of liquid hydrogen combined with 0.8 million liters of liquid oxygen through three rocket engines mounted in the aft. NASA monitors the nitrogen-purged aft compartment for increased levels of hydrogen or oxygen in order to detect and determine the severity of a cryogenic fuel leak. Current monitoring is accomplished with a group of mass spectrometer systems located as much as 400 feet away from the Shuttle. It can take up to 45 seconds for gas to reach the mass spectrometer, which precludes monitoring for leaks in the final moments before liftoff (the orbiter engines are started at T-00:06 seconds). To remedy the situation, NASA is developing a small rugged mass spectrometer to be used as point-sensors around the Space Shuttle. As part of this project, numerous mass analyzer technologies are being investigated. Presented here are the preliminary results for one such technology, quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QITMS). A compact QITMS system has been developed in-house at the University of Florida for monitoring trace levels of four primary gases, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon, all in a nitrogen background. Since commercially available QITMS systems are incapable of mass analysis at m/z(exp 2), the home-built system is preferred for the evaluation of QITMS technology.

  16. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs. PMID:26462014

  17. Analysis of inorganic nitrogen and related anions in high salinity water using ion chromatography with tandem UV and conductivity detectors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian; Gandhi, Jay; Zhang, Chunlong Carl

    2011-09-01

    Over 97% of the Earth's water is high salinity water in the form of gulfs, oceans, and salt lakes. There is an increasing concern for the quality of water in bays, gulfs, oceans, and other natural waters. These waters are affected by many different sources of contamination. The sources are, but not limited to, groundwater run-off of nitrogen containing fertilizer, pesticides, cleaning agents, solid wastes, industrial waters, and many more. The final destinations of these contaminants are rivers, lakes, and bayous that eventually will lead to bays, gulfs, and oceans. Many industries depend on the quality of these waters, such as the fishing industry. In addition to wild marine life, there are large aquariums and fish and shrimp farms that are required to know the quality of the water. However, the ability of these industries to monitor their processes is limited. Most analytical methods do not apply to the analysis of high salinity waters. They are dependent on wet chemistry techniques, spectrophotometers, and flow analyzers. These methods do not have the accuracy, precision, and sensitivity when compared to ion chromatography (IC). Since the inception of IC, it has become a standard practice for determining the content of many different water samples. Many IC methods are limited in the range of analytes that can be detected, as well as the numerous sample sources of which the methods are applicable. The main focus of current IC methods does not include high salinity waters. This research demonstrates an ion chromatographic method that has the ability to determine low level concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and related anions (nitrite-N, nitrate-N, phosphorous-P, sulfate, bromide, chloride, sulfide, fluoride, ammonia, calcium, and magnesium) in a single run using a combination of UV and conductivity detectors. This method is applicable to various waters, and uses both freshwater and high salinity water samples. PMID:21859532

  18. Isotope shifts in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, C.; Verdebout, S.; Godefroid, M.

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wavefunctions that account for valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  19. Bias in bonding behavior among boron, carbon, and nitrogen atoms in ion implanted a-BN, a-BC, and diamond like carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Genisel, Mustafa Fatih; Uddin, Md. Nizam; Say, Zafer; Bengu, Erman; Kulakci, Mustafa; Turan, Rasit; Gulseren, Oguz

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we implanted N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} ions into sputter deposited amorphous boron carbide (a-BC) and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films in an effort to understand the chemical bonding involved and investigate possible phase separation routes in boron carbon nitride (BCN) films. In addition, we investigated the effect of implanted C{sup +} ions in sputter deposited amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) films. Implanted ion energies for all ion species were set at 40 KeV. Implanted films were then analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in the chemical composition and bonding chemistry due to ion-implantation were examined at different depths of the films using sequential ion-beam etching and high resolution XPS analysis cycles. A comparative analysis has been made with the results from sputter deposited BCN films suggesting that implanted nitrogen and carbon atoms behaved very similar to nitrogen and carbon atoms in sputter deposited BCN films. We found that implanted nitrogen atoms would prefer bonding to carbon atoms in the films only if there is no boron atom in the vicinity or after all available boron atoms have been saturated with nitrogen. Implanted carbon atoms also preferred to either bond with available boron atoms or, more likely bonded with other implanted carbon atoms. These results were also supported by ab-initio density functional theory calculations which indicated that carbon-carbon bonds were energetically preferable to carbon-boron and carbon-nitrogen bonds.

  20. Thermal recoil force, telemetry, and the Pioneer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Viktor T.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2009-02-15

    Precision navigation of spacecraft requires accurate knowledge of small forces, including the recoil force due to anisotropies of thermal radiation emitted by spacecraft systems. We develop a formalism to derive the thermal recoil force from the basic principles of radiative heat exchange and energy-momentum conservation. The thermal power emitted by the spacecraft can be computed from engineering data obtained from flight telemetry, which yields a practical approach to incorporate the thermal recoil force into precision spacecraft navigation. Alternatively, orbit determination can be used to estimate the contribution of the thermal recoil force. We apply this approach to the Pioneer anomaly using a simulated Pioneer 10 Doppler data set.

  1. Improvement of Vitamin K2 Production by Escherichia sp. with Nitrogen Ion Beam Implantation Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Genhai; Liu, Hui; Gong, Guohong; Wu, Hefang; Liu, Hongxia; Tan, Mu; Li, Zhemin

    2015-02-01

    Low-energy ion implantation as a novel mutagen has been increasingly applied in the microbial mutagenesis for its higher mutation frequency and wider mutation spectra. In this work, N+ ion beam implantation was used to enhance Escherichia sp. in vitamin K2 yield. Optimization of process parameters under submerged fermentation was carried out to improve the vitamin K2 yield of mutant FM5-632. The results indicate that an excellent mutant FM5-632 with a yield of 123.2±1.6 μg/L, that is four times that of the original strain, was achieved by eight successive implantations under the conditions of 15 keV and 60×2.6×1013 ions/cm2. A further optimization increased the yield of the mutant by 39.7%, i.e. 172.1±1.2 μg/L which occurred in the mutant cultivated in the optimal fermentation culture medium composed of (per liter): 15.31 g glycerol, 10 g peptone, 2.89 g yeast extract, 5 g K2HPO4, 1 g NaCl, 0.5 g MgSO4·7H2O and 0.04 g cedar wood oil, incubated at 33 °C, pH 7.0 and 180 rpm for 120 h.

  2. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHS) and their Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattioda, Andrew L.; Hudgin, Douglas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Alamandola, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs) have attracted a good deal of attention because of their potent carcinogenic and mutagenic properties, and their prevalence in our environment. Such species also play a prominent role in the chemistry of life up to and including the very nucleobases from which our DNA is constructed. Surprisingly, these compounds may even be common outside of our terrestrial environment. To wit, it is now widely accepted that polycyclic aromatic materials are abundant in space and represent a major reservoir of organic carbon in the interstellar medium and developing planetary systems. Given that nitrogen is the fourth most abundant chemically reactive element in space (surpassed only by hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen), it is entirely reasonable to suspect that PANHs may represent an important component of that organic reservoir. Motivated by their intrinsic merit and with special attention toward evaluating their exobiological significance, we have initiated a program to study the spectroscopic and chemical properties of P A " s under conditions relevant to extraterrestrial environments. Here we present the first results of that program-infrared spectroscopic measurements on a series of PANH"s in neutral and cationic forms, isolated in inert matrices at cryogenic temperatures.temperatures. The species studied include: 1 -, and 2-azabenz[a]anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 4- azachrysene, dibenz[a,h]acridine, and dibenz[a,J)acridine. The experimental measurements are also compared with theoretical spectra calculated using density functional theory. General spectroscopic trends observed in this series of compounds are discussed and the implications of these results for Astrophysics and Exobiology are considered.

  3. Amperometric Detection of Aqueous Silver Ions by Inhibition of Glucose Oxidase Immobilized on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rust, Ian M; Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2015-07-21

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) was successfully developed for the determination of silver ions. Upon exposure to glucose, a steady-state enzymatic turnover rate was detected through amperometric oxidation of the H2O2 byproduct, directly related to the concentration of glucose in solution. Inhibition of the steady-state enzymatic glucose oxidase reaction by heavy metals ions such as Ag(+), produced a quantitative decrease in the steady-state rate, subsequently creating an ultrasensitive metal ion biosensor through enzymatic inhibition. The Ag(+) biosensor displayed a sensitivity of 2.00 × 10(8) ± 0.06 M(-1), a limit of detection (σ = 3) of 0.19 ± 0.04 ppb, a linear range of 20-200 nM, and sample recovery at 101 ± 2%, all acquired at a low-operating potential of 0.05 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). Interestingly, the biosensor does not display a loss in sensitivity with continued use due to the % inhibition based detection scheme: loss of enzyme (from continued use) does not influence the % inhibition, only the overall current associated with the activity loss. The heavy metals Cu(2+) and Co(2+) were also detected using the enzyme biosensor but found to be much less inhibitory, with sensitivities of 1.45 × 10(6) ± 0.05 M(-1) and 2.69 × 10(3) ± 0.07 M(-1), respectively. The mode of GOx inhibition was examined for both Ag(+) and Cu(2+) using Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots, where a strong correlation was observed between the inhibition constants and the biosensor sensitivity. PMID:26079664

  4. Neutron star recoils from anisotropic supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-T.; Mueller, E.

    1994-10-01

    Refering to recent hydrodynamical computations (Herant et al. 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993a) it is argued that neutron star kicks up to a few hundred km/s might be caused by a turbulent overturn of the matter between proto-neutron star and supernova shock during the early phase of the supernova explosion. These recoil speeds ("kick velocities") may be of the right size to explain the measured proper motions of most pulsars and do not require the presence of magnetic fields in the star. It is also possible that anisotropic neutrino emission associated with convective processes in the surface layers of the nascent neutron star (Burrows & Fryxell 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993b; Mueller 1993) provides an acceleration mechanism (Woosley 1987), although our estimates indicate that the maximum attainable velocities are around 200km/s. Yet, it turns out to be very unlikely that the considered stochastic asymmetries of supernova explosions are able to produce large enough recoils to account for pulsar velocities in excess of about 500km/s, which can be found in the samples of Harrison et al. (1993) and Taylor et al. (1993). It is concluded that other acceleration mechanisms have to be devised to explain the fast motion of PSR 2224+65 (transverse speed >=800km/s Cordes et al. 1993) and the high-velocities deduced from associations between supernova remnants and nearby young pulsars (e.g., Frail & Kulkarni 1991; Stewart et al. 1993; Caraveo 1993).

  5. Nuclear astrophysics studies by recoil mass separators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialanella, L.; Brand, K.; Campajola, L.; D'Onofrio, A.; Greife, U.; Morone, M. C.; Oliviero, G.; Ordine, A.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M.; Schmidt, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Zahnow, D.

    1997-11-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, used as a recoil separator in conjunction with a windowless gas target, can yield the high suppression factor needed to dispersively analyze radiative capture residues, with the aim of measuring cross sections in the sub-microbarn range. An experiment is underway utilizing a radioactive 7Be beam for the measurement of the cross section of the astrophysically important reaction 7Be(p, γ)8B at a center of mass energy ECM = 1 MeV. Preliminary results of this experiment are presented. The extension of the method to another reaction playing a key role in stellar evolution, i.e. 12C(α, γ)16O, requires an improvement of the angle- and momentum-acceptance of the recoil separator, the use of a jet gas target and of a specially designed low-threshold detector. The solutions proposed by a joint Italian-German project are discussed.

  6. Annealing of TiO2 Films Deposited on Si by Irradiating Nitrogen Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Yano, Yoshinori; Miyashita, Fumiyoshi

    2006-11-13

    Thin TiO2 films were deposited on Si at a temperature of 600 deg. C by an ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) method. The TiO2 films were annealed for 30 min in Ar at temperatures below 700 deg. C. The as-deposited TiO2 films had high permittivities such 200 {epsilon}o and consisted of crystallites that were not preferentially oriented to the c-axis but had an expanded c-axis. On the annealed TiO2 films, permittivities became lower with increasing annealing temperature, and crystallites were oriented preferentially to the (110) plane.

  7. Clean recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh TDPAC probe using a solenoidal separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W. J.; Williams, E.; Timmers, H.

    2012-10-01

    The synthesis and recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy using the solenoidal reaction product separator SOLITAIRE has been demonstrated for the first time. The separator suppresses the co-implantation of the intense flux of elastically scattered projectile ions that can affect results obtained with the hyperfine interactions technique. Using three different fusion evaporation reactions, the solenoid field was optimised at 4.5 T to achieve a concentrated, circular focus of evaporation residue ions with a lateral FWHM of 20 mm. Employing the reaction 92Zr(12C,4n)100Pd several samples have been recoil-implanted with the 100Pd/Rh probe. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of a silver sample and a TDPAC measurement on zinc confirm that the new preparation technique is effective. The ratio function measured with TDPAC of an undoped germanium sample may indicate that palladium-defect pairs are absent when implanting with SOLITAIRE. However, a direct comparison with TDPAC results for germanium samples prepared with conventional recoil implantation, which does not suppress the flux of elastics, does not support this assertion.

  8. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles ofmore » either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.« less

  9. Predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navrátil, Petr

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrödinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles of either hydrogen or helium. We compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.

  10. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles of either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.

  11. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field. PMID:24446877

  12. Nitrogen-doped graphene-decorated LiVPO4F nanocomposite as high-voltage cathode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Kai; Hu, Shuchun; Li, Yongkui

    2016-09-01

    In this study, nitrogen-doped graphene decorated LiVPO4F cathode material is firstly synthesized via a facile method. Well-dispersed LiVPO4F nanoparticles are embedded in nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets, forming an effective conducting network. The added nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets greatly enhance the electronic conductivity and Li-ion diffusion of LiVPO4F sample. When tested as cathode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, the hybrid electrode exhibits superior high-rate performance and long-term cycling stability between 3.0 and 4.5 V. It delivers a large discharge capacity of 152.7 mAhg-1 at 0.1 C and shows a capacity retention of 97.8% after 60 cycles. Moreover, a reversible capacity of 90.1 mAhg-1 is maintained even after 500 cycles at a high rate of 20 C. The charge-transfer resistance of LiVPO4F electrode is also reduced in the nitrogen-doped graphene, revealing that its electrode-electrolyte complex reactions take place easily and thus improve the electrochemical performance. The above results provide a facile and effective strategy for the synthesis of LiVPO4F cathode material for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Conformational Ordering of Biomolecules in the Gas Phase: Nitrogen Collision Cross Sections Measured on a Prototype High Resolution Drift Tube Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid “omni-omic” characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field. PMID:24446877

  14. Irradiation of nitrogen-rich ices by swift heavy ions. Clues for the formation of ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, B.; Dartois, E.; Engrand, C.; Duprat, J.; Godard, M.; Delauche, L.; Bardin, N.; Mejía, C.; Martinez, R.; Muniz, G.; Domaracka, A.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Extraterrestrial materials, such as meteorites and interplanetary dust particles, provide constraints on the formation and evolution of organic matter in the young solar system. Micrometeorites represent the dominant source of extraterrestrial matter at the Earth's surface, some of them originating from large heliocentric distances. Recent analyses of ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites recovered from Antarctica (UCAMMs) reveal an unusually nitrogen-rich organic matter. Such nitrogen-rich carbonaceous material could be formed in a N2-rich environment, at very low temperature, triggered by energetic processes. Aims: Several formation scenarios have been proposed for the formation of the N-rich organic matter observed in UCAMMs. We experimentally evaluate the scenario involving high energy irradiation of icy bodies subsurface orbiting at large heliocentric distances. Methods: The effect of Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) irradiation of ices containing N2 and CH4 was studied in the laboratory. The N2-CH4 (90:10 and 98:2) ice mixtures were irradiated at 14 K by 44 MeV Ni11+ and 160 MeV Ar15+ swift heavy ion beams. The evolution of the samples was monitored using in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The evolution of the initial ice molecules and new species formed were followed as a function of projectile fluence. After irradiation, the target was annealed to room temperature. The solid residue of the whole process left after ice sublimation was characterized in-situ by infrared spectroscopy, and the elemental composition was measured ex-situ. Results: The infrared bands that appear during irradiation allow us to identify molecules and radicals (HCN, CN-, NH3, ...). The infrared spectra of the solid residues measured at room temperature show similarities with that of UCAMMs. The results point towards the efficient production of a poly-HCN-like residue from the irradiation of N2-CH4 rich surfaces of icy bodies. The room temperature residue provides a viable

  15. Supramolecular complexes obtained from the interaction of violuric acid with manganese ion and nitrogenous ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Humberto C.; Diniz, Renata; Speziali, Nivaldo L.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C.

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization (Raman and infrared) and structural arrangement of three new supramolecular complexes named [Mn(H2Vi)2(H2O)4)](bpy)2(1), [Mn(bpa)2(H2O)4](H2Vi)2(2) and [Mn(bpp)2(H2Vi)2]·(bpp)2(H2O)2(3); these compounds have been obtained making use of different building blocks such as 4,4‧-bipyridyne (bpy), 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpa) and 4,4‧-trimethylene-dipyridine (bpp) acting as spacers with violuric acid and manganese ion, presenting behavior related to processes of molecular self-assembling and self-organization, very common in studies of supramolecular systems. In all these compounds the violurate anion appears in the crystalline arrangement as monodentate, anionic and chelate forms for 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The important to note is that monodentate coordination in 1 and chelate in 3 through O2 and O3 oxygen atoms from the oxime group can be considered the first example in literature involving violuric acid, both in coordination or interaction with manganese ion. Moreover, it can be seen a good agreement between the structural results and the spectroscopic data; for instance the presence of an intense band in the Raman spectrum around 1603 and 1012 cm-1 in all obtained compounds, assigned to the ν(CC)/ν(CN) and ν(ring)modes of the pyridyl ligand, respectively. Other important band can be observed in 1031 cm-1 only for compound 3, assigned to the ν(Nsbnd O) mode of the violurate ligand; the band at 1284 cm-1 referring to the ν(Ndbnd O) mode, very characteristic of violurate species is not seen in the spectrum, thus confirming the coordination of this building block by the oxime moiety.

  16. Energy Storage: Nitrogen-Doped Ordered Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanofibers as Anode Materials for High Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries (Small 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Xiaowu; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    On page 3522, Y. Yu and co-workers fabricate nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers (denoted as N-MTO) by electrospinning and subsequent nitridation treatment. Nitrogen atoms are successfully doped into the TiO2 lattice, accompanied by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies, contributing to the improvement of electronic conductivity of TiO2 . When used as an anode for a sodium-ion battery, the N-MTO demonstrates excellent rate capability and superior long cycling performance. PMID:27383035

  17. Source apportionment of ammonium and nitrate ion using nitrogen stable isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), defined to particle size as 100 % cut-off aerodynamic diameter at 10 μm, has adverse effects on human health. In these years, stable isotope ratio of small sample volume can be analyzed high precision by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupling with elemental analyzer. Recently some fields are using stable isotope ratio. For environmental field, it is expected such as powerful tool for source identification and understanding mechanism. But the existed researches intended for stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) of particulate matter have been limited. We try to analysis δ15N-ammonium (δ15N-NH4+) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) of SPM, to estimate source of NH4+ and NO3- of SPM. Average δ15N-NH4+ and δ15N-NO3- of SPM in Akita prefecture, Japan were 15.9 ‰ (1.3‰ to 38.5 ‰) and - 0.7 ‰ (-4.6 ‰ to 4.8 ‰), respectively. Although δ15N-NH4+ do not show seasonal trend, δ15N-NO3- increased in winter markedly and decreasing in summer. In generally, the dominant origin of NO3- of SPM is produced from NOx emitted by combustion of some fuel and NO by agriculture source. Heaton (1990) summarized that δ15N-NOx is very different by temperature of combustion. They insisted that δ15N-NOx values are between -13 ‰ to -2 ‰ over 2000 °C (e.g. vehicle engine) and 6 ‰ to 13 ‰ under 1300 °C (e.g. coal combustion). Therefore, the reason of the winter high trend in this study might be combustion process such as coal combustion source. Moreover, the baseline might be made by vehicle sources. In addition, the reason of decreasing in summer seemed to be affected very low δ15N-NO of fertilizer and urea indicated by Li and Wang (2008). Bacteria were activated in summer, and NO from fertilizer and urea was emitted. This summary seemed to be very reasonable.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and Twisted Bilayer Graphene via Hyperthermal Ion Implantation with Depth Control.

    PubMed

    Cress, Cory D; Schmucker, Scott W; Friedman, Adam L; Dev, Pratibha; Culbertson, James C; Lyding, Joseph W; Robinson, Jeremy T

    2016-03-22

    We investigate hyperthermal ion implantation (HyTII) as a means for substitutionally doping layered materials such as graphene. In particular, this systematic study characterizes the efficacy of substitutional N-doping of graphene using HyTII over an N(+) energy range of 25-100 eV. Scanning tunneling microscopy results establish the incorporation of N substituents into the graphene lattice during HyTII processing. We illustrate the differences in evolution of the characteristic Raman peaks following incremental doses of N(+). We use the ratios of the integrated D and D' peaks, I(D)/I(D') to assess the N(+) energy-dependent doping efficacy, which shows a strong correlation with previously reported molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results and a peak doping efficiency regime ranging between approximately 30 and 50 eV. We also demonstrate the inherent monolayer depth control of the HyTII process, thereby establishing a unique advantage over other less-specific methods for doping. We achieve this by implementing twisted bilayer graphene (TBG), with one layer of isotopically enriched (13)C and one layer of natural (12)C graphene, and modify only the top layer of the TBG sample. By assessing the effects of N-HyTII processing, we uncover dose-dependent shifts in the transfer characteristics consistent with electron doping and we find dose-dependent electronic localization that manifests in low-temperature magnetotransport measurements. PMID:26910346

  19. Designing nitrogen-enriched echinus-like carbon capsules for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction and lithium ion storage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuangang; Wang, Lixia; Zhao, Yang; Ye, Minhui; Chen, Qing; Feng, Zhihai; Qu, Liangti

    2014-07-21

    Both structural and compositional modulations are important for high-performance electrode materials in energy conversion/storage devices. Here hierarchical-structure nitrogen-rich hybrid porous carbon capsules with bamboo-like carbon nanotube whiskers (N-CC@CNTs) grown in situ have been specifically designed, which combine the advantageous features of high surface area, abundant active sites, easy access to medium and favorable mass transport. As a result, the newly prepared N-CC@CNTs show highly efficient catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media for fuel cells, which not only outperforms commercial Pt-based catalysts in terms of kinetic limiting current, stability and tolerance to methanol crossover effect, but is also better than most of the nanostructured carbon-based catalysts reported previously. On the other hand, as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the N-CC@CNTs obtained also exhibit an excellent reversible capacity of ca. 1337 mA h g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1), outstanding rate capability and long cycling stability, even at a current density of 20 A g(-1). The capacity is the highest among all the heteroatom-doped carbon materials reported so far, and is even higher than that of many of the composites of metal, metal oxides or metal sulfides with carbon materials. PMID:24906180

  20. Facile fabrication of molybdenum dioxide/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrid as high performance anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Jianqiang; Sun, Lingna; Cao, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    A facile, environmentally friendly and low-cost synthesis strategy is demonstrated to fabricate a MoO2/N-doped graphene (MoO2/N-GNS) hybrid, in which MoO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are uniformly dispersed on N-GNS sheets by Mo-N chemical bond formed between MoO2 and N-GNS. As an anode material in lithium ion batteries, the MoO2/N-GNS hybrid possesses superior rate capability, excellent cycling performance as well as high reversible capacity. A reversible capacity of 1138.5 mA h g-1 is maintained after 60 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1, and even at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1, the specific capacity of 873.7 mA h g-1 can be obtained after 60 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of the MoO2/N-GNS hybrid can be attributed to the synergistic effects of nitrogen-doping, flexible and conductive GNS, and MoO2 NPs.

  1. Nitrogen-Enriched Porous Carbon Coating for Manganese Oxide Nanostructures toward High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangan; Zhang, Cunbao; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-05-01

    Manganese oxides are promising high-capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) yet suffer from short cycle life and poor rate capability. Herein, we demonstrate a facile in situ interfacial synthesis of core-shell heterostructures comprising nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (pN-C) nanocoating and manganese oxide (MnOx) nanotubes. When MnOx/pN-C serves as an anode material for LIBs, the pN-C coating plays multiple roles in substantially improving the lithium storage performance. In combination with the nanosized structure and nanotubular architecture, the MnOx/pN-C nanocomposites exhibit an impressive reversible capacity of 1068 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1), a high-rate delivery of 361 mAh g(-1) at 8 A g(-1), and a stable cycling retention up to 300 cycles. The surface pN-C coating strategy can be extended to design and fabricate various metal oxide nanostructures for high-performance LIBs. PMID:25871883

  2. Analysis of an explosion accident of nitrogen trichloride in a waste liquid containing ammonium ion and platinum black.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ken; Akiyoshi, Miyako; Ishizaki, Keiko; Sato, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    2014-08-15

    Five liters of sodium hypochlorite aqueous solution (12 mass%) was poured into 300 L of liquid waste containing ammonium ion of about 1.8 mol/L in a 500 L tank in a plant area; then, two minutes later the solution exploded with a flash on March 30th, 2005. The tank cover, the fluorescent lamp and the air duct were broken by the blast wave. Thus, we have conducted 40 runs of laboratory-scale explosion tests under various conditions (solution concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 and NaClO, temperatures, Pt catalysts, pH, etc.) to investigate the causes for such an explosion. When solutions of ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite are mixed in the presence of platinum black, explosions result. This is ascribable to the formation of explosive nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). In the case where it is necessary to mix these 2 solutions (ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite) in the presence of platinum black, the following conditions would reduce a probability of explosion; the initial concentration of NH4(+) should be less than 3 mol/L and the pH should be higher than 6. The hypochlorite solution (in 1/10 in volume) to be added at room temperature is recommended to be less than 0.6 mol/L. PMID:24953938

  3. A comparative investigation on the effects of nitrogen-doping into graphene on enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2/graphene for sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Su, Dawei; Zhang, Jinqiang; Chen, Shuangqiang; Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-02-01

    SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids have been synthesized by an in situ hydrothermal method, during which the formation of SnO2 nanocrystals and nitrogen doping of graphene occur simultaneously. The as-prepared SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance for sodium-ion batteries compared to SnO2/graphene nanocomposites. A systematic comparison between SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids and the SnO2/graphene counterpart as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries has been conducted. The comparison is in a reasonable framework, where SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids and the SnO2/graphene counterpart have the same SnO2 ratio, similar SnO2 crystallinity and particle size, close surface area and pore size. The results clearly manifest that the improved electron transfer efficiency of SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene due to nitrogen-doping plays a more important role than the increased electro-active sites within graphene network in enhancing the electro-activity of SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids compared to the SnO2/graphene counterpart. In contrast to the previous reports which often ascribe the enhanced electro-activity of nitrogen-doped graphene based composites to two nitrogen-doping effects (improving the electron transfer efficiency and increasing electro-active sites within graphene networks) in one single declaration, this work is expected to provide more specific information for understanding the effects of nitrogen-doping into graphene on improving the electrochemical performance of graphene based composites.SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids have been synthesized by an in situ hydrothermal method, during which the formation of SnO2 nanocrystals and nitrogen doping of graphene occur simultaneously. The as-prepared SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance for sodium-ion batteries compared to SnO2/graphene nanocomposites. A systematic comparison

  4. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N(+)) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N(+) ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-(13)C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN(-) anion at energies down to approximately 5 eV. N(+) ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH(-) and NH(2) (-) anions. A fraction of OO(-) fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH(-). The formation of H(3)O(+) ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes. PMID:17935431

  5. Moving towards first science with the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zachary; Berg, G. P. A.; Gilardy, G.; Moran, M.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Couder, M.

    2015-10-01

    The St. George recoil mass separator has recently been coupled to the 5MV St. Ana accelerator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Lab. St. George is a unique tool designed to measure radiative alpha-capture reactions for nuclei up to A = 40 in inverse kinematics in order to directly obtain cross sections required for astrophysical models of stellar and explosive helium burning. Commissioning of St. George is presently taking place with primary beams of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. In this presentation, results will be shown for the measured energy acceptance of St. George, which compare favorably to COSY results when employing the calculated optimal ion-optical settings. Additionally, future plans will be discussed, such as assessing the angular acceptance of St. George and the re-integration of HiPPO at the separator target position to provide a dense, windowless helium gas-jet target. The material presented in this work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 1419765.

  6. A gun recoil system employing a magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. C.; Wang, J.

    2012-10-01

    This research aims to design and control a full scale gun recoil buffering system which works under real firing impact loading conditions. A conventional gun recoil absorber is replaced with a controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Through dynamic analysis of the gun recoil system, a theoretical model for optimal design and control of the MR fluid damper for impact loadings is derived. The optimal displacement, velocity and optimal design rules are obtained. By applying the optimal design theory to protect against impact loadings, an MR fluid damper for a full scale gun recoil system is designed and manufactured. An experimental study is carried out on a firing test rig which consists of a 30 mm caliber, multi-action automatic gun with an MR damper mounted to the fixed base through a sliding guide. Experimental buffering results under passive control and optimal control are obtained. By comparison, optimal control is better than passive control, because it produces smaller variation in the recoil force while achieving less displacement of the recoil body. The optimal control strategy presented in this paper is open-loop with no feedback system needed. This means that the control process is sensor-free. This is a great benefit for a buffering system under impact loading, especially for a gun recoil system which usually works in a harsh environment.

  7. Hyperfine structures and Landé gJ-factors for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdebout, S.; Nazé, C.; Jönsson, P.; Rynkun, P.; Godefroid, M.; Gaigalas, G.

    2014-09-01

    Energy levels, hyperfine interaction constants, and Landé gJ-factors are reported for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations. Valence, core-valence, and core-core correlation effects are taken into account through single and double-excitations from multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. A systematic comparison of the calculated hyperfine interaction constants is made with values from the available literature.

  8. Oxygen recoil implant from SiO{sub 2} layers into single-crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Chen, Y.; Li, D.; Oak, S.; Srivastav, G.; Banerjee, S.; Tasch, A.; Merrill, P.; Bleiler, R.

    2001-06-01

    It is important to understand the distribution of recoil-implanted atoms and the impact on device performance when ion implantation is performed at a high dose through surface materials into single crystalline silicon. For example, in ultralarge scale integration impurity ions are often implanted through a thin layer of screen oxide and some of the oxygen atoms are inevitably recoil implanted into single-crystalline silicon. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. We have modified the Monte Carlo ion implant simulator, UT-Marlowe (B. Obradovic, G. Wang, Y. Chen, D. Li, C. Snell, and A. F. Tasch, UT-MARLOWE Manual, 1999), which is based on the binary collision approximation, to follow the full cascade and to dynamically modify the stoichiometry of the Si layer as oxygen atoms are knocked into it. CPU reduction techniques are used to relieve the demand on computational power when such a full cascade simulation is involved. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles of oxygen have been carefully obtained for high dose As and BF{sub 2} implants at different energies through oxide layers of various thicknesses, and the simulated oxygen profiles are found to agree very well with the SIMS data. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of the DRAGON Recoil Mass Spectrometer End Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloce, Laurelle; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Reeve, S.

    2010-11-01

    DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions), located at TRIUMF in Vancouver, BC, is designed to study radiative capture reactions relevant in astrophysical nucleosynthesis processes. These types of reactions help us understand the production of heavy elements in the Universe. An accelerated beam of a given isotope is sent through a gas target where the reactions take place. Magnetic and electrostatic dipoles separate the recoils from the original beam particles, selecting particles according to charge and mass. The products of the nuclear reactions are then detected at the end of DRAGON by heavy ion detectors, which constitute two micro channel plate (MCP) detectors for time of flight measurements, used in conjunction with a Double Sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSSD) or an ionization chamber (IC). The DSSSD gives information on number of counts, total energy deposited, and position while the IC measures the number of counts and the energy deposited as the particle travels through the chamber. In order to determine which set up is ideal for a given reaction and energy range, we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation of these end detectors. The program simulates both recoil and beam particles, and takes into account effects such as straggling and pulse height defect. Reaction kinematics in the gas target are also considered. Comparisons to recent experimental data will be discussed.

  10. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  11. Application of an online ion-chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Walker, John T.

    2016-06-01

    The dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric deposition remains uncertain. The lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent make it difficult to develop accurate mass budgets and sufficient process level detail is not available to improve current air-surface exchange models. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of continuous air sampling measurement techniques, resulting with instruments of sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to directly quantify air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. However, their applicability is generally restricted to only one or a few of the compounds within the deposition budget. Here, the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA 2S), a commercially available online ion-chromatography-based analyzer is characterized for the first time as applied for air-surface exchange measurements of HNO3, NH3, NH4+, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-. Analytical accuracy and precision are assessed under field conditions. Chemical concentrations gradient precision are determined at the same sampling site. Flux uncertainty measured by the aerodynamic gradient method is determined for a representative 3-week period in fall 2012 over a grass field. Analytical precision and chemical concentration gradient precision were found to compare favorably in comparison to previous studies. During the 3-week period, percentages of hourly chemical concentration gradients greater than the corresponding chemical concentration gradient detection limit were 86, 42, 82, 73, 74 and 69 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. As expected, percentages were lowest for aerosol species, owing to their relatively low deposition velocities and correspondingly smaller gradients relative to gas phase species. Relative hourly median flux uncertainties were 31, 121, 42, 43, 67 and 56 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. Flux

  12. Difference between a Photon's Momentum and an Atom's Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibble, Kurt

    2006-08-18

    When an atom absorbs a photon from a laser beam that is not an infinite plane wave, the atom's recoil is less than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k in the propagation direction. We show that the recoils in the transverse directions produce a lensing of the atomic wave functions, which leads to a frequency shift that is not discrete but varies linearly with the field amplitude and strongly depends on the atomic state detection. The same lensing effect is also important for microwave atomic clocks. The frequency shifts are of the order of the naive recoil shift for the transverse wave vector of the photons.

  13. Designing nitrogen-enriched echinus-like carbon capsules for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction and lithium ion storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuangang; Wang, Lixia; Zhao, Yang; Ye, Minhui; Chen, Qing; Feng, Zhihai; Qu, Liangti

    2014-06-01

    Both structural and compositional modulations are important for high-performance electrode materials in energy conversion/storage devices. Here hierarchical-structure nitrogen-rich hybrid porous carbon capsules with bamboo-like carbon nanotube whiskers (N-CC@CNTs) grown in situ have been specifically designed, which combine the advantageous features of high surface area, abundant active sites, easy access to medium and favorable mass transport. As a result, the newly prepared N-CC@CNTs show highly efficient catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media for fuel cells, which not only outperforms commercial Pt-based catalysts in terms of kinetic limiting current, stability and tolerance to methanol crossover effect, but is also better than most of the nanostructured carbon-based catalysts reported previously. On the other hand, as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the N-CC@CNTs obtained also exhibit an excellent reversible capacity of ca. 1337 mA h g-1 at 0.5 A g-1, outstanding rate capability and long cycling stability, even at a current density of 20 A g-1. The capacity is the highest among all the heteroatom-doped carbon materials reported so far, and is even higher than that of many of the composites of metal, metal oxides or metal sulfides with carbon materials.Both structural and compositional modulations are important for high-performance electrode materials in energy conversion/storage devices. Here hierarchical-structure nitrogen-rich hybrid porous carbon capsules with bamboo-like carbon nanotube whiskers (N-CC@CNTs) grown in situ have been specifically designed, which combine the advantageous features of high surface area, abundant active sites, easy access to medium and favorable mass transport. As a result, the newly prepared N-CC@CNTs show highly efficient catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media for fuel cells, which not only outperforms commercial Pt-based catalysts in terms of kinetic limiting

  14. Ability of a gridless ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces by low-energy (60-100 eV) nitrogen ion bombardment. Effects of ageing in air and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Laurent; Scaglione, Salvatore; Flori, Daniele; Riga, Joseph; Caudano, Roland

    2001-12-01

    Polymer surface treatments are of great importance for various industrial applications that can range from food packaging or car bumper painting to biocompatible implants. For such applications, plasma or corona discharges are well known and used "on-line" in polymer plants to incorporate new chemical functions at polymer surfaces. The aim of this work is to investigate the ability of a simple ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces in comparison with these intensively used industrial methods. Estimation of the influence of the nitrogen ion dose (from 1×10 15 to 1×10 16 ions/ cm2) and the ion energy (from 60 to 100 eV) on incorporation is attempted in order to be able to use them in a controlled way. The ageing of these polymer surfaces in air and in water was studied by XPS for several months.

  15. Exerpts from the history of alpha recoils.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Christer

    2011-05-01

    Any confined air volume holding radon ((222)Rn) gas bears a memory of past radon concentrations due to (210)Pb (T(1/2) = 22 y) and its progenies entrapped in all solid objects in the volume. The efforts of quantifying past radon exposures by means of the left-behind long-lived radon progenies started in 1987 with this author's unsuccessful trials of removing (214)Po from radon exposed glass objects. In this contribution the history and different techniques of assessing radon exposure to man in retrospect will be overviewed. The main focus will be on the implantation of alpha recoils into glass surfaces, but also potential traps in radon dwellings will be discussed. It is concluded that for a successful retrospective application, three crucial imperatives must be met, i.e. firstly, the object must persistently store a certain fraction of the created (210)Pb atoms, secondly, be resistant over decades towards disturbances from the outside and thirdly, all (210)Pb atoms analysed must originate from airborne radon only. For large-scale radon epidemiological studies, non-destructive and inexpensive measurement techniques are essential. Large-scale studies cannot be based on objects rarely found in dwellings or not available for measurements. PMID:21306801

  16. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  17. Recoil splitting of x-ray-induced optical fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, S.; Aagren, H.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Sun, Y.-P.; Levin, S.

    2010-03-15

    We show that the anisotropy of the recoil velocity distribution of x-ray-ionized atoms or molecules leads to observable splittings in subsequent optical fluorescence or absorption when the polarization vector of the x rays is parallel to the momentum of the fluorescent photons. The order of the magnitude of the recoil-induced splitting is about 10 {mu}eV, which can be observed using Fourier or laser-absorption spectroscopic techniques.

  18. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  19. Research and Development of a New Gas-Filled Recoil Separator GARIS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Haba, Hiromitsu; Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Kudou, Yuki; Hung, Minghui; Goto, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Masashi; Goto, Naoya; Koyama, Takumi; Tamura, Nobuyuki; Tsuto, Shouhei; Sumita, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kengo; Takeyama, Mirei; Yamaki, Sayaka; Morita, Kosuke

    The results of the recent on-line test experiment using a gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, whose main purpose is to perform the so-called hot fusion reactions to produce superheavy elements, are presented. Reaction products via 169Tm(40Ar,4n)205Fr and 208Pb(40Ar,3n)245Fm were collected by the focal plane detection system of GARIS-II with high efficiency of 47% for 205Fr and 63% for 245Fm under low background condition.

  20. Thermal annealing of stabilization products from recoil bromine-82 atoms in neutron-irradiated ammonium perbromate

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, V.K.; Gavrilov, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    A study has been made on the thermal annealing of stabilization products from recoil bromine-82 atoms in neutron-irradiated ammonium perbromate. Paper and ion-exchange chromatography show that the oxidation of /sup 82/Br/sup -/ to /sup 82/BrO/sub 3//sup -/ in that case occurs only to a small extent, in contrast to alkali-metal perbromates. The effect is ascribed to metastable radiolysis products from the ammonium group. The pyrolysis of ammonium perbromate has also been examined.

  1. Calculated yield of isomer depletion due to NEEC for {sup 93m}Mo recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.

    2012-11-15

    In the present work, quantitative calculations were carried out for production and depletion of the {sup 93m}Mo isomer in a relatively simple experiment using {sup 91}Zr beam ions. Such studies could be arranged at existing and operating accelerator facilities, e.g. at GSI or in JINR. The {sup 93m}Mo nuclei produced in a He gas target due to the {sup 4}He({sup 91}Zr, 2n) reaction will recoil into a gas stopper with a high velocity, being then depleted due to NEEC in highly-ionized species.

  2. Sub-nanosecond lifetime measurement using the recoil-distance method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The electromagnetic properties of low-lying nuclear states are a sensitive probe of both collective and single-particle degrees of freedom in nuclear structure. The recoil-distance technique provides a very reliable, direct and precise method for measuring lifetimes of nuclear states with lifetimes ranging from less than one to several hundred picoseconds. This method complements the powerful, but complicated, heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation technique for measuring electromagnetic properties. The recoil distance technique has been combined with heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation to study a variety of problems. Examples discussed are: study of the two-phonon triplet in {sup 110}Pd, coupling of the {beta} and {gamma} degrees of freedom in {sup 182,184}W, highly deformed {gamma} bands in {sup 165}Ho, octupole collectivity in {sup 96}Zr, and opposite parity states in {sup 153}Eu. Consistency between the Coulomb excitation results and the lifetime measurements confirms the reliability of the complex analysis often encountered in heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation work.

  3. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording.more » Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.« less

  4. Conductive surface modification of LiFePO4 with nitrogen doped carbon layers for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sukeun; Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bridges, Craig A; Unocic, Raymond R; Nanda, Jagjit; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2012-01-01

    The LiFePO4 rod surface modified with nitrogen doped carbon layer has been prepared using hydrothermal processing followed by post-annealing in the presence of an ionic liquid. The coated LiFePO4 rod exhibits good capacity retention and high rate capability as the nitrogen doped carbon improves conductivity and prevents aggregation of the rod during cycling.

  5. Effect of activated carbon surface oxygen- and/or nitrogen-containing groups on adsorption of copper(II) ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Biniak, S.; Pakula, M.; Szymanski, G.S.; Swiatkowski, A.

    1999-08-31

    The adsorption properties of a modified activated carbon with various oxygen-and/or nitrogen-containing surface groups toward copper ions was studied. Previously de-ashed and chemically modified commercial activated carbon D-43/1 (carbo-Tech, Essen, Germany) was used. The chemical properties of the modified carbon surface were estimated by standard neutralization titration with HCl, NaOH, and HaOC{sub 2}{sub 5}. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions on three modified activated carbons from aqueous CuSO{sub 4} solution of various pH was measured. The carbon samples with adsorbed Cu{sup 2+} ions were analyzed by spectroscopic methods (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). In addition, an electrochemical measurement (cyclic voltammetry) was performed using powdered activated carbon electrodes. While the modification procedures employed alter the surface only slightly, they strongly influence the surface chemical structure. Basic groups are predominant in the heat-treated samples; acidic functional groups are predominant in the oxidized sample. Both the copper cation adsorption studies and the spectral and electrochemical measurements show that adsorbed ions interact with the carbon surface in different ways. The number of adsorbed ions depends on the nature and quantity of surface acid-base functionalities and on the pH equilibrium in the aqueous solution. The possible mechanisms of interactions between metal ions and carbon surface functionalities are summarized and discussed.

  6. Studies Of (lowercasep,γ) Reactions With The Daresbury Recoil Separator At ORNL'S HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R.; Champagne, A. E.; Visser, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Kozub, R. L.; Moazen, B. H.; Parker, P. D.; Greife, U.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Jones, K. L.; Thomas, J. S.; Johnson, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei is important in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts as well as in solar neutrino production. The Daresbury Recoil Separator and a windowless gas target system have been installed at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for measurements of proton capture reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The performance of the system has been characterized with a number of experiments with stable ion beams. The windowless gas target thickness has been determined to 3% using a novel technique and the DRS transmission has been studied with ^1H(^12C,γ)^13N. Results from this work will be presented. We will also report on plans for ^1H(^7Be,γ)^8B and ^1H(^17F,γ)^18Ne measurements at the HRIBF.

  7. Nitrogen-atom endohedral fullerene synthesis with high efficiency by controlling plasma-ion irradiation energy and C{sub 60} internal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Soon Cheon; Kaneko, Toshiro Ishida, Hiroyasu; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2015-03-28

    The nitrogen-atom endohedral fullerene (N@C{sub 60}) has been synthesized by controlling the plasma ion irradiation energy (E{sub i}) and fullerene (C{sub 60}) behavior in the sublimation phase. We examined the relationship between the synthesis purity of N@C{sub 60} [molar concentration ratio of N@C{sub 60} to pristine fullerene (C{sub 60})] and E{sub i}, which was controlled by changing the substrate bias voltages (V{sub sub}) and gas pressure (P{sub N2}) during the plasma irradiation process. High-density nitrogen-molecular ions (N{sub 2}{sup +}) with a suitable E{sub i} near 80 eV are confirmed to be the optimum condition of the nitrogen plasma for the synthesis of high-purity N@C{sub 60}. In addition, high sublimation of C{sub 60} contributes to a higher yield due to the high internal energy of C{sub 60} and the related cage defects that are present under these conditions. As a result, a purity of 0.83% is realized for the first time, which is almost two orders of magnitude higher than that using other methods.

  8. Recoil-α-fission and recoil-α-α-fission events observed in the reaction 48Ca + 243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, U.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Fahlander, C.; Gates, J. M.; Golubev, P.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schädel, M.; Yakushev, A.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Dobaczewski, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Shi, Yue; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2016-09-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Amongst the detected thirty correlated α-decay chains associated with the production of element Z = 115, two recoil-α-fission and five recoil- α- α-fission events were observed. The latter five chains are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator, and three such events reported from an experiment at the Berkeley gas-filled separator. The four chains observed at the Dubna gas-filled separator were assigned to start from the 2n-evaporation channel 289115 due to the fact that these recoil- α- α-fission events were observed only at low excitation energies. Contrary to this interpretation, we suggest that some of these recoil- α- α-fission decay chains, as well as some of the recoil- α- α-fission and recoil-α-fission decay chains reported from Berkeley and in this article, start from the 3n-evaporation channel 288115.

  9. Identification of the nitrogen-based blister agents bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine (HN-2) and tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN-3) and their hydrolysis products on soil using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gresham, G L; Groenewold, G S; Olson, J E

    2000-12-01

    The nitrogen blister agents HN-2 (bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine) and HN-3 (tris(2-chloroethyl)amine) were directly analyzed on the surface of soil samples using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In the presence of water, HN-1 (bis(2-choroethyl)ethylamine), HN-2 and HN-3 undergo hydrolysis to form N-ethyldiethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine (TEA), respectively; these compounds can be readily detected as adsorbed species on soil particles. When soil samples spiked with HN-3 in alcohol were analyzed, 2-alkoxyethylamine derivatives were observed on the sample surfaces. This result shows that nitrogen blister agents will undergo condensation reactions with nucleophilic compounds and emphasizes the need for an analytical methodology capable of detecting a range of degradation and condensation products on environmental surfaces. The ability of ion trap SIMS to isolate and accumulate ions, and then perform tandem mass spectrometric analysis improves the detection of low-abundance surface contaminants and the selectivity of the technique. Utilizing these techniques, the limits of detection for HN-3 were studied as a function of surface coverage. It was found that HN-3 could be detected at a surface coverage of 0.01 monolayer, which corresponds to 20 ppm (mass/mass) for a soil having a surface area of 2.2 m(2) g(-1). TEA, the exhaustive hydrolysis product of HN-3, was detected at a surface coverage of 0.001 monolayer, which corresponds to 0.86 ppm. PMID:11180637

  10. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C2H2 PIII is composed of mainly TiCx with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti4+, Ti3+ and Ti2+.

  11. Metal Ion Binding to Polypeptides Characterized by Irmpd Spectroscopy. Metal-Amide Nitrogen Binding and the Iminol Tautomerization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2012-06-01

    We have recently uncovered a new binding mode for the complexation of metal ions with gas-phase peptides. Termed the iminol mode, this binding mode is adopted by strongly binding divalent metal ions including Mg2+ and Ni2+. The metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, which moves to protonate the amide carbonyl oxygen. A spectroscopic signature of the tautomerization is the disappearance of the characteristic Amide II band normally seen in peptide ion infrared spectra. We find that in peptides up to pentapeptides, multiple iminol binding can take place, such that all amide linkages are tautomerized to the iminol form, and chelate the metal ion. However, the iminol tautomerization depends on the nature of the metal ion, as will be discussed. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm-1.

  12. Encapsulating micro-nano Si/SiO(x) into conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon as binder-free monolithic anodes for advanced lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Meijuan; Tan, Guoqiang; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-05-01

    Silicon monoxide, a promising silicon-based anode candidate for lithium-ion batteries, has recently attracted much attention for its high theoretical capacity, good cycle stability, low cost, and environmental benignity. Currently, the most critical challenge is to improve its low initial coulombic efficiency and significant volume changes during the charge-discharge processes. Herein, we report a binder-free monolithic electrode structure based on directly encapsulating micro-nano Si/SiOx particles into conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon frameworks to form monolithic, multi-core, cross-linking composite matrices. We utilize micro-nano Si/SiOx reduced by high-energy ball-milling SiO as active materials, and conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon formed by the pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile both as binders and conductive agents. Owing to the high electrochemical activity of Si/SiOx and the good mechanical resiliency of conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon backbones, this specific composite structure enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO and accommodates its large volume expansion, as well as its good ionic and electronic conductivity. The annealed Si/SiOx/polyacrylonitrile composite electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical properties, including a high initial reversible capacity (2734 mA h g(-1) with 75% coulombic efficiency), stable cycle performance (988 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles), and good rate capability (800 mA h g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) rate). Because the composite is naturally abundant and shows such excellent electrochemical performance, it is a promising anode candidate material for lithium-ion batteries. The binder-free monolithic architectural design also provides an effective way to prepare other monolithic electrode materials for advanced lithium-ion batteries. PMID:25865463

  13. Encapsulating micro-nano Si/SiOx into conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon as binder-free monolithic anodes for advanced lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Meijuan; Tan, Guoqiang; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-04-01

    Silicon monoxide, a promising silicon-based anode candidate for lithium-ion batteries, has recently attracted much attention for its high theoretical capacity, good cycle stability, low cost, and environmental benignity. Currently, the most critical challenge is to improve its low initial coulombic efficiency and significant volume changes during the charge-discharge processes. Herein, we report a binder-free monolithic electrode structure based on directly encapsulating micro-nano Si/SiOx particles into conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon frameworks to form monolithic, multi-core, cross-linking composite matrices. We utilize micro-nano Si/SiOx reduced by high-energy ball-milling SiO as active materials, and conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon formed by the pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile both as binders and conductive agents. Owing to the high electrochemical activity of Si/SiOx and the good mechanical resiliency of conjugated nitrogen-doped carbon backbones, this specific composite structure enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO and accommodates its large volume expansion, as well as its good ionic and electronic conductivity. The annealed Si/SiOx/polyacrylonitrile composite electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical properties, including a high initial reversible capacity (2734 mA h g-1 with 75% coulombic efficiency), stable cycle performance (988 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles), and good rate capability (800 mA h g-1 at 1 A g-1 rate). Because the composite is naturally abundant and shows such excellent electrochemical performance, it is a promising anode candidate material for lithium-ion batteries. The binder-free monolithic architectural design also provides an effective way to prepare other monolithic electrode materials for advanced lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  15. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  16. Stimulated Rayleigh resonances and recoil-induced effects

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, J.Y.; Grynberg, G.

    1996-12-31

    The organization of this paper is as follows. We present in Section II the basic ideas about stimulated Rayleigh scattering by considering more particularly the situation where it arises from a relaxation process going on in the material system, and we describe a few experimental observations made in atomic and molecular physics. We then consider the case of nonstationary two-level atoms, and we derive the shape and characteristics of the recoil-induced resonances (Section III). In particular, we show that these resonances can be interpreted either as originating from a stimulated Rayleigh effect or as a stimulated Raman phenomena between atomic energy-momentum states having different momenta. Finally, to make a clear distinction between the physical phenomena that pertain directly to recoil-induced processes (i.e., that actually permit the measurement of the photon recoil) and those for which the introduction of the recoil constitutes a mere physical convenience, we review in Section IV some indisputable manifestations of the photon recoil in atomic and molecular physics. 92 refs., 22 figs.

  17. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  18. Rupture and recoil of bent-core liquid crystal filaments.

    PubMed

    Salili, S M; Ostapenko, T; Kress, O; Bailey, C; Weissflog, W; Harth, K; Eremin, A; Stannarius, R; Jákli, A

    2016-05-25

    The recoil process of free-standing liquid crystal filaments is investigated experimentally and theoretically. We focus on two aspects, the contraction speed of the filament and a spontaneously formed undulation instability. At the moment of rupture, the filaments buckle similarly to the classical Euler buckling of elastic rods. The tip velocity decays with decreasing filament length. The wavelength of buckling affinely decreases with the retracting filament tip. The energy gain related to the decrease of the total length and surface area of the filaments is mainly dissipated by layer rearrangements during thickening of the fibre. A flow back into the meniscus is relevant only in the final stage of the recoil process. We introduce a model for the quantitative description of the filament retraction speed. The dynamics of this recoil behaviour may find relevance as a model for biology-related filaments. PMID:27140824

  19. Accounting for Recoil Effects in Geochronometers: A New Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; Huber, C.

    2012-12-01

    A number of geologically important chronometers are affected by, or owe their utility to, the "recoil effect". This effect describes the physical displacement of a nuclide due to energetic nuclear processes such as radioactive alpha decay (as in the case of various parent-daughter pairs in the uranium-series decay chains, and Sm-Nd), as well as neutron irradiation (in the case of the methodology for the 40Ar/39Ar dating method). The broad range of affected geochronometers means that the recoil effect can impact a wide range of dating method applications in the geosciences, including but not limited to: Earth surface processes, paleoclimate, volcanic processes, and cosmochemistry and planetary evolution. In particular, the recoil effect can have a notable impact on the use of fine grains (silt- and clay-sized particles) for geochronometric dating purposes. This is because recoil-induced loss of a nuclide from the surfaces of a grain can create an isotopically-depleted outer rind, and for small grains, this depleted rind can be volumetrically significant. When this recoil loss is measurable and occurs in a known time-dependent fashion, it can usefully serve as the basis for chronometers (such as the U-series comminution age method); in other cases recoil loss from fine particles creates an unwanted deviation from expected isotope values (such as for the Ar-Ar method). To improve both the accuracy and precision of ages inferred from geochronometric systems that involve the recoil of a key nuclide from small domains, it is necessary to quantify the magnitude of the recoil loss of that particular nuclide. It is also necessary to quantitatively describe the effect of geological processes that can alter the outer surface of grains, and hence the isotopically-depleted rind. Here we present a new mathematical and numerical model that includes two main features that enable enhanced accuracy and precision of ages determined from geochronometers. Since the surface area of the

  20. Recoil release of fission products from nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-10-01

    An analytical approximation is developed for calculating recoil release from nuclear fuel into gas filled interspaces. This expression is evaluated for a number of interspace geometries and shown to be generally accurate to within about 10% by comparison with numerical calculations. The results are applied to situations of physical interest and it is demonstrated that recoil can be important when modelling fission product release from low temperature CAGR pin failures. Furthermore, recoil can contribute significantly in experiments on low temperature fission product release, particularly where oxidation enhancement of this release is measured by exposing the fuel to CO 2. The calculations presented here are one way of allowing for this, other methods are suggested.

  1. Fission product release from nuclear fuel by recoil and knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.

    1987-03-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the fission product release from nuclear fuel arising from the surface-fission release mechanisms of recoil and knockout. Release expressions are evaluated and compared to the short-lived activity measurements from in-reactor experiments with intact operating fuel. Recoil is shown to be an important process for releasing fission products from free UO 2 surfaces into the fuel-to-sheath gap. The model is also applied to tramp uranium in a power reactor primary heat transport circuit where it is demonstrated that recoil is the dominant release mechanism for small particles of fuel which are deposited on in-core surfaces. A methodology is established whereby release from surface contamination can be distinguished from that of fuel pin failure.

  2. Simulation of Velocity Filters in the Daresbury Recoil Separator at the HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. P.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Liu, Y.; Matos, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) at Oak Ridge National Lab's (ORNL) Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is used for the study of nuclear reactions of astrophysical importance. For example, the DRS enables direct measurements of proton capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts. The DRS uses velocity filters (Wien filters) that are tuned to transmit the reaction products with a specific velocity while deflecting the unreacted primary beam particles away from the optical axis, where they are stopped on adjustable slits. Data from earlier calculations of the electromagnetic fields inside and around the filters has been implemented into a FORTRAN program to provide accurate calculations and graphic representations of particle trajectories through the Wien filters. This information can be used to predetermine optimum positions of the slits for future experiments. The program will be used as an experimental setup tool for the DRS.

  3. Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry of MOCVD grown Al xGa 1- xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. R.; Johnston, P. N.; Bubb, I. F.; Stannard, W. B.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Hult, M.; Whitlow, H. J.; Zaring, C.; Östling, M.; Andersson, M.

    1994-12-01

    Mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS) has been employed to study stoichiometric variations in Al xGa 1- xAs layers. Quantitative determination of x is an important problem in the production of device materials which is not easily solved with standard techniques. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used extensively in semiconductor research but overlap of signals in the backscattered ion spectrum is an important limitation in the analysis of materials such as Al xGa 1- xAs which contain elements of low and similar masses. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis has good elemental resolution for this class of materials but provides little depth resolution. RS enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual or small groups of isotopes. This allows it to be used in many situations where RBS is inappropriate. It employs a heavy ion beam to cause constituent nuclei to recoil from the target, and a Time of Flight and Energy (ToF- E) detector to detect these recoiling nuclei. Appropriate mass selection of the ToF- E data allows the determination of depth distributions for each element.

  4. Hierarchical Carbon with High Nitrogen Doping Level: A Versatile Anode and Cathode Host Material for Long-Life Lithium-Ion and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Christian; Breitung, Ben; Schneider, Artur; Wang, Di; von der Lehr, Martin; Leichtweiss, Thomas; Janek, Jürgen; Hahn, Horst; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2016-04-27

    Nitrogen-rich carbon with both a turbostratic microstructure and meso/macroporosity was prepared by hard templating through pyrolysis of a tricyanomethanide-based ionic liquid in the voids of a silica monolith template. This multifunctional carbon not only is a promising anode candidate for long-life lithium-ion batteries but also shows favorable properties as anode and cathode host material owing to a high nitrogen content (>8% after carbonization at 900 °C). To demonstrate the latter, the hierarchical carbon was melt-infiltrated with sulfur as well as coated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of anatase TiO2, both of which led to high-quality nanocomposites. TiO2 ALD increased the specific capacity of the carbon while maintaining high Coulombic efficiency and cycle life: the composite exhibited stable performance in lithium half-cells, with excellent recovery of low rate capacities after thousands of cycles at 5C. Lithium-sulfur batteries using the sulfur/carbon composite also showed good cyclability, with reversible capacities of ∼700 mA·h·g(-1) at C/5 and without obvious decay over several hundred cycles. The present results demonstrate that nitrogen-rich carbon with an interconnected multimodal pore structure is very versatile and can be used as both active and inactive electrode material in high-performance lithium-based batteries. PMID:26867115

  5. Status and Prospects of the HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mussgiller, Andreas

    2009-08-04

    Hard exclusive processes provide access to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), which extend our description of the nucleon structure beyond the standard parton distributions. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process provides the theoretically cleanest access to the GPDs. For the final two years of data taking, a recoil detector was installed at HERMES for the purpose of improving the ability to measure hard-exclusive processes. In addition the recoil detector allows one to measure the individual background contributions which can be used to refine previously published results on DVCS. The progress of the ongoing data analysis is presented.

  6. Further improvement in ganoderic acid production in static liquid culture of Ganoderma lucidum by integrating nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Han, Li-Liang; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To further improve the ganoderic acid (GA) production, a novel integrated strategy by combining nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition was developed. The effects of the integrated combination on the content of GA-T (one powerful anticancer compound), their intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and on the transcription levels of GA biosynthetic genes in G. lucidum fermentation were investigated. The maximum GA-T content with the integrated strategy were 1.87 mg/ 100 mg dry cell weight, which was 2.1-4.2 fold higher than that obtained with either calcium ion addition or nitrogen limitation alone, and it is also the highest record as ever reported in submerged fermentation of G. lucidum. The squalene content was increased by 3.9- and 2.2-fold in this case compared with either individual strategy alone. Moreover, the transcription levels of the GA biosynthetic genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and lanosterol synthase were also up-regulated by 3.3-7.5 and 1.3-2.3 fold, respectively. PMID:26508324

  7. Direct Measurements of (p,gamma) Cross Sections at Astrophysical Energies using Radioactive Beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W; Chipps, K.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, Robert; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis leads through proton-rich nuclei. These nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of (p,gamma) cross sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. First data from 17F(p,gamma)18Ne and 7B(p,gamma)8B measurements are presented.

  8. Direct measurements of (p, γ) cross-sections at astrophysical energies using radioactive beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, C.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Shriner, J. F.; Smith, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis proceeds through proton-rich nuclei. These nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of ( p, γ) cross-sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. First data from 17F ( p, γ 18Ne and 7Be ( p, γ 8B measurements are presented.

  9. Direct measurments of (p,gamma) cross sections at astrophysical energies using radioactive beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W; Chipps, K.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, Uwe; Hatarik, Robert; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis proceeds through proton-rich nuclei. Radioactive nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of (p,g ) cross sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. Data from 17F(p,g )18Ne and 7Be(p,g )8B measurements are presented.

  10. An experimental investigation of the dissociative ionization process of argon cluster ions induced by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, X.; Yan, S.; Xu, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, X.; Li, B.; Feng, W.; Qian, D.; Zhang, R.; Guo, D.; Wen, W.; Zhang, D.; Yang, J.; Zhao, D.; Liu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Utilizing the Cold Target Recoil Ions Momentum Spectrometer (COLTRIMS), dissociative ionization of argon cluster was experimentally investigated by electron impact. The recoil ions produced both in the pure ionization process and the dissociative ionization channels are measured with collision energies from 100 and 1000 eV. The ratios of the dimer ions from pure ionization (Ar2P+) and the dimer ions from small cluster dissociation (Ar+2D) to the atomic argon ion (Ar+) in different stagnation pressures were obtained.

  11. Measuring the spectrum of mutation induced by nitrogen ions and protons in the human-hamster hybrid cell line A(L)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Ueno, A.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed to charged particles, including protons, alpha particles and heavier ions, during space flights. Therefore, studying the biological effectiveness of these sparsely and densely ionizing radiations is important to understanding the potential health effects for astronauts. We evaluated the mutagenic effectiveness of sparsely ionizing 55 MeV protons and densely ionizing 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions using cells of two human-hamster cell lines, A(L) and A(L)C. We have previously characterized a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in the human-hamster hybrid cell lines A(L)C and A(L). CD59(-) mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen encoded by the CD59 gene located at 11p13. Deletion of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the A(L) hybrid, so that CD59 mutants that lose the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. In contrast, deletion of the 11p15.5 region is not lethal in the hybrid A(L)C, allowing for the detection of chromosome loss or other chromosomal mutations involving 11p15.5. The 55 MeV protons and 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions were each about 10 times more mutagenic per unit dose at the CD59 locus in A(L)C cells than in A(L) cells. In the case of nitrogen ions, the mutations observed in A(L)C cells were predominantly due to chromosome loss events or 11p deletions, often containing a breakpoint in the pericentromeric region. The increase in the CD59(-) mutant fraction for A(L)C cells exposed to protons was associated with either translocation of portions of 11q onto a hamster chromosome, or discontinuous or "skipping" mutations. We demonstrate here that A(L)C cells are a powerful tool that will aid in the understanding of the mutagenic effects of different types of ionizing radiation.

  12. Application of an online ion chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    EPA Science Inventory

    In North America, the dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur deposition remains uncertain due to a lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent to develop complete annual mass budgets or of sufficient process level detail to improve current air-s...

  13. Relativistic calculations of isotope shifts in highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tupitsyn, I.I.; Shabaev, V.M.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J.; Draganic, I.

    2003-08-01

    The isotope shifts of forbidden transitions in Be- and B-like argon ions are calculated. It is shown that only using the relativistic recoil operator can provide a proper evaluation of the mass isotope shift, which strongly dominates over the field isotope shift for the ions under consideration. Comparing the isotope shifts calculated with the current experimental uncertainties indicates very good perspectives for a first test of the relativistic theory of the recoil effect in middle-Z ions.

  14. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  15. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω0 , this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ0 to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γrecoil, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γrecoil. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces.

  16. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-17

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω_{0}, this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ_{0} to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γ_{recoil}, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γ_{recoil}. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces. PMID:27367388

  17. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in grassland ecosystems globally. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in alkaline grasslands. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in species composition by N deposition, the effects of 9 yr N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species composition were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of grasses, while high N addition rate (> 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on grass richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) in soils, reduced soil pH and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness, explaining 27.2% variation of forb richness. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+ and Cu2+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, accounting for 25.9 and 41.4% variation of forb richness, respectively. These results reveal that disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils by N addition, particularly enhanced release of soil Mn2+ and Cu2+ may be associated with reduction in forb richness in temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia.

  18. Isotopic disequilibrium of uranium: alpha-recoil damage and preferential solution effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, R.L.

    1980-02-29

    Preferential loss of uranium-234 relative to uranium-238 from rocks into solutions has long been attributed to recoiling alpha-emitting nuclei. Direct evidence has been obtained for two mechanisms, first, recoil ejection from grains, and now release by natural etching of alpha-recoil tracks. The observations have implications for radon emanation and for the storage of alpha-emitting radioactive waste.

  19. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  20. A Monte Carlo C-code for calculating transmission efficiency of recoil separators and viewing residue trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present a semimicroscopic Monte Carlo code for calculating absolute transmission efficiency of recoil separators for heavy ion-induced complete fusion reactions. The code generates realistic distributions for energy, charge state and angle of evaporation residues. Residue trajectories are calculated using first order ion optical transfer matrices. Trajectory plots in the dispersive and the non-dispersive planes are generated. Using this code, we have obtained good agreement between calculated and measured transmission efficiencies for the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at IUAC. The code can be adapted easily to any other electromagnetic recoil separator. Program summaryProgram title: TERS Catalogue identifier: AEBD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6818 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 216 097 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: The code has been developed and tested on a PC with Intel Pentium IV processor Operating system: Linux RAM: About 8 Mbytes Classification: 17.7 External routines: pgplot graphics subroutine library [1] should be installed in the system for generating residue trajectory plots. Nature of problem: Recoil separators are employed to select and identify nuclei of interest, produced in a nuclear reaction, rejecting unreacted beam and other undesired reaction products. It is important to know what fraction of the selected nuclei, leaving the target, reaches the detection system. This information is crucial for determining absolute cross section of the studied reaction. Solution method:Interaction of projectiles with target nuclei is treated event by event, semimicroscopically. Position and angle (with respect to beam

  1. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and their Ions. 6; Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattioda, A. L.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Rosi, M.; Allamandola, L. J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The matrix-isolation technique has been employed to measure the mid-infrared spectra of several polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles in both neutral and cationic forms. The species studied include: 7,8 benzoquinoline (C13H9N); 2-azapyrene (C15H9N); 1- and 2-azabenz(a)anthracene (C17H11N); and 1-, 2-, and 4-azachrysene (also C17H11N). The experimentally measured band frequencies and intensities for each molecule are tabulated and compared with their theoretically calculated values computed using density functional theory at the B3LYP/4-31G level. The overall agreement between experiment and theory is quite good, in keeping with previous investigations involving the parent aromatic hydrocarbons. Several interesting spectroscopic trends are found to accompany nitrogen substitution into the aromatic framework of these compounds. First, for the neutral species, the nitrogen atom produces a significant increase in the total integrated infrared intensity across the 1600 - 1100/cm region and plays an essential role in the molecular vibration that underlies an uncharacteristically intense, discrete feature that is observed near 1400/cm in the spectra of 7,8 benzoquinoline, 1-azabenz(a)anthracene, and 4-azachrysene. The origin of this enhanced infrared activity and the nature of the new 1400/cm vibrational mode are explored. Finally, in contrast to the parent hydrocarbon species, these aromatic nitrogen heterocycles possess a significant permanent dipole moment. Consequently, these dipole moments and the rotational constants are reported for these species in their neutral and ionized forms.

  3. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N+ ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly ‘X’ and ‘Y’ junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices.

  4. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-12

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N(+) ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly 'X' and 'Y' junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices. PMID:25990259

  5. Hierarchical self-assembled structures based on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as advanced negative electrodes for Li-ion batteries and 3D microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Tiva; Valvo, Mario; Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Sandström, Robin; Edström, Kristina; Wågberg, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Hierarchical structures based on carbon paper and multi-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes were fabricated and subsequently decorated with hematite nanorods to obtain advanced 3D architectures for Li-ion battery negative electrodes. The carbon paper provides a versatile metal-free 3D current collector ensuring a good electrical contact of the active materials to its carbon fiber network. Firstly, the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes onto the carbon paper were studied and a high footprint area capacity of 2.1 mAh cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2 was obtained. The Li can be stored in the inter-wall regions of the nanotubes, mediated by the defects formed on their walls by the nitrogen atoms. Secondly, the incorporation of hematite nanorods raised the footprint area capacity to 2.25 mAh cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2. However, the repeated conversion/de-conversion of Fe2O3 limited both coulombic and energy efficiencies for these electrodes, which did not perform as well as those including only the N-doped carbon nanotubes at higher current densities. Thirdly, long-cycling tests showed the robust Li insertion mechanism in these N-doped carbonaceous structures, which yielded an unmatched footprint area capacity enhancement up to 1.95 mAh cm-2 after 60 cycles at 0.3 mA cm-2 and an overall capacity of 204 mAh g-1 referred to the mass of the entire electrode.

  6. Three-dimensional nitrogen-doped graphene frameworks anchored with bamboo-like tungsten oxide nanorods as high performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyuan; Wu, Feilong; Lei, Bingbing; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ziliang; Xie, Kai; Song, Yun; Sun, Dalin; Sun, Lixian; Zhou, Huaiying; Fang, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Bamboo-like WO3 nanorods were anchored on three-dimensional nitrogen-doped graphene frameworks (r-WO3/3DNGF) by a facile one-step hydrothermal synthesis plus heating processes. There is a strong dependence of the obtained r-WO3/3DNGF nanostructures on the content of 3DNGF. The composite with 20 wt% 3DNGF content shows the most favorable structure where bamboo-like WO3 nanorods lie flat on the surface of fungus-like 3DNGF, and exhibits a high discharge capacity of 828 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles at 80 mA g-1 with the largest capacity retention of 73.9% for WO3 and excellent rate capacities of 719, 665, 573, 453 and 313 mAh g-1 at 80, 160, 400, 800 and 1600 mA g-1, respectively. The electrochemical performance is better than most of reported WO3-based carbonaceous composites, which can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the following actions: i) WO3 nanorods effectively shorten the diffusion path of Li+; ii) mechanically strong 3DNGF alleviates the huge volume change of WO3 upon Li+ intercalation/extraction; and iii) nitrogen-doping in 3D graphene frameworks improves electronic conductivity and provides large numbers of lithium ion diffusion channels.

  7. Ultrasmall TiO2 nanoparticles embedded in nitrogen doped porous graphene for high rate and long life lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Guohui; Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Chengyang

    2014-12-01

    Modifying TiO2 with nitrogen and porous N doped graphene to form mesoporous TiO2/N doped graphene nanostuctures has been successfully achieved by a two-step hydrothermal-calcining method with urea as an inhibitor and nitrogen source. Porous N doped graphene network hinders the agglomeration of TiO2 nanoparticles, and enhances the conductivity of TiO2 based electrode simultaneously, achieving the enhanced capacity and fast discharge and charge rate. As a anode material, such nanocomposite exhibits a capacity as high as 330.7 mAh g-1at a current rate of 0.5 C and a reversible capacity over 288.6 mAh g-1 accompanying a coulombic efficiency of 96.4% at a current rate of 30 C after 1000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is ascribed to the excellent rate performance and cycling stability, moreover, highly exciting from a fundamental point of view, the good electronic conductivity caused by N incorporated graphene sheets and the positive synergistic effect between ultrafined nanoparticles and porous N decorated graphene matrix. Additionally, the restriction to ultrasmall reaction domains with high specific surface area and mesoporous structure allowing for an almost diffusion less and nucleation-free "conversion" results in highly efficient lithium ion batteries with fast charge/discharge rate and a remarkably enhanced cycling performance.

  8. A recoil resilient lumen support, design, fabrication and mechanical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Arash; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Stents are artificial implants that provide scaffolding to a cavity inside the body. This paper presents a new luminal device for reducing the mechanical failure of stents due to recoil, which is one of the most important issues in stenting. This device, which we call a recoil-resilient ring (RRR), is utilized standalone or potentially integrated with existing stents to address the problem of recoil. The proposed structure aims to minimize the need for high-pressure overexpansion that can induce intra-luminal trauma and excess growth of vascular tissue causing later restenosis. The RRR is an overlapped open ring with asymmetrical sawtooth structures that are intermeshed. These teeth can slide on top of each other, while the ring is radially expanded, but interlock step-by-step so as to keep the final expanded state against compressional forces that normally cause recoil. The RRRs thus deliver balloon expandability and, when integrated with a stent, bring both radial rigidity and longitudinal flexibility to the stent. The design of the RRR is investigated through finite element analysis (FEA), and then the devices are fabricated using micro-electro-discharge machining of 200-µm-thick Nitinol sheet. The standalone RRR is balloon expandable in vitro by 5-7 Atm in pressure, which is well within the recommended in vivo pressure ranges for stenting procedures. FEA compression tests indicate 13× less reduction of the cross-sectional area of the RRR compared with a typical stainless steel stent. These results also show perfect elastic recovery of the RRR after removal of the pressure compared to the remaining plastic deformations of the stainless steel stent. On the other hand, experimental loading tests show that the fabricated RRRs have 2.8× radial stiffness compared to a two-column section of a commercial stent while exhibiting comparable elastic recovery. Furthermore, testing of in vitro expansion in a mock artery tube shows around 2.9% recoil, approximately 5-11

  9. Rapid synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene for a lithium ion battery anode with excellent rate performance and super-long cyclic stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Sun, Xiang; Sun, Hongtao; Xin, Guoqing; Shao, Dali; Liu, Changsheng; Lian, Jie

    2014-01-21

    Chemical doping of nitrogen into graphene can significantly enhance the reversible capacity and cyclic stability of the graphene-based lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes, and first principles calculations based on density functional theory suggested that pyridinic-N shows stronger binding with Li with reduced energy barrier for Li diffusion and thus is more effective for Li storage than pyrrolic and graphitic-N. Here, we report a novel and rapid (~30 seconds) process to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) by simultaneous thermal reduction of graphene oxide with ammonium hydroxide. The porous NGr with dominant pyridinic N atoms displays greatly enhanced reversible capacities, rate performance and exceptional cyclic stability as compared with pristine graphene. The reversible discharge capacity of the NGr electrode cycled between 0.01-3 V can reach 453 mA h g(-1) after 550 cycles at a charge rate of 2 A g(-1) (~5.4 C), and 180 mA h g(-1) after 2000 cycles at a high charge rate of 10 A g(-1) (~27 C) without any capacity fading. When charged within 0.01-1.5 V, the NGr anode still exhibits high reversible capacities of 224 mA h g(-1) and 169 mA h g(-1) after 700 cycles and 800 cycles at a charge rate of 1 A g(-1) and 5 A g(-1), respectively. Ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the NGr electrode upon lithiation and delithiation indicated that the pyridinic-N dominates the capacity enhancement at 3 V, while the pyrrolic-N contributes primarily to Li ion storage below 1.5 V. PMID:24287587

  10. Structural characterization of drug-like compounds by ion mobility mass spectrometry: comparison of theoretical and experimentally derived nitrogen collision cross sections.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Iain; Bush, Matthew F; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire; Richardson, Keith; Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Hugh I

    2012-01-17

    We present the use of drug-like molecules as a traveling wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) calibration sample set, covering the m/z range of 122.1-609.3, the nitrogen collision cross-section (Ω(N(2))) range of 124.5-254.3 Å(2) and the helium collision cross-section (Ω(He)) range of 63.0-178.8 Å(2). Absolute Ω(N(2)) and Ω(He) values for the drug-like calibrants and two diastereomers were measured using a drift-tube instrument with radio frequency (RF) ion confinement. T-wave drift-times for the protonated diastereomers betamethasone and dexamethasone are reproducibly different. Calibration of these drift-times yields T-wave Ω(N(2)) values of 189.4 and 190.4 Å(2), respectively. These results demonstrate the ability of T-wave IM spectrometry to differentiate diastereomers differing in Ω(N(2)) value by only 1 Å(2), even though the resolution of these IM experiments were ∼40 (Ω/ΔΩ). Demonstrated through density functional theory optimized geometries and ionic electrostatic surface potential analysis, the small but measurable mobility difference between the two diastereomers is mainly due to short-range van der Waals interactions with the neutral buffer gas and not long-range charge-induced dipole interactions. The experimental RF-confining drift-tube and T-wave Ω(N(2)) values were also evaluated using a nitrogen based trajectory method, optimized for T-wave operating temperature and pressures, incorporating additional scaling factors to the Lennard-Jones potentials. Experimental Ω(He) values were also compared to the original and optimized helium based trajectory methods. PMID:22141445

  11. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  12. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  13. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF. PMID:23635195

  14. Low-energy recoils and energy scale in liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Liquid xenon has been proven to be a great detector medium for the direct search of dark matter. However, in the energy region of below 10 keV, the light yield and charge production are not fully understood due to the convolution of excitation, recombination and quenching. We have already studied a recombination model to explain the physics processes involved in liquid xenon. Work is continued on the average energy expended per electron-ion pair as a function of energy based on the cross sections for different type of scattering processes. In this paper, the results will be discussed in comparison with available experimental data using Birk's Law to understand how scintillation quenching contributes to the non-linear light yield for electron recoils with energy below 10 keV in liquid xenon. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  15. Lifetime measurement of 2+- state in 74Zn by recoil-distance Doppler-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, M.; Mouginot, B.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Matea, I.; Stefan, I.; Verney, D.; Assie, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Borcea, C.; Burger, A.; Burgunder, G.; Buta, A.; Cáceres, L.; Cléement, E.; Coquard, L.; de Angelis, G.; de France, G.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Fiori, E.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Gaudefroy, L.; Georgiev, G.; Grévy, S.; Hackstein, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Ibrahim, F.; Kamalou, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mihai, C.; Möller, O.; Myalski, S.; Negoita, F.; Pantelica, D.; Perrot, L.; Pissulla, Th.; Rotaru, F.; Rother, W.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujic, P.

    2013-09-01

    We have performed the first direct lifetime measurement of the 2+- state in 74Zn. The neutron-rich 74Zn beam was produced by in-flight fragmentation of 76Ge at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds and separated with the LISE spectrometer. The lifetime of the 2+- state was measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method with the Cologne plunger device combined with the EXOGAM detectors. The lifetime of the 2+- state in 74Zn was determined to be 27.0(24) ps, which corresponds to a reduced transition probability B(E2; 2+- -> 0+) = 370(33) e2fm4.

  16. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  17. A Study of Intrinsic Statistical Variation for Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenzhao; Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils is a critical part that cannot be ignored when calculating energy resolution of germanium detector in detecting WIMPs. Have a good theoretical understanding about the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils and develop a model for calculating this variation based on experimental data is of great importance in determining the width of nuclear recoil band, which is used to identify nuclear recoils events. Hence, we designed an experiment to study the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils with various gamma sources and AmBe neutron source. In addition, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils based on data from AmBe neutron source. In this work, we will present our data and theoretical calculation for nuclear recoils. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  18. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  19. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  20. Metal organic frameworks derived porous lithium iron phosphate with continuous nitrogen-doped carbon networks for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Junjie; Zhang, Jinli; Yu, Feng; Dong, Lutao; Nie, Ning; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) nanoparticles embedded in the continuous interconnected nitrogen-doped carbon networks (LFP/N-CNWs) is an optimal architecture to fast electron and Li+ conduction. This paper, for the first time, reports a reasonable design and successful preparation of porous hierarchical LFP/N-CNWs composites using unique Fe-based metal organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)) as both template and starting material of Fe and C. Such nitrogen-doped carbon networks (N-CNWs) surrounding the lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles facilitate the transfer of Li+ and electrons throughout the electrodes, which significantly decreases the internal resistance for the electrodes and results in the efficient utilization of LiFePO4. The synthesized LFP/N-CNWs composites possess a porous structure with an amazing surface area of 129 m2 g-1, considerably enhanced electrical conductivities of 7.58 × 10-2 S cm-1 and Li+ diffusion coefficient of 8.82 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, thereby delivering excellent discharge capacities of 161.5 and 93.6 mAh·g-1 at 0.1C and 20C, respectively.

  1. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in ecosystems. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in grasslands with neutral or alkaline soils. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in biodiversity induced by N deposition, the effects of 9-year N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of graminoids, while high N addition rate (≥ 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on graminoid richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition reduced soil pH, depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+, Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness and biomass, explaining 23.59% variation of forb biomass. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+, Cu2+ and, Fe3+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, respectively. Changes in the metal ion concentrations accounted for 42.77% variation of forb richness, while reduction of base cations was not associated with the reduction in forb richness. These results reveal that patterns of plant biodiversity in the temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia are primarily driven by increases in metal ion

  2. Characterization of the CRESST detectors by neutron induced nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, C.; Ciemniak, C.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Gütlein, A.; Hagn, H.; Isaila, C.; Jochum, J.; Kimmerle, M.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Rau, W.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Usherov, I.; Westphal, W.

    CRESST is an experiment for the direct detection of dark matter particles via nuclear recoils. The CRESST detectors, based on CaWO4 scintillating crystals, are able to discriminate γ and β background by simultaneously measuring the light and phonon signals produced by particle interactions. The discrimination of the background is possible because of the different light output (Quenching Factor, QF) for nuclear and electron recoils. In this article a measurement is shown, aimed at the determination of the QFs of the different nuclei (O, Ca, W) of the detector crystal at 40-60 mK using an 11 MeV neutron beam produced at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching (MLL).

  3. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D.; Marconi, A.; Capetti, A.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  4. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  5. Recoil Polarization for Neutral Pion Electroproduction near the Delta Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James J

    2003-10-01

    We have measured angular distributions for recoil polarization in the p(e,e'p)p0 reaction at Q2»1(GeV/c)2 with 1.16 |lte| W |lte|1.36 GeV across the D resonance. The data are compared with representative models and a truncated Legendre analysis is compared with a more general multipole analysis.

  6. Solid-solid grinding/templating route to magnetically separable nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon for the removal of Cu(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aibing; Yu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yue; Xing, Tingting; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Yexin; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-30

    N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon materials (NOMC) with 2D hexagonal symmetry structure were synthesized via a facile solid-solid grinding/templating route, in which the ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-cyanoethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and SBA-15 were employed as the precursor and hard template, respectively. The as-synthesized NOMC features with a uniform mesoporous size (3.5nm), ropes-like morphology (0.4-1μm in length) and high surface area (803m(2)/g). The quantitative analysis revealed the nitrogen content on the surface of NOMC is 5.5at%. Magnetic iron nanoparticles were successfully embedded into the carbon matrix by introducing iron chloride to the mixture of SBA-15 and ILs during the synthesis process. The NOMC-Fe composite possessed superior adsorption capacity of Cu(2+) ions (23.6mg/g). Kinetic and isothermal analysis demonstrated the strong interactions between Cu(2+) ion and the adsorbent. Furthermore, the composite was magnetically separable from solution under an external magnetic field and thus displayed a superior reusability in the recycling test. PMID:25072134

  7. Recoiling from a Kick in the Head-On Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Van Meter, James

    2007-01-01

    Recoil "kicks" induced by gravitational radiation are expected in the inspiral and merger of black holes. Recently the numerical relativity community has begun to measure the significant kicks found when both unequal masses and spins are considered. Because understanding the cause and magnitude of each component of this kick may be complicated in inspiral simulations, we consider these effects in the context of a simple test problem. We study recoils from collisions of binaries with initially head-on trajectories, starting with the simplest case of equal masses with no spin; adding spin and varying the mass ratio, both separately and jointly. We find spin-induced recoils to be significant even in head-on configurations. Additionally, it appears that the scaling of transverse kicks with spins is consistent with post-Newtonian (PN) theory, even though the kick is generated in the nonlinear merger interaction, where PN theory should not apply. This suggests that a simple heuristic description might be effective in the estimation of spin-kicks.

  8. Absolute cross section for recoil detection of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besenbacher, F.; Stensgaard, I.; Vase, P.

    1986-04-01

    The D( 4He, D) 4He cross section used for recoil detection of deuterium (D) has been calibrated on an absolute scale against the cross section of the D( 3He, α)p nuclear reaction which is often used for D profiling. For 4He energies ranging from 0.8 to ~1.8 MeV. the D( 4He, D) 4He cross section varies only slightly with incident energy and recoil angle θ (for 0° ⩽ 8 ⩽ 35°) and has a value of ~ 500 mb/sr which is significantly higher than the ~ 65 mb/sr c.m.s. cross section of the D( 3He, α)p nuclear reaction. For 4He energies ranging from ~ 1.9 to ~ 2.3 MeV, the D( 4He,D) 4He cross section exhibits a fairly narrow resonance peak (fwhm ~ 70 keV), with a maximum value (for θ = 0°) of ~ 8.5 b/sr, corresponding to a 4He energy of ~ 2130 keV. The large values of the cross section in connection with the described energy dependence makes the use of forward-recoil detection of D attractive for many purposes, e.g., D Jepth profiling (with an extreme gain in sensitivity), absolute concentration or coverage measurements, and lattice-location experiments by transmission channeling.

  9. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  11. Ion-pair formation of Bi(III)-iodide with some nitrogenous drugs and its application to pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, F M

    1998-01-01

    A systematic spectrophotometric study on the ion-pair formation of Bi(III)-iodide with amineptine hydrochloride, piribedil and trimebutine maleate is carried out. The optimal experimental conditions pH, concentration of Bi(III) nitrate, potassium iodide; and the nature and amount of organic solvent have been studied. The ion pairs are soluble in 1,2-dichloroethane and the optimum pH range is 2.0-2.8. By application of the methods of Sommer and Job involving non-equimolar solutions, the conditional stability constant (log K') of the Bi(III) piridedil ion pair (1:1) at the optimum pH of 2.4 and an ionic strength (mu) 0.1 M, was found to be 5.436. The validity of Beer's law has been tested in the concentration range 5-50 microg ml(-1) in the organic layer, the relative standard deviation is less than 1%. The method is applied to the determination of these drugs in tablets without interference. PMID:9535191

  12. A Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Quantitative Analysis of Nitrogen-Purged Compartments within the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Yost, Richard A.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To enter orbit the Space Shuttle burns 1.8 million liters of liquid hydrogen combined with 0.8 million liters of liquid oxygen through three rocket engines mounted in the aft. NASA monitors the nitrogen-purged aft compartment for increased levels of hydrogen or oxygen in order to detect and determine the severity of a cryogenic fuel leak. Current monitoring is accomplished with a group of mass spectrometer systems located as much as 400 feet away from the shuttle. It can take up to 45 seconds for gas to reach the mass spectrometer, which precludes monitoring for leaks in the final moments before liftoff (the orbiter engines are started at T-00:06 seconds). To remedy the situation, NASA is developing a small rugged mass spectrometer to be used as point-sources around the Space Shuttle.

  13. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6-9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels.

  14. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2. PMID:27145983

  15. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 10(7) erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25-30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 10(17)/cm(2). PMID:27145983

  16. N-TiO2 nanoparticles embedded in silica prepared by Ti ion implantation and annealing in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Xia; Chen, Meng; Ju, Yongfeng; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Wang, Lumin M.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-05-01

    Room temperature Ti ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing in N2 ambience have been used to fabricate the anatase and rutile structured N-doped TiO2 particles embedded in the surface region of fused silica. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code simulation indicates a Gaussian distribution of implanted Ti, with a projected range of 74.4 nm and straggling of 16.5 nm. However, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy results show a much shallower distribution peaked at ~ 30 nm. Significant sputtering loss of silica substrates has occurred during implantation. Nanoparticles with size of 10-20 nm in diameter have formed after implantation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the coexistence of TiO2 and metallic Ti in the as-implanted samples. Metallic Ti is oxidized to anatase TiO2 after annealing at 600ºC, while rutile TiO2 forms by phase transformation after annealing at 900ºC. At the same time, N-Ti-O, Ti-O-N and/or Ti-N-O linkages have formed in the lattice of TiO2. A red shift of 0.34 eV in the absorption edge is obtained for N-doped anatase TiO2 after annealing at 600 ºC for 6 h. The absorbance increases in the ultraviolet and visible waveband.

  17. Nitrogen-doped 3D macroporous graphene frameworks as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaowu; Wu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhong; Pan, Fusen; Zhong, Xiongwu; Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped 3D graphene frameworks (N-3D GFs) were synthesized by a facile two-step method: Polystyrene (PS) encapsulated in graphene oxide (GO) composites (denoted as PS@GO) are first synthesized, followed by a post-thermal annealing in ammonia step to get N-doped 3D GFs. The resulting N-3D GFs inherit the advantages of graphene, which possesses high electrical conductivity and high specific surface area. Furthermore, the well-defined 3D interconnected structure can facilitate the access of the electrolyte to the electrode surface, thus shortening the diffusion length of both Li+/e-, keeping the overall electrode highly conductive and active in lithium storage. Simultaneously, the in-situ formation of pyridinic N and pyrrolic N in 3D GFs provide high electronic conductivity and structure stability for lithium storage. The designed N-3D GFs electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 1094 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 200 mAg-1 and superior rate capability (691 mAhg-1 after 500 cycles at 1000 mAg-1) when used as anode for LIBs. We believe that such an inherently inexpensive, scalable, facile method can significantly increase the feasibility of building high performance energy storage system.

  18. Comparative study of comprehensive gas chromatography-nitrogen chemiluminescence detection and gas chromatography-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry for determining nicotine and carcinogen organic nitrogen compounds in thirdhand tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Vallecillos, Laura; Lewis, Alastair C; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa M; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2015-12-24

    Thirdhand tobacco smoke (THS) constitutes a poorly understood pathway of exposure of non-smokers, especially toddlers, to tobacco-related carcinogens. However, to date most of the carcinogens present in tobacco smoke have not been detected in THS and, therefore, the significance of THS health risk is still unknown. In this study, we have compared the performance of two analytical methods - one based on gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry detection (GC-IT-MS) and the other on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (GC×GC-NCD) - for simultaneously determining, in settled house dust, the presence of 16 organic nitrogen carcinogens already detected in tobacco smoke. The target compounds included four aromatic amines, two nitrocompounds, eight N-nitrosamines and two tobacco-specific nitrosamines, as well as nicotine as a tobacco marker. Dust samples were extracted using in-cell clean up pressurized liquid extraction with silica as clean up sorbent and ethyl acetate as the organic solvent, with average recovery of 89%. Although GC-IT-MS, using chemical ionization with methanol and tandem MS, performed well, the optimized GC×GC-NCD gave lower limits of detection (from 4 to 22ngg(-1)) and better repeatability and reproducibility a low concentration levels (%RSD<8%) and, therefore, was applicable for determining these different groups of carcinogens without the need for derivatization prior to the GC analysis. The performance of the optimized PLE/GC×GC-NCD method was tested by quantifying the target compounds in house dust samples from smokers' and non-smokers' homes. The median carcinogen compounds detected was 3.8μgg(-1) and 1.1μgg(-1) in smokers' and non-smokers' house dust, respectively. In this study, we have detected highly carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitro compounds for the first time in settled house dust complementing the state of knowledge of THS composition and providing

  19. Ionization cross section data of nitrogen, methane, and propane for light ions and electrons and their suitability for use in track structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Rabus, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Track structure Monte Carlo simulations are frequently applied in micro- and nanodosimetry to calculate the radiation transport in detail. The use of a well-validated set of cross section data in such simulation codes ensures accurate calculations of transport parameters, such as ionization yields. These cross section data are, however, scarce and often discrepant when measured by different groups. This work surveys literature data on ionization and charge-transfer cross sections of nitrogen, methane, and propane for electrons, protons, and helium particles, focusing on the energy range between 100 keV and 20 MeV. Based on the evaluated data, different models for the parametrization of the cross section data are implemented in the code ptra, developed for simulating proton and alpha particle transport in an ion-counting nanodosimeter. The suitability of the cross section data is investigated by comparing the calculated mean ionization cluster size and energy loss with experimental results in either nitrogen or propane. For protons, generally good agreement between measured and simulated data is found when the Rudd model is used in ptra. For alpha particles, however, a considerable influence of different parametrizations of cross sections for ionization and charge transfer is observed. The ptra code using the charge-transfer data is, nevertheless, successfully benchmarked by the experimental data for the calculation of nanodosimetric quantities, but remaining discrepancies still have to be further investigated (up to 13% lower energy loss and 19% lower mean ionization cluster size than in the experiment). A continuation of this work should investigate data for the energy loss per interaction as well as differential cross section data of nitrogen and propane. Interpolation models for ionization and charge-transfer data are proposed. The Barkas model, frequently used for a determination of the effective charge in the ionization cross section, significantly

  20. Ionization cross section data of nitrogen, methane, and propane for light ions and electrons and their suitability for use in track structure simulations.

    PubMed

    Bug, Marion U; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Rabus, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Track structure Monte Carlo simulations are frequently applied in micro- and nanodosimetry to calculate the radiation transport in detail. The use of a well-validated set of cross section data in such simulation codes ensures accurate calculations of transport parameters, such as ionization yields. These cross section data are, however, scarce and often discrepant when measured by different groups. This work surveys literature data on ionization and charge-transfer cross sections of nitrogen, methane, and propane for electrons, protons, and helium particles, focusing on the energy range between 100 keV and 20 MeV. Based on the evaluated data, different models for the parametrization of the cross section data are implemented in the code ptra, developed for simulating proton and alpha particle transport in an ion-counting nanodosimeter. The suitability of the cross section data is investigated by comparing the calculated mean ionization cluster size and energy loss with experimental results in either nitrogen or propane. For protons, generally good agreement between measured and simulated data is found when the Rudd model is used in ptra. For alpha particles, however, a considerable influence of different parametrizations of cross sections for ionization and charge transfer is observed. The ptra code using the charge-transfer data is, nevertheless, successfully benchmarked by the experimental data for the calculation of nanodosimetric quantities, but remaining discrepancies still have to be further investigated (up to 13% lower energy loss and 19% lower mean ionization cluster size than in the experiment). A continuation of this work should investigate data for the energy loss per interaction as well as differential cross section data of nitrogen and propane. Interpolation models for ionization and charge-transfer data are proposed. The Barkas model, frequently used for a determination of the effective charge in the ionization cross section, significantly

  1. Current-induced giant polarization rotation using a ZnO single crystal doped with nitrogen ions

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Naoya; Kawazoe, Tadashi; Nomura, Wataru; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2015-01-01

    Giant polarization rotation in a ZnO single crystal was experimentally demonstrated based on a novel phenomenon occurring at the nanometric scale. The ZnO crystal was doped with N+ and N2+ ions serving as p-type dopants. By applying an in-plane current using a unique arrangement of electrodes on the device, current-induced polarization rotation of the incident light was observed. From the results of experimental demonstrations and discussions, it was verified that this novel behavior originates from a specific distribution of dopants and the corresponding light–matter interactions in a nanometric space, which are allowed by the existence of such a dopant distribution. PMID:26246456

  2. Atomic data and spectral analysis of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and silicon ions observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    1992-01-01

    According to the plan presented in the original proposal we have now completed most of the atomic calculations involving collision strengths and rate coefficients for electron impact excitation of C II, N III, and O IV ions. These have been reported in the first two publications appended with this report. We have now moved into the applications phase of the project with the new data being used to analyze the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of a variety of objects, as described in the third publication recently submitted (also appended). The analysis and interpretation of archival data will continue well into the next year with several collaborators that the PI and Co-PI are involved with. In addition, the atomic calculations on Si II have been started.

  3. Transition from amorphous boron carbide to hexagonal boron carbon nitride thin films induced by nitrogen ion assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, R.; Jiménez, I.; Agulló-Rueda, F.; Albella, J. M.; Czigány, Zs.; Hultman, L.

    2002-11-01

    Boron carbon nitride films (BCN) were grown by B4C evaporation under concurrent N2 ion beam assistance. The films were characterized by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopies, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The bonding structure and film composition correlate with the momentum transfer per incoming atom during deposition. As the momentum transfer is increased, the film structure evolves from an amorphous boron carbide network towards a hexagonal ternary compound (h-BCN) with standing basal planes. The growth of h-BCN takes place for momentum transfer in the window between 80 and 250 (eV×amu)1/2. The characteristic vibrational features of the h-BCN compounds have also been studied. Finally, the solubility limit of carbon in the hexagonal BN structure, under the working conditions of this article, is found to be ˜15 at. %.

  4. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on corrosion inhibition of nickel coated 316 stainless steel and correlation with nano-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    The influence of implantation of N+ with 20 keV energy and different fluences in the range of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 in the nickel coated type 316 stainless steel (SS) on the corrosion inhibition of SS in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution is investigated. The highest available N+ fluence showed highest corrosion inhibition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed formation of nickel nitride phases that enhanced by increasing the N+ fluence. Surface morphology was studied by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion test, respectively. AFM results showed that by increasing N+ fluence surface of the sample becomes smoother that may be the result of heat accumulation during implantation causing higher rate of diffusion in the sample.

  5. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. II. Specificities of hollow nitrogen molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carniato, S. Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-07

    The formalism developed in the companion Paper I is used here for the interpretation of spectra obtained recently on the nitrogen molecule. Double core-hole ionization K{sup −2} and core ionization-core excitation K{sup −2}V processes have been observed by coincidence electron spectroscopy after ionization by synchrotron radiation at different photon energies. Theoretical and experimental cross sections reported on an absolute scale are in satisfactory agreement. The evolution with photon energy of the relative contribution of shake-up and conjugate shake-up processes is discussed. The first main resonance in the K{sup −2}V spectrum is assigned to a K{sup −2}π{sup ∗} state mainly populated by the 1s→ lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dipolar excitation, as it is in the K{sup −1}V NEXAFS (Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) signals. Closer to the K{sup −2} threshold Rydberg resonances have been also identified, and among them a K{sup −2}σ{sup ∗} resonance characterized by a large amount of 2s/2p hybridization, and double K{sup −2}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} shake-up states. These resonances correspond in NEXAFS spectra to, respectively, the well-known σ{sup ∗} shape resonance and double excitation K{sup −1}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} resonances, all being positioned above the threshold.

  6. Isotopic disequilibrium of uranium: alpha-recoil damage and preferential solution effects.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L

    1980-02-29

    Preferential loss of uranium-234 relative to uranium-238 from rocks into solutions has long been attributed to recoiling alpha-emitting nuclei. Direct evidence has been obtained for two mechanisms, first, recoil ejection from grains, and now release by natural etching of alpha-recoil tracks. The observations have implications for radon emanation and for the storage of alpha-emitting radioactive waste. PMID:17830457

  7. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  8. (7)Be-recoil radiolabelling of industrially manufactured silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holzwarth, Uwe; Bellido, Elena; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Kozempel, Jan; Cotogno, Giulio; Gibson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelling of industrially manufactured nanoparticles is useful for nanoparticle dosimetry in biodistribution or cellular uptake studies for hazard and risk assessment. Ideally for such purposes, any chemical processing post production should be avoided as it may change the physico-chemical characteristics of the industrially manufactured species. In many cases, proton irradiation of nanoparticles allows radiolabelling by transmutation of a tiny fraction of their constituent atoms into radionuclides. However, not all types of nanoparticles offer nuclear reactions leading to radionuclides with adequate radiotracer properties. We describe here a process whereby in such cases nanoparticles can be labelled with (7)Be, which exhibits a physical half-life of 53.29 days and emits γ-rays of 478 keV energy, and is suitable for most radiotracer studies. (7)Be is produced via the proton-induced nuclear reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be in a fine-grained lithium compound with which the nanoparticles are mixed. The high recoil energy of (7)Be atoms gives them a range that allows the (7)Be-recoils to be transferred from the lithium compound into the nanoparticles by recoil implantation. The nanoparticles can be recovered from the mixture by dissolving the lithium compound and subsequent filtration or centrifugation. The method has been applied to radiolabel industrially manufactured SiO2 nanoparticles. The process can be controlled in such a way that no alterations of the (7)Be-labelled nanoparticles are detectable by dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Moreover, cyclotrons with maximum proton energies of 17-18 MeV that are available in most medical research centres could be used for this purpose. PMID:25285032

  9. B -> D* l nu at zero recoil: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C.M.; DeTar, C.; El-Khadra, A.X.; Freeland, E.D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.

    2010-11-01

    We present an update of our calculation of the form factor for {bar B} {yields} D*{ell}{bar {nu}} at zero recoil, with higher statistics and finer lattices. As before, we use the Fermilab action for b and c quarks, the asqtad staggered action for light valence quarks, and the MILC ensembles for gluons and light quarks (Luescher-Weisz married to 2+1 rooted staggered sea quarks). In this update, we have reduced the total uncertainty on F(1) from 2.6% to 1.7%.

  10. A Proton Recoil Telescope Detector for Neutron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, F.; Cinausero, M.; Rizzi, V.; Barbui, M.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Lunardon, M.; Pesente, S.; Fontana, A.; Gemignian, G.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Zenoni, A.; Fabris, D.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.

    2007-10-26

    A compact and versatile Proton Recoil Telescope (PRT) detector has been realized to measure neutron energy spectra in the range from few to hundred MeV. The PRT is a position sensitive detector made by: an active multilayer segmented plastic scintillator as neutron to proton converter, two silicon strip detectors for proton energy and position measurement and a final thick CsI(T1) scintillator to measure the residual proton energy. The detector has been tested with the {sup 13}C(d,n) reaction at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud using a 40 MeV deuteron beam.

  11. Projectile paths corrected for recoil and air resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. This is because recoil alters the direction of the barrel as the bullet moves along the barrel. Neither is the angle of projection of an arrow the same as the direction of the arrow just before it is projected. The difficulty in obtaining the angle of projection limits the value of the standard equation for trajectories relative to a horizontal plane. Furthermore, air resistance makes this equation unrealistic for all but short ranges.

  12. The adsorption of nitrogen oxides and water on rare-earth ion-exchanged ZSM-5: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Wan, Xiaohong; Ito, Yuki; Takami, Seiichi; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we present the adsorption behavior of NO, NO 2 and H 2O on trivalent rare-earth ion-exchanged ZSM-5 (RE-ZSM-5; RE=La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd and Dy) using density functional theory. The results show that Ce-ZSM-5 is more effective for the activation of NO x than La-ZSM-5 and Nd-ZSM-5, which is in good agreement with experimental results. The present investigation also suggests that Dy-ZSM-5 has a considerable ability for the activation of NO 2 as compared to Sm-ZSM-5 and Gd-ZSM-5. Furthermore, the Ce-, Nd- and Dy-analogues posses a quite stronger affinity for NO x and that the low affinity of H 2O indicate the poisoning resistance ability of these catalysts. In addition, the relationship between the adsorption energy of NO and the contribution of NO-2π g1 molecular orbital was also investigated in the NO/RE-ZSM-5 adsorption complex.

  13. Eco-friendly nitrogen-containing carbon encapsulated LiMn2O4 cathodes to enhance the electrochemical properties in rechargeable Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilango, P. Robert; Prasanna, K.; Do, Su Jung; Jo, Yong Nam; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon (N-C) and an approach to apply the N-C material as a surface encapsulant of LiMn2O4 (LMO) cathode material. The N heteroatoms in the N-C material improve the electrochemical performance of LMO. A low-cost wet coating method was used to prepare N-C@LMO particles. The N-C@LMO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution Raman spectroscopy (HR-Raman), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM) with elemental mapping. Furthermore, the prepared samples were electrochemically studied using the AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the electrochemical cycler. XPS suggested that the N-C coating greatly reduced the dissolution of Mn and EIS showed that the coating greatly suppressed the charge transfer resistance, even after long-term cycling. The control of Mn dissolution and inner resistance allowed faster Li-ion transport between the two electrodes resulting in improved discharge capacity and cycling stability.

  14. Eco-friendly nitrogen-containing carbon encapsulated LiMn2O4 cathodes to enhance the electrochemical properties in rechargeable Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ilango, P Robert; Prasanna, K; Do, Su Jung; Jo, Yong Nam; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon (N-C) and an approach to apply the N-C material as a surface encapsulant of LiMn2O4 (LMO) cathode material. The N heteroatoms in the N-C material improve the electrochemical performance of LMO. A low-cost wet coating method was used to prepare N-C@LMO particles. The N-C@LMO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution Raman spectroscopy (HR-Raman), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM) with elemental mapping. Furthermore, the prepared samples were electrochemically studied using the AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the electrochemical cycler. XPS suggested that the N-C coating greatly reduced the dissolution of Mn and EIS showed that the coating greatly suppressed the charge transfer resistance, even after long-term cycling. The control of Mn dissolution and inner resistance allowed faster Li-ion transport between the two electrodes resulting in improved discharge capacity and cycling stability. PMID:27406049

  15. Hybrid of porous cobalt oxide nanospheres and nitrogen-doped graphene for applications in lithium-ion batteries and oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Rong; Chang, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Chao; Gou, Xinglong

    2015-09-01

    A new single-source precursor has been developed from the hydrothermal reaction of graphite oxide (GO), melamine resin (MR) monomers, and CoCl2 to prepare a sandwich-like hybrid of ultrathin nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) sheets and porous Co3O4 nanospheres (Co3O4/NG). This unique structure endows the Co3O4/NG hybrid with large surface area and enhanced electrochemical performances as both anode material for Li-ion batteries and electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). As an anode material, it exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability and rate performance (1236 and 489 mAh g-1 over 200 cycles at 0.1C and 2C, respectively; 371 mAh g-1 at 5C). As an ORR electrocatalyst, it shows superior catalytic activity and high selectivity for the four-electron reduction pathway compared to the bare Co3O4 and NG alone. Moreover, the Co3O4/NG hybrid is insensitive to methanol, and is much more stable than Pt/C catalyst over long term operation.

  16. Eco-friendly nitrogen-containing carbon encapsulated LiMn2O4 cathodes to enhance the electrochemical properties in rechargeable Li-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ilango, P. Robert; Prasanna, K.; Do, Su Jung; Jo, Yong Nam; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon (N-C) and an approach to apply the N-C material as a surface encapsulant of LiMn2O4 (LMO) cathode material. The N heteroatoms in the N-C material improve the electrochemical performance of LMO. A low-cost wet coating method was used to prepare N-C@LMO particles. The N-C@LMO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution Raman spectroscopy (HR-Raman), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM) with elemental mapping. Furthermore, the prepared samples were electrochemically studied using the AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the electrochemical cycler. XPS suggested that the N-C coating greatly reduced the dissolution of Mn and EIS showed that the coating greatly suppressed the charge transfer resistance, even after long-term cycling. The control of Mn dissolution and inner resistance allowed faster Li-ion transport between the two electrodes resulting in improved discharge capacity and cycling stability. PMID:27406049

  17. B and N isolate-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins for enhanced oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Lu; Tian, Chungui; Zhao, Dongdong; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Jie; Wang, Ruihong; Fu, Honggang

    2014-06-01

    B,N-codoped carbon nanostructures (BNCS) can serve as alternative low-cost metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). However, the compensation effect between the p- (B atoms) and n-type (N atoms) dopants would make the covalent boron-nitride (BN) easily formed during the synthesis of BNCS, leading to a unsatisfactory ORR activity. Therefore, it has been challenging to develop facile and rapid synthetic strategies for highly active BNCS without forming the direct covalent BN. Here, a facile method is developed to prepare B and N isolate-doped graphitic nanosheets (BNGS) by using iron species for saving N element and simultaneous doping the B element from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins (NR). The resulting BNGS exhibits much more onset potential (Eonset) compared with the B-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (BGS), N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (NGS), as well as B,N-codoped disorder carbon (BNC). Moreover, the BNGS shows well methanol tolerance propery and excellent stability (a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles) compared to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The goog performance for BNGS towards ORR is attributed to the synergistic effect between B and N, and the well electrons transport property of graphitic carbon in BNGS.

  18. B and N isolate-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins for enhanced oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Lu; Tian, Chungui; Zhao, Dongdong; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Jie; Wang, Ruihong; Fu, Honggang

    2014-01-01

    B,N-codoped carbon nanostructures (BNCS) can serve as alternative low-cost metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). However, the compensation effect between the p- (B atoms) and n-type (N atoms) dopants would make the covalent boron-nitride (BN) easily formed during the synthesis of BNCS, leading to a unsatisfactory ORR activity. Therefore, it has been challenging to develop facile and rapid synthetic strategies for highly active BNCS without forming the direct covalent BN. Here, a facile method is developed to prepare B and N isolate-doped graphitic nanosheets (BNGS) by using iron species for saving N element and simultaneous doping the B element from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins (NR). The resulting BNGS exhibits much more onset potential (Eonset) compared with the B-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (BGS), N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (NGS), as well as B,N-codoped disorder carbon (BNC). Moreover, the BNGS shows well methanol tolerance propery and excellent stability (a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles) compared to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The goog performance for BNGS towards ORR is attributed to the synergistic effect between B and N, and the well electrons transport property of graphitic carbon in BNGS. PMID:24898033

  19. A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide determination in ambient air by use of passive samplers and ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krochmal, Dariusz; Kalina, Andrzej

    A passive sampling method for simultaneous determination of SO 2 and NO 2 in ambient air is presented. Sampling periods from 24 h to 1 month can be applied. SO 2 and NO 2 collected by the sampler are determined as sulphate and nitrite with ion chromatography in a single run. Both suppressed or nonsuppressed IC can be applied with the former giving lower detection limits. Analysis for NO 2 as nitrite can be also performed spectrophotometrically after reaction with Saltzman reagent. The lower determination limit for monthly exposure of samplers is 0.5 and 0.7 μg m -3 for NO 2 and SO 2, respectively. For shorter periods of exposure the determination limit is proportionally higher. Precision of the method as RSD is 6% for NO 2 and 14% for SO 2 at concentrations of around 50 μg m -3. Influence of meteorological factors like sunlight, wind velocity, temperature and humidity of air on sampling rate have been minimised by an appropriate modification of the sampler and calibration of the method under various conditions. The method has been optimised to make it possible to perform large number of analyses at a very low cost. Passive samplers can be stored before and after exposure for a period of up to 10 weeks what makes it possible to prepare and analyse them by a central laboratory for better integrity of data. Samplers can be sent from and back to the central laboratory by mail. Suitability of the method for large-scale monitoring was demonstrated in several projects.

  20. Design of the recoil mass separator St. George

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Görres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Lamm, L. O.; Stech, E.; Wiescher, M.; Hinnefeld, J.

    2008-03-01

    A recoil mass separator has been designed for the purpose of studying low energy (α,γ) reactions in inverse kinematics for beam masses up to about A=40. Their reaction rates are of importance for our understanding of energy production and nucleosynthesis during stellar and explosive helium burning. The reactions take place in a windowless He gas target at the beginning of the separator which consists of three sections. The first section selects the most abundant charge state. The Wien filter in the second section efficiently separates the intense beam from the few reaction products. In the last section the reaction products are focused into a detector system consisting of time pickup and energy detectors. In order to accept the complete kinematic cone of recoil particles for energies as low as reasonably possible we specified a large circular angular acceptance of ±40 mrad. This requires a careful minimization of higher-order aberrations. The present system has been designed to allow for a future upgrade to extend the experimental program to the analysis of (p,γ) reactions.

  1. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  2. Silicon shallow doping by erbium and oxygen recoils implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feklistov, K. V.; Cherkov, A. G.; Popov, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to get shallow high doping of Si with optically active complexes ErOn, Er followed by O recoils implantation was realized by means of subsequent Ar+ 250-290 keV implantation with doses 2×1015-1×1016 cm-2 through 50-nm deposited films of Er and then SiO2, accordingly. High Er concentration up to 5×1020 cm-3 to the depth of 10 nm was obtained after implantation. However, about a half of the Er implanted atoms become part of surface SiO2 during post-implantation annealing at 950 °C for 1 h in the N2 ambient under a SiO2 cap. The mechanism of Er segregation into the cap oxide following the moving amorphous-crystalline interface during recrystallization was rejected by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Instead, the other mechanism of immobile Er atoms and redistribution of recoil-implanted O atoms toward cap oxide was proposed. It explains the observed formation of two Er containing phases: Er-Si-O phase with a high O content adjacent to the cap oxide and deeper O depleted Er-Si phase. The correction of heat treatments is proposed in order to avoid the above-mentioned problems.

  3. Hydrogen ion supercapacitor: a new hybrid configuration of highly dispersed MnO₂ in porous carbon coupled with nitrogen-doped highly ordered mesoporous carbon with enhanced H-insertion.

    PubMed

    Qu, Deyu; Wen, Jianfeng; Liu, Dan; Xie, Zhizhong; Zhang, Xuran; Zheng, Dong; Lei, Jiahen; Zhong, Wei; Tang, Haolin; Xiao, Liang; Qu, Deyang

    2014-12-24

    A new configuration of hydrogen ion supercapacitors was reported. A positive electrode composed of pseudocapacitive MnO2, highly dispersed into active porous carbon through an impregnation method, was combined with a nitrogen-doped highly ordered mesoporous carbon with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen insertion capacity as a negative electrode. During the operation, hydrogen ion shuttled between MnO2 and carbon electrodes. The MnO2 was formed on the surface of nanostructured carbon through a spontaneous redox reaction. Operating in an aqueous neutral solution, the hybrid device demonstrated an extended working voltage to ∼2.1 V with good cycle life. PMID:25458840

  4. One-pot green synthesis of high quantum yield oxygen-doped, nitrogen-rich, photoluminescent polymer carbon nanoribbons as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for sensitive and selective detection of silver(I) and mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xia; Ding, Shou-Nian

    2014-08-01

    This work reports on a facile, economical, and green preparative strategy toward water-soluble, fluorescent oxygen-doped, nitrogen-rich, photoluminescent polymer carbon nanoribbons (ONPCRs) with a quantum yield of approximately 25.61% by the hydrothermal process using uric acid as a carbon-nitrogen source for the first time. The as-prepared fluorescent ONPCRs showed paddy leaf-like structure with 80-160 nm length and highly efficient fluorescent quenching ability in the presence of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)) or silver (Ag(+)) ions due to the formed nonfluorescent metal complexes via robust Hg(2+)-O or Ag(+)-N interaction with the O and N of fluorescent ONPCRs, which allowed the analysis of Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions in a very simple method. By employing this sensor, excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the ONPCRs and the concentrations of Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions in the range of 2.0 nM to 60 μM and 5.0 nM to 80 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate and ammonia as the masking agent of Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions, respectively, Hg(2+) or Ag(+) ions were exclusively detected in coexistence with Ag(+) or Hg(2+) ions with high sensitivity, and the detection limits as low as 0.68 and 1.73 nM (3σ) were achieved, respectively, which also provided a reusable detection method for Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions. Therefore, the easily synthesized fluorescent ONPCRs may have great potential applications in the detection of Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions for biological assay and environmental protection. PMID:24979236

  5. Numerical simulations of spiral galaxy formation and recoiling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Javiera M.

    This thesis discusses two major topics in regard to the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central massive black holes (MBH). Part 1 explores the detectability of recoiling massive back as kinematically and spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Chapter 3 is devoted to understanding the effect of an aspherical dark matter potential on the trajectories of the MBHs. This is done through collisionless N-body simulations of kicked black holes in the Via Lactea I halo and through a semi-analytical model that accounts for the evolution of the halo's triaxiality as a function of radius over cosmic time. We find that the return time of MBHs that wander through a differentially triaxial halo is significantly extended in comparison with spherical models. This is because their trajectories are become highly non-radial which prevents them from passing near the halo's center, where dynamical friction is most efficient. Chapter 4 puts recoiling MBHs into context. Here we carry out N-body + SPH simulations of recoiling MBHs in high-resolution galaxy mergers with mass ratios 1:1 (Mayer et al. 2007), 1:4, and 1:10 (Callegari et al. 2009). We study not only the trajectories and return times of these black holes, but also their detectability as spatially/kinematically offset AGN. We find that the probability of detection of these MBHs is extremely low. The detection of large kinematic offsets requires that the MBH have relative offset velocities Deltav > 600km s-1 at the time of observation. This is unlikely due to (1) the low probability of large recoils to occur from a general-relativistic viewpoint, and (2) the short time scale during which the MBH can sustain large velocities even if the initial kick is high. The large amounts of gas funneled to the center of the host potential during mergers also prevents MBHs from reaching large apocenter distances, which hampers their detection as spatially offset AGN, especially at high redshift when recoil events are

  6. Hyperfine structures and Landé g{sub J}-factors for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Verdebout, S.; Nazé, C.; Rynkun, P.; Godefroid, M.

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, hyperfine interaction constants, and Landé g{sub J}-factors are reported for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations. Valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects are taken into account through single and double-excitations from multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. A systematic comparison of the calculated hyperfine interaction constants is made with values from the available literature.

  7. Monitoring of physics performance of ILC Software based on Higgs Recoil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E.; Voutsinas, G.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a part of ILC software development, that allow us to make automated testing of ILC results. The testing code consists of automated everyday Higgs recoil mass analysis and compares Higgs recoil mass with one of the previous day result. This code uses the result of generation, Mokka simulation and Marlin reconstruction of ILC events.

  8. Optimal control of gun recoil in direct fire using magnetorheological absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Optimal control of a gun recoil absorber is investigated for minimizing recoil loads and maximizing rate of fire. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated by considering the mechanical model of the recoil absorber employing a spring and a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The damper forces are predicted by evaluating pressure drops using a nonlinear Bingham-plastic model. The optimization methodology provides multiple optimal design configurations with a trade-off between recoil load minimization and increased rate of fire. The configurations with low or high recoil loads imply low or high rate of fire, respectively. The gun recoil absorber performance is also analyzed for perturbations in the firing forces. The adaptive control of the MR damper for varying gun firing forces provides a smooth operation by returning the recoil mass to its battery position (ready to reload and fire) without incurring an end-stop impact. Furthermore, constant load transmissions are observed with respect to the recoil stroke by implementing optimal control during the simulated firing events.

  9. Nitrogen In Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Baragiola, R. A.; Crary, F.; Young, D.

    2004-11-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions to the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to the models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and the CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  10. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  11. Characterization of the Oxidation State of 229 Th Recoils Implanted in MgF2 for the Search of the Low-lying 229 Th Isomeric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau; Meyer, Edmund; Schacht, Mike; Collins, Lee; Wilkerson, Marianne; Zhao, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    The low-lying (7.8 eV) isomeric state in 229 Th has the potential to become a nuclear frequency standard. 229 Th recoils from 233 U decays have been collected in MgF2 for use in the direct search of the transition. Of interest is the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th atoms as this can have an influence on the decay mechanisms and photon emission rate. Too determine the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th recoils we have employed laser induced florescence (LIF), and plan-wave pseudopotential DFT calculations to search for emission from thorium ions in oxidation states less than + 4. Our search focused on detecting emission from Th3+ ions. The DFT calculations predicted the Th3+ state to be the most likely to be present in the crystal after Th4+. We also calculated the band structure for the Th3+ doped MgF2 crystal. For LIF spectra a number of excitation wavelengths were employed, emission spectra in the visible to near-IR were recorded along with time-resolved emission spectra. We have found no evidence for Th3+ in the MgF2 plates. We also analyzed the detection limit of our apprentice and found that the minimum number of Th3+ atoms that we could detect is quite small compared to the number of implanted 229 Th recoils. The number of implanted 229 Th recoils was derived from a γ-ray spectrum by monitoring emission from the daughters of 228 Th. These were present in the MgF2 plates due to a 232 U impurity, which decays to 228 Th, in the source. LA-UR-16-20442.

  12. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  13. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  14. Simulation of low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelaar, M. H.; Breeman, M.; Mijiritskii, A. V.; Boerma, D. O.

    A new simulation program `MATCH' has been developed for a detailed analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and recoiling data. Instead of performing the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories through the sample from the ion source towards the detector, incoming trajectories as well as reversed-time outgoing trajectories are calculated, separately. Finally, these trajectories are matched to obtain the yield. The program has been tested for spectra and azimuthal scans of scattering and recoiling events of various sample species in different scattering geometries.

  15. Dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes and its recoil effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Chen, Qunzhi; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Kaile; Jiang, Zhe; Sun, Zhili; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-06-15

    A dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes (HEDBS), in which gas flow oriented parallel to the electric field, was proposed. Results showed that with this structure, air can be effectively ignited, forming atmospheric low temperature plasma, and the proposed HEDBS could achieve much higher electron density (5 × 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3}). It was also found that the flow condition, including outlet diameter and flow rate, played a key role in the evolution of electron density. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic results showed that the concentration of reactive species had the same variation trend as the electron density. The simulated distribution of discharge gas flow indicated that the HEDBS had a strong recoil effect on discharge gas, and could efficiently promote generating electron density as well as reactive species.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  17. B{yields}D* at zero recoil revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, Paolo; Mannel, Thomas; Uraltsev, Nikolai

    2010-06-01

    We examine the B{yields}D* form factor at zero recoil using a continuum QCD approach rooted in the heavy quark sum rules framework. A refined evaluation of the radiative corrections as well as the most recent estimates of higher-order power terms together with more careful continuum calculation are included. An upper bound on the form factor of F(1) < or approx. 0.93 is derived, based on just the positivity of inelastic contributions. A model-independent estimate of the inelastic contributions shows they are quite significant, lowering the form factor by about 6% or more. This results in an unbiased estimate F(1){approx_equal}0.86 with about 3% uncertainty in the central value.

  18. Proton recoil spectroscopy 400 meters from a fission neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Stanka, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron kerma and spectrum measurements have been made at the US Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) to 400m in an air-over-ground geometry from a fission neutron source and have been compared to Monte Carlo transport calculations. The neutron spectra measurements were made using a rotating neutron spectrometer. This spectrometer consists of four spherical proton-recoil detectors mounted on a common rotating base. Detector radius, gas composition, and pressure have been varied to allow sensitivity over a neutron range of 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Neutron kerma was determined by using the Kerr soft-tissue kerma factors. Measured neutron kerma agreed with the calculated neutron kerma to within 5%. Comparisons with other neutron spectrometers such as NE213 and Bonner Spheres are presented and agreement between the different spectrometers is better than 20%.

  19. Recoil Polarization for {delta} Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C.C.; Chant, N.S.; Roos, P.G.; Roche, R.E.; McAleer, S.; Meekins, D.; Chai, Z.; Gayou, O.; Bertozzi, W.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Rvachev, M.; Sirca, S.; Suleiman, R.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jones, M.K.

    2005-09-02

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(6.84{+-}0.15)% and Re (E{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(2.91{+-}0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M{sub 1+} dominance and l{sub {pi}}{<=}1 truncation.

  20. Recoil polarization for delta excitation in pion electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J J; Roché, R E; Chai, Z; Jones, M K; Gayou, O; Sarty, A J; Frullani, S; Aniol, K; Beise, E J; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W U; Botto, T; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Brown, E; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chant, N S; Chen, J-P; Coman, M; Crovelli, D; De Leo, R; Dieterich, S; Escoffier, S; Fissum, K G; Garde, V; Garibaldi, F; Georgakopoulus, S; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Hotta, A; Huber, G M; Ibrahim, H; Iodice, M; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Klimenko, A; Kozlov, A; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lagamba, L; Laveissière, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Margaziotis, D J; Marie, F; Markowitz, P; McAleer, S; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Milbrath, B D; Mitchell, J; Nappa, J; Neyret, D; Perdrisat, C F; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Ransome, R D; Roos, P G; Rvachev, M; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Suleiman, R; Strauch, S; Templon, J A; Todor, L; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2005-09-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W = 1.23 GeV at Q(2) = 1.0 (GeV/c)(2), obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S(1+)/M(1+)) = -(6.84 +/- 0.15)% and Re (E(1+)/M(1+)) = -(2.91 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and ll(pi) < or = 1 truncation. PMID:16196919

  1. Calibration of a compact magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Guoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Qiu, Suizheng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Yang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer is considered as a powerful instrument to measure deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectrum, as it is currently used in inertial confinement fusion facilities and large Tokamak devices. The energy resolution (ER) and neutron detection efficiency (NDE) are the two most important parameters to characterize a neutron spectrometer. In this work, the ER calibration for the MPR spectrometer was performed by using the HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the NDE calibration was performed by using the neutron generator at CIAE. The specific calibration techniques used in this work and the associated accuracies were discussed in details in this paper. The calibration results were presented along with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  2. Recoil Polarization for Delta Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Kelly; R. E. Roche; Z. Chai; M. K. Jones; O. Gayou; A. J. Sarty; S. Frullani; K. Aniol; E. J. Beise; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; W. U. Boeglin; T. Botto; E. J. Brash; H. Breuer; E. Brown; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; C. Cavata; C. C. Chang; N. S. Chant; J.-P. Chen; M. Coman; D. Crovelli; R. De Leo; S. Dieterich; S. Escoffier; K. G. Fissum; V. Garde; F. Garibaldi; S. Georgakopoulus; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; J.-O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; A. Hotta; G. M. Huber; H. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; A. Klimenko; A. Kozlov; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; L. Lagamba; G. Laveissiere; J. J. LeRose; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Marie; P. Markowitz; S. McAleer; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; B. D. Milbrath; J. Mitchell; J. Nappa; D. Neyret; C. F. Perdrisat; M. Potokar; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; R. D. Ransome; P. G. Roos; M. Rvachev; A. Saha; S. Sirca; R. Suleiman; S. Strauch; J. A. Templon; L. Todor; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; and L. Zhu

    2005-08-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re(S1+/M1+)=-(6.84+/-0.15)% and Re(E1+/M1+)=-(2.91+/-0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and sp truncation.

  3. Spectroscopy of {sup 144}Ho using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P. J. R; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sorri, J.; Saren, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Xu, F. R.

    2010-02-15

    Excited states in the proton-unbound odd-odd nucleus {sup 144}Ho have been populated using the {sup 92}Mo({sup 54}Fe,pn){sup 144}Ho reaction and studied using the recoil-isomer-tagging technique. The alignment properties and signature splitting of the rotational band above the I{sup p}i=(8{sup +}){sup 144m}Ho isomer have been analyzed and the isomer confirmed to have a pih{sub 11/2} x nuh{sub 11/2} two-quasiparticle configuration. The configuration-constrained blocking method has been used to calculate the shapes of the ground and isomeric states, which are both predicted to have triaxial nuclear shapes with |gamma|approx =24 deg.

  4. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  5. Alpha-recoil thorium-234: dissolution into water and the uranium-234/uranium-238 disequilibrium in nature.

    PubMed

    Kigoshi, K

    1971-07-01

    The rate of ejection of alpha-recoil thorium-234 into solution from the surface of zircon sand gives an alpha-recoil range of 550 angstroms. The alpha-recoil thorium-234 atoms ejected into the groundwater may supply excess uranium-234. In pelagic sediments, ejected alpha-recoil thorium-234 may contribute to the supply of mobile uranium-234 in the sedimentary column. PMID:17747313

  6. Sub-barrier reactions measured using a recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Few data exist in the sub-barrier region for reaction channels other than fusion. In particular, our experimental knowledge of quasi-elastic transfer reactions is sparse, despite the belief that this particular channel may be dominant in determining some features of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Transfer reactions are governed primarily by the closet approach of the colliding nuclei which, at low energies, results in a strong backward peaking of the angular distribution in the center-of-mass frame. For situations where the projectile has a significant fraction of the target mass, as is so in most cases of interest, the backscattered projectile-like fragment has such low energy that the usual techniques of measurement and identification become invalid. Here, we report on a solution to this problem which allows a systematic study of many aspects of transfer reactions in the energy regime of interest. We exploit the fact that associated with the low-energy backscattered projectile-like fragment is a complementary target-like fragment which recoils to forward angles with a large fraction of the incident beam energy. These target-like fragments were detected and identified using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator thus allowing the measurement of quasi-elastic transfer over hitherto inaccessible energy range from the vicinity of the barrier to several tens of MeV below. The experiments described here used VYNi beams of energies ranging from 180 to 260 MeV provided by the Daresbury Laboratory Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. Data on sub-barrier transfer for targets of /sup 116,118,120,122,124/Sn and /sup 144,148,150,152,154/Sm were obtained. 16 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Properties of cold ions produced by synchrotron radiation and by charged particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.C.; Biederman, C.; Cederquist, H.; O, C.S.; Short, R.T.; Sellin, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Argon recoil ions produced by beams of 0.8 MeV/u Cl/sup 5 +/ have been detected by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques in coincidence with the loss of from one to five projectile electrons. Recoil-ion energies have been determined to be more than an order of magnitude higher than those of highly-charged ions produced by unmonochromatized synchrotron radiation. Charge-state distributions, however, show similarities, suggesting that loss of projectile electrons corresponds, in some cases, to inner-shell target ionization producing vacancy cascades. In an essential improvement to the usual multinomial description of ionization in the independent-electron-ejection model, we find the inclusion of Auger vacancy cascades significantly alters the description of the recoil ion spectra corresponding to projectile-electron loss. These conclusions are consistent with impact parameters inferred from determinations of mean recoil energy. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Production of 14 MeV neutrons by heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Brugger, Robert M.; Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a neutron generator and a method for the production of 14 MeV neutrons. Heavy ions are accelerated to impinge upon a target mixture of deuterium and tritium to produce recoil atoms of deuterium and tritium. These recoil atoms have a sufficient energy such that they interact with other atoms of tritium or deuterium in the target mixture to produce approximately 14 MeV neutrons.

  9. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hatchett, S.; Haan, S.; Cerjan, C.; Landen, O.; Moran, M.; Song, P.; Wilson, D. C.; Leeper, R. J.

    2008-10-15

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density ({rho}R), ion temperature (T{sub i}), and yield (Y{sub n}) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring {rho}R at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well.

  10. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited).

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Moran, M; Song, P; Wilson, D C; Leeper, R J

    2008-10-01

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density (rhoR), ion temperature (T(i)), and yield (Y(n)) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring rhoR at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well. PMID:19044488

  11. Hydrogen uptake in Zircaloy-2 reactor fuel claddings studied with elastic recoil detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekhara, S.; Doyle, B. L.; Enos, D. G.; Clark, B. G.

    2013-04-19

    The recent trend towards a high burn-up discharge spent nuclear fuel necessitates a thorough understanding of hydrogen uptake in Zr-based cladding materials that encapsulate spent nuclear fuel. Although it is challenging to experimentally replicate exact conditions in a nuclear reactor that lead to hydrogen uptake in claddings, in this study we have attempted to understand the kinetics of hydrogen uptake by first electrolytically charging Zircaloy-2 (Zr-2) cladding material for various durations (100 to 2,600 s), and subsequently examining hydrogen ingress with elastic recoil detection (ERD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To understand the influence of irradiation damage defects on hydrogen uptake, an analogous study was performed on ion - irradiated (0.1, 1 and 25 dpa) Zr-2. Analysis of ERD data from the un-irradiated Zr-2 suggests that the growth of the hydride layer is diffusion controlled, and preliminary TEM results support this assertion. In un-irradiated Zr-2, the diffusivity of hydrogen in the hydride phase was found to be approximately 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup 2}/s, while the diffusivity in the hydride phase for lightly irradiated (0.1 and 1 dpa) Zr-2 is an order of magnitude lower. Irradiation to 25 dpa results in a hydrogen diffusivity that is comparable to the un-irradiated Zr-2. These results are compared with existing literature on hydrogen transport in Zr - based materials.

  12. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  13. Damped elastic recoil of the titin spring in myofibrils of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Christiane A.; Kulke, Michael; Leake, Mark C.; Neagoe, Ciprian; Hinssen, Horst; Hajjar, Roger J.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2003-01-01

    The giant protein titin functions as a molecular spring in muscle and is responsible for most of the passive tension of myocardium. Because the titin spring is extended during diastolic stretch, it will recoil elastically during systole and potentially may influence the overall shortening behavior of cardiac muscle. Here, titin elastic recoil was quantified in single human heart myofibrils by using a high-speed charge-coupled device-line camera and a nanonewtonrange force sensor. Application of a slack-test protocol revealed that the passive shortening velocity (Vp) of nonactivated cardiomyofibrils depends on: (i) initial sarcomere length, (ii) release-step amplitude, and (iii) temperature. Selective digestion of titin, with low doses of trypsin, decelerated myofibrillar passive recoil and eventually stopped it. Selective extraction of actin filaments with a Ca2+-independent gelsolin fragment greatly reduced the dependency of Vp on release-step size and temperature. These results are explained by the presence of viscous forces opposing myofibrillar passive recoil that are caused mainly by weak actin–titin interactions. Thus, Vp is determined by two distinct factors: titin elastic recoil and internal viscous drag forces. The recoil could be modeled as that of a damped entropic spring consisting of independent worm-like chains. The functional importance of myofibrillar elastic recoil was addressed by comparing instantaneous Vp to unloaded shortening velocity, which was measured in demembranated, fully Ca2+-activated, human cardiac fibers. Titin-driven passive recoil was much faster than active unloaded shortening velocity in early phases of isotonic contraction. Damped myofibrillar elastic recoil could help accelerate active contraction speed of human myocardium during early systolic shortening. PMID:14563922

  14. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  15. The quasielastic 2H(e,e'p)n reaction at high recoil momenta

    SciTech Connect

    D. Crovelli; Konrad Aniol; Javier Gomez; John LeRose; Arunava Saha; Paul Ulmer; Vina Punjabi; Richard Lindgren; Charles Perdrisat; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; Mark Jones; Robert Michaels; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Hartmuth Arenhoevel; Michael Finn; Jens-Ole Hansen; Riad Suleiman; Kevin Fissum; Sergey Malov; Cornelis De Jager; Cornelis de Jager; Rikki Roche; Michael Kuss; Eugene Chudakov; Sabine Jeschonnek; Franck Sabatie; Luminita Todor; Meihua Liang; Olivier Gayou; Jian-Ping Chen

    2001-11-01

    The 2H(e,e'p)n cross section was measured in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in quasielastic kinematics (x=0.96) at a four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}=0.67 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment was performed in fixed electron kinematics for recoil momenta from zero to 550 MeV/c. Though the measured cross section deviates by 1-2 sigma from a state-of-the-art calculation at low recoil momenta, it agrees at high recoil momenta where final state interactions (FSI) are predicted to be large.

  16. Recoil-nucleus spectra in the interaction of cosmic-ray protons with spacecraft electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.; Chechenin, N. G.

    2008-07-15

    The cross sections for nuclear reactions induced by 50-to 1000-MeV protons in silicon and the angular distributions of products of these reactions are calculated, along with the recoil-nucleus spectra. The recoil-nucleus spectra are shown to contain a monotonically decreasing portion and a recoil peak, which is manifested most clearly at incident-proton energies in excess of 100 MeV. The possibility of employing these results to derive more reliable estimates of single-event upsets in onboard spacecraft electronics is discussed.

  17. Retention studies of recoiling daughter nuclides of 225Ac in polymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; de Kruijff, R M; Rol, A; Thijssen, L; Mendes, E; Morgenstern, A; Bruchertseifer, F; Stuart, M C A; Wolterbeek, H T; Denkova, A G

    2014-02-01

    Alpha radionuclide therapy is steadily gaining importance and a large number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have been carried out. However, due to the recoil effects the daughter recoil atoms, most of which are alpha emitters as well, receive energies that are much higher than the energies of chemical bonds resulting in decoupling of the radionuclide from common targeting agents. Here, we demonstrate that polymer vesicles (i.e. polymersomes) can retain recoiling daughter nuclei based on an experimental study examining the retention of (221)Fr and (213)Bi when encapsulating (225)Ac. PMID:24374072

  18. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi A.; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark E.; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006-September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25-50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3-) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3- from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p < 0.001), indicating a seasonal shift in the relative importance of regional NOx sources, such as coal combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3-. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3- between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3-. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack sampling can be used to

  19. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006–September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25–50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3−) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3− from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p < 0.001), indicating a seasonal shift in the relative importance of regional NOxsources, such as coal combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3−. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3− between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3−. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack

  20. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; et al

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  1. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF. PMID:23126915

  2. Measuring the 16O(α, γ)20Ne Reaction Rate with the Dragon Recoil Separator at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Greife, U.; Buchmann, L.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Erikson, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Brown, J. R.; Irvine, D.

    2013-03-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility at TRIUMF measures radiative α and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. This is done employing radioactive and stable ion beams produced and accelerated using the ISAC (Isotope Separator and ACcelerator) facility in conjunction with the DRAGON windowless gas target. Over the last few years, the DRAGON collaboration has embarked on a programme to measure a variety of reactions considered vital to the understanding of various astrophysical scenarios. An overview of DRAGON's separation, beam suppression, and detection capabilities will be given. In addition, examples of recent reaction cross section measurements will be discussed, such as the 16O(α, γ)20Ne reaction, which plays an important part in the He and Ne burning in massive stars.

  3. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  4. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail. PMID:26378338

  5. A study of intrinsic statistical variation for low-energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon detector for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wei, Wenzhao; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Noble liquid xenon experiments, such as XENON100, LUX, XENON 1-Ton, and LZ are large dark matter experiments directly searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). One of the most important features is to discriminate nuclear recoils from electronic recoils. Detector response is generally calibrated with different radioactive sources including 83mKr, tritiated methane, 241AmBe, 252Cf, and DD-neutrons. The electronic recoil and nuclear recoil bands have been determined by these calibrations. However, the width of nuclear recoil band needs to be fully understood. We derive a theoretical model to understand the correlation of the width of nuclear recoil band and intrinsic statistical variation. In addition, we conduct experiments to validate the theoretical model. In this paper, we present the study of intrinsic statistical variation contributing to the width of nuclear recoil band. DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  6. Analysis of Nitrogen Incorporation in Group III-Nitride-Arsenide Materials Using a Magnetic Sector Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Instrument: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R. C.; Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Adams, R. O.; Perkins, C. L.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Group III-nitride-arsenide materials were studied by SIMS, XRD, and Profiler to determine small amounts of nitrogen that can lower the alloys bandgap significantly.

  7. Developments for a measurement of the beta -- nu correlation and determination of the recoil charge-state distribution in 6He beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ran

    The beta-nu of a pure Gamow-Teller beta decay such as the 6He decay is sensitive to tensor-type weak currents predicted by theories beyond the Standard Model. An experiment is developed at University of Washington aiming at measuring the coefficient a_{beta-nu} of 6He decays to the 0.1% level and looking for its deviation from the Standard-Model prediction -1/3 using laser-trapped 6He atoms. The beta particle is detected by a scintillator and a multi-wire proportional chamber, and the recoil ion is detected by a microchannel plate with delay-line anodes for position readouts. a_{beta-nu} is extracted by fitting the measured time-of-flight spectrum of the recoil ions to templates generated by Monte Carlo simulations. This dissertation describes the developments of this experiment for the intermediate goal of a 1% level a_{beta-nu} measurement, such as the detector design, Monte Carlo simulation software, and data analysis frame work. Particularly, detector calibrations are described in detail. The analysis of a 2% level proof-of-principle run in October 2015 is presented as well. Shake-off probabilities for decays of trapped 6He atoms matter for the high-precision a_{beta-nu} measurement. The charge state distribution of recoil ions is obtained by analyzing their time-of-flight distribution using the same experimental setups for the a_{beta-nu} measurement. An analysis approach that is independent of the beta-nu correlation is developed. The measured upper limit of the double shake-off probability is 2x10. {-4} at 90% confidence level. This result is 100 times lower than the most recent calculation by Schulhoff and Drake. This disagreement is significant for the a_{beta-nu} measurement and needs to be addressed by improved atomic theory calculations.

  8. First Measurement of Beam-Recoil Observables Cx and Cz

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; G. Adams; M.J. Amaryan; P. Ambrozewicz; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; H. Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; N. Baillie; J.P. Ball; N.A. Baltzell; S. Barrow; V. Batourine; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bektasoglu; M. Bellis; N. Benmouna; B.L. Berman; N. Bianchi; A.S. Biselli; B.E. Bonner; S. Bouchigny; S. Boiarinov; D. Branford; W.J. Briscoe; W.K. Brooks; S. B¨ultmann; V.D. Burkert; C. Butuceanu; J.R. Calarco; S.L. Careccia; D.S. Carman; B. Carnahan; S. Chen; P.L. Cole; A. Coleman; P. Collins; P. Coltharp; D. Cords; † P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; V. Crede; J.P. Cummings; R. De Masi; E. De Sanctis; R. De Vita; P.V. Degtyarenko; H. Denizli; L. Dennis; A. Deur; K.V. Dharmawardane; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G.E. Dodge; J. Donnelly; D. Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; M. Dugger; S. Dytman; O.P. Dzyubak; H. Egiyan; K.S. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; P. Eugenio; R. Fatemi; G. Fedotov; G. Feldman; R.J. Feuerbach; T.A. Forest; H. Funsten; M. Garcon; G. Gavalian; G.P. Gilfoyle; K.L. Giovanetti; F.X. Girod; J.T. Goetz; A. Gonenc; R.W. Gothe; K.A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; M. Guillo; N. Guler; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; C. Hadjidakis; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; R.S. Hakobyan; J. Hardie; D. Heddle; F.W. Hersman; K. Hicks; I. Hleiqawi; M. Holtrop; J. Hu; M. Huertas; C.E. Hyde-Wright; Y. Ilieva; D.G. Ireland; B.S. Ishkhanov; E.L. Isupov; M.M. Ito; D. Jenkins; H.S. Jo; K. Joo; H.G. Juengst; N. Kalantarians; J.D. Kellie; M. Khandaker; K.Y. Kim; K. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F.J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L.H. Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; J. Kuhn; S.E. Kuhn; S.V. Kuleshov; J. Lachniet; J.M. Laget; J. Langheinrich; D. Lawrence; A.C.S. Lima; K. Livingston; H.Y. Lu; K. Lukashin; M. MacCormick; J.J. Manak; C. Marchand; N. Markov; S. McAleer; B. McKinnon; J.W.C. McNabb; B.A. Mecking; M.D. Mestayer; C.A. Meyer; T. Mibe; K. Mikhailov; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; S.A. Morrow; M. Moteabbed; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; G.S. Mutchler; P. Nadel-Turonski; J. Napolitano; R. Nasseripour; N. Natasha; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; B.B. Niczyporuk; M.R. Niroula; R.A. Niyazov; M. Nozar; G.V. O’Rielly; M. Osipenko; A.I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; C. Paterson; S.A. Philips; J. Pierce; N. Pivnyuk; D. Pocanic; O. Pogorelko; E. Polli; I. Popa; S. Pozdniakov; B.M. Preedom; J.W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; L.M. Qin; B.P. Quinn; B.A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B.G. Ritchie; F. Ronchetti; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; D. Rowntree; P.D. Rubin; F. Sabatie; J. Salamanca; C. Salgado; J.P. Santoro; V. Sapunenko; V.S. Serov; A. Shafi; Y.G. Sharabian; J. Shaw; N.V. Shvedunov; S. Simionatto; A.V. Skabelin; E.S. Smith; L.C. Smith; D.I. Sober; D. Sokhan; M. Spraker; A. Stavinsky; S.S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; B.E. Stokes; P. Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; S. Taylor; D.J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; A. Tkabladze; S. Tkachenko; L. Todor; C. Tur; M. Ungaro; M.F. Vineyard; A.V. Vlassov; K. Wang; D.P. Watts; L.B. Weinstein; H. Weller; D.P. Weygand; M. Williams; E. Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; J. Yun; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; and Z.W. Zhao

    2007-03-01

    Spin transfer from circularly polarized real photons to recoiling hyperons has been measured for the reactions $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Lambda$ and $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Sigma^0$. The data were obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies $W$ between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for $-0.85<\\cos\\theta_{K^+}^{c.m.}< +0.95$. For the $\\Lambda$, the polarization transfer coefficient along the photon momentum axis, $C_z$, was found to be near unity for a wide range of energy and kaon production angles. The associated transverse polarization coefficient, $C_x$, is smaller than $C_z$ by a roughly constant difference of unity. Most significantly, the {\\it total} $\\Lambda$ polarization vector, including the induced polarization $P$, has magnitude consistent with unity at all measured energies and production angles when the beam is fully polarized. For the $\\Sigma^0$ this simple phenomenology does not hold. All existing hadrodynamic models are in poor agreement with these results.

  9. Elastic recoil of coronary stents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Barragan, P; Rieu, R; Garitey, V; Roquebert, P O; Sainsous, J; Silvestri, M; Bayet, G

    2000-05-01

    Minimum elastic recoil (ER) has became an essential feature of new coronary stents when deployed in artheromatous lesions of various morphologies. The ER of coronary stent might be an important component of 6-month restenosis rate by minimizing the luminal loss. We evaluated the intrinsic ER of 23 coronary stents with a mechanical test bench. The amount of ER for one size of stent (3.0 mm) was quantified using a 3D optical contactless machine (Smartscope MVP, Rochester, NY). The stents were expanded on their own balloon for the precrimped stents; the uncrimped stents were expended using identical 3.0-mm balloons. Two types of measurements were done without exterior stress and with a 0.2-bar exterior stress, directly on the stent at the end of balloon expansion, immediately after balloon deflation, and then 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after. ER ranged from 1.54%+/-0.81% (Bestent BES 15) to 16.51%+/-2.89% (Paragon stent) without stress (P<0.01) and from 2.35%+/-1.14% (Bestent BES 15) to 18.34%+/-2.41% (Cook GR2) under 0.2-bar pressure (P<0.0001). Furthermore, there was a significant reduction between the mean result of tubular stents (TS) and coil stents (CS). The results of in vitro mechanical tests may confirm strongly the interest of a minimum ER in the prevention of the 6-month restenosis. PMID:10816295

  10. Fast thermometry for trapped atoms using recoil-induced resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Su, Dian-Qiang; Ji, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Shan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-09-01

    We have employed recoil-induced resonance (RIR) with linewidth on the order of 10 kHz to demonstrate the fast thermometry for ultracold atoms. We theoretically calculate the absorption spectrum of RIR which agrees well with the experimental results. The temperature of the ultracold sample derived from the RIR spectrum is T = 84±4.5 μK, which is close to 85 μK that measured by the method of time-of-flight absorption imaging. To exhibit the fast measurement advantage in applying RIR to the ultracold atom thermometry, we study the dependence of ultracold sample temperature on the trapping beam frequency detuning. This method can be applied to determine the translational temperature of molecules in photoassociation dynamics. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275209, 11304189, 61378015, and 11434007), and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (Grant No. IRT13076).

  11. Superconducting Nuclear Recoil Sensor for Directional Dark Matter Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann; Baldwin, Kevin; Hehlen, Markus; Lafler, Randy; Loomba, Dinesh; Phan, Nguyen; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina

    The Universe consists of 72% dark energy, 23% dark matter and only 5% of ordinary matter. One of the greatest challenges of the scientific community is to understand the nature of dark matter. Current models suggest that dark matter is made up of slowly moving, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). But detecting WIMPs is challenging, as their expected signals are small and rare compared to the large background that can mimic the signal. The largest and most robust unique signature that sets them apart from other particles is the day-night variation of the directionality of dark matter on Earth. This modulation could be observed with a direction-sensitive detector and hence, would provide an unambiguous signature for the galactic origin of WIMPs. There are many studies underway to attempt to detect WIMPs both directly and indirectly, but solid-state WIMP detectors are widely unexplored although they would present many advantages to prevalent detectors that use large volumes of low pressure gas. We present first results of a novel multi-layered architecture, in which WIMPs would interact primarily with solid layers to produce nuclear recoils that then induce measureable voltage pulses in adjacent superconductor layers. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  12. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  13. Further insights into the proton spin with the new HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vilardi, I.

    2007-11-19

    The HERMES experiment, installed in the 27.5 GeV HERA lepton ring at DESY/Hamburg, is used to study the spin structure of the nucleon. To get information about the orbital angular momentum L{sub q} of quarks, exclusive DIS reactions are investigated. The HERMES Collaboration installed a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the existing spectrometer to improve the study of hard exclusive processes, detecting recoil protons with low momentum. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering is the main process to be studied. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three subcomponents inside a superconducting magnet that provides a longitudinal superconducting magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was installed in January 2006 and commissioning started in February. First results from the detector will be presented.

  14. Element-specific recoil loops in Sm-Co/Fe exchange-spring magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.; Jiang, J. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Bader, S. D.; Liu, J. P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Texas at Arlington

    2008-04-01

    In two-phase nanocomposite magnets, open recoil loops have shown to be sensitive to interphase interfacial conditions and have been often used to characterize the interphase exchange coupling. Typically, the open recoil loops are attributed to the soft phase volume that is decoupled from the hard phase. Our element-specific magnetic measurements on bilayer Sm-Co/Fe exchange-spring magnets reveal that open recoil loops are present not only in the soft Fe layer but also in the hard Sm-Co layer and that the Fe- and Sm-specific remanence curves are similar to each other. The experimental results and micromagnetic modeling reveal that the observed open recoil loops can originate from the anisotropy variations in the hard Sm-Co layer.

  15. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  16. Investigation on modeling and controability of a magnetorheological gun recoil damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongsheng; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiong; Qian, Suxiang; Li, Yancheng

    2009-07-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid as a new smart material has done well in the vibration and impact control engineering fields because of its good electromechanical coupling characteristics, preferable dynamic performance and higher sensitivity. And success of MRF has been apparent in many engineering applied fields, such as semi-active suspension, civil engineering, etc. So far, little research has been done about MR damper applied into the weapon system. Its primary purpose of this study is to identify its dynamic performance and controability of the artillery recoil mechanism equipped with MR damper. Firstly, based on the traditional artillery recoil mechanism, a recoil dynamic model is developed in order to obtain an ideal rule between recoil force and its stroke. Then, its effects of recoil resistance on the stability and firing accuracy of artillery are explored. Because MR gun recoil damper under high impact load shows a typical nonlinear character and there exists a shear-thinning phenomenon, to establish an accurate dynamic model has been a seeking aim of its design and application for MR damper under high impact load. Secondly, in this paper, considering its actual bearing load, an inertia factor was introduced to Herschel-Bulkley model, and some factor's effect on damping force are simulated and analyzed by using numerical simulation, including its dynamic performance under different flow coefficients and input currents. Finally, both of tests with the fixed current and different On-Off control algorithms have been done to confirm its controability of MR gun recoil damper under high impact load. Experimental results show its dynamic performances of the large-scale single-ended MR gun recoil damper can be changed by altering the applied currents and it has a good controllability.

  17. Acute stent recoil in the left main coronary artery treated with additional stenting.

    PubMed

    Battikh, Kais; Rihani, Riadh; Lemahieu, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of acute stent recoil occurring after the stenting of an ostial left main coronary artery lesion. The marked recoil after high-pressure balloon inflation confirmed that the radial force of the first stent was unable to ensure vessel patency. The addition of a second stent provided the necessary support to achieve a good final result. This case illustrates a possible complication of aorto-ostial angioplasty that could be treated with double stenting. PMID:12499528

  18. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  19. Influence of elastic recoil on restenosis after successful coronary angioplasty in unstable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Ardissino, D; Di Somma, S; Kubica, J; Barberis, P; Merlini, P A; Eleuteri, E; De Servi, S; Bramucci, E; Specchia, G; Montemartini, C

    1993-03-15

    The elastic behavior of the dilated coronary vessel has been reported to affect the immediate results of coronary angioplasty. To determine whether elastic recoil may also influence the long-term restenosis process, 98 consecutive patients with unstable angina and 1-vessel disease were studied. An automated coronary quantitative program was used for the assessment of balloon and coronary luminal diameters. Elastic recoil was defined as the percent reduction between minimal balloon diameter at the highest inflation pressure and minimal lesion diameter immediately after coronary angioplasty. Follow-up coronary arteriography was performed 8 to 12 months after the procedure in all patients. The mean elastic recoil averaged 17.7 +/- 16% and was correlated to the degree of residual stenosis immediately after coronary angioplasty (r = 0.64; p < 0.001). Restenosis, defined as > 50% diameter stenosis at follow-up, developed in 53 patients (54%). There was no correlation between the degree of elastic recoil and the changes in minimal lesion diameter observed during follow-up, whereas a positive correlation between the amount of elastic recoil and the incidence of restenosis was documented (r = 0.84; p < 0.05). Thus, the elastic properties of the dilated vessel do not influence the active process of restenosis. However, because elastic recoil negatively influences the initial results of angioplasty, it is more likely that further reductions in lumen diameter during follow-up can reach a threshold of obstruction considered critical for a binary definition of restenosis. PMID:8447261

  20. Scalable synthesis of core-shell structured SiOx/nitrogen-doped carbon composite as a high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lu; Wang, Weikun; Wang, Anbang; Yuan, Keguo; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Yusheng

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel core-shell structured SiOx/nitrogen-doped carbon composite has been prepared by simply dispersing the SiOx particles, which are synthesized by a thermal evaporation method from an equimolar mixture of Si and SiO2, into the dopamine solution, followed by a carbonization process. The SiOx core is well covered by the conformal and homogeneous nitrogen-doped carbon layer from the pyrolysis of polydopamine. By contrast with the bare SiOx, the electrochemical performance of the as-prepared core-shell structured SiOx/nitrogen-doped carbon composite has been improved significantly. It delivers a reversible capacity of 1514 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and 933 mA h g-1 at 2 A g-1, much higher than those of commercial graphite anodes. The nitrogen-doped carbon layer ensures the excellent electrochemical performance of the SiOx/C composite. In addition, since dopamine can self-polymerize and coat virtually any surface, this versatile, facile and highly efficient coating process may be widely applicable to obtain various composites with uniform nitrogen-doped carbon coating layer.

  1. Control of ion content and nitrogen species using a mixed chemistry plasma for GaN grown at extremely high growth rates >9 μm/h by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Clinton, Evan A.; Merola, Joseph J.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Bresnahan, Rich C.

    2015-10-21

    Utilizing a modified nitrogen plasma source, plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been used to achieve higher growth rates in GaN. A higher conductance aperture plate, combined with higher nitrogen flow and added pumping capacity, resulted in dramatically increased growth rates up to 8.4 μm/h using 34 sccm of N{sub 2} while still maintaining acceptably low operating pressure. It was further discovered that argon could be added to the plasma gas to enhance growth rates up to 9.8 μm/h, which was achieved using 20 sccm of N{sub 2} and 7.7 sccm Ar flows at 600 W radio frequency power, for which the standard deviation of thickness was just 2% over a full 2 in. diameter wafer. A remote Langmuir style probe employing the flux gauge was used to indirectly measure the relative ion content in the plasma. The use of argon dilution at low plasma pressures resulted in a dramatic reduction of the plasma ion current by more than half, while high plasma pressures suppressed ion content regardless of plasma gas chemistry. Moreover, different trends are apparent for the molecular and atomic nitrogen species generated by varying pressure and nitrogen composition in the plasma. Argon dilution resulted in nearly an order of magnitude achievable growth rate range from 1 μm/h to nearly 10 μm/h. Even for films grown at more than 6 μm/h, the surface morphology remained smooth showing clear atomic steps with root mean square roughness less than 1 nm. Due to the low vapor pressure of Si, Ge was explored as an alternative n-type dopant for high growth rate applications. Electron concentrations from 2.2 × 10{sup 16} to 3.8 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} were achieved in GaN using Ge doping, and unintentionally doped GaN films exhibited low background electron concentrations of just 1–2 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. The highest growth rates resulted in macroscopic surface features due to Ga cell spitting, which is an engineering challenge still to be

  2. Control of ion content and nitrogen species using a mixed chemistry plasma for GaN grown at extremely high growth rates >9 μm/h by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Clinton, Evan A.; Merola, Joseph J.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Bresnahan, Rich C.

    2015-10-01

    Utilizing a modified nitrogen plasma source, plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been used to achieve higher growth rates in GaN. A higher conductance aperture plate, combined with higher nitrogen flow and added pumping capacity, resulted in dramatically increased growth rates up to 8.4 μm/h using 34 sccm of N2 while still maintaining acceptably low operating pressure. It was further discovered that argon could be added to the plasma gas to enhance growth rates up to 9.8 μm/h, which was achieved using 20 sccm of N2 and 7.7 sccm Ar flows at 600 W radio frequency power, for which the standard deviation of thickness was just 2% over a full 2 in. diameter wafer. A remote Langmuir style probe employing the flux gauge was used to indirectly measure the relative ion content in the plasma. The use of argon dilution at low plasma pressures resulted in a dramatic reduction of the plasma ion current by more than half, while high plasma pressures suppressed ion content regardless of plasma gas chemistry. Moreover, different trends are apparent for the molecular and atomic nitrogen species generated by varying pressure and nitrogen composition in the plasma. Argon dilution resulted in nearly an order of magnitude achievable growth rate range from 1 μm/h to nearly 10 μm/h. Even for films grown at more than 6 μm/h, the surface morphology remained smooth showing clear atomic steps with root mean square roughness less than 1 nm. Due to the low vapor pressure of Si, Ge was explored as an alternative n-type dopant for high growth rate applications. Electron concentrations from 2.2 × 1016 to 3.8 × 1019 cm-3 were achieved in GaN using Ge doping, and unintentionally doped GaN films exhibited low background electron concentrations of just 1-2 × 1015 cm-3. The highest growth rates resulted in macroscopic surface features due to Ga cell spitting, which is an engineering challenge still to be addressed. Nonetheless, the dramatically enhanced growth rates demonstrate

  3. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  4. MucR Is Required for Transcriptional Activation of Conserved Ion Transporters to Support Nitrogen Fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii in Soybean Nodules.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Wu, Li Juan; Zhang, Biliang; Hu, Yue; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Guo, Hui Juan; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Xin; Zhang, Ziding; Tian, Chang Fu

    2016-05-01

    To achieve effective symbiosis with legume, rhizobia should fine-tune their background regulation network in addition to activating key genes involved in nodulation (nod) and nitrogen fixation (nif). Here, we report that an ancestral zinc finger regulator, MucR1, other than its paralog, MucR2, carrying a frameshift mutation, is essential for supporting nitrogen fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU45436 within soybean nodules. In contrast to the chromosomal mucR1, mucR2 is located on symbiosis plasmid, indicating its horizontal transfer potential. A MucR2 homolog lacking the frameshift mutation, such as the one from S. fredii NGR234, can complement phenotypic defects of the mucR1 mutant of CCBAU45436. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the MucR1 regulon of CCBAU45436 within nodules exhibits significant difference compared with that of free-living cells. MucR1 is required for active expression of transporters for phosphate, zinc, and elements essential for nitrogenase activity (iron, molybdenum, and sulfur) in nodules but is dispensable for transcription of key genes (nif/fix) involved in nitrogen fixation. Further reverse genetics suggests that S. fredii uses high-affinity transporters to meet the demand for zinc and phosphate within nodules. These findings, together with the horizontal transfer potential of the mucR homolog, imply an intriguing evolutionary role of this ancestral regulator in supporting nitrogen fixation. PMID:26883490

  5. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  6. Friction and Wear Properties of As-deposited and Carbon Ion-implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1994-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 ke V ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2310(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40 percent relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and were properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to 10(exp -8)mm(exp 3)/N-m) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4)mm(exp 3/N-m) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implanation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine- and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7)mm(exp 3/N-m). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the nondiamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6)mm(exp 3)/N-m. Thus, the carbon ion-implanted, fine

  7. Friction and Wear Properties of As-Deposited and Carbon Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 keV ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions per cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40% relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and wear properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to lO(exp -8) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4) mm(exp 7) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implantation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, non-diamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp-1)). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the non-diamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Recoil momentum at a solid surface during developed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, L. I.

    1993-12-01

    The recoil momentum from a laser light pulse in the intensity range 105-107 W/cm2 is experimentally investigated for dielectric and metallic targets as a function of the pressure of the surrounding medium and angle of illumination. An equation with empirical coefficients is obtained for the recoil momentum of illuminated targets. Effects of the screening properties of the erosion jet and the back pressure on the recoil momentum are analyzed as the external pressure is varied.

  9. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  10. Alpha and recoil track detection in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)—Towards a method for in vitro assessment of radiopharmaceuticals internalized in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Myhra, S. Chakalova, R.; Falzone, N.

    2014-03-15

    A method for detection and characterization of single MeV α-particle and recoil tracks in PMMA photoresist by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been demonstrated. The energy deposition along the track is shown to lead to a latent pattern in the resist due to contrast reversal. It has been shown that the pattern, consisting of conical spikes, can be developed by conventional processing as a result of the dissolution rate of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) being greater than that for the modified material in the cylindrical volume of the track core. The spikes can be imaged and counted by routine AFM analysis. Investigations by angular-resolved near-grazing incidence reveal additional tracks that correspond to recoil tracks. The observations have been correlated with modelling, and shown to be in qualitative agreement with prevailing descriptions of collision cascades. The results may be relevant to technologies that are based on detection and characterization of single energetic ions. In particular, the direct visualization of the collision cascade may allow more accurate estimates of the actual interaction volume, which in turn will permit more precise assessment of dose distribution of α-emitting radionuclides used for targeted radiotherapy. The results could also be relevant to other diagnostic or process technologies based on interaction of energetic ions with matter.

  11. Imprints of recoiling massive black holes on the hot gas of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devecchi, B.; Rasia, E.; Dotti, M.; Volonteri, M.; Colpi, M.

    2009-04-01

    Anisotropic gravitational radiation from a coalescing black hole (BH) binary is known to impart recoil velocities of up to ~1000kms-1 to the remnant BH. In this context, we study the motion of a recoiling BH inside a galaxy modelled as a Hernquist sphere, and the signature that the hole imprints on the hot gas, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Ejection of the BH results in a sudden expansion of the gas ending with the formation of a gaseous core, similarly to what is seen for the stars. A cometary tail of particles bound to the BH is initially released along its trail. As the BH moves on a return orbit, a nearly spherical swarm of hot gaseous particles forms at every apocentre: this feature can live up to ~108 years. If the recoil velocity exceeds the sound speed initially, the BH shocks the gas in the form of a Mach cone in density near each supersonic pericentric passage. We find that the X-ray fingerprint of a recoiling BH can be detected in Chandra X-ray maps out to a distance of Virgo. For exceptionally massive BHs, the Mach cone and the wakes can be observed out to a few hundred of milliparsec. The detection of the Mach cone is of twofold importance as it can be a probe of high-velocity recoils, and an assessment of the scatter of the MBH - Mbulge relation at large BH masses.

  12. Measurement of nuclear recoil quenching factors in CaWO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagemann, Th.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Hagn, H.; Jochum, J.; Potzel, W.; Rau, W.; Stark, M.; Westphal, W.

    2006-11-01

    The CRESST experiment, aiming at the direct detection of WIMPs via nuclear recoils, is currently using scintillating CaWO4 crystals. The WIMP-nucleus cross section for elastic scattering as well as the scintillation efficiency differ considerably for recoils from Ca, W and O in these crystals. Therefore a discriminating detector calibration is essential in order to improve WIMP parameter claims. At the tandem accelerator of the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) in Garching, Germany, a neutron scattering facility is operated for the determination of the individual quenching factors (QF) in the bulk of a CaWO4 crystal to better understand the detector response to neutron background and a possible WIMP signal. First measurements at room temperature reveal QF(O) = 7.8 ± 0.3% (recoil energy 1.0-2.2 MeV), QF(Ca) = 6.3 ± 1.6% (recoil energy 0.4-1 MeV), QF(W) < 3.0% (2σ, recoil energy 0.1 MeV).

  13. Amorphous silicon nitride films of different composition deposited at room temperature by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I.V.; Jacobsohn, L.G.; Averitt, R.D.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}:H) films of different compositions (0{<=}x{<=}1.18) were prepared by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The processing gases were silane and nitrogen at a substrate temperature {<=}50 deg. C. The properties of the films were investigated using Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, UV-visible optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies, and nanoindentation. Depending on the value of x, the band gap of the films changes from 1.54 to 4.42 eV, and hardness changes from 11.2 to 15.3 GPa. Changes in the film properties are caused by formation of Si-N bonds and by reducing disorder in the films. It is shown that hard and transparent silicon nitride films can be obtained at room temperature.

  14. Amorphous silicon nitride films of different composition deposited at room temperature by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Averitt, R. D.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) films of different compositions (0<=x<=1.18) were prepared by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The processing gases were silane and nitrogen at a substrate temperature <=50 °C. The properties of the films were investigated using Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, UV-visible optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies, and nanoindentation. Depending on the value of x, the band gap of the films changes from 1.54 to 4.42 eV, and hardness changes from 11.2 to 15.3 GPa. Changes in the film properties are caused by formation of Si-N bonds and by reducing disorder in the films. It is shown that hard and transparent silicon nitride films can be obtained at room temperature.

  15. NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays grown on flexible nitrogen-doped carbon foams as three-dimensional binder-free integrated anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Songmei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei

    2016-02-14

    Binary metal sulfides, especially NiCo2S4, hold great promise as anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries because of their excellent electronic conductivity and high capacity compared to mono-metal sulfides and oxides. Here, NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays are successfully grown on flexible nitrogen-doped carbon foam (NDCF) substrates with robust adhesion via a facile surfactant-assisted hydrothermal route and the subsequent sulfurization treatment. The obtained NiCo2S4/NDCF composites show unique three-dimensional architectures, in which NiCo2S4 nanotubes of ∼5 μm in length and 100 nm in width are uniformly grown on the NDCF skeletons to form arrays. When used directly as integrated anodes for lithium-ion batteries without any conductive additives and binders, the NiCo2S4/NDCF composites exhibit a high reversible capacity of 1721 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 500 mA g(-1), enhanced cycling performance with the capacity maintained at 1182 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles, and a remarkable rate capability. The excellent lithium storage performances of the composites could be attributed to the unique material composition, a rationally designed hollow nanostructure and an integrated smart architecture, which offer fast electron transport and ion diffusion, enhanced material/-electrolyte contact area and facile accommodation of strains during the lithium insertion and extraction process. PMID:26796603

  16. Enhanced visible-light absorption of mesoporous TiO2 by co-doping with transition-metal/nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, John; Bi, Zhonghe; Bridges, Craig A; Kidder, Michelle; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (IV) oxide, TiO2, has been the object of intense scrutiny for energy applications. TiO2 is inexpensive, non-toxic, and has excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to electrolytes. A major drawback preventing the widespread use TiO2 for photolysis is its relatively large band gap of ~3eV. Only light with wavelengths shorter than 400 nm, which is in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, has sufficient energy to be absorbed. Less than 14 percent of the solar irradiation reaching the earth s surface has energy exceeding this band gap. Adding dopants such as transition metals has long been used to reduce the gap and increase photocatalytic activity by accessing the visible part of the solar spectrum. The degree to which the band gap is reduced using transition metals depends in part on the overlap of the d-orbitals of the transition metals with the oxygen p-orbitals. Therefore, doping with anions such as nitrogen to modify the cation-anion orbital overlap is another approach to reduce the gap. Recent studies suggest that using a combination of transition metals and nitrogen as dopants is more effective at introducing intermediate states within the band gap, effectively narrowing it. Here we report the synthesis of mesoporous TiO2 spheres, co-doped with transition metals and nitrogen that exhibit a nearly flat absorbance response across the visible spectrum extending into the near infrared.

  17. Experimental Concept for a Precision Measurement of Nuclear Recoil Ionization Yields for Low Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the response of dark matter detectors at the lowest recoil energies is important for correctly interpreting data from current experiments or predicting the sensitivity of future experiments to low mass weakly interacting massive particles. In particular, the ionization yield is essential for determining the correct recoil energy of candidate nuclear recoil events; however, few measurements in cryogenic crystals exist below 1 keV. Using the voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection technique with a mono-energetic neutron source, we show that it is possible to determine the ionization yield in cryogenic crystals down to an energy to 100 eV. This measurement will also determine the statistics of ionization production at these low energies.

  18. Recoiling black holes: prospects for detection and implications of spin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Sijacki, Debora; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Springel, Volker; Snyder, Gregory; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Supermassive black hole (BH) mergers produce powerful gravitational wave emission. Asymmetry in this emission imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which can eject the BH from its host galaxy altogether. Recoiling BHs could be observed as offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Several candidates have been identified, but systematic searches have been hampered by large uncertainties regarding their observability. By extracting merging BHs and host galaxy properties from the Illustris cosmological simulations, we have developed a comprehensive model for recoiling AGN. Here, for the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. For randomly oriented spins, ≲ 10 spatially offset AGN may be detectable in Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmological Evolution Survey, and >103 could be found with the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), Euclid, and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Nearly a thousand velocity offset AGN are predicted within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint; the rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. None the less, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.

  19. Recoil polarization and beam-recoil double polarization measurement of eta electroproduction on the proton in the region of the S11(1535) resonance.

    PubMed

    Merkel, H; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Cheymol, B; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Fonvieille, H; Friedrich, J; Janssens, P; Makek, M; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Sirca, S; Tiator, L; Walcher, Th; Weinriefer, M

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P(x')(h) and P(z')(h) and the recoil polarization P(y') were measured for the first time for the p(e,e'p)eta reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q(2) = 0.1 GeV(2)/c(2) and a center of mass production angle of theta = 120 degrees at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  20. Radiation Recoil Effects on the Dynamical Evolution of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desiree

    The Yarkovsky effect is a radiation recoil force that results in a semimajor axis drift in the orbit that can cause Main Belt asteroids to be delivered to powerful resonances from which they could be transported to Earth-crossing orbits. This force depends on the spin state of the object, which is modified by the YORP effect, a variation of the Yarkovsky effect that results in a torque that changes the spin rate and the obliquity. Extensive analyses of the basic behavior of the YORP effect have been previously conducted in the context of the classical spin state evolution of rigid bodies (YORP cycle). However, the YORP effect has an extreme sensitivity to the topography of the asteroids and a minor change in the shape of an aggregate asteroid can stochastically change the YORP torques. Here we present the results of the first simulations that self-consistently model the YORP effect on the spin states of dynamically evolving aggregates. For these simulations we have developed several algorithms and combined them with two codes, TACO and pkdgrav. TACO is a thermophysical asteroid code that models the surface of an asteroid using a triangular facet representation and which can compute the YORP torques. The code pkdgrav is a cosmological N-body tree code modified to simulate the dynamical evolution of asteroids represented as aggregates of spheres using gravity and collisions. The continuous changes in the shape of an aggregate result in a different evolution of the YORP torques and therefore aggregates do not evolve through the YORP cycle as a rigid body would. Instead of having a spin evolution ruled by long periods of rotational acceleration and deceleration as predicted by the classical YORP cycle, the YORP effect is self-limiting and stochastic on aggregate asteroids. We provide a statistical description of the spin state evolution which lays out the foundation for new simulations of a coupled Yarkovsky/YORP evolution. Both self-limiting YORP and to a lesser

  1. Discrimination of nuclear and electronic recoil events using plasma effect in germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Liu, J.; Mei, D.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a new method of using the plasma time difference, which results from the plasma effect, between the nuclear and electronic recoil events in high-purity germanium detectors to distinguish these two types of events in the search for rare physics processes. The physics mechanism of the plasma effect is discussed in detail. A numerical model is developed to calculate the plasma time for nuclear and electronic recoils at various energies in germanium detectors. It can be shown that under certain conditions the plasma time difference is large enough to be observable. The experimental aspects in realizing such a discrimination in germanium detectors is discussed.

  2. One-pot green synthesis of oxygen-rich nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and their potential application in pH-sensitive photoluminescence and detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingfang; Zhang, Liangliang; Lan, Chuanqing; Zhao, Jingjin; Su, Yubin; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen doping has been a powerful method to modulate the properties of carbon materials for various applications, and N-doped graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have gained remarkable interest because of their unique chemical, electronic, and optical properties. Herein, we introduce a facile one-pot solid-phase synthesis strategy for N-doped GQDs using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source and 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) as the N source. The as-prepared N-GQDs with oxygen-rich functional groups are uniform with an average diameter of 12.5 nm. Because of the introduction of nitrogen atoms, N-GQDs exhibit excitation-wavelength-independent fluorescence with the maximum emission at 445 nm, and a high quantum yield of 18% is achieved at an excitation wavelength of 346 nm. Furthermore, a highly efficient fluorosensor based on the as-prepared N-GQDs was developed for the detection of Hg(2+) because of the effective quenching effect of metal ions via nonradiative electron transfer. This fluorosensor exhibits high sensitivity toward Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 8.6 nM. The selectivity experiments reveal that the fluorescent sensor is specific for Hg(2+). Most importantly, the practical use of the sensor based on N-GQDs for Hg(2+) detection was successfully demonstrated in river-water samples. PMID:26003702

  3. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  4. Nitrogen-Doped Ordered Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanofibers as Anode Materials for High Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Xiaowu; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers (N-MTO) have been fabricated by electrospinning and subsequent nitridation treatment. The N-doping in TiO2 leads to the formation of Ti(3+) , resulting in the improved electron conductivity of TiO2 . In addition, one-dimensional (1D) N-MTO nanostructure possesses very short diffusion length of Na(+) /e(-) in N-MTO, easy access of electrolyte, and high conductivity transport of electrons along the percolating fibers. The N-MTO shows excellent sodium storage performance. PMID:27185585

  5. Boron and Nitrogen Codoped Carbon Layers of LiFePO4 Improve the High-Rate Electrochemical Performance for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinli; Nie, Ning; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiao; Yu, Feng; Gu, Junjie; Li, Wei

    2015-09-16

    An evolutionary composite of LiFePO4 with nitrogen and boron codoped carbon layers was prepared by processing hydrothermal-synthesized LiFePO4. This novel codoping method is successfully applied to LiFePO4 for commercial use, and it achieved excellent electrochemical performance. The electrochemical performance can be improved through single nitrogen doping (LiFePO4/C-N) or boron doping (LiFePO4/C-B). When modifying the LiFePO4/C-B with nitrogen (to synthesis LiFePO4/C-B+N) the undesired nonconducting N-B configurations (190.1 and 397.9 eV) are generated. This decreases the electronic conductivity from 2.56×10(-2) to 1.30×10(-2) S cm(-1) resulting in weak electrochemical performance. Nevertheless, using the opposite order to decorate LiFePO4/C-N with boron (to obtain LiFePO4/C-N+B) not only eliminates the nonconducting N-B impurity, but also promotes the conductive C-N (398.3, 400.3, and 401.1 eV) and C-B (189.5 eV) configurations-this markedly improves the electronic conductivity to 1.36×10(-1) S cm(-1). Meanwhile the positive doping strategy leads to synergistic electrochemical activity distinctly compared with single N- or B-doped materials (even much better than their sum capacity at 20 C). Moreover, due to the electron and hole-type carriers donated by nitrogen and boron atoms, the N+B codoped carbon coating tremendously enhances the electrochemical property: at the rate of 20 C, the codoped sample can elevate the discharge capacity of LFP/C from 101.1 mAh g(-1) to 121.6 mAh g(-1), and the codoped product based on commercial LiFePO4/C shows a discharge capacity of 78.4 mAh g(-1) rather than 48.1 mAh g(-1). Nevertheless, the B+N codoped sample decreases the discharge capacity of LFP/C from 101.1 mAh g(-1) to 95.4 mAh g(-1), while the commercial LFP/C changes from 48.1 mAh g(-1) to 40.6 mAh g(-1). PMID:26305802

  6. Effects of molecular rotation after ionization and prior to fragmentation on observed recoil-frame photoelectron angular distributions in the dissociative photoionization of nonlinear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Domínguez, Jesús A.; Lucchese, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental angle-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments measure photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in dissociative photoionization (DPI) in the reference frame provided by the momenta of the emitted heavy fragments. By extension of the nomenclature used with DPI of diatomic molecules, we refer to such a PAD as a recoil-frame PAD (RFPAD). When the dissociation is fast compared to molecular rotational and bending motions, the emission directions of the heavy fragments can be used to determine the orientation of the bonds that are broken in the DPI at the time of the ionization, which is known as the axial-recoil approximation (ARA). When the ARA is valid, the RFPADs correspond to molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) when the momenta of a sufficient number of the heavy fragments are determined. When only two fragments are formed, the experiment cannot measure the orientation of the fragments about the recoil axes so that the resulting measured PAD is an azimuthally averaged RFPAD (AA-RFPAD). In this study we consider how the breakdown of the ARA due to rotation will modify the observed RFPADs for DPI processes in nonlinear molecules for ionization by light of arbitrary polarization. This model is applied to the core C 1 s DPI of CH4, with the results compared to experimental measurements and previous theoretical calculations done within the ARA. The published results indicate that there is a breakdown in the ARA for two-fragment events where the heavy-fragment kinetic energy release was less than 9 eV. Including the breakdown of the ARA due to rotation in our calculations gives very good agreement with the experimental AA-RFPAD, leading to an estimate of upper bounds on the predissociative lifetimes as a function of the kinetic energy release of the intermediate ion states formed in the DPI process.

  7. Recoil spectrometer for the detection of single atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiorso, A.

    1987-04-01

    A much improved version of our gas-filled spectrometer for heavy-ion-induced fusion reactions is described. This instrument (SASSY II) is of the type D-Q-D wherein the dipoles are made with strong vertically-focussing gradients. The problems associated with experiments with cross sections in the picobarn range are discussed. In such experiments, it is necessary to identify single atoms with a high degree of confidence.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Their Ions. 7; Phenazine, a Dual Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattioda, A. L.; Hudgins, D. M.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The matrix-isolation technique has been employed to measure the mid-infrared spectra of phenazine (C12H8N2), a dual substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycle (PANH), in the neutral, cationic and anionic forms. The experimentally measured band frequencies and intensities are tabulated and compared with their calculated values as well as those of the non-substituted parent molecule, anthracene. The theoretical band positions and intensities were calculated using both the 3-31 G as well as the larger 6-3lG* Basis Sets. A comparison of the results can be found in the tables. The spectroscopic properties of phenazine and its cation are similar to those observed in mono-substituted PANHs, with one exception. The presence of a second nitrogen atom results in an additional enhancement of the cation's total integrated intensity, for the 1500-1000 cm(sup -1) (6.7 to 10 micron) region, over that observed for a mono-substituted PANH cation. The significance of this enhancement and the astrobiological implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  10. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  11. Tribological characteristics of nitrogen (N+) implanted iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ferrante, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of implantation of nitrogen ions (1.5 MeV) on the friction and wear characteristics of pure ion sliding against M-50 steel (unimplanted) was studied in a pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus. Test conditions included room temperature (25 C), a dry air atmosphere, a load of 1/2 kg (4.9 N), sliding velocities of 0.043 to 0.078 m/sec (15 to 25 rpm), a pure hydrocarbon lubricant (n-hexadecane), or a U.S.P. mineral oil and nitrogen ion implantation doses of 5x10 to the 15th power and 5x10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm. No differences in wear rates were observed in the low dose experiments. In the high dose experiments, small reductions in initial (40 percent) and steady state (20 percent) wear rates were observed for nitrogen implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. No differences in average friction coefficients were noted for either dose. Auger electron spectroscopy combined with argon ion bombardment revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 6 atomic percent at a depth of 0.8 microns. Similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration. No inward migration of nitrogen ions was observed. Previously announced in STAR as N82-24322

  12. Tribological characteristics of nitrogen (N+) implanted iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Ferrante, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of implantation of nitrogen ions (1.5 MeV) on the friction and wear characteristics of pure ion sliding against M-50 steel (unimplanted) was studied in a pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus. Test conditions included room temperature (25 C), a dry air atmosphere, a load of 1/2 kg (4.9 N), sliding velocities of 0.043 to 0.078 m/sec (15 to 25 rpm), a pure hydrocarbon lubricant (n-hexadecane), or a U.S.P. mineral oil and nitrogen ion implantation doses of 5x10 to the 15th power and 5x10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm. No differences in wear rates were observed in the low dose experiments. In the high dose experiments, small reductions in initial (40 percent) and steady state (20 percent) wear rates were observed for nitrogen implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. No differences in average friction coefficients were noted for either dose. Auger electron spectroscopy combined with argon ion bombardment revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 6 atomic percent at a depth of 0.8 microns. Similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration. No inward migration of nitrogen ions was observed.

  13. Low energy nuclear recoils study in noble liquids for low-mass WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    Detector response to low-energy nuclear recoils is critical to the detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPs (Weakly interacting massive particles). Although the detector response to the processes of low-energy nuclear recoils is subtle and direct experimental calibration is rather difficult, many studies have been performed for noble liquids, NEST is a good example. However, the response of low-energy nuclear recoils, as a critical issue, needs more experimental data, in particular, with presence of electric field. We present a new design using time of flight to calibrate the large-volume xenon detector, such as LUX-Zeplin (LZ) and Xenon1T, energy scale for low-energy nuclear recoils. The calculation and physics models will be discussed based on the available data to predict the performance of the calibration device and set up criteria for the design of the device. A small test bench is built to verify the concepts at The University of South Dakota. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  14. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  15. Sound production by a recoiling system in the pempheridae and terapontidae.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Eric; Fine, Michael L; Mok, Hin-Kiu

    2016-06-01

    Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon jarbua and Pelates quadrilineatus. All sonic mechanisms are built on the same structures. The rostral part of the swimbladder is connected to a pair of large sonic muscles from the head whereas the posterior part is fused with bony widenings of vertebral bodies. Two bladder regions are separated by a stretchable fenestra that allows forward extension of the anterior bladder during muscle contraction. A recoiling apparatus runs between the inner face of the anterior swimbladder and a vertebral body expansion. The elastic nature of the recoiling apparatus supports its role in helping the swimbladder to recover its initial position during sonic muscle relaxation. This system should aid fast contraction (between 100 and 250Hz) of sonic muscles. There are many differences between species in terms of the swimbladder and its attachments to the vertebral column, muscle origins, and morphology of the recoiling apparatus. The recoiling apparatus found in the phylogenetically-related families (Glaucosomatidae, Pempheridae, Terapontidae) could indicate a new character within the Percomorpharia. J. Morphol. 277:717-724, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27021214

  16. Mass calibration of the energy axis in ToF-E elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meersschaut, J.; Laricchiuta, G.; Sajavaara, T.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-03-01

    We report on procedures that we have developed to mass-calibrate the energy axis of ToF-E histograms in elastic recoil detection analysis. The obtained calibration parameters allow one to transform the ToF-E histogram into a calibrated ToF-M histogram.

  17. Inhibition of aqueous degradation of Y1Ba2Cu3O7 - x high-Tc superconductor by nitrogen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, S. M.; Viswanathan, R.; Bendre, S. T.; Nawale, P. P.; Kanetkar, S. M.; Ogale, S. B.

    1989-11-01

    The influence of 60-keV N+2 ion implantation on the aqueous degradation of the Y1Ba2Cu3O7-x high-Tc superconductor is studied by the small-angle x-ray diffraction technique. Structural depth profiling is performed by registering the x-ray data at several small angles of incidence between 0.3° and 10.0° within Seeman-Bohlin geometry. Examination of samples implanted at a dose value of 3×1017 ions/cm2 and subjected to different aqueous treatments reveals that implantation arrests the degradation process and imparts structural stability to the superconductor. Resistivity temperature data are also provided for specific cases of interest.

  18. Inhibition of aqueous degradation of Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x high- T sub c superconductor by nitrogen ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, S.M.; Viswanathan, R.; Bendre, S.T.; Nawale, P.P.; Kanetkar, S.M.; Ogale, S.B. )

    1989-11-01

    The influence of 60-keV N{sup +}{sub 2} ion implantation on the aqueous degradation of the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor is studied by the small-angle x-ray diffraction technique. Structural depth profiling is performed by registering the x-ray data at several small angles of incidence between 0.3{degree} and 10.0{degree} within Seeman--Bohlin geometry. Examination of samples implanted at a dose value of 3{times}10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} and subjected to different aqueous treatments reveals that implantation arrests the degradation process and imparts structural stability to the superconductor. Resistivity temperature data are also provided for specific cases of interest.

  19. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Barbara J; Gowen, Brent E; Robbins, Samantha L

    2010-03-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plant species differ in their prey capture strategies, prey capture rates, and pitcher longevity. In this study, it is investigated whether or not interspecific differences in nutrient sequestration strategy are reflected in the physiology and microstructure of the pitchers themselves. Using a non-invasive technique (MIFE), ion fluxes in pitchers of Nepenthes ampullaria Jack, Nepenthes bicalcarata Hook.f., and Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack were measured. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to characterize the distribution of glandular and other structures on the inner pitcher walls. The results demonstrate that nutrient sequestration strategy is indeed mirrored in pitcher physiology and microstructure. Species producing long-lived pitchers with low prey capture rates (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) showed lower rates of NH(4)(+) uptake than N. rafflesiana, a species producing short-lived pitchers with high capture rates. Crucially, species dependent upon aquatic commensals (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) actively manipulated H(+) fluxes to maintain less acid pitcher fluid than found in 'typical' species; in addition, these species lacked the lunate cells and epicuticular waxes characteristic of 'typical' insectivorous congeners. An unexpected finding was that ion fluxes occurred in the wax-covered, non-glandular zones in N. rafflesiana. The only candidates for active transport of aqueous ions in these zones appear to be the epidermal cells lying beneath the lunate cells, as these are the only sites not visibly coated with epicuticular waxes. PMID:20150519

  1. Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jonathan A.; Hawkins, Barbara J.; Gowen, Brent E.; Robbins, Samantha L.

    2010-01-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plant species differ in their prey capture strategies, prey capture rates, and pitcher longevity. In this study, it is investigated whether or not interspecific differences in nutrient sequestration strategy are reflected in the physiology and microstructure of the pitchers themselves. Using a non-invasive technique (MIFE), ion fluxes in pitchers of Nepenthes ampullaria Jack, Nepenthes bicalcarata Hook.f., and Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack were measured. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to characterize the distribution of glandular and other structures on the inner pitcher walls. The results demonstrate that nutrient sequestration strategy is indeed mirrored in pitcher physiology and microstructure. Species producing long-lived pitchers with low prey capture rates (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) showed lower rates of NH4+ uptake than N. rafflesiana, a species producing short-lived pitchers with high capture rates. Crucially, species dependent upon aquatic commensals (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) actively manipulated H+ fluxes to maintain less acid pitcher fluid than found in ‘typical’ species; in addition, these species lacked the lunate cells and epicuticular waxes characteristic of ‘typical’ insectivorous congeners. An unexpected finding was that ion fluxes occurred in the wax-covered, non-glandular zones in N. rafflesiana. The only candidates for active transport of aqueous ions in these zones appear to be the epidermal cells lying beneath the lunate cells, as these are the only sites not visibly coated with epicuticular waxes. PMID:20150519

  2. In situ fabrication of three-dimensional nitrogen and boron co-doped porous carbon nanofibers for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Xia, Guanglin; Guo, Zaiping; Sun, Dalin; Li, Xingguo; Yu, Xuebin

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of three-dimensional porous carbon nanofibers network with high doping level of nitrogen (N, 5.17 at.%) and boron (B, 6.87 at.%) through a general electrospinning strategy followed by a calcination process. The employed ammonia borane (NH3BH3, denote as AB) not only functions as a porogen reagent to generate porous structures but also as the heteroatoms source to induce N and B co-doping. Such highly unique nanoarchitectures offer remarkably improved Li storage performance including high reversible capacity (∼910 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1) with good cycling and rate performances.

  3. Complete and incomplete fusion reactions in the {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm system: Excitation functions and recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Sharma, B.K.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K.S.

    2004-10-01

    With the view to study complete and incomplete fusion in heavy ion induced reactions, experiments have been carried out for measuring excitation functions for several reactions in the system {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm at energies near the Coulomb barrier to well above it, using an activation technique. The measured excitation functions have been compared with those calculated theoretically using three different computer codes viz., ALICE-91, CASCADE and PACE2. The enhancement of experimentally measured cross sections for alpha emission channels over their theoretical prediction has been attributed to the fact that these residues are formed not only by complete fusion but also through incomplete fusion. In order to separate out the relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion, the recoil range distributions of eight residues produced in the interaction of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm at {approx_equal}87 MeV have been measured. The recoil range distributions indicate significant contributions from incomplete fusion at {approx_equal}87 MeV for some of the channels.

  4. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  5. Constraints on the Nature of CID-42: Recoil Kick or Supermassive Black Hole Pair?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. An apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsecscale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity approximately greater than 1300 km s(exp -1). Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk approximately greater than 2000 km s(exp -1)). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton-thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially-resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad and narrow line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  6. Constraints on the nature of CID-42: recoil kick or supermassive black hole pair?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. As an apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsec-scale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity of ≳ 1300 km s-1. Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk ≳ 2000 km s-1). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad-line and narrow-line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  7. Multiscale anode materials in lithium ion batteries by combining micro- with nanoparticles: design of mesoporous TiO2 microfibers@nitrogen doped carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Primc, Darinka; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    TiO2 has been considered as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. However, its poor rate capability originating from the intrinsically low lithium ion diffusivity and its poor electronic conductivity hampers putting such an application into practice. Both issues can be addressed by nanostructure engineering and conductive surface coating. Herein, we report a template-assisted synthesis of micron sized TiO2 fibers consisting of a mesoporous network of anatase nanoparticles of about 7.5 nm and coated by N doped carbon. In a first step, an amorphous layer of TiO2 was deposited on cobalt silicate nanobelts and subsequently transformed into crystalline anatase nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment. The N doped carbon coating was realized by in situ polymerization of dopamine on the crystalline TiO2 followed by annealing under N2. After removal of the template, we obtained the final mesoporous TiO2 fibers@N doped carbon composite. Electrochemical tests revealed that the composite electrode exhibited excellent electrochemical properties in terms of specific capacity, rate performance and long term stability.TiO2 has been considered as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. However, its poor rate capability originating from the intrinsically low lithium ion diffusivity and its poor electronic conductivity hampers putting such an application into practice. Both issues can be addressed by nanostructure engineering and conductive surface coating. Herein, we report a template-assisted synthesis of micron sized TiO2 fibers consisting of a mesoporous network of anatase nanoparticles of about 7.5 nm and coated by N doped carbon. In a first step, an amorphous layer of TiO2 was deposited on cobalt silicate nanobelts and subsequently transformed into crystalline anatase nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment. The N doped carbon coating was realized by in situ polymerization of dopamine on the crystalline TiO2 followed by annealing under N2. After

  8. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haan, S. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Landen, O. L.; Fletcher, K. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ˜300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  9. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2016-07-01

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe2+ and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 + in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe2+ + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe+ and N2 + product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å2 to about 40 Å2 with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe2+ - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies.

  10. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe(2+) + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Hause, Michael L; Prince, Benjamin D; Bemish, Raymond J

    2016-07-28

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe(2+) and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 (+) in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe(2+) + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe(+) and N2 (+) product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å(2) to about 40 Å(2) with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe(2+) - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies. PMID:27475363

  11. Multiscale anode materials in lithium ion batteries by combining micro- with nanoparticles: design of mesoporous TiO2 microfibers@nitrogen doped carbon composites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Primc, Darinka; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-09-01

    TiO2 has been considered as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. However, its poor rate capability originating from the intrinsically low lithium ion diffusivity and its poor electronic conductivity hampers putting such an application into practice. Both issues can be addressed by nanostructure engineering and conductive surface coating. Herein, we report a template-assisted synthesis of micron sized TiO2 fibers consisting of a mesoporous network of anatase nanoparticles of about 7.5 nm and coated by N doped carbon. In a first step, an amorphous layer of TiO2 was deposited on cobalt silicate nanobelts and subsequently transformed into crystalline anatase nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment. The N doped carbon coating was realized by in situ polymerization of dopamine on the crystalline TiO2 followed by annealing under N2. After removal of the template, we obtained the final mesoporous TiO2 fibers@N doped carbon composite. Electrochemical tests revealed that the composite electrode exhibited excellent electrochemical properties in terms of specific capacity, rate performance and long term stability. PMID:26220269

  12. Nano electrochemical reactors of Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in shells of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fangcai; He, Mengni; Yang, Yang; Chen, Qianwang

    2015-02-01

    Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in nitrogen-doped hollow carbon sphere shells (Fe2O3@N-C) by the direct pyrolysis of Fe-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (Fe-ZIF) at 620 °C in air. As an anode material for LIBs, the capacity retained was 1573 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 0.1 C (1 C = 1000 mA g-1). Even undergoing the high-rate capability test twice, it can still deliver a remarkably reversible and stable capacity of 1142 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the unique structure of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the shell of nitrogen-doped carbon spheres, which simultaneously solve the major problems of pulverization, facilitate rapid electrochemical kinetics, and effectively avoid the aggregation of Fe2O3 nanoparticles during de/lithiation. The novel method developed in this work for the synthesis of functional hybrid materials can be extended to the preparation of various MOFs-derived functional nanocomposites owing to the versatility of links and metal centers in MOFs.Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles

  13. One-step Synthesis of Highly Luminescent Nitrogen-doped Carbon Dots for Selective and Sensitive Detection of Mercury(II) Ions and Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Liao, Mei; He, Xueling; Liu, Xia; Kou, Xingming; Xiao, Dan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with high quantum yield (QY) of 40.5% were prepared through a facile and straightforward hydrothermal route. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited excellent photoluminescence properties, good water-solublity and photostability, negligible cytotoxicity and favourable biocompatibility. Such N-CDs were found to serve as an effective fluorescent sensor for selective and sensitive detection of Hg(2+) in a wide linear response concentration range of 0 - 8 μM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.087 μM and could be applied to the determination of Hg(2+) in environmental water samples. The corresponding mechanisms were discussed in detail. Moreover, another attractive finding was that the N-CDs showed satisfactory performance in bioimaging before and after the addition of Hg(2+) in human lung cancer PC14 cells. With excellent sensitivity, selectivity and biocompatibility, such cheap carbonmaterials are potentially suitable for monitoring of Hg(2+) in environmental applications and promising for biological applications. PMID:26460360

  14. Nano electrochemical reactors of Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in shells of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fangcai; He, Mengni; Yang, Yang; Chen, Qianwang

    2015-02-28

    Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in nitrogen-doped hollow carbon sphere shells (Fe2O3@N-C) by the direct pyrolysis of Fe-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (Fe-ZIF) at 620 °C in air. As an anode material for LIBs, the capacity retained was 1573 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles at a current density of 0.1 C (1 C = 1000 mA g(-1)). Even undergoing the high-rate capability test twice, it can still deliver a remarkably reversible and stable capacity of 1142 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the unique structure of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the shell of nitrogen-doped carbon spheres, which simultaneously solve the major problems of pulverization, facilitate rapid electrochemical kinetics, and effectively avoid the aggregation of Fe2O3 nanoparticles during de/lithiation. The novel method developed in this work for the synthesis of functional hybrid materials can be extended to the preparation of various MOFs-derived functional nanocomposites owing to the versatility of links and metal centers in MOFs. PMID:25631451

  15. Modeling and Measurement of 39Ar Recoil Loss From Biotite as a Function of Grain Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, J. H.; Nomade, S.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    The call for age measurements with less than 1 per mil error puts a demand upon geochronologists to be aware of and quantify a number of problems which were previously negligible. One such factor is 39Ar recoil loss during sample irradiation, a phenomenon which is widely assumed to affect only unusually small crystals having exceptionally high surface/volume ratios. This phenomenon has important implications for thermochronologic studies seeking to exploit a range of closure temperatures arising from variable diffusion radii. Our study focuses on biotite, in which spatial isotope distributions cannot be reliably recovered by stepwise heating and which therefore lack recoil-diagnostic age spectrum behavior. Previous work by Renne et al. [Application of a deuteron-deuteron (D-D) neutron generator to 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, Applied Radiation and Isotopes, in press] used the SRIM code to calculate a ˜20% 39Ar recoil loss from the outermost 0.25 μ m of an infinite slab of phyllosillicate. This result is applied to measured grains of the biotite standard GA1550, a hypabyssal granite from the Mount Dromedary Complex, Australia. We measure the thickness and surface area of 166 grains and approximate the shape of each grain as a cylinder. Grain thickness ranges from 3 to 210 μ m, with an average grain radius of 350 μ m. We predict the amount of 39Ar recoil loss from each grain, finding an expected age error >0.1 % for grains thinner than 150 μ m, a >1% error for grain less than 10 μ m thick, and up to a 3% error for grains less than 3 μ m thick. These modeling results will be tested by analysis of the measured grains after irradiation in the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor. It is important to either account for 39Ar loss in thin biotite grains, or use sufficiently thick ones so that recoil loss is negligible. Our results indicate that only biotite grains thicker than 150 μ m should be used for neutron fluence monitoring in order to avoid bias greater than the

  16. Vector correlations in photodissociation of polarized polyatomic molecules beyond the axial recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B; Kuznetsov, Vladislav V; Suits, Arthur G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2011-05-14

    We present the full quantum mechanical theory of the angular momentum distributions of photofragments produced in photolysis of oriented/aligned parent polyatomic molecules beyond the axial recoil limit. This paper generalizes the results of Underwood and Powis(28,29) to the case of non-axial recoil photodissociation of an arbitrary polyatomic molecule. The spherical tensor approach is used throughout this paper. We show that the recoil angular distribution of the angular momentum polarization of each of the photofragments can be presented in a universal spherical tensor form valid for photolysis in diatomic or polyatomic molecules, irrespective of the reaction mechanism. The angular distribution can be written as an expansion over the Wigner D-functions in terms of the set of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(i))(K) (k(d), K(0)) which contain all of the information about the photodissociation dynamics and can be either determined from experiment, or computed from quantum mechanical theory. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that the component q(i) of the initial reagent polarization rank K(i) and the photofragment polarization rank K onto the photofragment recoil direction k is preserved in any photolysis reaction. Both laboratory and body frame expressions for the recoil angle dependence of the photofragment angular momentum polarization are presented. The parent molecule polarization is shown to lead to new terms in the obtained photofragment angular distributions compared with the isotropic case. In particular, the terms with |q(i)| > 2 can appear which are shown to manifest angular momentum helicity non-conservation in the reaction. The expressions for the coefficients c(K(i)q(i))(K) (k(d), K(0)) have been simplified using the quasiclassical approximation in the high-J limit which allows for introducing the dynamical functions and the rotation factors which describe the decreasing of the photofragment

  17. A statistical method to search for recoiling supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffai, P.; Haiman, Z.; Frei, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an observational test for gravitationally recoiling supermassive black holes (BHs) in active galactic nuclei, based on a correlation between the velocities of BHs relative to their host galaxies, |Δv|, and their obscuring dust column densities, Σdust (both measured along the line of sight). We use toy models for the distribution of recoil velocities, BH trajectories, and the geometry of obscuring dust tori in galactic centres, to simulate 2.5 × 105 random observations of recoiling quasars. BHs with recoil velocities comparable to the escape velocity from the galactic centre remain bound to the nucleus, and do not fully settle back to the centre of the torus due to dynamical friction in a typical quasar lifetime. We find that |Δv| and Σdust for these BHs are positively correlated. For obscured (Σdust > 0) and for partially obscured (0 < Σdust ≲ 2.3 g m-2) quasars with |Δv| ≥ 45 km s-1, the sample correlation coefficient between log10(|Δv|) and Σdust is r45 = 0.28 ± 0.02 and r45 = 0.13 ± 0.02, respectively. Allowing for random ± 100 km s- 1 errors in |Δv| unrelated to the recoil dilutes the correlation for the partially obscured quasars to r45 = 0.026 ± 0.004 measured between |Δv| and Σdust. A random sample of ≳ 3500 obscured quasars with |Δv| ≥ 45 km s-1 would allow rejection of the no-correlation hypothesis with 3σ significance 95 per cent of the time. Finally, we find that the fraction of obscured quasars, {F_obs} (|Δv|), decreases with |Δv| from {F_obs} (<10 km s-1) ≳ 0.8 to {F_obs} (>103 km s-1) ≲ 0.4. This predicted trend can be compared to the observed fraction of type II quasars, and can further test combinations of recoil, trajectory, and dust torus models.

  18. Atomistic Simulation of Track Formation by Energetic Recoils in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2010-09-17

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5 to 12.8 keV/nm and radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV/nm, the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission-track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermo-chronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  19. Complexation of nitrogen and sulphur donor Schiff's base ligand to Cr(III) and Ni(II) metal ions: Synthesis, spectroscopic and antipathogenic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Chandra, Sulekh

    2011-01-01

    2,6-Diacetyl pyridine based ligand was synthesized by the reaction of 2,6-diacetyl pyridine with thiocarbohydrazide in presence of acetic acid. The coordination compounds with Cr(III) and Ni(II) metal ions having [Cr(L)X]X 2 and [Ni(L)X]X compositions (where L = ligand and X = NO 3-, Cl - and CH 3COO -) were synthesized and characterized by physicochemical and spectral studies. The studies like elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, UV-Vis, NMR, mass and EPR reveal that the complexes are octahedral. The compounds were examined against the pathogenic fungal and bacterial strains like Alternaria brassicae, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, Xanthomonas compestris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A. niger causes the diseases Apergillosis and Otomycosis in humans.

  20. Soil response to a 3-year increase in temperature and nitrogen deposition measured in a mature boreal forest using ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    D'Orangeville, Loïc; Houle, Daniel; Côté, Benoît; Duchesne, Louis

    2014-12-01

    The projected increase in atmospheric N deposition and air/soil temperature will likely affect soil nutrient dynamics in boreal ecosystems. The potential effects of these changes on soil ion fluxes were studied in a mature balsam fir stand (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill) in Quebec, Canada that was subjected to 3 years of experimentally increased soil temperature (+4 °C) and increased inorganic N concentration in artificial precipitation (three times the current N concentrations using NH4NO3). Soil element fluxes (NO3, NH4, PO4, K, Ca, Mg, SO4, Al, and Fe) in the organic and upper mineral horizons were monitored using buried ion-exchange membranes (PRS™ probes). While N additions did not affect soil element fluxes, 3 years of soil warming increased the cumulative fluxes of K, Mg, and SO4 in the forest floor by 43, 44, and 79 %, respectively, and Mg, SO4, and Al in the mineral horizon by 29, 66, and 23 %, respectively. We attribute these changes to increased rates of soil organic matter decomposition. Significant interactions of the heating treatment with time were observed for most elements although no clear seasonal patterns emerged. The increase in soil K and Mg in heated plots resulted in a significant but small K increase in balsam fir foliage while no change was observed for Mg. A 6-15 % decrease in foliar Ca content with soil warming could be related to the increase in soil-available Al in heated plots, as Al can interfere with the root uptake of Ca. PMID:25139238

  1. Reactivity and chemical characterization of effluent organic nitrogen from wastewater treatment plants determined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mesfioui, Rajaa; Love, Nancy G; Bronk, Deborah A; Mulholland, Margaret R; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2012-03-01

    In advanced wastewater treatment plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen (N) removal, up to one-third of the N in effluent is organic, herein referred to as effluent organic N (EON). While we know that inorganic N is highly labile, it is unclear what fraction of EON is bioavailable. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of a method that can be used to examine the reactivity of EON in natural receiving waters to better understand both the ecosystem response and the potential bioavailability of EON. The technique is suitable for analyzing polar organic matter in natural waters; electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Bioassays were performed on samples collected at the end of the biological process from two wastewater treatment plants achieving advanced N removal. The samples were concentrated, and then added to natural water samples collected from the oligohaline James River, a major tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. Our results demonstrate that while the lignin-like fraction of the effluent dissolved organic matter (some of which contains N) was conserved, a large portion of aliphatic and aromatic compounds containing N was removed (79-100%) during incubations, while other compounds were produced. Furthermore, the two effluents exhibited differences in the degree of degradation and type of degradation, which can be related both to the various processes employed in the two WWTPs and the dramatic differences in the type of influent they received. These findings suggest that EON is highly reactive in the natural environment and that simple assays examining net consumption or production of bulk dissolved organic N pools are inadequate for assessing the bioavailability of EON. PMID:22172558

  2. Surface diagnostics by ion scattering spectroscopy in gaseous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, N. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Sinelnikov, D. N.; Kolodko, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, it is important to perform in-situ analysis of composition and thickness of ultra-thin (∼5-50 Å) surface layers in the course of the surface exposure to plasma or its components. For this aim, a new experimental facility based on the MEPhI Mass Monochromator is being developed, where low and medium energy ion spectroscopy of samples is used just after or during plasma exposure/ion treatment. A differentially pumped energy analyzer is used for recoil ion spectroscopy under grazing incidence conditions in the automated ion mass monochromator. A built-in Penning plasma source is used for plasma/ion treatment of samples. In this paper, the influence of the working gas (during the plasma source operation) on the energy spectra of reflected and recoil ions is studied. It is shown that the peak shape of the energy spectrum of scattered H+ ions increases during gas injection, and, at the same time, the signal intensity of the ionized recoils from the sample decreases. Nevertheless, analysis of the surface composition and thickness of the outer layer could be done at pressures ranging up to 10-4 Torr.

  3. Simulation of ion beam bombardment using Bayfol CR 6-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, S. I.; Shehata, M. M.; El-Khabeary, H.; Helal, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the simulation of ion beam bombardment in Bayfol CR 6-2 polymer at energies varies from 5 keV to 45 keV was determined. The simulation process was made by multiply charged copper and lead ions of different incident angles. The open source computer code SRIM 3D was used for the simulation to determine the ion beam penetrability into the Bayfol CR 6-2 specimens. The range, recoil distribution and total damage of copper and lead ions using Bayfol 6-2 specimens at different energies and incident angles were studied. It was found that the ion range, recoil distribution and total damage at different incident angles on Bayfol 6-2 specimens increases by increasing the ions energy using copper and lead ions respectively.

  4. Recoil Polarization and Beam-Recoil Double Polarization Measurement of {eta} Electroproduction on the Proton in the Region of the S{sub 11}(1535) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, H.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Tiator, L.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.; Cheymol, B.; Fonvieille, H.

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} and the recoil polarization P{sub y{sup '}} were measured for the first time for the p(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){eta} reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q{sup 2}=0.1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} and a center of mass production angle of {theta}=120 deg. at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  5. Alpha-recoil damage: Relation to isotopic disequilibrium and leaching of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, R.L. )

    1988-06-01

    The observation by Raabe et al. (1973) of large differences between the solubilities of isotopically different plutonium dioxides, has led to the recognition of preferential etching of recoil damage as a widespread phenomenon for alpha-active radionuclides. The associated preferential solubility of the products of alpha decay, along with direct recoil ejection, are the two specific microscopic mechanisms that are documented as causes of isotopic disequilibrium in the U and Th decay series. Similarly, leaching plays a significant role in releasing {sup 222}Rn from natural substances, {sup 222}Rn being the alpha-decay product of {sup 226}Ra. The average annealing time in nature of the damage sites can be inferred from the extent of isotopic disequilibrium for different isotopic pairs in the Th and U decay chains.

  6. A coherent understanding of low-energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Liquid xenon detectors such as XENON10 and XENON100 obtain a significant fraction of their sensitivity to light (∼<10 GeV) particle dark matter by looking for nuclear recoils of only a few keV, just above the detector threshold. Yet in this energy regime a correct treatment of the detector threshold and resolution remains unclear. The energy dependence of the scintillation yield of liquid xenon for nuclear recoils also bears heavily on detector sensitivity, yet numerous measurements have not succeeded in obtaining concordant results. In this article we show that the ratio of detected ionization to scintillation can be leveraged to constrain the scintillation yield. We also present a rigorous treatment of liquid xenon detector threshold and energy resolution. Notably, the effective energy resolution differs significantly from a simple Poisson distribution. We conclude with a calculation of dark matter exclusion limits, and show that existing data from liquid xenon detectors strongly constrain recent interpretations of light dark matter.

  7. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α . The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Z α expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Z α -expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1 S and 2 S states.

  8. Development of bubble chambers with enhanced stability and sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, W.J.; Collar, Juan I.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Nakazawa, D.; Odom, B.; O'Sullivan, K.; Plunkett, R.; Ramberg, E.; Raskin, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Vieira, J.D.; /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    The viability of using a Bubble Chamber for rare event searches and in particular for the detection of dark matter particle candidates is considered. Techniques leading to the deactivation of inhomogeneous nucleation centers and subsequent enhanced stability in such a detector are described. Results from prototype trials indicate that sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles can be obtained in conditions of near total insensitivity to minimum ionizing backgrounds. An understanding of the response of superheated heavy refrigerants to these recoils is demonstrated within the context of existing theoretical models. We comment on the prospects for the detection of supersymmetric dark matter particles with a large CF{sub 3}I chamber.

  9. Digital characterization of recoil charged-particle tracks for neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.; Hunter, S.R.; Hamm, R.N.; Wright, H.A.; Hurst, G.S.; Gibson, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    We are developing a new optical ionization detector for imaging the track of a charged neutron-recoil particle in a gas. Electrons produced in the path of the recoil particle are excited by an external, high-voltage, RF, electric field of short duration. Their oscillatory motion causes ionization and excitation of nearby gas molecules, which then emit light in subsequent de-excitation. Two digital cameras image the optical radiation across two perpendicular planes and analyze it for the numbers of electrons in various volume elements along the track. These numbers constitute the digital characterization of the track. This information can then be used to infer the energy deposited in the track and the track LET in the gas. We have now observed alpha-particle tracks in a chamber utilizing these principles. The application of such a device for neutron dosimetry and neutron spectrometry will be described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Low energy electron/recoil discrimination for directional Dark Matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D. E-mail: mayet@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-07-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Even though it could accommodate to a sizeable background contamination, electron/recoil discrimination remains a key and challenging issue as for direction-insensitive detectors. The measurement of the 3D track may be used to discriminate electrons from nuclear recoils. While a high rejection power is expected above 20 keV ionization, a dedicated data analysis is needed at low energy. After identifying discriminant observables, a multivariate analysis, namely a Boosted Decision Tree, is proposed, enabling an efficient event tagging for Dark Matter search. We show that it allows us to optimize rejection while keeping a rather high efficiency which is compulsory for rare event search.With respect to a sequential analysis, the rejection is about ∼ 20 times higher with a multivariate analysis, for the same Dark Matter exclusion limit.

  11. Stoichiometric disturbances in compound semiconductors due to ion implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to calculate the depth distribution of the local stoichiometric disturbance (SD) resulting from ion implantation in binary-compound substrates. The calculation includes first-order recoils considering projected range straggle of projectiles and recoils and lateral straggle of recoils. The method uses tabulated final-range statistics to infer the projectile range distributions at intermediate energies. This approach greatly simplifies the calculation with little compromise on accuracy as compared to existing procedures. As an illustration, the SD profile is calculated for implantation of boron, silicon, and aluminum in silicon carbide. The results for the latter case suggest that the SD may be responsible for otherwise unexplained distortions in the annealed aluminum profile. A comparison with calculations by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation shows good agreement.

  12. SIMULATIONS OF RECOILING MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN THE VIA LACTEA HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, J.; Madau, P.; Diemand, J.; Kuhlen, M.; Zemp, M.

    2009-09-10

    The coalescence of a massive black hole (MBH) binary leads to the gravitational-wave recoil of the system and its ejection from the galaxy core. We have carried out N-body simulations of the motion of a M{sub BH} = 3.7 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} MBH remnant in the 'Via Lactea I' simulation, a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo. The black hole receives a recoil velocity of V{sub kick} = 80, 120, 200, 300, and 400 km s{sup -1} at redshift 1.5, and its orbit is followed for over 1 Gyr within a 'live' host halo, subject only to gravity and dynamical friction against the dark matter background. We show that, owing to asphericities in the dark matter potential, the orbit of the MBH is highly nonradial, resulting in a significantly increased decay timescale compared to a spherical halo. The simulations are used to construct a semi-analytic model of the motion of the MBH in a time-varying triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo plus a spherical stellar bulge, where the dynamical friction force is calculated directly from the velocity dispersion tensor. Such a model should offer a realistic picture of the dynamics of kicked MBHs in situations where gas drag, friction by disk stars, and the flattening of the central cusp by the returning black hole are all negligible effects. We find that MBHs ejected with initial recoil velocities V{sub kick} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1} do not return to the host center within a Hubble time. In a Milky Way-sized galaxy, a recoiling hole carrying a gaseous disk of initial mass {approx}M{sub BH} may shine as a quasar for a substantial fraction of its 'wandering' phase. The long decay timescales of kicked MBHs predicted by this study may thus be favorable to the detection of off-nuclear quasar activity.

  13. Kinematically Identified Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole Candidates in SDSS QSOs with z > 0.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S.; Privon, G. C.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a spectral decomposition to search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBHs) in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) with z < 0.25. Out of 1271 QSOs, we have identified 26 rSMBH candidates that are recoiling toward us. The projected recoil velocities range from ‑76 to ‑307 km s‑1 with a mean of ‑149 ± 58 km s‑1. Most of the rSMBH candidates are hosted by gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), but only 23% of them show signs of tidal features, which suggests that a majority of them are advanced mergers. We find that the black hole masses M BH of the rSMBH candidates are on average ∼5 times smaller than those of their stationary counterparts and cause a scatter in the {M}{BH}-{σ }\\ast relation. The Eddington ratios of all of the rSMBH candidates are larger than 0.1, with a mean of 0.52 ± 0.27, suggesting that they are actively accreting mass. Velocity shifts in high-excitation coronal lines suggest that the rSMBH candidates are recoiling with an average velocity of about ‑265 km s‑1. The electron density in the narrow line region of the H ii rSMBH candidates is about 1/10 of that in active galactic nucleus (AGN) rSMBH candidates, probably because the AGN in the former was more spatially offset than that in the latter. The estimated spatial offsets between the rSMBH candidate and the center of the host galaxy range from 0.″21 to 1.″97 and need to be confirmed spatially with high-resolution adaptive optics imaging observations.

  14. Recoil velocity at second post-Newtonian order for spinning black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, Étienne; Buonanno, Alessandra; Kidder, Larry

    2009-08-01

    We compute the flux of linear momentum carried by gravitational waves emitted from spinning binary black holes at second post-Newtonian (2PN) order for generic orbits. In particular we provide explicit expressions of three new types of terms, namely, next-to-leading order spin-orbit terms at 1.5 post-Newtonian (1.5PN) order, spin-orbit tail terms at 2PN order, and spin-spin terms at 2PN order. Restricting ourselves to quasicircular orbits, we integrate the linear-momentum flux over time to obtain the recoil velocity as function of orbital frequency. We find that in the so-called superkick configuration the higher-order spin corrections can increase the recoil velocity up to a factor ˜3 with respect to the leading-order PN prediction. Whereas the recoil velocity computed in PN theory within the adiabatic approximation can accurately describe the early inspiral phase, we find that its fast increase during the late inspiral and plunge, and the arbitrariness in determining until when it should be trusted, makes the PN predictions for the total recoil not very accurate and robust. Nevertheless, the linear-momentum flux at higher PN orders can be employed to build more reliable resummed expressions aimed at capturing the nonperturbative effects until merger. Furthermore, we provide expressions valid for generic orbits, and accurate at 2PN order, for the energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves emitted from spinning binary black holes. Specializing to quasicircular orbits we compute the spin-spin terms at 2PN order in the expression for the evolution of the orbital frequency and found agreement with Mikóczi, Vasúth, and Gergely. We also verified that in the limit of extreme mass ratio our expressions for the energy and angular momentum fluxes match the ones of Tagoshi, Shibata, Tanaka, and Sasaki obtained in the context of black hole perturbation theory.

  15. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  16. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  17. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  18. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  19. Design and characterization of a neutron calibration facility for the study of sub-keV nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, P. S.; Collar, J. I.; Whaley, P. M.

    2007-05-01

    We have designed and built a highly monochromatic 24 keV neutron beam at the Kansas State University Triga Mark-II reactor, as part of an experimental effort to demonstrate sensitivity in a large-mass detector to the ultra-low energy recoils expected from coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering. The beam characteristics were chosen so as to mimic the soft recoil energies expected from reactor antineutrinos in a variety of targets, allowing to understand the response of dedicated detector technologies in this yet unexplored sub-keV recoil range. A full characterization of the beam properties (intensity, monochromaticity, contaminations, beam profile) is presented, together with first tests of the calibration facility using proton recoils in organic scintillator.

  20. Einstein-Bohr recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment performed at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Miao, Quan; Gel'Mukhanov, Faris; Patanen, Minna; Travnikova, Oksana; Nicolas, Christophe; Ågren, Hans; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-02-01

    Double-slit experiments illustrate the quintessential proof for wave-particle complementarity. If information is missing about which slit the particle has traversed, the particle, behaving as a wave, passes simultaneously through both slits. This wave-like behaviour and corresponding interference is absent if ‘which-slit’ information exists. The essence of Einstein-Bohr's debate about wave-particle duality was whether the momentum transfer between a particle and a recoiling slit could mark the path, thus destroying the interference. To measure the recoil of a slit, the slits should move independently. We showcase a materialization of this recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment by resonant X-ray photoemission from molecular oxygen for geometries near equilibrium (coupled slits) and in a dissociative state far away from equilibrium (decoupled slits). Interference is observed in the former case, while the electron momentum transfer quenches the interference in the latter case owing to Doppler labelling of the counter-propagating atomic slits, in full agreement with Bohr's complementarity.

  1. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  2. Nuclear Recoil Calibrations in the LUX Detector Using Direct and Backscattered D-D Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyne, Casey; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will discuss the latest calibration of the nuclear recoil (NR) response in liquid xenon (LXe), performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced via the Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 D-D neutron generator. The calibration measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keVnr recoil energy with an absolute determination of deposited energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keVnr, both of which improve upon all previous measurements. I will then focus in depth on the extension of this calibration using a new technique for generating a beam of sub-300 keV quasi-mono-energetic neutrons via the backscatter of 2.45 MeV neutrons off a deuterium-based reflector. Current simulations work optimizing the technique, its advantages, and its impact on future research will be discussed, including the extension of the NR Qy calibration down to 0.14 keVnr, an independent NR Ly calibration, and an a priori estimate of the expected 8B solar neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering signal in the upcoming LUX-ZEPLIN experiment.

  3. A Novel Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbus, James; LUX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will describe a novel calibration of nuclear recoils (NR) in liquid xenon (LXe) performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a D-D neutron generator. This technique was used to measure the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to < 1 keV recoil energy with an absolute determination of the deposited energy. The LUX Qy result is a factor of × 5 lower in energy compared to any other previous measurement in the field, and provides a significant improvement in calibration uncertainties. We also present a measurement of the NR light yield in LXe (Leff) to recoil energies as low as ~ 2 keV using the LUX D-D data. The Leff result is also lower in energy with smaller uncertainties than has been previously achieved. These absolute, ultra-low energy calibrations of the NR signal yields in LXe are a clear confirmation of the detector response used for the first LUX WIMP search analysis. Strategies for extending this calibration technique to even lower energies and smaller uncertainties will be discussed.

  4. Binary black hole merger gravitational waves and recoil in the large mass ratio limit

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, Pranesh A.; Hughes, Scott A.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-05-15

    Spectacular breakthroughs in numerical relativity now make it possible to compute spacetime dynamics in almost complete generality, allowing us to model the coalescence and merger of binary black holes with essentially no approximations. The primary limitation of these calculations is now computational. In particular, it is difficult to model systems with large mass ratio and large spins, since one must accurately resolve the multiple length scales that play a role in such systems. Perturbation theory can play an important role in extending the reach of computational modeling for binary systems. In this paper, we present first results of a code that allows us to model the gravitational waves generated by the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of a binary system in which one member of the binary is much more massive than the other. This allows us to accurately calibrate binary dynamics in the large mass ratio regime. We focus in this analysis on the recoil imparted to the merged remnant by these waves. We closely examine the ''antikick,'' an antiphase cancellation of the recoil arising from the plunge and ringdown waves, described in detail by Schnittman et al. We find that, for orbits aligned with the black hole spin, the antikick grows as a function of spin. The total recoil is smallest for prograde coalescence into a rapidly rotating black hole, and largest for retrograde coalescence. Amusingly, this completely reverses the predicted trend for kick versus spin from analyses that only include inspiral information.

  5. Nuclear Recoil Cross Sections from Time-dependent Studies of Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-12-21

    We examine the sensitivity of nuclear recoil cross sections produced by two-photon double ionization of helium to the underlying triple differential cross sections (TDCS) used in their computation. We show that this sensitivity is greatest in the energy region just below the threshold for sequential double ionization. Accurate TDCS, extracted from non-perturbative solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, are used here in new computations of the nuclear recoil cross section.

  6. MIDAS, a high efficiency microwave discharge ion source for the EXCYT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Raia, G.; Sura, J.

    1994-04-01

    A microwave discharge ion source has been designed in order to obtain high efficiencies for positive ionization of the recoils to be produced at the exotics at the cyclotron Tandem facility. After a charge exchange process the negative ions will be injected into the 15-MV Tandem, already working at the Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud. The short ionization time and the fast wall recycling make this source very well suited for the purpose of high efficiency ionization of the recoils. The operational principle and the design are described in the following.

  7. Nitrogen Supply Uses Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine dissociated and residual gas removed to produce almost pure nitrogen. Nitrogen-generation module catalytically dissociates liquid hydrazine then dissociates and separates product gases to yield almost pure nitrogen.

  8. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described. PMID:26932115

  9. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  10. Damage calculation in fusion ceramics: comparing neutrons and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, P. V.; Lizunov, D.; Ryazanov, Yu. A. I.; Möslang, A.

    1998-03-01

    A method developed earlier for displacement damage calculations in compound materials is applied to fusion ceramics irradiated by various neutron sources and light ion accelerators. For protons up to 40 MeV and alpha-particles up to 100 MeV, as well as for several neutron environments (EEF, ITER, HFIR, FFTF), sublattice-specific primary recoil spectra and displacement damage rates have been calculated for α-Al 2O 3, AlN, BeO, MgO, MgAl 2O 4 and SiC. Although the primary recoil spectra can vary significantly for different neutron sources and light ions, the ratios of sublattice-specific damage rates are the same within 5% for BeO, MgO and SiC in all considered environments. For ceramics containing Al, the damage ratio differs up to about 40% between neutron and light ion irradiations.

  11. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  12. [Characteristics of atmospheric nitrogen wet deposition in Beijing urban area].

    PubMed

    He, Cheng-Wu; Ren, Yu-Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Mao, Yu-Xiang

    2014-02-01

    With the ion-exchange resin method, the atmospheric nitrogen wet deposition in Beijing urban area within the Fifth Ring Road was investigated from June to October, 2012. The relationship between atmospheric nitrogen wet deposition and rainfall precipitation was investigated, the differences of nitrogen wet deposition in different months, different ring roads (the Fifth Ring Road, the Fourth Ring Road, the Third Ring Road and the Second Ring Road) and different functional areas (institutes and colleges district, ring-road, residential areas, railway station and public garden) were also investigated. The results showed that the average value and standard deviation of ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen were significantly different during different months in 2012. The atmospheric nitrite nitrogen deposition first decreased and then increased, the maximum value appeared in September. The positive relationships between ammonia nitrogen (nitrate nitrogen) and mean monthly precipitation and negative relationships between nitrite nitrogen and mean monthly precipitation were both significant (P < 0.05). The three nitrogen depositions of ring-road and railway station were higher than other functional areas, but only the nitrite nitrogen deposition had obvious regional difference. The differences of the three nitrogen depositions among different ring roads were all not significant and it meant that the nitrogen wet deposition was equally distributed in Beijing urban area. PMID:24812938

  13. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle rate. The detector was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and will be used in GODDESS measurements with stable and rare isotope beams. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident

  14. Measurement and calculation of recoil pressure produced during CO{sub 2} laser interaction with ice

    SciTech Connect

    Semak, V.V.; Knorovsky, G.A.; Maccallum, D.O.; Noble, D.R.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1999-12-09

    Evaporation is a classical physics problem which, because of its significant importance for many engineering applications, has drawn considerable attention by previous researchers. Classical theoretical models [Ta. I. Frenkel, Kinetic Theory of Liquids, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1946] represent evaporation in a simplistic way as the escape of atoms with highest velocities from a potential well with the depth determined by the atomic binding energy. The processes taking place in the gas phase above the rapidly evaporating surface have also been studied in great detail [S.I.Anisimov and V. A. Khokhlov, Instabilities in Lasser-Matter Interaction, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995]. The description of evaporation utilizing these models is known to adequately characterize drilling with high beam intensity, e.g., >10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the interaction regimes when beam intensity is relatively low, such as during welding or cutting, lack both theoretical and experimental consideration of the evaporation. It was shown recently that if the evaporation is treated in accordance with Anisimov et.al.'s approach, then predicted evaporation recoil should be a substantial factor influencing melt flow and related heat transfer during laser beam welding and cutting. To verify the applicability of this model for low beam intensity interaction, the authors compared the results of measurements and calculations of recoil pressure generated during laser beam irradiation of a target. The target material used was water ice at {minus}10 C. The displacement of a target supported in a nearly frictionless air bearing under irradiation by a defocused laser beam from a 14 kW CO{sub 2} laser was recorded and Newton's laws of motion used to derive the recoil pressure.

  15. Order-of-Magnitude Estimate of Fast Neutron Recoil Rates in Proposed Neutrino Detector at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Erik B.

    2006-02-01

    Yuri Efremenko (UT-K) and Kate Scholberg (Duke) indicated, during discussions on 12 January 2006 with the SNS Neutronics Team, interest in a new type of neutrino detector to be placed within the proposed neutrino bunker at SNS, near beam-line 18, against the RTBT. The successful operation of this detector and its associated experiments would require fast-neutron recoil rates of approximately one event per day of operation or less. To this end, the author has attempted the following order-of-magnitude estimate of this recoil rate in order to judge whether or not a full calculation effort is needed or justified. For the purposes of this estimate, the author considers a one-dimensional slab geometry, in which fast and high-energy neutrons making up the general background in the target building are incident upon one side of an irbon slab. This iron slab represents the neutrino bunker walls. If we assume that a significant fraction of the dose rate throughout the target building is due to fast or high-energy neutrons, we can estimate the flux of such neutrons based upon existing shielding calculations performed for radiation protection purposes. In general, the dose rates within the target building are controlled to be less than 0.25 mrem per hour. A variety of calculations have indicated that these dose rates have significant fast and high-energy neutron components. Thus they can estimate the fast neutron flux incident on the neutrino bunker, and thereby the fast neutron flux inside that bunker. Finally, they can estimate the neutron recoil rate within a nominal detector volume. Such an estimate is outlined in Table 1.

  16. Gravitational recoil: effects on massive black hole occupation fraction over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Gültekin, Kayhan; Dotti, Massimo

    2010-06-01

    We assess the influence of massive black hole (MBH) ejections from galaxy centres due to gravitational radiation recoil, along the cosmic merger history of the MBH population. We discuss the `danger' of recoil for MBHs as a function of different MBH spin-orbit configurations and of the host halo cosmic bias, and on how that reflects on the occupation fraction of MBHs. We assess ejection probabilities for mergers occurring in a gas-poor environment, in which the MBH binary coalescence is driven by stellar dynamical processes and the spin-orbit configuration is expected to be isotropically distributed. We contrast this case with the `aligned' case. The latter is the more realistic situation for gas-rich, i.e. `wet', mergers, which are expected for high-redshift galaxies. We find that if all haloes at z > 5-7 host an MBH, the probability of the Milky Way (or similar size galaxy) to host an MBH today is less than 50 per cent, unless MBHs form continuously in galaxies. The occupation fraction of MBHs, intimately related to halo bias and MBH formation efficiency, plays a crucial role in increasing the retention fraction. Small haloes, with shallow potential wells and low escape velocities, have a high ejection probability, but the MBH merger rate is very low along their galaxy formation merger hierarchy: MBH formation processes are likely inefficient in such shallow potential wells. Recoils can decrease the overall frequency of MBHs in small galaxies to ~60 per cent, while they have little effect on the frequency of MBHs in large galaxies (at most a 20 per cent effect).

  17. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  18. A New Method for Electronic Recoil Calibration in Liquid Noble Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmullin, Sean

    2014-03-01

    Calibration of next-generation liquid noble dark matter detectors present new challenges because radiation from external sources will not probe the entire target, owing to its large volume and high stopping power. For electronic recoil calibration in particular, a proposed solution is to dissolve a source of low-energy β-electrons directly into the liquid. A particularly promising candidate is 212Pb, a daughter of 220Rn. We have acquired a custom-made source of electrodeposited 228Th that efficiently emanates the desired 220Rn. Details of recent measurements of mixing 220Rn and its daughters in a liquid xenon detector and future prospects will be presented.

  19. Reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}' (958) p and polarization of recoil protons

    SciTech Connect

    Tryasuchev, V. A.

    2006-02-15

    On the basis of the isobar model extended by including the t-channel, the cross sections for and single-polarization features of the reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}'p are calculated for incident-photon energies up to 5 GeV, two poorly studied resonances, S{sub 11}(1978) and P{sub 13}(2080), being taken into account in this calculation. In order to reduce the ambiguities in the choice of resonances and their parameters that make it possible to reproduce the experimental differential cross sections, it is proposed to measure the polarization of recoil protons in the reaction being considered.

  20. Triple Differential Cross sections and Nuclear Recoil in Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N

    2008-04-29

    Triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for two-photon double ionization of helium are calculated using the method of exterior complex scaling both above and below the threshold for sequential ionization (54.4 eV). It is found that sequential ionization produces characteristic behavior in the TDCS that identifies that process when it is in competition with nonsequential ionization. Moreover we see the signature in the TDCS and nuclear recoil cross sections of"virtual sequential ionization" below the threshold for the sequential process.