Science.gov

Sample records for nitrogen leaching losses

  1. Arbuscular Mycorrhizas Reduce Nitrogen Loss via Leaching

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Hamid R.; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO3−) and ammonium (NH4+) loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less) via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone. PMID:22253790

  2. Biotic and abiotic controls on nitrogen leaching losses into waterways during successive bovine urine application to soil.

    PubMed

    Neilen, Amanda D; Chen, Chengrong R; Faggotter, Stephen J; Ellison, Tanya L; Burford, Michele A

    2016-07-01

    Cattle waste products high in nitrogen (N) that enter waterways via rainfall runoff can contribute to aquatic ecosystem health deterioration. It is well established that N leaching from this source can be reduced by plant assimilation, e.g. pasture grass. Additionally, N leaching can be reduced when there is sufficient carbon (C) in the soil such as plant litterfall to stimulate microbial processes, i.e. denitrification, which off-gas N from the soil profile. However, the relative importance of these two processes is not well understood. A soil microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the role of biotic processes, pasture grass and microbial activity, and abiotic processes such as soil sorption, in reducing N leaching loss, during successive additions of bovine urine. Pasture grass was the most effective soil cover in reducing N leaching losses, which leached 70% less N compared to exposed soil. Successive application of urine to the soil resulted in N accumulation, after which there was a breaking point indicated by high N leaching losses. This is likely to be due to the low C:N ratio within the soil profiles treated with urine (molar ratio 8:1) compared to water treated soils (30:1). In this experiment we examined the role of C addition in reducing N losses and showed that the addition of glucose can temporarily reduce N leaching. Overall, our results demonstrated that plant uptake of N was a more important process in preventing N leaching than microbial processes. PMID:27031296

  3. Evidence for a uniformly small isotope effect of nitrogen leaching loss: results from disturbed ecosystems in seasonally dry climates.

    PubMed

    Mnich, Meagan E; Houlton, Benjamin Z

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) losses constrain rates of plant carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake and storage in many ecosystems globally. N isotope models have been used to infer that ~30 % of terrestrial N losses occur via microbial denitrification; however, this approach assumes a small isotope effect associated with N leaching losses. Past work across tropical/sub-tropical forest sites has confirmed this expectation; however, the stable N isotope ratio (δ(15)N) of ecosystem leaching has yet to be systematically evaluated in seasonally dry climates or across major ecosystem disturbances. We here present new measurements of the δ(15)N of total dissolved N (TDN) in small streams, bulk deposition, and soil pools across eight watershed sites in California, including grassland, chaparral, and coastal redwood forest ecosystems, with and without fire, grazing, and forest harvesting. Regardless of the dominant vegetation type or disturbance regime, average δ(15)N of TDN in stream water differed only slightly (<~1 ‰) from that of bulk soil δ(15)N, revealing a uniformly small isotope effect associated with N leaching losses even under non-steady state conditions. Rather, lower input δ(15)N compared to TDN δ(15)N in streams pointed to fractionations via gaseous loss pathways as the dominant mechanism behind soil δ(15)N enrichment. We conclude that N leaching does not impart a major isotope effect across a broad range of ecosystems and conditions examined, thereby advancing the N gas-loss hypothesis as the principal explanation for variation in bulk soil δ(15)N. PMID:26343040

  4. Catch crops as universal and effective method for reducing nitrogen leaching loss in spring cereal production: A meta-analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkama, Elena; Lemola, Riitta; Känkänen, Hannu; Turtola, Eila

    2016-04-01

    Sustainable farms produce adequate amounts of a high-quality product, protect their resources and are both environmentally friendly and economically profitable. Nitrogen (N) fertilization decisively influences the cereal yields as well as increases soil N balance (N input in fertilizer - N output in harvested yield), thereby leading to N losses to the environment. However, while N input reduction affects soil N balance, such approach would markedly reduce N leaching loss only in case of abnormally high N balances. As an alternative approach, the growing of catch crops aims to prevent nutrient leaching in autumn after harvest and during the following winter, but due to competition, catch crops may also reduce yields of the main crop. Although studies have explored the environmental effects of catch crops in cereal production in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway) during the past 40 years, none has yet carried out a meta-analysis. We quantitatively summarized 35 studies on the effect of catch crops (non-legume and legume) undersown in spring cereals on N leaching loss or its risk as estimated by the content of soil nitrate N or its sum with ammonium in late autumn. The meta-analysis also included the grain yield and N content of spring cereals. To identify sources of variation, we studied the effects of soil texture and management (ploughing time, the amount of N applied, fertilizer type), as well as climatic (annual precipitation) and experimental conditions (duration of experiments, lysimeter vs. field experiments). Finally, we examined whether the results differed between the countries or over the decades. Compared to control groups with no catch crops, non-legume catch crops, mainly ryegrass species, reduced N leaching loss by 50% on average, and soil nitrate N or inorganic N by 35% in autumn. Italian ryegrass depleted soil N more effectively (by 60%) than did perennial ryegrass or Westerwolds ryegrass (by 25%). In contrast, legumes (white

  5. Denitrification, leaching, and river nitrogen export in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, Cynthia; Hess, Peter; Riddick, Stuart; Ward, Dan

    2016-03-01

    River nitrogen export is simulated within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) by coupling nitrogen leaching and runoff fluxes from the Community Land Model (CLM) to the River Transport Model (RTM). The coupled CLM-RTM prognostically simulates the downstream impact of human N cycle perturbation on coastal areas. It also provides a framework for estimating denitrification fluxes of N2 and associated trace gases like N2O in soils and river sediments. An important limitation of the current model is that it only simulates dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) river export, due to the lack of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and particulate nitrogen (PN) leaching fluxes in CLM. In addition, the partitioning of soil N loss in CLM between the primary loss pathways of denitrification and N leaching/runoff appears heavily skewed toward denitrification compared to other literature estimates, especially in nonagricultural regions, and also varies considerably among the four model configurations presented here. River N export is generally well predicted in the model configurations that include midlatitude crops, but tends to be underpredicted in rivers that are less perturbed by human agriculture. This is especially true in the tropics, where CLM likely underestimates leaching and runoff of all forms of nitrogen. River export of DIN is overpredicted in some relatively unperturbed Arctic rivers, which may result from excessive N inputs to those regions in CLM. Better representation of N loss in CLM can improve confidence in model results with respect to the core model objective of simulating nitrogen limitation of the carbon cycle.

  6. Nitrogen leaching from Douglas-fir forests after urea fertilization.

    PubMed

    Flint, Cynthia M; Harrison, Rob B; Strahm, Brian D; Adams, A B

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of nitrogen (N) after forest fertilization has the potential to pollute ground and surface water. The purpose of this study was to quantify N leaching through the primary rooting zone of N-limited Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] forests the year after fertilization (224 kg N ha(-1) as urea) and to calculate changes in the N pools of the overstory trees, understory vegetation, and soil. At six sites on production forests in the Hood Canal watershed, Washington, tension lysimeters and estimates of the soil water flux were used to quantify the mobilization and leaching of NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, and dissolved organic nitrogen below the observed rooting depth. Soil and vegetation samples were collected before fertilization and 1 and 6 mo after fertilization. In the year after fertilization, the total leaching beyond the primary rooting zone in excess of control plots was 4.2 kg N ha(-1) (p = 0.03), which was equal to 2% of the total N applied. The peak NO(3)-N concentration that leached beyond the rooting zone of fertilized plots was 0.2 mg NO(3)-N L(-1). Six months after fertilization, 26% of the applied N was accounted for in the overstory, and 27% was accounted for in the O+A horizon of the soil. The results of this study indicate that forest fertilization can lead to small N leaching fluxes out of the primary rooting zone during the first year after urea application. PMID:18689739

  7. Leaching of nitrogen from forested catchments in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortelainen, Pirkko; Saukkonen, Sari; Mattsson, Tuija

    1997-12-01

    This study provides an assessment on the spatial variability of the long-term leaching (8-23 years) of nitrogen and organic carbon from 22 forested catchments (0.69-56 km2). The catchments are located throughout Finland excluding the northernmost regions. The Kruunuoja catchment is located in a national park; the other catchments represent typical Finnish forestry land. The leaching from the 21 forestry land catchments can be considered to represent average leaching from Finnish forestry land since the most important forestry practices (ditching, clear-cutting, scarification, and fertilization) since the 1960s have affected about 2.4% of the catchment area per year (compare 2.5% in the entire country in 1980 and 2% in 1991). Moreover, the mean annual runoff from the catchments, 230-420 mm yr-1, agree with the mean annual runoff from Finland (301 mm yr-1 from 1931 to 1990). The major part of the nitrogen transported from the catchments consisted of organic nitrogen (on average 79%). The average inorganic nitrogen proportion ((NO3-N + NH4-N)/Ntot) was lowest (7.3%) in the Kruunuoja catchment and was highest (54%) in the southernmost Teeressuonoja catchment located in the highest anthropogenic nitrogen deposition area. The median C/N ratio in the study streams was high, ranging from 34 to 66. Nitrate leaching from the catchments varied between 2.8 (Kruunuoja) and 100 kg km-2 yr-1 (Teeressuonoja) and was negatively related to C/N ratio in stream water and latitude. The stepwise multiple regression model selected C/N ratio and nitrogen deposition which together explained 72% of the variation in NO3-N leaching. Retention of NO3-N deposition (calculated as ((input-output)/input) was high in all catchments, ranging from 0.99 in Kruunuoja to 0.67 in Teeressuonoja.

  8. Identification of nitrate leaching loss indicators through regression methods based on a meta-analysis of lysimeter studies.

    PubMed

    Boy-Roura, M; Cameron, K C; Di, H J

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a meta-analysis of 12 experiments that quantify nitrate-N leaching losses from grazed pasture systems in alluvial sedimentary soils in Canterbury (New Zealand). Mean measured nitrate-N leached (kg N/ha × 100 mm drainage) losses were 2.7 when no urine was applied, 8.4 at the urine rate of 300 kg N/ha, 9.8 at 500 kg N/ha, 24.5 at 700 kg N/ha and 51.4 at 1000 kg N/ha. Lismore soils presented significantly higher nitrate-N losses compared to Templeton soils. Moreover, a multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to determine the key factors that influence nitrate-N leaching and to predict nitrate-N leaching losses. The MLR analyses was calibrated and validated using 82 average values of nitrate-N leached and 48 explanatory variables representative of nitrogen inputs and outputs, transport, attenuation of nitrogen and farm management practices. The MLR model (R (2) = 0.81) showed that nitrate-N leaching losses were greater at higher urine application rates and when there was more drainage from rainfall and irrigation. On the other hand, nitrate leaching decreased when nitrification inhibitors (e.g. dicyandiamide (DCD)) were applied. Predicted nitrate-N leaching losses at the paddock scale were calculated using the MLR equation, and they varied largely depending on the urine application rate and urine patch coverage. PMID:26498804

  9. Nitrogen leaching on Fluvisols under vegetable cropping system: An assessment with the NLEAP model in Southern Bulgaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main mechanism for nitrogen (N) losses in shallow vegetable rooted crops grown in irrigated sandy soils is nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching. There is the need to calibrate and validate quick assessment tools to evaluate the effect of best management practices (BMP) for irrigated vegetable cropp...

  10. Oceanography: Coastal oceanic nitrogen loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamdrup, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones crop up along the eastern boundaries of ocean basins in the low latitudes. A survey of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific points to the coastal zone as a hotspot for anammox-driven marine nitrogen loss.

  11. Quantifying nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions in China's cropland.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuoshuo; Xu, Peng; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Hui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Cao, Wei; Tao, Shu; Piao, Shilong; Zhao, Yue; Ji, Xiaoyan; Shang, Ziyin; Chen, Minpeng

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural soils account for more than 50% of nitrogen leaching (LN) to groundwater in China. When excess levels of nitrogen accumulate in groundwater, it poses a risk of adverse health effects. Despite this recognition, estimation of LN from cropland soils in a broad spatial scale is still quite uncertain in China. The uncertainty of LN primarily stems from the shape of nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions (N rate) and the role of environmental conditions. On the basis of 453 site-years at 51 sites across China, we explored the nonlinearity and variability of the response of LN to N rate and developed an empirical statistical model to determine how environmental factors regulate the rate of N leaching (LR). The result shows that LN-N rate relationship is convex for most crop types, and varies by local hydro-climates and soil organic carbon. Variability of air temperature explains a half (∼ 52%) of the spatial variation of LR. The results of model calibration and validation indicate that incorporating this empirical knowledge into a predictive model could accurately capture the variation in leaching and produce a reasonable upscaling from site to country. The fertilizer-induced LN in 2008 for China's cropland were 0.88 ± 0.23 TgN (1σ), significantly lower than the linear or uniform model, as assumed by Food and Agriculture Organization and MITERRA-EUROPE models. These results also imply that future policy to reduce N leaching from cropland needs to consider environmental variability rather than solely attempt to reduce N rate. PMID:26774771

  12. Nitrate-Nitrogen Leaching and Modeling in Intensive Agriculture Farmland in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ligang; Xu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protecting water resources from nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) contamination is an important public health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. Loss of NO3-N in soils due to leaching is not only one of the most important problems in agriculture farming, but is also the main factor causing nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. Three typical intensive agriculture farmlands in Jiangyin City in China are selected as a case study for NO3-N leaching and modeling in the soil profile. In this study, the transport and fate of NO3-N within the soil profile and nitrate leaching to drains were analyzed by comparing field data with the simulation results of the LEACHM model. Comparisons between measured and simulated data indicated that the NO3-N concentrations in the soil and nitrate leaching to drains are controlled by the fertilizer practice, the initial conditions and the rainfall depth and distribution. Moreover, the study reveals that the LEACHM model gives a fair description of the NO3-N dynamics in the soil and subsurface drainage at the field scale. It can also be concluded that the model after calibration is a useful tool to optimize as a function of the combination “climate-crop-soil-bottom boundary condition” the nitrogen application strategy resulting for the environment in an acceptable level of nitrate leaching. The findings in this paper help to demonstrate the distribution and migration of nitrogen in intensive agriculture farmlands, as well as to explore the mechanism of groundwater contamination resulting from agricultural activities. PMID:23983629

  13. Plant diversity effects on leaching of nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic nitrogen from an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Leaching of nitrogen (N) from soil represents a resource loss and, in particular leaching of nitrate, can threaten drinking water quality. As plant diversity leads to a more exhaustive resource use, we investigated the effects of plant species richness, functional group richness, and the presence of specific functional groups on nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic N (DON), and total dissolved N (TDN) leaching from an experimental grassland in the first 4 years after conversion from fertilized arable land to unfertilized grassland. The experiment is located in Jena, Germany, and consists of 82 plots with 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 60 plant species and 1-4 functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs). Nitrate, ammonium, and TDN concentrations in soil solution in the 0-0.3 m soil layer were measured every second week during 4 years on 62 plots and DON concentrations were calculated as difference between TDN and inorganic N. Missing concentrations in soil solution were estimated using a Bayesian statistical model. Downward water fluxes (DF) per plot from the 0-0.3 m soil layer were simulated in weekly resolution with a water balance model in connection with a Bayesian model for simulating missing soil water content measurements. To obtain annual nitrate, ammonium, and DON leaching from the 0-0.3 m soil layer per plot, we multiplied the respective concentrations in soil solution with DF and aggregated the data to annual sums. TDN leaching resulted from summation of nitrate, ammonium, and DON leaching. DON leaching contributed most to TDN leaching, particularly in plots without legumes. Dissolved inorganic N leaching in this grassland was dominated by nitrate. The amount of annual ammonium leaching was small and little influenced by plant diversity. Species richness affected DON leaching only in the fourth and last investigated year, possibly because of a delayed soil biota effect that increased microbial transformation of organic

  14. Management to reduce nitrogen losses in animal production.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A

    2004-01-01

    Reduction of nitrogen loss in animal production requires whole-farm management. Reduced loss from one farm component is easily negated in another if all components are not equally well managed. Animal excretion of manure N can be decreased by improving the balance of protein or amino acids fed to that required by individual animals or animal groups or by improving production efficiency. Management to increase milk, meat, or egg production normally improves efficiency by reducing the maintenance protein required per unit of production. Large losses of manure nitrogen occur through the ammonia and nitrous oxide that are emitted into the atmosphere and the nitrate leached into groundwater. Up to half of the excreted nitrogen is lost from the housing facility, but this loss can be decreased through frequent manure removal and by avoiding deep litter systems and feedlots. Techniques such as acid treatment of manure, scrubbing of ventilation air, and floor designs for separating feces and urine substantially reduce ammonia emissions, but these practices are often impractical or uneconomical for general use. Manure storage units improve nutrient utilization by allowing better timing of nutrient application with crop needs. At least 70% of the nitrogen entering anaerobic lagoons is typically lost, but a less than 10% loss can be maintained using slurry storage with a natural crust or other cover, or by drying poultry manure to at least 50% dry matter. Irrigation and surface spreading of manure without soil incorporation often ensures the loss of all remaining nonorganic nitrogen (typically, 20 to 40% of remaining nitrogen). Rapid incorporation and shallow injection methods decrease this loss by at least 50%, and deep injection into the soil essentially eliminates this loss. For grazing animals, excessive loss can be avoided by not overstocking pastures and avoiding late fall and winter grazing. Reducing emissions between the animal and the soil can lead to greater leaching

  15. [Effect of monocalcium phosphate and potassium chloride on nitrogen leaching in paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Li, Shou-tian; Zhou, Jian-min; Wang, Huo-yan; Du, Chang-wen; Chen, Xiao-qin

    2004-05-01

    In this article, influence of monocalcium phosphate and potassium chloride application on nitrogen leaching in paddy soil of Taihu region was studied by soil column leaching. The results showed that nitrate nitrogen was the main component of nitrogen leaching without urea application which accounts for 93.39 percent of total nitrogen leaching (including urea, ammonium, and nitrate nitrogen). Amounts of urea, ammonium, and nitrate nitrogen in leachates increased significantly after urea application which account for 3.95, 15.25, and 80.80 percent of total nitrogen leaching respectively and for 0.26, 0.80, and 2.54 percent of applied nitrogen respectively. Amounts of urea, ammonium, and nitrate nitrogen in leachates were enhanced prominently by monocalcium phosphate or potassium chloride which are 4.54, 24.11, 71.34, and 3.45, 24.53, 72.02 percent of total nitrogen leaching respectively, and which are 0.39, 1.86, 3.34, and 0.32, 2.12, 4.06 percent of applied nitrogen separately. There is interactive influence on nitrogen leaching after application of monocalcium phosphate and potassium chloride together, and amounts of urea, ammonium, and nitrate nitrogen were 4.10, 27.35, and 68.55 percent of total nitrogen leaching, and 0.42, 2.60, and 4.26 percent of total applied nitrogen respectively. The leaching order of different form nitrogen followed as urea N > ammonium N > nitrate N, and leaching amounts of different form nitrogen followed as urea N < ammonium N < nitrate N. PMID:15327269

  16. Longer thaw seasons increase nitrogen availability for leaching during fall in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treat, Claire C.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Varner, Ruth K.; Bowden, William B.

    2016-06-01

    Climate change has resulted in warmer soil temperatures, earlier spring thaw and later fall freeze-up, resulting in warmer soil temperatures and thawing of permafrost in tundra regions. While these changes in temperature metrics tend to lengthen the growing season for plants, light levels, especially in the fall, will continue to limit plant growth and nutrient uptake. We conducted a laboratory experiment using intact soil cores with and without vegetation from a tundra peatland to measure the effects of late freeze and early spring thaw on carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange, methane (CH4) emissions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (N) leaching from soils. We compared soil C exchange and N production with a 30 day longer seasonal thaw during a simulated annual cycle from spring thaw through freeze-up and thaw. Across all cores, fall N leaching accounted for ∼33% of total annual N loss despite significant increases in microbial biomass during this period. Nitrate ({{{{NO}}}3}-) leaching was highest during the fall (5.33 ± 1.45 mg N m‑2 d‑1) following plant senescence and lowest during the summer (0.43 ± 0.22 mg N m‑2 d‑1). In the late freeze and early thaw treatment, we found 25% higher total annual ecosystem respiration but no significant change in CH4 emissions or DOC loss due to high variability among samples. The late freeze period magnified N leaching and likely was derived from root turnover and microbial mineralization of soil organic matter coupled with little demand from plants or microbes. Large N leaching during the fall will affect N cycling in low-lying areas and streams and may alter terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem nitrogen budgets in the arctic.

  17. Leaching of nitrogen and base cations from calcareous soil amended with organic residues.

    PubMed

    Zarabi, Mahboubeh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    The potential for groundwater and surface water pollution by nutrients in organic residues, primarily nitrogen (N) and base cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+), is a consideration when applying such residues to land. In this study, we used a laboratory column leaching procedure to examine the leaching of N, K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ in soils treated with two types of raw organic residues (poultry manure and potato residues) and one municipal waste compost, which are currently recycled on agricultural land in Iran. Each organic residue was thoroughly mixed with two different soils (sandy loam and clay) at the rate of 3%. Soil columns were leached at 4-d intervals for 92 d with distilled water, and effluents were analysed for pH, EC, nitrate (NO3(-)-N), ammonium (NH4(+)-N) K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. The results indicated that the amounts of NO3(-)-N and NH4(+)-N leached from the poultry manure and potato residues could represent very important economic losses of N and pose an environmental threat under field conditions. The sandy loam soil amended with poultry manure lost the highest amount of NO3(-)-N (206.4 kg ha(-1)), and clay soil amended with poultry manure lost the highest amounts of NH4(+)-N (454.3 kg ha(-1)). The results showed that a treatment incorporating 3% of municipal waste compost could be used without negative effects to groundwater N concentration in clay soil. Significant amounts of K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ were leached owing to the application of poultry manure, potato and municipal waste compost to soils. There was a positive relationship between K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ with NO3(-)-N and NH4(+)-N leached in soils. Analysis of variance detected significant effects of amendment, soil type and time on the leaching NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. PMID:22988618

  18. Assessing nitrate leaching losses with simulation scenarios and model based fertiliser recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalczyk, A.; Kersebaum, K. C.; Hartmann, T.; Yue, S. C.; Chen, X. P.

    2012-04-01

    Excessive mineral nitrogen fertiliser application and irrigation in intensive agricultural cropping systems is seen as a major reason for low water and nitrogen use efficiencies in the North China Plain. High nitrogen fertiliser and irrigation water inputs do not only lead to higher production costs but also to decreasing ground water tables, nitrate accumulation in deeper soil layers below the root zone and water pollution. To evaluate the effects of improved management practices on environmental pollution risk, the HERMES model is used to simulate nitrate leaching losses. The HERMES model is a dynamic, process based crop model made for practical applications such as fertiliser recommendations. The model was tested and validated on two field studies in the south of the Hebei Province that lasted for about three years with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) double cropping system. Biomass, grain yield, plant N uptake and soil water content were better simulated than mineral nitrogen in the soil. A model based nitrogen fertiliser recommendation was applied in the field for one wheat crop. The parallel model simulation showed satisfying results. Although there was no change in the amount of irrigation, the results indicated a possibility to reduce the fertiliser rate and thus nitrogen leaching even more than in the reduced treatment without reducing crop yields. Further more a simulation scenario with a model based fertiliser recommendation and a field capacity based irrigation was compared to farmers practice and reduced nitrogen treatment. The scenario results showed that the model recommendation together with the reduced irrigation has the highest potential to reduce nitrate leaching. The results also showed that flood irrigation as practiced by the farmers and its difficult to estimate amounts of water bears a big uncertainty for modelling.

  19. Leaching behavior of nitrogen in a long-term experiment on rice under different N management systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang-Guo; Itoh, Sumio; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Yang, Shi-Qi; Zhang, Qing-Zhong; Yang, Zheng-Li

    2011-06-01

    The leaching behavior of nitrogen was studied in single rice paddy production ecosystems in Tsukuba, Japan after 75 years of consistent fertilization regimes (no fertilizer, ammonium sulfate, a combination of composted rice straw with soybean cake, and fresh clover). During the 75-year period, management was unchanged with respect to rice planting density, irrigation, and net N fertilization for each field to which an N-source was added. Percolation water was collected, from May 2001 to April 2002, using porous suction cups installed in the fields at depths of 15, 40, and 60 cm. All water samples were taken to the laboratory for the measurement of both NH(4) ( + )-N and NO(3) ( - )-N concentrations using a continuous-flow nitrogen analyzer. The result indicated that there were significant differences in N leaching losses between treatments during the rice growing season. Total N leaching was significantly lower with the application of composted rice straw plus soybean cake (0.58 kg N ha( - 1)) than with ammonium sulfate (2.41 kg N ha( - 1)), which resulted in N leaching at a similar level to that with the fresh clover treatment (no significant difference). The majority of this N leaching was not due to NO(3) ( - )-N loss, but to that of NH(4) ( + )-N. The mean N leaching for all fertilizer treatments during the entire rice growing season was 1.58 kg N ha( - 1). Composted rice straw plus soybean cake produced leaching losses which were 65-75% lower than those with the application of fresh clover and ammonium sulfate. N accumulation resulting from nitrification in the fallow season could be a key source of nitrate-N leaching when fields become re-flooded before rice transplanting in the following year; particular attention should be paid to this phenomenon. PMID:20676930

  20. Modeling Nitrogen Leaching With A Biogeochemical Model Coupled With Soil Hydrology Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, R.; Yang, X.; Jain, A.; Post, W. M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2008-12-01

    Land use changes for cropland, excessive application of fertilizers in agriculture, and increase in anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel burning have lead to widespread increases in anthropogenic production of reactive N and NH3 emissions, and N deposition rates. An important consequence of these processes is intensification of soil nutrient leaching activities, leading to serious ground water contamination problems. The current study focuses on the issue of nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) leaching due to land cover changes for cropland, excess N fertilizer application, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition on nitrogen leaching at a global scale. Simulations of nitrogen leaching require integration of processes involving soil hydrology and biogeochemical cycles. An existing terrestrial coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle model, Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), was used to estimate nitrogen leaching. The N-cycle in ISAM includes the major processes associated with nitrogen (immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, leaching, nitrogen fixation, and vegetation nitrogen uptake). ISAM also considers how carbon and nitrogen dynamics are influenced by the effects of human perturbations to the N cycle including atmospheric deposition and fertilizer application, and the fate of N in land use activities, i.e., deforestation and agricultural harvest. In this study, the ISAM soil hydrology was extended and improved with CLM 3.5 hydrology processes and algorithms, which extended the modeling capabilities to consider the prediction of nitrogen leaching. The model performance was evaluated with flow and nutrient data at several locations within the Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois, and flow data in contrasting watersheds in Oklahoma. This talk will focus on describing the results of a series of modeling experiments examining the influence of land management changes for cropland and nitrogen deposition on nitrogen leaching at a global scale

  1. Managing metolachlor and atrazine leaching losses using lignite fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Neera

    2012-10-01

    Application of low cost amendment for pesticide retention in soil is an important area of research in environmental sciences. The present study reports the potential of coal fly ash (Inderprastha and Badarpur), a waste from thermal power stations, for retaining soil applied metolachlor and atrazine within the application zone. Both the fly ashes were highly effective in reducing the leaching losses of metolachlor and atrazine and at 2% and 5% fly ash amendment levels the herbicides were retained in the top 15 cm profile of the column. However, fly ashes varied in their capacity in reducing the downward mobility of herbicides, as the Inderprastha fly ash was more effective than the Badarpur fly ash. Although fly ash contained heavy metals like Cr, Cu or Pb, but they were not detected in the leachate. Also, concentration of other metals like Zn, Mn and Fe in leachate decreased after fly ash amendment. Results of this study have implications in reducing the leaching losses of these herbicides in agricultural soils. PMID:22854744

  2. Virtual Nitrogen Losses from Organic Food Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattell Noll, L.; Galloway, J. N.; Leach, A. M.; Seufert, V.; Atwell, B.; Shade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is necessary for crop and animal production, but when it is lost to the environment, it creates a cascade of detrimental environmental impacts. The nitrogen challenge is to maximize the food production benefits of Nr, while minimizing losses to the environment. The first nitrogen footprint tool was created in 2012 to help consumers learn about the Nr losses to the environment that result from an individual's lifestyle choices. The nitrogen lost during food production was estimated with virtual nitrogen factors (VNFs) that quantify the amount of nitrogen lost to the environment per unit nitrogen consumed. Alternative agricultural systems, such as USDA certified organic farms, utilize practices that diverge from conventional production. In order to evaluate the potential sustainability of these alternative agricultural systems, our team calculated VNFs that reflect organic production. Initial data indicate that VNFs for organic grains and organic starchy roots are comparable to, but slightly higher than conventional (+10% and +20% respectively). In contrast, the VNF for organic vegetables is significantly higher (+90%) and the VNF for organic legumes is significantly lower (-90%). Initial data on organic meat production shows that organic poultry and organic pigmeat are comparable to conventional production (both <5% difference), but that the organic beef VNF is significantly higher (+30%). These data show that in some cases organic and conventional production are comparable in terms of nitrogen efficiency. However, since conventional production relies heavily on the creation of new reactive nitrogen (Haber-Bosch, biological nitrogen fixation) and organic production primarily utilizes already existing reactive nitrogen (manure, crop residue, compost), the data also show that organic production contributes less new reactive nitrogen to the environment than conventional production (approximately 70% less). Therefore, we conclude that on a local

  3. Nitrogen loss during solar drying of biosolids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar drying has been used extensively to dewater biosolids for ease of transportation and to a lesser degree to reduce pathogens prior to land application. The nitrogen in biosolids makes it a relatively inexpensive but valuable source of fertilizer. In this study, nitrogen loss from tilled and unt...

  4. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission. PMID:25388561

  5. Effect of biochar on leaching of organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from compost in bioretention systems.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Hamid; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Flury, Markus

    2015-07-15

    Compost is used in bioretention systems to improve soil quality, water infiltration, and retention of contaminants. However, compost contains dissolved organic matter, nitrate, and phosphorus, all of which can leach out and potentially contaminate ground and surface waters. To reduce the leaching of nutrients and dissolved organic matter from compost, biochar may be mixed into the bioretention systems. Our objective was to test whether biochar and co-composted biochar mixed into mature compost can reduce the leaching of organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. There was no significant difference between the effects of biochar and co-composted biochar amendments on nutrient leaching. Further, biochar amendments did not significantly reduce the leaching of dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and phosphorus as compared to the compost only treatment. The compost-sand mix was the most effective in reducing nitrate and phosphorus leaching among the media. PMID:25828410

  6. Pathways of nitrogen loss following land clearing in a humid tropical forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Pamela; Vitousek, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Tropical deforestation generally leads to large losses of carbon and nitrogen. The Premontane Wet Forest Life Zone is subject to the highest rate of deforestation in Central America, and carbon and nutrient losses in from these fertile soils is very rapid and extreme. Losses of 2000 to 3000 kgN/ha have been reported. Losses of this magnitude could be extremely significant on a regional or global scale if even a small proportion of this nitrogen is lost as nitrous oxide to the atmosphere or through leaching of nitrate to rivers. This study seeks to measure the rates and regulation of nitrogen transformations, and the pathways of nitrogen losses following land clearing and burning at a site in the Premontane Wet Forest Life Zone near Turrialba, Costa Rica.

  7. Leaching and utilization of nitrogen during a spring wheat catch crop succession.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Juan M; Liedgens, Markus

    2009-01-01

    An experiment covering a 2-yr spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) catch crop succession was conducted in lysimeters to account for the losses of N due to leaching. We sought to relate these losses to the N uptake of the main crop and to integrate the estimated N loss and uptake into a balance. The non-winter hardy catch crops [yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), Phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)] as well as bare soil fallow were studied at low and high N input levels of 4 and 29 g N m(-2) yr(-1), respectively. Catch crops allowed for an effective reduction of N leaching of 0.33 to 1.67 g N m(-2) yr(-1) compared to fallow. Reductions in N leaching were achieved mainly by avoiding the fallow period during autumn and winter while the catch crop species grown had little impact. During the spring wheat growing season, N leaching losses were highest after yellow mustard, the most effective catch crop for the entire crop succession. A balance of N indicated that the reductions in N leaching exerted by the catch crops did not result in a higher overall utilization of N by spring wheat. Thus, the efficacy shown by catch crops in reducing N leaching during growth is relatively lower when considering the entire crop succession. In addition, the N saved by growing catch crops does not increase N utilization by succeeding spring wheat. PMID:19465716

  8. Leaching losses of two nutrients and an herbicide from two sandy soils during transient drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Mansell, R.S.; Wheeler, W.B.; Calvert, D.W.

    1980-09-01

    Shallow-tilled (ST) and deep-tilled (DT) plots of an acid, sandy soil were used to measure changes in potassium, nitrogen nitrates, and Terbacil concentrations in subsurface drainage water from the plots. Fertilizer and Terbacil herbicide was applied to the soil. Transient water flow was applied to the plots for a 2-wk period after 7.6 cm of irrigation had been achieved. Drainage water contained higher concentrations of all solutes than did DT drainage water. In the DT soil, the discharges of potassium, nitrogen producing nitrates, and terbacil were only 29.6, 37.0, and 13.9% respectively as large as those in the ST soil. Total cumulative drainage from DT soil was only 51.1% that from ST soil. Thus, relatively small quantities of irrigation and rainfall produced relatively large nutrient discharges. As irrigation was begun soon after fertilizer application, the leaching loss of these solutes would be expected to be greater than if water application had occurred later. 13 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

  9. N-15 tracing helps explaining N leaching losses from contrasting forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staelens, J.; Rütting, T.; Huygens, D.; Müller, C.; Verheyen, K.; Boeckx, P.

    2009-04-01

    Despite chronically enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition to forest ecosystems in Europe and NE America, considerable N retention by forests has been observed, reducing N leaching losses. Organic and mineral soil layers typically immobilize more N than the aboveground biomass, but it is unclear which factors determine N retention in forest ecoystems. However, this knowledge is crucial to assess the impact of changing anthropogenic N emissions on future N cycling and N loss of forests. For coniferous and deciduous forest stands at comparable sites, it is known that both N deposition onto the forest floor as well as N loss by leaching below the rooting zone are significantly higher in coniferous stands. In addition, the N loss in coniferous stands is often more enhanced than can be explained by the higher N input only. This suggests lower N retention by coniferous stands, and may be related to differences in litter and soil characteristics, microbial activity, and N uptake by plant roots. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of forest type on N retention using 15N tracing techniques: a field tracer experiment and a combination of in situ isotope pool dilution and a tracing model. The N dynamics were examined for two adjacent forest stands (pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)) on a well-drained sandy soil and with a similar stand history, located in a region with high N deposition (Belgium). Input-output N budgets were established by quantifying atmospheric deposition and leaching below the rooting zone, and confirmed the above finding of higher N deposition and disproportionately higher N loss for the pine stand compared to the oak stand. First, the fate of inorganic N within the ecosystems was studied by spraying three pulses of dissolved 15N, either as ammonium or as nitrate, onto the forest floor in 12 plots of 25 m2. The organic and mineral soil layers, tree roots, soil water percolate, ferns, and tree foliage were sampled

  10. Field measurements of water and nitrogen losses under irrigated maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengni, L.; Vachaud, G.; Thony, J. L.; Laty, R.; Garino, B.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P.; Viscogliosi, R.

    1994-10-01

    An intensive multidisciplinary experiment has been conducted over several years at La Côte Saint-André, near Grenoble, France. The major objective is to determine an optimal fertilizer application scheme for an irrigated agricultural system. Such a scheme would not degrade the quality of the environment, and yet would maintain a profitable level of crop production. This study is explicitly related to the cultivation of irrigated maize, a major crop in the area. The various terms of the water balance (consumption, drainage, soil storage) and of the nitrogen cycle (mineralization, plant uptake, leaching) were obtained from intensive monitoring in the upper layer of the 0.8 m of soil which corresponds to the root zone of the crop. This entailed the combined use of a neutron moisture meter, tensiometers and soil suction cups. To determine the specific effects of fertilization and crop growth, there were different treatments. These corresponded to a traditional fertilizer application of 260 kg N ha -1, no fertilization, and bare soil, carried out within an area of approximately 2 ha. Several sites were instrumented on each treatment, one of them being specifically for the application and the monitoring of 15N-tagged fertilizer. The results have shown that, in terms of the water balance, irrigation water management is extremely efficient, as drainage losses under the maize culture are negligible during the crop cycle. The situation is totally different, however, during the intercrop period (October-April), owing to rainfall. Then the soil is left bare and evaporation is very small, and now the drainage corresponds to about 90% of total inputs from precipitation. In terms of the nitrogen cycle, the results showed clearly that up to 150 kg N ha -1 was produced by mineralization in the soil. Nitrogen leaching beyond the root zone during the crop cycle is negligible, regardless of the rate of fertilizer application, as a result of the very small amount of drainage, despite

  11. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrate leaching of a sandy soil amended with different organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Pilar; Madejón, Engracia; Cabrera, Francisco

    2006-04-01

    35-50 cm) was determined. The nitrate concentration in drainage water confirmed the results obtained in the incubation experiment: nitrate leaching was higher in soil treated with MWC due to its higher N-mineralization rate. Nevertheless, the nitrate losses represented a low amount compared with the total nitrogen added to soil. No clear signs of water-draining contamination were observed during the first year after the application of AC and PS; however, the nitrate leaching in soil treated with MWC slightly exceeded the limit allowed for the Drinking Water Directive 98/83/CE. PMID:16634232

  12. Effects of polymer-coated urea on nitrate leaching and nitrogen uptake by potato.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa L; Rosen, Carl J; Moncrief, John F

    2010-01-01

    Increasing groundwater nitrate concentrations in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production regions have prompted the need to identify alternative nitrogen management practices. A new type of polymer-coated urea (PCU) called Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (Agrium, Inc., Calgary, AB) is significantly lower in cost than comparable PCUs, but its potential to reduce nitrate leaching and improve fertilizer recovery has not been extensively studied in potato. In 2006 and 2007, four rates of PCU applied at emergence were compared with equivalent rates of soluble N split-applied at emergence and post-hilling. Additional treatments included a 0 N control, two PCU timing treatments (applied at preplant or planting), and a soluble N fertigation simulation. Nitrate leaching, fertilizer N recovery, N use efficiency (NUE), and residual soil inorganic N were measured. Both 2006 and 2007 were low leaching years. Nitrate leaching with PCU (21.3 kg NO(3)-N ha(-1) averaged over N rates) was significantly lower than with split-applied soluble N (26.9 kg NO(3)-N ha(-1)). The soluble N fertigation treatment resulted in similar leaching as PCU at equivalent N rates. Apparent fertilizer N recovery with PCU (65% averaged over four rates) tended to be higher than split-applied soluble N (55%) at equivalent rates (p = 0.059). Residual soil N and NUE were not significantly affected by N source. Under the conditions of this study, PCU significantly reduced leaching and tended to improved N recovery over soluble N applied in two applications and resulted in similar N recovery and nitrate leaching as soluble N applied in six applications. PMID:20176822

  13. Leaching behavior of total organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from banana peel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruixue; Sun, Shujuan; Xu, Yan; Qiu, Xiudong; Yang, Jili; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-01-01

    The leaching behavior of organic carbon and nutrient compounds from banana peel (BP) was investigated in batch assays with respect to particle size, contact time, pH value, and temperature. The granularity, contact time, pH, and temperature caused no significant effects on the leaching of total phosphorus (TP) from the BP. The maximum leached total nitrogen (TN) content was found at pH 5.0 and 90 minutes, while no significant effects were caused by the granularity and temperature. The maximum leached total organic carbon (TOC) content was found by using a powder of 40 mesh, 150 minutes and at pH 6.0, while the temperature had no effect on the TOC leaching. The proportions of the TN, TP, and TOC contents leached from the dried BP ranged from 33.6% to 40.9%, 60.4% to 72.7%, and 8.2% to 9.9%, respectively, indicating that BP could be a potential pollution source for surface and ground water if discharged as domestic waste or reutilized without pretreatment. PMID:26442486

  14. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P < 0.05); (2) the long-term application of NPK and OM increased the NH4(+) -N, DOC, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01), while NH4(+) -N contents in soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01). PMID:25338383

  15. Winter wheat starter nitrogen management: a preplant soil nitrate test and site specific nitrogen loss potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing highly variable residual nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) following corn (Zea mays L.) is difficult because it can supply starter nitrogen (N) for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and/or be leached into water resources during the fall-winter water-recharge season in the Humid East. A series of...

  16. Modelling the ecosystem effects of nitrogen deposition: Model of Ecosystem Retention and Loss of Inorganic Nitrogen (MERLIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, B. J.; Ferrier, R. C.; Jenkins, A.; Emmett, B. A.; Wright, R. F.; Tietema, A.

    A catchment-scale mass-balance model of linked carbon and nitrogen cycling in ecosystems has been developed for simulating leaching losses of inorganic nitrogen. The model (MERLIN) considers linked biotic and abiotic processes affecting the cycling and storage of nitrogen. The model is aggregated in space and time and contains compartments intended to be observable and/or interpretable at the plot or catchment scale. The structure of the model includes the inorganic soil, a plant compartment and two soil organic compartments. Fluxes in and out of the ecosystem and between compartments are regulated by atmospheric deposition, hydrological discharge, plant uptake, litter production, wood production, microbial immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification. Nitrogen fluxes are controlled by carbon productivity, the C:N ratios of organic compartments and inorganic nitrogen in soil solution. Inputs required are: 1) temporal sequences of carbon fluxes and pools- 2) time series of hydrological discharge through the soils, 3) historical and current external sources of inorganic nitrogen; 4) current amounts of nitrogen in the plant and soil organic compartments; 5) constants specifying the nitrogen uptake and immobilization characteristics of the plant and soil organic compartments; and 6) soil characteristics such as depth, porosity, bulk density, and anion/cation exchange constants. Outputs include: 1) concentrations and fluxes of NO3 and NH4 in soil solution and runoff; 2) total nitrogen contents of the organic and inorganic compartments; 3) C:N ratios of the aggregated plant and soil organic compartments; and 4) rates of nitrogen uptake and immobilization and nitrogen mineralization. The behaviour of the model is assessed for a combination of land-use change and nitrogen deposition scenarios in a series of speculative simulations. The results of the simulations are in broad agreement with observed and hypothesized behaviour of nitrogen dynamics in

  17. [Effects of poplar-amaranth intercropping system on the soil nitrogen loss under different nitrogen applying levels].

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun; Xue, Jian-Hui; Wu, Dian-Ming; Jin, Mei-Juan; Wu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of soil nitrogen loss were investigated based on field experiments in two types of poplar-amaranth intercropping systems (spacing: L1 2 m x 5 m, L2 2 m x 15 m) with four N application rates, i. e., 0 (N1), 91 (N2), 137 (N3) and 183 (N4) kg · hm(-2). The regulation effects on the soil surface runoff, leaching loss and soil erosion were different among the different types of intercropping systems: L1 > L2 > L3 (amaranth monocropping). Compared with the amaranth monocropping, the soil surface runoff rates of L1 and L2 decreased by 65.1% and 55.9%, the soil leaching rates of L1 and L2 with a distance of 0.5 m from the poplar tree row de- creased by 30.0% and 28.9%, the rates with a distance of 1. 5 m decreased by 25. 6% and 21.9%, and the soil erosion rates decreased by 65.0% and 55.1%, respectively. The control effects of two intercropping systems on TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N in soil runoff and leaching loss were in the order of L1 > L2 > L3. Compared with the amaranth monocropping, TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N loss rates in soil runoff of L1 decreased by 62.9%, 45.1% and 69.2%, while the loss rates of L2 decreased by 23.4%, 6.9% and 46.2% under N1 (91 kg · hm(-2)), respectively. High- er tree-planting density and closer positions to the polar tree row were more effective on controlling the loss rates of NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N caused by soil leaching. The loss proportion of NO(3-)-N in soil runoff decreased with the increasing nitrogen rate under the same tree-planting density, while that of NH(4+)-N increased. Leaching loss of NO(3-)-N had a similar trend with that of NH(4+)-N, i. e. , N3 > N2 > N1 > N0. PMID:25757310

  18. Manure Application under Winter Conditions: Nutrient Runoff and Leaching Losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses can be difficult to predict due to wide variations in weather within a year and between years. This study was conducted to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure ...

  19. Manure Application Under Winter Conditions: Nutrient Runoff and Leaching Losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses are difficult to predict. This study was conducted in order to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure based on its relative placement with respect to snow. A labo...

  20. Manure application under winter conditions: Nutrient runoff and leaching losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses are difficult to predict. This study was conducted in order to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure based on its relative placement with respect to snow. A labo...

  1. Modelling nitrogen leaching from sewage sludge application to arable land in the Lombardy region (northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Perego, Alessia; Acutis, Marco

    2013-09-01

    Sewage sludge can be used as fertiliser, offering the possibility of safely recycling this waste product as a resource in agricultural applications. As the environmental concerns related to waste recycling in agricultural applications are well-known, restrictions on the use of sewage sludge have been implemented by the EU and local authorities. This work aimed to evaluate the nitrogen leaching associated with the application of sludge and the effectiveness of the temporal restrictions on its application implemented to safeguard the environment in the Lombardy region of northern Italy (120 days in Nitrate Vulnerable Zones and 90 days elsewhere) using the CropSyst model which was first validated. The effects of fertilisation using four different sludge types on N leaching were simulated at five sites under cultivation with maize and rice crops; six different timing schemes for sludge application were tested, three of which involved dates that were in agreement (AT) with the regulation, while the other three were not in agreement (NAT). We detected a significant effect of the sludge type and application timing, whereas the effect of their interaction was never significant. The mean annual leaching was 22 to 154 kg N ha(-1). The higher the ammonium N content in the sludge was, the greater the potential for N leaching was found to be. For the maize crop, the distribution of sludge in the late fall period resulted in significantly greater N leaching (61 kg N ha(-1)) and led to lower yields (9 t DM ha(-1)) compared to late winter fertilisation (49 kg N ha(-1); 10 t DM ha(-1)), whereas no differences in N leaching or yield were detected between AT and NAT, which was also observed for the rice crop. Therefore, the applied temporal constraints did not always appear to be advantageous for protecting the environment from leaching. PMID:23751334

  2. Abiotic gas formation drives nitrogen loss from a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Sparks, Jed P

    2009-11-01

    In arid environments such as deserts, nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient for biological activity. The majority of the ecosystem nitrogen flux is typically thought to be driven by production and loss of reactive nitrogen species by microorganisms in the soil. We found that high soil-surface temperatures (greater than 50 degrees C), driven by solar radiation, are the primary cause of nitrogen loss in Mojave Desert soils. This abiotic pathway not only enables the balancing of arid ecosystem nitrogen budgets, but also changes our view of global nitrogen cycling and the predicted impact of climate change and increased temperatures on nitrogen bioavailability. PMID:19892980

  3. Nitrogen and phosphorus leaching as affected by gypsum amendment and exchangeable calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The movement of N and P from the soil by leaching contributes to losses from agricultural land and represents an important environmental and human health concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum amendment and the resultant impact of different levels of exchangeable C...

  4. Impact of anthropogenic induced nitrogen input and liming on phosphorous leaching in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, Stefan; Puhlmann, Heike; Wilpert, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Phosphorous (P) is essential for sustainable forest growth, yet the impact of anthropogenic impacts on P leaching losses from forest soils are hardly known. Methods: We conducted an irrigation experiment with 128 mesocosms of 7.4 cm diameter containing 20 cm mineral soil plus the organic layer from three forest sites representing a gradient of resin extractable P of the A-horizon. On each site we selected a Fagus sylvatica and a Picea abies managed subsite. Half of the cylinders where planted with seedlings of the respective species to access the plant impact. We simulated ambient rain (AR), anthropogenic nitrogen input (NI) of 100 kg/ha/a and forest liming (FL) with a dolomite input of 0.3 Mg/ha/a. Soil solution was extracted from the organic layer and at 20 cm depth. We collected the soil solution over a period of 13.5 months and analyzed it separated by 5 periods. The soil solution was analyzed for total phosphorous (TP) by measuring the molybdane reactive phosphorous after acid digestion. To analyze the multivariate dataset we applied random forest modelling and used partial (co-)dependency plots to interpret the results. Results: The TP content of the soil solution from the organic horizon was approximately ten times higher than the soil solution content of the mineral soil. The NI treatment did increase the TP content on all sites. The increase was more pronounced in the organic layer than in the mineral layer. The FL treatment lead to a slight increase of TP in the organic layer while we could observe a slight decrease in the mineral horizon. Both the organic layer and the mineral horizon showed a seasonal cycle with the exception of one Picea abies subsite which displayed a constant increase in TP in the organic layer. The seasonal cycle of the organic horizon had a minimum during the period of April to July, while the minimum at the mineral horizon was during November to January. Conclusion: TP in the soil solution is highest in the organic

  5. [Effects of seeding-box total fertilization on rice yield and nitrogen loss].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Liang; Li, You-Hong; Zhang, Ai-Ping; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Tian-Cheng; Chen, Chen; Hong, Yu; Yang, Zheng-Li

    2012-07-01

    By using seeding-box total fertilization technology, a two-year field plot experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying medium rate of controlled-release urea fertilizer (MN, 80 kg N x hm(-2)), high rate of controlled-release urea fertilizer (HN, 120 kg N x hm(-2)), and conventional urea fertilizer (FP, 300 kg N x hm(-2)) on rice yield and nitrogen loss. As compared with FP, HN did not decrease rice yield significantly, and MN and HN increased the two-year average nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by 26.2% and 20.7%, respectively (the NUE in treatment FP was 33.2%). In treatment FP, the total N concentration in surface water peaked after 1-3 days of urea application; while in treatments MN and HN, the total N concentration in surfate water peaked after 7-9 days of urea application, and was significantly lower than that in treatment FP throughout the rice growth period. The nitrogen leaching loss in treatment FP mainly occurred at tillering stage, while that in treatments MN and HN delayed to tillering-flowering stage. In all treatments, the NO3(-)-N loss accounted for 59.7% - 64.2% of the total N loss. HN decreased the total N leaching loss by 51.8%, as compared with FP. PMID:23173459

  6. Nitrogen fertilizer form and associated nitrate leaching from cool-season lawn turf.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Karl; Kopp, Kelly L

    2004-01-01

    Various N fertilizer sources are available for lawn turf. Few field studies, however, have determined the losses of nitrate (NO(3)-N) from lawns receiving different formulations of N fertilizers. The objectives of this study were to determine the differences in NO(3)-N leaching losses among various N fertilizer sources and to ascertain when losses were most likely to occur. The field experiment was set out in a completely random design on a turf typical of the lawns in southern New England. Treatments consisted of four fertilizer sources with fast- and slow-release N formulations: (i) ammonium nitrate (AN), (ii) polymer-coated sulfur-coated urea (PCSCU), (iii) organic product, and (iv) a nonfertilized control. The experiment was conducted across three years and fertilized to supply a total of 147 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Percolate was collected with zero-tension lysimeters. Flow-weighted NO(3)-N concentrations were 4.6, 0.57, 0.31, and 0.18 mg L(-1) for AN, PCSCU, organic, and the control, respectively. After correcting for control losses, average annual NO(3)-N leaching losses as a percentage of N applied were 16.8% for AN, 1.7% for PCSCU, and 0.6% for organic. Results indicate that NO(3)-N leaching losses from lawn turf in southern New England occur primarily during the late fall through the early spring. To reduce the threat of NO(3)-N leaching losses, lawn turf fertilizers should be formulated with a larger percentage of slow-release N than soluble N. PMID:15356243

  7. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to fresh broiler litter, little is known about the dynamics of composted litter derived-nutrient in the ecosystem. In this study, the potential leaching losses of nutrients from compost relative to fresh broiler litter along with flue gas desulfurization (FGD gypsum), as a nutrient immobil...

  8. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss.

    PubMed

    Adeli, Ardeshir; Sheng, J; Jenkins, J N; Feng, G

    2015-03-01

    The effect of composted litter relative to fresh litter on leaching losses of nutrients has not been well documented. Fresh and composted broiler litter was surface-applied to bermudagrass (hay) [ (L.) Pers.] established in undisturbed soil columns based on N need of the grass in the presence or absence of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to evaluate an approach to reduce broiler litter nutrient leaching potential. Columns were periodically leached and biomass was harvested during the 60-d experiment. Total N applied to bermudagrass from broiler litter was 320 kg ha. Gypsum was mixed with fresh and composted litter at the rate based on 20% of litter weight. For composted broiler litter, NO-N, P, K, Cu, and Zn contents in the leachate obtained from the first leaching event were 58, 50, 40, 32, and 38% less than fresh broiler litter, respectively. Significant decreases in NO-N (13%), P (53%), Cu (17%), and Zn (28%) in leachate were obtained when gypsum was mixed with fresh broiler litter. Fresh broiler litter and composted broiler litter applications increased bermudagrass growth compared with the control and gypsum significantly increased yields when mixed with broiler litter. Composted broiler litter application significantly increased N and organic C in the soil compared with fresh litter. Results demonstrate that coapplication of composted broiler litter with FGD gypsum provide the most effective management option for minimizing leaching losses of nutrients while sustaining crop productivity. PMID:26023985

  9. Root growth and nitrate-nitrogen leaching of catch crops following spring wheat.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Juan M; Feil, Boy; Stamp, Peter; Liedgens, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Growing nitrogen (N) catch crops can reduce NO(3)-N leaching after cultivating cereals. The objective of this study was to relate NO(3)-N leaching to variation in the uptake of N and the size and distribution of the root systems of different catch crops species. In a 3-yr lysimeter experiment, phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and a Brassica species (yellow mustard [Brassica alba L.] or a hybrid of turnip rape [B. rapa L. spp. oleifera (DC.) Metzg.] and Chinese cabbage [B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt]) were grown after the harvest of spring wheat under two levels of N supply. Bare soil lysimeters served as the control. Water percolation from the lysimeters and the NO(3)(-) concentration in the leachate were measured weekly from the sowing until the presumed frost-kill of the catch crops. Minirhizotrons were used to assess the spatial and temporal patterns of root growth from 0.10 to 1.00 m. The catch crop species differed in their shoot biomass, N uptake, total NO(3)-N leaching, and root growth. The results suggested that there was no strict relationship between the total NO(3)-N leaching of each catch crop species and the N uptake or parameters that indicate static characteristics of the root system. In contrast, the ranking of each catch crop species by parameters that indicate early root growth was inversely related to the ranking of each catch crop species in NO(3)-N leaching. The rapid establishment of the root system is essential for a catch crop following spring wheat to reduce the amount of NO(3)-N leaching after the harvest of spring wheat. PMID:20400580

  10. Impacts of Future Land-Use Change on Nitrogen Leaching and Global Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiyappan, P.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.; McIsaac, G.; Lawrence, P.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural expansion, excessive application of fertilizers, and increase in fossil fuel burning have led to widespread increases in anthropogenic production of reactive nitrogen (N), increasing N-deposition rates. An important consequence of these processes is intensification of soil nutrient leaching activities, leading to serious ground water and coastal water contamination problems. During the 21st century, projected land-use changes due to expansion of cropland surface are likely to significantly enhance anthropogenic soil N loading, intensifying nutrient leaching activities. Additionally, projected soil warming and increased fire disturbances in the high latitude forest ecosystems is also likely to increasingly mobilize soil N, and significantly contributing to the global leaching budget. In this study we employ a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), recently coupled to the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM1), to investigate the 21st century budget of soil N-leaching due to both anthropogenic and natural causes. ISAM (spatial resolution of 0.5ox0.5o) contains process based representation of prognostically coupled carbon-nitrogen cycles, and simulates all major N processes (immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, leaching, biological fixation, and vegetation uptake). Biogeophysical schemes in the ISAM have been adapted from the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM3.5/CLM4) and the Common Land Model (CoLM), and fluxes of water and carbon are integrated at a time step of 30 minutes. ISAM incorporates land use change and secondary forest dynamics, to simulate the anthropogenic perturbation effects to the N cycle including atmospheric deposition and fertilizer application. Finally, the ISAM-CESM framework integrates a nutrient runoff tracer into the existing River Transport Model (RTM) in the CESM, enabling this study. In this talk, we will specifically focus on the results of a series of simulation

  11. Nutrient leaching losses in lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Syahrul; Corre, Marife D.; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, Sumatra, Indonesia is experiencing rapid expansion of oil palm and rubber plantations by conversion of rainforest. This is evident from the 2.9 thousand km2 decrease in forest area in this region over the last 15 years. Such rapid land-use change necessitates assessment of its environmental impacts. Our study was aimed to assess the impact of forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations on nutrient leaching losses. Land-use conversion increases nutrient leaching losses due to changes in vegetation litter input, rooting depth, nutrient cycling and management (e.g. fertilization) practices. Our study area was in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each soil landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured leaching losses using suction lysimeters installed at 1.5-m soil depth, which was well below the rooting depth, with bi-weekly to monthly sampling from February to December 2013. In general, the loam Acrisol landscape, particularly the forest and oil palm plantations, had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of dissolved organic N, Na, Ca, Mg, total Al, total S and Cl than the clay Acrisol of the same land uses (all P ≤ 0.05). Among land uses in the loam Acrisol landscape, oil palm had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, dissolved organic C, total P, total S and Cl than rubber plantation whereas forest and jungle rubber showed intermediate fluxes (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for total P); oil palm had also higher Na, Ca, Mg and total Al leaching fluxes than all the other land uses (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for Na

  12. Delayed plowing of forages within potato rotation reduces nitrate leaching losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Jamieson, T.; Nyiraneza, J.; Somers, G.; Thompson, B.; Murray, B.; Grimmett, M.

    2013-12-01

    The potato industry plays an important role in the economics in Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. Intensive potato production has been conducted on sandy soil underlain by a semi-confined or unconfined sandstone aquifer, which provides all the drinking water and a large majority of stream flow on the island. Typically, potato is grown in rotation with grain underseeded with forages, with the latter being plowed down in the fall of the third season. High levels of nitrate leaching losses from the potato production systems have adversely affected both groundwater and associated surface water quality. Beneficial Management Practices (BMPs) were proposed for maintaining optimal crop production while mitigating the nitrate contamination in PEI. But there is limited information on the environmental performance of the BMPs in commercial fields. The potentials of delayed forage plowing from fall to spring to reduce nitrate losses were evaluated in commercial fields at two separated sites in PEI during October 2010 and March 2013. At Site 1, two tile-drained fields were paired for spring vs. fall plowing treatments (with pre-plow herbicidal treatment); weekly tile-drainage samples were collected to evidence the effects of the treatments. At Site 2, a field was split in half for spring vs. fall plowing treatments (without pre-plow herbicidal treatment). Shallow piezometers were installed at the upper and lower ends of the field for water sampling, with the upper end one indicating the effects of shallow groundwater inflow and the lower ones evidencing the combined effects of groundwater inflow and drainage from plowing treatments. Soil drainage was estimated through coupled LEACHN and MODFLOW simulations. Nitrate leaching losses were calculated as the integration of measured leached nitrate concentrations and simulated drainage. Field monitoring showed that nitrate leaching mainly occurred during the offseason. Nitrate leaching during the forage phase were estimated to be

  13. Increased nitrogen leaching following soil freezing is due to decreased root uptake in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John L; Socci, Anne M; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-08-01

    The depth and duration of snow pack is declining in the northeastern United States as a result of warming air temperatures. Since snow insulates soil, a decreased snow pack can increase the frequency of soil freezing, which has been shown to have important biogeochemical implications. One of the most notable effects of soil freezing is increased inorganic nitrogen losses from soil during the following growing season. Decreased nitrogen retention is thought to be due to reduced root uptake, but has not yet been measured directly. We conducted a 2-year snow-removal experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA to determine the effects of soil freezing on root uptake and leaching of inorganic nitrogen simultaneously. Snow removal significantly increased the depth of maximal soil frost by 37.2 and 39.5 cm in the first and second winters, respectively (P < 0.001 in 2008/2009 and 2009/2010). As a consequence of soil freezing, root uptake of ammonium declined significantly during the first and second growing seasons after snow removal (P = 0.023 for 2009 and P = 0.005 for 2010). These observed reductions in root nitrogen uptake coincided with significant increases in soil solution concentrations of ammonium in the Oa horizon (P = 0.001 for 2009 and 2010) and nitrate in the B horizon (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003 for 2009 and 2010, respectively). The excess flux of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from the Oa horizon that was attributable to soil freezing was 7.0 and 2.8 kg N ha(-1) in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The excess flux of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from the B horizon was lower, amounting to 1.7 and 0.7 kg N ha(-1) in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Results of this study provide direct evidence that soil freezing reduces root nitrogen uptake, demonstrating that the effects of winter climate change on root function has significant consequences for nitrogen retention and loss in forest ecosystems. PMID:24574104

  14. Ammonia and odour emissions from UK pig farms and nitrogen leaching from outdoor pig production. A review.

    PubMed

    Webb, J; Broomfield, Mark; Jones, Stephanie; Donovan, Brian

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed specific literature for emissions of ammonia (NH3) and odours from all stages of pig production together with nitrogen (N) leaching from raising pigs outdoors. Emissions of NH3 decrease with decreases in the crude protein (CP) content of pig diets, at all stages of manure management. The CPs of pig diets have been greatly reduced by matching the CP content to the protein required at each stage of the animals' growth and by using synthetic essential amino acids to minimise total CP intake. The CP contents of the dietary ingredients needed to provide energy for the animals impose further limits to reductions in dietary CP. Housing systems have been designed and evaluated which offer potential for reducing NH3 emissions. However such designs may not be applicable at all stages of the pigs' development and the careful management needed to ensure their effective working may be costly and difficult to implement on commercial farms. The factors behind odour emissions are less well characterised. Reducing diet CP to 160 g CP kg(-1) has been shown to reduce odour emissions but further CP reductions may increase them. Some reductions in odour emissions from buildings can be achieved by careful management of the ventilation rate but the most effective measures to reduce emissions of NH3 and odours are to cover slurry stores and to inject slurry into soil. Changes in the feeding and management of outdoor pigs mean that N leaching losses may be up to 50% less than previously reported. No studies have been undertaken that compare the N leached from pigs raised outdoors, versus that arising from the application of pig manure from an equal number of housed pigs. As a precursor to any field study, current models could be used to provide a first estimate of any systematic differences. PMID:24211346

  15. Accuracy and performance of three water quality models for simulating nitrate nitrogen losses under corn.

    PubMed

    Jabro, J D; Jabro, A D; Fox, R H

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models can be used to predict N dynamics in a soil-water-plant system. The simulation accuracy and performance of three models: LEACHM (Leaching Estimation And CHemistry Model), NCSWAP (Nitrogen and Carbon cycling in Soil, Water And Plant), and SOILN to predict NO3-N leaching were evaluated and compared to field data from a 5-yr experiment conducted on a Hagerstown silt loam (fine, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludalf). Nitrate N losses past 1.2 m from N-fertilized and manured corn (Zea mays L.) were measured with zero-tension pan lysimeters for 5 yr. The models were calibrated using 1989-1990 data and validated using 1988-1989, 1990-1991, 1991-1992, and 1992-1993 NO3-N leaching data. Statistical analyses indicated that LEACHM, NCSWAP, and SOILN models were able to provide accurate simulations of annual NO3-N leaching losses below the 1.2-m depth for 8, 9, and 7 of 10 cases, respectively, in the validation years. The inaccuracy in the models' annual simulations for the control and manure treatments seems to be related to inadequate description of processes of N and C transformations in the models' code. The overall performance and accuracy of the SOILN model were worse than those of LEACHM and NCSWAP. The root mean square error (RMSE) and modeling efficiency (ME) were 10.7 and 0.9, 9.5 and 0.93, and 20.7 and 0.63 for LEACHM, NCSWAP, and SOILN, respectively. Overall, the three models have the potential to predict NO3-N losses below 1.2-m depth from fertilizer and manure nitrogen applied to corn without recalibration of models from year to year. PMID:16825442

  16. Stabilized nitrogen fertilizers and application rate influence nitrogen losses under rainfed spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) losses associated with fertilizer application have negative economic and environmental consequences, but urease and nitrification inhibitors have potential to reduce N losses. The effectiveness of these inhibitors has been studied extensively in irrigated but not rainfed systems. Theref...

  17. [Evaluation of nitrogen loss way in summer maize system under different fertilizer N managements].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Hu, Ke-Lin; Li, Guang-De; Wang, Huan-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate nitrogen (N) loss from soil-crop systems under different fertilizer N managements, and to provide some suggestions on optimizing fertilizer management practices. The experiment was carried in high yield production area of Huantai county in Shandong province in 2009. Four kinds of fertilizer N application practices were designed, including CK, farmer practice (FP), optimizing fertilizer application (OPT) and controlled release fertilizer (CRT) for studying the fate of N during the maize growth season in 2009. The water and nitrogen management model (WNMM) was used to simulate the dynamics of soil water and N fate. The results indicated that the ratio of nitrate leaching and NH3 volatilization accounting of fertilizer N ranged from 6% to 18% and 5% to 34%, and their means were 12.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The amount of N leaching under OPT was 14.5 kg x hm(-2), was the lowest in all treatments. The amount of NH3 volatilization under CRT was 7.6 kg x hm(-2), respectively, was the lowest in all treatments. The order of total N loss under four treatments followed as: FP > OPT > CRF approximately CK. Both OPT and CRT treatments are the best management practices considering their high grain yield, water and nitrogen use efficiencies, and environmental protection. PMID:22165230

  18. Assessment of nitrogen losses to the environment with a Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delta (or reduced) nitrogen losses (DNL) refer to potential downstream reductions in nonpoint source nitrogen (N) loading of streams or other water bodies and/or in reduced loading of the atmosphere with N-associated greenhouse gases from agriculture. Nitrogen credits as traded on the Communities Ma...

  19. Study of nitrate leaching and nitrogen fate under intensive vegetable production pattern in northern China.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Zong; Zhao, Chang-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Lan; Li, Ji

    2009-04-01

    Because of intensive vegetable production in plastic greenhouses in northern China, the potential risk of nitrate leaching to groundwater is increasingly apparent, threatening ecosystem services and the sustainability of food production. In the present work, nine drainable lysimeters were installed into vegetable fields, with in-situ loamy soils, in Shouguang City of the north China vegetable base. The experiments were conducted to quantify the magnitude and variability of nitrate leaching to groundwater and to access the fate of total fertilizer-N inputs in the area. The results obtained indicated that: under local conventional agronomic practices, there is a high discrepancy in leaching nitrate-N concentration (ranging from 17 to 457 mg L(-1)), and nitrate losses (152-347 kg N ha(-1)) were observed from 1-m soil profiles in the field. Meanwhile, high fertilizer N application resulted in low N efficiency, with only (33.0+/-13)% (mean+/-S.D.) of input N absorbed by the crops, while additionally nearly half of the total inputs of N were unaccounted in a partial N balance sheet. It is concluded that groundwater pollution associated with greenhouse-based vegetable production had been confirmed in Shouguang, adversely affecting water quality and leading to serial agro-ecological problems. PMID:19304269

  20. Adaptive Management Tools for Nitrogen: Nitrogen Index, Nitrogen Trading Tool and Nitrogen Losses Environmental Assessment Package (NLEAP-GIS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Average nitrogen (N) use efficiencies are approximately fifty percent and can be even lower for shallower rooted systems grown on irrigated sandy soils. These low N use efficiencies need to be increased if reactive N losses to the environmental are to be reduced. Recently, USDA-NRCS identified Adapt...

  1. Miscanthus and switchgrass production in central Illinois: impacts on hydrology and inorganic nitrogen leaching.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, Gregory F; David, Mark B; Mitchell, Corey A

    2010-01-01

    Biomass crops are being promoted as environmentally favorable alternatives to fossil fuels or ethanol production from maize (Zea mays L.), particularly across the Corn Belt of the United States. However, there are few if any empirical studies on inorganic N leaching losses from perennial grasses that are harvested on an annual basis, nor has there been empirical evaluation of the hydrologic consequences of perennial cropping systems. Here we report on the results of 4 yr of field measurements of soil moisture and inorganic N leaching from a conventional maize-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] system and two unfertilized perennial grasses harvested in winter for biomass: Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum cv. Cave-in-Rock). All crops were grown on fertile Mollisols in east-central Illinois. Inorganic N leaching was measured with ion exchange resin lysimeters placed 50 cm below the soil surface. Maize--soybean nitrate leaching averaged 40.4 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), whereas switchgrass and Miscanthus had values of 1.4 and 3.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. Soil moisture monitoring (to a depth of 90 cm) indicated that both perennial grasses dried the soil out earlier in the growing season compared with maize-soybean. Later in the growing season, soil moisture under switchgrass tended to be greater than maize-soybean or Miscanthus, whereas the soil under Miscanthus was consistently drier than under maize--soybean. Water budget calculations indicated that evapotranspiration from Miscanthus was about 104 mm yr(-1) greater than under maize-soybean, which could reduce annual drainage water flows by 32% in central Illinois. Drainage water is a primary source of surface water flows in the region, and the impact ofextensive Miscanthus production on surface water supplies and aquatic ecosystems deserves further investigation. PMID:21043284

  2. Nitrogen inputs and losses in response to chronic CO2 exposure in a subtropical oak woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungate, B. A.; Duval, B. D.; Dijkstra, P.; Johnson, D. W.; Ketterer, M. E.; Stiling, P.; Cheng, W.; Millman, J.; Hartley, A.; Stover, D. B.

    2014-06-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may alter the nitrogen (N) content of ecosystems by changing N inputs and N losses, but responses vary in field experiments, possibly because multiple mechanisms are at play. We measured N fixation and N losses in a subtropical oak woodland exposed to 11 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We also explored the role of herbivory, carbon limitation, and competition for light or nutrients in shaping the response of N fixation to elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 did not significantly alter gaseous N losses, but lower recovery and deeper distribution in the soil of a long-term 15N tracer indicated that elevated CO2 increased leaching losses. Elevated CO2 had no effect on nonsymbiotic N fixation, and had a transient effect on symbiotic N fixation by the dominant legume. Elevated CO2 tended to reduce soil and plant concentrations of iron, molybdenum, phosphorus, and vanadium, nutrients essential for N fixation. Competition for nutrients and herbivory likely contributed to the declining response of N fixation to elevated CO2. These results indicate that positive responses of N fixation to elevated CO2 may be transient and that chronic exposure to elevated CO2 can increase N leaching. Models that assume increased fixation or reduced N losses with elevated CO2 may overestimate future N accumulation in the biosphere.

  3. After the Storm: Assessing the carbon and nitrogen leaching potential from sediments deposited in aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Krieg, C.; Canning, C.; Inamdar, S. P.; Rowland, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The erosive energy of large storms can mobilize, and subsequently deposit large amounts of sediment in receiving aquatic ecosystems. Depending on the character of the sediments there is potential for leaching or sequestration of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) from the sediments. This could have significant implications for water quality, aquatic metabolism, and global cycling of C and N. This study examines the fate of these sediments by: (1) determining the amount and quality of organic matter that can be leached into the surrounding water from coarse, medium and fine particle classes (2) assessing the C and N contents of various particles classes and the sources of the sediment through isotopic composition. Bed sediment samples were collected along a 1-2nd order stream (eight locations) in a forested catchment in the Piedmont region of Maryland following a large storm event. Samples were sieved into three particle classes - coarse (2mm-1mm), medium (1mm-250µm) and fine (<250µm). Extractions were performed for each of three particle class sizes by leaching with DI water. Organic matter composition for the extracts was characterized using fluorescence. Stable isotopes of 13C and 15N were determined for bed sediment classes and upland source sediments to identify the origins of the eroded sediments. Extracts with low C:N ratios that also exhibit a higher percent protein and lower percent humic carbon content are considered most labile. Within the bed sediment deposits, differences were found in the distribution of labile compounds between each particle class size. Generally, course particle size exhibited the most labile characteristics, closely followed by medium particle size. Fine particle size exhibited the most refractory characteristics in all locations. These results are critical since climate-change predictions reveal more intense and large storms for the northeast US, with potentially greater impacts on aquatic ecosystems from eroded upland sediments.

  4. A Coupled Land Surface-Subsurface Biogeochemical Model for Aqueous and Gaseous Nitrogen Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.; Pan, L.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.; Miller, N.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to nitrate (NOB3PB-P) water pollution and atmospheric pollution of nitrous oxide (NB2BO), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NHB3B). Characterizing the amount and species of N losses is therefore essential in developing a strategy to estimate and mitigate N leaching and emission to the atmosphere. Indeed, transformations of nitrogen depend strongly on water content, soil temperature, and nitrogen concentration. Land surface processes therefore have to be taken into account to properly characterize N biogeochemical cycling. However, most current nitrogen biogeochemical models take the land surface as the upper boundary by lumping the complex processes above the surface as known boundary conditions. In this study, an extant subsurface mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was coupled with the community land model (CLM). The resulting coupled model extends the modeling capability of TOUGHREACT-N to include the important energy, momentum, and moisture dynamics provided by CLM. The coupled model showed a significant impact of land-surface diurnal forcing on soil temperature and moisture and on nitrogen fluxes. We also discuss field applications of the model and discuss how temporal dynamics of nitrogen fluxes are affected by land surface processes.

  5. Correlation of leachant analyses and weight loss measurements in the leaching of high-iron synthetic basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Materials which simulate the slag product of the Slagging Pyrolysis Incinerator under consideration for the INEL Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility have been characterized. This slag is an iron-rich basalt-like material designed to contain the low-level TRU waste stored at INEL. Leach tests on synthetic compositions have been performed to provide information for process design and to indicate the quality of the waste form. Experiments have been performed to confirm that microbalance weight losses agree with the contents of the leachants as determined by chemical analyses. Deionized water was used as the leachant and the leachants from experiments at 70/sup 0/C were analyzed by atomic absorption and inductively-coupled plasma and flame emission techniques and by isotopic dilution mass spectrometry (for uranium). Leachant analyses provided both elemental leach rates ad weight loss leach rates. The weight loss leach rates were calculated from the sums of the analytically determined elemental contents of the leachants, converted to weights of oxides. These rates correlate with the elemental leach rates calculated from the microbalance weight loss, measured by a substitution-type electronic microbalance. Sample composition and devitrification effects, including microcracking effects, and comparisons of elemental leachant analyses and leach rates with microbalance weight losses are the most significant results of this work.

  6. Controls on Nitrogen Retention and Loss in Urban and Rural Forest Ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and production of fertilizer, have increased the amount of nitrogen deposited onto terrestrial ecosystems. In addition to changes in atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, other human-induced disturbances have led to dramatic shifts in forest composition of the United States over the last 100 years. Tree species composition of many forests is changing in response to introduced pests and pathogens, competition with introduced plant species and changes in climate. Understanding the combined effects of increased nitrogen inputs and changes in plant species composition on forest nitrogen cycling is critical to our understanding of forest biogeochemistry and nutrient budgets. Despite several decades of research on the effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, there is still significant uncertainty about the factors that regulate nitrogen retention and loss in forest ecosystems. The use of natural abundance stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen has proven to be a powerful tool for tracing the sources of nitrate in water, from inputs to leaching, as it moves through an ecosystem. The evaluation of natural abundance nitrogen values in atmospheric deposition has been used to partition sources of nitrogen, such as coal-fired power plants vs. tailpipe exhaust, since each of their isotopic signatures is distinct. Similarly, natural abundance oxygen values of nitrate in atmospheric inputs and soil leachate have been used as a tool to partition sources of nitrate between precipitation and nitrate produced microbially during nitrification. We measured the natural abundance isotopic composition of nitrate to quantify rates of nitrogen inputs to the forest and to determine rates of nitrogen losses from healthy, declining and preemptively cut eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) stands in both an urban forest at the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, MA, and a rural forest at Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. The hemlock woolly adelgid

  7. Phosphorus and nitrogen losses from winter stacking of manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appropriate management of animal manure including storage is essential for minimizing nutrient losses and guaranteeing good water quality. A field lysimeter study was carried out at the Susquehanna River Basin, northeastern USA to investigate phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) losses in leachate and ru...

  8. Nitrogen loss from sprinkler applied beef feedlot effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of nitrogen from sprinkler applied beef feedlot effluent can be costly for both the producer and the environment. Sprinkler application of effluent is common throughout the Great Plains, though little work has occurred focusing specifically on N losses from beef feedlot effluent. The objectives...

  9. Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuanhui; Maggi, F.; Riley, W. J.; Hornberger, G. M.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Spycher, N.; Miller, N. L.; Venterea, R. T.; Steefel, C.

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use to nitrate (NO3-) water pollution and nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH3) atmospheric pollution. Characterizing soil N effluxes is essential in developing a strategy to mitigate N leaching and emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, a previously described and tested mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was successfully tested against additional observations of soil pH and N2O emissions after fertilization and irrigation and before plant emergence. We used TOUGHREACT-N to explain the significantly different N gas emissions and nitrate leaching rates resulting from the different N fertilizer types, application methods, and soil properties. The N2O emissions from NH4+-N fertilizer were higher than from urea and NO3--N fertilizers in coarse-textured soils. This difference increased with decreases in fertilization application rate and increases in soil buffering capacity. In contrast to methods used to estimate global terrestrial gas emissions, we found strongly nonlinear N2O emissions as a function of fertilizer application rate and soil calcite content. Speciation of predicted gas N flux into N2O and N2 depended on pH, fertilizer form, and soil properties. Our results highlighted the need to derive emission and leaching factors that account for fertilizer type, application method, and soil properties.

  10. Nitrogen availability and leaching from soil amended with municipal solid waste compost

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Halbach, T.R.

    1999-08-01

    Beneficial use of municipal solid waste compost depends on identifying a management strategy that supports crop production and protects water quality. Effects of compost and N fertilizer management strategies on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching were evaluated in a 3-yr study on a Hubbard loamy sand soil. Two composts were each applied at either 90 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} from 1993 to 1995, or at 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} in one application in 1993. The compost and non-amended plots were side dressed annually with N fertilizer as urea at 0, 125, and 250 kg ha{sup {minus}1}. Biochemical properties of the compost as well as compost management strongly affected crop response and fate of N. Compost increased grain yield with no significant yield response to N fertilizer with the single compost application in Year 1 and the annual compost application in Year 3. Plant N uptake increased with N fertilizer rate, except in the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost treatments in Year 1. Over the 3-yr period, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching with the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost application was 1.8 times greater compared to that with the annual application. The estimated N mineralization ranged from 0 to 12% and 3 to 6% in the annual and single compost addition, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, annual compost application with reduced supplemental N fertilizer was the best management strategy to reach optimum crop yield while minimizing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching losses.

  11. Marine Nitrogen loss in Oxygen minimum zones: a modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, Katharina; Hense, Inga; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    In the oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) of the global ocean fixed nitrogen is lost by two pathways: heterotrophic denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Lab experiments show that denitrification and anammox occur at a ratio of about 70:30 depending on the amount and the C:N ratio of the available organic matter. However, observations in the OMZ are sparse and, thus, the contribution of anammox to the global loss of fixed nitrogen is still under debate. In addition, it is projected that the OMZ expand in the future due to global warming. This compels an urgent need to understand the controlling mechanisms of nitrogen loss in OMZ. Global biogeochemical ocean models assessed in the last IPCC have a rather poor representation of nitrogen related processes, primarily focusing on nitrate. These models do not include the nitrogen loss by anammox as they lack a representation of ammonium and nitrite. Here we present results of a more comprehensive marine nitrogen cycle including interactions between nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and organic matter in the water column and the sediments in the framework of HAMOCC, the global biogeochemical ocean model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The representation of a stepwise dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrite and ammonium captures observed features like the secondary nitrite maximum. We set up a global marine nitrogen budget and discuss changes in the subsurface oxygen distributions.

  12. Modeling Nitrogen Losses under Rapid Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, M.; Imhoff, P. T.; Andres, A. S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin System (RIBS) is one of the major land treatment techniques used for wastewater treatment and reuse of recovered treated wastewater. In this system, wastewater that is treated using primary, secondary, or advanced treatment techniques is applied at high rates to shallow basins constructed in permeable deposits of soil or sand, with further treatment occurring in soil and the vadose zone before the water recharges groundwater. Because the influent wastewater is usually enriched in nitrogen (N) compounds, there is particular concern that RIBS may contaminant groundwater or nearby surface waters if not designed and operated properly. In most of the new sequenced batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plants, N is found in the form of nitrate in the discharged wastewater, so denitrification (DNF) is the main reaction in N removal. The absence of molecular oxygen is one of the required conditions for DNF. During RIBS operation, application of wastewater is cyclic and typically consists of a flooding period followed by days or weeks of drying. Key operational parameters include the ratio of wetting to drying time and the hydraulic loading rate, which affect water saturation and air content in the vadose zone and as a result have an impact on DNF. Wastewater is typically distributed at a limited number of discharge points in RIBS and basins are not usually completely flooded which result in non-homogeneous distribution of wastewater and unusual surface water flow patterns. For this reason, we couple overland flow within RIBS with subsurface flow to investigate the influence of non-uniform application of wastewater on DNF. No modeling effort has been done for understanding this aspect of RIBS performance previously. TOUGH2/ iTOUGH2, a general-purpose numerical simulation program for multi-phase fluid flow in porous media, is used for modeling fluid movement. Water saturation is used as a surrogate parameter to evaluate oxygen limitations in the

  13. Quantifying and characterizing dissolved carbon and nitrogen leaching from litter: a comparison of methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Litter decomposition has a fundamental role in ecosystem functioning. It recycles energy, carbon and nutrients, supporting ecosystem productivity and soil organic matter formation. Litter decomposition occurs through leaching, fragmentation, and catabolism. Leaching is, arguably, the least studie...

  14. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  15. Environmental indicators to assess the risk of diffuse Nitrogen losses from agriculture.

    PubMed

    Buczko, Uwe; Kuchenbuch, Rolf O

    2010-05-01

    Diffuse Nitrogen (N) loss from agriculture is a major factor contributing to increased concentrations of nitrate in surface and groundwater, and of N(2)O and NH(3) in the atmosphere. Different approaches to assess diffuse N losses from agriculture have been proposed, among other direct measurements of N loads in leachate and groundwater, and physically-based modelling. However, both these approaches have serious drawbacks and are awkward to use at a routine base. N loss indicators (NLIs) are environmental management tools for assessing the risk of diffuse N losses from agricultural fields. They range in complexity from simple proxy variables to elaborate systems of algebraic equations. Here we present an overview of NLIs developed in different parts of the world. NLIs can be categorized into source-based, transport-based, and composite approaches. Several issues demand more attention in future studies. (1) Is incorporation of leaching losses and gaseous losses into one single NLI warranted? (2) Is it sufficient to restrict the focus on the rooted soil zone without considering the vadose zone and aquifer? (3) Calibration and validation of NLIs using field data of N loss seems not sufficient. Comparisons of several different NLIs with each other needs more attention; however, the different scaling of NLIs impedes comparability. (4) Sensitivity of input parameters with regard to the final NLI output needs more attention in future studies. (5) For environmental management purposes, factors addressing management decision by farmers deserve more attention. PMID:20306042

  16. Modeling nitrate leaching and optimizing water and nitrogen management under irrigated maize in desert oases in Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kelin; Li, Yong; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Deli; Wei, Yongping; Edis, Robert; Li, Baoguo; Huang, Yuanfang; Zhang, Yuanpei

    2010-01-01

    Understanding water and N transport through the soil profile is important for efficient irrigation and nutrient management to minimize nitrate leaching to the groundwater, and to promote agricultural sustainable development in desert oases. In this study, a process-based water and nitrogen management model (WNMM) was used to simulate soil water movement, nitrate transport, and crop growth (maize [Zea mays L.]) under desert oasis conditions in northwestern China. The model was calibrated and validated with a field experiment. The model simulation results showed that about 35% of total water input and 58% of the total N input were leached to <1.8 m depth under traditional management practice. Excessive irrigation and N fertilizer application, high nitrate concentration in the irrigation water, together with the sandy soil texture, resulted in large nitrate leaching. Nitrate leaching was significantly reduced under the improved management practice suggested by farm extension personnel; however, the water and nitrate inputs still far exceeded the crop requirements. More than 1700 scenarios combining various types of irrigation and fertilizer practices were simulated. Quantitative analysis was conducted to obtain the best management practices (BMPs) with simultaneous consideration of crop yield, water use efficiency, fertilizer N use efficiency, and nitrate leaching. The results indicated that the BMPs under the specific desert oasis conditions are to irrigate the maize with 600 mm of water in eight times with a single fertilizer application at a rate of 75 kg N ha(-1). PMID:20176839

  17. Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.J.; Hornberger, G.M.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Spycher, N.; Miller, N.L.; Venterea, R.T.; Steefel, C.

    2009-01-15

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use to nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) water pollution and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) atmospheric pollution. Characterizing soil N effluxes is essential in developing a strategy to mitigate N leaching and emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, a previously described and tested mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was successfully tested against additional observations of soil pH and N{sub 2}O emissions after fertilization and irrigation, and before plant emergence. We used TOUGHREACT-N to explain the significantly different N gas emissions and nitrate leaching rates resulting from the different N fertilizer types, application methods, and soil properties. The N{sub 2}O emissions from NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N fertilizer were higher than from urea and NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N fertilizers in coarse-textured soils. This difference increased with decreases in fertilization application rate and increases in soil buffering capacity. In contrast to methods used to estimate global terrestrial gas emissions, we found strongly non-linear N{sub 2}O emissions as a function of fertilizer application rate and soil calcite content. Speciation of predicted gas N flux into N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} depended on pH, fertilizer form, and soil properties. Our results highlighted the need to derive emission and leaching factors that account for fertilizer type, application method, and soil properties.

  18. Gaseous losses of nitrogen other than through denitrification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) losses from human activities are the major reason behind the growing concerns about the enrichment of the biosphere with reactive N. The single largest cause of human alteration of the global N cycle is crop production. Reactive atmospheric N trace gases resulting from agricultural acti...

  19. Gaseous Losses of Nitrogen Other Than Through Denitrification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) losses from human activities are the major reason behind the growing concerns about the enrichment of the biosphere with reactive N. The single largest cause of human alteration of the global N cycle is crop production. Reactive atmospheric N trace gases resulting from agricultural acti...

  20. Aqeuous and Gaseous Nitrogen Losses Induced by Fertilizer Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to nitrate (NO3-) water pollution and atmospheric pollution of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH3). Characterizing the amount and species of N losses is therefore essential in developing a strat...

  1. INDICATORS OF NITRATE LEACHING LOSS UNDER DIFFERENT LAND USE OF CLAYEY AND SANDY SOILS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence of increasing nitrate (NO3-) leaching losses from soils under various land use systems has elevated the interest and need to find better land management practices. An essential step in developing new management practices is understanding of the com...

  2. Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Productivity and Nitrogen Loss in Three Grass-Based Perennial Bioenergy Cropping Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Duran, Brianna E. L.; Duncan, David S.; Oates, Lawrence G.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Jackson, Randall D.

    2016-03-18

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization can greatly improve plant productivity but needs to be carefully managed to avoid harmful environmental impacts. Nutrient management guidelines aimed at reducing harmful forms of N loss such as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate (NO3 -) leaching have been tailored for many cropping systems. The developing bioenergy industry is likely to make use of novel cropping systems, such as polycultures of perennial species, for which we have limited nutrient management experience. We studied how a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) monoculture, a 5-species native grass mixture and an 18- species restored prairie responded to annual fertilizer applications ofmore » 56 kg N ha-1 in a fieldscale agronomic trial in south-central Wisconsin over a 2-year period.We observed greater fertilizer-induced N2O emissions and sub-rooting zone NO3 - concentrations in the switchgrass monoculture than in either polyculture. Fertilization increased aboveground net primary productivity in the polycultures, but not in the switchgrass monoculture. Switchgrass was generally more productive, while the two polycultures did not differ from each other in productivity or N loss. In conclusion, our results highlight differences between polycultures and a switchgrass monoculture in responding to N fertilization.« less

  3. Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Productivity and Nitrogen Loss in Three Grass-Based Perennial Bioenergy Cropping Systems

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Brianna E. L.; Duncan, David S.; Oates, Lawrence G.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Jackson, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization can greatly improve plant productivity but needs to be carefully managed to avoid harmful environmental impacts. Nutrient management guidelines aimed at reducing harmful forms of N loss such as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate (NO3-) leaching have been tailored for many cropping systems. The developing bioenergy industry is likely to make use of novel cropping systems, such as polycultures of perennial species, for which we have limited nutrient management experience. We studied how a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) monoculture, a 5-species native grass mixture and an 18-species restored prairie responded to annual fertilizer applications of 56 kg N ha-1 in a field-scale agronomic trial in south-central Wisconsin over a 2-year period. We observed greater fertilizer-induced N2O emissions and sub-rooting zone NO3- concentrations in the switchgrass monoculture than in either polyculture. Fertilization increased aboveground net primary productivity in the polycultures, but not in the switchgrass monoculture. Switchgrass was generally more productive, while the two polycultures did not differ from each other in productivity or N loss. Our results highlight differences between polycultures and a switchgrass monoculture in responding to N fertilization. PMID:26991790

  4. Atmospheric nitrogen inputs and losses along an urbanization gradient from Boston to Harvard Forest, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Rao, P.; Hutyra, L.; Raciti, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most measurement stations for atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition within national monitoring networks are located intentionally away from urban areas and point sources of pollution in order to capture regional trends. Models have been used to spatially predict estimates of N deposition between established deposition collectors, but these models may under-estimate rates of N deposition in areas with local sources of N emissions and often do not account for heterogeneity of the landscape between collectors. For example, urbanization alters N cycling, but the spatiotemporal distribution and impact of these alterations on ecosystems are not well-quantified. We measured fluxes and isotopic composition of atmospheric N inputs and soil leaching losses along an urbanization gradient from Boston, MA to the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. Atmospheric N inputs at urban sites were significantly greater than non-urban sites with NH4+ contributing thrice as much as NO3-. Proximity to urban core correlated positively with NH4+ (R2 = 0.57, p = 0.02) and total inorganic N inputs (R2 = 0.61, p = 0.01); on-road CO2 emissions correlated positively with NO3- inputs (R2 = 0.74, p = 0.003). Inorganic N leaching rates correlated positively with atmospheric N input rates (R2 = 0.61, p = 0.01), but did not differ significantly between urban and non-urban sites (p > 0.05). Our empirical measurements of atmospheric N inputs are greater for urban areas and less for rural areas compared to modeled regional estimates of N deposition. A significant proportion (17 - 100 %) of NO3- leached from four of the nine sites came directly from the atmosphere, indicating that these sites may be experiencing N saturation. In contrast, five of the sites had NO3- leached that came almost entirely from nitrification, indicating that the NO3- in leachate came from biological processes rather than directly passing through. This study improves our understanding of atmospheric N deposition and leaching in urban

  5. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, T; Hutchings, N; Dragosits, U; Olesen, J E; Kjeldsen, C; Drouet, J L; Cellier, P

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20-30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N accumulation (p > 0.95) was also identified and needs to be included when modelling landscape level N-fluxes and greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:21458123

  6. A New GIS-Nitrogen Trading Tool Concept to Minimize Reactive Nitrogen losses to the Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential element which is needed to maximize agricultural production and sustainability of worldwide agroecosystems. N losses to the environment are impacting water and air quality that has become an environmental concern for the future generations. It has led to the need for dev...

  7. Contribution of dairy ration components to nitrogen in milk, manure, crops, and environmental nitrogen loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the total nitrogen (N) consumed by dairy cows, a general range of 20 to 35% is secreted in milk, and the remaining N is excreted in manure, which is subject to environmental loss. For many dairy herds, improved feed management, including feeding rations balanced in energy and crude protein, can e...

  8. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling: implications for crop yields and nitrogen leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Schurgers, G.; Wårlind, D.; Mishurov, M.; Zaehle, S.; Stocker, B. D.; Smith, B.; Arneth, A.

    2015-06-01

    We explore cropland management alternatives and the effect these can have on future C and N pools and fluxes using the land use-enabled dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS. Simulated crop production, cropland carbon storage, carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching from croplands are evaluated and discussed. Compared to the version of LPJ-GUESS that does not include land use dynamics, estimates of soil carbon stocks and nitrogen leaching from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems were improved. We explore trade-offs between important ecosystem services that can be provided from agricultural fields such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. These trade-offs are evaluated for current land use and climate and further explored for future conditions within the two future climate change scenarios, RCP 2.6 and 8.5. Our results show that the potential for carbon sequestration due to typical cropland management practices such as no-till and cover-crops proposed in literature is not realised, globally or over larger climatic regions. Our results highlight important considerations to be made when modelling C-N interactions in agricultural ecosystems under future environmental change, and the effects these have on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Tracking nitrogen losses in a greenhouse crop rotation experiment in North China using the EU-Rotate_N simulation model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruiying; Nendel, Claas; Rahn, Clive; Jiang, Chunguang; Chen, Qing

    2010-06-01

    Vegetable production in China is associated with high inputs of nitrogen, posing a risk of losses to the environment. Organic matter mineralisation is a considerable source of nitrogen (N) which is hard to quantify. In a two-year greenhouse cucumber experiment with different N treatments in North China, non-observed pathways of the N cycle were estimated using the EU-Rotate_N simulation model. EU-Rotate_N was calibrated against crop dry matter and soil moisture data to predict crop N uptake, soil mineral N contents, N mineralisation and N loss. Crop N uptake (Modelling Efficiencies (ME) between 0.80 and 0.92) and soil mineral N contents in different soil layers (ME between 0.24 and 0.74) were satisfactorily simulated by the model for all N treatments except for the traditional N management. The model predicted high N mineralisation rates and N leaching losses, suggesting that previously published estimates of N leaching for these production systems strongly underestimated the mineralisation of N from organic matter. PMID:20227804

  10. Nitrate leaching and nitrogen recovery following application of polyolefin-coated urea to potato.

    PubMed

    Zvomuya, Francis; Rosen, Carl J; Russelle, Michael P; Gupta, Satish C

    2003-01-01

    High N fertilizer and irrigation amounts applied to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) on coarse-textured soils often result in nitrate (NO3) leaching and low recovery of applied fertilizer N. This 3-yr study compared the effects of two rates (140 and 280 kg N ha(-1)) of a single polyolefin-coated urea (PCU) application versus split applications of urea on 'Russet Burbank' potato yield and on NO3 leaching and N recovery efficiency (RE) on a loamy sand. Standard irrigation was applied in all years and excessive irrigation was used in another experiment in the third year. At the recommended rate of 280 kg N ha(-1), NO3 leaching during the growing season was 34 to 49% lower with PCU than three applications of urea. Under standard irrigation in the third year, leaching from five applications of urea (280 kg N ha(-1)) was 38% higher than PCU. Under leaching conditions in the first year (> or = 25 mm drainage water in at least one 24-h period) and excessive irrigation in the third year, PCU at 280 kg N ha(-1) improved total and marketable tuber yields by 12 to 19% compared with three applications of urea. Fertilizer N RE estimated by the difference and 15N isotope methods at the 280 kg N ha(-1) rate was, on average, higher with PCU (mean 50%) than urea (mean 43%). Fertilizer N RE values estimated by the isotope method (mean 51%) were greater than those estimated by the difference method (mean 47%). Results from this study indicate that PCU can reduce leaching and improve N recovery and tuber yield during seasons with high leaching. PMID:12708671

  11. Nitrogen Utilization and Environmental Losses from Organic Farming and Biochar's Potential to Improve N Efficiency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. I.; SIX, J. W. U. A.

    2014-12-01

    The response of plant performance and nitrogen (N) dynamics to biochar amendments were studied across various levels of N input for two growing seasons in mesocosms representing an organic lettuce production systems. A silt loam soil was amended with pine chip (PC) and walnut shell (WS) biochar (10 t ha-1) in combination with five organic N fertilization rates 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of 225 kg N ha-1. N output through harvest, leachate, and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were determined to assess N utilization and environmental losses of biochar-amended soils. Analysis of plant performance indicate that PC and WS biochar did not provide any increases in plant biomass in soils that received less than business-as-usual fertilization rates. At 100% N fertilization rate, biochar amendments (both PC and WS) improved lettuce biomass production, which resulted in significant increases in NUE with no effects on N2O emissions. Furthermore, N losses via leaching were decreased by PC biochar at 100% N fertilization rates. Thus, due to increases in plant biomass and decreases in N losses via leachate, PC biochar significantly decreased the ratio of N lost over N exported in biomass. Findings from this study suggest that biochar can provide some beneficial effects to organic farming systems, however, not in all circumstances, given the effects seem to vary with biochar type and fertilization level.

  12. Nitrogen loss in surface runoff from Chinese cabbage fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi-Yuan, Wu; Zhang, Li-Ping; Fu, Xing-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, He-Si

    A growth period of Chinese cabbage included seedling, rosette, anterior folding, middle folding, and posterior folding stages. To investigate characteristic of surface runoff, evolution of various nitrogen (N) forms at different growth stages, and contribution of N loss during a whole growth period to environment, 10 simulated rainfalls were applied on Chinese cabbage planted in two 2 m 2 troughs (A and B), with two replicates. Troughs A and B were designed with slopes of 14° and 21°. Five simulated rainfalls were applied in each trough. Seedling and rosette stages were with rainfall intensities of 0.65 mm min -1 and folding stages were with 1.93 mm min -1, respectively. Fertilizers were applied at seedling and anterior folding stages at rate of 103 and 103 kg N ha -1, respectively. One rainfall event lasted for approximately 20 min. Conclusions were as follows: N loss mainly occurred at rosette stage and anterior folding stage. Nitrogen loss had a close relationship with runoff volume. Percentage of NH4+-N in TN had an ascending trend with growth of Chinese cabbage while percentage of NO3--N had a descending trend. Folding stages had more percentages of undissolved N than seedling and rosette stages. Lower slope was advantageous to the concentrations of TN, NO3--N, and NH4+-N and proportion of NO3--N. Based on the results, we need to pay more attention to the NO3--N pollution in Chinese cabbage filed at lower slope.

  13. Nitrogen inputs and losses in response to chronic CO2 exposure in a sub-tropical oak woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungate, B. A.; Duval, B. D.; Dijkstra, P.; Johnson, D. W.; Ketterer, M. E.; Stiling, P.; Cheng, W.; Millman, J.; Hartley, A.; Stover, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations could alter the nitrogen (N) content of ecosystems by changing N inputs and N losses, but responses vary in field experiments, possibly because multiple mechanisms are at play. We measured N fixation and N losses in a subtropical oak woodland exposed to 11 yr of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We also explored the role of herbivory, carbon limitation, and competition for light and nutrients in shaping response of N fixation to elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 did not significantly alter gaseous N losses, but lower recovery and deeper distribution in the soil of a long-term 15N tracer indicated that elevated CO2 increased leaching losses. Elevated CO2 had no effect on asymbiotic N fixation, and had a transient effect on symbiotic N fixation by the dominant legume. Elevated CO2 tended to reduce soil and plant concentrations of iron, molybdenum, phosphorus, and vanadium, nutrients essential for N fixation. Competition for nutrients and herbivory likely contributed to the declining response N fixation to elevated CO2. These results indicate that positive responses of N fixation to elevated CO2 may be transient, and that chronic exposure to elevated CO2 can increase N leaching. Models that assume increased fixation or reduced N losses with elevated CO2 may overestimate future N accumulation in the biosphere.

  14. Quantify the loss of major ions induced by CO2 enrichment and nitrogen addition in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Li, Yuelin; Liu, Shizhong

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that atmospheric CO2 enrichment would increase the ion concentrations in the soil water. However, none of these studies could exactly quantify the amount of ion changes in the soil water induced by elevated CO2 and all of these experiments were carried out only in the temperate areas. Using an open-top chamber design, we studied the effects of CO2 enrichment alone and together with nitrogen (N) addition on soil water chemistry in the subtropics. Three years of exposure to an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 700 ppm resulted in accelerated base cation loss via leaching water below the 70 cm soil profile. The total of base cation (K+ + Na+ + Ca2+ + Mg2+) loss in the elevated CO2 treatment was higher than that of the control by 220%, 115%, and 106% in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. The N treatment decreased the effect of high CO2 treatment on the base cation loss in the leachates. Compared to the control, N addition induced greater metal cation (Al3+ and Mn2+) leaching loss in 2008 and net Al3+ and Mn2+ loss in the high N treatment increased by 100% and 67%, respectively. However, the CO2 treatment decreased the effect of high N treatment on the metal cation loss. Changes of ion export followed by the exposure to the elevated CO2, and N treatments were related to both ion concentrations and leached water amount. We hypothesize that forests in subtropical China might suffer from nutrient limitation and some poisonous metal activation in plant biomass under future global change.

  15. Inorganic nitrogen leaching from organic and conventional rice production on a newly claimed calciustoll in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanqiao; Olesen, Jørgen E; Sun, Xiangping; Wu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the dynamics of nitrogen (N) leaching from organic and conventional paddy fields is necessary to optimize fertilization and to evaluate the impact of these contrasting farming systems on water bodies. We assessed N leaching in organic versus conventional rice production systems of the Ili River Valley, a representative aquatic ecosystem of Central Asia. The N leaching and overall performance of these systems were measured during 2009, using a randomized block experiment with five treatments. PVC pipes were installed at soil depths of 50 and 180 cm to collect percolation water from flooded organic and conventional paddies, and inorganic N (NH4-N+NO3-N) was analyzed. Two high-concentration peaks of NH4-N were observed in all treatments: one during early tillering and a second during flowering. A third peak at the mid-tillering stage was observed only under conventional fertilization. NO3-N concentrations were highest at transplant and then declined until harvest. At the 50 cm soil depth, NO3-N concentration was 21-42% higher than NH4-N in percolation water from organic paddies, while NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations were similar for the conventional and control treatments. At the depth of 180 cm, NH4-N and NO3-N were the predominant inorganic N for organic and conventional paddies, respectively. Inorganic N concentrations decreased with soil depth, but this attenuation was more marked in organic than in conventional paddies. Conventional paddies leached a higher percentage of applied N (0.78%) than did organic treatments (0.32-0.60%), but the two farming systems leached a similar amount of inorganic N per unit yield (0.21-0.34 kg N Mg(-1) rice grains). Conventional production showed higher N utilization efficiency compared to fertilized organic treatments. These results suggest that organic rice production in the Ili River Valley is unlikely to reduce inorganic N leaching, if high crop yields similar to conventional rice production are to be maintained

  16. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling: implications for crop yields and nitrogen leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Schurgers, G.; Wårlind, D.; Mishurov, M.; Zaehle, S.; Stocker, B. D.; Smith, B.; Arneth, A.

    2015-11-01

    Croplands are vital ecosystems for human well-being and provide important ecosystem services such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. On large (regional to global)-scale levels, assessment of how these different services will vary in space and time, especially in response to cropland management, are scarce. We explore cropland management alternatives and the effect these can have on future C and N pools and fluxes using the land-use-enabled dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS (Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator). Simulated crop production, cropland carbon storage, carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching from croplands are evaluated and discussed. Compared to the version of LPJ-GUESS that does not include land-use dynamics, estimates of soil carbon stocks and nitrogen leaching from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems were improved. Our model experiments allow us to investigate trade-offs between these ecosystem services that can be provided from agricultural fields. These trade-offs are evaluated for current land use and climate and further explored for future conditions within the two future climate change scenarios, RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) 2.6 and 8.5. Our results show that the potential for carbon sequestration due to typical cropland management practices such as no-till management and cover crops proposed in previous studies is not realised, globally or over larger climatic regions. Our results highlight important considerations to be made when modelling C-N interactions in agricultural ecosystems under future environmental change and the effects these have on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles.

  17. Nitrogen Runoff Losses during Warm-Season Turfgrass Sod Establishment.

    PubMed

    Wherley, Benjamin G; Aitkenhead-Peterson, Jacqueline A; Stanley, Nina C; Thomas, James C; Fontanier, Charles H; White, Richard H; Dwyer, Phil

    2015-07-01

    Concern exists over the potential loss of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in runoff from newly established and fertilized lawns. Nutrient losses can be higher from turf when shoot density and surface cover are low and root systems are not fully developed. This study was conducted to evaluate fertilizer source and timing effects on nutrient losses from newly sodded lawns of St. Augustinegrass [ (Walt.) Kuntze]. For each study, 12 33.6-m plots were established on an undisturbed Alfisol having a 3.7% slope. Each plot was equipped with a runoff collection system, instrumentation for runoff flow rate measurement, and automated samplers. A 28-d establishment study was initiated on 8 Aug. 2012 and repeated on 9 Sept. 2012. Treatments included unfertilized plots, fertilized plots receiving 4.88 g N m as urea 6 d after planting, fertilized plots receiving 4.88 g N m as sulfur-coated urea 6 d after planting, and fertilized plots receiving 4.88 g N m as urea 19 d after planting. Runoff events were created by irrigating with 17 mm of water over 27 min. Runoff water samples were collected after every 37.8 L and analyzed for NO-N, NH-N, dissolved organic N (DON), and PO-P. Increases of approximately 2 to 4 mg L NO-N and 8 to 12 mg L PO-P occurred in runoff 1 d after fertilization, which returned to background levels within 7 d. Total fertilizer N lost to runoff was 0.6 to 4.2% of that applied. Delaying fertilizer application until 19 d after planting provided no reduction in nutrient loss compared with a similar application 6 d after planting. Approximately 33% of the N lost in runoff was as DON. This large amount of DON suggests significant N loss from decomposing organic matter may occur during sod establishment. PMID:26437095

  18. Turnover and losses of phosphorus in Swedish agricultural soils: long-term changes, leaching trends, and mitigation measures.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Lars; Kirchmann, Holger; Djodjic, Faruk; Kyllmar, Katarina; Ulén, Barbro; Liu, Jian; Andersson, Helena; Aronsson, Helena; Börjesson, Gunnar; Kynkäänniemi, Pia; Svanbäck, Annika; Villa, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Transport of phosphorus (P) from agricultural fields to water bodies deteriorates water quality and causes eutrophication. To reduce P losses and optimize P use efficiency by crops, better knowledge is needed of P turnover in soil and the efficiency of best management practices (BMPs). In this review, we examined these issues using results from 10 Swedish long-term soil fertility trials and various studies on subsurface losses of P. The fertility trials are more than 50 years old and consist of two cropping systems with farmyard manure and mineral fertilizer. One major finding was that replacement of P removed by crops with fertilizer P was not sufficient to maintain soil P concentrations, determined with acid ammonium lactate extraction. The BMPs for reducing P leaching losses reviewed here included catch crops, constructed wetlands, structure liming of clay soils, and various manure application strategies. None of the eight catch crops tested reduced P leaching significantly, whereas total P loads were reduced by 36% by wetland installation, by 39 to 55% by structure liming (tested at two sites), and by 50% by incorporation of pig slurry into a clay soil instead of surface application. Trend analysis of P monitoring data since the 1980s for a number of small Swedish catchments in which various BMPs have been implemented showed no clear pattern, and both upward and downward trends were observed. However, other factors, such as weather conditions and soil type, have profound effects on P losses, which can mask the effects of BMPs. PMID:26023970

  19. Practices to reduce nitrate leaching and increase nitrogen use efficiency in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quemada, Miguel; Baranski, Marcin; Nobel de Lange, Majimcha; Vallejo, Antonio; Cooper, Julia

    2013-04-01

    Despite the large body of research in irrigated agriculture, it is still not clear which practices most effectively reduce nitrate leaching (NL) while maintaining crop yield. A meta-analysis (MA) of published experimental results from agricultural irrigated systems was conducted to identify those agricultural practices that have proven effective at reducing NL and to quantify the scale of reduction that can be achieved. Forty-four scientific articles were identified which investigated four main strategies (water and fertilizer management, use of cover crops and fertilizer technology) creating a database with 279 observations on NL and 166 on crop yield. Management practices that adjust water application to crop needs reduced NL by a mean of 80% without a reduction in crop yield. Improved fertilizer management reduced NL by 40%, and the best relationship between yield and NL was obtained when applying the recommended N fertilizer rate. Applications above the recommended rate increased leaching without enhancing yield. Replacing a fallow with a non-legume cover crop (CC) reduced NL by 50% while using a legume CC did not have any effect on NL. Legume CC increased yield and N use efficiency while yields following non-legume CC were not different from the fallow. Improved fertilizer technology also decreased NL but was the least effective of the selected strategies. The risk of nitrate leaching from irrigated systems is high, but optimum management practices may mitigate this risk and maintain crop yields while enhancing environmental sustainability.

  20. Chemical precipitation for controlling nitrogen loss during composting.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li-Mei; Li, Guo-Xue; Shen, Yun-Jun; Schuchardt, Frank; Lu Peng

    2010-05-01

    Aimed at controlling the nitrogen loss during composting, the mixture of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)( 2)) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) (molar ratio 1:2) were utilized as additives to avoid increasing total salinity. In trial TA, the additives were put into absorption bottles connecting with a gas outlet of fermentor (ex situ method); in trial TB, the additives were directly added to the composting materials (in situ method). During the 26 day composting period, the temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and germination index (GI) were measured. The experimental results show that the additives reduced the pH, while NH( 4)(+)-N and TN were obviously improved. NH(4)( +)-N was 11.9 g kg(-1) and 3 g kg(- 1) in amended compost trial (TB) and unamended compost trial (TA), respectively; TN increased from 26.5 g kg(-1) to 40.3 g kg(-1) in TB and increased from 26.5 g kg( -1) to 26.8 g kg(-1) in TA. Analysis of the TOC and carbon mass revealed that absorbents accelerated the degradation of organic matter. The germination index test showed the maturity of TB (102%) was better than TA (82%) in final compost. Furthermore, TP and AP were also obviously improved. X-ray diffraction analysis of precipitation showed that the precipitation in absorption bottle of TA was newberyite (MgHPO( 4) 3H(2)O), however, the crystal in the TB compost was struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4) 6H(2)O: magnesium ammonium phosphate). These results indicated that Mg(OH)(2) and H(3)PO( 4) could reduce the ammonia emission by struvite crystallization reaction. Optimal conditions for struvite precipitation should be determined for different systems. PMID:19808738

  1. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss.

    PubMed

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Burns, Andrew S; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R; Padilla, Cory C; Stone, Benjamin K; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Stewart, Frank J

    2016-08-11

    Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Anaerobic metabolism has not yet been observed in SAR11, and it remains unknown how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling. Here, genomic analysis of single cells from the world's largest OMZ revealed previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages with adaptations for life without oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalysing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the anoxic zone of maximum nitrate reduction activity. These results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth's most abundant organismal group. PMID:27487207

  2. Reduced nitrogen losses following conversion of row crop agriculture to perennial biofuel crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2O emissions, and require large inputs of N fertilizer. Second generation cellulosic crops have the potential to reduce these N losses, and provide even greater biomass for conversion t...

  3. Quantifying Nitrogen Loss From Flooded Hawaiian Taro Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deenik, J. L.; Penton, C. R.; Bruland, G. L.; Popp, B. N.; Engstrom, P.; Mueller, J. A.; Tiedje, J.

    2010-12-01

    In 2004 a field fertilization experiment showed that approximately 80% of the fertilizer nitrogen (N) added to flooded Hawaiian taro (Colocasia esculenta) fields could not be accounted for using classic N balance calculations. To quantify N loss through denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) pathways in these taro systems we utilized a slurry-based isotope pairing technique (IPT). Measured nitrification rates and porewater N profiles were also used to model ammonium and nitrate fluxes through the top 10 cm of soil. Quantitative PCR of nitrogen cycling functional genes was used to correlate porewater N dynamics with potential microbial activity. Rates of denitrification calculated using porewater profiles were compared to those obtained using the slurry method. Potential denitrification rates of surficial sediments obtained with the slurry method were found to drastically overestimate the calculated in-situ rates. The largest discrepancies were present in fields greater than one month after initial fertilization, reflecting a microbial community poised to denitrify the initial N pulse. Potential surficial nitrification rates varied between 1.3% of the slurry-measured denitrification potential in a heavily-fertilized site to 100% in an unfertilized site. Compared to the use of urea, fish bone meal fertilizer use resulted in decreased N loss through denitrification in the surface sediment, according to both porewater modeling and IPT measurements. In addition, sub-surface porewater profiles point to root-mediated coupled nitrification/denitrification as a potential N loss pathway that is not captured in surface-based incubations. Profile-based surface plus subsurface coupled nitrification/denitrification estimates were between 1.1 and 12.7 times denitrification estimates from the surface only. These results suggest that the use of a ‘classic’ isotope pairing technique that employs 15NO3- in fertilized agricultural systems can lead to a drastic

  4. Treatment of copper ores and concentrates with industrial nitrogen species catalyzed pressure leaching and non-cyanide precious metals recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Corby G.

    2003-04-01

    Today, with a stringent economic and environmental climate prevailing in the copper business, there is increased interest in evaluating new processing alternatives for production. Hydrometallurgical pressure oxidation of copper concentrates is one of the more viable approaches, and several technological candidates have emerged. Of these, an overlooked but, ironically, the first industrially proven methodology utilized nitrogen species catalyzation in the oxidizing pressure-leach system to produce copper via solvent extraction/electrowinning. Given its advantages, this may prove to be a feasible process alternative for the future. In this article, the history of the system and its application to copper concentrates and ores will be outlined. In particular, a non-cyanide methodology for effective recovery of precious metals from chalcopyrite concentrates will be discussed.

  5. Leaching of nitrogen and phenolics from wood waste and co-composts used for road rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Venner, K H; Prescott, C E; Preston, C M

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation and reforestation of disused forest roads and landings can be facilitated by the incorporation of organic matter. The British Columbia forest industry creates residual woody materials, but they are nutrient poor and may leach phenolic compounds. We assessed the potential for wood wastes (chipped cedar wood waste, sort-yard waste, hogfuel) and co-composts with shellfish waste or municipal biosolids to provide inorganic N and release phenolics and condensed tannins, compared with natural forest floor and mineral soil. Initial concentrations of tannins and phenolics were low, and 13C cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that composts were still dominated by wood. During a 426-d laboratory leaching experiment, release of phenolics from woody amendments (other than cedar wood) was lower than from native forest floor. The pH levels of woody amendments and their leachates were also within the range of native forest floor and soil (except cedar wood, which was the most acidic material). Co-composts had higher total N and available P, greatly reduced tannins and phenolics, and negligible leaching of polyphenols. Uncomposted materials released very little N during the incubation. Hogfuel-biosolids compost released a large amount of nitrate, but only during the first 100 d. Shrimp-wood compost released moderate amounts of ammonium and nitrate throughout the incubation, had high available P and low tannin content, and released less polyphenols than did native forest floors. Our results indicate that appropriate use of these amendments does not pose an environmental risk with regard to the parameters measured in this study. PMID:19141818

  6. Estimating nitrogen losses in furrow irrigated soil amended by compost using HYDRUS-2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Guber, Andrey; Zaman Khan, Haroon; ullah, Ehsan

    2014-05-01

    Furrow irrigation commonly results in high nitrogen (N) losses from soil profile via deep infiltration. Estimation of such losses and their reduction is not a trivial task because furrow irrigation creates highly nonuniform distribution of soil water that leads to preferential water and N fluxes in soil profile. Direct measurements of such fluxes are impractical. The objective of this study was to assess applicability of HYDRUS-2D model for estimating nitrogen balance in manure amended soil under furrow irrigation. Field experiments were conducted in a sandy loam soil amended by poultry manure compost (PMC) and pressmud compost (PrMC) fertilizers. The PMC and PrMC contained 2.5% and 0.9% N and were applied at 5 rates: 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 ton/ha. Plots were irrigated starting from 26th day from planting using furrows with 1x1 ridge to furrow aspect ratio. Irrigation depths were 7.5 cm and time interval between irrigations varied from 8 to 15 days. Results of the field experiments showed that approximately the same corn yield was obtained with considerably higher N application rates using PMC than using PrMC as a fertilizer. HYDRUS-2D model was implemented to evaluate N fluxes in soil amended by PMC and PrMC fertilizers. Nitrogen exchange between two pools of organic N (compost and soil) and two pools of mineral N (soil NH4-N and soil NO3-N) was modeled using mineralization and nitrification reactions. Sources of mineral N losses from soil profile included denitrification, root N uptake and leaching with deep infiltration of water. HYDRUS-2D simulations showed that the observed increases in N root water uptake and corn yields associated with compost application could not be explained by the amount of N added to soil profile with the compost. Predicted N uptake by roots significantly underestimated the field data. Good agreement between simulated and field-estimated values of N root uptake was achieved when the rate of organic N mineralization was increased

  7. Erosional nitrogen losses in a geomorphologically dynamic wet tropical watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, S. R.; Stallard, R. F.; Taylor, P.; Asner, G. P.; Townsend, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In erosion-prone watersheds, the loss of nutrients associated with eroding topsoil can be substantial. Previous studies in a geomorphologically dynamic wet-tropical study site demonstrated elevated nitrogen availability, characterized by larger nitrate pools, higher 15-N enrichment, and higher rates of net and potential nitrification, on stable ridge-tops compared to N-poor steep hillslopes. In the current study, we sought to test whether these pronounced differences in N availability were correlated with spatial patterns of erosional N-export. In order to characterize N transport patterns within a small (12-hectare) forested watershed, we buried Gerlach troughs at approximately 15-meter intervals along a 100-meter long study hillslope, beginning at the ridge-slope break and continuing downslope toward the stream. We recovered and analyzed all soil, water, and detritus collected by these troughs over the course of one year and concurrently monitored rainfall and stream discharge. We also measured soil mineralogy, texture, and permeability (Ksat) at the topographic locations where troughs were installed. We observed distinct patterns in the nature and timing of downslope N transport, with shifts in the contribution of dissolved versus particulate losses both across the hillslope and with intensification of wet-season precipitation. Unlike the flat ridge-top, steeper downslope segments exported a substantial amount of N during the late wet season, approximately 85% of which was in particulate form. These slope fluxes help account for much of the watershed- scale losses of > 10 kg particulate N per hectare per year, quantified in a nearby stream. Soil mineralogic and hydraulic characteristics varied in concert with general N export patterns, implying different degrees of soil stability and the dominance of different soil water flowpaths in steeper versus flatter areas. In this forested landscape, geomorphic position determines overland N fluxes and likely couples N

  8. Growing season loss of nitrate at three northeastern hardwood forests: A regional indicator of nitrogen saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, L.H.; Murdoch, P.E.; Mitchell, M.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Likens, G.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Nitrogen is typically tightly retained in terrestrial ecosystems in the Northeast. In ecosystems with episodic nitrogen losses, nitrate export during the summer period of high biotic demand remains low. Increasing nitrate loss during the growing season is an early indicator of ecosystems shifting from episodic to chronic nitrogen loss (nitrogen saturation). Studies of nitrogen cycling from Biscuit Brook, Catskills, NY, Huntington Forest, Adirondacks, NY and Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, White Mountains, NH, showed high nitrate loss at each site during the summer of 1990. This regional pattern many be caused by anthropogenic (higher nitrogen deposition), climatic (temperature and weather interactions), and/or natural (eg. pest outbreaks) disturbance. High nitrate loss causes surface water quality deterioration and may be linked to forest decline. The pattern also demonstrates the need for surface water monitoring on a regional scale to assess the effects of air pollution emissions legislation.

  9. Matrix based fertilizers reduce nitrogen and phosphorus leaching in three soils.

    PubMed

    Entry, James A; Sojka, R E

    2008-05-01

    We compared the efficacy of matrix based fertilizers (MBFs) formulated to reduce NO3-, NH4+, and total phosphorus (TP) leaching, with Osmocoate 14-14-14, a conventional commercial slow release fertilizer (SRF) and an unamended control in three different soil textures in a greenhouse column study. The MBFs covered a range of inorganic N and P in compounds that are relatively loosely bound (MBF 1) to more moderately bound (MBF 2) and more tightly bound compounds (MBF 3) mixed with Al(SO4)3H2O and/or Fe2(SO4)3 and with high ionic exchange compounds starch, chitosan and lignin. When N and P are released, the chemicals containing these nutrients in the MBF bind N and P to a Al(SO4)3H2O and/or Fe2(SO4)3 starch-chitosan-lignin matrix. One milligram (8000 spores) of Glomus intradices was added to all formulations to enhance nutrient uptake. In all three soil textures the SRF leachate contained a higher amount of NH4+, NO3- and TP than leachate from all other fertilizers. In all three soils there were no consistent differences in the amount of NH4+, NO3- and TP in the MBF leachates compared to the control leachate. Plants growing in soils receiving SRF had greater shoot, root and total biomass than all MBFs regardless of Al(SO4)3H2O or Fe2(SO4)3 additions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal infection in plant roots did not consistently differ among plants growing in soil receiving SRF, MBFs and control treatments. Although the MBFs resulted in less plant growth in this experiment they may be applied to soils growing plants in areas that are at high risk for nutrient leaching to surface waters. PMID:17597286

  10. [Effects of applying controlled-release fertilizer blended with conventional nitrogen fertilizer on Chinese cabbage yield and quality as well as nitrogen losses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-gang; Xu, Kai; Tong, Er-jian; Cao, Bing; Ni, Xiao-hui; Xu, Jun-xiang

    2010-12-01

    An open field experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying controlled-release fertilizer blended with rapidly available chemical N fertilizer on Chinese cabbage yield and quality as well as nitrogen losses, including ammonia volatilization and NO3- -N accumulation and leaching in Beijing suburb. The results showed that a combined application of 2:1 controlled-release fertilizer and urea fertilizer (total N rate 150 kg x hm(-2)) did not induce the reduction of Chinese cabbage yield, and decreased the leaf nitrate and organic acid contents significantly, compared with conventional urea N application (300 kg x hm(-2)), and had no significant difference in the cabbage yield and leaf nitrate content, compared with applying 150 kg x hm(-2) of urea N. The combined application of 2:1 controlled-release fertilizer and urea fertilizer improved the N use efficiency of Chinese cabbage, and reduced the ammonia volatilization and NO3- -N leaching. At harvest, the NO3- -N concentrations in 20-40, 60-80 and 80-100 cm soil layers were significantly lower in the combined application treatment than in urea N treatment. PMID:21443002

  11. Net nitrogen mineralization and leaching in response to warming and nitrogen deposition in a temperate old field: the importance of winter temperature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle M; Henry, Hugh A L

    2010-01-01

    While climate warming can increase plant N availability over the growing season by increasing rates of N mineralization, increased N mineralization over winter at a time when plant roots are largely inactive, coupled with an increased frequency of soil freeze-thaw cycles, may increase soil N leaching losses. We examined changes in soil net N mineralization and N leaching in response to warming and N addition (6 g m(-2) year(-1)) in a factorial experiment conducted in a temperate old field. We used two warming treatments, year-round and winter-only warming, to isolate the effects of winter warming on soil N dynamics from the year-round warming effects. We estimated net N mineralization using in situ soil cores with resin bags placed at the bottom to catch throughput, and we measured N leaching using lysimeters located below the plant rooting zone at a depth of 50 cm. There were minor effects of warming on changes in soil extractable N and resin N in the soil cores over winter. Nevertheless, the overall effects of both warming and N addition on net N mineralization (the sum of changes in soil extractable N and resin N) were not significant over this period. Likewise, there were no significant treatment effects on the concentration of N in leachate collected below the plant rooting zone. However, in response to winter warming, net N mineralization over summer was approximately double that of both the ambient and year-round warming treatments. This result demonstrates a potentially large and unexpected effect of winter warming on soil N availability in this old field system. PMID:19690892

  12. Spatial coupling of nitrogen inputs and losses in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Curtis; Sarmiento, Jorge L; Sigman, Daniel M; Gruber, Nicolas; Dunne, John P

    2007-01-11

    Nitrogen fixation is crucial for maintaining biological productivity in the oceans, because it replaces the biologically available nitrogen that is lost through denitrification. But, owing to its temporal and spatial variability, the global distribution of marine nitrogen fixation is difficult to determine from direct shipboard measurements. This uncertainty limits our understanding of the factors that influence nitrogen fixation, which may include iron, nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios, and physical conditions such as temperature. Here we determine nitrogen fixation rates in the world's oceans through their impact on nitrate and phosphate concentrations in surface waters, using an ocean circulation model. Our results indicate that nitrogen fixation rates are highest in the Pacific Ocean, where water column denitrification rates are high but the rate of atmospheric iron deposition is low. We conclude that oceanic nitrogen fixation is closely tied to the generation of nitrogen-deficient waters in denitrification zones, supporting the view that nitrogen fixation stabilizes the oceanic inventory of fixed nitrogen over time. PMID:17215838

  13. Assessment of Delta Nitrogen Losses (Delta NL) at the Field Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We defined a new concept of field-level delta nitrogen (N) losses (Delta NL) as a comparison between management scenarios. We defined delta nitrogen losses (Delta NL) as a function of improved N use efficiencies of field management scenarios that reduce the average N inputs and/or modify other manag...

  14. Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Templer, P.; Silver, W.; Pett-Ridge, J.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-09-15

    Humid tropical forests are generally characterized by the lack of nitrogen (N) limitation to net primary productivity, yet paradoxically have high potential for N loss. We conducted an intensive field experiment with {sup 15}NH{sub 4} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} additions to highly weathered tropical forest soils to determine the relative importance of N retention and loss mechanisms. Over half of all the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced from gross mineralization was rapidly converted to NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the process of gross nitrification. During the first 24 h plant roots took up 28 % of the N mineralized, dominantly as NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and were a greater sink for N than soil microbial biomass. Soil microbes were not a significant sink for added {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} or {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the first 24 hr, and only for {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} after 7 d. Patterns of microbial community composition, as determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, were weakly, but significantly correlated with nitrification and denitrification to N{sub 2}O. Rates of dissimilatory NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction to NH{sub 4}{sup +} (DNRA) were high in this forest, accounting for up to 25 % of gross mineralization and 35 % of gross nitrification. DNRA was a major sink for NO{sub 3}{sup -} which may have contributed to the lower rates of N{sub 2}O and leaching losses. Despite considerable N conservation via DNRA and plant NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake, the fate of approximately 45% of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} produced and 22% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced were not measured in our fluxes, suggesting that other important pathways for N retention and loss (e.g., denitrification to N{sub 2}) are important in this system. The high proportion of mineralized N that was rapidly nitrified and the fates of that NO{sub 3}{sup -} highlight the key role of gross nitrification as a proximate control on N retention and loss in humid tropical forest soils. Furthermore, our

  15. Maintaining yields and reducing nitrogen loss in rice-wheat rotation system in Taihu Lake region with proper fertilizer management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lihong; Yu, Yingliang; Yang, Linzhang

    2014-11-01

    In the Tailake region of China, heavy nitrogen (N) loss of rice-wheat rotation systems, due to high fertilizer-N input with low N use efficiency (NUE), was widely reported. To alleviate the detrimental impacts caused by N loss, it is necessary to improve the fertilizer management practices. Therefore, a 3 yr field experiments with different N managements including organic combined chemical N treatment (OCN, 390 kg N ha-1 yr-1, 20% organic fertilizer), control-released urea treatment (CRU, 390 kg N ha-1 yr-1, 70% resin-coated urea), reduced chemical N treatment (RCN, 390 kg N ha-1 yr-1, all common chemical fertilizer), and site-specific N management (SSNM, 333 kg N ha-1 yr-1, all common chemical fertilizer) were conducted in the Taihu Lake region with the ‘farmer’s N’ treatment (FN, 510 kg N ha-1 yr-1, all common chemical fertilizer) as a control. Grain yield, plant N uptake (PNU), NUE, and N losses via runoff, leaching, and ammonia volatilization were assessed. In the rice season, the FN treatment had the highest N loss and lowest NUE, which can be attributed to an excessive rate of N application. Treatments of OCN and RCN with a 22% reduced N rate from FN had no significant effect on PNU nor the yield of rice in the 3 yr; however, the NUE was improved and N loss was reduced 20-32%. OCN treatment achieved the highest yield, while SSNM has the lowest N loss and highest NUE due to the lowest N rate. In wheat season, N loss decreased about 28-48% with the continuous reduction of N input, but the yield also declined, with the exception of OCN treatment. N loss through runoff, leaching and ammonia volatilization was positively correlated with the N input rate. When compared with the pure chemical fertilizer treatment of RCN under the same N input, OCN treatment has better NUE, better yield, and lower N loss. 70% of the urea replaced with resin-coated urea had no significant effect on yield and NUE improvement, but decreased the ammonia volatilization loss. Soil

  16. Phosphorus and nitrogen losses via leaching and surface runoff from stacking of poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The practice of stacking poultry litter in fields prior to spreading provides important logistical benefits to farmers but is controversial due to its potential to serve as a source of nutrients to leachate and runoff. We evaluated nutrient fate under stacked poultry litter to assess differences in ...

  17. Phosphorus and nitrogen losses from poultry litter stacks and leaching through soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The practice of stacking poultry litter in fields prior to spreading provides important logistical benefits to farmers but is controversial due to its potential to serve as a source of nutrients to leachate and runoff. We evaluated nutrient fate under stacked poultry litter to assess differences in ...

  18. Application of pig slurry to soils. Effect of air stripping treatment on nitrogen and TOC leaching.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; García-Sinovas, David; Alvarez-Benedí, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The effect of physical-chemical slurry treatment on the mobility and transformation of nitrogen and organic matter from pig slurry after soil application is evaluated. Two different pig slurries (one treated by stripping with air at pH=9 and another non-treated) were applied at the top of a soil column, containing approximately 100 kg of soil. Effluents were monitored measuring concentration values of ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total organic carbon (TOC). The breakthrough curves were modelled using STANMOD and HYDRUS 1D codes. Low concentrations of ammonia were detected in the effluent recovered at the bottom of the soil profile for both types of slurry. Nitrate concentration in effluent was lower and more homogenous over time when applying stripping treated pig slurry. In N modelling, adsorption of ammonia by soil proved an important process, nitrite and nitrate adsorption being less significant, although not negligible. Transformation from ammonia to nitrite controls the kinetics of the nitrification process. Total organic carbon in the column effluent was higher in the experiment using treated pig slurry, which can be attributed to organic matter solubilisation in the stripping treatment process. PMID:20705384

  19. Manure incorporation reduces environmental nitrogen loss while sustaining crop productivity in the subtropical wheat-maize rotation system: A comprehensive study of nitrogen cycling and balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; Zhu, Bo; Butterbach-Bahl, klaus; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Balancing nitrogen (N) budgets of agricultural systems is essential for sustaining yields at lower environmental costs. The knowledge, however, of total N budgets of agricultural systems including all N fluxes is still rare in the literature. Here, we applied a combination of monitoring in situ N fluxes and field 15N tracer and 15N isotope dilution techniques to investigate the effects of different N fertilizers (control, synthetic fertilizer, 60% synthetic fertilizer N plus 40% pig manure N, pig manure only applied at the same N rate 280 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) on N pools, cycling processes, fluxes and total N balances in a subtropical wheat-maize rotation system of China. Nitrate leaching and NH3 volatilization were main hydrological and gaseous N loss pathways, respectively. The warm and wet maize season was associated with significantly larger environmental N losses than the cooler and drier wheat season. The field 15N tracing experiment showed that the wheat system had high N retention capacity (˜50% of 15N application) but with short residence time. I.e. 90% of soil residual 15N labelled fertilizer in the wheat system were utilized by plants or lost to the environment in the subsequent maize season. Our annual total N balances of the different treatments revealed that combined synthetic and organic fertilization or manure only maintained the same level of yields and led to significantly lower N losses and higher N retention, even though larger NH3 volatilization losses were caused by manure incorporation. Thus, our study suggests that a combination of synthetic and organic N fertilizers is suitable for sustaining agricultural productivity while reducing environmental N losses through fostering interactions between the soil C and N cycle.

  20. The effects of the African Green Revolution on nitrogen losses from two contrasting soil types in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, K. L.; Russo, T.; Hickman, J. E.; Palm, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 80% of countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) face problems of nitrogen (N) scarcity, which together with poverty causes food insecurity and malnutrition. The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa has set a goal of increasing fertilizer use in the region six-fold by 2015. While there is substantial evidence that greater N fertilizer use will improve crop yields, it could lead to increased N leaching and elevated nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in surface water and groundwater reservoirs. However, it is unclear what the magnitude of impacts will be in SSA given historically low nutrient additions (of less than 5 kg N/ha/yr), highly degraded soils (due to years of nutrient and soil organic matter depletion), and a wide range of soil types on which increased fertilizer use is occurring. Current estimates of N dynamics and balances in SSA agriculture now rely on data from other regions with different soil types, soil fertility, and land management practices. To understand the influence of increased fertilizer use on water quality requires data from representative areas in SSA. Experimental maize plots were established in a randomized complete block design in both western Kenya (clayey soil) and mid-western Tanzania (sandy soil). Plots were amended with 0, 50, 75, and 200 kg N/ha/yr as mineral fertilizer. Tension lysimeters were installed at three depths in each treatment, and water was collected throughout the maize growing season. Soil water solutions were analyzed for NO3--N. Flow through the soil column at each soil depth, was modeled using VS2DT, a variably saturated flow and solute transport model, and water flux values were multiplied by measured NO3--N concentrations to estimate seasonal N leaching flux. Soil texture was a major driver of N losses, altering both the pathways and magnitude of losses. Clayey soils in western Kenya show an enormous potential for loss of NO3--N immediately following the onset of rains as they trigger high rates of N

  1. Reduced nitrogen losses after conversion of row crop agriculture to perennial biofuel crops.

    PubMed

    Smith, Candice M; David, Mark B; Mitchell, Corey A; Masters, Michael D; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Bernacchi, Carl J; Delucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and NO emissions; second-generation cellulosic crops have the potential to reduce these N losses. We measured N losses and cycling in establishing miscanthus (), switchgrass ( L. fertilized with 56 kg N ha yr), and mixed prairie, along with a corn ( L.)-corn-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] rotation (corn fertilized at 168-202 kg N ha). Nitrous oxide emissions, soil N mineralization, mid-profile nitrate leaching, and tile flow and nitrate concentrations were measured. Perennial crops quickly reduced nitrate leaching at a 50-cm soil depth as well as concentrations and loads from the tile systems (year 1 tile nitrate concentrations of 10-15 mg N L declined significantly by year 4 in all perennial crops to <0.6 mg N L, with losses of <0.8 kg N ha yr). Nitrous oxide emissions were 2.2 to 7.7 kg N ha yr in the corn-corn-soybean rotation but were <1.0 kg N ha yr by year 4 in the perennial crops. Overall N balances (atmospheric deposition + fertilization + soybean N fixation - harvest, leaching losses, and NO emissions) were positive for corn and soybean (22 kg N ha yr) as well as switchgrass (9.7 kg N ha yr) but were -18 and -29 kg N ha yr for prairie and miscanthus, respectively. Our results demonstrate rapid tightening of the N cycle as perennial biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. PMID:23673757

  2. Assessment of drainage nitrogen losses on a yield-scaled basis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface nitrogen (N) losses represent a major environmental concern in agriculture, particularly from fields containing artificial drainage to prevent saturated soil conditions and increase crop production. To develop sustainable intensification strategies and achieve high yields with minimal en...

  3. Ammonia Losses from Surface-Applied Urea-Based Nitrogen Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from surface applied urea-based sources of nitrogen (N) may reduce the efficiency of N fertilizers and the availability of N to crops. Nitrogen losses through ammonia volatilization are greater during summer months because N fertilizers are applied in conditions of high tempe...

  4. Nitrogen loss from windblown agricultural soils in the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion of agricultural soils can degrade both air quality and soil productivity in the Columbia Plateau of the Pacific Northwest United States. Soils in the region contain fine particles that, when suspended, are highly susceptible to long range transport in the atmosphere. Nitrogen (N) associ...

  5. A NEW GIS NITROGEN TRADING TOOL CONCEPT FOR CONSERVATION AND REDUCTION OF REACTIVE NITROGEN LOSSES TO THE ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems are important for their sustainability. However, when N inputs are unnecessarily high, the excess can contribute to greater agricultural N losses that impact air, surface water and groundwater quality. It is paramount to reduce off-site transport of N by using...

  6. Effects of Mulching and Nitrogen on Soil Nitrate-N Distribution, Leaching and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mulching and nitrogen are critical drivers of crop production for smallholders of the Loess Plateau in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of mulching and nitrogen fertilizer on the soil water content, soil nitrate-N content and vertical distribution in maize root-zone. The experiment was conducted over two consecutive years and used randomly assigned field plots with three replicates. The six treatments consisted of no fertilizer without plastic film (CK), plastic film mulching with no basal fertilizer and no top dressing (MN0), basal fertilizer with no top dressing and no mulching (BN1), plastic film mulching and basal fertilizer with no top dressing (MN1), basal fertilizer and top dressing with no mulching (BN2) and plastic film mulching with basal fertilizer and top dressing (MN2). In the top soil layers, the soil water content was a little high in the plastic film mulching than that without mulching. The mean soil water content from 0 to 40 cm without mulching were 3.35% lower than those measured in the corresponding mulching treatments in 31 days after sowing in 2012. The mulching treatment increased the soil nitrate-N content was observed in the 0–40-cm soil layers. The results indicate that high contents of soil nitrate-N were mainly distributed at 0–20-cm at 31 days after sowing in 2012, and the soil nitrate-N concentration in the MN2 treatment was 1.58 times higher than that did not receive fertilizer. The MN2 treatment greatly increased the soil nitrate-N content in the upper layer of soil (0–40-cm), and the mean soil nitrate-N content was increased nearly 50 mg kg−1 at 105 days after sowing compared with CK treatment in 2012. The soil nitrate-N leaching amount in MN1 treatment was 28.61% and 39.14% lower than BN1 treatment, and the mulch effect attained to 42.55% and 65.27% in MN2 lower than BN2 in both years. The yield increased with an increase in the basal fertilizer, top dressing and plastic film mulching, and the

  7. Effects of Mulching and Nitrogen on Soil Nitrate-N Distribution, Leaching and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiukang; Xing, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Mulching and nitrogen are critical drivers of crop production for smallholders of the Loess Plateau in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of mulching and nitrogen fertilizer on the soil water content, soil nitrate-N content and vertical distribution in maize root-zone. The experiment was conducted over two consecutive years and used randomly assigned field plots with three replicates. The six treatments consisted of no fertilizer without plastic film (CK), plastic film mulching with no basal fertilizer and no top dressing (MN0), basal fertilizer with no top dressing and no mulching (BN1), plastic film mulching and basal fertilizer with no top dressing (MN1), basal fertilizer and top dressing with no mulching (BN2) and plastic film mulching with basal fertilizer and top dressing (MN2). In the top soil layers, the soil water content was a little high in the plastic film mulching than that without mulching. The mean soil water content from 0 to 40 cm without mulching were 3.35% lower than those measured in the corresponding mulching treatments in 31 days after sowing in 2012. The mulching treatment increased the soil nitrate-N content was observed in the 0-40-cm soil layers. The results indicate that high contents of soil nitrate-N were mainly distributed at 0-20-cm at 31 days after sowing in 2012, and the soil nitrate-N concentration in the MN2 treatment was 1.58 times higher than that did not receive fertilizer. The MN2 treatment greatly increased the soil nitrate-N content in the upper layer of soil (0-40-cm), and the mean soil nitrate-N content was increased nearly 50 mg kg-1 at 105 days after sowing compared with CK treatment in 2012. The soil nitrate-N leaching amount in MN1 treatment was 28.61% and 39.14% lower than BN1 treatment, and the mulch effect attained to 42.55% and 65.27% in MN2 lower than BN2 in both years. The yield increased with an increase in the basal fertilizer, top dressing and plastic film mulching, and the grain

  8. From The Cover: Massive nitrogen loss from the Benguela upwelling system through anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Lavik, Gaute; Woebken, Dagmar; Schmid, Markus; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Amann, Rudolf; Barker Jørgensen, Bo; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2005-05-01

    In many oceanic regions, growth of phytoplankton is nitrogen-limited because fixation of N2 cannot make up for the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen (NH+4, NO-2, and NO-3) by anaerobic microbial processes. Globally, 30-50% of the total nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) and is commonly attributed to denitrification (reduction of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria). Here, we show that instead, the anammox process (the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to yield N2) is mainly responsible for nitrogen loss in the OMZ waters of one of the most productive regions of the world ocean, the Benguela upwelling system. Our in situ experiments indicate that nitrate is not directly converted to N2 by heterotrophic denitrification in the suboxic zone. In the Benguela system, nutrient profiles, anammox rates, abundances of anammox cells, and specific biomarker lipids indicate that anammox bacteria are responsible for massive losses of fixed nitrogen. We have identified and directly linked anammox bacteria to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the OMZ waters of an open-ocean setting. We hypothesize that anammox could also be responsible for substantial nitrogen loss from other OMZ waters of the ocean.

  9. Organic Matter Loading Modifies the Microbial Community Responsible for Nitrogen Loss in Estuarine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine sediments, as locations of substantial fixed nitrogen loss, are very important to the nitrogen budget and to the primary productivity of the oceans. Coastal sediment systems are also highly dynamic and subject to periodic natural and anthropogenic organic substrate additions. The response to organic matter by the microbial community involved in nitrogen loss processes was evaluated using mesocosms of Chesapeake Bay sediments. Over the course of a 50-day incubation, rates of anammox and denitrification were measured weekly using (15)N tracer incubations, and samples were collected for genetic analysis. Rates of both nitrogen loss processes and gene abundances associated with them corresponded loosely, probably because heterogeneities in sediments obscured a clear relationship. The rates of denitrification were stimulated more, and the fraction of nitrogen loss attributed to anammox slightly reduced, by the higher organic matter addition. Furthermore, the large organic matter pulse drove a significant and rapid shift in the denitrifier community composition as determined using a nirS microarray, indicating that the diversity of these organisms plays an essential role in responding to anthropogenic inputs. We also suggest that the proportion of nitrogen loss due to anammox in these coastal estuarine sediments may be underestimated due to temporal dynamics as well as from methodological artifacts related to conventional sediment slurry incubation approaches. PMID:26520832

  10. Dissolved nitrogen, chloride, and potassium loss from fields in conventional and conservation tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Losses of soluble nutrients from cropland and their transport to surface and groundwater are a continuing water quality concern. In this study we evaluated tillage impact on dissolved losses of ammonium (NH4-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), chloride (Cl), and potassium (K) during rotational cotton ...

  11. Nitrogen Loss from a Mixed Land Use Watershed as Influenced by Hydrology and Growing Seasons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-point nitrogen loss from agriculture is an environmental concern among scientists, decision-makers, and the public. This study investigated nitrate-N and total N losses from a mixed land use watershed (39.5 ha) as influenced by hydrology (flow type, runoff volume, storm sizes, and precipitation ...

  12. Nitrogen loss from a mixed land use watershed as influenced by hydrology and seasons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-point nitrogen loss from agriculture is an environmental concern among scientists, decision-makers, and the public. This study investigated NO3-N and total N losses from a mixed land use watershed (39.5 ha) in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province as influenced by hydrology (fl...

  13. Nitrogen catch crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  14. [Temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen losses in hilly area of Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Yao, Qi; Han, Long-Xi; Shen, Xia

    2006-08-01

    Four typical land uses in hilly area of Taihu Lake were studied on temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen losses in surface runoff under natural rainfall through experiment in situ. The medium value of event mean concentration (EMC) of ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) which dominated agricultural N in surface runoff accounted for 44.5% of total nitrogen (TN), while nitrite nitrogen (NO2(-) -N) accounted for 1.8%. Concentration of nitrogen in runoff had significantly seasonal variation which was related to meteorologic conditions such as rainfall, temperature, and agricultural activities. Temporal variabilities of site mean concentration (SMC) for TN, NH4(+) -N, NO3(-) -N and NO2(-) -N were decreased sequentially. The highest SMC value of TN, NH(+) -N and NO3(-) -N in upland runoff and N2(-) -N in bamboo grove were observed. The spatial distribution of nitrogen losses was determined by fertilizer application and vegetation coverage. Spatial variabilities for SMC of nitrogen were less than temporal variabilities. It was found that transportation fluxes of nitrogen in surface runoff from upland and vegetable plot were higher than that from chestnut orchard and bamboo forest which have significantly related to surface runoff volume. PMID:17111632

  15. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LOADING, FRESHWATER RESIDENCE TIME, AND INTERNAL LOSSES ON NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple model is presented that uses the annual loading rate of total nitrogen (TN) and the water residence time to calculate: 1) average annual TN concentration and intemalloss rates (e.g. denitrification and incorporation in sediments) in an estuary, and 2) the rate of nitroge...

  16. Nitrogen loss by anaerobic oxidation of ammonium in rice rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Nie, San'an; Li, Hu; Yang, Xiaoru; Zhang, Zhaoji; Weng, Bosen; Huang, Fuyi; Zhu, Gui-Bing; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen (N) cycling, yet its role in agricultural ecosystems, which are intensively fertilized, remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, functional gene abundance and role of anammox bacteria in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere paddy soils using catalyzed reporter deposition–fluorescence in situ hybridization, isotope-tracing technique, quantitative PCR assay and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Results showed that rhizosphere anammox contributed to 31–41% N2 production with activities of 0.33–0.64 nmol N2 g−1 soil h−1, whereas the non-rhizosphere anammox bacteria contributed to only 2–3% N2 production with lower activities of 0.08–0.26 nmol N2 g−1 soil h−1. Higher anammox bacterial cells were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107 copies g−1 soil) in the rhizosphere, which were twofold higher compared with the non-rhizosphere soil (3.7–5.9 × 106 copies g−1 soil). Phylogenetic analysis of the anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated that two genera of ‘Candidatus Kuenenia' and ‘Candidatus Brocadia' and the family of Planctomycetaceae were identified. We suggest the rhizosphere provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria, which are important to N cycling, but were previously largely overlooked. PMID:25689022

  17. Where did all the Nitrogen go? Use of Watershed-Scale Budgets to Quantify Nitrogen Inputs, Storages, and Losses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Goodale, C. L.; Howarth, R. W.; VanBreemen, N.

    2001-12-01

    Inputs of nitrogen (N) to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems have increased during recent decades, primarily from the production and use of fertilizers, the planting of N-fixing crops, and the combustion of fossil fuels. We present mass-balanced budgets of N for 16 catchments along a latitudinal profile from Maine to Virginia, which encompass a range of climatic variability and are major drainages to the coast of the North Atlantic Ocean. We quantify inputs of N to each catchment from atmospheric deposition, application of nitrogenous fertilizers, biological nitrogen fixation by crops and trees, and import of N in agricultural products (food and feed). We relate these input terms to losses of N (total, organic, and nitrate) in streamflow. The importance of the relative N sources to N exports varies widely by watershed and is related to land use. Atmospheric deposition was the largest source of N to the forested catchments of northern New England (e.g., Penobscot and Kennebec); import of N in food was the largest source of N to the more populated regions of southern New England (e.g., Charles and Blackstone); and agricultural inputs were the dominant N sources in the Mid-Atlantic region (e.g., Schuylkill and Potomac). In all catchments, N inputs greatly exceed outputs, implying additional loss terms (e.g., denitrification or volatilization and transport of animal wastes), or changes in internal N stores (e.g, accumulation of N in vegetation, soil, or groundwater). We use our N budgets and several modeling approaches to constrain estimates about the fate of this excess N, including estimates of N storage in accumulating woody biomass, N losses due to in-stream denitrification, and more. This work is an effort of the SCOPE Nitrogen Project.

  18. Amelioration of bauxite residue sand by intermittent additions of nitrogen fertiliser and leaching fractions: The effect on growth of kikuyu grass and fate of applied nutrients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Phillips, Ian; Fey, Martin V

    2016-04-15

    Bauxite residue, a waste product of aluminium processing operations is characterised by high pH, salinity and exchangeable sodium which hinders sustainable plant growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake form, optimum application rate and timing of nitrogen fertiliser to improve bauxite residue characteristics for plant growth. Kikuyu grass was grown in plastic columns filled with residue sand/carbonated residue mud mixture (20:1) previously amended with gypsum, phosphoric acid and basal nutrients. The experiment was set up as a 4×4 factorial design comprising four levels of applied nitrogen (N) fertiliser (0, 3, 6 and 12mgNkg(-1) residue) and four frequencies of leaching (16, 8 and 4day intervals). We hypothesised that the use of ammonium sulfate fertiliser would increase retention of N within the rhizosphere thereby encouraging more efficient fertiliser use. We found that N uptake by kikuyu grass was enhanced due to leaching of excess salts and alkalinity from the residue profile. It was also concluded that biomass production and associated N uptake by kikuyu grass grown in residue is dependent on the type of fertiliser used. PMID:26824271

  19. Reducing nitrogen loss with managed drainage and polymer-coated urea.

    PubMed

    Nash, Patrick; Nelson, Kelly; Motavalli, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Continuous corn ( L.) production during dry years combined with high N fertilizer rates can have a high potential for NO-N loss through tile drainage water. Claypan soils can further increase the potential for NO-N loss through tile drainage water due to the claypan layer that restricts N leaching below the tile drains. The objective of this 4-yr study was to determine whether use of managed subsurface drainage (MD) in combination with a controlled-release N fertilizer could reduce the annual amount of NO-N loss through tile drainage water compared with free subsurface tile drainage (FD) with a noncoated urea application. Due to dry conditions over the summer and fall months, MD reduced the annual amount of water drained by at least 73% compared with FD in two of the four crop years. Low N loss and reduced corn N uptake possibly resulted in carry-over N and high soil N concentrations throughout the study, which may have limited the effect of N fertilizer source on annual NO-N loss in the tile drainage water. Use of MD reduced annual NO-N loss in the tile drainage water by 78 to 85% in two of the four years. High NO-N loss reduction with MD compared with FD was largely due to dry growing season conditions in combination with wet conditions over the noncropping period. PMID:25602341

  20. Soil temperature regulates nitrogen loss from lysimeters following fall and winter manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many producers practice fall and winter manure spreading for economic and practical reasons. In order to minimize the risk of nitrogen loss between application and crop uptake in the spring, university extension publications and industry professionals often make recommendations based on soil tempera...

  1. A comparison of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, chloride and potassium loss in conventional and conservation tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tillage impact on dissolved losses of ammonium (NH4-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), chloride (Cl), and potassium (K) during rotational cotton and peanut production was evaluated. Tillage treatments were strip-tillage (ST) and conventional-tillage (CT). Winter cover crops were used in both tillage...

  2. Fragipan controls on nitrogen loss by surface and subsurface flow pathways in an upland agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved understanding of nutrient transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways is critical to protecting water quality in agricultural watersheds. We sought to compare nitrogen loss in overland and subsurface flow on two opposing hillslopes (north versus south facing), each with contrasting so...

  3. Nitrogen Loss in Corn Production Varies as a Function of Topsoil Depth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding availability and loss potential of nitrogen (N) for claypan soil landscapes that vary in topsoil depth could help producers make better decisions when managing crops for feed grain. While it has been well documented that topsoil depth on these soils plays an important role in storing p...

  4. Simulation processes for the nitrogen loss and environmental assessment package (NLEAP).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nitrogen Loss and Environmental Assessment Package model with Geographic Information System (GIS) (NLEAP-GIS) has been updated to include a MS Windows© user interface and simulation code refinements for surface residue decay, N2O soil gas emissions, crop rooting, multiple simultaneous simulatio...

  5. Runoff losses of suspended sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus from a small watershed in Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to develop annual and seasonal load-discharge relationships for Suspended Sediment (SS), Total Nitrogen (TN), and Total Phosphorus (TP) losses in runoff from a small mixed land use watershed, and to use these relationships to explicate the annual and monthly pattern...

  6. Nitrogen losses from dairy manure estimated through nitrogen mass balance and chemical markers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Zaman, S.; Vander Pol, M.; Ndegwa, P.; Campbell, L.; Silva, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonia is an important air and water pollutant, but the spatial variation in its concentrations presents technical difficulties in accurate determination of ammonia emissions from animal feeding operations. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between ammonia volatilization and ??15N of dairy manure and the feasibility of estimating ammonia losses from a dairy facility using chemical markers. In Exp. 1, the N/P ratio in manure decreased by 30% in 14 d as cumulative ammonia losses increased exponentially. Delta 15N of manure increased throughout the course of the experiment and ??15N of emitted ammonia increased (p < 0.001) quadratically from -31??? to -15 ???. The relationship between cumulative ammonia losses and ??15N of manure was highly significant (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.76). In Exp. 2, using a mass balance approach, approximately half of the N excreted by dairy cows (Bos taurus) could not be accounted for in 24 h. Using N/P and N/K ratios in fresh and 24-h manure, an estimated 0.55 and 0.34 (respectively) of the N excreted with feces and urine could not be accounted for. This study demonstrated that chemical markers (P, K) can be successfully used to estimate ammonia losses from cattle manure. The relationship between manure ??15N and cumulative ammonia loss may also be useful for estimating ammonia losses. Although promising, the latter approach needs to be further studied and verified in various experimental conditions and in the field. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Riverine nitrogen loss in the Tibetan Plateau and potential impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yindong; Chen, Long; Chi, Jie; Zhen, Gengchong; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Ruonan; Yao, Ruihua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2016-05-15

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) has been the subject of study on water circulation and global climate change. Given the environmental processes related to water outflows, there could be massive nutrient losses in the land surface of TP. In this study, we analyzed the nitrogen discharges of the major rivers flowing out of the TP based on the 5-year monitoring data. According to our calculation, the majority of nitrogen outflows were discharged through the upper Yangtze River and upper Huanghe River, representing ~29% and ~17% of total riverine outflows, respectively. In the entire nitrogen deficit in TP land surface, about 2.7 × 10(5)Mg/year was lost through riverine discharges. Due to the global warming, the changes of hydrologic processes in TP would possibly accelerate the riverine nitrogen outflows in the future. PMID:26925738

  8. Nitrogen Accumulation and Changes in Nitrate Leaching After Four Years of Intensive Forest Culture on Marginal Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.M.; Gresham, C.A.

    2000-02-15

    Loblolly pine and sweetgum were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilizer application and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate-nitrogen in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for four years. Years 1 and 2, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration exceeded drinking water standards. Years 3 and 4, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration decreased where the greatest reduction occurred in soil moisture at the shallowest depths.

  9. First approach to the Japanese nitrogen footprint model to predict the loss of nitrogen to the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hideaki; Cattaneo, Lia R.; Leach, Allison M.; Galloway, James N.

    2014-11-01

    Humans increase the amount of reactive nitrogen (all N species except N2) in the environment through a number of processes, primarily food and energy production. Once in the environment, excess reactive nitrogen may cause a host of various environmental problems. Understanding and controlling individual nitrogen footprints is important for preserving environmental and human health. In this paper we present the per capita nitrogen footprint of Japan. We considered the effect of the international trade of food and feed, and the impact of dietary preferences among different consumer age groups. Our results indicate that the current average per capita N footprint in Japan considering trade is 28.1 kg N capita-1 yr-1. This footprint is dominated by food (25.6 kg N capita-1 yr-1), with the remainder coming from the housing, transportation, and goods and services sectors. The difference in food choices and intake between age groups strongly affected the food N footprint. Younger age groups tend to consume more meat and less fish, which leads to a larger food N footprint (e.g., 27.5 kg N capita-1 yr-1 for ages 20 to 29) than for older age groups (e.g., 23.0 kg N capita-1 yr-1 for ages over 70). The consideration of food and feed imports to Japan reduced the per capita N footprint from 37.0 kg N capita-1 yr-1 to 28.1 kg N capita-1 yr-1. The majority of the imported food had lower virtual N factors (i.e., Nr loss factors for food production), indicating that less N is released to the environment during the respective food production processes. Since Japan relies on imported food (ca. 61%) more than food produced domestically, much of the N losses associated with the food products is released in exporting countries.

  10. [Effects of different fertilization modes on vegetable growth, fertilizer nitrogen utilization, and nitrogen loss from vegetable field].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-feng; Wang, Guo; Li, Wei-hua; Qiu, Xiao-xuan

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment with Chinese cabbage, water spinach, and three-colored amaranth cropped three times in one year was conducted to study the effects of seven fertilization modes, i.e., none fertilization, basal application of chemical fertilizers, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers, basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure, and basal application of organic manure, on the plant height, yield, nitrogen accumulation, and fertilizer nitrogen utilization of the vegetables, and the loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N from vegetable field under natural rainfall condition. The results showed that comparing with none fertilization, the fertilization modes '1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure' and 'basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide' improved the agronomic properties of test vegetables, increased their yields by 103%-219% and 93%-226%, and nitrogen accumulation by 153% -216% and 231%-320%, respectively, and enhanced fertilizer nitrogen utilization rate. They also decreased the surface runoff loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N by 48.1% and 46.5%, respectively, compared with the mode 'basal application of chemical fertilizers', and hence, reduced the risk of agricultural non-point pollution. Therefore, these two fertilization modes could be popularized in vegetable production. PMID:19637603

  11. Nitrogen sources and timing effects on nitrogen loss and uptake in delayed flood rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted over four environments during 2009 and 2010 in the rice (Oryza sativa L.) producing regions of Louisiana and Mississippi to evaluate ammonia volatilization loss and subsequent effects on apparent N recovery efficiency (ANRE) and grain yield. Multiple N sources were applied...

  12. Evaluation of Poultry Litter Amendment to Agricultural Soils: Leaching Losses and Partitioning of Trace Elements in Collard Greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaching of trace metals and greenhouse plant growth (Collard greens; Brassica oleracea var. acephala) response studies were conducted in two types of soils with contrasting characteristics amended with varying rates (0 to 24.70 Mg ha-1) of poultry litter (PL) or 1:1 mixture of PL and fly ash (FA). ...

  13. The study of aluminum loss and consequent phase transformation in heat-treated acid-leached kaolin

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, Choo Thye; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohd Salleh, Mohamad Amran

    2011-04-15

    This study investigates the effect of Al leaching during Fe removal from kaolin to mullite. Heat-treated kaolin was obtained by heating natural kaolin at 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 deg. C. The heat-treated kaolin was then leached at 100 deg. C with 4 M, 3 M, 2 M, 1 M, 0.2 M solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.2 M solution of oxalic acid. The dried samples were sintered to 1300 deg. C for 4 h at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1}. X-ray diffractometry and differential thermal analysis were used to study the phase transformation of kaolin to mullite. It was found that 700 deg. C is the optimum preheat-treatment temperature to leach out Fe and also Al for both types of the acids used. The majority of the 4 M sulfuric acid-treated kaolins formed the cristobalite phase when sintered. On the other hand, 1 M, 0.2 M sulfuric acid and 0.2 M oxalic acid leached heat-treated kaolin formed mullite and quartz phase after sintering. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preheat-treatment of kaolin improves the leachability of unwanted iron. {yields} The optimum preheat-treatment temperature is 700 deg. C. {yields} Sintered 4 M sulfuric acid-treated kaolin majorly formed the cristobalite phase. {yields} Sintered 0.2 M oxalic acid-treated kaolin formed lesser amorphous silicate phase.

  14. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  15. A Model to Predict Nitrogen Losses in Advanced Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, I.; Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Amador, J.; Boving, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the non-point source Nitrogen (N) load in rural areas is attributed to onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). Nitrogen compounds are considered environmental pollutants because they deplete the oxygen availability in water bodies and produce eutrophication. The objective of this study was to simulate the fate and transport of Nitrogen in OWTS. The commercially-available 2D/3D HYDRUS software was used to develop a transport and fate model. Experimental data from a laboratory meso-cosm study included the soil moisture content, NH4 and NO3- data. That data set was used to calibrate the model. Three types of OWTS were simulated: (1) pipe-and-stone (P&S), (2) advanced soil drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (SND) and (3) Geomat (GEO), a variation of SND. To better understand the nitrogen removal mechanism and the performance of OWTS technologies, replicate (n = 3) intact soil mesocosms were used with 15N-labelled nitrogen inputs. As a result, it was estimated that N removal by denitrification was predominant in P&S. However, it is suggested that N was removed by nitrification in SND and GEO. The calibrated model was used to estimate Nitrogen fluxes for both conventional and advanced OWTS. Also, the model predicted the N losses from nitrification and denitrification in all OWTS. These findings help to provide practitioners with guidelines to estimate N removal efficiencies for OWTS, and predict N loads and spatial distribution for identifying non-point sources.

  16. [Simulation of nitrogen and phosphorus loss in Siling Reservoir watershed with AnnAGNPS].

    PubMed

    Bian, Jin-yun; Wang, Fei-er; Yang, Jia; Yu, Jie; Lou, Li-ping; Yu, Dan-ping

    2012-08-01

    By using annual agricultural non-point source model (AnnAGNPS), this study simulated the export loading of nitrogen and phosphorus in Siling Reservoir watershed in Tiaoxi Basin, and integrated with the simulation results, the spatial distribution characteristics of non-point source pollution in the watershed was analyzed. The result showed that the export loading of nitrogen and phosphorus had similar characteristics: in the study area, the export loading of nutrients were higher in southern and western regions and lower in northern and eastern regions. Forest land mainly made up of bamboo was the main export source of nitrogen and phosphorus loading with the contribution above 90% of nutrient load of whole watershed. Three fertilization practices such as no fertilizer (CK), site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) and farmers' fertilizaction practice (FFP) were used in the scenario analysis. The scenario analysis showed that to a certain degree, SSNM could reduce the nitrogen and phosphorus loss. Comparing with FFP, the reduction of SSNM in dissolved nitrogen (DN), particle nitrogen (PN), dissolved phosphorus (DP) and particle phosphorus (PP) was 8.17%, 4.33%, 9.08% and 1.02%, respectively. PMID:23213887

  17. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff. PMID:26710649

  18. Denitrification as the dominant nitrogen loss process in the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Ward, B B; Devol, A H; Rich, J J; Chang, B X; Bulow, S E; Naik, Hema; Pratihary, Anil; Jayakumar, A

    2009-09-01

    Primary production in over half of the world's oceans is limited by fixed nitrogen availability. The main loss term from the fixed nitrogen inventory is the production of dinitrogen gas (N(2)) by heterotrophic denitrification or the more recently discovered autotrophic process, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are responsible for about 35% of oceanic N(2) production and up to half of that occurs in the Arabian Sea. Although denitrification was long thought to be the only loss term, it has recently been argued that anammox alone is responsible for fixed nitrogen loss in the OMZs. Here we measure denitrification and anammox rates and quantify the abundance of denitrifying and anammox bacteria in the OMZ regions of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific and the Arabian Sea. We find that denitrification rather than anammox dominates the N(2) loss term in the Arabian Sea, the largest and most intense OMZ in the world ocean. In seven of eight experiments in the Arabian Sea denitrification is responsible for 87-99% of the total N(2) production. The dominance of denitrification is reproducible using two independent isotope incubation methods. In contrast, anammox is dominant in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific OMZ, as detected using one of the isotope incubation methods, as previously reported. The abundance of denitrifying bacteria always exceeded that of anammox bacteria by up to 7- and 19-fold in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific and Arabian Sea, respectively. Geographic and temporal variability in carbon supply may be responsible for the different contributions of denitrification and anammox in these two OMZs. The large contribution of denitrification to N(2) loss in the Arabian Sea indicates the global significance of denitrification to the oceanic nitrogen budget. PMID:19727197

  19. Effects of combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers plus nitrification inhibitor DMPP on nitrogen runoff loss in vegetable soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaogang; Ma, Junwei; Zou, Ping; Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Yin, Jianzhen; Fu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The application of nitrogen fertilizers leads to various ecological problems such as large amounts of nitrogen runoff loss causing water body eutrophication. The proposal that nitrification inhibitors could be used as nitrogen runoff loss retardants has been suggested in many countries. In this study, simulated artificial rainfall was used to illustrate the effect of the nitrification inhibitor DMPP (3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate) on nitrogen loss from vegetable fields under combined organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilizer application. The results showed that during the three-time simulated artificial rainfall period, the ammonium nitrogen content in the surface runoff water collected from the DMPP application treatment increased by 1.05, 1.13, and 1.10 times compared to regular organic and inorganic combined fertilization treatment, respectively. In the organic and inorganic combined fertilization with DMPP addition treatment, the nitrate nitrogen content decreased by 38.8, 43.0, and 30.1% in the three simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. Besides, the nitrite nitrogen content decreased by 95.4, 96.7, and 94.1% in the three-time simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. A robust decline in the nitrate and nitrite nitrogen surface runoff loss could be observed in the treatments after the DMPP addition. The nitrite nitrogen in DMPP addition treatment exhibited a significant low level, which is near to the no fertilizer application treatment. Compared to only organic and inorganic combined fertilizer treatment, the total inorganic nitrogen runoff loss declined by 22.0 to 45.3% in the organic and inorganic combined fertilizers with DMPP addition treatment. Therefore, DMPP could be used as an effective nitrification inhibitor to control the soil ammonium oxidation in agriculture and decline the nitrogen runoff loss, minimizing the nitrogen transformation risk to the water body and being beneficial for the ecological environment

  20. A SIMPLE MODEL OF THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LOADING, FRESHWATER RESIDENCE TIME, AND INTERNAL LOSSES ON THE NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPORT IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This simple model uses the annual loading rate of total nitrogen (TN) and the water residence time to calculate average annual TN concentration and internal loss rates (e.g. denitrification and incorporation in sediments) in an estuary, and rate of nitrogen export across the seaw...

  1. Gaseous Nitrogen Losses from Tropical Savanna Soils of Northern Australia: Dynamics, Controls and Magnitude of N2O, NO, and N2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Hickler, T.; Hutley, L. B.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical savanna covers a large fraction of the global land area and thus may have a substantial effect on the global soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen. The pronounced seasonality of hygric conditions in this ecosystem affects strongly microbial process rates in the soil. As these microbial processes control the uptake, production, and release of nitrogen compounds, it is thought that this seasonality finally leads to strong temporal dynamics and varying magnitudes of gaseous losses to the atmosphere. However, given their areal extent and in contrast to other ecosystems, still few in-situ or laboratory studies exist that assess the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen. We present laboratory incubation results from intact soil cores obtained from a natural savanna site in Northern Australia, where N2O, NO, and N2 emissions under controlled environmental conditions were investigated. Furthermore, in-situ measurements of high temporal resolution at this site recorded with automated static and dynamic chamber systems are discussed (N2O, NO). This data is then used to assess the performance of a process-based biogeochemical model (LandscapeDNDC), and the potential magnitude and dynamics of components of the site-scale nitrogen cycle where no measurements exist (biological nitrogen fixation and nitrate leaching). Our incubation results show that severe nutrient limitation of the soil only allows for very low N2O emissions (0.12 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and even a periodic N2O uptake. Annual NO emissions were estimated at 0.68 kg N ha-1 yr-1, while the release of inert nitrogen (N2) was estimated at 6.75 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (data excl. contribution by pulse emissions). We observed only minor N2O pulse emissions after watering the soil cores and initial rain events of the dry to wet season transition in-situ, but short-lived NO pulse emissions were substantial. Interestingly, some cores exhibited a very different N2O emission potential, indicating a substantial spatial variability of

  2. Long-term effects of clear cutting and intensive biomass harvesting on the nitrogen leaching to groundwater in the boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubin, Eero

    2013-04-01

    Clear-cutting and site preparation cause the greatest changes in site conditions and to the environment. The oldest research carried out within the boreal coniferous forest zone on the leaching of nutrients into watercourses was conducted in Sweden in the early 1970s. Also in Finland, the effect of clear-cutting and site preparation on the quality of surface runoff has been monitored since 1974 and into the groundwater, after waste wood harvesting, since 1986. Recently intensive biomass harvest has been rapidly increasing and nowadays about seven percent of the total consumption of energy in Finland comes from forest energy. The consumption derived from wood-based fuels is as much as 23 per cent of the total energy. Thus study and understanding forest ecosystems function is nowadays facing new challenges, especially when harvested forest energy, especially stumps, course disturbances and more water penetrating into the soil and groundwater in addition to other ecosystem changes. According the long term-monitoring results nitrate nitrogen seems to be the foremost nutrient leached into the groundwater as a consequence of forestry operations. The effects of clear-cutting on nitrate nitrogen leaching and concentrations in surface water have been shown to last only a few years, but the long-term property of increasing groundwater concentrations, have persisted 25 years which has not reported earlier from other sites. Clear-cutting increases the input of precipitation, but in northern areas this cannot be the main reason for the higher values. The greater part of the increased concentrations is due to the decomposition of cutting waste and humus. This is interesting in relation to intensive biomass harvesting. The availability and the quality of water are strongly influenced by forests. The relationship between forests and water is therefore a critical issue that must be accorded high priority also when developing forest biomass harvesting for energy. To develop best

  3. Nitrogen and phosphorus losses from agricultural systems in China: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Di; Cao, Wenzhi; Fang, Jing; Cai, Longyan

    2014-08-30

    Studies worldwide have indicated that agricultural pollution is the main source of nitrogen and phosphorus (N and P) in surface waters. A systematic understanding of N and P sources and sinks in agricultural systems is important for selecting the appropriate remedial strategies to control nutrient losses and water pollution. Based on nationwide data and a long-term monitoring program in Southeast China, the nationwide spatial and temporal patterns of N and P losses and the relationships between such losses and N and P inputs and rainfall were analyzed. The results showed that the annual nutrient losses from agricultural systems in China strongly varied, and the N/P values ranged from 0.01 to 51.0, with a majority at approximately 0-20, and an arithmetic mean of 9.73; these values mostly overlap the suitable range of N/P (6-15) for red bloom algae. PMID:24934439

  4. Role of soil erodibility in affecting available nitrogen and phosphorus losses under simulated rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Wu, Binbin; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Zongxue

    2014-06-01

    The loss of available nutrients and the effects of soil erodibility on available nutrients losses were rarely researched. Here, laboratory simulation experiments were conducted to determine the soil erodibility effects on the available nitrogen (AN) and phosphorus (AP) losses. The impacts of rainfall intensity and slope on AN and AP losses were also studied. Two contrasting agricultural soils (Burozems and Cinnamon) that occur throughout the northern erosion region of China were selected. Two rainfall intensities (60 and 120 mm h-1) and two slopes (10% and 20%) were studied. Overall, greater runoff, sediment and available nutrient losses occurred from the Cinnamon soil due to its greater soil erodibility, which was approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the Burozems soil. The influence of runoff on sediment was positively linear. The absolute slope of the regression line between runoff rate and sediment yield rate was suitable as a soil erodibility indicator. Runoff-associated AN and AP losses were mainly controlled by runoff rate, and were weakly affected by soil erodibility (p > 0.05). However, soil erodibility significantly influenced the sediment-associated AN and AP losses (p < 0.01), and a positive logarithmic correlation best described their relationships. Since the runoff-associated AN and AP losses dominated the total AN and AP losses for both soils, soil erodibility also exhibited negligible influence on the total AN and AP losses (p > 0.05). Increasing rainfall intensity and slope generally increased the runoff, sediment, and available nutrient losses for both soils, but had no significant influences on their relationships. Our results provide a better understanding of soil and nutrient loss mechanisms.

  5. A laboratory evaluation of ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching following nitrogen fertilizer application on a coarse-textured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a series of field studies, differing rainfall patterns within the first month after nitrogen (N) fertilizer application to a coarse-textured soil significantly affected yields and N-use efficiency of irrigated corn (Zea mays L.), and responses varied with N source. A laboratory study was conducte...

  6. Chapter 14. New tools to assess nitrogen management for conservation of our biosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several tools that can be used to assess the effects of management on nitrogen (N) losses to the environment. The Nitrogen Loss and Environmental Assessment Package (NLEAP) is an improved and renamed version of the DOS program that was called the Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis Pack...

  7. Riparian zones attenuate nitrogen loss following bark beetle-induced lodgepole pine mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, Joel A.; Meixner, Thomas; Harpold, Adrian A.; Reed, David E.; Gutmann, Ethan D.; Gaun, Janelle A.; Brooks, Paul D.

    2016-03-01

    A North American bark beetle infestation has killed billions of trees, increasing soil nitrogen and raising concern for N loss impacts on downstream ecosystems and water resources. There is surprisingly little evidence of stream N response in large basins, which may result from surviving vegetation uptake, gaseous loss, or dilution by streamflow from unimpacted stands. Observations are lacking along hydrologic flow paths connecting soils with streams, challenging our ability to determine where and how attenuation occurs. Here we quantified biogeochemical concentrations and fluxes at a lodgepole pine-dominated site where bark beetle infestation killed 50-60% of trees. We used nested observations along hydrologic flow paths connecting hillslope soils to streams of up to third order. We found soil water NO3 concentrations increased 100-fold compared to prior research at this and nearby southeast Wyoming sites. Nitrogen was lost below the major rooting zone to hillslope groundwater, where dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) increased by 3-10 times (mean 1.65 mg L-1) and NO3-N increased more than 100-fold (3.68 mg L-1) compared to preinfestation concentrations. Most of this N was removed as hillslope groundwater drained through riparian soils, and NO3 remained low in streams. DON entering the stream decreased 50% within 5 km downstream, to concentrations typical of unimpacted subalpine streams (~0.3 mg L-1). Although beetle outbreak caused hillslope N losses similar to other disturbances, up to 5.5 kg ha-1y-1, riparian and in-stream removal limited headwater catchment export to <1 kg ha-1y-1. These observations suggest riparian removal was the dominant mechanism preventing hillslope N loss from impacting streams.

  8. Nitrogen Losses in Runoff from Row-cropped Watersheds: Environmental Benefits of Native Prairie Filter Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Helmers, M. J.; Asbjornsen, H.; Kolka, R. K.; Tomer, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Loss of nitrogen in runoff from agricultural landscapes is a serious problem in the Midwestern United States due to inappropriate/intensive management practices. Among other best management practices, vegetative filter strips have been effectively adopted to reduce pollutant transport with agricultural runoff. In this study, twelve ephemeral watersheds at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Central Iowa were used to evaluate the effectiveness of native prairie filter strips (NPFS) in reducing total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate-N (NO3-N) loss from row-cropped watersheds. Small amounts of NPFS were incorporated at different locations within the watersheds in fall 2006 using a balanced incomplete block design. A no-till 2-yr corn-soybean rotation was adopted in nonperennial areas since spring 2007. Each watershed was instrumented with an H-flume, a flow-monitoring device, and an ISCO water sampler in 2007. Runoff samples during the growing season between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed for TN and NO3-N concentrations for each individual rainfall event. The 4-year mean annual TN loss for watersheds with NPFS was 6.9 kg ha-1, approximately 85% lower than TN loss from 100% row-cropped watersheds (47.7 kg ha-1). Mean annual NO3-N loss during the growing season was 4.2 and 1.3 kg ha-1 for the watersheds with and without NPFS, respectively. The results of this study suggest that incorporation of small amounts of NPFS within annual rowcrop systems could greatly reduce TN and NO3-N loss from agricultural watersheds.

  9. [Characteristics of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Losses in Longhong Ravine Basin of Westlake in Rainstorm Runoff].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Jiang, Yi-feng; Wang, Cui-cui; Huang, Xiao-nan; Wu, Zhi-ying; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-15

    In order to understand the non-point source pollution status in Longhong ravine basin of Westlake, the characteristics of nutrient losses in runoff was investigated during three rainstorms in one year. The results showed that long duration rainstorm event generally formed several runoff peaks, and the time of its lag behind the peaks of rain intensity was dependent on the distribution of heavy rainfall. The first flush was related to the antecedent rainfall, and the less rainfall in the earlier period, the more total phosphorus (TP) and ammonia (NH4+ -N) in runoff was washed off. During the recession of runoff, more subsurface runoff would result in a concentration peak of total nitrogen (TN) and nitrogen (NO3- -N) . The event mean concentration (EMC) of runoff nitrogen had a negative correlation with rainfall, rainfall duration, maximum rain intensity and average rain intensity except for antecedent rainfall, whereas the change in TP EMC showed the opposite trend. The transport fluxes of nutrients increased with an elevation in runoffs, and Pearson analysis showed that the transport fluxes of TN and NO3- -N had good correlations with runoff depth. The average transport fluxes of TP, TN, NH4+ -N and NO3- -N were 34.10, 1195.55, 1006.62 and 52.38 g x hm(-2), respectively, and NO3- -N was the main nitrogen form and accounted for 84% of TN. PMID:27078951

  10. Effects of AN Alfalfa (medicago Sativa) Buffer Strip on Leached δ15NNITRATE Values: Implications for Management of Hydrologic N Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. J.; Keller, C. K.; Smith, J. L.; Evans, R. D.; Harlow, B.

    2011-12-01

    Buffer strips are commonly used to decrease agricultural runoff with the objective of limiting sediment and agrochemicals fluxes to surface waters. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an alfalfa buffer strip on the magnitude and source(s) of leached nitrate from a dryland agricultural field. Previous research at the Cook Agronomy Farm has inferred two sources of nitrate in tile drain discharge, a high-discharge-season (January through May) synthetic fertilizer source, and a low-discharge-season (June through December) soil organic nitrogen source. This study examines how a change in management strategy and crop species alters the low discharge season nitrate source. In the spring of 2006 an alfalfa buffer strip approximately 20 m wide was planted running approximately north-south in the lowland portion of a 12 ha tile-drained field bordering a ditch that drains into Missouri Flat Creek. Three-year (2003 through 2005) average NO3--N flux prior to the planting of the alfalfa buffer strip was ~0.40 kg ha-1 year-1. After planting, the three-year (2006 through 2008) average NO3--N flux was ~0.38 kg ha-1 year-1. The lack of evident buffer-strip influence on the fluxes may be due in part to the large variation in precipitation amounts and timing that control water flows through the system. Three-year average δ15Nnitrate values for the tile drain pre and post planting of the alfalfa buffer strip were 6.9 ± 1.1 % and 4.2 ± 0.9 % respectively. We hypothesize that the significant difference indicates that the alfalfa strip affects the source of leached nitrate. Before planting the alfalfa buffer strip, the interpreted source of nitrate was mineralization of soil organic nitrogen from non-N2 fixing crops (spring and summer wheat varieties). After planting the alfalfa buffer strip, the source of nitrate was interpreted to be a mixture of mineralized soil organic nitrogen from N2 fixing alfalfa and non-N2 fixing crops. Further work is needed to test

  11. Implications of Land-Use and Land-Management Changes for Nitrogen Losses in South American Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarakas, C.

    2015-12-01

    South America has experienced extensive land-use and land-management changes, which accelerated in the 19th century and are projected to continue in the future. As a result, increased anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs via cultivation of nitrogen-fixing crops and application of fertilizer and manure have altered the terrestrial-aquatic N cycle. Anthropogenic perturbations to the N cycle propagate through the ecosystem, impacting downstream freshwater and coastal life, terrestrial and riverine N2O emissions, and carbon cycling throughout the system. We used the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory LM3-TAN (Terrestrial-Aquatic Nitrogen) model to simulate anthropogenic influences on nitrogen losses across terrestrial and riverine systems in South America from 1700 to 2050. The model's representation of ecological, hydrological, and biogeochemical processes captures the transport and transformation of nitrogen throughout the vegetation-soil-river continuum, enabling a more comprehensive accounting of nitrogen losses than previous estimates. We find that land-use and land-management changes increase nitrogen losses and explore the difference in regional patterns between the Amazon and La Plata basins. We highlight the importance of biological fixation and demonstrate that historical changes in nitrogen losses have been more driven by the type of crop introduced than by the amount of fertilizer used.

  12. Environmental and plant community determinants of species loss following nitrogen enrichment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, C.M.; Cleland, E.E.; Collins, S.L.; Fargione, J.E.; Gough, L.; Gross, K.L.; Pennings, S.C.; Suding, K.N.; Grace, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Global energy use and food production have increased nitrogen inputs to ecosystems worldwide, impacting plant community diversity, composition, and function. Previous studies show considerable variation across terrestrial herbaceous ecosystems in the magnitude of species loss following nitrogen (N) enrichment. What controls this variation remains unknown. We present results from 23 N-addition experiments across North America, representing a range of climatic, soil and plant community properties, to determine conditions that lead to greater diversity decline. Species loss in these communities ranged from 0 to 65% of control richness. Using hierarchical structural equation modelling, we found greater species loss in communities with a lower soil cation exchange capacity, colder regional temperature, and larger production increase following N addition, independent of initial species richness, plant productivity, and the relative abundance of most plant functional groups. Our results indicate sensitivity to N addition is co-determined by environmental conditions and production responsiveness, which overwhelm the effects of initial community structure and composition. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Nitrogen concentrations and losses from agricultural streams in the Nordic and Baltic countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålnacke, Per; Bechmann, Marianne; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Iital, Arvo; Kyllmar, Katarina; Koskiaho, Jari; Lagzdins, Ainis; Povilaitis, Arvydas

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of long-term trends is one of the key objectives in most national water quality monitoring programmes. It is for example essential that we know how long it can take to detect the response in agricultural streams to changes in agriculture and implemented measures, because such information is needed to allow environmental authorities and decision and policy makers to establish realistic goals. Thus, long-term monitoring data is the key to cover future management needs and demands such as implementation of various EU-Directives (e.g., WFD, the Nitrates Directive). This paper in a uniform fashion examines the levels and temporal trends of nitrogen concentrations and losses in streams draining agricultural catchment areas in the Nordic and Baltic countries. 35 catchments (range 0.1-33km2) in Norway (9), Denmark (5), Sweden (8), Finland (4), Estonia (3), Latvia (3) and Lithuania (3) were selected for the study. Most of these catchments are part of national water quality monitoring programmes and initially selected to represent the major crops, soil types and climatic conditions in each country. The longest time series where 23 years (1988-2010) while the shortest one was 10 years (2002-2011). The reasons for these identified trends and no-trends will be discussed during the oral presentation in relation to land use, agricultural management and implementation of mitigation measures. Furthermore, the difference in mean level concentrations and losses will be discussed in relation to differences in climate, land use and agricultural management Overall the results show that agricultural catchments in the Nordic and Baltic countries exhibit different levels of nitrogen concentrations and losses, with a large interannual variability in all catchments. For example, the overall range in annual long-term mean TN losses was 6-102 kg N ha-1. Nearly one third of the investigated agricultural catchments showed statistically significant downward trends in nitrogen losses or

  14. Using simulation and budget models to scale-up nitrogen leaching from field to region in Canada.

    PubMed

    Huffman, E C; Yang, J Y; Gameda, S; De Jong, R

    2001-12-11

    Efforts are underway at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) to develop an integrated, nationally applicable, socioeconomic/biophysical modeling capability in order to predict the environmental impacts of policy and program scenarios. This paper outlines our Decision Support System (DSS), which integrates the IROWCN (Indicator of the Risk of Water Contamination by Nitrogen) index with the agricultural policy model CRAM (Canadian Regional Agricultural Model) and presents an outline of our methodology to provide independent assessments of the IROWCN results through the use of nitrogen (N) simulation models in select, data-rich areas. Three field-level models--DSSAT, N_ABLE, and EPIC--were evaluated using local measured data. The results show that all three dynamic models can be used to simulate biomass, grain yield, and soil N dynamics at the field level; but the accuracy of the models differ, suggesting that models need to be calibrated using local measured data before they are used in Canada. Further simulation of IROWCN in a maize field using N_ABLE showed that soil-mineral N levels are highly affected by the amount of fertilizer N applied and the time of year, meaning that fertilizer and manure N applications and weather data are crucial for improving IROWCN. Methods of scaling-up simulated IROWCN from field-level to soil-landscape polygons and CRAM regions are discussed. PMID:12805754

  15. Simulation of Long-Term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Grassland-Based Dairy Farming Systems to Evaluate Mitigation Strategies for Nutrient Losses

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ghulam Abbas; Groot, Jeroen C.J.; Shah, Ghulam Mustafa; Lantinga, Egbert A.

    2013-01-01

    Many measures have been proposed to mitigate gaseous emissions and other nutrient losses from agroecosystems, which can have large detrimental effects for the quality of soils, water and air, and contribute to eutrophication and global warming. Due to complexities in farm management, biological interactions and emission measurements, most experiments focus on analysis of short-term effects of isolated mitigation practices. Here we present a model that allows simulating long-term effects at the whole-farm level of combined measures related to grassland management, animal housing and manure handling after excretion, during storage and after field application. The model describes the dynamics of pools of organic carbon and nitrogen (N), and of inorganic N, as affected by farm management in grassland-based dairy systems. We assessed the long-term effects of delayed grass mowing, housing type (cubicle and sloping floor barns, resulting in production of slurry and solid cattle manure, respectively), manure additives, contrasting manure storage methods and irrigation after application of covered manure. Simulations demonstrated that individually applied practices often result in compensatory loss pathways. For instance, methods to reduce ammonia emissions during storage like roofing or covering of manure led to larger losses through ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching or denitrification after application, unless extra measures like irrigation were used. A strategy of combined management practices of delayed mowing and fertilization with solid cattle manure that is treated with zeolite, stored under an impermeable sheet and irrigated after application was effective to increase soil carbon stocks, increase feed self-sufficiency and reduce losses by ammonia volatilization and soil N losses. Although long-term datasets (>25 years) of farm nutrient dynamics and loss flows are not available to validate the model, the model is firmly based on knowledge of processes and

  16. Effects of dietary protein concentration on ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching, and plant nitrogen uptake from dairy manure applied to lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lysimeter experiment was designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) concentration on nitrate-N (NO3-N) and ammonia (NH3) losses from dairy manure applied to soil and manure N use for plant growth. Lactating dairy cows were fed diets with 16.7 (HighCP) or 14.8% (LowCP) cru...

  17. Fertilizer management effects on nitrate leaching and indirect nitrous oxide emissions in irrigated potato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a nitrogen (N) intensive crop with high potential for nitrate (NO3-) losses, particularly when irrigated. The high leaching potential also represents a potential source of indirect nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions resulting from the transformation of NO3- to N2O after it leaves the fertilized...

  18. Management options to limit nitrate leaching from grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuttle, S. P.; Scholefield, D.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrate leaching can be reduced by the adoption of less intensive grassland systems which, though requiring a greater land area to achieve the same agricultural output, result in less nitrate leaching per unit of production than do intensively managed grasslands. The economic penalties associated with reductions in output can be partly offset by greater reliance on symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the use of clover-based swards in place of synthetic N fertilisers. Alternatively, specific measures can be adopted to improve the efficiency of nitrogen use in intensively managed systems in order to maintain high outputs but with reduced losses. Controls should take account of other forms of loss and flows of nitrogen between grassland and other components of the whole-farm system and, in most instances, should result in an overall reduction in nitrogen inputs. Removing stock from the fields earlier in the grazing season will reduce the accumulation of high concentrations of potentially leachable nitrate in the soil of grazed pastures but will increase the quantity of manure produced by housed animals and the need to recycle this effectively. Supplementing grass diets with low-nitrogen forages such as maize silage will reduce the quantity of nitrogen excreted by livestock but may increase the potential for nitrate leaching elsewhere on the farm if changes to cropping patterns involve more frequent cultivation of grassland. Improved utilisation by the sward of nitrogen in animal excreta and manures and released by mineralisation of soil organic matter will permit equivalent reductions to be made in fertiliser inputs, provided that adequate information is available about the supply of nitrogen from these non-fertiliser sources.

  19. Major sources of nitrogen input and loss in the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael

    1996-01-01

    A mass balance of total nitrogen input and loss in Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Twin Falls Counties suggests that more than 6,000,000 kg (6,600 tons) of total nitrogen is input in this four-county area than is discharged by the Snake River. This excess nitrogen probably is utilized by aquatic vegetation in the Snake River (causing eutrophication), stored as nitrogen in soil, stored as nitrate in the ground water and eventually discharged through the springs, utilized by noncrop vegetation, and lost through denitrification.

  20. Extensive nitrogen loss from permeable sediments off North-West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoll, Sarah; Lavik, Gaute; Sommer, Stefan; Goldhammer, Tobias; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Holtappels, Moritz

    2016-04-01

    The upwelling area off North-West Africa is characterized by high export production, high nitrate and low oxygen concentration in bottom waters. The underlying sediment consists of sands that cover most of the continental shelf. Due to their permeability sands allow for fast advective pore water transport and can exhibit high rates of nitrogen (N) loss via denitrification as reported for anthropogenically eutrophied regions. However, N loss from sands underlying naturally eutrophied waters is not well studied, and in particular, N loss from the North-West African shelf is poorly constrained. During two research cruises in April/May 2010/2011, sediment was sampled along the North-West African shelf and volumetric denitrification rates were measured in sediment layers down to 8 cm depth using slurry incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate. Areal N loss was calculated by integrating volumetric rates down to the nitrate penetration depth derived from pore water profiles. Areal N loss was neither correlated with water depth nor with bottom water concentrations of nitrate and oxygen but was strongly dependent on sediment grain size and permeability. The derived empirical relation between benthic N loss and grains size suggests that pore water advection is an important regulating parameter for benthic denitrification in sands and further allowed extrapolating rates to an area of 53,000 km2 using detailed sediment maps. Denitrification from this region amounts to 995 kt yr-1 (average 3.6 mmol m-2 d-1) which is 4 times higher than previous estimates based on diffusive pore water transport. Sandy sediments cover 50-60% of the continental shelf and thus may contribute significantly to the global benthic N loss.

  1. Nitrogen losses in anoxic marine sediments driven by Thioploca-anammox bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, M G; Hirst, M B; De Brabandere, L; Lawrence, D J P; Berelson, W M; Granger, J; Chang, B X; Dawson, S; Crane, E J; Chong, L; Thamdrup, B; Townsend-Small, A; Sigman, D M

    2013-08-01

    Ninety per cent of marine organic matter burial occurs in continental margin sediments, where a substantial fraction of organic carbon escapes oxidation and enters long-term geologic storage within sedimentary rocks. In such environments, microbial metabolism is limited by the diffusive supply of electron acceptors. One strategy to optimize energy yields in a resource-limited habitat is symbiotic metabolite exchange among microbial associations. Thermodynamic and geochemical considerations indicate that microbial co-metabolisms are likely to play a critical part in sedimentary organic carbon cycling. Yet only one association, between methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, has been demonstrated in marine sediments in situ, and little is known of the role of microbial symbiotic interactions in other sedimentary biogeochemical cycles. Here we report in situ molecular and incubation-based evidence for a novel symbiotic consortium between two chemolithotrophic bacteria--anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria and the nitrate-sequestering sulphur-oxidizing Thioploca species--in anoxic sediments of the Soledad basin at the Mexican Pacific margin. A mass balance of benthic solute fluxes and the corresponding nitrogen isotope composition of nitrate and ammonium fluxes indicate that anammox bacteria rely on Thioploca species for the supply of metabolic substrates and account for about 57 ± 21 per cent of the total benthic N2 production. We show that Thioploca-anammox symbiosis intensifies benthic fixed nitrogen losses in anoxic sediments, bypassing diffusion-imposed limitations by efficiently coupling the carbon, nitrogen and sulphur cycles. PMID:23925243

  2. Lime and Soil Moisture Effects on Nitrogen gas Loss Following Fertilizer Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.; Oldenburg, C.

    2007-12-01

    The loss of nitrogen from fertilizer application through ammonia volatilization and nitrous oxide emissions are of major environmental concern. Liming has been regarded as a mitigation option for lowering soil nitrogen gas emissions following the addition of fertilizers. A mechanistic nitrogen-cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) has been developed to simulate the interaction of water saturation variation with biogeochemical processes, and the balance between liming and soil buffering capacity. The model was tested with data from a laboratory soil incubation following the addition of synthetic urine (500 kg N ha-1). Simulation results agreed well with measured N2O emissions and soil inorganic-N concentrations. The study indicated that liming significantly increase NH3 volatilization, while the reduction in cumulative N2O emissions depended strongly on water regime. The cumulative N2O emissions under relatively dry conditions were reduced by up to 243% with liming. However, the cumulative N2O and N2 emissions were predicted to increase by up to 346% following liming because the resulting NO3--N pools (from enhanced nitrification) were susceptible to enhanced N2O and N2 losses during subsequent water application. Consequently, short-term (i.e., days ¡§C weeks) gains made in reducing soil N2O emissions by liming can be offset, and potentially reversed, by emissions later in the growing season. We describe an approach using the modeling framework to optimize N gas reductions using liming under various edaphic, crop type, fertilizer and irrigation application rates, and climate conditions.

  3. Testing of a Vacuum Insulated Flexible Line with Flowing Liquid Nitrogen during the Loss of Insulating Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demko, J. A.; Duckworth, R. C.; Roden, M.; Gouge, M.

    2008-03-01

    Long length vacuum insulated lines are used to carry flowing liquid nitrogen in several high temperature superconducting cable projects. An important, but rare, failure scenario is the abrupt or catastrophic loss of the thermal insulating vacuum producing a rapid increase in heat transfer to the liquid nitrogen stream. In this experimental investigation, a vacuum superinsulated 3 inch by 5 inch nominal pipe size (NPS) (88.9 mm by 141.3 mm) flexible cryostat is subjected to an abrupt loss of vacuum in order to measure the thermal response of a flowing liquid nitrogen stream and the temperature response of the cryostat. The measured outlet stream temperature has a slight peak shortly after the loss of vacuum incident and decreases as the cryostat warms up. The heat loads measured before and after the vacuum loss event are reported. Measurements of the temperatures in the multi-layer superinsulation are also discussed.

  4. Impacts of management alternatives on rice yield and nitrogen losses to the environment: A case study in rural Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Stone, Elizabeth C; Hornberger, George M

    2016-01-15

    Maintaining crop yields is vital as populations increase, but environmental degradation resulting from cultivation must be prevented. In particular, freshwater resources are at risk of nitrate leaching from superfluous fertilization. This research explores the tradeoffs between maximizing yield and limiting environmental impacts of rice production in Sri Lanka. The DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model was used to examine how various combinations of fertilization and irrigation management affect yield, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and nitrogen (N) leaching in paddy systems under climate and soil conditions in the dry zone of Sri Lanka from 1991 to 2010. Simulated fertilizer application rates ranged from zero to 2700 kgN/ha and simulated irrigation schemes were continuously flooded, marginally flooded, and rain-fed. Increasing fertilizer levels from zero to 300 kgN/ha per year increased yield but application of fertilizer beyond that amount ceased to affect yield for any of the three irrigation schemes. The combination of management options for obtaining the maximum grain yield, near 9000 kgC/ha, with the greatest amount of N uptake and relatively low nitrate leaching was using 225 kgN/ha under a continuously flooded regime. This research explores how cultivation in rice-growing regions in south Asia affects the environment and the N cycle, and demonstrates how informed management of these systems can reduce external inputs of N fertilizer without impacting yield. PMID:26519587

  5. Impact of struvite crystallization on nitrogen losses during composting of pig manure and cornstalk

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Limei; Schuchardt, Frank; Shen Yujun; Li Guoxue; Li Chunping

    2010-05-15

    An absorbent mixture of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was added to compost mixtures of pig manure with cornstalk in different molar ratios (T1, 1:1; T2, 1:2; T3, 1:3) in order to examine its effect on controlling ammonia losses during composting. Based on the principle of struvite precipitation, and with an unamended trial as control (CK), an in-vessel composting experiment was conducted in fermenters (60 L with forced aeration) in which the absorbent mixture was added with proportions of 3.8%, 7.3% and 8.9% of dry weight for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. The results showed that the total nitrogen loss was reduced from 35% to 12%, 5% and 1% of initial N mass, respectively. In the final compost, the total nitrogen content in T1, T2 and T3 was improved by 10, 14, 12 g kg{sup -1}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N in T1, T2 and T3 was improved by 8, 9, and 10 g kg{sup -1}, respectively, compared with the unamended trial. The results of the germination index test showed that the maturity of treatment T2 was best among the four treatments in the final compost, followed by T1, CK and T3. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MgNH{sub 4}PO{sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O:MAP) in the T1, T2 and T3 compost. Based on these results, the adsorbent mixture of Mg(OH){sub 2} + H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} could control nitrogen loss effectively during composting via struvite crystallization. However, an excess of phosphoric acid (1:3) had a negative influence on composting properties. The pH value decreased which led to reduced microorganism activity, and which finally resulted in reduced biodegradation of the organic matter.

  6. High winds induce nitrogen loss from US Pacific Northwest agricultural lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, B. S.; Graves, L.; Pressley, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    High winds common to the Pacific Northwest region of the USA have resulted in massive loss of topsoil from agricultural fields that are primarily managed in a winter wheat / summer fallow rotation. This topsoil contains nitrogen (N), an essential nutrient required for growth and development of plants. Loss of N from soils can cause degradation of air and water quality and also is an economic concern to farmers because depletion of nutrients from soils results in lower crop yield. Flux of windblown sediment moving across eroding fields was measured during high wind events between 1999 and 2006 in eastern Washington. Samplers were deployed to trap sediment that was creeping along or in saltation/suspension at various heights above fields that were in the summer fallow phase of the rotation. Windblown sediment was weighed and analyzed for N content by combustion and a thermal conductivity analyzer. Enrichment, or the ratio of N in the windblown sediment to soil of greater than one, was observed in about half of the years. For nearly all high wind events, N content of sediment transported by creep was greater than sediment transported by saltation or suspension. This study suggests that wind erosion can result in loss of N from agricultural soils.

  7. Global Patterns in Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction: A Latitudinal Gradient in Nitrogen Retention and Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, W. L.; Thompson, A. W.; Bradbury, D.; Chapin, F. S.; Ewel, J. J.; Firestone, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    Increased nitrogen (N) deposition in humid environments has the potential to significantly increase nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions via nitrification and denitrification. This potential N loss may be significantly offset by N retention from dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). In this study, we report on rates of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2O and ammonium along a latitudinal gradient from the tropics to the boreal forest. We conducted laboratory experiments with forest soils from Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, California, and Alaska to determine maximum potential rates of DNRA and N2O production. We also conducted field experiments in Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Alaska to estimate in situ rates. Maximum potential rates of DNRA ranged from 10 ug/g/d in fertilized poplar forests in Alaska to 0.3 ug/g/d in unfertilized polyculture plantations in Costa Rica. At all sites, rates of DNRA appeared to be nitrate limited. On average, temperate and boreal forests had greater potential rates of DNRA (5 +/- 1 ug/g/d) than tropical forests (3 +/- 1 ug/g/d). Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased rates of DNRA in Alaska. Rates of maximum potential N2O flux were generally lower than DNRA rates (0.16 to 4 ug/g/d). In field experiments, rates of DNRA were greatest in tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico, followed by wet forests in Costa Rica, and black spruce forests in Alaska. Although field DNRA rates were low in Alaska, they accounted for up to 13 % of gross mineralization and 24 % of gross nitrification. At all sites, rates of N2O flux via denitrification and nitrification were significantly lower than N retention via DNRA. Our results suggest that this previously unmeasured N cycling pathway effectively competes with processes resulting in N-trace gas loss from a range of forested ecosystems.

  8. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  9. Farm nitrogen balances in six European landscapes as an indicator for nitrogen losses and basis for improved management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Bienkowski, J. F.; Bleeker, A.; Dragosits, U.; Drouet, J. L.; Durand, P.; Frumau, A.; Hutchings, N. J.; Kedziora, A.; Magliulo, V.; Olesen, J. E.; Theobald, M. R.; Maury, O.; Akkal, N.; Cellier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Improved management of nitrogen (N) in agriculture is necessary to achieve a sustainable balance between the production of food and other biomass, and the unwanted effects of N on water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity deterioration and human health. To analyse farm N-losses and the complex interactions within farming systems, efficient methods for identifying emissions hotspots and evaluating mitigation measures are therefore needed. The present paper aims to fill this gap at the farm and landscape scales. Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm N balances, N surpluses and for evaluating uncertainty for the 222 farms and 11 440 ha of farmland included in the study. In all landscapes, a large variation in the farm N surplus was found, and thereby a large potential for reductions. The highest average N surpluses were found in the most livestock-intensive landscapes of IT, FR, and NL; on average 202 ± 28, 179 ± 63 and 178 ± 20 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. All landscapes showed hotspots, especially from livestock farms, including a special UK case with large-scale landless poultry farming. Overall, the average N surplus from the land-based UK farms dominated by extensive sheep and cattle grazing was only 31 ± 10 kg N ha-1 yr-1, but was similar to the N surplus of PL and DK (122 ± 20 and 146 ± 55 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively) when landless poultry farming was included. We found farm N balances to be a useful indicator for N losses and the potential for improving N management. Significant correlations to N surplus were found, both with ammonia air concentrations and nitrate concentrations in soils and groundwater, measured during the period of N management data collection in the landscapes from 2007-2009. This indicates that farm N surpluses may be used as an

  10. Field evaluation of a model for predicting nitrogen losses from drained lands.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed A; Skaggs, R Wayne; Chescheir, George M; Gilliam, J Wendell

    2006-01-01

    The N simulation model, DRAINMOD-N II, was field-tested using a 6-yr data set from an artificially drained agricultural site located in eastern North Carolina. The test site is on a nearly flat sandy loam soil which is very poorly drained under natural conditions. Four experimental plots, planted to a corn (Zea mays)-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-soybean (Glycine max.) rotation and managed using conventional and controlled drainage, were used in model testing. Water table depth, subsurface drainage, and N concentration in drain flow were measured and meteorological data were recorded continuously. DRAINMOD-N II was calibrated using the data from one plot; data sets from the other three plots were used for model validation. Simulation results showed an excellent agreement between observed and predicted nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) losses in drainage water over the 6-yr period and a reasonable agreement on an annual basis. The agreement on a monthly basis was not as good. The Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency (EF) for monthly predictions was 0.48 for the calibration plot and 0.19, 0.01, and -0.02 for the validation plots. The value of the EF for yearly predictions was 0.92 for the calibration plot and 0.73, 0.62, and -0.10 for the validation plots. Errors in predicting cumulative NO(3)-N losses over the 6-yr period were remarkably small; -1.3% for the calibration plot, -8.1%, -2.8%, and 4.0% for the validation plots. Results of this study showed the potential of DRAINMOD-N II for predicting N losses from drained agricultural lands. Further research is needed to test the model for different management practices and soil and climatological conditions. PMID:17071872

  11. Losses of surface runoff, total solids, and nitrogen during bermudagrass establishment on levee embankments.

    PubMed

    Burwell, Robert W; Beasley, Jeffrey S; Gaston, Lewis A; Borst, Steven M; Sheffield, Ron E; Strahan, Ron E; Munshaw, Gregg C

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient and sediment runoff from newly constructed levee embankments pose a threat to water quality during soft armor vegetation establishment. Research was initiated in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate the effect of bermudagrass ( L.) coverage and N source on nutrient and sediment runoff from levee embankments during establishment. Bermudagrass plots were seeded at 195.3 kg pure live seed ha and fertilized at 50 kg N ha using a water-soluble N source, urea or NH-NO, or slow-release N source, S-coated urea (SCU) or urea formaldehyde (UF), with controls unfertilized. Vegetative cover percentage, time until the onset of runoff, runoff volume, and total solids (TS), NO-N, and NH-N concentrations were measured from simulated and natural rainfall events for 70 d in 2008 and 56 d in 2009. Bermudagrass at 90% grass cover delayed the onset of runoff an additional 441 to 538 s and reduced runoff volumes 74 to 84% of that exhibited at 10% grass cover. Nitrogen fertilizers did not accelerate bermudagrass growth sufficiently, however, to reduce TS loading compared with unfertilized bermudagrass in either year of the study. The application of urea and SCU resulted in cumulative N losses of 2.45 and 3.13 kg ha compared with 1.59 kg ha from the unfertilized bermudagrass in 2008, and 1.73 kg ha from NH-NO vs. 0.24 kg ha from controls in 2009. Only UF increased bermudagrass establishment without increasing cumulative N losses compared with unfertilized bermudagrass. Therefore, the benefit of greater erosion and runoff resistance expected from N-accelerated vegetative growth did not occur but had the unintended consequence of higher N losses when water-soluble N and SCU fertilizers were applied. PMID:21712593

  12. Prevention and control of losses of gaseous nitrogen compounds in livestock operations: a review.

    PubMed

    Jongebreur, A A; Monteny, G J

    2001-11-27

    Nitrogen (N) losses from livestock houses and manure storage facilities contribute greatly to the total loss of N from livestock farms. Volatilisation of ammonia (NH3) is the major process responsible for the loss of N in husbandry systems with slurry (where average dry matter content varies between 3 and 13%). Concerning this volatilisation of NH3, the process parameters of pH and air temperature are crucial. During a period of approximately 10 years, systematic measurements of NH3 losses originating from a large variety of different livestock houses were made. One of the problems with NH3 emissions is the large variation in the measured data due to the season, the production of the animals, the manure treatment, type of livestock house, and the manure storage. Generally speaking, prevention and control of NH3 emission can be done by control of N content in the manure, moisture content, pH, and temperature. In houses for growing pigs, a combination of simple housing measures can be taken to greatly reduce NH3 emissions. In houses for laying hens, the control of the manure drying process determines the emission of NH3. Monteny has built an NH3 production model with separate modules for the emission of the manure storage under the dairy house and the floor in the house. Manure spreading is also a major source of NH3 emission and is dependent on slurry composition, environmental conditions, and farm management. The effects of these factors have been employed in a model. Losses via NO, N2O, and N2 are important in husbandry systems with solid manure and straw. The number of experimental data is, however, very limited. As N2O is an intermediate product of complex biochemical processes of nitrification and denitrification, optimal conditions are the key issues in N2O reduction strategies. We may expect that in the near future the emission of greenhouse gases will get the same attention from policy makers as NH3. Sustainable livestock production has to combine low

  13. Nitrogen and phosphorus losses from variable and constant intensity rainfall simulations on loamy sand under conventional and strip tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen and phosphorus loss in runoff for different tillage systems must be better quantified to evaluate nutrient management strategies for best nutrient use efficiency and calibration of current nutrient transport risk assessment tools. Our objective was to quantify and compare effects of consta...

  14. Solution Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  15. A NEW NITROGEN INDEX: An Adaptive Management Tool for Reducing Nitrogen Losses to the Environment from Mexican Forage Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexico has about 2 million ha planted in forage, which is used to feed 2.2 million dairy cows. It is estimated that up to 70% of the ingested nitrogen (N) is cycled back into the system via manure and urea depositions. This contributes to an undesirably high ratio of manure N to land available to us...

  16. Investigation of microbially induced permeability loss during in-situ leaching. Contract research report 23 feb 81-15 jul 82

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

    1982-04-16

    Accumulations of microorganisms in the in situ leaching environment are believed responsible for plugging of the orebody and thus decreasing uranium extraction. To assess the contribution of microbial growth to this problem, packed columns of ore and core specimens were leached in the laboratory. Samples collected at four in situ uranium mining operations revealed pseudomonads, Xanthomonads, Bacillus sp. and Micrococcus sp. These microorganisms, inoculated into simulated leaching conditions, decreased permeability in two uranium ores by one order of magnitude in 20 days. Hydrogen peroxide alleviated microbial plugging in the laboratory. Periodic injection of hydrogen peroxide through the production well into the orebody may reduce microbial plugging problems in the field.

  17. Surficial gains and subsoil losses of soil carbon and nitrogen during secondary forest development.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Megan L; Lajtha, Kate; Kramer, Marc G; Bacon, Allan R; Heine, Paul R; Richter, Daniel Deb

    2015-02-01

    Reforestation of formerly cultivated land is widely understood to accumulate above- and belowground detrital organic matter pools, including soil organic matter. However, during 40 years of study of reforestation in the subtropical southeastern USA, repeated observations of above- and belowground carbon documented that significant gains in soil organic matter (SOM) in surface soils (0-7.5 cm) were offset by significant SOM losses in subsoils (35-60 cm). Here, we extended the observation period in this long-term experiment by an additional decade, and used soil fractionation and stable isotopes and radioisotopes to explore changes in soil organic carbon and soil nitrogen that accompanied nearly 50 years of loblolly pine secondary forest development. We observed that accumulations of mineral soil C and N from 0 to 7.5 cm were almost entirely due to accumulations of light-fraction SOM. Meanwhile, losses of soil C and N from mineral soils at 35 to 60 cm were from SOM associated with silt and clay-sized particles. Isotopic signatures showed relatively large accumulations of forest-derived carbon in surface soils, and little to no accumulation of forest-derived carbon in subsoils. We argue that the land use change from old field to secondary forest drove biogeochemical and hydrological changes throughout the soil profile that enhanced microbial activity and SOM decomposition in subsoils. However, when the pine stands aged and began to transition to mixed pines and hardwoods, demands on soil organic matter for nutrients to support aboveground growth eased due to pine mortality, and subsoil organic matter levels stabilized. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term experiments and deep measurements when characterizing soil C and N responses to land use change and the remarkable paucity of such long-term soil data deeper than 30 cm. PMID:25155991

  18. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  19. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  20. Understanding the Variability in Soybean Nitrogen Fixation across Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional farming practices have uncoupled carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles through the application of inorganic N fertilizers applied in plant available forms at levels that saturate the system. As a result, extensive N losses via leaching and denitrification are having significant environment...

  1. [Nitrogen and phosphorus loss in different land use types and its response to environmental factors in the Three Gorges Reservoir area].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Xiong; Huang, Zhi-Lin; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Tian, Yao-Wu

    2012-10-01

    The control of agricultural non-point source pollution (AGNPS) is an urgent problem to be solved for the ecological environment construction in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. We analyzed the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loss and its response to environmental factors through monitoring the nutrient loss in different land use types after returning farmland to forest. The results showed that: 1) The variability of nutrient concentration loss was strong in different land use types under different rainfall conditions, and the variability in the concentration of available nutrient was much higher than that of total nutrient; 2) Compared to farmland, the annual phosphorus loss of different land use types was reduced by 84.53% - 91.61% after returning farmland to forest; the reduction of annual nitrogen loss was not significant except Chinese chestnut forest (Castanea mollissima) and arbor forest, and the nitrogen loss was much higher than the phosphorus loss in all land use types; 3) The particle phosphorus and nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) were the main forms of the phosphorus and nitrogen loss, respectively; 4) The nutrient loss of tea garden (Camellia sinensis) and bamboo forest (Phyllostachys pubescens) showed a good correlation with precipitation, and the correlation of phosphorus was better than that of nitrogen, but there was no significant relation with the rainfall intensity; 5) The coverage of vegetation, tree layer and litter had a great influence on the loss of total nitrogen (TN). NO3(-)-N loss was highly influenced by the ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) content in the surface soil, and P loss mainly by the total phosphorus (TP) and sand content in the soil. PMID:23233964

  2. Utilization and requirement of dietary protein taking into account the dermal and miscellaneous nitrogen losses in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Ishikawa, K; Setoguchi, K; Koike, G

    1988-10-01

    Utilization and requirement of mixed protein in the conventional Japanese diet and the obligatory integumental and miscellaneous nitrogen losses were measured in female subjects. Twelve female students aged 18 to 24 years were given conventional low-protein diets at N intake levels of 50, 70, and 90 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Constituents of the diets corresponded to those of average intake of the Japanese in recent years (1982). N balances were estimated and regression equations between N intake (X) and N balance (Y) were calculated by the multiple level-constant variation method. The equation was Y = 0.426X - 40.0 (n = 36, r = 0.615, p less than 0.01) and the intersection of the regression line with zero nitrogen balance was 93.9 +/- 14.3 mg N/kg/day. The mean digestibility was 92.2 +/- 4.7%. In another experimental group, nitrogen losses due to hair, nails, and menstruation in ten Japanese women were 0.624 +/- 0.172, 0.020 +/- 0.005, and 1.76 +/- 0.68 mg/kg/day, respectively. In a third experimental group, mean of the integumental N losses was 2.8 mg/kg/day in both the subjects given a low-protein diet (19 women) and an ordinary-protein diet (4 women). It increased to 12.7 mg N/kg/day when subjects exercised in summer (4 subjects). The protein requirement in the conventional Japanese diet estimated as the sum of the mean requirement of dietary protein and obligatory dermal and miscellaneous nitrogen losses in Japanese women was 99.1 mg N/kg/day or 0.62 g protein/kg/day. The net protein utilization (NPU) of the proteins at the N intake level for N equilibrium was estimated as 48. PMID:3230417

  3. Carbon and nitrogen loss during initial erosion processes under litter cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Steffen; Goebes, Philipp; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion translocates carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) from the soil pool. In natural or near-natural ecosystems like forests the soil is usually covered by litter. It can be assumed that litter decomposition and dust particles adhered on the surface of the leaves contribute to C and N fluxes during erosion processes as well. To our knowledge, the contribution of these compartments to the C and N balance of soil erosion is not yet known. As part of the "New Integrated Litter Experiment" within the DFG research unit "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (BEF)-China" we conducted a rainfall simulation experiment to quantify the role of litter cover for C and N fluxes during soil erosion in subtropical China. 96 mini runoff plots (40cm x 40cm) were established and divided into four blocks, two of them replicates. Seven different domestic litter species were used in this study combined to 1-species, 2-species and 4-species mixtures and complemented by none species plots (bare ground). Erosion processes were initiated by artificial rainfall using a rainfall simulator with a continuous and stable intensity of 60 mm/h. Sediment discharge and runoff volume were measured every 5 minutes for 20 minutes of rainfall duration and filtrated in the laboratory. Two time steps of rainfall simulation were carried out (summer 2012 and autumn 2012). Total C and N content were quantified from the solid sediment and the liquid runoff volume. Leaf decomposition rates were calculated based on the mass, leaf litter coverage was measured and loss of C and N contents from the decomposing leaves were provided by other project members. Additionally, C and N content of corresponding soils were designated. Lab work and statistical analysis are still ongoing. First results show that C and N concentrations of runoff and sediment are slightly higher for plots covered by litter than bare plots during the first run in summer 2012. It seems that 4-species plots have the highest C and N flux during

  4. Runoff, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses from purple slope cropland soil under rating fertilization in Three Gorges Region.

    PubMed

    Bouraima, Abdel-Kabirou; He, Binghui; Tian, Taiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Soil erosion along with soil particles and nutrients losses is detrimental to crop production. We carried out a 5-year (2010 to 2014) study to characterize the soil erosion and nitrogen and phosphorus losses caused by rainfall under different fertilizer application levels in order to provide a theoretical evidence for the agricultural production and coordinate land management to improve ecological environment. The experiment took place under rotation cropping, winter wheat-summer maize, on a 15° slope purple soil in Chongqing (China) within the Three Gorges Region (TGR). Four treatments, control (CK) without fertilizer, combined manure with chemical fertilizer (T1), chemical fertilization (T2), and chemical fertilizer with increasing fertilization (T3), were designed on experimental runoff plots for a long-term observation aiming to study their effects on soil erosion and nutrients losses. The results showed that fertilization reduced surface runoff and nutrient losses as compared to CK. T1, T2, and T3, compared to CK, reduced runoff volume by 35.7, 29.6, and 16.8 %, respectively and sediment yield by 40.5, 20.9, and 49.6 %, respectively. Regression analysis results indicated that there were significant relationships between soil loss and runoff volume in all treatments. The combined manure with chemical fertilizer (T1) treatment highly reduced total nitrogen and total phosphorus losses by 41.2 and 33.33 %, respectively as compared with CK. Through this 5-year experiment, we can conclude that, on the sloping purple soil, the combined application of manure with fertilizer is beneficial for controlling runoff sediments losses and preventing soil erosion. PMID:26517994

  5. The fate of nitrogen fertilizer added to soy-maize agriculture in the Amazon basin: Quantifying N2O flux and losses to groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, K. J.; Neill, C.; Davidson, E. A.; Macedo, M.; Costa, C., Jr.; Galford, G. L.; Coe, M. T.; O'Connell, C.; Brando, P. M.; Lefebvre, P.; Maracahipes, L.; Nunes, D.; McHorney, R.

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation and agricultural intensification are rapidly changing the landscape of southeastern Amazonia. With international pressure to reduce deforestation, many Brazilian farms have opted to intensify agriculture to a system of soybean-maize double cropping, and it has expanded rapidly in the last 10 years. Maize agriculture requires additional nitrogen (N) fertilizers, whose downstream fate is currently unknown. Typical fertilizer application rates range from 30-120 kg N ha-1, and have the potential to introduce large amounts of N to ecosystems of the Amazon basin, which can alter greenhouse gas flux and nutrient transport to groundwater and streams. Little data on the fate of added fertilizers are available in the tropics in general, especially in this critical region of agricultural expansion. Therefore, we established a field-scale experiment to evaluate the fate of N fertilizer on Tanguro Ranch in Mato Grosso, Brazil, a region of rapidly expanding soy-maize double cropping. We measured greenhouse gas fluxes (N2O, CO2, and CH4), soil N content, losses to groundwater, and corn productivity across five levels of fertilizer addition (0-200 kg N ha-1) throughout an entire growing season. We found that N2O flux increased with fertilizer addition, but was only significantly higher at 200 kg N ha-1. Surface soil N content increased after fertilizer addition, but decreased within weeks, and was quickly observed in subsurface soil water. Modeling results that scale these findings to the state of Mato Grosso suggest that this land use transition could create a substantial new source of N2O and CO2 to the atmosphere and has the potential to leach N fertilizer into groundwater and downstream. It is important to maintain forest code policies that minimize these impacts.

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  7. Nutritional studies on East African herbivores. 2. Losses of nitrogen in the faeces.

    PubMed

    Arman, P; Hopcraft, D; McDonald, I

    1975-03-01

    1. A series of nitrogen-balance trials was done using groups of four animals of various species of wild and domesticated ruminants using pelleted diets (Arman & Hopcraft, 1975). 2. Various herbivores were given grass or grass hays, legumes, herbs and shrubs. Food and faecal samples were analysed for N. 3. With the pelleted diets, the N content of the faecal dry matter (DM) was low for eland (Taurotragus oryx Pallas), high for sheep and cattle (Bos taurus and Bos indicus) and intermediate for the three small antelope species (hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus cokei Günther), Thomson's gazelle (Gazella thomsonii Günther) and duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia L.)). With the natural doffers, similar relationships were found, together with variations associated with the type of diet. 4. Three forms of equation were used to express the relationship between faecal N and food N. One of the forms, the linear regression of g faecal N/kg DM intake v. g food N/kg DM intake, fitted the results less well than did the other two and was not used to estimate metabolic faecal N(MFN) losses9 5. MFN was calculated by extrapolation of linear regressions of g faecal N/kg faecal DM v. g N intake/kg faecal DM for the pelleted diets. The range of values was (g N/kg faecal DM): Friesians 7-6, eland 8-1, zebu cattle 11-0 and small antelope and sheep 11-5-12-69 There were significant differences (P smaller than 0-001) between species in slopes and intercepts. 6. MFN was calculated from linear regressions of g faecal N/kg faecal DM v. g food N/kg food DM for all diets. This method gave the best fit for the pelleted diets. Values for these diets were (g N/kg faecal DM): eland 8-3, cattle and sheep 9-3-11-0 and small antelope 11-6-12-3. Species differences were significant (P smaller than 0-001). With grasses, values ranged from 5-9 for non-ruminants (rabbit (domesticated), warthog (Phacohoerus aethiopicus Pallas) and hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius L.)) plus eland and wildebeest (Connochaetes

  8. Rewetting effects on soil CO2 flux and nutrients leaching in alpine Kobresia pasture on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibin; Schleuss, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan Plateau are one of the most important ecosystems around the world due to its large grazing area and very high soil organic carbon storage. Since the last decades grasslands of the TP are highly affected by grassland degradation because of various sedimentary programs and strongly increase grazing pressure. Climate changes (e.g. increased precipitation and temperature) may accelerate this degradation processes by enhancing soil organic matter mineralization and nutrients leaching. We exposed repeated rewetting cycles to test the effects of increased precipitation frequency on CO2 fluxes and leaching on varying K. pygmaea root mats (including: intact root mats (KL); recently died root mats (KD); crust covered root mats (LI)). Two phases were conducted (a) to identify the response of nighttime CO2 flux to changing soil moisture and (b) to investigate the impacts of rewetting cycles on day-, night-, and full day CO2 fluxes together with leaching of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). Nighttime CO2 fluxes correlated positively with soil moisture, indicating that increasing precipitation will accelerate SOC losses due to increasing mineralization rates. KD showed highest C losses as CO2 efflux and also the highest leaching compared to KL and LI. It indicates that dying of Kobresia root mats (as induced by overgrazing and continuously removal of photosynthetically active shoot biomass) will rapidly decrease SOC storage. The lowest C losses (from soil respiration and DOC leaching) were obtained in the crust covered root mats (LI), because most C losses have already occurred during the early period. Highest N losses (especially NO3-) were obtained in the highly degraded pasture (LI). Due to long-term SOM decomposition of crust covered root mats (LI) in situ, inorganic nitrogen (NO3-) was accumulated in and was leached out during the first rewetting cycles. In contrast, no losses of NH4+ and NO3- occurred for intact Kobresia root mats (KL

  9. Potential use of the N2/Ar ratio as a constraint on the oceanic fixed nitrogen loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, M.; Gruber, N.; Oka, A.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Using a global ocean biogeochemical model, we investigate the suitability of the N2/Ar supersaturation ratio (ΔN2/Ar) as a tracer of marine nitrogen fixation and denitrification, i.e., the main biological processes that add or remove fixed nitrogen to or from the ocean. In a series of factorial simulations, we demonstrate that, in regions away from the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), the ΔN2/Ar characteristics are mostly determined by benthic denitrification occurring in the deep ocean with minor contributions from benthic and water column denitrification at shallower depths. In the OMZs, the subsurface maxima of ΔN2/Ar are mainly determined by water column denitrification. In contrast, nitrogen fixation has little impact on ΔN2/Ar owing to the rapid loss of the N2 supersaturation signal through air-sea exchange. We thus conclude that ΔN2/Ar can act as a powerful constraint on water column and benthic denitrification occurring in intermediate to deep waters, but it cannot be used to estimate nitrogen fixation. A comparison between the currently very limited observations of the ΔN2/Ar with our model results shows an acceptable level of agreement, suggesting that the model's prescribed rates and distributions of benthic and water column denitrification (i.e., 140 and 52 Tg N yr-1, respectively) are reasonable and confirm the results derived from other constraints.

  10. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  11. Subsurface application of manure slurries for conservation tillage and pasture soils and their impact on the nitrogen balance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure injection provides for soil incorporation of manures in no-till and perennial forage production. Injection is expected to substantially reduce nitrogen loss due to ammonia volatilization, but a portion of that N conservation may be offset by greater denitrification and leaching losses. This ...

  12. Seasonal Patterns of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Losses in Agricultural Drainage Ditches in Northern Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage ditches convey nutrient laden waters from agricultural landscapes to receiving waters. Surface drainage ditches are landscape features that have been overlooked for non-point source pollution mitigation of receiving waters. The objective of this study was to determine the nitrogen and phosp...

  13. Partial nitrogen loss in SrTaO2N and LaTiO2N oxynitride perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daixi; Habu, Daiki; Masubuchi, Yuji; Torii, Shuki; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kikkawa, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    SrTaO2N heated in a helium atmosphere began to release nitrogen of approximately 30 at% at 950 °C while maintaining the perovskite structure and its color changed from orange to dark green. Then it decomposed above 1200 °C to a black mixture of Sr1.4Ta0.6O2.73, Ta2N, and Sr5Ta4O15. The second decomposition was not clearly observed when SrTaO2N was heated in a nitrogen atmosphere below 1550 °C. After heating at 1500 °C for 3 h under a 0.2 MPa nitrogen atmosphere, the perovskite product became dark green and conductive. Structure refinement results suggested that the product was a mixture of tetragonal and cubic perovskites with a decreased ordering of N3-/O2-. The sintered body was changed to an n-type semiconductor after a partial loss of nitrogen to be reduced from the originally insulating SrTaO2N perovskite lattice. LaTiO2N was confirmed to have a similar cis-configuration of the TiO4N2 octahedron as that of TaO4N2 in SrTaO2N. It also released some of its nitrogen at 800 °C changing its color from brown to black and then decomposed to a mixture of LaTiO3, La2O3, and TiN at 1100 °C. These temperatures are lower than those in SrTaO2N.

  14. Controlling nitrogen migration through micro-nano networks.

    PubMed

    Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Jiang, Jiang; Wu, Yuejin; Feng, Huiyun; Brown, Ian G; Chu, Paul K; Yu, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer unabsorbed by crops eventually discharges into the environment through runoff, leaching and volatilization, resulting in three-dimensional (3D) pollution spanning from underground into space. Here we describe an approach for controlling nitrogen loss, developed using loss control fertilizer (LCF) prepared by adding modified natural nanoclay (attapulgite) to traditional fertilizer. In the aqueous phase, LCF self-assembles to form 3D micro/nano networks via hydrogen bonds and other weak interactions, obtaining a higher nitrogen spatial scale so that it is retained by a soil filtering layer. Thus nitrogen loss is reduced and sufficient nutrition for crops is supplied, while the pollution risk of the fertilizer is substantially lowered. As such, self-fabrication of nano-material was used to manipulate the nitrogen spatial scale, which provides a novel and promising approach for the research and control of the migration of other micro-scaled pollutants in environmental medium. PMID:24419037

  15. Controlling nitrogen migration through micro-nano networks

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Jiang, Jiang; Wu, Yuejin; Feng, Huiyun; Brown, Ian G.; Chu, Paul K.; Yu, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer unabsorbed by crops eventually discharges into the environment through runoff, leaching and volatilization, resulting in three-dimensional (3D) pollution spanning from underground into space. Here we describe an approach for controlling nitrogen loss, developed using loss control fertilizer (LCF) prepared by adding modified natural nanoclay (attapulgite) to traditional fertilizer. In the aqueous phase, LCF self-assembles to form 3D micro/nano networks via hydrogen bonds and other weak interactions, obtaining a higher nitrogen spatial scale so that it is retained by a soil filtering layer. Thus nitrogen loss is reduced and sufficient nutrition for crops is supplied, while the pollution risk of the fertilizer is substantially lowered. As such, self-fabrication of nano-material was used to manipulate the nitrogen spatial scale, which provides a novel and promising approach for the research and control of the migration of other micro-scaled pollutants in environmental medium. PMID:24419037

  16. Controlling nitrogen migration through micro-nano networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Jiang, Jiang; Wu, Yuejin; Feng, Huiyun; Brown, Ian G.; Chu, Paul K.; Yu, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer unabsorbed by crops eventually discharges into the environment through runoff, leaching and volatilization, resulting in three-dimensional (3D) pollution spanning from underground into space. Here we describe an approach for controlling nitrogen loss, developed using loss control fertilizer (LCF) prepared by adding modified natural nanoclay (attapulgite) to traditional fertilizer. In the aqueous phase, LCF self-assembles to form 3D micro/nano networks via hydrogen bonds and other weak interactions, obtaining a higher nitrogen spatial scale so that it is retained by a soil filtering layer. Thus nitrogen loss is reduced and sufficient nutrition for crops is supplied, while the pollution risk of the fertilizer is substantially lowered. As such, self-fabrication of nano-material was used to manipulate the nitrogen spatial scale, which provides a novel and promising approach for the research and control of the migration of other micro-scaled pollutants in environmental medium.

  17. LEACHING EVALUATION OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS (LEACH) HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology has been developed to assess potential pesticide leaching from the crop root zones in major (corn, soybean, wheat and cotton) crop growing areas of the United States. Use of the Leaching Evaluation of Agricultural Chemicals (LEACH) methodology provides an indication...

  18. Water quality and nitrogen mass loss from anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control methods are needed to abate ammonia losses from swine anaerobic lagoons to reduce contribution of confined swine operations to air pollution. In a 15-month meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreatment on water quality, reduction of N losses, and sludge accumulation...

  19. [Nitrogen Losses Under the Action of Different Land Use Types of Small Catchment in Three Gorges Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-long; Gao, Ming; Ni, Jiu-pai; Xie, De-ti; Deng, Hua

    2016-05-15

    As an independent water-collecting area, small catchment is the source of non-point source pollution in Three Gorges Region. Choosing 3 kinds of the most representative land-use types and using them to lay monitoring points of overland runoff within the small catchment of Wangjiagou in Fuling of Three Gorges Region, the author used the samples of surface runoff collected through the twelve natural rainfalls from May to December to analyze the feature of spatial-temporal change of Nitrogen's losses concentrations under the influence of different land use types and the hillslopes and small catchments composed by those land use types, revealing the relation between different land-use types and Nitrogen's losses of small catchments in Three Gorges Region. The result showed: the average losses concentration of TN showed the biggest difference for different land use types during the period of spring crops, and the average value of dry land was 1. 61 times and 6.73 times of the values of interplanting field of mulberry and paddy field, respectively; the change of the losses concentration of TN was most conspicuous in the 3 periods of paddy field. The main element was NO₃⁻-N, and the relation between TN and NO₃⁻-N showed a significant linear correlation. TN's and NO₃⁻-N's losses concentrations were significantly and positively correlated with the area ratio of corn and mustard, but got a significant negative correlation with the area ratio of paddy and mulberry; NH₄⁺-N's losses concentrations got a significant positive correlation with the area ratio of mustard. Among all the hillslopes composed by different land use types, TN's average losses concentration of surface runoff of the hillslope composed by interplantating field of mulberry and paddy land during the three periods was the lowest, and the values were 2.55, 11.52, 8.58 mg · L⁻¹, respectively; the hillslope of rotation plough land of corn and mustard had the maximum value, and the values were

  20. Regional modelling of nitrate leaching from Swiss organic and conventional cropping systems under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calitri, Francesca; Necpalova, Magdalena; Lee, Juhwan; Zaccone, Claudio; Spiess, Ernst; Herrera, Juan; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Organic cropping systems have been promoted as a sustainable alternative to minimize the environmental impacts of conventional practices. Relatively little is known about the potential to reduce NO3-N leaching through the large-scale adoption of organic practices. Moreover, the potential to mitigate NO3-N leaching and thus the N pollution under future climate change through organic farming remain unknown and highly uncertain. Here, we compared regional NO3-N leaching from organic and conventional cropping systems in Switzerland using a terrestrial biogeochemical process-based model DayCent. The objectives of this study are 1) to calibrate and evaluate the model for NO3-N leaching measured under various management practices from three experiments at two sites in Switzerland; 2) to estimate regional NO3-N leaching patterns and their spatial uncertainty in conventional and organic cropping systems (with and without cover crops) for future climate change scenario A1B; 3) to explore the sensitivity of NO3-N leaching to changes in soil and climate variables; and 4) to assess the nitrogen use efficiency for conventional and organic cropping systems with and without cover crops under climate change. The data for model calibration/evaluation were derived from field experiments conducted in Liebefeld (canton Bern) and Eschikon (canton Zürich). These experiments evaluated effects of various cover crops and N fertilizer inputs on NO3-N leaching. The preliminary results suggest that the model was able to explain 50 to 83% of the inter-annual variability in the measured soil drainage (RMSE from 12.32 to 16.89 cm y-1). The annual NO3-N leaching was also simulated satisfactory (RMSE = 3.94 to 6.38 g N m-2 y-1), although the model had difficulty to reproduce the inter-annual variability in the NO3-N leaching losses correctly (R2 = 0.11 to 0.35). Future climate datasets (2010-2099) from the 10 regional climate models (RCM) were used in the simulations. Regional NO3-N leaching

  1. Modeling Nitrogen Losses in Conventional and Advanced Soil-Based Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems under Current and Changing Climate Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Most of the non-point source nitrogen (N) load in rural areas is attributed to onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). Nitrogen compounds cause eutrophication, depleting the oxygen in marine ecosystems. OWTS rely on physical, chemical and biological soil processes to treat wastewater and these processes may be affected by climate change. We simulated the fate and transport of N in different types of OWTS drainfields, or soil treatment areas (STA) under current and changing climate scenarios, using 2D/3D HYDRUS software. Experimental data from a mesocosm-scale study, including soil moisture content, and total N, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, were used to calibrate the model. A water content-dependent function was used to compute the nitrification and denitrification rates. Three types of drainfields were simulated: (1) a pipe-and-stone (P&S), (2) advanced soil drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (PSND) and (3) Geomat (GEO), a variation of SND. The model was calibrated with acceptable goodness-of-fit between the observed and measured values. Average root mean square error (RSME) ranged from 0.18 and 2.88 mg L-1 for NH4+ and 4.45 mg L-1 to 9.65 mg L-1 for NO3- in all drainfield types. The calibrated model was used to estimate N fluxes for both conventional and advanced STAs under current and changing climate conditions, i.e. increased soil temperature and higher water table. The model computed N losses from nitrification and denitrification differed little from measured losses in all STAs. The modeled N losses occurred mostly as NO3- in water outputs, accounting for more than 82% of N inputs in all drainfields. Losses as N2 were estimated to be 10.4% and 9.7% of total N input concentration for SND and Geo, respectively. The highest N2 losses, 17.6%, were estimated for P&S. Losses as N2 increased to 22%, 37% and 21% under changing climate conditions for Geo, PSND and P&S, respectively. These findings can provide practitioners

  2. Modeling Nitrogen Losses in Conventional and Advanced Soil-Based Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems under Current and Changing Climate Conditions.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ivan; Cooper, Jennifer; Amador, José A; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Most of the non-point source nitrogen (N) load in rural areas is attributed to onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). Nitrogen compounds cause eutrophication, depleting the oxygen in marine ecosystems. OWTS rely on physical, chemical and biological soil processes to treat wastewater and these processes may be affected by climate change. We simulated the fate and transport of N in different types of OWTS drainfields, or soil treatment areas (STA) under current and changing climate scenarios, using 2D/3D HYDRUS software. Experimental data from a mesocosm-scale study, including soil moisture content, and total N, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, were used to calibrate the model. A water content-dependent function was used to compute the nitrification and denitrification rates. Three types of drainfields were simulated: (1) a pipe-and-stone (P&S), (2) advanced soil drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (PSND) and (3) Geomat (GEO), a variation of SND. The model was calibrated with acceptable goodness-of-fit between the observed and measured values. Average root mean square error (RSME) ranged from 0.18 and 2.88 mg L-1 for NH4+ and 4.45 mg L-1 to 9.65 mg L-1 for NO3- in all drainfield types. The calibrated model was used to estimate N fluxes for both conventional and advanced STAs under current and changing climate conditions, i.e. increased soil temperature and higher water table. The model computed N losses from nitrification and denitrification differed little from measured losses in all STAs. The modeled N losses occurred mostly as NO3- in water outputs, accounting for more than 82% of N inputs in all drainfields. Losses as N2 were estimated to be 10.4% and 9.7% of total N input concentration for SND and Geo, respectively. The highest N2 losses, 17.6%, were estimated for P&S. Losses as N2 increased to 22%, 37% and 21% under changing climate conditions for Geo, PSND and P&S, respectively. These findings can provide practitioners

  3. Cattle feedlot soil moisture and manure content: I. Impacts on greenhouse gases, odor compounds, nitrogen losses, and dust.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel N; Berry, Elaine D

    2005-01-01

    Beef cattle feedlots face serious environmental challenges associated with manure management, including greenhouse gas, odor, NH3, and dust emissions. Conditions affecting emissions are poorly characterized, but likely relate to the variability of feedlot surface moisture and manure contents, which affect microbial processes. Odor compounds, greenhouse gases, nitrogen losses, and dust potential were monitored at six moisture contents (0.11, 0.25, 0.43, 0.67, 1.00, and 1.50 g H2O g(-1) dry matter [DM]) in three artificial feedlot soil mixtures containing 50, 250, and 750 g manure kg(-1) total (manure + soil) DM over a two-week period. Moisture addition produced three microbial metabolisms: inactive, aerobic, and fermentative at low, moderate, and high moisture, respectively. Manure content acted to modulate the effect of moisture and enhanced some microbial processes. Greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O, and CH4) emissions were dynamic at moderate to high moisture. Malodorous volatile fatty acid (VFA) compounds did not accumulate in any treatments, but their persistence and volatility varied depending on pH and aerobic metabolism. Starch was the dominant substrate fueling both aerobic and fermentative metabolism. Nitrogen losses were observed in all metabolically active treatments; however, there was evidence for limited microbial nitrogen uptake. Finally, potential dust production was observed below defined moisture thresholds, which were related to manure content of the soil. Managing feedlot surface moisture within a narrow moisture range (0.2-0.4 g H2O g(-1) DM) and minimizing the accumulation of manure produced the optimum conditions that minimized the environmental impact from cattle feedlot production. PMID:15758117

  4. The contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen loss in two temperate eutrophic estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2014-04-01

    Studies of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) continue to show the significance of this metabolic pathway for the removal of nitrogen (N) in several natural environments, including estuaries. However, the seasonal dynamics of the anammox process and related environmental controls within estuarine systems remains poorly explored. We evaluated the seasonal anammox activity along a salinity gradient in two temperate Atlantic estuaries, the Ave and the Douro (NW Portugal). Anammox potential rates were measured in anaerobic sediment slurries using 15N-labeled NO3- and NH4+ amendments. Production of 29N2 and 30N2 in the slurries was quantified using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). Environmental characteristics of the sediment and water column were also monitored. Anammox potentials in the Ave and Douro estuarine sediments varied between 0.8-8.4, and 0-2.9 nmol cm-3 wet sediment h-1, respectively, with high seasonal and spatial fluctuations. Inorganic nitrogen availability emerged as the primary environmental control of anammox activity, while water temperature appeared to modulate seasonal variations. The contribution of anammox to overall N2 production averaged over 20%, suggesting that the role of anammox in removing fixed N from these two systems cannot be neglected.

  5. Slow release coating remedy for nitrogen loss from conventional urea: a review.

    PubMed

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2016-03-10

    Developing countries are consuming major part of the global urea production with an anticipated nitrogen use efficiency of 20 to 35%. The release of excess nitrogen in the soil is not only detrimental to the environment but also lessens the efficiency of the conventional urea. The urea performance can be enhanced by encapsulating it with slow release coating materials and synchronizing the nutrients' release with the plant up-taking. However, the present cost of most of the coated fertilizers is considerably higher than the conventional fertilizers. The high cost factor prevents their widespread use in mainstream agriculture. This paper documents a review of literature related to the global urea market, issues pertaining to the conventional urea use, natural and synthetic materials for slow release urea and fluidized bed spray coating process. The aim of the current review is to develop technical understanding of the conventional and non-conventional coating materials and associated spray coating mechanism for slow release urea production. The study also investigated the potential of starch as the coating material in relation to the coatings tested previously for controlled release fertilizers. PMID:26809006

  6. Nitrate loss in subsurface drainage and corn yield as affected by timing of sidedress nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using chlorophyll meters, crop sensors, or aerial photography to fine-tune sidedress N application rates have been proposed for optimizing and perhaps reducing overall N fertilizer use on corn (Zea mays L.) and thereby improving water quality by reducing NO3 losses to surface and ground waters. Howe...

  7. Carbon and nitrogen loss in windblown dust on the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion from windstorms may lead to high nutrient loss in fields and cause environmental degradation as a result of suspension in the atmosphere or deposition in surface water systems. In particular, high wind weather events can emit particulates from tilled agricultural soils on the Columbia P...

  8. Integrating soil and weather information into canopy sensor algorithms for improved corn nitrogen rate recommendation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn production can be often limited by the loss of nitrogen (N) due to leaching, volatilization and denitrification. The use of canopy sensors for making in-season N fertilizer applications has been proven effective in matching plant N requirements with periods of rapid N uptake (V7-V11), reducing ...

  9. The influence of photochemical fractionation on the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratios - detailed analysis of current photochemical loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.; Liang, M. C.; Bell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Tracking the evolution of molecular nitrogen over geologic time scales requires an understanding of the loss rates of both isotopologues (14N2 and 14N15N) as a function of time (e.g. Mandt et al., 2009). The relative loss rates, if different, “fractionate” the isotopes so that the ratios change as a function of time, and rate at which the ratio changes due to a loss process is determined by the “fractionation factor.” Photochemistry is known to fractionate the nitrogen isotopes in Titan’s atmosphere by preferentially removing the heavy isotope from the molecular nitrogen inventory and increasing the ratio (heavy/light) in one of the primary photochemical products, HCN. This fractionation occurs due to a selective shielding during photodissociation where the photons that dissociate 14N15N penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (Liang et al., 2007) than the photons that dissociate 14N14N. Two methods can be used to determine the photochemical fractionation factor, f. The first approach for calculating f is based on the isotopic ratios of the photochemical source and product, as measured by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) (Niemann et al., 2010) and the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) (Vinatier et al., 2007), respectively. The second method uses the loss rates and the ratio of the source and requires detailed photochemical modeling to ensure that the loss rates are calculated accurately. We compare these two methods for calculating the photochemical fractionation factor for N2 by using measurements of the isotopic ratios of N2 and HCN combined with an updated coupled ion-neutral-thermal model (De la Haye et al., 2008). We find that accurate magnetospheric electron fluxes and a rotating model that accounts for diurnal variations are essential for accurate calculations of the HCN densities and for determination of the fractionation factor through photochemical modeling. References: De La Haye, V., J. H. Waite, Jr., T. E. Cravens, I. P

  10. Nitrogen Cycle Modeling: a Mechanistic Estimate of N-losses From Agricultural Fields Over the Seasonal Time Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Gu, C.; Venterea, R.; Riley, W.; Oldenburg, C.

    2007-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and production of NO, N2O, and CO2 gas and NO2- and NO3- ions in nutrient-enriched agricultural fields is mediated by soil microbial activity, the hydrological cycle, plant dynamics, and climatic forcing. Understanding how NO, N2O, CO2 gases and NO2- and NO3- ions are released from agricultural fields to the environment is a key factor in controlling the green-house effect and water contamination, and assumes ever greater importance in view of the foreseen increase in biofuel, food, and fiber production. To address these issues we have developed a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) for various nitrification and denitrification pathways, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, heat and water flows, and various chemical reactions at local and kinetic equilibrium. The soil column is represented in a 1D framework, with hydraulic properties described by a water tension-saturation model. Biotic and abiotic reactions are assumed to follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, while a consortium of several micro-organismal strains is assumed to follow multiple Monod growth kinetics accounting for electron donor, electron acceptor, and inhibitor concentrations. Water flow is modeled with the Darcy-Richards equation, while nutrient transport is modeled by Fickian advective and diffusive processes in both gaseous and liquid phases. Heat flow is modeled with the Fourier equation. Plant dynamics is taken into account by coupling TOUGHREACT-N with CERES to determine water and nutrient uptake, and soil carbon accumulation. TOUGHREACT-N was calibrated against field measurements to assess pathways of N losses following fertilization. A good agreement between field observations and model predictions was found. We identified two dominant time scales in the system response that depended on plants dynamics. Before plants have substantial impact on soil nutrients and moisture content, N losses are characterized by rapid increases as a function of water application

  11. [Nutrient leaching and acidification of Southern China coniferous forest red soil under stimulated N deposition].

    PubMed

    Sun, Benhua; Hu, Zhengyi; Lü, Jialong; Zhou, Lina; Xu, Chengkai

    2006-10-01

    In an eight months interval leaching experiment with soil column (10 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height) at 20 degrees C, this paper studied the effects of N deposition on the leaching losses of soil NO -, NH4+ , H+, Ca2+, Mg2+ , K+, and Na+ , and on soil acidification. Soil columns were taken from the coniferous forest experimental plot at the Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Southern China, and the N deposition loads were 0, 7.8, 26 and 52 mg N x month (-1) x column (-1) , respectively. The results indicated that the leaching losses of total exchangeable cations, Ca2+ , and Mg2+ increased with increasing N deposition loads, but K+ and Na+ were little affected. The proportion of net cations leaching loss (difference of cations in eluate and leachate) to total exchangeable cations was 13.9% , 18.6% , 31.8% and 57.9% under 0, 7.8, 26 and 52 mg N x month (-1) column (-1) deposition loads, respectively, and that for exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ was 19. 6%, 25.8% , 45. 3% and 84.8% , and 4.4% , 6.1% , 10. 9% and 17.1% , respectively. The leaching losses of inorganic N, NO3- and H+ also increased with increasing N deposition loads. Topsoil pH decreased with increasing N deposition loads, being 3.85, 3.84, 3.80 and 3.75 under 0, 7.8, 26 and 52 mg N x month (-1) x column(-1) N deposition loads, respectively. N deposition could increase the apparent mineralization rate of soil organic nitrogen, and accelerate the nutrient losses and acidification of coniferous forest red soil. PMID:17209377

  12. Soil nitrogen gas fluxes during woody legume encroachment: Does encroachment increase gaseous losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Groffman, P. M.; Sparks, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Expansion of nitrogen (N2)-fixing trees is a major driver of ecosystem N enrichment in semi-arid grasslands. During this process, fluxes of N trace gases from soils are likely mediated by interactions between changing soil N availability and primary abiotic biogeochemical drivers in arid systems, namely temperature and wetting/re-wetting dynamics. We investigated the effects of encroachment, season and rainfall dynamics on total reactive N flux (NO, NOy, NH3, N2O) in a sub-tropical, semi-arid Texan savanna encroached by N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa over two years. We compared unencroached upland grasslands and non-fixing woody clusters with continuous Prosopis cover over uplands, intermediate drainages, and playa lowlands. We also quantified denitrification potential of intact soil cores to determine whether N2 could contribute significantly to soil N flux. Substantial soil N enrichment in upland Prosopis groves did not elevate N fluxes above those in remnant grasslands, though lower (moister) landscape positions did exhibit higher total emissions. Along with temperature, soil-wetting dynamics explained the greatest portion of variation in emissions and interacted with vegetation type. Timing and quantity of most recent soil wetting and interval to previous wetting were significant predictors, highlighting the importance of dynamics not captured by soil moisture measurements alone. As with other arid systems, rainfall events after dry periods can stimulate pulse emissions of >400 ug NO-N m-2 h-1. At realistic soil O2 concentrations, N2 fluxes fell below the detection limit of the Nitrogen-Free Atmospheric Recirculation Method system (~11 ug N m-2 h-1). However, applying plausible N2O:N2 flux ratios likely constrains the flux to much lower levels under field conditions. We conclude that encroachment does not increase N fluxes from upland savannas, but that interactions with rainfall and landscape position are important determinants of total emissions.

  13. Estimating annual soil carbon loss in agricultural peatland soils using a nitrogen budget approach.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Emilie R; van Kessel, Chris; Horwath, William R; Linquist, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Around the world, peatland degradation and soil subsidence is occurring where these soils have been converted to agriculture. Since initial drainage in the mid-1800s, continuous farming of such soils in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta) has led to subsidence of up to 8 meters in places, primarily due to soil organic matter (SOM) oxidation and physical compaction. Rice (Oryza sativa) production has been proposed as an alternative cropping system to limit SOM oxidation. Preliminary research on these soils revealed high N uptake by rice in N fertilizer omission plots, which we hypothesized was the result of SOM oxidation releasing N. Testing this hypothesis, we developed a novel N budgeting approach to assess annual soil C and N loss based on plant N uptake and fallow season N mineralization. Through field experiments examining N dynamics during growing season and winter fallow periods, a complete annual N budget was developed. Soil C loss was calculated from SOM-N mineralization using the soil C:N ratio. Surface water and crop residue were negligible in the total N uptake budget (3 - 4 % combined). Shallow groundwater contributed 24 - 33 %, likely representing subsurface SOM-N mineralization. Assuming 6 and 25 kg N ha-1 from atmospheric deposition and biological N2 fixation, respectively, our results suggest 77 - 81 % of plant N uptake (129 - 149 kg N ha-1) was supplied by SOM mineralization. Considering a range of N uptake efficiency from 50 - 70 %, estimated net C loss ranged from 1149 - 2473 kg C ha-1. These findings suggest that rice systems, as currently managed, reduce the rate of C loss from organic delta soils relative to other agricultural practices. PMID:25822494

  14. Estimating Annual Soil Carbon Loss in Agricultural Peatland Soils Using a Nitrogen Budget Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Emilie R.; van Kessel, Chris; Horwath, William R.; Linquist, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Around the world, peatland degradation and soil subsidence is occurring where these soils have been converted to agriculture. Since initial drainage in the mid-1800s, continuous farming of such soils in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta) has led to subsidence of up to 8 meters in places, primarily due to soil organic matter (SOM) oxidation and physical compaction. Rice (Oryza sativa) production has been proposed as an alternative cropping system to limit SOM oxidation. Preliminary research on these soils revealed high N uptake by rice in N fertilizer omission plots, which we hypothesized was the result of SOM oxidation releasing N. Testing this hypothesis, we developed a novel N budgeting approach to assess annual soil C and N loss based on plant N uptake and fallow season N mineralization. Through field experiments examining N dynamics during growing season and winter fallow periods, a complete annual N budget was developed. Soil C loss was calculated from SOM-N mineralization using the soil C:N ratio. Surface water and crop residue were negligible in the total N uptake budget (3 – 4 % combined). Shallow groundwater contributed 24 – 33 %, likely representing subsurface SOM-N mineralization. Assuming 6 and 25 kg N ha-1 from atmospheric deposition and biological N2 fixation, respectively, our results suggest 77 – 81 % of plant N uptake (129 – 149 kg N ha-1) was supplied by SOM mineralization. Considering a range of N uptake efficiency from 50 – 70 %, estimated net C loss ranged from 1149 – 2473 kg C ha-1. These findings suggest that rice systems, as currently managed, reduce the rate of C loss from organic delta soils relative to other agricultural practices. PMID:25822494

  15. Body protein losses estimated by nitrogen balance and potassium-40 counting

    SciTech Connect

    Belyea, R.L.; Babbitt, C.L.; Sedgwick, H.T.; Zinn, G.M.

    1986-07-01

    Body protein losses estimated from N balance were compared with those estimated by 40K counting. Six nonlactating dairy cows were fed an adequate N diet for 7 wk, a low N diet for 9 wk, and a replete N diet for 3 wk. The low N diet contained high cell wall grass hay plus ground corn, starch, and molasses. Soybean meal was added to the low N diet to increase N in the adequate N and replete N diets. Intake was measured daily. Digestibilities, N balance, and body composition (estimated by 40K counting) were determined during each dietary regimen. During low N treatment, hay dry matter intake declined 2 kg/d, and supplement increased about .5 kg/d. Dry matter digestibility was not altered by N treatment. Protein and acid detergent fiber digestibilities decreased from 40 and 36% during adequate N to 20 and 2%, respectively, during low N. Fecal and urinary N also declined when cows were fed the low N diet. By the end of repletion, total intake, fiber, and protein digestibilities as well as N partition were similar to or exceeded those during adequate N intake. Body protein (N) loss was estimated by N balance to be about 3 kg compared with 8 kg by 40K counting. Body fat losses (32 kg) were large because of low energy digestibility and intake. Seven kilograms of body fat were regained during repletion, but there was no change in body protein.

  16. A modeling study on mitigation of N2O emissions and NO3 leaching at different agricultural sites across Europe using LandscapeDNDC.

    PubMed

    Molina-Herrera, Saúl; Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Kraus, David; Augustin, Jürgen; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Tallec, Tiphaine; Ceschia, Eric; Ammann, Christof; Loubet, Benjamin; Skiba, Ute; Jones, Stephanie; Brümmer, Christian; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-05-15

    The identification of site-specific agricultural management practices in order to maximize yield while minimizing environmental nitrogen losses remains in the center of environmental pollution research. Here, we used the biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC to explore different agricultural practices with regard to their potential to reduce soil N2O emissions and NO3 leaching while maintaining yields. In a first step, the model was tested against observations of N2O emissions, NO3 leaching, soil micrometeorology as well as crop growth for eight European cropland and grassland sites. Across sites, LandscapeDNDC predicts very well mean N2O emissions (r(2)=0.99) and simulates the magnitude and general temporal dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen pools. For the assessment of site-specific mitigation potentials of environmental nitrogen losses a Monte Carlo optimization technique considering different agricultural management options (i.e., timing of planting, harvest and fertilization, amount of applied fertilizer as well as residue management) was used. The identified optimized field management practices reduce N2O emissions and NO3 leaching from croplands on average by 21% and 31%, respectively. Likewise, average reductions of 55% for N2O emissions and 16% for NO3 leaching are estimated for grasslands. For mitigating environmental loss - while maintaining yield levels - it was most important to reduce fertilizer application rates by in average 10%. Our analyses indicate that yield scaled N2O emissions and NO3 leaching indicate possible improvements of nitrogen use efficiencies in European farming systems. Moreover, the applied optimization approach can be used also in a prognostic way to predict optimal timings and fertilization options (rates and splitting) upon accurate weather forecasts combined with the knowledge of modeled soil nutrient availability and plant nitrogen demand. PMID:26909705

  17. Identification and testing of early indicators for N leaching from urine patches.

    PubMed

    Vogeler, Iris; Cichota, Rogerio; Snow, Val

    2013-11-30

    Nitrogen leaching from urine patches has been identified as a major source of nitrogen loss under intensive grazing dairy farming. Leaching is notoriously variable, influenced by management, soil type, year-to-year variation in climate and timing and rate of urine depositions. To identify early indicators for the risk of N leaching from urine patches for potential usage in a precision management system, we used the simulation model APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems SIMulator) to produce an extensive N leaching dataset for the Waikato region of New Zealand. In total, nearly forty thousand simulation runs with different combinations of soil type and urine deposition times, in 33 different years, were done. The risk forecasting indicators were chosen based on their practicality: being readily measured on farm (soil water content, temperature and pasture growth) or that could be centrally supplied to farms (such as actual and forecast weather data). The thresholds of the early indicators that are used to forecast a period for high risk of N leaching were determined via classification and regression tree analysis. The most informative factors were soil temperature, pasture dry matter production, and average soil water content in the top soil over the two weeks prior to the urine N application event. Rainfall and air temperature for the two weeks following urine deposition were also important to fine-tune the predictions. The identified early indicators were then tested for their potential to predict the risk of N leaching in two typical soils from the Waikato region in New Zealand. The accuracy of the predictions varied with the number of indicators, the soil type and the risk level, and the number of correct predictions ranged from about 45 to over 90%. Further expansion and fine-tuning of the indicators and the development of a practical N risk tool based on these indicators is needed. PMID:24064140

  18. Controls on mass loss and nitrogen dynamics of oak leaf litter along an urban-rural land-use gradient.

    PubMed

    Pouyat, Richard V; Carreiro, Margaret M

    2003-04-01

    Using reciprocal leaf litter transplants, we investigated the effects of contrasting environments (urban vs. rural) and intraspecific variations in oak leaf litter quality on mass loss rates and nitrogen (N) dynamics along an urban-rural gradient in the New York City metropolitan area. Differences in earthworm abundances and temperature had previously been documented in the stands along this gradient. Red oak leaf litter was collected and returned to its original source stand as native litter to measure decay rates along the gradient. To separate site effects from litter quality effects on decay, reciprocal transplants of litter were also made between stands at the extremes of the environmental gradient (urban and rural stands). Land-use had no effect on mass loss and N dynamics of native litter by the end of the 22-month incubation period. The lack of differences in native litter suggests the factors affecting decay were similar across the stands in this study. However, in the transplant study both environment and litter type strongly affected decay of oak leaf litter. On average urban and rural litter decomposed faster over the incubation period in urban than in rural stands (P=0.016 and P=0.001, respectively, repeated measures ANOVA). Differences in mass loss between urban and rural stands resulted in rural environments having less mass remaining than urban environments at the end of the incubation period (25.6 and 46.2% for urban and rural sites, respectively). Likewise, less N remained in leaf residue in urban sites (71.3%) compared to that in rural sites (115.1%). Litter type also affected mass loss rates during the 22-month incubation period. On average rural litter mass loss rates were faster than urban litter rates in both urban and rural stands (P=0.030 and P=0.026, respectively, repeated measures ANOVA). By the end of the incubation period, rural litter exhibited 43 and 20% greater mass loss and retained 44 and 5% less N than urban litter decomposing in

  19. Hydrologic Flushing of Forest Soils and the Consequent Leaching of Nitrogen and Calcium During Rainstorms and Snowmelt, Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, P. S.; Burns, D. A.; McHale, M.; Lawrence, G. B.

    2005-12-01

    Catskill Mountain streams in New York often receive pulses of NO3 during storms and snowmelt from watershed soils and acid deposition. This "flushing effect" of nutrients and acids was documented in forest-soil water through use of sequential lysimetry, in which soil-water was collected in equal-volume increments from zero-tension lysimeters placed within the soil profile. Stormflow in previously unsaturated soils began with percolation of water through the upper soil to the B horizon. NO3 pulses in soilwater during storms and snowmelt were typically delayed in the B-horizon relative to the O-horizon, indicating a percolation process for soil water movement between the lysimeters, but during the fall rains and spring snowmelt periods water-table measurements indicated that the B-horizon lysimeter was overtopped by the water table. Net flux was similar from throughfall and 0-lysimeters for individual events, suggesting that throughfall could either percolate unchanged through the soil column or that microbial release of N was rapid and similar to throughfall inputs. Patterns of change in O-Lysimeter concentrations during individual storms indicate repeated backflushing periods in which percolating acidic deposition or snowmelt from an individual event rose back into the O-horizon with a rising water table. This back-flushing phenomena may be enhancing the leaching of soil calcium beyond what would occur if acidic deposition was only percolating once through the O horizon . The sequential lysimetry method allowed investigators a more detailed look at N dynamics in forest soils than has been possible through the typical monthly lysimeter sampling strategy.

  20. Nitrate leaching, water-use efficiency and yield of corn with different irrigation and nitrogen management systems in coastal plains, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation management for corn (Zea mays L.) production on the typical low water holding capacity soil of the southeastern USA needs to be improved to increase irrigation efficiency and reduce losses of nitrate from fields. A three-year (2012-2014) field study was conducted to compare the effects of...

  1. Ammonia losses and nitrogen partitioning at a southern High Plains open lot dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Richard W.; Cole, N. Andy; Hagevoort, G. Robert; Casey, Kenneth D.; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2015-06-01

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of ammonia (NH3). Cattle excrete most ingested nitrogen (N); most urinary N is converted to NH3, volatilized and lost to the atmosphere. Open lot dairies on the southern High Plains are a growing industry and face environmental challenges as well as reporting requirements for NH3 emissions. We quantified NH3 emissions from the open lot and wastewater lagoons of a commercial New Mexico dairy during a nine-day summer campaign. The 3500-cow dairy consisted of open lot, manure-surfaced corrals (22.5 ha area). Lactating cows comprised 80% of the herd. A flush system using recycled wastewater intermittently removed manure from feeding alleys to three lagoons (1.8 ha area). Open path lasers measured atmospheric NH3 concentration, sonic anemometers characterized turbulence, and inverse dispersion analysis was used to quantify emissions. Ammonia fluxes (15-min) averaged 56 and 37 μg m-2 s-1 at the open lot and lagoons, respectively. Ammonia emission rate averaged 1061 kg d-1 at the open lot and 59 kg d-1 at the lagoons; 95% of NH3 was emitted from the open lot. The per capita emission rate of NH3 was 304 g cow-1 d-1 from the open lot (41% of N intake) and 17 g cow-1 d-1 from lagoons (2% of N intake). Daily N input at the dairy was 2139 kg d-1, with 43, 36, 19 and 2% of the N partitioned to NH3 emission, manure/lagoons, milk, and cows, respectively.

  2. SOLID WASTE LEACHING CHEMISTRY AND LEACH TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is the most common test used by regulatory agencies for classifying and comparing the leaching characteristics of different waste matrices. However, the test has several practical limitations and it simulates only one...

  3. Leaching of nitroso rubber material removes uncured polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratfisch, W. A.; Gonzalez, R.

    1972-01-01

    New leaching process removes uncured polymer from nitroso rubber, elastomer used in presence of nitrogen tetroxide. Uncured portion is removed by controlled soaking of polymer slab in Freon TF. Leaching with Freon TF prevents nitroso rubber from adhering to adjoining surfaces and limiting its usefulness in either static or dynamic applications.

  4. Role of biochar amendment in mitigation of nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas emission during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Wang, Quan; Ren, Xiuna; Zhao, Junchao; Huang, Hui; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Li, Ronghua; Zhou, Lina; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to mitigate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during composting of dewatered fresh sewage sludge (DFSS) employing biochar combined with zeolite (B+Z) and low dosage of lime (B+L). The 12% biochar was mixed at a 10%, 15% and 30% of zeolite and 1% lime, while without any additives was used as control. The results indicated that the combine use of B+Z was significantly increased the enzymatic activities and reduced the ammonia loss 58.03-65.17% as compare to B+L amended treatment, while CH4 92.85-95.34% and N2O 95.14-97.28% decreased than control. The B+L1% amendment significantly increased the organic matter degradation but the reduction was lower than B+Z and that could reduce the CH4 and N2O emission by 55.17-63.08% and 62.24-65.53% as compare to control, respectively. Overall our results demonstrated that 12%B+Z10% addition into DFSS can be potentially used to improve the DFSS composting by mitigation of GHG emission and nitrogen loss. PMID:27497088

  5. Responses of nitrous oxide emissions and nitrate leaching to farm field management, climate, and soil characteristics: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, J. B.; Eagle, A.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Olander, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Agriculture is a major source of both nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere and nitrate (NO3-) to surface and groundwaters, but synergies and tradeoffs between these nitrogen (N) loss pathways in response to agricultural practices are not well understood. We conducted a meta-analysis of both N2O emissions and NO3- leaching losses to quantify their individual responses to fertilization rate, tillage, and other practices. Overall, we assembled over 40 studies that reported fertilization rate, yield, and either N2O emissions or NO3- leaching losses over the growing season from North American corn fields. Our complete database ultimately included over 600 observations of N2O emissions or NO3- leaching. Notably, we found no individual studies that reported both NO3- leaching and N2O emissions. We used multiple regression to quantify the response of N loss pathways to fertilization rate; rotation crop and tillage practice; and climate and soil type. We also included yield as a predictor to better account for the magnitude of surplus N. We found insufficient data to address effects of fertilizer placement, timing and source. On a mass basis, NO3- losses were far greater than N2O emissions. Both NO3- leaching and N2O emissions exhibited positive relationships with fertilizer rate and surplus N, but the responses of N loss pathways to environmental conditions and to various management practices varied considerably. These results suggest that minimizing excess fertilizer application will both improve water quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but that other practices such as tillage induce tradeoffs between these N loss pathways.

  6. Species-driven changes in nitrogen cycling can provide a mechanism for plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Laungani, Ramesh; Knops, Johannes M H

    2009-07-28

    Traits that permit successful invasions have often seemed idiosyncratic, and the key biological traits identified vary widely among species. This fundamentally limits our ability to determine the invasion potential of a species. However, ultimately, successful invaders must have positive growth rates that longer term result in higher biomass accumulation than competing established species. In many terrestrial ecosystems nitrogen limits plant growth, and is a key factor determining productivity and the outcome of competition among species. Plant nitrogen use may provide a powerful framework to evaluate the invasive potential of a species in nitrogen-limiting ecosystems. Six mechanisms influence plant nitrogen use or acquisition: photosynthetic tissue allocation, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, nitrogen fixation, nitrogen-leaching losses, gross nitrogen mineralization, and plant nitrogen residence time. Here we show that among these alternatives, the key mechanism allowing invasion for Pinus strobus into nitrogen limited grasslands was its higher nitrogen residence time. This higher nitrogen residence time created a positive feedback that redistributed nitrogen from the soil into the plant. This positive feedback allowed P. strobus to accumulate twice as much nitrogen in its tissues and four times as much nitrogen to photosynthetic tissues, as compared with other plant species. In turn, this larger leaf nitrogen pool increased total plant carbon gain of P. strobus two- to sevenfold as compared with other plant species. Thus our data illustrate that plant species can change internal ecosystem nitrogen cycling feedbacks and this mechanism can allow them to gain a competitive advantage over other plant species. PMID:19592506

  7. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  8. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  9. Potential Contribution of Anammox to Nitrogen Loss from Paddy Soils in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Hu; Nie, San-An; Su, Jian-Qiang; Weng, Bo-Sen; Zhu, Gui-Bing; Yao, Huai-Ying; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) process has been observed in diverse terrestrial ecosystems, while the contribution of anammox to N2 production in paddy soils is not well documented. In this study, the anammox activity and the abundance and diversity of anammox bacteria were investigated to assess the anammox potential of 12 typical paddy soils collected in southern China. Anammox bacteria related to “Candidatus Brocadia” and “Candidatus Kuenenia” and two novel unidentified clusters were detected, with “Candidatus Brocadia” comprising 50% of the anammox population. The prevalence of the anammox was confirmed by the quantitative PCR results based on hydrazine synthase (hzsB) genes, which showed that the abundance ranged from 1.16 × 104 to 9.65 × 104 copies per gram of dry weight. The anammox rates measured by the isotope-pairing technique ranged from 0.27 to 5.25 nmol N per gram of soil per hour in these paddy soils, which contributed 0.6 to 15% to soil N2 production. It is estimated that a total loss of 2.50 × 106 Mg N per year is linked to anammox in the paddy fields in southern China, which implied that ca. 10% of the applied ammonia fertilizers is lost via the anammox process. Anammox activity was significantly correlated with the abundance of hzsB genes, soil nitrate concentration, and C/N ratio. Additionally, ammonia concentration and pH were found to be significantly correlated with the anammox bacterial structure. PMID:25416768

  10. MASS LOSS AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS DURING THE DECOMPOSITION OF A N-LABELED N2-FIXING EPOPHYTIC LICHEN, LOBARIA OREGANA (TUCK.) MULL. ARG.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied mass loss and nitrogen dynamics during fall and spring initiated decomposition of an N2-fixing epiphytic lichen, Lobaria oregana (Tuck.) Mull. Arg. using 15N. We developed a method of labeling lichens with 15N that involved spraying lichen material with a nutrient sol...

  11. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Loss Potential from Biosolids-Amended Soils and Biotic Response in the Receiving Water.

    PubMed

    Hanief, Aslam; Matiichine, Denis; Laursen, Andrew E; Bostan, I Vadim; McCarthy, Lynda H

    2015-07-01

    Application of municipal biosolids to agricultural soil can improve soil quality and improve crop yields. However, runoff or tile leachate from biosolids-applied fields may contribute to localized eutrophication of surface water. A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine loss potential of nutrients from soils amended with two different biosolids (anaerobically digested and chemically stabilized) relative to loss from a reference soil and to determine response in freshwater microcosms to nutrients lost from soils. Total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were measured in runoff, and equivalent amounts were added to reference microcosms to determine if aquatic systems would respond similarly to TN and TP loading in bioavailable forms (PO, NH, NO) simulating loading related to inorganic fertilizer application. Nutrient concentrations (TP, TN, PO, NH, NO, and organic P and N) were similar in the runoff from the two biosolids-amended soils and higher than those in the runoff from the reference soil. Runoff from biosolids-amended soils stimulated algal growth and production (chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen) relative to runoff from reference soil, but the response was weaker than in microcosms receiving equivalent amounts of inorganic N and P. Nutrient runoff from land-applied biosolids does have potential to increase algal production in receiving waters; however, this experiment suggests receiving waters may absorb a single large nutrient loading event associated with runoff from biosolids-amended soil without substantial impact. Moreover, the response to N and P in biosolids versus inorganic nutrient additions suggests biosolids may contribute relatively less to eutrophication than inorganic fertilizers, assuming equivalent TN and TP loading to aquatic systems. PMID:26437111

  12. Nitrogen Losses as N2O and NO After Non-tillage Agricultural Practice in a Tropical Corn Field at Guarico State, Venezuela.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, T. J.; Gil, J. A.; Marquina, S.; Donoso, L. E.; Trumbore, S. E.; Tyler, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Historically, the most common agricultural practice in Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions, has been mono cropping, with extensive tillage operations that usually causes rapid soil degradation and nitrogen losses. Alternative production systems, such as non-tillage agricultural practices, have been extensively implemented during the last few years. However, studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these alternative practices are not widely available. This study was conducted at "Fundo Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9°23'33" N, 66° 38'30" W) in a corn field under the non-tillage agricultural practice, during the growing season June-August 2005. The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). The area has two well defined precipitation seasons: wet (May-October) and dry (November-April). The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). Because the irrigation of the crop depends on precipitation, the planting is scheduled during the months of highest precipitation in June-July. We measured nitrogenous gas emissions (N2O and NO), concentrations of total nitrogen (NT), NH4+ and NO3- in soil (0-100 cm) after fertilization to estimate the nitrogen losses. We also measured CO2 emissions to evaluate the relationship of microbial respiration to the emissions of nitrogenous trace gases. Soils were fertilized with 54 kgN/ha (NPK 12:24:12, nitrogen as NH4Cl) and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depth. Thirty days later, soils were fertilized by broadcast addition of 18 kgN/ha (as ammonium nitrate). Nitrous oxide emissions were highly dependant on the water content. Prior to fertilization N2O emissions were very low. Right after fertilization the emissions increased by a factor of 5 compared to pre-fertilization levels and increased to 100 times larger after the first heavy rain. NO emissions did not increase

  13. Assessment of the predictive quality of simple indicator approaches for nitrate leaching from agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczko, Uwe; Kuchenbuch, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    Diffuse N losses from agriculture are a major cause of excessive nitrate concentrations in surface and groundwaters. Leaching through the soil is the main pathway of nitrate loss. For environmental management, an anticipatory assessment and monitoring of nitrate leaching risk by indicator (index) approaches is increasingly being used. Although complex Nitrogen Loss Indicator (NLI) approaches may provide more information, relatively simple NLIs may have advantages in many practical situations, for instance, when data availability is restricted. In this study, we tested four simple NLIs to asses their predictive properties: 1. N balance (Nbal); 2. exchange frequency of soil solution (EF); 3. potential nitrate concentration in leachate (PNCL); 4. a composite NLI (balance exchange frequency product, BEP). Field data of nitrate leaching from two sites in northeast Germany along with published data from several sites in Germany, Scotland and the USA were utilized. Nbal proved to be a relatively poor indicator of N loss for the time frame of one year, whereas its prediction accuracy improved for longterm averaged data. Correlation between calculated EF and experimental data was high for single year data, whereas it was lower for longterm averaged data. PNCL gave no significant correlations with measured data and high deviations. The results for BEP were intermediate between those for Nbal and EF. The results suggest that the use of EF is appropriate for assessing N leaching loss for single year data and specific sites with comparable N input and management practices, whereas for long-term averaged data, Nbal is better suited. BEP is an appropriate NLI both for single year and longterm data which accounts for source and transport factors and thus is more flexible than source based Nbal and transport based EF. However, such simplified NLIs have limitations: 1. the N cycle is not covered completely; 2. processes in the vadose zone and the aquifer are neglected, 3. assessment

  14. [Fate and balance of bulk blending controlled release fertilizer nitrogen under continuous cropping of mustard].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan-Pan; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Under the conditions of applying water soluble fertilizer and its bulk blending with controlled release fertilizer (BB-CRF), and by using micro-lysimeter, this paper quantitatively studied the nitrogen (N) uptake by mustard, the soil N losses from N2O emission, leaching and others, and the N residual in soil in three rotations of continuously cropped mustard. In the treatment of BB-CRF with 25% of controlled release nitrogen, the N uptake by mustard increased with rotations, and the yield by the end of the experiment was significantly higher than that in the treatment of water soluble fertilizer. The cumulated N2O emission loss and the N leaching loss were obviously higher in treatment water soluble fertilizer than in treatment BB-CRF. NO3(-)-N was the primary form of N in the leachate. In relative to water soluble fertilizer, BB-CRF altered the fates of fertilizer nitrogen, i.e., the N uptake by mustard and the N residual in soil increased by 75.4% and 76.0%, and the N leaching loss and other apparent N losses decreased by 27.1% and 66.3%, respectively. The application of BB-CRF could be an effective way to reduce the various losses of fertilizer N while increase the fertilizer N use efficiency, and the controlled release fertilizer is the environmentally friendly fertilizer with the property of high N use efficiency. PMID:23359937

  15. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  16. Impacts of management and climate change on nitrate leaching in a forested karst area.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dirnböck; Johannes, Kobler; David, Kraus; Rüdiger, Grote; Ralf, Kiese

    2016-01-01

    Forest management and climate change, directly or indirectly, affect drinking water resources, both in terms of quality and quantity. In this study in the Northern Limestone Alps in Austria we have chosen model calculations (LandscapeDNDC) in order to resolve the complex long-term interactions of management and climate change and their effect on nitrogen dynamics, and the consequences for nitrate leaching from forest soils into the karst groundwater. Our study highlights the dominant role of forest management in controlling nitrate leaching. Both clear-cut and shelterwood-cut disrupt the nitrogen cycle to an extent that causes peak concentrations and high fluxes into the seepage water. While this effect is well known, our modelling approach has revealed additional positive as well as negative impacts of the expected climatic changes on nitrate leaching. First, we show that peak nitrate concentrations during post-cutting periods were elevated under all climate scenarios. The maximal effects of climatic changes on nitrate concentration peaks were 20-24 mg L(-1) in 2090 with shelterwood or clear-cut management. Second, climate change significantly decreased the cumulative nitrate losses over full forest rotation periods (by 10-20%). The stronger the expected temperature increase and precipitation decrease (in summer), the lesser were the observed nitrate losses. However, mean annual seepage water nitrate concentrations and cumulative nitrate leaching were higher under continuous forest cover management than with shelterwood-cut and clear-cut systems. Watershed management can thus be adapted to climate change by either reducing peak concentrations or long-term loads of nitrate in the karst groundwater. PMID:26439862

  17. Spatial and temporal variations in non-point source losses of nitrogen and phosphorus in a small agricultural catchment in the Three Gorges Region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenglong; Gao, Ming; Xie, Deti; Ni, Jiupai

    2016-04-01

    Losses of agricultural pollutants from small catchments are a major issue for water quality in the Three Gorges Region. Solutions are urgently needed. However, before pollutant losses can be controlled, information about spatial and temporal variations in pollutant losses is needed. The study was carried out in the Wangjiagou catchment, a small agricultural catchment in Fuling District, Chongqing, and the data about non-point source losses of nitrogen and phosphorus was collected here. Water samples were collected daily by an automatic water sampler at the outlets of two subcatchments from 2012 to 2014. Also, samples of surface runoff from 28 sampling sites distributed through the subcatchments were collected during 12 rainfall events in 2014. A range of water quality variables were analyzed for all samples and were used to demonstrate the variation in non-point losses of nitrogen and phosphorus over a range of temporal and spatial scales and in different types of rainfall in the catchment. Results showed that there was a significant linear correlation between the mass concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate (NO3-N) in surface runoff and that the relationship was maintained with changes in time. Concentrations of TN and NO3-N peaked after fertilizer was applied to crops in spring and autumn; concentrations decreased rapidly after the peak values in spring but declined slowly in autumn. N and P concentrations fluctuated more and showed a greater degree of dispersion during the spring crop cultivation period than those in autumn. Concentrations of TN and NO3-N in surface runoff were significantly and positively correlated with the proportion of the area that was planted with corn and mustard tubers, but were negatively correlated with the proportion of the area taken up with rice and mulberry plantations. The average concentrations of TN and NO3-N in surface runoff reached the highest level from the sampling points at the bottom of the land used for corn

  18. Spatial and temporal variations in non-point source losses of nitrogen and phosphorus in a small agricultural catchment in the Three Gorges Region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenglong; Gao, Ming; Xie, Deti; Ni, Jiupai

    2016-04-01

    Losses of agricultural pollutants from small catchments are a major issue for water quality in the Three Gorges Region. Solutions are urgently needed. However, before pollutant losses can be controlled, information about spatial and temporal variations in pollutant losses is needed. The study was carried out in the Wangjiagou catchment, a small agricultural catchment in Fuling District, Chongqing, and the data about non-point source losses of nitrogen and phosphorus was collected here. Water samples were collected daily by an automatic water sampler at the outlets of two subcatchments from 2012 to 2014. Also, samples of surface runoff from 28 sampling sites distributed through the subcatchments were collected during 12 rainfall events in 2014. A range of water quality variables were analyzed for all samples and were used to demonstrate the variation in non-point losses of nitrogen and phosphorus over a range of temporal and spatial scales and in different types of rainfall in the catchment. Results showed that there was a significant linear correlation between the mass concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate (NO3-N) in surface runoff and that the relationship was maintained with changes in time. Concentrations of TN and NO3-N peaked after fertilizer was applied to crops in spring and autumn; concentrations decreased rapidly after the peak values in spring but declined slowly in autumn. N and P concentrations fluctuated more and showed a greater degree of dispersion during the spring crop cultivation period than those in autumn. Concentrations of TN and NO3-N in surface runoff were significantly and positively correlated with the proportion of the area that was planted with corn and mustard tubers, but were negatively correlated with the proportion of the area taken up with rice and mulberry plantations. The average concentrations of TN and NO3-N in surface runoff reached the highest level from the sampling points at the bottom of the land used for corn

  19. A model-based assessment of whether anammox or denitrification is the more important nitrogen-loss process in the Eastern Tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Ivonne; Oschlies, Andreas; Gutknecht, Elodie; Dadou, Isabelle; Garçon, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    The Oxygen Minimum zones (OMZs) are well known for being nitrogen (N) loss regions, brought about by the two processes: denitrification and anammox. The relative importance of these processes has, however, been subject to some debate. By means of a high-resolution coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the Eastern Tropical Pacific, encompassing the extended OMZ off Peru, we investigate whether we can infer from biogeochemical tracer distributions which of these two N-loss processes dominate. Sensitivity simulations are performed in which variations of biogeochemical model parameters select either anammox or denitrification as dominant N-loss process, and implications on the simulated nitrogen, carbon and oxygen fluxes and biogeochemical tracer distributions are investigated. Largest sensitivities are found in the simulated nitrate, nitrite and ammonium fields. Our model results provide an estimate of the biogeochemical and physical conditions that control the relative contributions of these two processes. In our model, both processes are active at the same depths, occurring in suboxic zones and near the upper edge of the OMZ. In the case study with anammox dominating N loss, the first step of denitrification is still required to provide the substrates for anammox.

  20. Leach testing of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant final waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of pellets and highly durable glasses prepared from nonradioactive-simulated high-level wasste calcines have been leach tested. The leach tests are patterned on the IAEA standard test and the proposed Materials Characterization Center tests. Most tests are made with static distilled water at 25, 70, 95, 250, and 350/sup 0/C and in refluxing distilled water, Soxhlet, at 95/sup 0/C. Leach rates are determined by analyzing the leachate by instrumental activation analysis or spectrochemical analysis and from weight loss. Leaches are run on glass using cast and core drilled cylinders, broken pieces and coarse ground material. Sample form has a considerable effect on leach rates; solid pieces gave higher leach rates than ground glass when expressed in g/cm/sup 2//day. Cesium, molybdenum and weight loss leach rates of cast glass cylinders in distilled water varied from <10/sup -7/ g/cm/sup 7//day at 25/sup 0/C to approx. 10/sup -3/ g/cm/sup 2//day at 250/sup 0/C. The leach rates in static distilled water at 95/sup 0/C were considerably lower than those in refluxing distilled water, Soxhlet, at the same temperature. Even at 25/sup 0/C, sodium, cesium, and molybdenum readily leached from the porous pellets, but the pellets showed no visible attack, even at 250/sup 0/C.

  1. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    PubMed

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. PMID:25712610

  2. Calibration and Validation of the Precision Nitrogen Management Tool for Artificially Drained Fields Under Maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjerison, R.; Hutson, J.; Melkonian, J.; van Es, H.; Sela, S.

    2015-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fertilizer additions to agricultural fields can lead to soil nitrogen (N) levels in excess of those required for optimal crop growth. The primary loss pathways for this excess N are leaching and denitrification. Nitrate leaching from agricultural sources contributes to the formation of hypoxic zones in critical estuarine systems including the Chesapeake Bay and Gulf of Mexico. Denitrification can lead to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Agricultural practices such as controlling the timing and location of fertilizer application can help reduce these losses. The Precision Nitrogen Management (PNM) model was developed to simulate water transport, nitrogen transformations and transport, and crop growth and nutrient uptake from agricultural fields. The PNM model allows for the prediction of N losses under a variety of crop and management scenarios. Recent improvements to the model include the option to simulate artificially drained fields. The model performs well in simulating drainage and nitrate leaching when compared to measured data from field studies in artificially drained soils in New York and Minnesota. A simulated N budget was compared to available data. The improved model will be used to assess different management options for reducing N losses in maize production under different climate projections for key maize production locations/systems in the U.S.

  3. Reducing fertilizer-nitrogen losses from rowcrop landscapes: Insights and implications from a spatially explicit watershed model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLellan, Eileen; Schilling, Keith; Robertson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    We present conceptual and quantitative models that predict changes in fertilizer-derived nitrogen delivery from rowcrop landscapes caused by agricultural conservation efforts implemented to reduce nutrient inputs and transport and increase nutrient retention in the landscape. To evaluate the relative importance of changes in the sources, transport, and sinks of fertilizer-derived nitrogen across a region, we use the spatially explicit SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes watershed model to map the distribution, at the small watershed scale within the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River Basin (UMORB), of: (1) fertilizer inputs; (2) nutrient attenuation during delivery of those inputs to the UMORB outlet; and (3) nitrogen export from the UMORB outlet. Comparing these spatial distributions suggests that the amount of fertilizer input and degree of nutrient attenuation are both important in determining the extent of nitrogen export. From a management perspective, this means that agricultural conservation efforts to reduce nitrogen export would benefit by: (1) expanding their focus to include activities that restore and enhance nutrient processing in these highly altered landscapes; and (2) targeting specific types of best management practices to watersheds where they will be most valuable. Doing so successfully may result in a shift in current approaches to conservation planning, outreach, and funding.

  4. No-tillage and fertilization management on crop yields and nitrate leaching in North China Plain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Manxiang; Liang, Tao; Wang, Lingqing; Zhou, Chenghu

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment was performed from 2003 to 2008 to evaluate the effects of tillage system and nitrogen management regimes on crop yields and nitrate leaching from the fluvo-aquic soil with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–maize (Zea mays L.) double-cropping system. The tillage systems consisted of conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT). Three nitrogen management regimes were included: 270 kg N ha−1 of urea for wheat and 225 kg N ha−1 of urea for maize (U), 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 90 kg N ha−1 of straw for wheat and 180 kg N of urea and 45 kg N ha−1 of straw for maize (S), 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 90 kg N ha−1 of manure for wheat and 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 45 kg N ha−1 of manure for maize (M). An array of tension-free pan lysimeters (50 cm × 75 cm) were installed (1.2 m deep) to measure water flow and -N movement. No significant effect of the N management regime on yields of winter wheat and maize grain was found in the 5-year rotation. Tillage systems had significant influences on -N leaching from the second year and thereafter interacted with N management regimes on -N loads during all maize seasons. The average yield-scaled -N leaching losses were in order of CTS < NTS< CTU < NTU leaching losses while sustaining crop grain yields. Considering the lower costs, NTS could be a potential alternative to decrease yield-scaled -N leaching losses and improve soil fertility while maintaining crop yield for the winter wheat–maize double-cropping systems in the North China Plain. PMID:25859321

  5. [Effects of controlled release nitrogen fertilizer on surface water N dynamics and its runoff loss in double cropping paddy fields in Dongtinghu Lake area].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiong-Hui; Zheng, Sheng-Xian; Lu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yu-Lin

    2007-07-01

    By using leakage pond to simulate the double cropping paddy fields in Dongtinghu Lake area, this paper studied the effects of urea (CF) and controlled release nitrogen fertilizer (CRNF) on the dynamics of surface water pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) and the runoff loss of TN in alluvial sandy loamy paddy soil and purple calcareous clayed paddy soil, the two main paddy soils in this area. The results showed that after applying urea, the surface water TN and NH4(+)-N concentrations reached the peak at the 1st and 3rd day, respectively, and decreased rapidly then. Surface water NO3(-)-N concentration was very low, though it showed a little raise at the 3rd to 7th day after applying urea in purple calcareous clayed paddy soil. In early rice field, surface water pH rose gradually within 15 days after applying urea, while in late rice field, it did within 3 days. EC kept consistent with the dynamics of NH4(+)-N. CRNF, especially 70% N CRNF, gave rise to distinctly lower surface water pH, EC, and TN and NH4(+)-N concentrations within 15 days after application, but NO3- concentration rose slightly at late growth stages, compared with urea application. The monitoring of TN runoff loss indicated that during double cropping rice growth season, the loss amount of TN under urea application was 7.70 kg x hm(-2), accounting for 2.57% of applied urea-N. The two runoff events occurred within 20 days after urea application contributed significantly to the TN runoff loss. CRNF application resulted in a significantly lower TN concentration in runoff water from the 1st runoff event occurred within 10 days of its application, and thereafter, the total TN runoff loss for CRNF and 70% N CRNF application was decreased by 24.5% and 27.2%, respectively, compared with urea application. PMID:17886631

  6. Master Amino acid Pattern as sole and total substitute for dietary proteins during a weight-loss diet to achieve the body's nitrogen balance equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Lucà-Moretti, M; Grandi, A; Lucà, E; Muratori, G; Nofroni, M G; Mucci, M P; Gambetta, P; Stimolo, R; Drago, P; Giudice, G; Tamburlin, N; Karbalai, M; Valente, C; Moras, G

    2003-01-01

    Results of this multicentric study have shown that by giving Master Amino acid Pattern (MAP) as a sole and total substitute of dietary proteins to 500 overweight participants undergoing the American Nutrition Clinics/Overweight Management Program (ANC/OMP), the participants' body nitrogen balance could be maintained in equilibrium with essentially no calories (MAP 1 g=0.04 kcal), thereby preserving the body's structural and functional proteins, eliminating excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment, and preventing the sudden weight increase after study conclusion commonly known as the yo-yo effect. Study results have shown that the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP regimen, has proven to be safe and effective by preventing those adverse effects associated with a negative nitrogen balance, such as oversized or flabby tissue, stretch marks, the sagging of breast tissue, increased hair loss, faded hair color, and fragile or brittle nails. Also prevented were those anomalies commonly associated with weight-loss diets, such as hunger, weakness, headache caused by ketosis, constipation, and decreased libido. The use of MAP in conjunction with the ANC/OMP also allowed for mean weight loss of 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) per week, achieved through reduction of excessive fat tissue and elimination of excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment. PMID:14964347

  7. Master Amino acid Pattern as substitute for dietary proteins during a weight-loss diet to achieve the body's nitrogen balance equilibrium with essentially no calories.

    PubMed

    Lucà-Moretti, M; Grandi, A; Lucà, E; Muratori, G; Nofroni, M G; Mucci, M P; Gambetta, P; Stimolo, R; Drago, P; Giudice, G; Tamburlin, N

    2003-01-01

    Results of this multicentric study have shown that by giving 10 g (10 tablets) of Master Amino acid Pattern (MAP) as a substitute for dietary proteins, once a day, to 114 overweight participants undergoing the American Nutrition Clinics/Overweight Management Program (ANC/OMP), the participants' nitrogen balance could be maintained in equilibrium with essentially no calories (MAP 1 g=0.04 kcal), thereby preserving the body's structural and functional proteins, eliminating excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment, and preventing the sudden weight increase after study conclusion commonly known as the yo-yo effect. Study results have shown that the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP, has proven to be safe and effective by preventing those adverse effects associated with a negative nitrogen balance, such as oversized or flabby tissue, stretch marks, sagging of breast tissue, increased hair loss, faded hair color, and fragile or brittle nails. Also preventing those anomalies commonly associated with weight-loss diets, such as hunger, weakness, headache caused by ketosis, constipation, or decreased libido, the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP, allowed for mean weight loss of 1.4 kg (3 lb) per week. PMID:14964348

  8. Nitrogen Cycle Modeling: a Mechanistic Estimate of N-losses From Agricultural Fields Over the Seasonal Time Period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and production of NO, N2O, and CO2 gas and NO2- and NO3- ions in nutrient-enriched agricultural fields is mediated by soil microbial activity, the hydrological cycle, plant dynamics, and climatic forcing. Understanding how NO, N2O, CO2 gases and NO2- and NO3- io...

  9. Effect of condensed tannin extract supplementation of performance, nitrogen, balance, gas emissions, and energetic losses of beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations are of increasing concern to regulatory agencies and consumers. We evaluated the effect of top-dressing a finishing diet (14.4% crude protein) for beef steers with a commercially-available condensed tannin extract (CT) at three levels (0...

  10. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Boyer, E.W.; David, M.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Tobias, C.R.; Tonitto, C.; Wollheim, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  11. Air pollution and changes in forest nitrogen status: Fog and rain deposition and nitrogen losses from forested watersheds in the San Bernardino Mountains. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to examine the effects of N deposition on mixed conifer forests in southern California. Studies were conducted at selected sites an air pollution gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The main tasks were: (1) to measure N deposition to the forest in fog and throughfall, (2) to determine spatial and temporal patterns of nitrate export in stream water, and (3) to quantify trace gas fluxes from soil at sites with high and low N deposition. Fog was found to be an important N source at the western end of the SMB due to his high frequency and presence at elevated concentrations. N deposition from throughfall was found to be similar to levels in forests where adverse effects have occurred. Annual fluxes of N from soil were 18-times higher at the western end of the SBM than at the eastern end. The data provide evidence of forest nitrogen saturation caused by the deposition of anthropogenic pollutants over a multi-decade period in the SBM.

  12. Effects of biochar addition to soil on nitrogen fluxes in a winter wheat lysimeter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Neftel, Albrecht; Conen, Franz; Six, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous residue from pyrolysis of biomass that potentially increases crop yields by reducing losses of nitrogen from soils and/or enhancing the uptake of applied fertiliser by the crops. Previous research is scarce about biochar's ability to increase wheat yields in temperate soils or how it changes nitrogen dynamics in the field. In a lysimeter system with two different soils (sandy/silt loam) nitrogen fluxes were traced by isotopic 15N enriched fertiliser to identify changes in nitrous oxide emissions, leaching and plant uptake after biochar addition. 20t/ha woodchip-waste biochar (pH=13) was applied to these soils in four lysimeters per soil type; the same number of lysimeters served as a control. The soils were cropped with winter wheat during the season 2012/2013. 170 kg-N/ha ammonium nitrate fertiliser with 10% 15N was applied in 3 events during the growing season and 15N concentrations where measured at different points in time in plant, soil, leachate and emitted nitrous oxide. After one year the lysimeter system showed no difference between biochar and control treatment in grain- and straw yield or nitrogen uptake. However biochar did reduce nitrous oxide emissions in the silt loam and losses of nitrate leaching in sandy loam. This study indicates potential reduction of nitrogen loss from cropland soil by biochar application but could not confirm increased yields in an intensive wheat production system.

  13. Estimating water and nitrate leaching in tree crops using inverse modelled plant and soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, Valentin; Kandelous, Maziar; Mairesse, Harmony; Baram, Shahar; Moradi, Ahmad; Pope, Katrin; Hopmans, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other (semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, root nitrate and water uptake interact with soil and root properties in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modelling studies are required to allow for unravelling of the relevant complexities that result from typical variations of crop properties, soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. A combined field monitoring and modelling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content within the root zone, soil matric potential below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. Plant and soil properties of incremented complexity are optimized with the software HYDRUS in an inverse modelling scheme, which allows estimating leaching under constraint of hydraulic principles. Questions of optimal irrigation and fertilization timing can then be addressed using predictive results and global optimization algorithms.

  14. Combined deep sampling and mass-based approaches to assess soil carbon and nitrogen losses due to land-use changes in karst area of southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yecui; Du, Zhangliu; Wang, Qibing; Li, Guichun

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of natural vegetation to human-managed ecosystems, especially the agricultural systems, may decrease soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) stocks. The objective of present study was to assess SOC and TN stocks losses by combining deep sampling with mass-based calculations upon land-use changes in a typical karst area of southwestern China. We quantified the changes from native forest to grassland, secondary shrub, eucalyptus plantation, sugarcane and corn fields (both defined as croplands), on the SOC and TN stocks down to 100 cm depth using fixed-depth (FD) and equivalent soil mass (ESM) approaches. The results showed that converting forest to cropland and other types significantly led to SOC and TN losses, but the extent depended on both sampling depths and calculation methods selected (i.e., FD or ESM). On average, the shifting from native forest to cropland led to SOC losses by 19.1, 25.1, 30.6, 36.8 and 37.9 % for the soil depths of 0-10, 0-20, 0-40, 0-60 and 0-100 cm, respectively, which highlighted that shallow sampling underestimated SOC losses. Moreover, the FD method underestimated SOC and TN losses for the upper 40 cm layer, but overestimated the losses in the deeper layers. We suggest that the ESM together with deep sampling should be encouraged to detect the differences in SOC stocks. In conclusion, the conversion of forest to managed systems, in particular croplands significantly decreased in SOC and TN stocks, although the effect magnitude to some extent depended on sampling depth and calculation approach selected.

  15. Linking an economic model for European agriculture with a mechanistic model to estimate nitrogen losses from cropland soil in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, A.; Marchi, G.; Koeble, R.; Kempen, M.; Britz, W.; Li, C.

    2007-07-01

    For the comprehensive assessment of the policy impact on greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils both socio-economic aspects and the environmental heterogeneity of the landscape are important factors that must be considered. We developed a modelling framework that links the large-scale economic model for agriculture CAPRI with the bio-geochemistry model DNDC to simulate greenhouse gas fluxes, carbon stock changes and the nitrogen budget of agricultural soils in Europe. The framework allows the ex-ante simulation of agricultural or agri-environmental policy impacts on wide range of environmental problems such as climate change (greenhouse gas emissions), air pollution and groundwater pollution. Those environmental impacts can be analysed in the context of economic and social indicators as calculated by the economic model. The methodology consists in four steps (i) the definition of appropriate calculation units that can be considered as homogeneous in terms of economic behaviour and environmental response; (ii) downscaling of regional agricultural statistics and farm management information from a CAPRI simulation run into the spatial calculation units; (iii) setting up of environmental model scenarios and model runs; and finally (iv) aggregating results for interpretation. We show first results of the nitrogen budget in cropland for the area of fourteen countries of the European Union. These results, in terms of estimated nitrogen fluxes, must still be considered as illustrative as needs for improvements in input data (e.g. the soil map) and management data (yield estimates) have been identified and will be the focus of future work. Nevertheless, we highlight inter-dependencies between farmer's choices of land uses and the environmental impact of different cultivation systems.

  16. Accelerated leach test development program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. A model study of the effects of intermittent loss on odd nitrogen concentrations in the lower troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. W.; Hameed, S.; Matloff, G.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent box model of the lower troposphere which includes a description of photochemical and physical processes has been developed. This model has been applied to the calculation of nitric acid and NO(x)(NO + NO2) concentrations over a diurnal cycle which includes precipitation. Nitric acid concentrations and the HNO3/NO(x) ratio are found to be highly variable under the assumptions regarding the frequency, duration, and intensity of precipitation employed in this model. The chemistry of odd nitrogen compounds during the night is potentially important in establishing the level of nitric acid in the lower troposphere. These calculations also indicate that relatively large errors may occur when the continuity equation describing nitric acid variations is averaged over a diurnal cycle which includes precipitation. Interpretation of simultaneous measurements of HNO3 and NO(x) will require some knowledge of the history of the observed air mass and may require an improved understanding of nighttime odd nitrogen chemistry.

  18. Frequency of deflagration in the in-tank precipitation process tanks due to loss of nitrogen purge system. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.M.; Mason, C.L.; Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Gupta, M.K.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    High-level liquid wastes (HLLW) from the processing of nuclear material at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are stored in large tanks in the F- and H-Area tank farms. The In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process is one step in the processing and disposal of HLLW. The process hazards review for the ITP identified the need to implement provisions that minimize deflagration/explosion hazards associated with the process. The objective of this analysis is to determine the frequency of a deflagration in Tank 48 and/or 49 due to nitrogen purge system failures (including external events) and coincident ignition source. A fault tree of the nitrogen purge system coupled with ignition source probability is used to identify dominant system failures that contribute to the frequency of deflagration. These system failures are then used in the recovery analysis. Several human actions, recovery actions, and repair activities are identified that reduce total frequency. The actions are analyzed and quantified as part of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). The probabilities of failure of these actions are applied to the fault tree cutsets and the event trees.

  19. Modelling biocide leaching from facades.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Irene K; Scheidegger, Ruth; Stamm, Christian; Gujer, Willi; Bader, Hans-Peter

    2011-05-01

    Biocides leach from facades during rain events and subsequently enter the aquatic environment with storm water. Little is known about the losses of an entire settlement, since most studies referred to wash-off experiments conducted under laboratory conditions. Their results show a fast decrease of concentrations in the beginning, which subsequently slows down. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model to understand the mechanisms leading to these losses as well as to simulate losses under various rainfall and application conditions. We developed a four-box model based on the knowledge gained from fits of an exponential function to an existing experimental data set of a wash-off experiment. The model consists of two mobile stocks from which biocides are washed off during a rain event. These mobile stocks are supplied with biocides from storage stocks by diffusion-type processes. The model accurately reproduced the measured data of wash-off during single cycles as well as peak wash-offs over all cycles. Our model results for diuron losses showed that a large proportion (∼ 70%) of the applied biocides are still in the stocks even after a rain volume corresponding to several years (1100 mm y(-1), Swiss Plateau). Applications to realistic outdoor conditions showed that losses can not be neglected for urban environments and that knowledge about the amount of rainfall turned into runoff and the decay constants of the biocides in the facades are crucial. The model increased our understanding of the processes leading to the observed dynamic in laboratory experiments and was used to simulate losses for various rainfall and application conditions. PMID:21529881

  20. Results of rainfall simulation to estimate sediment-bound carbon and nitrogen loss from an Atlantic Coastal Plain (USDA) ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of erosion on soil and carbon loss and redistribution within landscapes is an important component for developing estimates of carbon sequestration potential, management plans to maintain soil quality, and transport of sediment bound agrochemicals. Soils of the Southeastern U.S. Coastal Pl...

  1. Runoff losses of phosphorus and nitrogen in a corn silage system: A field-scale paired watershed approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport of P, N, and sediment via runoff from crop fields, especially where manure has been applied, can contribute to eutrophication and degradation of surface waters. We established a paired-watershed field site to evaluate surface runoff losses of nutrients and sediment from different manure/cr...

  2. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokken, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    Glass ceramic waste forms were investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt percent simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90 C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 grams per square meter when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

  3. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  4. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.; Doty, R.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1984-09-01

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Leaching of accelerator-produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.; Bull, J.; Goss, D.

    1994-05-01

    Leaching of radionuclides produced in soil and rock by high energy proton-induced radiation was studied for the SCC and CEBAF sites. Comparison was made with predictions of a Monte-Carlo code CASIM and previous results for the Fermilab site. The principal long-lived radionuclides were {sup 3}H and {sup 22}Na in agreement with Fermilab results. A few other radionuclides were present at lower concentrations in a subset of the samples. For example, {sup 134}Cs was detected in a few SSC water samples and {sup 7}Be and {sup 54}Mn were present at higher concentrations in a CEBAF sample. Leaching from SSC chalk was dependent on previous weathering and on leaching time. The more soil-like marl and shale were leached more rapidly. Results of this study in conjunction with the SSC ground-water model show that adequate ground-water protection would result for loss of the entire proton beam in the SSC Collider tunnel.

  6. Wheat leaf photosynthesis loss due to leaf rust, with respect to lesion development and leaf nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Robert, Corinne; Bancal, Marie-Odile; Ney, Bertrand; Lannou, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Soissons) plants grown under three different fertilisation treatments, we quantified the effect of leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) on flag leaf photosynthesis during the whole sporulation period. Bastiaans' model: Y = (1 - x)beta was used to characterize the relationship between relative leaf photosynthesis (Y) and disease severity (x). The evolution of the different types of symptoms induced by the pathogen (sporulating, chlorotic and necrosed tissues) was evaluated using image analysis. The beta-values varied from 2 to 11, 1.4-2, and 0.8-1 during the sporulation period, when considering the proportion of sporulating, sporulating + necrotic, and total diseased area, respectively. Leaf nitrogen (N) content did not change the effect of the disease on host photosynthesis. We concluded that leaf rust has no global effect on the photosynthesis of the symptomless parts of the leaves and that the large range in the quantification of leaf rust effect on the host, which is found in the literature, can be accounted for by considering the different symptom types. We discuss how our results could improve disease assessments and damage prediction in a wheat crop. PMID:15720636

  7. Interflow, overland flow and leaching of natural nutrients on an Alfisol slope of southern Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Oliveira Leite, J.

    1985-09-01

    Two experimental plots for hydrologic studies, 3595 and 7060 m 2, were delimited on a slope of Alfisol planted with cacao in Bahia, Brazil. Volumes of overland flow and interflow were measured daily and samples of collected water were taken monthly for analysis of Ca, Mg, Na, K, N, P and Fe. The highest overland-flow volumes represented 24% and the highest interflow 53% of the rainfall but on the average the volumes of overland flow and interflow were found to represent 1 and 14% of the annual rainfall. The percentage of interflow increases with increasing rainfall. In winter, it is higher than in summer, except during the highest rains observed. The mean annual loss for calcium was 85.8 kg ha -1 yr -1; for magnesium 18.2; potassium 17.0; sodium 23.5; nitrogen 22.1; iron 5.5 and phosphorus 0.9. In relative terms, considering the chemical components of the soils, the K losses are highest, indicating that this element is most leachable. The interflow volumes and the amounts of Na, K, N and P correlated at the 1% significance level in both plots. A general conclusion is that the leaching of nutrients varied with the intensity of the interflow, especially for Na, K, N and P, the leaching of nutrients through overland flow being of less importance.

  8. Reactive Nitrogen in Atmospheric Emission Inventories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess reactive Nitrogen (NT) has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current i...

  9. Leaching of dissolved phosphorus from tile-drained agricultural areas.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H E; Windolf, J; Kronvang, B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated leaching of dissolved phosphorus (P) from 45 tile-drains representing animal husbandry farms in all regions of Denmark. Leaching of P via tile-drains exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity with a low concentration in the majority of tile-drains and few tile-drains (15% in our investigation) having high to very high concentration of dissolved P. The share of dissolved organic P (DOP) was high (up to 96%). Leaching of DOP has hitherto been a somewhat overlooked P loss pathway in Danish soils and the mechanisms of mobilization and transport of DOP needs more investigation. We found a high correlation between Olsen-P and water extractable P. Water extractable P is regarded as an indicator of risk of loss of dissolved P. Our findings indicate that Olsen-P, which is measured routinely in Danish agricultural soils, may be a useful proxy for the P leaching potential of soils. However, we found no straight-forward correlation between leaching potential of the top soil layer (expressed as either degree of P saturation, Olsen-P or water extractable P) and the measured concentration of dissolved P in the tile-drain. This underlines that not only the source of P but also the P loss pathway must be taken into account when evaluating the risk of P loss. PMID:27332841

  10. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in grassland ecosystems globally. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in alkaline grasslands. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in species composition by N deposition, the effects of 9 yr N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species composition were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of grasses, while high N addition rate (> 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on grass richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) in soils, reduced soil pH and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness, explaining 27.2% variation of forb richness. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+ and Cu2+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, accounting for 25.9 and 41.4% variation of forb richness, respectively. These results reveal that disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils by N addition, particularly enhanced release of soil Mn2+ and Cu2+ may be associated with reduction in forb richness in temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia.

  11. Release of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Poultry Litter Amended with Acidified Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Doydora, Sarah A.; Cabrera, Miguel L.; Das, Keshav C.; Gaskin, Julia W.; Sonon, Leticia S.; Miller, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of poultry litter (PL) to soil may lead to nitrogen (N) losses through ammonia (NH3) volatilization and to potential contamination of surface runoff with PL-derived phosphorus (P). Amending litter with acidified biochar may minimize these problems by decreasing litter pH and by retaining litter-derived P, respectively. This study evaluated the effect of acidified biochars from pine chips (PC) and peanut hulls (PH) on NH3 losses and inorganic N and P released from surface-applied or incorporated PL. Poultry litter with or without acidified biochars was surface-applied or incorporated into the soil and incubated for 21 d. Volatilized NH3 was determined by trapping it in acid. Inorganic N and P were determined by leaching the soil with 0.01 M of CaCl2 during the study and by extracting it with 1 M KCl after incubation. Acidified biochars reduced NH3 losses by 58 to 63% with surface-applied PL, and by 56 to 60% with incorporated PL. Except for PH biochar, which caused a small increase in leached NH4 +-N with incorporated PL, acidified biochars had no effect on leached or KCl-extractable inorganic N and P from surface-applied or incorporated PL. These results suggest that acidified biochars may decrease NH3 losses from PL but may not reduce the potential for P loss in surface runoff from soils receiving PL. PMID:21655132

  12. Microbiological Leaching of Metallic Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, W. E.; Trussell, P. C.

    1963-01-01

    The percentage of chalcopyrite leached in percolators by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was dependent on the surface area of the ore but not on the amount. Typical examples of ore leaching, which demonstrate the role of the bacteria, are presented. In stationary fermentations, changes in KH2PO4 concentration above or below 0.1% decreased copper leaching as did reduction in the MgSO4·7H2O and increase in the (NH4)2SO4 concentration. Bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite was more effective than nonbiological leaching with ferric sulfate; ferric sulfate appeared to retard biological leaching, but this effect was likely caused by formation of an insoluble copper-iron complex. Ferrous sulfate and sodium chloride singly accentuated both bacterial and nonbiological leaching of chalcocite but jointly depressed bacterial action. Sodium chloride appeared to block bacterial iron oxidation without interfering with sulfide oxidation. Bacterial leaching of millerite, bornite, and chalcocite was greatest at pH 2.5. The economics of leaching a number of British Columbia ore bodies was discussed. PMID:16349627

  13. Low-disturbance manure incorporation effects on ammonia and nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Dell, Curtis J; Kleinman, Peter J A; Schmidt, John P; Beegle, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    Low-disturbance manure application methods can provide the benefits of manure incorporation, including reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions, in production systems where tillage is not possible. However, incorporation can exacerbate nitrate (NO3⁻) leaching. We sought to assess the trade-offs in NH3 and NO3⁻ losses caused by alternative manure application methods. Dairy slurry (2006-2007) and liquid swine manure (2008-2009) were applied to no-till corn by (i) shallow (<10 cm) disk injection, (ii) surface banding with soil aeration, (iii) broadcasting, and (iv) broadcasting with tillage incorporation. Ammonia emissions were monitored for 72 h after application using ventilated chambers and passive diffusion samplers, and NO3⁻ leaching to 80 cm was monitored with buried column lysimeters. The greatest NH3 emissions occurred with broadcasting (35-63 kg NH3-N ha⁻), and the lowest emissions were from unamended soil (<1 kg NH-N ha⁻¹). Injection decreased NH-N emissions by 91 to 99% compared with broadcasting and resulted in lower emissions than tillage incorporation 1 h after broadcasting. Ammonia-nitrogen emissions from banding manure with aeration were inconsistent between years, averaging 0 to 71% that of broadcasting. Annual NO3⁻ leaching losses were small (<25 kg NO3-N ha⁻¹) and similar between treatments, except for the first winter when NO3⁻ leaching was fivefold greater with injection. Because NO3⁻ leaching with injection was substantially lower over subsequent seasons, we hypothesize that the elevated losses during the first winter were through preferential flow paths inadvertently created during lysimeter installation. Overall, shallow disk injection yielded the lowest NH3 emissions without consistently increasing NO3⁻ leaching, whereas manure banding with soil aeration conserved inconsistent amounts of N. PMID:22565274

  14. Effect of Tillage and Non-tillage Agricultural Practice on Nitrogen Losses as NO and N2O in Tropical Corn Fields at Guarico State, Venezuela.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquina, S.; Rojas, A.; Donoso, L.; Rasse, R.; Giuliante, A.; Corona, O.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of agricultural practices on NO and N2O emissions from corn fields at Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions. Historically, the most common agricultural practice in these regions has been mono cropping. Tillage (T) and non-tillage (NT) of soils represent approximately 30 and 70% of the planted area, respectively. Comparative studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these agricultural practices are not available for these regions. This study was conducted at the farm "Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9° 23' 33'' N, 66° 38' 30'' W) in two corn fields under tillage and non-tillage agricultural practice during the growing season (June-August 2006). A dry tropical forest, the primary ecosystem of the region, was evaluated for the same period of time. The corn and the forest fields were adjacent; therefore, they were exposed to the same meteorological conditions. The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). Nutrient soil concentrations (as nitrate and ammonium), water soil content and pH soil were measured in the fields for the same period of time. Soils were fertilized and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depths. Tillage soils were fertilized on June 1st 2006 with 65 kgN/ha of NPK (13:18:16/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl), whereas non-tillage soils were fertilized the next day with 56 kgN/ha of NPK (12:25:12/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl). Second fertilization of both fields was done thirty-seven days later by broadcast adding 58 kgN/ha approximately, using nitrophosphate as fertilizer (NP 33-3: 33% N total; 16.7% N- NO3- and 16.6% N- NH4+). In general, NO and N2O soil emissions from both corn fields increased after fertilization events, and depend on water soil content and nutrient soil concentration. N2O soil emissions were 11 and 9 times larger in

  15. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  16. Irrigation and Fertilization Controls on Critical Zone Carbon and Nitrogen cycles in Harvested Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parolari, A.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Feedbacks between hydrology, soil biogeochemistry, and primary productivity raise questions regarding the broader impact of human modifications to one or more of these critical zone processes. In particular, irrigation and nitrogen fertilization are used simultaneously to stimulate agricultural productivity and biomass export; however, together they may lead to unintended downstream consequences such as increased nitrogen leaching or greenhouse gas release. To quantify such trade-offs among ecosystem services and to identify optimal agricultural management practices, an ecosystem model coupling the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles is studied. The model is forced by stochastic climate and periodic management interventions that include irrigation, fertilization, and harvest. Steady-state solutions of ecosystems under rotational harvest are developed, demonstrating that these ecosystems operate in a limit-cycle. Under constant fertilization and soil moisture conditions, the model predicts an optimal rotation length associated with maximum yield and maximum ecosystem nitrogen use efficiency. Through plant-soil feedbacks mediated by the harvest, intermediate rotation lengths promote short periods of immobilization, which stimulates mineral nitrogen retention. In these systems, increased soil moisture increases non-productive nitrogen losses, especially under long rotations, where mineral nitrogen availability is greatest. Time-variable water and nitrogen input scenarios are also considered and suggest the possibility of an optimal irrigation-fertilization strategy that balances productivity, which provides an economic benefit, and leaching, which may have consequences for aquatic ecosystems in receiving waters. These results highlight several soil C-N cycle responses to management practices that influence the provision of and trade-off between ecosystem services, namely primary productivity and mineral nitrogen export.

  17. A Unified Experimental Approach for Estimation of Irrigationwater and Nitrate Leaching in Tree Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmans, J. W.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other(semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, as well as root growth and associated nitrate and water uptake, interact with soil properties and fertilizer source(s) in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modeling studies are required to allow for unraveling of the relevant complexities that result from typical field-wide spatial variations of soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. We present experimental approaches across a network of tree crop orchards in the San Joaquin Valley, that provide the necessary soil data of soil moisture, water potential and nitrate concentration to evaluate and optimize irrigation water management practices. Specifically, deep tensiometers were used to monitor in-situ continuous soil water potential gradients, for the purpose to compute leaching fluxes of water and nitrate at both the individual tree and field scale.

  18. Assessing the risk of N leaching from forest soils across a steep N deposition gradient in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Akselsson, Cecilia; Belyazid, Salim; Hellsten, Sofie; Klarqvist, Malin; Pihl-Karlsson, Gunilla; Karlsson, Per-Erik; Lundin, Lars

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen leaching from boreal and temporal forests, where normally most of the nitrogen is retained, has the potential to increase acidification of soil and water and eutrophication of the Baltic Sea. In parts of Sweden, where the nitrogen deposition has been intermediate to high during recent decades, there are indications that the soils are close to nitrogen saturation. In this study, four different approaches were used to assess the risk of nitrogen leaching from forest soils in different parts of Sweden. Nitrate concentrations in soil water and C:N ratios in the humus layer where interpreted, together with model results from mass balance calculations and detailed dynamic modelling. All four approaches pointed at a risk of nitrogen leaching from forest soils in southern Sweden. However, there was a substantial variation on a local scale. Basing the assessment on four different approaches makes the assessment robust. PMID:20864233

  19. Leaching of plasticizers from temporary denture soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Erik Christian

    2004-02-01

    The loss of the plasticizers dibutylphthalate, butylphthalylbutyl glycolate, benzylbenzoate, methylsalicylate, and benzylsalicylate from four soft lining materials was measured. A 0.1% aqueous solution of triton X-100, reduced was used as immersion medium, since the solubility of plasticizer in this medium was close to that of saliva. The loss of plasticizer was monitored up to 30 d after mixing. For two of the materials, the average amount of leached dibutylphthalate within the first day exceeded the proposed tolerable daily intake (TDI) by about 11 and 32 times, respectively, for an average adult person. Similarly, for these two materials, the average daily amount within the first 30 d of leached dibutylphthalate was 2.2 and 6.6 times larger, respectively, than the TDI limit. The cumulative amount leached over 30 d for each of the four materials was 128-253 mg plasticizer g(-1). The results indicate the need for further biological evaluations of these products. PMID:14871201

  20. The impact of exogenous N supply on soluble organic nitrogen dynamics and nitrogen balance in a greenhouse vegetable system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Kang, Lingyun; Ren, Tao; Junliang, Li; Chen, Qing; Wang, Jingguo

    2015-05-01

    A long-term greenhouse experiment (2004-2012) was conducted with continuous tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plantings to understand the influence of an exogenous nitrogen supply from irrigation water, chemical fertilizer, or organic amendment on the N balance and soluble organic nitrogen (SON). The results from 16 tomato growing seasons indicated that the application of organic amendment (manure and straw) alone (Or-N) resulted in the same yield as the conventional chemical N with organic amendment (Co-N) and the reduced chemical N with organic amendment (Re-N) treatments. The annual apparent N loss was >1000 and 438 kg N ha(-1) in the Co-N and Re-N treatments, respectively. Over the study period, the SON in the 1.8 m soil profile was 1449 and 1978 kg N ha(-1) in the Re-N and Co-N treatments, respectively, it was 1.7- and 2.3-fold higher than that observed in the Or-N treatment, which indicated that SON increased with the chemical N application. The percentage of SON in the cumulative soluble N (SON plus mineral N) ranged from 28% to 44%, and there were no significant differences across the 0-0.6, 0.6-1.2, and 1.2-1.8 m soil profile, which indicated that the leaching and distribution of SON was similar to those of the mineral N in the 0-1.8 m soil profile. We conclude that the mobility of soluble organic N in the 0-1.8 m of the soil was synchronous with the mineral N under a greenhouse production system, and the risk of soluble organic N leaching increased with inorganic N application rate. Therefore, leaching of SON in the intensive agriculture should not be ignored when evaluating the risk of N leaching. PMID:25753397

  1. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in ecosystems. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in grasslands with neutral or alkaline soils. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in biodiversity induced by N deposition, the effects of 9-year N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of graminoids, while high N addition rate (≥ 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on graminoid richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition reduced soil pH, depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+, Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness and biomass, explaining 23.59% variation of forb biomass. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+, Cu2+ and, Fe3+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, respectively. Changes in the metal ion concentrations accounted for 42.77% variation of forb richness, while reduction of base cations was not associated with the reduction in forb richness. These results reveal that patterns of plant biodiversity in the temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia are primarily driven by increases in metal ion

  2. Nitrogen export from a watershed subjected to partial salvage logging.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, M; Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R; Swistock, B R

    2001-11-01

    Logging has been shown to induce nitrogen (N) leaching. We hypothesized that logging a watershed that previously exhibited forest decline symptoms would place additional stress on the ecosystem and result in greater N loss, compared to harvesting vigorous forests. We conducted a 10-year (1988 to 1998) assessment of N export from the Baldwin Creek watershed in southwestern Pennsylvania that was partially clearcut to salvage dead and dying northern red oak. N export from the watershed increased significantly following salvage logging operations and did not completely return to prelogging levels by the end of the study period. The largest annual NO3-N export of 13 kg/ha was observed during the first year after harvesting, an increase of approximately 10 kg/ha. Compared to data from other Appalachian Mountain watersheds in North Carolina, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, calculated N loss for Baldwin Creek was considerably greater. Longer periods of reduced N uptake due to slow revegetation of salvage logged areas, coupled with increased amounts of N available to leaching, could have accounted for the large N losses observed for Baldwin Creek. Salvage logging of dead and dying trees from forested watersheds in this region appears to have the potential to result in much larger N losses than previously reported for harvest of healthy stands. PMID:12805802

  3. Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2009-06-22

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in

  4. MODELS FOR LEACHING OF PESTICIDES IN SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models are developed which describe leaching of pesticides in the root zone and the intermediate vadose zone, and flushing of residual solute mass in the aquifer. Pollutants' loss pathways in the soil, such as volatilization, crop uptake, and biochemical decay, are emphasized, a...

  5. Microbial denitrification dominates nitrate losses from forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yunting; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Takahashi, Chieko; Zhu, Weixing; Hayashi, Takahiro; Hokari, Azusa A; Urakawa, Rieko; Bai, Edith; Houlton, Benjamin Z; Xi, Dan; Zhang, Shasha; Matsushita, Kayo; Tu, Ying; Liu, Dongwei; Zhu, Feifei; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Guoyi; Chen, Dexiang; Makita, Tomoko; Toda, Hiroto; Liu, Xueyan; Chen, Quansheng; Zhang, Deqiang; Li, Yide; Yoh, Muneoki

    2015-02-01

    Denitrification removes fixed nitrogen (N) from the biosphere, thereby restricting the availability of this key limiting nutrient for terrestrial plant productivity. This microbially driven process has been exceedingly difficult to measure, however, given the large background of nitrogen gas (N2) in the atmosphere and vexing scaling issues associated with heterogeneous soil systems. Here, we use natural abundance of N and oxygen isotopes in nitrate (NO3 (-)) to examine dentrification rates across six forest sites in southern China and central Japan, which span temperate to tropical climates, as well as various stand ages and N deposition regimes. Our multiple stable isotope approach across soil to watershed scales shows that traditional techniques underestimate terrestrial denitrification fluxes by up to 98%, with annual losses of 5.6-30.1 kg of N per hectare via this gaseous pathway. These N export fluxes are up to sixfold higher than NO3 (-) leaching, pointing to widespread dominance of denitrification in removing NO3 (-) from forest ecosystems across a range of conditions. Further, we report that the loss of NO3 (-) to denitrification decreased in comparison to leaching pathways in sites with the highest rates of anthropogenic N deposition. PMID:25605898

  6. Microbial denitrification dominates nitrate losses from forest ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yunting; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Takahashi, Chieko; Zhu, Weixing; Hayashi, Takahiro; Hokari, Azusa A.; Urakawa, Rieko; Bai, Edith; Houlton, Benjamin Z.; Xi, Dan; Zhang, Shasha; Matsushita, Kayo; Tu, Ying; Liu, Dongwei; Zhu, Feifei; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Guoyi; Chen, Dexiang; Makita, Tomoko; Toda, Hiroto; Liu, Xueyan; Chen, Quansheng; Zhang, Deqiang; Li, Yide; Yoh, Muneoki

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification removes fixed nitrogen (N) from the biosphere, thereby restricting the availability of this key limiting nutrient for terrestrial plant productivity. This microbially driven process has been exceedingly difficult to measure, however, given the large background of nitrogen gas (N2) in the atmosphere and vexing scaling issues associated with heterogeneous soil systems. Here, we use natural abundance of N and oxygen isotopes in nitrate (NO3−) to examine dentrification rates across six forest sites in southern China and central Japan, which span temperate to tropical climates, as well as various stand ages and N deposition regimes. Our multiple stable isotope approach across soil to watershed scales shows that traditional techniques underestimate terrestrial denitrification fluxes by up to 98%, with annual losses of 5.6–30.1 kg of N per hectare via this gaseous pathway. These N export fluxes are up to sixfold higher than NO3− leaching, pointing to widespread dominance of denitrification in removing NO3− from forest ecosystems across a range of conditions. Further, we report that the loss of NO3− to denitrification decreased in comparison to leaching pathways in sites with the highest rates of anthropogenic N deposition. PMID:25605898

  7. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces environmental impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen input.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunlian; Liu, Lingli; Hu, Shuijin; Compton, Jana E; Greaver, Tara L; Li, Quanlin

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities, and in particular the use of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer, have doubled global annual reactive N inputs in the past 50-100 years, causing deleterious effects on the environment through increased N leaching and nitrous oxide (N2 O) and ammonia (NH3 ) emissions. Leaching and gaseous losses of N are greatly controlled by the net rate of microbial nitrification. Extensive experiments have been conducted to develop ways to inhibit this process through use of nitrification inhibitors (NI) in combination with fertilizers. Yet, no study has comprehensively assessed how inhibiting nitrification affects both hydrologic and gaseous losses of N and plant nitrogen use efficiency. We synthesized the results of 62 NI field studies and evaluated how NI application altered N cycle and ecosystem services in N-enriched systems. Our results showed that inhibiting nitrification by NI application increased NH3 emission (mean: 20%, 95% confidential interval: 33-67%), but reduced dissolved inorganic N leaching (-48%, -56% to -38%), N2 O emission (-44%, -48% to -39%) and NO emission (-24%, -38% to -8%). This amounted to a net reduction of 16.5% in the total N release to the environment. Inhibiting nitrification also increased plant N recovery (58%, 34-93%) and productivity of grain (9%, 6-13%), straw (15%, 12-18%), vegetable (5%, 0-10%) and pasture hay (14%, 8-20%). The cost and benefit analysis showed that the economic benefit of reducing N's environmental impacts offsets the cost of NI application. Applying NI along with N fertilizer could bring additional revenues of $163 ha(-1)  yr(-1) for a maize farm, equivalent to 8.95% increase in revenues. Our findings showed that NIs could create a win-win scenario that reduces the negative impact of N leaching and greenhouse gas production, while increases the agricultural output. However, NI's potential negative impacts, such as increase in NH3 emission and the risk of NI contamination, should be fully

  8. Groundwater: Contamination from Nitrogen Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in water pose problems for human health and the environment. Groundwater is a major source for human water supplies and for contributing to surface water bodies. Leaching of N fertilizers is a major factor for high NO3-N concentrations in groundwater. Current ...

  9. Next Generation of Leaching Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corresponding abstract has been cleared for this presentation. The four methods comprising the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework are described along with the tools to support implementation of the more rigorous and accurate source terms that are developed using LEAF ...

  10. Nitrate leaching beneath a containerized nursery crop receiving trickle or overhead irrigation.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, D J; Brand, M H

    2001-01-01

    Container production of nursery crops is intensive and a potential source of nitrogen release to the environment. This study was conducted to determine if trickle irrigation could be used by container nursery producers as an alternative to standard overhead irrigation to reduce nitrogen release into the environment. The effect of overhead irrigation and trickle irrigation on leachate nitrate N concentration, flow-weighted nitrate N concentration, leachate volume, and plant growth was investigated using containerized rhododendron (Rhododendron catawbiense Michx. 'Album') supplied with a controlled-release fertilizer and grown outdoors on top of soil-monolith lysimeters. Leachate was collected over two growing seasons and overwinter periods, and natural precipitation was allowed as a component of the system. Precipitation accounted for 69% of the water entering the overhead-irrigated system and 80% of the water entering the trickle-irrigated system. Leachate from fertilized plants exceeded the USEPA limit of 10 mg L(-1) at several times and reached a maximum of 26 mg L(-1) with trickle irrigation. Average annual loss of nitrate N in leachate for fertilized treatments was 51.8 and 60.5 kg ha(-1) for the overhead and trickle treatments, respectively. Average annual flow-weighted concentration of nitrate N in leachate of fertilized plants was 7.2 mg L(-1) for overhead irrigation and 12.7 mg L(-1) for trickle irrigation. Trickle irrigation did not reduce the amount of nitrate N leached from nursery containers when compared with overhead irrigation because precipitation nullified the potential benefits of reduced leaching fractions and irrigation inputs provided under trickle irrigation. PMID:11577861

  11. Nitrate Leaching From Vegetable Field in Shimousa Plateau and the Effect of Decrease Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, Atsushi

    In vegetable fields in Shimousa plateau, a survey was carried out to find the state of nitrate nitrogen flowing out from the farmland. A measure was taken to decrease leaching of nitrogen with carrot cultivation, a major crop, and its effect was evaluated. (1) There were fields with large amount of residual nitrogen and concentrations of nitrate nitrogen were higher than the environmental standard at a depth of four meters after harvesting of vegetables. The data indicated that nitrogen leaching out from the farmland was likely to burden to groundwater. (2) The level of nitrate nitrogen in permeating water was inferred to exceed 15 mg/ L in surveyed fields from nitrogen balance. This calculation showed that a 23% cut of nitrogen input would decrease nitrate nitrogen in permeating water to 10 mg/L or less. (3) As a measure to diminish nitrogen by effective utilization of residual nitrogen, nitrogen input was decreased by 25% in a carrot field. As a result, the yield was comparable to conventional method.

  12. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component. PMID:24457909

  13. Incorporating the Role of Nitrogen in the Noah-MP Land Surface Model for Climate and Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Yang, Z. L.; Fisher, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Noah-MP (Niu et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011) is the next generation land surface model for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model and the Climate Forecast Systems in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. While Noah-MP does not currently contain a dynamic nitrogen cycle, this can readily be updated with the interactive vegetation canopy option. In this study, Noah-MP is coupled with the Fixation & Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model (Fisher et al., 2010) for the above ground processes and the soil nitrogen model from the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for the below ground processes. This combines FUN's state-of-the-art concept of the carbon cost theory and SWAT's strength in representing the anthropogenic effects on the nitrogen cycle. The processes employed from FUN are the nitrogen uptake and fixation of plants, both of which are directly linked to the plant productivity. If passive nitrogen uptake cannot meet the nitrogen demand, plants have to spend part of the photosynthesized carbon production on nitrogen acquisition. The processes employed from SWAT are nitrogen mineralization, nitrification, immobilization, volatilization, atmospheric deposition, and leaching. In addition, the modified universal soil loss equation is used to more accurately account for the nitrogen removal in sediment caused by surface runoff. Because human input of nitrogen greatly changes the nitrogen cycle, a simple nitrogen fertilization approach is also applied to crops. Preliminary results show that Noah-MP is capable of simulating the dynamics of the major nitrogen pools. Further comprehensive evaluation of the new model will be conducted at one or more experimental sites.

  14. Hypochlorous Acid Leaching of Sulfide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eung Ha

    1987-01-01

    The leaching mechanisms of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and chalcocite with hypochlorous acid have been resolved by analyzing the concentrations of the products of the leaching reactions and also by determining the effects of pH on the leaching rate. Chalcopyrite and sphalerite give rise to sulfur and sulfate as the primary products and the leaching rates are pH independent. However, chalcocite gives rise to only sulfur as the primary product, and the leaching rates are pH dependent.

  15. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Monitoring of nitrate leaching in sandy soils: comparison of three methods.

    PubMed

    Zotarelli, Lincoln; Scholberg, Johannes M; Dukes, Michael D; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Proper N fertilizer and irrigation management can reduce nitrate leaching while maintaining crop yield, which is critical to enhance the sustainability of vegetable production on soils with poor water and nutrient-holding capacities. This study evaluated different methods to measure nitrate leaching in mulched drip-irrigated zucchini, pepper, and tomato production systems. Fertigation rates were 145 and 217 kg N ha(-1) for zucchini; 192 and 288 kg N ha(-1) for pepper; and 208 and 312 kg N ha(-1) for tomato. Irrigation was either applied at a fixed daily rate or based on threshold values of soil moisture sensors placed in production beds. Ceramic suction cup lysimeters, subsurface drainage lysimeters and soil cores were used to access the interactive effects of N rate and irrigation management on N leaching. Irrigation treatments and N rate interaction effects on N leaching were significant for all crops. Applying N rates in excess of standard recommendations increased N leaching by 64, 59, and 32%, respectively, for pepper, tomato, and zucchini crops. Independent of the irrigation treatment or nitrogen rate, N leaching values measured from the ceramic cup lysimeter-based N leaching values were lower than the values from the drainage lysimeter and soil coring methods. However, overall nitrate concentration patterns were similar for all methods when the nitrate concentration and leached volume were relatively low. PMID:17526874

  17. [Nitrogen flow in farming-feeding system and its environmental impact in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-peng; Chen, Ji-ning

    2007-10-01

    By applying nitrogen flow model for farming-feeding system (NFM-FFS) which integrates soil full nitrogen balance model with inventory analysis for agricultural pollution, nitrogen flow in China farming-feeding systems and its environmental impact are analyzed. In 2003, although surface nitrogen surpluses, nitrogen deficit in agricultural soil system in China is estimated to be 623.9 x 10(4) t, and 13.7 kg/hm2 averagely, which implies that soils in China farming-feeding systems are at the risk of nitrogen content decline and potential soil degradation as a whole. With a intense nutrient input in arable land and no extra fertilizer input in grassland in China, there is a nitrogen surplus of 1761.9 x 10(4) t, averagely 142.8 kg/hm2, while grassland has a deficit of 2,385.7 x 10(4) t, averagely 90.7 kg/hm2. As a result, existing negative impact of cropping activities on water environment as well as grassland degradation may be effectively abated by balancing nitrogen input between arable land and grassland. Total nitrogen loss from China farming-feeding system is 2,266 x 10(4) t, including 495.8 x 10(4) t exported into surface water by drainage and surface runoff, and 102.4 x 10(4) t into groundwater by leaching. Lost nitrogen is to be deposited in rivers, lakes and marine system, and is less likely to return to farming-feeding system. Fertilizer should be the priority of rural pollution control and management because of its dominant contribution to nitrogen exported into water environment from farming-feeding system. PMID:18269003

  18. ArcNEMO, a spatially distributed nutrient emission model developed in Python to quantify losses of nitrogen and phosphorous from agriculture to surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Opstal, Mattias; Tits, Mia; Beckers, Veronique; Batelaan, Okke; Van Orshoven, Jos; Elsen, Annemie; Diels, Jan; D'heygere, Tom; Van Hoof, Kor

    2014-05-01

    Pollution of surface water bodies with nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) from agricultural sources is a major problem in areas with intensive agriculture in Europe. The Flemish Environment Agency requires information on how spatially explicit policy measures on manure and fertilizer use, and changes in land use and soil management affect the N and P concentration in the surface waters in the region of Flanders, Belgium. To assist in this, a new spatially distributed, mechanistic nutrient emission model was developed in the open-source language Python. The model is called ArcNEMO (Nutrient Emission MOdel). The model is fully integrated in ArcGIS, but could be easily adapted to work with open-source GIS software. In Flanders, detailed information is available each year on the delineation of each agricultural parcel and the crops grown on them. Parcels are linked to farms, and for each farm yearly manure and fertilizer use is available. To take full advantage of this information and to be able to simulate nutrient losses to the high-density surface water network, the model makes use of grid cells of 50 by 50m. A fertilizer allocation model was developed to calculate from the yearly parcel and farm data the fertilizer and manure input per grid cell for further use in the ArcNEMO-model. The model architecture was chosen such that the model can be used to simulate spatially explicit monthly discharge and losses of N and P to the surface water for the whole of Flanders (13,500 km²) over periods of 10-20 years. The extended time period is necessary because residence times in groundwater and the rates of organic matter turnover imply that water quality reacts slowly to changes of land use and fertilization practices. Vertical water flow and nutrient transport in the unsaturated zone are described per grid cell using a cascading bucket-type model with daily time steps. Groundwater flow is described by solving the 2D-groundwater flow equation using an explicit numerical

  19. Soil Nitrogen Budgets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) recoveries are commonly 45% to 70% for modern field-crop systems. Nitrogen budgets are a valuable tool for improving N efficiency because they assess the size of various N pools, N gains from the atmosphere, N losses to the environment, and the interactions among soil-N-cycle processes...

  20. Nitrogen segregation in nanocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Erbahar, D; Wagner, Ph; Rocquefelte, X; Arenal, R; Pochet, P; Rayson, M; Scardamaglia, M; Bittencourt, C; Briddon, P

    2014-01-01

    We explore the behaviour of nitrogen doping in carbon nanomaterials, notably graphene, nanotubes, and carbon thin films. This is initially via a brief review of the literature, followed by a series of atomistic density functional calculations. We show that at low concentrations, substitutional nitrogen doping in the sp(2)-C graphenic basal plane is favoured, however once the nitrogen concentration reaches a critical threshold there is a transition towards the formation of the more thermodynamically-favoured nitrogen terminated 'zigzag' type edges. These can occur either via formation of finite patches (polycyclic aromatic azacarbons), strips of sp(2) carbon with zigzag nitrogen edges, or internal nitrogen-terminated hole edges within graphenic planes. This transition to edge formation is especially favoured when the nitrogen can be partially functionalised with, e.g. hydrogen. By comparison with available literature results, notably from electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray spectroscopy, the current results suggest that much of the nitrogen believed to be incorporated into carbon nanoobjects is instead likely to be present terminating the edges of carbonaceous impurities attached to nanoobject's surface. By comparison to nitrogen-doped tetrahedrally amorphous carbon, we suggest that this transition at around 10-20% nitrogen concentration and above towards sp(2) coordination via internal nitrogen-terminated edge formation may be a general property of nitrogen-doped carbon materials. PMID:25468305

  1. Copper leaching from chalcopyrite concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2005-07-01

    Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) is one of the most abundant copper-bearing minerals, which accounts for approximately 70 percent of the world’s known copper reserves. For more than 30 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to leach copper from chalcopyrite concentrates. These processes recover copper via hydrometallurgical leaching of the copper component of chalcopyrite concentrates, followed by solvent extraction and electrowinning. A number of demonstration plant operations have been conducted, but as of this writing none of the processes have become completely commercially operational.

  2. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  3. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Kereszt, Attila; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  4. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-01

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber. PMID:23145882

  5. Factors influencing DOC leaching from terrestrial ecosystems: a database analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino Serrano, M.; Janssens, I.; Luyssaert, S.; Ciais, P.; Gielen, B.

    2012-04-01

    The lateral transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important process linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Neglecting these fluxes can lead to biased of eddy covariance-based estimates of terrestrial ecosystem carbon sequestration. The necessity for integrating DOC leaching in carbon cycle models is thus clear, especially in view of future model development aiming at directly linking terrestrial, freshwater and ocean carbon cycles. However, to achieve this goal, more accurate information is needed in order to better understand and predict dissolved organic carbon dynamics. DOC concentrations mainly vary by geographical location, soil and vegetation types, topography, season and climate. Within this framework, we developed a database on DOC concentrations and fluxes with the aim of better understanding how those parameters determine DOC variations. This database compiles DOC concentrations and fluxes in soil solution and creeks at site or catchment level for different ecosystems around the world, but with special focus on the Northern Hemisphere and on peatland ecosystems. The database currently includes information from around 120 sites, gathered from published literature and datasets accessible on the internet. The database contains annual, seasonal and monthly data on DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and also includes other meta-data related to the site, such as land cover, soil properties, climate, annual water balance and other soil solution parameters. This compiled dataset allows to study the influence of several physical factors that determine DOC production in soils. We will present the observed relationships between drivers, such as precipitation, drainage flows, soil pH, soil texture, and DOC concentration/ DOC fluxes at different levels, ecosystem types, temporal scales (monthly versus annual or seasonal), and soil depths. The same relations will be analysed

  6. Effect of uniaxially pressing ordinary Portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxides on porosity, density, and leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeseman, C.R.; Asavapisit, S.; Knight, J.

    1998-11-01

    Synthetic metal hydroxide wastes containing Zn and Pb have been mixed with partially hydrated cement and uniaxially pressed. The effect on porosity, pore size distribution, and bulk and skeletal densities has been characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry. Ca(OH){sub 2} formation has been determined using differential thermal analysis and metal leaching has been assessed in a series of static leach tests completed on monolithic samples. Pressed solidified materials have increased density, reduced porosity, and reduced Ca(OH){sub 2}. They exhibit increased resistance to acid attack in terms of sample weight loss during leaching due to reduced release of alkalis. Leaching of Zn and Pb is primarily determined by pH. A peak observed in Zn leaching from pressed samples is due to the effect of changing leachate pH on the dominant Zn species present.

  7. Differential leaching of nutrients from soluble vs. controlled-release fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, Ashok K.

    1992-11-01

    Extremely sandy soils and poorly distributed high annual rainfall in the state of Florida contribute to significant leaching losses of nutrients from routine fertilization practices. A leaching column experiment was conducted to evaluate the leaching losses of nutrients when using currently available N, P, K blend fertilizers for young citrus tree fertilization. Fertilizer blends included NH4NO3, Ca(NO3)2, IBDU, IBDU plus Escote, Nutralene, Osmocote, and Meister. Following leaching of 1000 ml of water through soil columns, which simulates leaching conditions with 26 cm of rainfall, the amount of NO3 and NH4 recovered in the leachate from soil columns amended with an NH4NO3 blend accounted for 37% and 88% of the respective nutrients contained in the quantity of blend per column. The corresponding values for soil columns amended with a Ca(NO3)2 blend were 48% and 100%. Leraching losses of both NO3 (<3%) and NH4 (<4%) were drastically decreased when using controlled-release fertilizers. The recoveries of P and K in 1000 ml of leachate were 1.3% and 8%, respectively, of the nutrients added as Osmocote, which contained coated P and K sources. In the case of the rest of fertilizer blends, the recoveries of P and K in 1000 ml of leachate were as high as 52%-100% and 28%-100%, respectively. Therefore, controlled-release technology offers an important capability for minimizing leaching losses of nutrients.

  8. Mechanisms of nitrogen retention in forest ecosystems - A field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P. M.; Matson, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Intensive forest management led to elevated losses of nitrogen from a recently harvested loblolly pine plantation in North Carolina. Measurements of nitrogen-15 retention in the field demonstrated that microbial uptake of nitrogen during the decomposition of residual organic material was the most important process retaining nitrogen. Management practices that remove this material cause increased losses of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  9. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  10. Simulating temporal variations of nitrogen losses in river networks with a dynamic transport model unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Alexander, Richard; Bohlke, John; Boyer, Elizabeth; Harvey, Judson; Seitzinger, Sybil; Tobias, Craig; Tonitto, Christina; Wollheim, Wilfred

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  11. Phosphorus leaching in an acid tropical soil "recapitalized" with phosphate rock and triple superphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gikonyo, Esther W; Zaharah, Abdul R; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Anuar, Rahim A

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase "capital P" as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP) and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR) at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50) at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold) compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters. PMID:20694445

  12. Simulating nitrate leaching under winter wheat grown on a structured clay soil considering bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, R.; Coopers, D. M.; Harris, G. L.; Catt, J. A.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate leaching from drained plots of structured clay soil under winter wheat is simulated for one growing season using the SOILN model. Results are compared with field measurements from two replicate plots. Soil water movement is simulated both with and without a bypass flow component using the SOIL model. Flow to field drains and soil water content in the root zone are simulated better when bypass flow is included. The results emphasise the importance of considering bypass flow in modelling leaching from structured clay soils. Simulations of nitrate leaching using the SOILN model show that the model captures the main features of the cumulative loss of nitrate over the year.

  13. Leaching of uranium and thorium from monazite: I. Initial leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, Yehuda; Olander, Donald R.

    1990-07-01

    Interaction of three natural monazite specimens with a bicarbonate-carbonate solution was investigated for times up to 6.8 years. Dissolution was observed to be incongruent with respect to 238U and 232Th as well as their radiogenic daughters 234U, 230Th, and 228Th. Leaching was divided into a very rapid initial stage lasting a few hours and a slower process active for the remaining time. The initial stage was modeled as the sum of a contribution from a mechanico-chemically damaged portion of the specimen, which did not exhibit isotopic selectivity in leach properties, and a contribution from the selective removal of recoil daughter products from their recoil tracks in the surface of the otherwise undamaged bulk mineral. The latter effect is greater for short-lived 228Th compared to long-lived 234U. A correlation between the magnitude of the effect and the half-life of the radiogenic nuclide suggests an upper limit of ~ 10 6 years for the timescale of natural track annealing. After the initial dissolution stage, insoluble precipitates of the intermediate product in the Th chain, 228Ra, provide a supplementary source of 228Th by radioactive decay. Contributions to these precipitates come from dissolution-released and recoil-released 228Ra. This source is manifest as large apparent release rates of 228Th which begin after several weeks of leaching. Preannealing of a specimen at 800°C depresses the elemental Th leach rate but enhances the amount of 228Th /232Th fractionation. This enhancement is associated with rejection of Ra from the mineral during annealing of α-recoil damage.

  14. A regional assessment of the cost and effectiveness of mitigation measures for reducing nutrient losses to water and greenhouse gas emissions to air from pastoral farms.

    PubMed

    Vibart, Ronaldo; Vogeler, Iris; Dennis, Samuel; Kaye-Blake, William; Monaghan, Ross; Burggraaf, Vicki; Beautrais, Josef; Mackay, Alec

    2015-06-01

    Using a novel approach that links geospatial land resource information with individual farm-scale simulation, we conducted a regional assessment of nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) losses to water and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to air from the predominant mix of pastoral industries in Southland, New Zealand. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of several nutrient loss mitigation strategies applied at the farm-scale, set primarily for reducing N and P losses and grouped by capital cost and potential ease of adoption, followed an initial baseline assessment. Grouped nutrient loss mitigation strategies were applied on an additive basis on the assumption of full adoption, and were broadly identified as 'improved nutrient management' (M1), 'improved animal productivity' (M2), and 'restricted grazing' (M3). Estimated annual nitrate-N leaching losses occurring under representative baseline sheep and beef (cattle) farms, and representative baseline dairy farms for the region were 10 ± 2 and 32 ± 6 kg N/ha (mean ± standard deviation), respectively. Both sheep and beef and dairy farms were responsive to N leaching loss mitigation strategies in M1, at a low cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Only dairy farms were responsive to N leaching loss abatement from adopting M2, at no additional cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Dairy farms were also responsive to N leaching loss abatement from adopting M3, but this reduction came at a greater cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Only dairy farms were responsive to P-loss mitigation strategies, in particular by adopting M1. Only dairy farms were responsive to GHG abatement; greater abatement was achieved by the most intensified dairy farm system simulated. Overall, M1 provided for high levels of regional scale N- and P-loss abatement at a low cost per farm without affecting overall farm production, M2 provided additional N-loss abatement but only marginal P-loss abatement, whereas M3 provided the greatest N-loss abatement, but

  15. [Effects of nitrogen management on maize nitrogen utilization and residual nitrate nitrogen in soil under maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Wen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Qun; Yong, Tai-Wen; Liu, Wei-Guo; Yang, Feng; Mao, Shu-Ming

    2014-10-01

    A large amount of nitrogen (N) fertilizers poured into the fields severely pollute the environment. Reasonable application of N fertilizer has always been the research hotpot. The effects of N management on maize N utilization and residual nitrate N in soil under maize/soybean and maize/ sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems were reported in a field experiment in southwest China. It was found that maize N accumulation, N harvest index, N absorption efficiency, N contribution proportion after the anthesis stage in maize/soybean relay strip intercropping were increased by 6.1%, 5.4%, 4.3%, and 15.1% than under maize/sweet potato with an increase of 22.6% for maize yield after sustainable growing of maize/soybean intercropping system. Nitrate N accumulation in the 0-60 cm soil layer was 12.9% higher under maize/soybean intercropping than under maize/sweet potato intercropping. However, nitrate N concentration in the 60-120 cm soil layer when intercropped with soybean decreased by 10.3% than when intercropped with sweet potato, indicating a decrease of N leaching loss. Increasing of N application rate enhanced N accumulation of maize and decreased N use efficiency and significantly increased nitrate concentration in the soil profile except in the 60-100 cm soil layer, where no significant difference was observed with nitrogen application rate at 0 to 270 kg · hm(-2). Further application of N fertilizer significantly enhanced nitrate leaching loss. Postponing N application increased nitrate accumulation in the 60-100 cm soil layer. The results suggested that N application rates and ratio of base to top dressing had different influences on maize N concentration and nitrate N between maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato intercropping. Maize N concentration in the late growing stage, N harvest index and N use efficiency under maize/soybean intercropping increased (with N application rate at 180-270 kg · hm(-2) and ratio of base to top dressing = 3:2:5) and

  16. Impact of selected agricultural management options on the reduction of nitrogen loads in three representative meso scale catchments in Central Germany.

    PubMed

    Rode, Michael; Thiel, Enrico; Franko, Uwe; Wenk, Gerald; Hesser, Fred

    2009-05-15

    Nitrogen inputs into surface waters from diffuse sources are still unduly high and the assessment of mitigation measures is associated with large uncertainties. The objective of this paper is to investigate selected agricultural management scenarios on nitrogen loads and to assess the impact of differing catchment characteristics in central Germany. A new modelling approach, which simulates spatially distributed N-transport and transformation processes in soil and groundwater, was applied to three meso scale catchments with strongly deviating climate, soil and topography conditions. The approach uses the integrated modelling framework JAMS to link an agro-ecosystem, a rainfall-runoff and a groundwater nitrogen transport model. Different agricultural management measures with deviating levels of acceptance were analysed in the three study catchments. N-leaching rates in all three catchments varied with soil type, the lowest leaching rates being obtained for loess soil catchment (18.5 kg nitrate N ha(-1) yr(-1)) and the highest for the sandy soils catchment (41.2 kg nitrate N ha(-1) yr(-1)). The simulated baseflow nitrogen concentrations varied between the catchments from 1 to 6 mg N l(-1), reflecting the nitrogen reduction capacity of the subsurfaces. The management scenarios showed that the highest N leaching reduction could be achieved by good site-adapted agricultural management options. Nitrogen retention in the subsurface did not alter the ranking of the management scenarios calculated as losses from the soil zone. The reduction effect depended strongly on site specific conditions, especially climate, soil variety and the regional formation of the crop rotations. PMID:19261322

  17. Linking an economic model for European agriculture with a mechanistic model to estimate nitrogen and carbon losses from arable soils in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, A.; Marchi, G.; Koeble, R.; Kempen, M.; Britz, W.; Li, C.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of policy impact on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural soils requires careful consideration of both socio-economic aspects and the environmental heterogeneity of the landscape. We developed a modelling framework that links the large-scale economic model for agriculture CAPRI (Common Agricultural Policy Regional Impact assessment) with the biogeochemistry model DNDC (DeNitrification DeComposition) to simulate GHG fluxes, carbon stock changes and the nitrogen budget of agricultural soils in Europe. The framework allows the ex-ante simulation of agricultural or agri-environmental policy impacts on a wide range of environmental problems such as climate change (GHG emissions), air pollution and groundwater pollution. Those environmental impacts can be analyzed in the context of economic and social indicators as calculated by the economic model. The methodology consists of four steps: (i) definition of appropriate calculation units that can be considered as homogeneous in terms of economic behaviour and environmental response; (ii) downscaling of regional agricultural statistics and farm management information from a CAPRI simulation run into the spatial calculation units; (iii) designing environmental model scenarios and model runs; and finally (iv) aggregating results for interpretation. We show the first results of the nitrogen budget in croplands in fourteen countries of the European Union and discuss possibilities to improve the detailed assessment of nitrogen and carbon fluxes from European arable soils.

  18. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  19. Soil Profile Nitrate Response to Nitrogen Fertilization of Winter Triticale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing triticale (XTriticosecale Wittmack) as a winter crop has the potential to utilize residual nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) from previous crops, thus reducing its availability for leaching. Our objectives were to quantify nitrogen (N) capture and changes in soil NO3-N levels in response to N fertili...

  20. Consumptive use and resulting leach-field water budget of a mountain residence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, David; Paul, William T.; Laws, Roy; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2010-01-01

    Consumptive use of water in a dispersed rural community has important implications for maximum housing density and its effects on sustainability of groundwater withdrawals. Recent rapid growth in Colorado, USA has stressed groundwater supplies in some areas, thereby increasing scrutiny of approximate methods developed there more than 30 years ago to estimate consumptive use that are still used today. A foothills residence was studied during a 2-year period to estimate direct and indirect water losses. Direct losses are those from evaporation inside the home, plus any outdoor use. Indirect loss is evapotranspiration (ET) from the residential leach-field in excess of ET from the immediately surrounding terrain. Direct losses were 18.7% of water supply to the home, substantially larger than estimated historically in Colorado. A new approach was developed to estimate indirect loss, using chamber methods together with the Penman–Monteith model. Indirect loss was only 0.9% of water supply, but this value probably was anomalously low due to a recurring leach-field malfunction. Resulting drainage beneath the leach-field was 80.4% of water supply. Guidelines are given to apply the same methodology at other sites and combine results with a survey of leach-fields in an area to obtain more realistic average values of ET losses.

  1. NITROGEN BOUNDING STUDY: METHODS FOR ESTIMATING THE RELATIVE EFFECTS OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN DEPOSITION ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The leaching of atmospherically deposited nitrogen from forested watersheds may acidify lakes and streams. he Nitrogen Bounding Study evaluates the potential range of such adverse effects. he study estimates bounds on changes in regional-scale surface water acidification that mig...

  2. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was <1.0% of applied P and not statistically different from controls. Largo biosolids, generated from a biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils. PMID:11931462

  3. CHANGE IN NATURAL ABUNDANCE OF 15N AND ESTIMATION OF N LOSSES FROM DAIRY MANURE DURING STORAGE BY MASS BALANCE AND NITROGEN-TO-PHOSPHORUS RATIO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main objective was to evaluate methodologies to estimate N losses from stored dairy manure. Manure with high N (HN) and low N (LN) content was obtained from two groups of cows assigned diets of 17 and 15% CP (DM), respectively. Manure collected from the barn floor was diluted with water to 10% ...

  4. [Effects of biochar on soil nutrients leaching and potential mechanisms: A review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-xue; Lyu, Hao-hao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Yao-feng; Zhong, Zhe-ke; Yang, Sheng-mao

    2015-01-01

    Controlling soil nutrient leaching in farmland ecosystems has been a hotspot in the research field of agricultural environment. Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in enhancing soil carbon storage, improving soil quality and increasing crop yield. As a kind of new exogenous material, biochar has the potential in impacting soil nutrient cycling directly or indirectly, and has profound influences on soil nutrient leaching. This paper analyzed the intrinsic factors affecting how biochar affects soil nutrient leaching, such as the physical and chemical properties of biochar, and the interaction between biochar and soil organisms. Then the latest literatures regarding the external factors, including biochar application rates, soil types, depth of soil layer, fertilization conditions and temporal dynamics, through which biochar influences soil nutrient (especially nitrogen and phosphorus) leaching were reviewed. On that basis, four related action mechanisms were clarified, including direct adsorption of nutrients by biochar due to its micropore structure or surface charge, influencing nutrient leaching through increasing soil water- holding capacity, influencing nutrient cycling through the interaction with soil microbes, and preferential transport of absorbed nutrients by fine biochar particles. At last future research directions for better understanding the interactions between biochar and nutrient leaching in the soil were proposed. PMID:25985683

  5. Nutrient leaching from sediments according to different oxygen supplying conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Park, J. I.; Choi, S. H.; Kim, K.

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the role of sediments controlling the water quality, many studies have adopted nutrient leaching experiments. However, the experiments were mostly performed under air-open condition, which is different from the actual condition at the bottom of fairly stagnant water body. Therefore, the results may not properly reflect the capability of the sediments supplying the nutrients to the water column. In this study, nutrient leaching experiments were conducted using various sediment samples under two different oxygen supplying conditions: one open and the other closed to the air. For this study, 5 sediment samples were collected from lakes and rivers around Kunsan, Korea. Air-closed leaching experiments were carried out using conventional BOD glass bottles (355 mL) without any head spaces. All the experiments were performed at a solid:solution ratio of 1:7.3. Each reactor was incubated at 25 ℃ for 72 hours or 120 hours. The solution was analyzed for pH, DO, Eh, NO3-N, NH4-N, and PO4-P after the incubation. Silt+clay fraction, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and COD of the sediments showed close correlations with each other. Air-closed condition showed much higher leached concentrations for NH4-N and PO4-P (up to 60 times) than the air-open condition and the concentrations increased with the incubation time. However, the differences were very small in the experiments using sandy sediments (<0.13 mg/L and < 50 ug/L for NH4 and PO4 concentrations, respectively). In general, the leached NH4 and PO4 concentrations from the air-open experiments were not correlated well with the fine fractions due to nitrification and suppression of Fe-oxide reduction in aerobic condition, respectively. Because of this reason, some air-open results showed NO3-N concentrations higher than the concentrations obtained from the air-closed experiments. The experiments closed to air showed NO3-N concentrations substantially decreasing with the incubation time due to

  6. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  7. Extensive Management Promotes Plant and Microbial Nitrogen Retention in Temperate Grassland

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Franciska T.; Bloem, Jaap; Quirk, Helen; Stevens, Carly J.; Bol, Roland; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Leaching losses of nitrogen (N) from soil and atmospheric N deposition have led to widespread changes in plant community and microbial community composition, but our knowledge of the factors that determine ecosystem N retention is limited. A common feature of extensively managed, species-rich grasslands is that they have fungal-dominated microbial communities, which might reduce soil N losses and increase ecosystem N retention, which is pivotal for pollution mitigation and sustainable food production. However, the mechanisms that underpin improved N retention in extensively managed, species-rich grasslands are unclear. We combined a landscape-scale field study and glasshouse experiment to test how grassland management affects plant and soil N retention. Specifically, we hypothesised that extensively managed, species-rich grasslands of high conservation value would have lower N loss and greater N retention than intensively managed, species-poor grasslands, and that this would be due to a greater immobilisation of N by a more fungal-dominated microbial community. In the field study, we found that extensively managed, species-rich grasslands had lower N leaching losses. Soil inorganic N availability decreased with increasing abundance of fungi relative to bacteria, although the best predictor of soil N leaching was the C/N ratio of aboveground plant biomass. In the associated glasshouse experiment we found that retention of added 15N was greater in extensively than in intensively managed grasslands, which was attributed to a combination of greater root uptake and microbial immobilisation of 15N in the former, and that microbial immobilisation increased with increasing biomass and abundance of fungi. These findings show that grassland management affects mechanisms of N retention in soil through changes in root and microbial uptake of N. Moreover, they support the notion that microbial communities might be the key to improved N retention through tightening linkages

  8. Estimation of Nitrogen Pools in Irrigated Potato Production on Sandy Soil Using the Model SUBSTOR

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rishi; Hochmuth, George J.; Boote, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent increases in nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River and associated springs in northern Florida have raised concerns over the contributions of non-point sources. The Middle Suwannee River Basin (MSRB) is of special concern because of prevalent karst topography, unconfined aquifers and sandy soils which increase vulnerability of the ground water contamination from agricultural operations- a billion dollar industry in this region. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production poses a challenge in the area due to the shallow root system of potato plants, and low water and nutrient holding capacity of the sandy soils. A four-year monitoring study for potato production on sandy soil was conducted on a commercial farm located in the MSRB to identify major nitrogen (N) loss pathways and determine their contribution to the total environmental N load, using a partial N budget approach and the potato model SUBSTOR. Model simulated environmental N loading rates were found to lie within one standard deviation of the observed values and identified leaching loss of N as the major sink representing 25 to 38% (or 85 to 138 kg ha-1 N) of the total input N (310 to 349 kg ha-1 N). The crop residues left in the field after tuber harvest represented a significant amount of N (64 to 110 kg ha-1N) and posed potential for indirect leaching loss of N upon their mineralization and the absence of subsequent cover crops. Typically, two months of fallow period exits between harvest of tubers and planting of the fall row crop (silage corn). The fallow period is characterized by summer rains which pose a threat to N released from rapidly mineralizing potato vines. Strategies to reduce N loading into the groundwater from potato production must focus on development and adoption of best management practices aimed on reducing direct as well as indirect N leaching losses. PMID:25635904

  9. δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, S.S.; Sinkhorn, E.R.; Compton, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ15N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha−1 and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha−1, with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ15N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96–98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N2-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N2-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ15NO3 − patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N2-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N2-fixing vegetation.

  10. Estimation of nitrogen pools in irrigated potato production on sandy soil using the model SUBSTOR.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rishi; Hochmuth, George J; Boote, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Recent increases in nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River and associated springs in northern Florida have raised concerns over the contributions of non-point sources. The Middle Suwannee River Basin (MSRB) is of special concern because of prevalent karst topography, unconfined aquifers and sandy soils which increase vulnerability of the ground water contamination from agricultural operations--a billion dollar industry in this region. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production poses a challenge in the area due to the shallow root system of potato plants, and low water and nutrient holding capacity of the sandy soils. A four-year monitoring study for potato production on sandy soil was conducted on a commercial farm located in the MSRB to identify major nitrogen (N) loss pathways and determine their contribution to the total environmental N load, using a partial N budget approach and the potato model SUBSTOR. Model simulated environmental N loading rates were found to lie within one standard deviation of the observed values and identified leaching loss of N as the major sink representing 25 to 38% (or 85 to 138 kg ha(-1) N) of the total input N (310 to 349 kg ha(-1) N). The crop residues left in the field after tuber harvest represented a significant amount of N (64 to 110 kg ha(-1) N) and posed potential for indirect leaching loss of N upon their mineralization and the absence of subsequent cover crops. Typically, two months of fallow period exits between harvest of tubers and planting of the fall row crop (silage corn). The fallow period is characterized by summer rains which pose a threat to N released from rapidly mineralizing potato vines. Strategies to reduce N loading into the groundwater from potato production must focus on development and adoption of best management practices aimed on reducing direct as well as indirect N leaching losses. PMID:25635904

  11. Monitoring of water and nitrate leaching in an almond orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Brown, P.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The quality of groundwater is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands such as in California and many other (semi-) arid regions of the world. The regular application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water is likely responsible for the increase in nitrate concentrations of groundwater resources such as in CA's main agricultural areas in the Salinas Valley and the Tulare Lake Basin. Since groundwater contamination regulations are going to be implemented, improved fertigation practices may become an essential part of CA farming operations. Therefore, we conducted a field study in an almond orchard located in Lost Hills, CA which provides critical information on the movement of water and nutrients through the soil under variable soil moisture conditions. Water balance and Darcy equation were two approaches used to estimate the leaching in this study. Given the amount of applied irrigation water using flowmeter, water lost through evapotranspiration measured by Eddy-Covariance tower, changes in soil water storage using neutron probe data, and precipitation data provided by a nearby CIMIS station, we applied water balance to estimate the amount of leaching water. In the other hand, coupled deep tensiometers were used to calculate the head gradient below the root zone, thereby estimating the leaching flux with Darcy equation for known hydraulic conductivity of layer between two tensiometers. Although, the cumulative amount of leaching estimated by water balance were in the same order of magnitude as what was estimated using Darcy method, the uncertainties and different cumulative trend observed in each method suggest further evaluation of collected data and also looking for an alternative method which could reduce the observed uncertainty.

  12. Ion-beam depth-profiling studies of leached glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, C.A.; Tsong, I.S.T.; White, W.B.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Miller, P.D.; Moak, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ion-beam depth-profiling was carried out on three different glasses leached (or hydrated) in deionized water using /sup 1/H(/sup 19/F,..cap alpha gamma..)/sup 16/O nuclear reaction, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and sputter-induced photon spectrometry (SIPS) techniques. The depth-profiles show an interdiffusion mechanism in which the sodium ions in the glass are depleted and replaced by hydrogen (H/sup +/) or hydronium (H/sub 3/O/sup +/) ions from the solution. The leaching behavior does not show significant difference whether the glass surface is fractured or polished. Problems of mobile ion migration caused by ion bombardment and loss of hydrogen during analysis are discussed.

  13. [Changes of nitrogen fractions in horse dung during its decomposition on the typical steppe of Inner Mongolia, North China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Yan; Arengaowa; Liu, Xin-Min

    2013-01-01

    From June 2008 to September 2009, a field experiment was conducted to study the change characteristics of the nitrogen fractions in horse dung during its decomposition on the typical steppe of Inner Mongolia. Two treatments were installed, i. e., deposited the horse dung on the ground and buried the horse dung in soil. In the two treatments, the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (NH3 -N), amino acid nitrogen (AAN), and aminosugar nitrogen (ASN) in residual horse dung were maintained at a higher level in the earlier period of horse dung decomposition (0-90 d), but declined obviously in the later period (330-450 d). The concentrations of acid-hydrolysable unknown nitrogen (AHUN) and non-acid-hydrolysable unknown nitrogen (UUN) presented an increasing trend with the decomposition of horse dung, and increased to a higher level in the later period. In fresh horse dung, NH4(+)-N was the main fraction of inorganic nitrogen, and its concentration in residual horse dung decreased with the decomposition of horse dung. The concentration of NO3(-)-N in fresh horse dung was lower, its leaching loss from the residual horse dung was weak, and it was accumulated in the residual horse dung with the decomposition of horse dung. The horse dung buried in soil had significant effects on the gaseous ammonia volatilization of NH4(+)-N, but minor effects on the other nitrogen fractions. The main nitrogen sources of nitrogen mineralization in the earlier period of horse dung decomposition were NH3-N, AAN and ASN, and those in the later period were AHUN and UUN. The bio-availability of NH4(+)-N was mainly revealed in the earlier period of horse dung decomposition, while that of NO3(-)-N was in the later period. PMID:23717996

  14. Nitrogen fertilization challenges the climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Leilei; Bhardwaj, Ajay K.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2016-06-01

    Cellulosic biofuels are intended to improve future energy and climate security. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is commonly recommended to stimulate yields but can increase losses of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and other forms of reactive N, including nitrate. We measured soil N2O emissions and nitrate leaching along a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) high resolution N-fertilizer gradient for three years post-establishment. Results revealed an exponential increase in annual N2O emissions that each year became stronger (R 2 > 0.9, P < 0.001) and deviated further from the fixed percentage assumed for IPCC Tier 1 emission factors. Concomitantly, switchgrass yields became less responsive each year to N fertilizer. Nitrate leaching (and calculated indirect N2O emissions) also increased exponentially in response to N inputs, but neither methane (CH4) uptake nor soil organic carbon changed detectably. Overall, N fertilizer inputs at rates greater than crop need curtailed the climate benefit of ethanol production almost two-fold, from a maximum mitigation capacity of ‑5.71 ± 0.22 Mg CO2e ha‑1 yr‑1 in switchgrass fertilized at 56 kg N ha‑1 to only ‑2.97 ± 0.18 Mg CO2e ha‑1 yr‑1 in switchgrass fertilized at 196 kg N ha‑1. Minimizing N fertilizer use will be an important strategy for fully realizing the climate benefits of cellulosic biofuel production.

  15. Nitrogen fertilization challenges the climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruan, Leilei; Bhardwaj, Ajay K.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2016-06-01

    Cellulosic biofuels are intended to improve future energy and climate security. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is commonly recommended to stimulate yields but can increase losses of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and other forms of reactive N, including nitrate. We measured soil N2O emissions and nitrate leaching along a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) high resolution N-fertilizer gradient for three years post-establishment. Results revealed an exponential increase in annual N2O emissions that each year became stronger (R2 > 0.9, P < 0.001) and deviated further from the fixed percentage assumed for IPCC Tier 1 emission factors. Concomitantly, switchgrass yields became less responsivemore » each year to N fertilizer. Nitrate leaching (and calculated indirect N2O emissions) also increased exponentially in response to N inputs, but neither methane (CH4) uptake nor soil organic carbon changed detectably. Overall, N fertilizer inputs at rates greater than crop need curtailed the climate benefit of ethanol production almost two-fold, from a maximum mitigation capacity of–5.71 ± 0.22 Mg CO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 56 kgNha–1 to only –2.97 ± 0.18 MgCO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 196 kgNha–1. In conclusion, minimizing N fertilizer use will be an important strategy for fully realizing the climate benefits of cellulosic biofuel production.« less

  16. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  17. Leaky nitrogen cycle in pristine African montane rainforest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rütting, Tobias; Cizungu Ntaboba, Landry; Roobroeck, Dries; Bauters, Marijn; Huygens, Dries; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Many pristine humid tropical forests show simultaneously high nitrogen (N) richness and sustained loss of bioavailable N forms. To better understand this apparent upregulation of the N cycle in tropical forests, process-based understanding of soil N transformations, in geographically diverse locations, remains paramount. Field-based evidence is limited and entirely lacking for humid tropical forests on the African continent. This study aimed at filling both knowledge gaps by monitoring N losses and by conducting an in situ 15N labeling experiment in the Nyungwe tropical montane forest in Rwanda. Here we show that this tropical forest shows high nitrate (NO3-) leaching losses, confirming findings from other parts of the world. Gross N transformation rates point to an open soil N cycle with mineralized N nitrified rather than retained via immobilization; gross immobilization of NH4+ and NO3- combined accounted for 37% of gross mineralization, and plant N uptake is dominated by ammonium (NH4+). This study provided new process understanding of soil N cycling in humid tropical forests and added geographically independent evidence that humid tropical forests are characterized by soil N dynamics and N inputs sustaining bioavailable N loss.

  18. RELATIVE LEACHING AND AQUATIC TOXICITY OF PRESSURE-TREATED WOOD PRODUCTS USING BATCH LEACHING TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of southern yellow pine dimensional lumber, each treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-hour batch leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), coppe...

  19. A New Generation of Leaching Tests – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides an overview of newly released leaching tests that provide a more accurate source term when estimating environmental release of metals and other constituents of potential concern (COPCs). The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) methods have been (1) develo...

  20. Recovery of zinc from leach residues with minimum iron dissolution using oxidative leaching.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Reza; Rashchi, Fereshteh; Vahidi, Ehsan

    2011-02-01

    Leaching was performed to recover zinc from a zinc leach residue which contained 9.87% Zn and 4.93% Fe. During sulfuric acid leaching, Fe was dissolved as well as Zn which can reduce the Zn extraction efficiency. Leaching the residue in the presence of an oxidizing reagent such as hydrogen peroxide or manganese dioxide significantly reduced the iron content of the leach liquor. Effect of pH, temperature, solid/liquid ratio, reaction time and hydrogen peroxide or manganese dioxide concentration on the recovery of zinc and iron in non-oxidative and oxidative leaching conditions were investigated. By using the optimum oxidative leaching conditions, iron recovery reduced from 70% in non-oxidative leaching to 0.4 and 5% in the presence of MnO(2) and H(2)O(2), respectively, with acceptable Zn recovery. This reduction in the iron content was due to the different iron compounds formed at different conditions. PMID:20516004

  1. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  2. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  3. Zeolite Soil Application Method Affects Inorganic Nitrogen, Moisture, and Corn Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of new management techniques which improve soil water storage and soil nitrogen plant availability yet limit nitrogen leaching may help improve environmental quality. A benchtop study was conducted to determine the influence of a single urea fertilizer rate (224 kilograms of Nitrogen per ...

  4. Improved nitrogen management utilizing ground-penetrating-radar: A nine-year investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water availability and efficient use of nitrogen are critical components of a sustainable and profitable agricultural system. Since nitrogen is typically excessively applied, considerable nitrogen may leach to and move through the subsurface. Our hypothesis is that knowledge of the subsurface hydr...

  5. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on inorganic nitrogen in silt loam and sandy agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral Clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4...

  6. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on nitrogen in a manure-amended sandy agricultural soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-...

  7. Clinoptilolite Zeolite Influence on Inorganic Nitrogen in Silt Loam and Sandy Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral Clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4...

  8. Nitrate and phosphate leaching in a Phaeozem soil treated with biosolids, composted biosolids and inorganic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Esteller, M V; Martínez-Valdés, H; Garrido, S; Uribe, Q

    2009-06-01

    The use of organic wastes in agriculture may increase the production of crops by incorporating organic matter and nutrients into the soil, and by improving its physical characteristics; however, this use may cause environmental problems such as the leaching of certain ions. The objective of this study was to establish possible nitrogen and phosphorus leaching under real field conditions in Phaeozem soils. The experimental work was performed in a corn (Zea mays L.) field where three plots were conditioned with inorganic fertilizer, three plots with 4.5 Mgha(-1) of biosolids on dry basis, and three plots with the same amount of composted biosolids. The quality of biosolids and composted biosolids complied with the Mexican Official Standards. Soil water samples were collected with suction cups during two agricultural cycles and were analysed. Soil samples were also taken and analysed. The N-NO(3) concentrations in soil water fluctuated between 0.9 and 98mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, between 0.7 and 64 mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment, and between 1 and 61 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The maximum concentration of N-NO(2) and N-NH(3) in soil water was 1.02 and 2.65 mgL(-1), respectively. The greatest percentage of nitrogen leached is produced when inorganic fertilizer is used (37.4% and 24.0% N leached in the first and second years, respectively), followed by composted biosolids (17.1% and 13.5% N leached in the first and second years, respectively) and last by biosolids (11% for both years). This difference could be related to the form in which nitrogen is present in the fertilizers, while commercial fertilizer is as inorganic nitrogen, organic wastes are basically presented as organic nitrogen. The maximum PO(4)(3-) concentration in soil water was 1.9 mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, 1.7mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment and 0.9 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The estimated percentage of leached phosphorus

  9. A Mechanistic Treatment of the Dominant Soil Nitrogen Cycling Processes: Model Development, Testing, and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, William; Maggi, F.; Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.; Hornberger, G.M.; Venterea, R.T.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C.; Miller, N.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2008-05-01

    The development and initial application of a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) designed to characterize soil nitrogen (N) cycling and losses are described. The model couples advective and diffusive nutrient transport, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, and equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. TOUGHREACT-N was calibrated and tested against field measurements to assess pathways of N loss as either gas emission or solute leachate following fertilization and irrigation in a Central Valley, California, agricultural field as functions of fertilizer application rate and depth, and irrigation water volume. Our results, relative to the period before plants emerge, show that an increase in fertilizer rate produced a nonlinear response in terms of N losses. An increase of irrigation volume produced NO{sub 2}{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching, whereas an increase in fertilization depth mainly increased leaching of all N solutes. In addition, nitrifying bacteria largely increased in mass with increasing fertilizer rate. Increases in water application caused nitrifiers and denitrifiers to decrease and increase their mass, respectively, while nitrifiers and denitrifiers reversed their spatial stratification when fertilizer was applied below 15 cm depth. Coupling aqueous advection and diffusion, and gaseous diffusion with biological processes, closely captured actual conditions and, in the system explored here, significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements.

  10. A mechanistic treatment of the dominant soil nitrogen cycling processes: Model development, testing, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Gu, C.; Riley, W. J.; Hornberger, G. M.; Venterea, R. T.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C.; Miller, N. L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2008-06-01

    The development and initial application of a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) designed to characterize soil nitrogen (N) cycling and losses are described. The model couples advective and diffusive nutrient transport, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, and equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. TOUGHREACT-N was calibrated and tested against field measurements to assess pathways of N loss as either gas emission or solute leachate following fertilization and irrigation in a Central Valley, California, agricultural field as functions of fertilizer application rate and depth, and irrigation water volume. Our results, relative to the period before plants emerge, show that an increase in fertilizer rate produced a nonlinear response in terms of N losses. An increase of irrigation volume produced NO2- and NO3- leaching, whereas an increase in fertilization depth mainly increased leaching of all N solutes. In addition, nitrifying bacteria largely increased in mass with increasing fertilizer rate. Increases in water application caused nitrifiers and denitrifiers to decrease and increase their mass, respectively, while nitrifiers and denitrifiers reversed their spatial stratification when fertilizer was applied below 15 cm depth. Coupling aqueous advection and diffusion, and gaseous diffusion with biological processes, closely captured actual conditions and, in the system explored here, significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements.

  11. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  12. Climate change, agricultural adaptation and mitigation, and using the nitrogen index to increase nitrogen use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen is needed to maximize productivity of agricultural systems in Mexico. However, when these systems receive more nitrogen than necessary, losses of nitrogen to the environment can occur and negatively impact water bodies. Additionally, it has been reported across the literature that nitrogen ...

  13. Verifiable metamodels for nitrate losses to drains and groundwater in the Corn Belt, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, B.T.; Malone, R.W.; Gronberg, J.A.; Thorp, K.R.; Ma, L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in the unsaturated zone poses a risk to groundwater, whereas nitrate in tile drainage is conveyed directly to streams. We developed metamodels (MMs) consisting of artificial neural networks to simplify and upscale mechanistic fate and transport models for prediction of nitrate losses by drains and leaching in the Corn Belt, USA. The two final MMs predicted nitrate concentration and flux, respectively, in the shallow subsurface. Because each MM considered both tile drainage and leaching, they represent an integrated approach to vulnerability assessment. The MMs used readily available data comprising farm fertilizer nitrogen (N), weather data, and soil properties as inputs; therefore, they were well suited for regional extrapolation. The MMs effectively related the outputs of the underlying mechanistic model (Root Zone Water Quality Model) to the inputs (R 2 = 0.986 for the nitrate concentration MM). Predicted nitrate concentration was compared with measured nitrate in 38 samples of recently recharged groundwater, yielding a Pearson's r of 0.466 (p = 0.003). Predicted nitrate generally was higher than that measured in groundwater, possibly as a result of the time-lag for modern recharge to reach well screens, denitrification in groundwater, or interception of recharge by tile drains. In a qualitative comparison, predicted nitrate concentration also compared favorably with results from a previous regression model that predicted total N in streams. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2011 by the American Chemical Society.

  14. Verifiable metamodels for nitrate losses to drains and groundwater in the Corn Belt, USA.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Bernard T; Malone, Robert W; Gronberg, Jo Ann; Thorp, Kelly R; Ma, Liwang

    2012-01-17

    Nitrate leaching in the unsaturated zone poses a risk to groundwater, whereas nitrate in tile drainage is conveyed directly to streams. We developed metamodels (MMs) consisting of artificial neural networks to simplify and upscale mechanistic fate and transport models for prediction of nitrate losses by drains and leaching in the Corn Belt, USA. The two final MMs predicted nitrate concentration and flux, respectively, in the shallow subsurface. Because each MM considered both tile drainage and leaching, they represent an integrated approach to vulnerability assessment. The MMs used readily available data comprising farm fertilizer nitrogen (N), weather data, and soil properties as inputs; therefore, they were well suited for regional extrapolation. The MMs effectively related the outputs of the underlying mechanistic model (Root Zone Water Quality Model) to the inputs (R(2) = 0.986 for the nitrate concentration MM). Predicted nitrate concentration was compared with measured nitrate in 38 samples of recently recharged groundwater, yielding a Pearson's r of 0.466 (p = 0.003). Predicted nitrate generally was higher than that measured in groundwater, possibly as a result of the time-lag for modern recharge to reach well screens, denitrification in groundwater, or interception of recharge by tile drains. In a qualitative comparison, predicted nitrate concentration also compared favorably with results from a previous regression model that predicted total N in streams. PMID:22129446

  15. From Gene Expression to the Earth System: Isotopic Constraints on Nitrogen Cycling Across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.

    2015-12-01

    A central motivation of the Biogeosciences is to understand the cycling of biologically essential elements over multiple scales of space and time. This charge is vital to basic knowledge of Earth system functioning. It is also relevant to many of the global challenges we face, such as climate change, biodiversity conservation, and the multifaceted role of global fertilizer use in maximizing human health and well-being. Nitrogen is connected to all of these; yet it has been one of the more vexing elements to quantitatively appraise across systems and scales. Here I discuss how research in my group has been exploring the use of natural nitrogen isotope abundance (15N/14N) as a biogeochemical tracer - from the level of gene expression to nitrogen's role in global climate change. First, I present evidence for a positive correlation between the bacterial genes that encode for gaseous nitrogen production (i.e., nirS) and the 15N/14N of soil extractable nitrate pools across an array of terrestrial ecosystems. Second, I demonstrate how these local-scale results fit with our work on ecosystem-scale nitrogen isotope budgets, where we quantify a uniformly small isotope effect (i.e., < 1 per mil) of nitrogen leaching losses from tropical rainforest to highly disturbed arid sites. Third, I present results from our global isotope model, which is based on results from our field investigations, providing a new nitrogen "benchmarking" scheme for global computational models and climate change forecasts. Finally, I move to a new research frontier where we have been developing a technique to measure the nitrogen isotope composition of ancient terrestrial plant compounds (i.e., chlorins) buried in the soil. This research aims to address the response of the nitrogen cycle to glacial-interglacial transitions over millennia, which is beyond the window of experimental testing. Together, this research highlights the utility of nitrogen isotope composition in addressing the myriad scales of

  16. Coatings to reduce wood preservative leaching.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Mojgan; Cooper, Paul

    2010-08-15

    The efficiency of semitransparent penetrating stains to reduce leaching of wood preservative components was evaluated. Five commercial wood deck finishes were applied to untreated and chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quat (ACQ), and copper azole (CA) treated wood, and leachates were collected and analyzed during 3 years of natural weathering exposure in Toronto, Canada. All stains evaluated effectively reduced the cumulative leaching of all inorganic preservative components by about 60% on average. Although most coatings showed significant film degradation starting around 12 months, the reduced leaching persisted even after 3 years. This suggests that temporary protection of wood with a coating during the early stages of use resulted in long-term reduction in preservative leaching potential. A two-week screening leaching test was able to predict the long-term leaching performance of different coatings reasonably well. Cured coating glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid coating viscosity were the most important variables affecting a leaching prediction model. To effectively reduce leaching of preservative components from treated wood, coatings should have Tg low enough to withstand stresses caused by freezing in winter and have adequate viscosity to form a barrier film layer on the wood surface. PMID:20704213

  17. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestiates the levels of metals such as oxoa...

  18. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral Processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestimates the levels of metals such as oxo...

  19. Leaching adapted for metals in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Fristad, W.E.; Weerts, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    The technical hurdle in metal leaching is coupling a leaching process, which effectively removes the contaminant metals from the soil, with a recovery process that isolates the metal in a form suitable for disposal or reuse. Problems associated with this process are described.

  20. Orchard nitrogen management: Which nitrogen source is best?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal management of nitrogen fertility in pecan orchards leads to a loss of nutmeat yield and quality, but also a waste of natural resources and money. This article reviews several basic guiding principles useful to orchard managers when developing nitrogen management strategies, and determini...

  1. Phytoremediation of a nitrogen-contaminated desert soil by native shrubs and microbial processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Glenn, Edward P.; Jordan, Fiona; Waugh, W. Joseph

    2016-02-24

    Here, we combined phytoremediation and soil microbial nitrification and denitrification cycles to reduce nitrate and ammonium levels at a former uranium mill site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Ammonia used in uranium extraction was present throughout the soil profile. Sulfate,applied as sulfuric acid to solubilize uranium, was also present in the soil. These contaminants were leaching from a denuded area where a tailings pile had been removed and were migrating away from the site in groundwater. We planted the source area with two deep-rooted native shrubs, Atriplex cansescens and Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and irrigated transplants for 11 years at 20% the ratemore » of potential evapotranspiration to stimulate growth, then discontinued irrigation for 4 years. Over 15 years, total nitrogen levels dropped 82%, from 347 to 64 mg kg–1. Analysis of δ15N supported our hypothesis that coupled microbial nitrification and denitrification processes were responsible for the loss of N. Soil sulfate levels changed little; however, evapotranspiration reduced sulfate leaching into the aquifer. For arid sites where traditional pump-and-treat methods are problematic, the Monument Valley data suggest that alternatives that incorporate native plants and rely on vadose zone biogeochemistry and hydrology could be a sustainable remediation for nitrogen contaminated soil.« less

  2. PRESERVATIVE LEACHING FROM WEATHERED CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), arsenic concentrations exceed the toxicity characteris...

  3. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  4. Relative leaching and aquatic toxicity of pressure-treated wood products using batch leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Stook, Kristin; Tolaymat, Thabet; Ward, Marnie; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Bitton, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Size-reduced samples of southern yellow pine dimensional lumber, each treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimethyldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample was tested as well. The batch leaching tests followed methodology prescribed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The wood samples were first size-reduced and then leached using four different leaching solutions (synthetic landfill leachate, synthetic rainwater, deionized water, and synthetic seawater). CCA-treated wood leached greater concentrations of arsenic and copper relative to chromium, with copper leaching more with the TCLP and synthetic seawater. Copper leached at greater concentrations from the arsenic-free preservatives relative to CCA. Arsenic leached from CCA-treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All of the arsenic-free alternatives displayed a greater degree of aquatic toxicity compared to CCA. Invertebrate and algal assays were more sensitive than Microtox. Examination of the relative leaching of the preservative compounds indicated that the arsenic-free preservatives were advantageous over CCA with respect to waste disposal and soil contamination issues but potentially posed a greater risk to aquatic ecosystems. PMID:15667090

  5. Nitrogen storage with cover crops and nitrogen fertilization in tilled and non-tilled soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher cost of nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increase in the price of gasoline and increased N leaching from croplands necessitate that soil N be conserved and N fertilization rate be reduced. Proper crop and N management practices may increase soil N conservation and reduce N fertilization rate...

  6. TILLAGE, COVER CROPS, AND NITROGEN FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SOIL NITROGEN AND COTTON AND SORGHUM YIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable soil and crop management practices that reduce soil erosion and nitrogen (N) leaching, conserve soil organic matter, and optimize cotton and sorghum yields still remain a challenge. We examined the influence of three tillage practices (no-till, strip till, and chisel till ), four cover c...

  7. Severe leaching of trachytic glass without devitrification, Terceira, Azores

    SciTech Connect

    Mungall, J.E.; Martin, R.F. )

    1994-01-01

    Pumice produced during the subplinian phase of eruption of a peralkaline trachyte lava on the island of Terceira, Azores, has undergone extensive leaching at ambient conditions by groundwater, while remaining in a glassy state. Over 25% of F, Na, K, Si, Fe, Ti, and Mn originally present has been removed, whereas U, Al, Nb, Ca, Y, and Rb show smaller but significant losses. Thorium , Zr, Hf, Ta, and Lu have remained immobile. Water content (measured as LOI) has increased up to tenfold, whereas the Sr content has risen by up to 80%. The absence of devitrification requires that leached elements escaped by diffusing through the glass; a coefficient of chemical diffusion D[sub Na] between 1.8 X 10[sup [minus]19] cm[sup 2] s[sup [minus]1] and 6.1 X 10[sup [minus]19] cm[sup 2] s[sup [minus]1] has been calculated, in excellent agreement with previously published experimentally derived values for comparably low temperatures. Water has not replaced the leached cations on a charge-equivalent basis, a finding that requires an explanation other than simple binary interdiffusion. The authors suggest that a simultaneous influx of molecular water and cation exchange between Na[sup +] in the glass and H[sup +] in the groundwater opens the glass structure and frees cations, which can diffuse outward by hydrolysis of bridging oxygen atoms. Reported mobilities have important implications for such diverse fields as igneous petrology, nuclear waste management, and agriculture.

  8. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  9. Losses of Ammonia and Nitrate from Agriculture and Their Effect on Nitrogen Recovery in the European Union and the United States between 1900 and 2050.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Hans J M; Bouwman, Lex; Cassman, Kenneth G; van Es, Harold M; McCrackin, Michelle L; Beusen, Arthur H W

    2015-03-01

    Historical trends and levels of nitrogen (N) budgets and emissions to air and water in the European Union and the United States are markedly different. Agro-environmental policy approaches also differ, with emphasis on voluntary or incentive-based schemes in the United States versus a more regulatory approach in the European Union. This paper explores the implications of these differences for attaining long-term policy targets for air and water quality. Nutrient surplus problems were more severe in the European Union than in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s. The EU Nitrates and National Emission Ceilings directives contributed to decreases in fertilizer use, N surplus, and ammonia (NH) emissions, whereas in the United States they stabilized, although NH emissions are still increasing. These differences were analyzed using statistical data for 1900-2005 and the global IMAGE model. IMAGE could reproduce NH emissions and soil N surpluses at different scales (European Union and United States, country and state) and N loads in the Rhine and Mississippi. The regulation-driven changes during the past 25 yr in the European Union have reduced public concerns and have brought agricultural N loads to the aquatic environment closer to US levels. Despite differences in agro-environmental policies and agricultural structure (more N-fixing soybean and more spatially separated feed and livestock production in the United States than in the European Union), current N use efficiency in US and EU crop production is similar. IMAGE projections for the IAASTD-baseline scenario indicate that N loading to the environment in 2050 will be similar to current levels. In the United States, environmental N loads will remain substantially smaller than in the European Union, whereas agricultural production in 2050 in the United States will increase by 30% relative to 2005, as compared with an increase of 8% in the European Union. However, in the United States, even rigorous mitigation

  10. California Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California N Index User Manual is designed to help you become accustomed to the software environment in which the N Index runs. This manual will use an example scenario to demonstrate how to use the N Index to assess nitrogen losses. The objective of this theoretical example is to guide you towa...

  11. [Nitrogen and water cycling of typical cropland in the North China Plain].

    PubMed

    Pei, Hong-wei; Shen, Yan-jun; Liu, Chang-ming

    2015-01-01

    Intensive fertilization and irrigation associated increasing grain production has led to serious groundwater depletion and soil/water pollution in the North China Plain (NCP). Intensive agriculture changes the initial mass and energy balance, and also results in huge risks to the water/soil resources and food security regionally. Based on the research reports on the nitrogen cycle and water cycle in typical cropland (winter wheat and summer corn) in the NCP during the past 20 years, and the meteorological data, field experiments and surveys, we calculated the nitrogen cycle and water-cycle for this typical cropland. Annual total nitrogen input were 632 kg N . hm-2, including 523 kg N . hm-2 from commercial fertilizer, 74 kg N . hm-2 from manure, 23 kg N . hm-2 from atmosphere, and 12 kg N . hm-2 from irrigation. All of annual outputs summed to 532 kg N . hm-2 including 289 kg N . hm-2 for crop, 77 kg N . hm-2 staying in soil profile, leaching 104 kg N . hm-2, 52 kg N . hm-2 for ammonia volatilization, 10 kg N . hm-2 loss in nitrification and denitrification. Uncertainties of the individual cases and the summary process lead to the unbalance of nitrogen. For the dominant parts of the field water cycle, annual precipitation was 557 mm, irrigation was 340 mm, while 762 mm was for evapotranspiration and 135 mm was for deep percolation. Considering uncertainties in the nitrogen and water cycles, coupled experiments based on multi-disciplines would be useful for understanding mechanisms for nitrogen and water transfer processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere-continuum (SPAC) , and the interaction between nitrogen and water, as well as determining the critical threshold values for sustainability of soil and water resources in the NCP. PMID:25985681

  12. Use of open-path FTIR and inverse dispersion technique to quantify gaseous nitrogen loss from an intensive vegetable production site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei; Suter, Helen; Lam, Shu Kee; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2014-09-01

    An open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic technique in combination with a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model (WindTrax) can be used to simultaneously measure gaseous emissions of N2O, NH3, CH4 and CO2. We assessed the capability of this technique for measuring NH3 and N2O emissions following the application of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2), Nitrophoska (NPK) and chicken manure on a celery farm at Boneo, Victoria, during April and May 2013. We found that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax method was able to measure the diurnal variation in NH3 flux from the field site following application of chicken manure with measured emissions ranging from approximately 0.1-9.8 kg NH3-N ha-1 day-1. The OP-FTIR/WindTrax method also detected a diurnal variation in N2O flux of 1.5-6.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1 and N2O flux increased in response to application of the Ca(NO3)2. We concluded that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax technique can quantify gaseous N loss from vegetable production systems.

  13. Egg production and associated losses of carbon, nitrogen and fatty acids from maternal biomass in Calanus finmarchicus before the spring bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Anderson, Thomas R.; Pond, David W.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2009-11-01

    We present concurrent data on ingestion, egg production and the loss of maternal biomass in pre-spring bloom female Calanus finmarchicus incubated under conditions representative of those in situ in the North Atlantic. A balanced metabolic budget was constructed and used to examine the relative importance of ingestion and biomass for fuelling egg production during the incubations. Ingested carbon was not sufficient to meet the observed demands for egg production. More than 80% of the carbon utilised by the females was instead derived from their biomass. Fatty acid analysis demonstrated that the storage reserves, 20:1 ( n-9) and 22:1 ( n-11), were virtually absent before experimentation began, and therefore could not have been used to supply the carbon required for egg production during the incubations. The C:N mass-specific ratio of the biomass utilised was 4.1, suggesting that the females had instead catabolised protein in order to meet their metabolic demands. These results suggest that C. finmarchicus adopts a sacrificial reproductive strategy when food availability is low.

  14. Leaching zinc from spent catalyst: process optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyong; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, C; Zhang, Zebiao; Zhang, Libo; Fernández, Y; Menéndez, J A

    2010-04-15

    The spent catalyst from vinyl acetate synthesis contains large quantity of zinc. The present study attempts to leach zinc using a mixture of ammonia, ammonium carbonate and water solution, after microwave treatment. The effect of important parameters such as leaching time, liquid/solid ratio and the ammonia concentration was investigated and the process conditions were optimized using surface response methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). The optimum condition for leaching of zinc from spent catalyst was identified to be a leaching time of 2.50 h, a liquid/solid ratio of 6 and ammonia concentration 5.37 mol/L. A maximum of 97% of zinc was recovered under the optimum experimental conditions. The proposed model equation using RSM has shown good agreement with the experimental data, with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.95. The samples were characterized before and after leaching using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscope (SEM). PMID:20060224

  15. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  16. Dairy Slurry Application Method Effects on Ammonia Emission and Nitrate Leaching in No-till Corn Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To reduce odors and conserve dairy slurry nitrogen (N) for subsequent crop use, various slurry application techniques have been tested. Reductions in ammonia (NH3) emissions through slurry incorporation or other soil management techniques may, however, increase nitrate (NO3) leaching. Possible trade...

  17. Rapid transport and transformation of phosphorus species during the leaching of poultry manure amended soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Courtney; Cade-Menun, Barbara; Liu, Corey; Hill, Jane

    2015-04-01

    The loss of phosphorus (P) from soils due to leaching is a major concern in heavily fertilized agricultural regions. The mobility and transformation of P species will depend on the source of manure fertilizer, leaching regime, and the extent of soil P saturation within the soil profile. We investigate spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of P species within a poultry manure-amended soil at two depths (0-5, 10-15 cm) as well as leachate P fractions during 10 weeks of leaching. Leachate P was primarily composed of dissolved fractions (soluble reactive P; dissolved unreactive P) and reached a maximum in the fourth week of leaching. In soils, the degree of P saturation (80%) and water extractable P (9 mg kg-1) were also greatest in week 4. 31P NMR spectra of the 0-5 cm depth indicate that surface soils were most similar to the poultry manure in week 4. During peak leaching, the proportion of orthophosphate (OrthoP) at the soil surface (0-5 cm; 80%) was greater than that from the lowest depth (10-15 cm; 72%), which contained relatively larger proportions of monoester-(17%) and diester-P classes (10%). Poultry manure likely contributed to the mobile pool of P species, including OrthoP, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (myo-IHP), and nucleic acids. The appearance of neo- and D-chiro-IHP, as well as phospholipid signals during the leaching period indicate possible short-term (<10 week) contributions of organic P to the generation and leaching of OrthoP, under P-saturated conditions. Further work is needed to determine how fertilization and leaching will affect the mobility and transformation of P species across a wider range of soil types. Keywords: Phytate, organic phosphorus, degree of phosphorus saturation, soil, leachate, poultry manure

  18. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains

    PubMed Central

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Background Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). Results In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72–115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. Conclusions The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:23658148

  19. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  20. Effects of dehydrated lucerne and soya bean meal on milk production and composition, nutrient digestion, and methane and nitrogen losses in dairy cows receiving two different forages.

    PubMed

    Doreau, M; Ferlay, A; Rochette, Y; Martin, C

    2014-03-01

    Dehydrated lucerne is used as a protein source in dairy cow rations, but little is known about the effects of lucerne on greenhouse gas production by animals. Eight Holstein dairy cows (average weight: 582 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. They received diets based on either maize silage (M) or grass silage (G) (45% of diet on dry matter (DM) basis), with either soya bean meal (15% of diet DM) completed with beet pulp (15% of diet DM) (SP) or dehydrated lucerne (L) (30% of diet DM) as protein sources; MSP, ML, GSP and GL diets were calculated to meet energy requirements for milk production by dairy cows and degradable protein for rumen microbes. Dry matter intake (DMI) did not differ among diets (18.0 kg/day DMI); milk production was higher with SP diets than with L diets (26.0 v. 24.1 kg/day), but milk production did not vary with forage type. Milk fatty-acid (FA) composition was modified by both forage and protein sources: L and G diets resulted in less saturated FA, less linoleic acid, more trans-monounsaturated FA, and more linolenic acid than SP and M diets, respectively. Enteric methane (CH4) production, measured by the SF6 tracer method, was higher for G diets than for M diets, but did not differ with protein source. The same effects were observed when CH4 was expressed per kg milk. Minor effects of diets on rumen fermentation pattern were observed. Manure CH4 emissions estimated from faecal organic matter were negatively related to diet digestibility and were thus higher for L than SP diets, and higher for M than G diets; the resulting difference in total CH4 production was small. Owing to diet formulation constraints, N intake was higher for SP than for L diets; interaction between forage type and protein source was significant for N intake. The same statistical effects were found for N in milk. Faecal and urinary N losses were determined from total faeces and urine collection. Faecal N output was lower for M than for G diets but

  1. Anthropogenic nitrogen sources and exports in a village-scale catchment in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenzhi; Hong, Huasheng; Zhang, Yuzhen; Chen, Nengwang; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    An experimental village-scale catchment was selected for investigation of nitrogen (N) sources and exports. The mean N application rate over the catchment was 350.2 kg N ha(-1), but this rate varied spatially and temporally. The N leaching loss rate varied from 8.1 to 52.7 kg N ha(-1) under different land use regimes. The average N leaching loss rate was 13.4 kg N ha(-1) over the whole catchment, representing about 3.8% of the total N inputs. The N export rate through stormflows was 28.8 kg N ha(-1), about 8.2% of the total N inputs. Seasonal patterns showed that 95% of N exports through stormflows occurred during July to September in 2002. Overall, the maximum riverine N exports were 12.1% of total N inputs and 15.5% of the inorganic fertilizer N applied. Understanding N sources and exports in a village-scale catchment can provide a knowledge base for amelioration of diffuse agricultural pollution. PMID:16528595

  2. Assessing the Fate of Nitrogen Deposition on the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roybal, C.; Belnap, J.; Floyd-Hanna, L.; Crews, T.; Reed, S.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is a growing concern in the western U.S., and is known to modify ecosystem composition and function. Arches National Park is near an identified 'hotspot' of N pollution in the Southwest U.S. There is real concern regarding how the area's drylands will respond to elevated deposition. Yet, our understanding of potential responses remains poor. Uncertainties persist regarding how these systems will hold and cycle additional N, and how N inputs will affect other aspects of biogeochemistry. We used a field fertilization experiment in Arches NP to explore three questions: 1) does added N stay within soil and for how long; 2) are N additions primarily utilized by native grass and the soil microbial community; and 3) is N leaving the system as gas (NOx, N2O) or in leached forms? Results indicate added N remained in the plots even 90 days after fertilization: soil NO3- concentrations were consistently elevated and were related to the amount of fertilization. Significant amounts of N left the system through leaching and as gas (N2O and NOx); in particular, NOx losses were greater in the plots receiving 8 kg N/ha/yr relative to the control plots, a pattern that matched soil NO3- concentrations. While treatment effects were significant, soil moisture was the strongest control over gas efflux rates, and we observed significant interactions between fertilization treatment and soil moisture at the time of sample collection. These data support the idea that N strongly interacts with rainfall patterns to regulate pulse-driven losses of excess N. There was no treatment effect in foliar N concentrations, but treatment effects on soil P concentrations and microbial biomass stoichiometry suggest that N addition has a broad influence on other biogeochemical dynamics. Data suggest that this arid, low N ecosystem passes a threshold of ecological change at low levels of N, although much of the additional N is relatively quickly lost from the system.

  3. Factors Controlling Nitrogen Fluxes in Groundwater in Agricultural Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, L.; Green, C. T.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Predictions of effects of land use changes on water quality require identification of the relative importance of geochemical and hydrologic factors. To understand the factors controlling the transport of nitrogen in groundwater, vertical fluxes of water and solutes were estimated for 13 aquifers in agricultural areas located in California, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin. The aquifers are overlain by unsaturated zones with thicknesses ranging from 2.5 to 100 m. Precipitation ranges from 19 to 132 cm/yr and irrigation ranges from 0 to 120 cm/yr. Main crop types include corn, soybeans, forage, wheat, and cotton. A 1-dimensional mathematical model was developed to estimate vertical N transport in response to N inputs on the land surface from chemical fertilizer, manure and atmospheric deposition. Simulated vertical profiles of O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, Cl- and atmospheric age tracers were matched to observations by adjusting parameters for recharge rate, unsaturated zone travel time, N leaching ratio (defined as leaching fraction of N reaching water table of N input at land surface), Cl- leaching ratio, O2 reduction rate and denitrification rate. Results indicated that vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table were affected by both geochemical and physical factors. High vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table are associated with high N input at the land surface. Values of Cl- leaching ratios were less than 1 (0.42 to 1) likely as a result of runoff and exported harvested crops. N leaching ratios were lower (0.1 to 0.6), consistent with additional N losses such as denitrification and volatilization. The sites with high leaching ratios for both N and Cl tended to be those with high recharge rates and low ET loss, defined as the fraction of applied water lost to ET. Modeled zero-order denitrification rates in the saturated zone varied within an order of magnitude with a maximum rate of 1.6 mg

  4. Dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) application in acidic sandy soil in reducing leaching of phosphorus and heavy metals-a column leaching study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuangen; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe; Stoffella, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    A column leaching study was designed to investigate the leaching potential of phosphorus (P) and heavy metals from acidic sandy soils applied with dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers containing varying amounts of DPR material and N-Viro soils. DPR fertilizers were made from DPR materials mixing with N-Viro soils at the ratios of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 %, and applied in acidic sandy soils at the level of 100 mg available P per kilogram soil. A control and a soluble P chemical fertilizer were also included. The amended soils were incubated at room temperature with 70 % field water holding capacity for 21 days before packed into a soil column and subjected to leaching. Seven leaching events were conducted at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 70, respectively, and 258.9 mL of deionized water was applied at each leaching events. The leachate was collected for the analyses of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), major elements, and heavy metals. DPR fertilizer application resulted in elevations up to 1 unit in pH, 7-10 times in EC, and 20-40 times in K and Ca concentrations, but 3-10 times reduction in P concentration in the leachate as compared with the chemical fertilizer or the control. After seven leaching events, DPR fertilizers with adequate DPR materials significantly reduced cumulative leaching losses of Fe, P, Mn, Cu, and Zn by 20, 55, 3.7, 2.7, and 2.5 times than chemical fertilizer or control. Even though higher cumulative losses of Pb, Co, and Ni were observed after DPR fertilizer application, the loss of Pb, Co, and Ni in leachate was <0.10 mg (in total 1,812 mL leachate). Significant correlations of pH (negative) and DOC (positive) with Cu, Pb, and Zn (P<0.01) in leachate were observed. The results indicated that DPR fertilizers had a great advantage over the soluble chemical fertilizer in reducing P loss from the acidic sandy soil with minimal likelihood of heavy metal risk to the water environment. pH elevation and high

  5. Assessing pesticide leaching under climate change: The role of climate input uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Karin; Larsbo, Mats; Moeys, Julien; Jarvis, Nicholas J.; Kjellström, Erik; Lewan, Elisabet

    2013-04-01

    amounts and temperatures in periods that are critical for pesticide losses from drained clay soils in Sweden (spring and autumn) and to the choice of the pesticide application date. The choice of a specific climate model projection could not only change the magnitude of the predicted future losses but also the direction of change independent from pesticide properties and application season and thus, strongly influence our estimations of future changes in pesticide leaching risks and thereby linked threats to surface water quality. Although the parameter uncertainty was relatively large, 50 to 80% of the different parameter sets predicted a similar change in pesticide leaching losses from present to future, which underlined the impact of climate input uncertainty on the results.

  6. Pyrolysis kinetics of acid-leached rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.H.; Chang, F.W.; Lo, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    A highly pure mixture of carbon and silica was obtained on pyrolysis rice husk leached with acid at high temperature in a nonoxidizing atmosphere. The product was suitable for use as a starting material in the manufacture of silicon nitride powder. The effect of treatment including the kind and concentration of acid and the pyrolysis temperature on the constituents of the specimen was presented. Kinetic tests on pyrolysis of rice husk in a nitrogen atmosphere were carried out with a thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) technique at heating rates 2, 3, and 5 K/min. The results indicated that thermal degradation of rice husk consisted of two distinct pyrolysis stages. The corresponding kinetic parameters including the activation energy were determined. A reasonable pyrolysis mechanism was proposed, which agreed satisfactorily with the experimental results.

  7. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Hearing Loss What is Hearing Loss? Hearing loss is a common problem caused by ... sec Click to watch this video Types of Hearing Loss Hearing loss comes in many forms. It can ...

  8. Soil Warming Alters the Nitrogen Cycle: Ecosystem Implications and Feedbacks to the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, S. M.; Melillo, J. M.; Johnson, J. E.; Mohan, J. E.; Steudler, P. A.; Bowles, F. P.

    2008-12-01

    Increases in soil temperatures associated with global warming have the potential to accelerate nitrogen turnover in soils, which could alter other biogeochemical processes and eventually affect the structure of these forests. Over the past five years we have been studying soil and plant responses to soil warming in large plots in a deciduous stand at Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts. We have heated the soil 5°C above ambient and measured nitrogen cycling parameters including in situ net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification, nitrogen leaching and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes. We have also measured various aspects of the carbon cycle including soil respiration and carbon accumulation in vegetation. Over the first five years of the study, we observed a mean annual increase in the net nitrogen mineralized in the warmed plot of 23.8 kg N ha-1. While nitrification rates were low throughout the five years in the control plot, they increased in the warmed plot to account for over 25% of the total net nitrogen mineralized in year five. The increase in nitrogen mineralization stimulated tree growth and carbon storage in woody tissue in the warmed plot. The increased carbon storage in the trees compensated for more than half of the carbon lost from the soils due to accelerated decay of soil organic matter and so reduced the magnitude of the positive feedback to the climate system due to soil warming. We hypothesize that the increase in nitrification we observed will eventually "open" the nitrogen cycle and make gaseous and solution losses more likely. To date, however, we have measured no major losses of nitrous oxide or solution losses of nitrate in response to soil warming. Trees with the capacity to use nitrate may have a competitive advantage in a warmer world. Nitrate-using plants have an inducible enzyme that transforms nitrate to ammonium, a key building block for producing essential amino acids and proteins. Studies by our research group and by others have

  9. LEACHING BOUNDARY MOVEMENT IN SOLIDIFIED/STABILIZED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of the leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions found that acids attacked the waste form from the surface toward the center. harp leaching boundary was identified in every leached sample, using pH color indicators. he movement of the leaching bo...

  10. Leaching of chalcopyrite with sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlapalli, Ravinder Kumar

    Chalcopyrite is the most important copper mineral source and also a refractory mineral for leaching. Several processing routes have been proposed to overcome the environmental problems related to copper extraction from chalcopyrite. In this study, the leaching of chalcopyrite has been investigated with a new reagent sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Experiments were carried out in two stages: conversion of chalcopyrite to cupric oxide with NaOCl solution in the first stage, followed by dissolution of the cupric oxide to cupric ion with 1 normal sulfuric acid at room temperature in the second stage. In the first stage leaching, the initial pH varied from 12.5 to 13.7; the temperature, from 35 to 75°C; NaOCl concentration, from 0.2 to 0.85 molar; and the chalcopyrite dosage, from 1 to 10 grams/500 ml. The leaching conversion showed a maximum (68.3%) around pH 13.2 at 0.5 molar of hypochlorite concentration and 65°C in 1 hour. The reagent consumption ratio, defined as the number of moles of hypochlorite consumed to leach one mole of chalcopyrite is found to be much higher than its stoichiometric ratio of 8.5. It reached 57.6 when the solid dosage was 1 gram/500 ml and decreased to 12.9 when the solid dosage was increased to 10 grams/500 ml. It was found that the leaching rate of chalcopyrite in the first stage was controlled by chemical reaction with the activation energy of 50.2 kJ/mol (12.0 kcal/mol). A leaching scheme was identified in which 98% chalcopyrite was leached by adding hypochlorite stock solution stepwise in less than three hours.

  11. Bromide leaching on a Piedmont toposequence

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.; Cassel, D.K.

    1999-10-01

    Solute leaching on the field-scale is a poorly understood, complex process affected by local soil variation and landscape position. The authors hypothesized that Br ion leaching is a function of landscape position in a well-structured, clayey soil on a Piedmont toposequence that had been in pasture for the previous 30 yr. Dry KBr, mixed with sand at a ratio of 12 g sand to 1 g KBr, was surface-applied at a rate of 314 kg Br ha{sup {minus}1} on 24 May 1994 along two transects and allowed to move into the soil under natural rainfall conditions. Soil cores 0.90- and 2.00-m-long were taken 13 June and 20 Dec. 1994, respectively. The cores were subdivided into increments 10 or 15 cm, oven dried, and analyzed for Br. Centers of Br mass at both sampling times were significantly deeper in the footslope position compared with the shoulder and linear slope positions combined, which was possibly due to lower clay contents and lower water retention for the footslope vs. the linear and shoulder slopes combined, respectively. Predicted leaching depths were calculated from measured soil water content profiles and were positively correlated with observed depths to the center of Br mass for the Dec. 20 sampling. Anion leaching may be partially controlled by landscape position, and soils susceptible to initial rapid leaching may not necessarily be susceptible to sustained rapid leaching throughout the year.

  12. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  13. Nitrate-nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for identification of nitrate sources and dominant nitrogen cycle processes in a tile-drained dryland agricultural field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural systems are a leading source of reactive nitrogen to aquatic and atmospheric ecosystems. Natural d15Nnitrate and d18Onitrate are used to identify the dominant nitrogen cycle processes and sources of NO3- leached from a tile-drained, dryland agricultural field. Tile-drain water discharge...

  14. A comparative study of nitrate leaching from soils of differing textures under similar climatic and cropping conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinten, A. J. A.; Vivian, B. J.; Wright, F.; Howard, R. S.

    1994-07-01

    This study reports a direct comparison of nitrate leaching on a field scale from a sandy soil overlying a relatively impermeable glacial till ( Ksat = 30-50 mm day -1), with that from a clay loam soil overlying a similar glacial till ( Ksat = 2-8 mm day -1), under nearly identical climatic and cropping conditions. Drained plots were installed at each site, and N application rate on the plots, which grew spring barley, varied from 0 to 210 kg N ha -1. Nitrate concentrations in drainage water from the two sites were measured using a simple flow-weighted sampling device and drainflow was measured using tipping bucket flow meters. Total leaching losses (including an estimate of deep percolation) in the first year of the comparison were not significantly higher on the sandy site (38 ± 11 kg N ha -1 at 150 kg N ha -1 N fertiliser application) than on the clay loam site (27 ± 4 kg N ha -1). In the subsequent 2 years, leaching losses increased at the sandy loam site. At the clay loam site leaching losses were much lower (7-11 kg N ha -1) in the final year). Timing of cultivation was an important factor influencing the amount of leaching in the clay loam soil. The effect of applied N fertiliser on nitrate leaching was small at both sites, except in the final year at the sandy site, which leached 105 kg N ha -1 at the highest fertiliser rate. The interpretation of these results was aided by concurrent chloride leaching experiments. These experiments showed that the residence time of a substantial proportion of chloride (40-50%) was longer than 1 year. This may be because of diffusion and slow convection into the glacial till horizons, where the residence time is long.

  15. Nitrate leaching concentrations in the Netherlands decreased more than expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, Leo; Fraters, Dico; Wattel, Esther

    2014-05-01

    The implementation of EU environmental directives and national policies into measures has led to a decrease in nitrogen (N) surplus in agriculture, notably at dairy farms in the 1995-2002 period. In addition, N emissions to air from agricultural fields have been reduced, and atmospheric N deposition on nature areas subsequently lessened. The nitrate concentrations in root zone leaching at dairy farms and nature areas in the Sand region of the Netherlands also decreased. These decreases were larger than would be expected based on the decreases in net loads. We have formulated and tested hypotheses to explain these extra decreases at farms and in nature areas. Dairy farms cover about 60% of the area in the sandy region of the Netherlands. They have shown a nitrate leaching decrease of 100 mg/l during the 1992-2010 period (67%). The N-surplus at dairy farms decreased from about 340 to 180 kg/ha in this period (47%). Other farm management factors may have caused the additional decrease in root zone leaching concentration on farm level. The main potential factors are the ratio grassland - arable land, the grazing intensity and the ratio artificial fertilizer N - manure N. There are no indications that the ratio grassland - arable land or the ratio artificial fertilizer N - manure N significantly changed between 1992 and 2010. The mowing percentage, as an indicator for grazing intensity, increased from about 180 to 290% in the study period. About 80% (80 mg/l) of the decrease at dairy farms can be attributed to a lower N-surplus and about 20% (20 mg/l) is postulated to be caused by an increasing mowing percentage or less fodder grazing. Nature areas cover about 20% of the area in the Sand region. Nitrate concentrations in root zone leaching in nature areas showed a decrease of 55% in 2010 compared to 1990. Yet in rainwater, the concentration decrease is only 40%. Several factors may cause an additional decrease in nitrate concentration particularly an increase of plant

  16. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  17. P losses in soil columns amended with compost and digestate from municipal solid wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Albacete, Marta; Cartagena, M. Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Sludge's, manures and compost applied to agricultural soils in high quantities and long-term application to increase crop productivity, result in accumulation of soil phosphorous (P). Soluble P is directly available to algae (Sonzogni et al., 1982) and thus particularly relevant to water quality degradation. Transport of P from agricultural soils to surface waters has been linked to eutrophication in fresh water and estuaries (Sharpley and Lemunyon, 1998). Almost 50% of stored water in Spain is degraded by eutrophication processes that cause the proliferation of algae and other organisms and a decrease in oxygen content (Environmental Profile of Spain 2005). Fertilizers and biodegradable wastes application rates in agriculture are based on nitrogen requirements. This results in a P supply that is in excess of crops needs since the ratio of P to N in waste use to be greater than required by plants (Smith, 1995). While surface runoff is an important pathway of phosphorus losses from agricultural lands, significant losses can also occur via leaching thought soils. Leaching tests are important for assessing the risk of release of potential pollutants from biodegradable wastes into groundwater or surface water. Percolation tests also get information about the interaction of organic waste with soils. The study was conducted according to the percolation leaching test CEN/TS 14405 "Characterization of waste-Leaching behavior test- Up-flow percolation test" with three different soils mixed with organic wastes from msw (compost and digestato) and an inorganic fertilizer (NaH2PO4). Each soil was amended with the P sources at rates of 100 kg P ha-1. Leachates were collected and analyzed for each column for dissolved reactive P by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP) following USEPA Method 3050A digestion (USEPA, 1995). The fact that P sorption capacity (Xmax, PSI) of the soils was determined using Langmuiŕs isotherms and the P forms from organic

  18. Ecological Engineering Practices for the Reduction of Excess Nitrogen in Human-Influenced Landscapes: A Guide for Watershed Managers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in freshwater systems, estuaries, and coastal areas has well-documented deleterious effects on ecosystems. Ecological engineering practices (EEPs) may be effective at decreasing nonpoint source N leaching to surface and groundwater. However, few studies have s...

  19. The mineralogical phase transformation of invisible gold-concentrate by microwave heating, and enhancement of their gold leaching rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Geonyoung; Kim, Bongju; Choi, Nagchoul; Park*, Cheonyoung

    2015-04-01

    In this study, in order to obtain the maximum Au leaching rate, an invisible gold concentrate sample was microwave-treated and a thiourea leaching experiment was performed. It is found that gold exists as invisible as a result of observation with an optical microscope and an electron microscope. As the invisible gold concentrate sample was exposed to microwave longer, its temperature and weight loss were increased together and its S content was decreased. The conditions for the maximum Au leaching rate and the fast leaching effect were a particle size of -325×400 mesh, exposure to microwave for 70 minutes, 1.0 g of thiourea, 0.0504 g of sodium sulfite and 0.425 g of ferric sulfate. However, the condition under which Au was leached out to the maximum was applied to the control sample, but its Au leaching rate was just in a range of 78% to 88%. Such results suggest that the effect of sodium sulfite and ferric sulfate was more effective in the microwave-treated sample than in the control sample. Therefore, it was confirmed that the complete and very fast Au leaching can be achieved by means of the microwave pretreatment of invisible gold concentrate.

  20. Farmland Runoff of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Songhuajiang Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Zhaohui; Song, Xinshan; Liu, Jianshe; Dong, Jianwei

    2010-05-01

    Qianguo Irrigation District is typical soda saline-alkaline land of Songhuajiang Watershed, where the excess irrigation for leaching Na+ from the root zone has aggravated the non-point source pollution (NPS) from agricultural system and therefore threatened the water quality of Chagan Lake, a national nature reserve. A field experiment with independent irrigation system was conducted to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in surface water of paddy field under different hydrotechnic conditions and their potential environmental impact in 2009. The results showed that split N fertilizer application with four times and single basal application of P fertilizer greatly increased the concentration of nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N), total nitrogen (TN), soluble phosphorus (SP) and total phosphorus in surface water, and then subsequently declined. During all the experimental period, the concentration of N and P in paddy field runoff in the investigated area were TN 1.08~3.90 mg/L, TP 1.32~3.87 mg/L respectively, higher than the surface water quality criteria of Class III and Class V in China, therefore N and P losses from paddy soils during each drainage were contributing to downstream water eutrophication. N and P in runoff mainly consist of particulate phosphorus (PP) and NO3--N, respectively. During rainfall or paddy growth period, the concentration of N and P in the runoff tended to temporal decrease, but showed great fluctuation during irrigation and heavy rainfall. Pollution load of the experimental plot showed that either N and P loss amount or the variation coefficient of TN and TP concentration in drainage was significantly positively correlated with the hydrotechnic conditions. N and P runoff from paddy field directly affected the eutrophication level of offtakes and hence deteriorated the downstream aquatic environment. The ammonia concentration of the return water from farmland was rather high, thus threatening the fish farming in

  1. Leaching of Chalcopyrite with Sodium Hypochlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlapalli, Ravinder K.; Cho, Eung Ha; Yang, Ray Y. K.

    2010-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted on the leaching of chalcopyrite with NaOCl (sodium hypochlorite). Experiments were carried out in the following two stages: (1) Chalcopyrite was converted to CuO (cupric oxide) with a sodium hypochlorite solution, and (2) cupric oxide was dissolved to cupric ions with 1 normal sulfuric acid at room temperature. In the first-stage leaching, the initial pH varied from 12.5 to 13.7, the temperature from 35 °C to 75 °C, the sodium hypochlorite concentration from 0.2 to 0.85 molar, and the chalcopyrite dosage from 1 to 10 g/500 ml. The leaching conversion showed a maximum (68.3 pct) around a pH of 13.2 at 0.5 molar OCl- (hypochlorite) concentration and at 65 °C in 1 hour. The reagent consumption ratio—defined as the number of moles of hypochlorite consumed to leach 1 mole of chalcopyrite—was much higher than its stoichiometric ratio of 8.5. It reached 57.6 when the solid dosage was 1 g/500 ml and decreased to 12.9 when the solid dosage was increased to 10 g/500 ml. The leaching rate of chalcopyrite in the first stage was controlled by a chemical reaction with the activation energy of 50.2 kJ/mol (12.0 kcal/mol). A leaching scheme was identified in which 98 pct of the chalcopyrite was leached by adding hypochlorite stock solution stepwise in less than 3 hours.

  2. Leaching of FGD Byproducts Using a CSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kairies, C.L.; Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. Fixed-bed columns offer the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the material itself, such as is seen for fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash, or because of precipitate formation, such as can occur when a high-calcium ash is subjected to sulfate-containing leachates. Also, very fine-grained materials, such as gypsum, do not provide sufficient permeability for study in a fixed-bed column. A continuous, stirred-tank extractor (CSTX) is being used as an alternative technique that can provide the elution profile of column leaching but without the low permeability problems. The CSTX has been successfully employed in the leaching of flue gas desulfurization products that would not be sufficiently permeable under traditional column leaching conditions. The results indicate that the leaching behavior depends on a number of factors, including (but not limited to) solubility and neutralization capacity of the mineral phases present, sorption properties of these phases, behavior of the solubilized material in the tank, and the type of species in solution. In addition, leaching to near-exhaustion of a wallboard produced from FGD gypsum has allowed the isolation of a highly adsorptive phase. This phase appears to be present in at least some FGD gypsums and accounts for the immobilization of trace metals such as arsenic, cobalt, lead, and mercury.

  3. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Olsen, P.; Plauborg, F.; Grant, R.; Juhler, R. K.; Brüsch, W.; Kjær, J.

    2014-12-01

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products to the groundwater. There are shortcomings to the procedure, however, as revealed by the results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme from the period 1990/2000 to 2012 (app. twelve years). This monitoring program has for this period assessed leaching into groundwater via the variably-saturated zone of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on sandy and loamy agricultural fields, and 47 of their degradation products. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the authorization procedure: i) long-term leaching of degradation products of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sandy soils, ii) leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loamy soils, and iii) leaching of various pesticides and their degradation products following early summer application on loamy soils. The monitoring data revealed that the authorization procedure was unable to predict leaching scenarios for a number of pesticides in hydrogeological settings dominated by rapid preferential transport via e.g. biopores that bypasses the retardation (sorption and degradation) of the plow layer. Such settings are primarily present in the autumn, but can also occur during the early summer in connection with the formation of a structural seal on the soil surface.

  4. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  5. Nitrogen balance as a tool to assess nitrogen mineralized from winery wastes under different irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Grape marc is a by-product coming from the winery industry, composed of skins, seeds and stalks generated during the crushing process. In Spain, large quantities of wine are produced every year (3,610,000 tonnes in 2010 (FAO, 2010)) with the consequent waste generation. With an adequate composting treatment, this waste can be applied to soils as a source of nutrients and organic matter. Compost N forms added to soil are mostly organic N forms, so organic N can be mineralized during the crop period and thus be taken up by the plants, immobilised, or leached. Compost N mineralization depends on factors such as compost C/N ratio but also on climate conditions. Estimation of N mineralization is necessary to optimise crop yield and minimize the risk of N losses to the environment, especially in zones vulnerable to nitrate pollution. The aim of this work was to assess mineralized N during the crop season when applying grape marc compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated under different drip irrigation rates. A nitrogen balance in field conditions was carried out with three different doses of compost: 0 (D0), 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha (D3); and two irrigation rates (100% ETc and 120% ETc). The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Nitrogen plant uptake and nitrate losses were measured weekly; mineral N in soil was determined before compost addition and at the end of the crop cycle. An estimation of soil mineralized N during the crop season using nitrogen balance is presented. Results are compared with data obtained in laboratory conditions. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  6. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  7. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  8. DAYCENT simulated effects of land use and climate on county level N loss vectors in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the nitrogen (N) gas (NH3, NOx, N2O, N2) emission and NO3 leaching submodels used in the DAYCENT ecosystem model and demonstrate the ability of DAYCENT to simulate observed N2O emission and NO3 leaching rates for various sites representing different climate regimes, soil types, and land...

  9. Modeling sustainable reuse of nitrogen-laden wastewater by poplar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yusong; Licht, Louis; Just, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the leaching of nitrogen (N) to groundwater as a consequence of irrigating food processing wastewater onto grass and poplar under various management scenarios. Under current management practices for a large food processor, a simulated annual N loading of 540 kg ha(-1) yielded 93 kg ha(-1) of N leaching for grass and no N leaching for poplar during the growing season. Increasing the annual growing season N loading to approximately 1,550 kg ha(-1) for poplar only, using "weekly", "daily" and "calculated" irrigation scenarios, yielded N leaching of 17 kg ha(-1), 6 kg ha(-1), and 4 kg ha(-1), respectively. Constraining the simulated irrigation schedule by the current onsite wastewater storage capacity of approximately 757 megaliters (Ml) yielded N leaching of 146 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) while storage capacity scenarios of 3,024 and 4,536 Ml yielded N leaching of 65 and 13 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively, for a loading of 1,550 kg ha(-1) yr(-1). Further constraining the model by the current wastewater storage volume and the available land area (approximately 1,000 hectares) required a "diverse" irrigation schedule that was predicted to leach a weighted average of 13 kg-N ha(-1) yr(-1) when dosed with 1,063 kg-N ha(-1) yr(-1). PMID:26375195

  10. A Case Study of Environmental Benefits of Sensor-Based Nitrogen Application in Corn.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Duval, Benjamin D; Anex, Robert; Scharf, Peter; Ashtekar, Jenette M; Owens, Phillip R; Ellis, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Crop canopy reflectance sensors make it possible to estimate crop N demand and apply appropriate N fertilizer rates at different locations in a field, reducing fertilizer input and associated environmental impacts while maintaining crop yield. Environmental benefits, however, have not been quantified previously. The objective of this study was to estimate the environmental impact of sensor-based N fertilization of corn using model-based environmental Life Cycle Assessment. Nitrogen rate and corn grain yield were measured during a sensor-based, variable N-rate experiment in Lincoln County, MO. Spatially explicit soil properties were derived using a predictive modeling technique based on in-field soil sampling. Soil NO emissions, volatilized NH loss, and soil NO leaching were predicted at 60 discrete field locations using the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model. Life cycle cumulative energy consumption, global warming potential (GWP), acidification potential, and eutrophication potential were estimated using model predictions, experimental data, and life cycle data. In this experiment, variable-rate N management reduced total N fertilizer use by 11% without decreasing grain yield. Precision application of N is predicted to have reduced soil NO emissions by 10%, volatilized NH loss by 23%, and NO leaching by 16%, which in turn reduced life cycle nonrenewable energy consumption, GWP, acidification potential, and eutrophication potential by 7, 10, 22, and 16%, respectively. Although mean N losses were reduced, the variations in N losses were increased compared with conventional, uniform N application. Crop canopy sensor-based, variable-rate N fertilization was predicted to increase corn grain N use efficiency while simultaneously reducing total life-cycle energy use, GWP, acidification, and eutrophication. PMID:27065415

  11. Fertilizer source effects on phosphate and nitrate leaching through simulated golf greens.

    PubMed

    Shuman, L M

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen leached from high-porosity golf greens can adversely affect surface water and groundwater quality. Greenhouse and field lysimeter experiments were carried out to determine the effects of eight fertilizer sources on P and N leaching from simulated golf greens. Phosphorus appeared in the leachate later than nitrate-N, and the highest concentrations were for the soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 starter fertilizers. The other six sources resulted in lower P concentrations. The soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 sources each resulted in 43% of the added P eluting in the leachate, whereas the others varied from 15 to 25%. For nitrate-N the lowest cumulative mass was for the controlled-release 13-13-13 and sulfur-coated urea. A higher percentage of applied P than applied N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. However, the amounts of P leached for the field lysimeters were lower than for the greenhouse columns. PMID:12826419

  12. Evaluating the impacts of landscape positions and nitrogen fertilizer rates on dissolved organic carbon on switchgrass land seeded on marginally yielding cropland.

    PubMed

    Lai, Liming; Kumar, Sandeep; Mbonimpa, Eric G; Hong, Chang Oh; Owens, Vance N; Neupane, Ram P

    2016-04-15

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through leaching into the soils is another mechanism of net C loss. It plays an important role in impacting the environment and impacted by soil and crop management practices. However, little is known about the impacts of landscape positions and nitrogen (N) fertilizer rates on DOC leaching in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). This experimental design included three N fertilizer rates [0 (low); 56 (medium); 112 (high) kg N ha(-1)] and three landscape positions (shoulder, backslope and footslope). Daily average DOC contents at backslope were significantly lower than that at shoulder and footslope. The DOC contents from the plots that received medium N rate were also significantly lower than the plots that received low N rates. The interactions of landscape and N rates on DOC contents were different in every year from 2009 to 2014, however, no significant consistent trend of DOC contents was observed over time. Annual average DOC contents from the plots managed with low N rate were higher than those with high N rate. These contents at the footslope were higher than that at the shoulder position. Data show that there is a moderate positive relationship between the total average DOC contents and the total average switchgrass biomass yields. Overall, the DOC contents from leachate in the switchgrass land were significantly influenced by landscape positions and N rates. The N fertilization reduced DOC leaching contents in switchgrass field. The switchgrass could retain soil and environment sustainability to some extent. These findings will assist in understanding the mechanism of changes in DOC contents with various parameters in the natural environment and crop management systems. However, use of long-term data might help to better assess the effects of above factors on DOC leaching contents and loss in the switchgrass field in the future. PMID:26861225

  13. Mechanistic study of chlorine removal from coal by high-temperature leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han Lin . Dept. of Technology); Muchmore, C.B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes)

    1990-11-01

    The objectives of this research were to: (1) continue the experimental investigation of removal of chlorine from coal using high-temperature leaching techniques, (2) understand the mechanisms involved in the leaching of chlorine from coal, and (3) develop a mathematical model which can be used to correlate the data and to describe the performance of the process. Efforts involved developing procedures for estimation of effective pore volumes of coal samples and measurement of surface areas of coal samples by use of carbon dioxide rather than nitrogen. Different mesh sizes of Illinois No. 6 seam and Illinois No. 5 seam coals were evaluated. Based on the pore volume and CO{sub 2} surface areas obtained, average pore diameters were calculated for the samples examined. This information was compared to the chlorine removal of the coal samples that occurred during hot water leaching. A second aspect of this research involved study of chloride evolution rates from coal and model chlorine compounds heated in a tube furnace under continuous nitrogen flow. Kinetic parameters were determined. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

    2013-02-24

    Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions

  15. Leaching hierarchies in co-combustion residues

    SciTech Connect

    A. George; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2008-05-15

    The leaching propensities from co-combustion residues of 10 trace elements (Be, V, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Hg, Pb) were evaluated. Eight fuels varying from coal blends to coal and secondary fuel mixtures to ternary mixtures were co-combusted in two reactor configurations and at two temperatures (850 and 950{sup o}C). The ash was subjected to a miniaturized toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) developed for this study, and the trace element content in the leachate was analyzed, andpercentage retentions of elements in the ashes and leachates were calculated. Hg and Se were almost completely volatilized during combustion and, therefore, were largely absent from the ashes, in all cases. For the other trace elements, it was not possible to establish a hierarchy of relative trace-element retention. Retention was primarily a function of the combustion method, with no clear effect of temperature retention being observed. The measured trace-element retentions were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, using the MTDATA software. The model successfully predicted the measured values in many cases; however, many anomalies were also noted. From trace-element analysis in the leachates, an extent-of-leaching hierarchy could be established. The elements that underwent low degrees of leaching were Zn, Hg, Pb, low to moderate leaching were Be, Cr, and Cd, and thoseleached to a greater extent were V, As, Se, and Ba. This hierarchy was observed for all fuels and conditions studied. Leaching was found to be a strong function of the combustion temperature and combustion method. When assessing the potential toxicity of leachate from co-combustion residues, Zn, Hg, and Pb may be deemed of least concern, while a greater emphasis should be placed in mitigating the release of the remaining elements. 18 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Effect of drying-wetting cycles on leaching behavior of cement solidified lead-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Xue, Qiang; Wang, Ping; Li, Zhen-Ze; Liu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Lead contaminated soil was treated by different concentration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Solidified cylindrical samples were dried at 40°C in oven for 48 h subsequent to 24h of immersing in different solution for one drying-wetting. 10 cycles were conducted on specimens. The changes in mass loss of specimens, as well as leaching concentration and pH of filtered leachates were studied after each cycle. Results indicated that drying-wetting cycles could accelerate the leaching and deterioration of solidified specimens. The cumulative leached lead with acetic acid (pH=2.88) in this study was 109, 83 and 71 mg respectively for solidified specimens of cement-to-dry soil (C/Sd) ratios 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4, compared to 37, 30, and 25mg for a semi-dynamic leaching test. With the increase of cycle times, the cumulative mass loss of specimens increased linearly, but pH of filtered leachates decreased. The leachability and deterioration of solidified specimens increased with acidity of solution. Increases of C/Sd clearly reduced the leachability and deterioration behavior. PMID:25433988

  17. Study of the Dissolution Behavior of Muscovite in Stone Coal by Oxygen Pressure Acid Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Nan-nan; Zhang, Yi-min; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The dissolution behavior of muscovite in stone coal during the oxygen pressure acid leaching process was studied. The study showed that the dissolution behaviors of V, Al, and K were similar. K was the most easily leached, followed by Al, and then by V during oxygen pressure acid leaching process. When the reaction temperature exceeded 423 K (150 °C), alunite was generated, which led to vanadium losses because of its absorption performance. The dissolution of the muscovite in stone coal mainly depended on H2SO4 concentration and temperature. O2 had a main effect not on muscovite's dissolution but on the V3+ oxidation. During the oxygen pressure acid leaching process, (1) the interfacial K in the muscovite lattice was dissolved rapidly, producing a new interface; (2) for charge balance, the interfacial O absorbed hydrogen ions to form hydroxy; (3) the interfacial hydroxy reacted with hydrogen ions and left vacancy as a result of O loss, producing more new surface to expose more Al, V, and Si; (4) the interfacial Al or V was exchanged by hydrogen ions and V3+ was oxidized to V4+ and V5+; and (5) Si hardly reacted with H+ and generated high-Si surface.

  18. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    PubMed

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH < 6.0). Thus, Zn leaching is enhanced using the modified TCLP. While Pb leached readily during the first 126 h and then leachate concentrations decreased to below the analytical detection limit. To conclude, this modified TCLP is a more suitable method for these cement rotary kiln co-processing products. PMID:26781629

  19. EPA's ''Lead leaching from submersible well pumps''

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    An attempt is made to provide comprehensive answers to questions EPA anticipates those involved in the environmental health profession may encounter from public concern in response to national media coverage of drinking water submersible well pumps and lead leaching. In laboratory tests, several models of new, previously unused submersible pumps with brass and bronze components have been found to leach high levels of lead into the water that comes in contact with these pumps. The findings of these tests indicate cause for concern to users of such pumps and a need for further research. Questions concerning the extent of the problem, health effects, and solutions are addressed.

  20. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    SciTech Connect

    Allegrini, E.; Butera, S.; Kosson, D.S.; Van Zomeren, A.; Van der Sloot, H.A.; Astrup, T.F.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  1. Assessment of global nitrogen pollution in rivers using an integrated biogeochemical modeling framework.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Kanae, Shinjiro; Oki, Taikan; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Yamashiki, Yosuke; Takara, Kaoru

    2011-04-01

    This study has analyzed the global nitrogen loading of rivers resulting from atmospheric deposition, direct discharge, and nitrogenous compounds generated by residential, industrial, and agricultural sources. Fertilizer use, population distribution, land cover, and social census data were used in this study. A terrestrial nitrogen cycle model with a 24-h time step and 0.5° spatial resolution was developed to estimate nitrogen leaching from soil layers in farmlands, grasslands, and natural lands. The N-cycle in this model includes the major processes of nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, immobilization, mineralization, leaching, and nitrogen absorption by vegetation. The previously developed Total Runoff Integrating Pathways network was used to analyze nitrogen transport from natural and anthropogenic sources through river channels, as well as the collecting and routing of nitrogen to river mouths by runoff. Model performance was evaluated through nutrient data measured at 61 locations in several major world river basins. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations calculated by the model agreed well with the observed data and demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model. The results indicate that nitrogen loading in most global rivers is proportional to the size of the river basin. Reduced nitrate leaching was predicted for basins with low population density, such as those at high latitudes or in arid regions. Nitrate concentration becomes especially high in tropical humid river basins, densely populated basins, and basins with extensive agricultural activity. On a global scale, agriculture has a significant impact on the distribution of nitrogenous compound pollution. The map of nitrate distribution indicates that serious nitrogen pollution (nitrate concentration: 10-50 mg N/L) has occurred in areas with significant agricultural activities and small precipitation surpluses. Analysis of the model uncertainty also suggests that the nitrate

  2. Organic carbon leaching behavior from incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, A L; Okuda, T; Nishijima, W; Okada, M

    2006-09-21

    The understanding of the leaching behavior of organic carbon from incinerator bottom ash is an important aspect for the control of organic carbon emissions from landfills in order to minimize their potential risk to the environment. The leaching behavior of organic carbon from incinerator bottom ash samples, obtained from two different solid waste sources, as well as the effects of calcium (Ca) on organic carbon (DOC) leaching associated with pH were therefore investigated in this paper. The effect of pH on the leaching of DOC and other major elements from bottom ash was ascertained through pH-stat leaching experiments. Column leaching experiments were carried out to evaluate the dependence of the leached amount of DOC on Ca leaching. It was found that the bottom ash produced by incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) was composed of two DOC fractions: DOC leached independent (fraction I) of Ca leaching, observed at alkaline-neutral pH, and DOC leached dependent (fraction II) on Ca leaching, observed at acid pH. However, the bottom ash produced by incineration of industrial solid waste (ISW) was composed of only DOC fraction I. The addition of calcium oxide during incineration and the differences in the paper to plastic ratio in the physical composition of the solid wastes incinerated would explain the distinct organic carbon leaching behaviors of bottom ash samples. PMID:16675109

  3. Nitrate Accumulation and Leaching in Surface and Ground Water Based on Simulated Rainfall Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Gao, Jian-en; Li, Xing-hua; Zhang, Shao-long; Wang, Hong-jie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the process of nitrate accumulation and leaching in surface and ground water, we conducted simulated rainfall experiments. The experiments were performed in areas of 5.3 m2 with bare slopes of 3° that were treated with two nitrogen fertilizer inputs, high (22.5 g/m2 NH4NO3) and control (no fertilizer), and subjected to 2 hours of rainfall, with. From the 1st to the 7th experiments, the same content of fertilizer mixed with soil was uniformly applied to the soil surface at 10 minutes before rainfall, and no fertilizer was applied for the 8th through 12th experiments. Initially, the time-series nitrate concentration in the surface flow quickly increased, and then it rapidly decreased and gradually stabilized at a low level during the fertilizer experiments. The nitrogen loss in the surface flow primarily occurred during the first 18.6 minutes of rainfall. For the continuous fertilizer experiments, the mean nitrate concentrations in the groundwater flow remained at less than 10 mg/L before the 5th experiment, and after the 7th experiment, these nitrate concentrations were greater than 10 mg/L throughout the process. The time-series process of the changing concentration in the groundwater flow exhibited the same parabolic trend for each fertilizer experiment. However, the time at which the nitrate concentration began to change lagged behind the start time of groundwater flow by approximately 0.94 hours on average. The experiments were also performed with no fertilizer. In these experiments, the mean nitrate concentration of groundwater initially increased continuously, and then, the process exhibited the same parabolic trend as the results of the fertilization experiments. The nitrate concentration decreased in the subsequent experiments. Eight days after the 12 rainfall experiments, 50.53% of the total nitrate applied remained in the experimental soil. Nitrate residues mainly existed at the surface and in the bottom soil layers, which represents a

  4. Nitrate Accumulation and Leaching in Surface and Ground Water Based on Simulated Rainfall Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Gao, Jian-en; Li, Xing-hua; Zhang, Shao-long; Wang, Hong-jie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the process of nitrate accumulation and leaching in surface and ground water, we conducted simulated rainfall experiments. The experiments were performed in areas of 5.3 m2 with bare slopes of 3° that were treated with two nitrogen fertilizer inputs, high (22.5 g/m2 NH4NO3) and control (no fertilizer), and subjected to 2 hours of rainfall, with. From the 1st to the 7th experiments, the same content of fertilizer mixed with soil was uniformly applied to the soil surface at 10 minutes before rainfall, and no fertilizer was applied for the 8th through 12th experiments. Initially, the time-series nitrate concentration in the surface flow quickly increased, and then it rapidly decreased and gradually stabilized at a low level during the fertilizer experiments. The nitrogen loss in the surface flow primarily occurred during the first 18.6 minutes of rainfall. For the continuous fertilizer experiments, the mean nitrate concentrations in the groundwater flow remained at less than 10 mg/L before the 5th experiment, and after the 7th experiment, these nitrate concentrations were greater than 10 mg/L throughout the process. The time-series process of the changing concentration in the groundwater flow exhibited the same parabolic trend for each fertilizer experiment. However, the time at which the nitrate concentration began to change lagged behind the start time of groundwater flow by approximately 0.94 hours on average. The experiments were also performed with no fertilizer. In these experiments, the mean nitrate concentration of groundwater initially increased continuously, and then, the process exhibited the same parabolic trend as the results of the fertilization experiments. The nitrate concentration decreased in the subsequent experiments. Eight days after the 12 rainfall experiments, 50.53% of the total nitrate applied remained in the experimental soil. Nitrate residues mainly existed at the surface and in the bottom soil layers, which represents a

  5. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  6. Modeling the effects of different N fertilizer rates on N2O emissions and nitrate leaching from arable soils in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Berger, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Gebauer, G.; Kiese, R.

    2012-12-01

    Process-based biogeochemical models can be used to predict the impact of various agricultural management practices on plant nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen losses to the environment such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrate leaching by analyzing the interactions between management practices, primary drivers such as climate, soil properties, crop types, etc., and biogeochemical reactions. In this study we applied the Landscape-DNDC model, which combines and uniforms functions of the agricultural-DNDC and the Forest-DNDC for simulation of C and N turnover, GHG emissions, nitrate leaching, and plant growth for a Korean arable field cultivated with radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The annual average temperature is app. 8.5°C and the annual precipitation is app. 1,500 mm. According to farmers practice the study field received a basal fertilizer application of app. 200 kg N ha-1 before setting up four fertilizer treatments i.e. additionally 50, 150, 250 and 350 kg N ha-1. All N treatment plots were tilled a week after application of specific N fertilizer in order to make row and interrow. Just before radish seeding rows were covered with black plastic mulch which was removed after harvest. In spite the widespread usage of black mulch in Korea or even Asia; so far biogeochemical models do not consider impacts of mulch on soil environmental conditions and soil biogeochemistry. Based on field measurements we adjusted input information and used only half of the annual precipitation and the maximum temperature for simulation of row conditions, whereas the actual weather data were used for the interrow simulations. Simulated N2O emissions agreed well with measurements; however peak emissions after fertilization were slightly underestimated in row and interrow. Annual N2O emissions of the fertilizer treatments increased with increasing fertilization rates from around 1.5 to 3 kg N ha-1 in the row and lower emissions of app. 1.5 kg N ha-1 (for all N treatments) in the

  7. Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Amonette, J. E.; Drake, Meghan M; Brown, Steven D; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2009-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

  8. Characterization of porous media properties and leaching capacity of spent oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, W.F.; Morelli, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    Porous media properties of spent oil shales have been determined in order to provide fundamental data needed to identify and predict the transport of leachates through surface piles or abandoned modified insitu retorts. Using high pressure mercury porosimetry, pore size distributions were measured. Specific surface areas were measured using both the mercury intrusion technique as well as BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption. Visual and chemical analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Leaching capacities of the various spent shale samples were measured using equilibrium leaching studies to determine Equilibrium Exchange Isotherms. Based on these characterization studies, fundamental modeling concepts have benn established for the transport of leachates through spent oil shales. 13 refs.

  9. Effects of poultry manure, compost, and biochar amendments on soil nitrogen dynamics in maize production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryals, R.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Dell, C. J.; Sims, T.

    2013-12-01

    Intensification of animal agriculture has profound impacts on the global and local biogeochemistry of nitrogen (N), resulting in consequences to environmental and human health. In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, intensive agriculture is the primary contributor to N pollution, with animal manure comprising more than half of N from agriculture. Management interventions may play an important role in mitigating reactive N pollution in the Bay watershed. The objective of our research was to test management strategies that maximize benefits of poultry manure as an agricultural resource while minimizing it as a source of reactive nitrogen to the atmosphere and ground and surface waters. We conducted field experiments in two agricultural regions of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Georgetown, Delaware and State College, Pennsylvania) to explore the effects of poultry manure amendments on gaseous N losses and soil N transformations. Treatments were applied at rates needed to meet the plant N demand at each site and included unfertilized controls, fertilizer N (urea), and raw, composted, or and biocharred poultry manure. The fate of the N from all sources was followed throughout the growing season. Global greenhouse gases emitted from soil (nitrous oxide [N2O] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) and regional air pollutants (nitrogen oxides [NOx] and ammonia [NH3]) were measured. Gas measurements were coupled with data on treatment effects on temperature, moisture, and concentrations of nitrate (NO3¬-) and ammonium (NH4+) in surface soils (0-10 cm). Soil NO3- and NH4+ were also measured approximately monthly in the soil profile (0-10, 10-30, 30-50, 50-70, and 70-100 cm) as an index of leaching potential. Plant N uptake and grain production were also quantified to quantify crop N use efficiency and compare measured N losses for each N source. Our results suggest that the form of poultry manure amendments can affect the magnitude of reactive N losses to the environment.

  10. Process for the leaching of AP from propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, G. C.; Mcintosh, M. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method for the recovery of ammonium perchlorate from waste solid rocket propellant is described wherein shredded particles of the propellant are leached with an aqueous leach solution containing a low concentration of surface active agent while stirring the suspension.

  11. Leaching Pretreatments for Improving Biomass Quality: Feedstocks, Solvents, and Extraction Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao Wei

    In this research, a systematic study was conducted to quantify the inorganic and organic compounds leached from rice straw, wheat straw, corn stover, switchgrass, Jose Tall Wheatgrass, Douglas fir, and Miscanthus with water, and to evaluate the feedstock quality and characteristics of leached solids for thermal process applications. Leaching feedstocks with water at ambient temperature with a 20 L/kg (dry matter) ratio for 2 hours greatly increased the ash fusion temperature of rice straw (from 1050°C to above 1550°C) and wheat straw (from 900°C to 1250°C), but the treatment only increased the ash fusion temperature of corn stover from 900°C to 950°C. Miscanthus had relatively good initial feedstock quality and leaching may not prove necessary for this feedstock in thermal systems. Leaching also changed the combustion kinetics of biomass by increasing the initial degradation temperature of most feedstocks from originally between 165°C and 186°C to between 180°C and 250°C depending on feedstock. Moreover, leaching increased the maximum rate of weight loss of feedstock by 11% to 54% and increased the corresponding temperatures for peak loss up to 34°C. Leaching removed a sizeable fraction of organic compounds (between 2% and 12% of dry matter). These organic extracts were identified as mostly sugars and acids which might be valuable co-products. Moisture contents of feedstocks after leaching were typically high, ranging between 68 and 81% wet basis. A dewatering step is generally required prior to using the leached biomass for thermochemical conversion. Solvents with ability to dissolve ion-exchangeable, organically associated, and acid soluble metals can further remove non-water soluble metals from biomass and may also improve feedstock quality. In a solvent evaluation, corn stover and wheat straw were leached with water, 1M ammonium acetate, 1M HCl, 100% methanol, 50% methanol, 100% ethanol, and 50% ethanol, and leached solids and leachate were

  12. Leaching Pretreatments for Improving Biomass Quality: Feedstocks, Solvents, and Extraction Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao Wei

    In this research, a systematic study was conducted to quantify the inorganic and organic compounds leached from rice straw, wheat straw, corn stover, switchgrass, Jose Tall Wheatgrass, Douglas fir, and Miscanthus with water, and to evaluate the feedstock quality and characteristics of leached solids for thermal process applications. Leaching feedstocks with water at ambient temperature with a 20 L/kg (dry matter) ratio for 2 hours greatly increased the ash fusion temperature of rice straw (from 1050°C to above 1550°C) and wheat straw (from 900°C to 1250°C), but the treatment only increased the ash fusion temperature of corn stover from 900°C to 950°C. Miscanthus had relatively good initial feedstock quality and leaching may not prove necessary for this feedstock in thermal systems. Leaching also changed the combustion kinetics of biomass by increasing the initial degradation temperature of most feedstocks from originally between 165°C and 186°C to between 180°C and 250°C depending on feedstock. Moreover, leaching increased the maximum rate of weight loss of feedstock by 11% to 54% and increased the corresponding temperatures for peak loss up to 34°C. Leaching removed a sizeable fraction of organic compounds (between 2% and 12% of dry matter). These organic extracts were identified as mostly sugars and acids which might be valuable co-products. Moisture contents of feedstocks after leaching were typically high, ranging between 68 and 81% wet basis. A dewatering step is generally required prior to using the leached biomass for thermochemical conversion. Solvents with ability to dissolve ion-exchangeable, organically associated, and acid soluble metals can further remove non-water soluble metals from biomass and may also improve feedstock quality. In a solvent evaluation, corn stover and wheat straw were leached with water, 1M ammonium acetate, 1M HCl, 100% methanol, 50% methanol, 100% ethanol, and 50% ethanol, and leached solids and leachate were

  13. Leaching of toluene-neoprene adhesive wastes.

    PubMed

    Font, R; Sabater, M C; Martínez, M A

    2001-03-01

    This work consists of the study of the extraction of solvent (toluene) from a polymeric (neoprene) substrate during a leaching process. Total organic carbon (TOC) is the main contaminant parameter in the leaching of these systems due to the solution of the toluene and the dispersion of the polymer. The toxicity of the extracts was measured with a Microtox equipment, using Photobacteria phosphoreum, deducing that the toxicity of the extracts is low due to the low solubility of toluene but that the toxicity of toluene is high. On the basis of the experimental results, the amount of toluene diffused vs time in plane sheet systems was studied. A kinetic model has been developed considering two stages: In the first stage, the toluene diffuses into the system across the neoprene chains at a constant rate, not depending on the initial toluene concentration. This fact is explained by considering that there is a constant difference of the toluene concentration between the interface with the water and the inner part of the sample. In the second stage, the dispersion of the polymer with the corresponding amount of toluene takes place. The diffusion of toluene in the leaching process is compared and analyzed considering the diffusion of toluene in a desorption process in air so that the difference of toluene concentration between the interface and the interior can be estimated. A mathematical model is also proposed for considering the leaching process in other operating conditions. PMID:11351545

  14. Land application of domestic effluent onto four soil types: plant uptake and nutrient leaching.

    PubMed

    Barton, L; Schipper, L A; Barkle, G F; McLeod, M; Speir, T W; Taylor, M D; McGill, A C; van Schaik, A P; Fitzgerald, N B; Pandey, S P

    2005-01-01

    Land application has become a widely applied method for treating wastewater. However, it is not always clear which soil-plant systems should be used, or why. The objectives of our study were to determine if four contrasting soils, from which the pasture is regularly cut and removed, varied in their ability to assimilate nutrients from secondary-treated domestic effluent under high hydraulic loadings, in comparison with unirrigated, fertilized pasture. Grassed intact soil cores (500 mm in diameter by 700 mm in depth) were irrigated (50 mm wk(-1)) with secondary-treated domestic effluent for two years. Soils included a well-drained Allophanic Soil (Typic Hapludand), a poorly drained Gley Soil (Typic Endoaquept), a well-drained Pumice Soil formed from rhyolitic tephra (Typic Udivitrand), and a well-drained Recent Soil formed in a sand dune (Typic Udipsamment). Effluent-irrigated soils received between 746 and 815 kg N ha(-1) and 283 and 331 kg P ha(-1) over two years of irrigation, and unirrigated treatments received 200 kg N ha(-1) and 100 kg P ha(-1) of dissolved inorganic fertilizer over the same period. Applying effluent significantly increased plant uptake of N and P from all soil types. For the effluent-irrigated soils plant N uptake ranged from 186 to 437 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), while plant P uptake ranged from 40 to 88 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1) for the effluent-irrigated soils. Applying effluent significantly increased N leaching losses from Gley and Recent Soils, and after two years ranged from 17 to 184 kg N ha(-1) depending on soil type. Effluent irrigation only increased P leaching from the Gley Soil. All P leaching losses were less than 49 kg P ha(-1) after two years. The N and P leached from effluent treatments were mainly in organic form (69-87% organic N and 35-65% unreactive P). Greater N and P leaching losses from the irrigated Gley Soil were attributed to preferential flow that reduced contact between the effluent and the soil matrix. Increased N leaching from

  15. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  16. Leaching Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glass in a saturated tuff environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Wicks, G.G.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-11-01

    Samples of SRP glass containing either simulated or actual radioactive waste were leached at 90{sup 0}C under conditions simulating a saturated tuff repository environment. The leach vessels were fabricated of tuff and actual tuff groundwater was used. Thus, the glass was leached only in the presence of those materials (including the Type 304L stainless steel canister material) that would be in the actual repository. Tests were performed for time periods up t 6 months at a SA/V ratio of 100 m{sup -1}. Results with glass containing simulated waste indicated that stainless steel canister material around the glass did not significantly affect the leaching. Based on Li and B (elements not in significant concentrations in the tuff or tuff groundwater), glass containing simulated waste leached identically to glass containing actual radioactive waste. The tuff buffered the pH so that only a slight increase was observed as a result of leaching. Results with glass containing actual radioactive waste indicated that tuff reduced the concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90, and Pu-238 in the free groundwater in the simulated repository by 10 to 100X. Also, radiolysis of the groundwater by the glass (approximately 1000 rad/h) did not significantly affect the pH in the presence of tuff. Measured normalized mass losses in the presence of tuff for the glass based on Cs-137, Sr-90, and Pu-238 in the free groundwater were extremely low, nominally 0.02, 0.02, and 0.005 g/m{sup 2}, respectively, indicating that the glass-tuff system retained radionuclides well. 9 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Characterization of Nitrogen use efficiency in sweet sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Dweikat, Ismail; Clemente, Thomas

    2014-09-09

    Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) has the potential to augment the increasing demand for alternative fuels and for the production of input efficient, environmentally friendly bioenergy crops. Nitrogen (N) and water availability are considered two of the major limiting factors in crop growth. Nitrogen fertilization accounts for about 40% of the total production cost in sorghum. In cereals, including sorghum, the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) from fertilizer is approximately 33% of the amount applied. There is therefore extensive concern in relation to the N that is not used by the plant, which is lost by leaching of nitrate, denitrification from the soil, and loss of ammonia to the atmosphere, all of which can have deleterious environmental effects. To improve the potential of sweet sorghum as a leading and cost effective bioenergy crop, the enhancement of NUE must be addressed. To this end, we have identified a sorghum line (SanChi San) that displays about 25% increase in NUE over other sorghum lines. As such, the overarching goal of this project is to employ three complementary strategies to enhance the ability of sweet sorghum to become an efficient nitrogen user. To achieve the project goal, we will pursue the following specific objectives: Objective 1: Phenotypic characterization of SanChi San/Ck60 RILs under low and moderate N-availability including biochemical profiles, vegetative growth and seed yield Objective 2: Conduct quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and marker identification for nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in a grain sorghum RIL population. Objective 3: Identify novel candidate genes for NUE using proteomic and gene expression profiling comparisons of high- and low-NUE RILs. Candidate genes will be brought into the pipeline for transgenic manipulation of NUE This project will apply the latest genomics resources to discover genes controlling NUE, one of the most complex and economically important traits in cereal crops. As a result of the

  18. Wollastonite: Incongruent dissolution and leached layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissbart, Erich J.; Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2000-12-01

    Measurements of the dissolution rates of wollastonite in solutions with pH ranging from 2 to 6 in an externally recycled mixed flow reactor show that the concentrations of Ca and Si in the reactor effluent decline with time following a power law behavior. After 24 h of reaction, the release rate of Si was 1.90 × 10 -9 mol/m 2 s and the release rate of Ca was 9.09 × 10 -9 mol/m 2 s and these rates were effectively independent of pH. The more rapid release of Ca relative to Si produced a leached layer with an average thickness, x, that is a function of both hydrogen ion activity and time: x = (1.19 × 10 -9)( aH+) 0.121t0.412. The rate of Si release from the hydrated silica leached layer was thousands of times faster than the dissolution rate of vitreous silica. We believe that this is best explained by the release of large silica polymers from the leached layer. The rate of silica release declined as a power law function of time. This behavior is consistent with the idea that the silica in the leached layer undergoes reconstruction reactions that produce regions that are more polymerized and therefore dissolve at a slower rate. In addition, we found that the specific surface of the reacted grains increases as the leached layer grows. This additional surface area appears to come from crazing of the surface and the development of internal porosity. These results are not consistent with the idea that the dissolving mineral will eventually display a steady state behavior.

  19. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  20. LEACHING AND SELECTED HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF PROCESSED OIL SHALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a column leaching test procedure developed to simulate the leaching of high volume wastes under semi-arid field conditions. The report also presents results obtained when retorted oil shales (Tosco, Paraho, Lurgi) are leached by this procedure. Selected hydr...

  1. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields - long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme.

    PubMed

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn; Grant, Ruth; Juhler, René K; Brüsch, Walter; Kjær, Jeanne

    2015-06-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. PMID:25771345

  2. Fertilizer management effects on nitrate leaching and indirect nitrous oxide emissions in irrigated potato production.

    PubMed

    Venterea, Rodney T; Hyatt, Charles R; Rosen, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    Potato ( L.) is a N-intensive crop, with high potential for nitrate (NO) leaching, which can contribute to both water contamination and indirect nitrous oxide (NO) emissions. Two approaches that have been considered for reducing N losses include conventional split application (CSA) of soluble fertilizers and single application of polymer-coated urea (PCU). The objectives of this study were to: (i) compare NO leaching using CSA and two PCUs (PCU-1 and PCU-2), which differed in their polymer formulations, and (ii) use measured NO leaching rates and published emissions factors to estimate indirect NO emissions. Averaged over three growing seasons (2007-2009), NO leaching rates were not significantly different among the three fertilizer treatments. Using previously reported direct NO emissions data from the same experiment, total direct plus indirect growing season NO emissions with PCU-1 were estimated to be 30 to 40% less than with CSA. However, PCU-1 also resulted in greater residual soil N after harvest in 2007 and greater soil-water NO in the spring following the 2008 growing season. These results provide evidence that single PCU applications for irrigated potato production do not increase growing season NO leaching compared with multiple split applications of soluble fertilizers, but have the potential to increase N losses after the growing season and into the following year. Estimates of indirect NO emissions ranged from 0.8 to 64% of direct emissions, depending on what value was assumed for the emission factor describing off-site conversion of NO to NO. Thus, our results also demonstrate how more robust models are needed to account for off-site conversion of NO to NO, since current emission factor models have an enormous degree of uncertainty. PMID:21712579

  3. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  4. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  5. Leaching of metals from steel samples in peracetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabutani, Tomoki; Nakamura, Takamasa; Takayabagi, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, leaching behavior of metallic species from steel samples in peracetic acid was investigated. We compared the leaching efficiency between peracetic acid and acetic acid to estimate the role of peroxo functional group for the leaching. As a result, peracetic acid enhanced the leaching ability of metallic species from the high speed steel and the alloy steel samples. MoO3, Mo, MO2C, W, WO3, VC and MnO2 were effectively leached by peracetic acid, while the stainless steel had a high resistance against corrosion by peracetic acid.

  6. Leaching of chromated copper arsenate wood preservatives: a review.

    PubMed

    Hingston, J A; Collins, C D; Murphy, R J; Lester, J N

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have generated conflicting data regarding the bioaccumulation and toxicity of leachates from preservative-treated wood. Due to the scale of the wood preserving industry, timber treated with the most common preservative, chromated copper arsenate (CCA), may form a significant source of metals in the aquatic environment. The existing literature on leaching of CCA is reviewed, and the numerous factors affecting leaching rates, including pH, salinity, treatment and leaching test protocols are discussed. It is concluded from the literature that insufficient data exists regarding these effects to allow accurate quantification of leaching rates, and also highlights the need for standardised leaching protocols. PMID:11202715

  7. A synthesis of regional inputs and damage costs of reactive nitrogen in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    We estimated the fate of N in crops and in the environment (air, land, freshwater, groundwater, and coastal zones) with published coefficients describing nutrient uptake efficiency, gaseous emissions, and leaching losses. Benefits and damage costs of anthropogenic N inputs were ...

  8. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  9. Energy losses in switches

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  10. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: the importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, E; Butera, S; Kosson, D S; Van Zomeren, A; Van der Sloot, H A; Astrup, T F

    2015-04-01

    Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results of the study, recommendations are provided regarding the use of leaching data in LCA studies. PMID:25573739

  11. Nickel recovery from spent Raneynickel catalyst through dilute sulfuric acid leaching and soda ash precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Rao, S Venkateswara; Kumar, B Nagaphani; Kang, Dong Jun; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2010-04-15

    Pharmaceutical industry makes extensive use of Raneynickel catalyst for various organic drug intermediates/end products. Spent catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical process using dilute sulfuric acid leaching was described for the recovery of nickel from spent Raneynickel catalyst. Recovery of nickel varied with acid concentration and time, whereas temperature had negligible effect. Increase of S/L ratio to 30% (w/v) showed marginal effect on nickel (90%) recovery, whereas Al recovery decreased drastically to approximately 20%. Under the optimum conditions of leaching viz: 12 vol.% H(2)SO(4), 30 degrees C, 20% solid to liquid (S/L) ratio and 120 min reaction time, it was possible to recover 98.6% Ni along with 39.2% Al. Leach liquor [pH 0.7] containing 85.0 g/L Ni and 3.25 g/L Al was adjusted to pH 5.4 with 30 wt.% alkali for quantitative aluminum removal. Nickel loss was about 2% during this Al removal step. Nickel from the purified leach liquor was recovered as nickel carbonate by adding required amount of Na(2)CO(3). The purity of NiCO(3) product was found to be 100% with a Ni content of 48.6%. Na(2)SO(4) was recovered as a by-product with a purity of 99%. Complete process is presented. PMID:20018448

  12. Impact of agricultural management practices on DOC leaching - results of a long-term lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Ollesch, G.; Seeger, J.; Meißner, R.; Rode, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are recently increasing in surface waters of humid climate regions. Due to its substantial importance for leaching processes, aquatic foodwebs, and drinking water purification a better understanding of sources and pathways of DOC is needed. Therefore this study aims to analyse and simulate DOC fluxes in agricultural ecosystems with selected crop rotations. A data set of 24 lysimeters of the UFZ Lysimeter station at Falkenberg (Saxony-Anhalt) covering nine years of DOC investigation has been selected and examined. The data set covers a wide range of climatic conditions with deviating management practices for grasslands and agricultural crop rotations. The monthly DOC concentrations assessed in the leached water range from 2.4 to 34.1 mg /l. DOC concentrations depend on temperature, precipitation and discharge. The type of crop grown on the lysimeter is an important trigger for DOC leaching - especially lysimeters used as pasture, or planted with rape and carrots exhibit high DOC concentrations. Management practices and fertilizer application modify the leaching of DOC and offer potentials to reduce DOC losses. The results form the basis of further process simulation studies and upscaling of the results to the small catchment scale.

  13. Risk of Leaching in Soils Amended by Compost and Digestate from Municipal Solid Waste

    PubMed Central

    Tarquis, Ana M.; Cartagena, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha−1 to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste's wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems. PMID:25003139

  14. Orthophosphate Leaching in St. Augustinegrass and Zoysiagrass Grown in Sandy Soil under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ronald F; Sartain, Jerry B; Kruse, Jason K; Obreza, Thomas A; O'Connor, George A; Harris, Willie G

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is required to maintain healthy, high-quality, warm-season turf. However, excessive P applications to soils with poor P retention capabilities may lead to leaching losses to groundwater. This field study was conducted to determine the maximum P fertilizer application rate to (Walt.) [Kuntze] 'Floratam' St. Augustinegrass (St. Augustinegrass) and 'Empire' zoysiagrass (zoysiagrass) below which P leaching is minimized. Five P levels ranging from 0 to 5.0 g P m yr were surface applied as triple superphosphate. Turf was established on an uncoated, low-P sand with negligible P retention capacity. Leaf and root growth, tissue P concentration, soil P concentration, soil P saturation, leachate volume, and orthophosphate (P) concentration in leachates were measured. Mehlich 1-extractable soil P (M1-P) and soil P saturation ratio (PSR) increased with time as the P rate increased. Lower M1-P and PSR values were measured with St. Augustinegrass, which absorbed more P than did zoysiagrass. The root system of St. Augustinegrass was larger and deeper compared with zoysiagrass, promoting greater P uptake and less P leaching. If tissue analysis indicates that P fertilization is required and the soil has the capacity to retain additional P, application of 0.8 g P m yr to zoysiagrass and 1.07 g P m yr to St. Augustinegrass is appropriate and does not result in increased P leaching. PMID:23673941

  15. Risk of leaching in soils amended by compost and digestate from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    García-Albacete, Marta; Tarquis, Ana M; Cartagena, M Carmen

    2014-01-01

    New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha(-1) to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste's wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems. PMID:25003139

  16. Plant community controls on short-term ecosystem nitrogen retention.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    Retention of nitrogen (N) is a critical ecosystem function, especially in the face of widespread anthropogenic N enrichment; however, our understanding of the mechanisms involved is limited. Here, we tested under glasshouse conditions how plant community attributes, including variations in the dominance, diversity and range of plant functional traits, influence N uptake and retention in temperate grassland. We added a pulse of (15) N to grassland plant communities assembled to represent a range of community-weighted mean plant traits, trait functional diversity and divergence, and species richness, and measured plant and microbial uptake of (15) N, and leaching losses of (15) N, as a short-term test of N retention in the plant-soil system. Root biomass, herb abundance and dominant plant traits were the main determinants of N retention in the plant-soil system: greater root biomass and herb abundance, and lower root tissue density, increased plant (15) N uptake, while higher specific leaf area and root tissue density increased microbial (15) N uptake. Our results provide novel, mechanistic insight into the short-term fate of N in the plant-soil system, and show that dominant plant traits, rather than trait functional diversity, control the fate of added N in the plant-soil system. PMID:26749302

  17. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  18. Combining sulfate electrowinning with chloride leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, A. W.; Sudderth, R. B.; Olafson, S. M.

    1991-08-01

    Although the chloride leaching of copper sulfide concentrates has proved highly efficient, electrowinning from chloride solutions presents many difficulties, notably in cell design and the handling of the powder product. Sulfate electrowinning,on the other hand, continues to improve and has played a significant part in the widespread adoption of the solvent extraction-electrowinning process for copper recovery from low-grade ores. It has been found that the two steps can be combined by introducing a novel solvent extraction process after chloride leaching. This article presents the results of laboratory tests to prove the feasibility of this approach and discusses how it can be integrated into a commercially viable flow sheet.

  19. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, S.; Del Giudice, D.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Building facades are protected from microbial attack by incorporation of biocides within them. Flow over facades leaches these biocides and transports them to the urban environment. A parsimonious water quantity/quality model applicable for engineered urban watersheds was developed to compute biocide release from facades and their transport at the urban basin scale. The model couples two lumped submodels applicable at the basin scale, and a local model of biocide leaching at the facade scale. For the facade leaching, an existing model applicable at the individual wall scale was utilized. The two lumped models describe urban hydrodynamics and leachate transport. The integrated model allows prediction of biocide concentrations in urban rivers. It was applied to a 15 km2urban hydrosystem in western Switzerland, the Vuachère river basin, to study three facade biocides (terbutryn, carbendazim, diuron). The water quality simulated by the model matched well most of the pollutographs at the outlet of the Vuachère watershed. The model was then used to estimate possible ecotoxicological impacts of facade leachates. To this end, exceedance probabilities and cumulative pollutant loads from the catchment were estimated. Results showed that the considered biocides rarely exceeded the relevant predicted no-effect concentrations for the riverine system. Despite the heterogeneities and complexity of (engineered) urban catchments, the model application demonstrated that a computationally "light" model can be employed to simulate the hydrograph and pollutograph response within them. It thus allows catchment-scale assessment of the potential ecotoxicological impact of biocides on receiving waters.

  20. Heavy metals leaching in Indian fly ash.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Fly ash is an industrial waste generated from thermal power plants. Fly ash constitutes 80-85% of the total ash produced. A small part of fly ash is utilised in some sectors such as construction materials, building engineering, road, back fill, agriculture, selective engineering and processing useful materials. A large part of fly ash produced is disposed of with very high environmental risk. In the present paper, laboratory leaching test has been used to determine the potential mobility of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn and Ni in fly ash samples, collected from Chandrapura Thermal Power Plant, Jharkhand and Ramagundam Super Thermal Power Plant, Andhra Pradesh, in order to assess their leachability when these wastes are disposed of. A cascade-leaching test was used at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) ranging between 20 and 100. Both fly ash samples exhibited neutral reactions, as indicated by pH values <11.75 and >7.0 at L/S=10 and contact time of 10 minutes. The percentage of leached amounts found to follow the trend Zn>Fe>Mn>Cr>Pb>Cu>Ni>Cd for fly ash from Chandrapura and Fe>Zn>Cu>Mn>Cr>Ni>Pb>Cd for fly ash from Ramagundam. Effect of pH on metals released from ash surface in aqueous solution followed a predictable pattern of decreasing release with increasing pH. PMID:19295096