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Sample records for nitrous oxide n2o

  1. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from aquaculture: a review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2012-06-19

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) which has a global warming potential 310 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) over a hundred year lifespan. N(2)O is generated during microbial nitrification and denitrification, which are common in aquaculture systems. To date, few studies have been conducted to quantify N(2)O emission from aquaculture. Additionally, very little is known with respect to the microbial pathways through which N(2)O is formed in aquaculture systems. This review suggests that aquaculture can be an important anthropogenic source of N(2)O emission. The global N(2)O-N emission from aquaculture in 2009 is estimated to be 9.30 × 10(10) g, and will increase to 3.83 × 10(11)g which could account for 5.72% of anthropogenic N(2)O-N emission by 2030 if the aquaculture industry continues to increase at the present annual growth rate (about 7.10%). The possible mechanisms and various factors affecting N(2)O production are summarized, and two possible methods to minimize N(2)O emission, namely aquaponic and biofloc technology aquaculture, are also discussed. The paper concludes with future research directions. PMID:22594516

  2. Diurnality of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Moyer, R.; Poe, A.; Pan, D.; Abraha, M.; Chen, J.; Zondlo, M. A.; Robertson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are important contributors to the greenhouse gas balance of the atmosphere. Agricultural soils contribute ~65% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Understanding temporal and spatial variability of N2O emissions from agricultural soils is vital for closure of the global N2O budget and the development of mitigation opportunities. Recent studies have observed higher N2O fluxes during the day and lower at night. Understanding the mechanisms of such diurnality may have important consequences for our understanding of the N cycle. We tested the hypothesis that diurnal cycles are driven by root carbon exudes that stimulate denitrification and therefore N2O production. Alternatively, we considered that the cycle could result from higher afternoon temperatures that accelerate soil microbial activity. We removed all plants from a corn field plot and left another plot untouched. We measured soil N2O emissions in each plot using a standard static chamber technique throughout the corn growing season. And also compared static chamber results to ecosystem level N2O emissions as measured by eddy covariance tower equipped with an open-path N2O sensor. We also measured soil and air temperatures and soil water and inorganic N contents. Soil N2O emissions followed soil inorganic N concentrations and in control plot chambers ranged from 10 μg N m-2 hr-1 before fertilization to 13×103 after fertilization. We found strong diurnal cycles measured by both techniques with emissions low during night and morning hours and high during the afternoon. Corn removal had no effect on diurnality, but had a strong effect on the magnitude of soil N2O emissions. Soil temperature exhibited a weak correlation with soil N2O emissions and could not explain diurnal patterns. Further studies are underway to explore additional mechanisms that might contribute to this potentially important phenomena.

  3. Spatiotemporal variations of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from two reservoirs in SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Li, Si-Liang; Wang, Fu-Shun; Wang, Bao-Li; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2011-10-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric dams have recently given rise to controversies about whether hydropower still provides clean energy. China has a large number of dams used for energy supply and irrigation, but few studies have been carried out on aquatic nitrous oxide (N 2O) variation and its emissions in Chinese river-reservoir systems. In this study, N 2O spatiotemporal variations were investigated monthly in two reservoirs along the Wujiang River, Southwest China, and the emission fluxes of N 2O were estimated. N 2O production in the reservoirs tended to be dominated by nitrification, according to the correlation between N 2O and other parameters. N 2O saturation in the surface water of the Wujiangdu reservoir ranged from 214% to 662%, with an average fluctuation of 388%, while in the Hongjiadu reservoir, it ranged from 201% to 484%, with an average fluctuation of 312%. The dissolved N 2O in both reservoirs was over-saturated with respect to atmospheric equilibrium levels, suggesting that the reservoirs were net sources of N 2O emissions to the atmosphere. The averaged N 2O emission flux in the Wujiangdu reservoir was 0.64 μmol m -2 h -1, while it was 0.45 μmol m -2 h -1 in the Hongjiadu reservoir, indicating that these two reservoirs had moderate N 2O emission fluxes as compared to other lakes in the world. Downstream water of the dams had quite high levels of N 2O saturation, and the estimated annual N 2O emissions from hydropower generation were 3.60 × 10 5 and 2.15 × 10 5 mol N 2O for the Wujiangdu and the Hongjiadu reservoir, respectively. These fluxes were similar to the total N 2O emissions from the reservoir surfaces, suggesting that water released from reservoirs would be another important way for N 2O to diffuse into the atmosphere. It can be concluded that dam construction significantly changes the water environment, especially in terms of nutrient status and physicochemical conditions, which have obvious influences on the N 2O

  4. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions by Termites: Does the Feeding Guild Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Buatois, Bruno; Robert, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, termites are major players in the mineralization of organic matter leading to the production of greenhouse gases including nitrous oxide (N2O). Termites have a wide trophic diversity and their N-metabolism depends on the feeding guild. This study assessed the extent to which N2O emission levels were determined by termite feeding guild and tested the hypothesis that termite species feeding on a diet rich in N emit higher levels of N2O than those feeding on a diet low in N. An in-vitro incubation approach was used to determine the levels of N2O production in 14 termite species belonging to different feeding guilds, collected from a wide range of biomes. Fungus-growing and soil-feeding termites emit N2O. The N2O production levels varied considerably, ranging from 13.14 to 117.62 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1 for soil-feeding species, with Cubitermes spp. having the highest production levels, and from 39.61 to 65.61 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1 for fungus-growing species. Wood-feeding termites were net N2O consumers rather than N2O producers with a consumption ranging from 16.09 to 45.22 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1. Incubating live termites together with their mound increased the levels of N2O production by between 6 and 13 fold for soil-feeders, with the highest increase in Capritermes capricornis, and between 14 and 34 fold for fungus-growers, with the highest increase in Macrotermes muelleri. Ammonia-oxidizing (amoA-AOB and amoA-AOA) and denitrifying (nirK, nirS, nosZ) gene markers were detected in the guts of all termite species studied. No correlation was found between the abundance of these marker genes and the levels of N2O production from different feeding guilds. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that N2O production rates were higher in termites feeding on substrates with higher N content, such as soil and fungi, compared to those feeding on N-poor wood. PMID:26658648

  5. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions by Termites: Does the Feeding Guild Matter?

    PubMed

    Brauman, Alain; Majeed, Muhammad Zeeshan; Buatois, Bruno; Robert, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, termites are major players in the mineralization of organic matter leading to the production of greenhouse gases including nitrous oxide (N2O). Termites have a wide trophic diversity and their N-metabolism depends on the feeding guild. This study assessed the extent to which N2O emission levels were determined by termite feeding guild and tested the hypothesis that termite species feeding on a diet rich in N emit higher levels of N2O than those feeding on a diet low in N. An in-vitro incubation approach was used to determine the levels of N2O production in 14 termite species belonging to different feeding guilds, collected from a wide range of biomes. Fungus-growing and soil-feeding termites emit N2O. The N2O production levels varied considerably, ranging from 13.14 to 117.62 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1) for soil-feeding species, with Cubitermes spp. having the highest production levels, and from 39.61 to 65.61 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1) for fungus-growing species. Wood-feeding termites were net N2O consumers rather than N2O producers with a consumption ranging from 16.09 to 45.22 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1). Incubating live termites together with their mound increased the levels of N2O production by between 6 and 13 fold for soil-feeders, with the highest increase in Capritermes capricornis, and between 14 and 34 fold for fungus-growers, with the highest increase in Macrotermes muelleri. Ammonia-oxidizing (amoA-AOB and amoA-AOA) and denitrifying (nirK, nirS, nosZ) gene markers were detected in the guts of all termite species studied. No correlation was found between the abundance of these marker genes and the levels of N2O production from different feeding guilds. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that N2O production rates were higher in termites feeding on substrates with higher N content, such as soil and fungi, compared to those feeding on N-poor wood. PMID:26658648

  6. Tidal and spatial variability of nitrous oxide (N2O) in Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Célia; Brogueira, Maria José; Nogueira, Marta

    2015-12-01

    The estimate of the nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes is fundamental to assess its impact on global warming. The tidal and spatial variability of N2O and the air-sea fluxes in the Sado estuary in July/August 2007 are examined. Measurements of N2O and other relevant environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic nitrogen - nitrate plus nitrite and ammonium) were recorded during two diurnal tidal cycles performed in the Bay and Marateca region and along the estuary during ebb, at spring tide. N2O presented tidal and spatial variability and varied spatially from 5.0 nmol L-1 in Marateca region to 12.5 nmol L-1 in Sado river input. Although the Sado river may constitute a considerable N2O source to the estuary, the respective chemical signal discharge was rapidly lost in the main body of the estuary due to the low river flow during the sampling period. N2O varied with tide similarly between 5.2 nmol L-1 (Marateca) and 10.0 nmol L-1 (Sado Bay), with the maximum value reached two hours after flooding period. The influence of N2O enriched upwelled seawater (˜10.0 nmol L-1) was well visible in the estuary mouth and apparently represented an important contribution of N2O in the main body of Sado estuary. Despite the high water column oxygen saturation in most of Sado estuary, nitrification did not seem a relevant process for N2O production, probably as the concentration of the substrate, NH4+, was not adequate for this process to occur. Most of the estuary functioned as a N2O source, and only Marateca zone has acted as N2O sink. The N2O emission from Sado estuary was estimated to be 3.7 Mg N-N2O yr-1 (FC96) (4.4 Mg N-N2O yr-1, FRC01). These results have implications for future sampling and scaling strategies for estimating greenhouse gases (GHGs) fluxes in tidal ecosystems.

  7. Does zinc in livestock wastewater reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from mangrove soils?

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang C; Tam, Nora F Y; Ye, Yong

    2014-11-15

    Zinc (Zn) affects nitrogen cycling but the effect of Zn in wastewater on the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) from the soil has not been reported. This study compared N2O emissions from mangrove soil receiving livestock wastewater containing various Zn(2+) concentrations and evaluated how long the effects of Zn would last in these soil-wastewater microcosms. Significant increases in N2O flux were observed soon after the discharge of wastewater with a low Zn content. On the other hand, the flux was reduced significantly in the wastewater with high Zn levels but such inhibitory effect was not observed after tidal flushing. Continuous monitoring of the N2O fluxes also confirmed that the inhibitory effect of Zn was confined within a few hours and the fluxes recovered in 6-9 h after the wastewater was completely drained away. These results indicated that the inhibitory effect of Zn on N2O fluxes occurred immediately after wastewater discharge and disappeared gradually. In the surface soil, nitrate levels increased with the addition of wastewater but there was no significant accumulation of NH4(+)-N, irrespective of the Zn content in the wastewater. The study also showed that nitrification potential and immediate N2O emissions were inhibited by high Zn levels in the soil, but the total oxidation of ammonium to nitrate was not affected. PMID:25171729

  8. Using natural isotopic abundances to determine the source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothet, A.; Sebilo, M.; Laverman, A. M.; Vaury, V.; Mariotti, A.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous greenhouse gas studies have focused on carbon dioxide (CO2), whereas nitrous oxide (N2O) also plays a major role in global warming. Indeed, while nitrous oxide is 1000 times less concentrated than CO2 in the atmosphere, it is 300 times more efficient in terms of global warming potential. In addition, its atmospheric concentration increases with 0,3 % per year. According to the literature, nitrous oxide is produced, in soils and sediments, by two major processes: (1) Nitrification, mediated by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria under oxic conditions; (2) Denitrification, mediated by heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria under anoxic conditions. Denitrification induces intensive, localized and instantaneous fluxes. N2O emissions can be easily measured and modeled. In contrast, nitrification induces weak emissions, but spatially and temporally extended. Therefore, this process could represent a large potential of N2O emissions from soils and sediments. The study of isotopomer's isotopic composition of N2O, i.e. the intramolecular distribution or site preference (SP) determined by 15N measurement allows the determination of the origin of N2O emissions (nitrification vs. denitrification). Recent studies on pure cultures have showed that SP associated with nitrification is 35 ‰ while SP associated with denitrification is 0 ‰. The aim of this study was to determine SP associated with denitrification in soils and sediments, taking into account the environmental denitrifying bacterial communities, and under different environmental variables. To this end, flow-through reactors were used to determine denitrification rates at different temperatures and varying substrate (nitrate) concentrations. Site preference was measured for the different experiments. Different experiments of denitrification were realized in sediment flow through reactors under denitrifying conditions (anoxia, presence of organic matter and nitrate). We used acetylene (25°C) to block the enzyme

  9. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from biotrickling filters used for ammonia removal at livestock facilities.

    PubMed

    Melse, Roland W; Mosquera, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Recently several manufacturers of nitrifying biotrickling filters for ammonia (NH3) removal at animal houses have started to add a denitrification step to the installation, aiming to reduce the amount of discharge water by conversion of NH3 to nitrogen gas (N2). The aim of this research was to quantify the possible formation of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a potent greenhouse gas, in three of these farm-scale installations. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of NH3 and odor was determined. All installations were successful in reducing the amount of discharge water. The average NH3 removal efficiency for the three locations was 85, 71 and 86%, respectively. However, a significant part of the NH3 removed from the inlet air was not converted to N2 but to N2O, which is a potent greenhouse gas. The part of the inlet NH3-N that was converted to N2O-N amounted to 17, 66 and 24%, respectively. The high N2O production might have been caused by a too low scarcity of biodegradable carbon/N ratio for complete denitrification. The average odor removal efficiency was 21, 32 and 48%, respectively. Further research is necessary to explore how process conditions can be adjusted and controlled in order to reduce the production and emission of N2O from these types of systems. PMID:24622548

  10. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) production in axenic Chlorella vulgaris microalgae cultures: evidence, putative pathways, and potential environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieysse, B.; Plouviez, M.; Coilhac, M.; Cazali, L.

    2013-10-01

    Using antibiotic assays and genomic analysis, this study demonstrates nitrous oxide (N2O) is generated from axenic Chlorella vulgaris cultures. In batch assays, this production is magnified under conditions favouring intracellular nitrite accumulation, but repressed when nitrate reductase (NR) activity is inhibited. These observations suggest N2O formation in C. vulgaris might proceed via NR-mediated nitrite reduction into nitric oxide (NO) acting as N2O precursor via a pathway similar to N2O formation in bacterial denitrifiers, although NO reduction to N2O under oxia remains unproven in plant cells. Alternatively, NR may reduce nitrite to nitroxyl (HNO), the latter being known to dimerize to N2O under oxia. Regardless of the precursor considered, an NR-mediated nitrite reduction pathway provides a unifying explanation for correlations reported between N2O emissions from algae-based ecosystems and NR activity, nitrate concentration, nitrite concentration, and photosynthesis repression. Moreover, these results indicate microalgae-mediated N2O formation might significantly contribute to N2O emissions in algae-based ecosystems (e.g. 1.38-10.1 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 in a 0.25 m deep raceway pond operated under Mediterranean climatic conditions). These findings have profound implications for the life cycle analysis of algae biotechnologies and our understanding of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle.

  11. Quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) uptake in boreal forest soils by combining isotopic and microbial approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, Nina; Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2015-04-01

    The amount of nitrous oxide (N2O) produced during denitrification is highly regulated by the function of the last reductase enzyme (nitrous oxide reductase; nosZ) which is known to be inhibited by oxygen, low pH and low temperature, which are typical characteristics of boreal peatlands and some forest soils. Denitrification can be a sink for N2O, if the last step of the process is very efficient. Generally, the N2O sink potential of soils is poorly constrained; while uptake rates were often observed in field studies, the data was rejected as analytical errors or artifacts. This led to the question: when and by which mechanisms does N2O uptake occur in natural boreal forests? In order to answer this question, we established a 15N2O tracer experiment where the production of 15N2 and consumption of 15N2O were quantified in aerobic and anaerobic conditions followed by abundance analyses of genes and transcripts. The laboratory incubations were complemented with molecular approaches which linked the N2O dynamics with individual microbial species and transcriptomics. The abundance of denitrifying functional genes and gene transcripts reducing nitrous oxide (nosZ) were quantified throughout the experiment with sacrificial sampling in order to solve the role of typical and atypical denitrifying populations on N2O consumption. For this study, a Finnish boreal spruce forest and peatland were selected where previous field measurements have revealed negative N2O fluxes (i.e. N2O uptake). Soil horizons were selected in both the organic layer and uppermost mineral soil layer and in the peat layers 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, where oxygen is limited and N2O uptake occurs at the field scale. 15N-N2O (99 AT %) was added to an initial N2O concentration of 1.7 ppm. All soils were flushed with 100% helium prior to the N2O addition to ensure that the NO3 stocks were reduced, leaving the added N2O as the sole activator of N2O uptake and primary N source. Aerobic N2O uptake was quantified in

  12. Nitrous oxide (N2O) production in axenic Chlorella vulgaris cultures: evidence, putative pathways, and potential environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieysse, B.; Plouviez, M.; Coilhac, M.; Cazali, L.

    2013-06-01

    Using antibiotic assays and genomic analysis, this study demonstrates nitrous oxide (N2O) is generated from axenic C. vulgaris cultures. In batch assays, this production is magnified under conditions favoring intracellular nitrite accumulation, but repressed when nitrate reductase (NR) activity is inhibited. These observations suggest N2O formation in C. vulgaris might proceed via NR-mediated nitrite reduction into nitric oxide (NO) acting as N2O precursor via a pathway similar to N2O formation in bacterial denitrifiers, although NO reduction to N2O under oxia remains unproven in plant cells. Alternatively, NR may reduce nitrite to nitroxyl (HNO), the latter being known to dimerize to N2O under oxia. Regardless of the precursor considered, an NR-mediated nitrite reduction pathway provides a unifying explanation for correlations reported between N2O emissions from algae-based ecosystems and NR activity, nitrate concentration, nitrite concentration, and photosynthesis repression. Moreover, these results indicate microalgae-mediated N2O formation might significantly contribute to N2O emissions in algae-based ecosystems. These findings have profound implications for the life cycle analysis of algae biotechnologies and our understanding of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle.

  13. Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils under different land use in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurer, Katharina H. E.; Madari, Beata E.; Franko, Uwe; Spott, Oliver; Stange, Claus F.; Jungkunst, Hermann F.

    2015-04-01

    Cropland area has been expanded in Brazil and by now the agricultural sector has been calculated as the major emitter of nitrous oxide (N2O). This state was preceded by the conversion of natural ecosystems, which inevitably causes changes in the carbon and nitrogen cycle of the soil. However, detailed model and measurement approaches are lacking for sound national estimates. Here we present data from model driven measurement campaigns from different ecosystems and the results of a review of available data on annual N2O fluxes. Contrary to expectations, emissions from agricultural land (1.13 kg N ha-1 yr-1) tended to be even lower than from rainforest (2.29 kg N ha-1 yr-1). At the same time, N-fertilization did not lead to a relevant increase in annual N2O emissions. Moreover, pastures showed an age-related decrease in emissions; median annual emissions from young pastures (≤ 10 years) were 2.52 kg N ha-1, whereas old pastures (> 10 years) emitted 0.90 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Since N2O is known to react very sensitive to changes (for example dry-wet changes, our measurement campaigns concentrated on the transitional period from dry to wet season, as predicted by our model simulations. For spatial explanation, model simulations were made for selected locations in the Brazilian state Mato Grosso, where agriculture is practiced since more than two decades. In accordance with the measurement and literature results, modelled emissions maize-soybean and cotton-soybean rotations were lower than from areas fallow areas. At the same time, the location and soil type, respectively, turned out to be an important factor when trying to quantify extensive emission budgets. Although existing models perform quite well based on monthly measurements, better adaptation is inevitable with regard to the possibility of more precise predictions. This requires spatial and temporal higher resolved monitoring, in order to involve soil types, which have so far not been considered sufficiently, and

  14. Controlling factors of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions at the field-scale in an agricultural slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilain, Guillaume; Garnier, Josette; Tallec, Gaëlle; Tournebize, Julien; Cellier, Pierre; Flipo, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Agricultural practices widely contribute to the atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration increase and are the major source of N2O which account for 24% of the global annual emission (IPCC, 2007). Soil nitrification and denitrification are the microbial processes responsible for the production of N2O, which also depends on soil characteristics and management. Besides their control by various factors, such as climate, soil conditions and management (content of NO3- and NH4+, soil water content, presence of degradable organic material…), the role of topography is less known although it can play an important role on N2O emissions (Izaurralde et al., 2004). Due to the scarcity of data on N2O direct vs. indirect emission rate from agriculture in the Seine Basin (Garnier et al., 2009), one of the objectives of the study conducted here was to determine the N2O emission rates of the various land use representative for the Seine Basin, in order to better assess the direct N2O emissions, and to explore controlling factor such as meteorology, topography, soil properties and crop successions. The main objective of this study was at the same time to characterize N2O fluxes variability along a transect from an agricultural plateau to a river and to analyze the influence of landscape position on these emissions. We conducted this study in the Orgeval catchment (Seine basin, France; between 48°47' and 48°55' N, and 03°00' and 03°55' E) from May 2008 to August 2009 on two agricultural fields cropped with wheat, barley, oats, corn. N2O fluxes were monitored from weekly to bimonthly using static manual chambers placed along the chosen transect in five different landscape positions from the plateau to the River. This study has shown that soil moisture (expressed as Water Filled Pore Space) and NO3- soil concentrations explained most of the N2O flux variability during the sampling period. Most of N2O was emitted directly after N fertilization application during a relatively

  15. Influence of biofilm thickness on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from denitrifying fluidized bed bioreactors (DFBBRs).

    PubMed

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2014-12-20

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a significant anthropogenic greenhouse gas emitted from biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes. This study tries to get a deeper insight into N2O emissions from denitrifying fluidized bed bioreactors (DFBBRs) and its relationship to the biofilm thickness, diffusivity, and reaction rates. The DFBBR was operated at two different organic and nitrogen loading rates of 5.9–7 kg COD/(m3 d) and 1.2–2 kg N/(m3 d), respectively. Results showed that the N2O conversion rate from the DFBBR at a biofilm thickness of 680 μm was 0.53% of the total influent nitrogen loading while at the limited COD and a biofilm thickness of 230 μm, the N2O conversion rate increased by 196–1.57% of the influent nitrogen loading concomitant with a sevenfold increase in liquid nitrite concentration. Comparing the N2O emissions at different biofilm thickness showed that the N2O emission decreased exponentially with biofilm thickness due to the retention of slow growth denitrifiers and the limited diffusivity of N2O. PMID:25450644

  16. Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, Iurii; Millar, Neville; Robertson, G Philip

    2014-06-24

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that also depletes stratospheric ozone. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate is the best single predictor of N2O emissions from agricultural soils, which are responsible for ∼ 50% of the total global anthropogenic flux, but it is a relatively imprecise estimator. Accumulating evidence suggests that the emission response to increasing N input is exponential rather than linear, as assumed by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodologies. We performed a metaanalysis to test the generalizability of this pattern. From 78 published studies (233 site-years) with at least three N-input levels, we calculated N2O emission factors (EFs) for each nonzero input level as a percentage of N input converted to N2O emissions. We found that the N2O response to N inputs grew significantly faster than linear for synthetic fertilizers and for most crop types. N-fixing crops had a higher rate of change in EF (ΔEF) than others. A higher ΔEF was also evident in soils with carbon >1.5% and soils with pH <7, and where fertilizer was applied only once annually. Our results suggest a general trend of exponentially increasing N2O emissions as N inputs increase to exceed crop needs. Use of this knowledge in GHG inventories should improve assessments of fertilizer-derived N2O emissions, help address disparities in the global N2O budget, and refine the accuracy of N2O mitigation protocols. In low-input systems typical of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, modest N additions will have little impact on estimated N2O emissions, whereas equivalent additions (or reductions) in excessively fertilized systems will have a disproportionately major impact. PMID:24927583

  17. Effect of aeration on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from nitrogen-removing sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Jin; Kim, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    In this study, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emission was compared between the operations of two different sequencing batch reactors, conventional sequencing batch reactor (CNVSBR) and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification sequencing batch reactor (SND-SBR), using synthetic wastewater. The CNV-SBR consisted of anoxic (denitrification) and aerobic phases, whereas the SND-SBR consisted of a microaerobic (low dissolved oxygen concentration) phase, which was achieved by intermittent aeration for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. The CNV-SBR emitted 3.9 mg of N(2)O-N in the denitrification phase and 1.6 mg of N2O-N in the nitrification phase, resulting in a total emission of 5.5 mg from 432 mg of NH(4)(+)-N input. In contrast, the SND-SBR emitted 26.2 mg of N(2)O-N under the microaerobic condition, which was about 5 times higher than the emission obtained with the CNV-SBR at the same NH(4)(+)-N input. From the N(2)O yield based on NH(4)(+)-N input, the microaerobic condition produced the highest yield (6.1%), followed by the anoxic (0.9%) and aerobic (0.4%) conditions. It is thought that an appropriate dissolved oxygen level is critical for reducing N(2)O emission during nitrification and denitrification at wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23314375

  18. Investigating the Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrous Oxide [N2O(X 1Σ+)] in Extraterrestrial Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Corey S.; Bennett, Chris J.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2005-05-01

    The formation of nitrous oxide, N2O(X 1Σ+), in interstellar space and in ices on Pluto and Triton has been experimentally investigated. A molecular nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) ice mixture was irradiated at 10 K with 5 keV electrons to simulate the electronic interaction effects of Galactic cosmic-ray bombardment of extraterrestrial ice samples over a time of 5×106 yr. By monitoring the experiment with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on line and in situ, the temporal evolution of the 2235 cm-1 absorption band of nitrous oxide was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics. This indicates that the mechanism of formation is most likely a reaction between ground-state molecular nitrogen, N2(X 1Σ+g), and an oxygen atom, either in the ground state (3P) or in the first electronically excited state (1D), within the matrix cage through an addition of the oxygen atom to a nonbonding electron pair on the nitrogen molecule. The observation of nitrous oxide together with the kinetics and dynamics studies investigated in this paper underline the role of nonequilibrium processes in low-temperature ice matrices, aid in the understanding of chemical reaction pathways that exist in extraterrestrial ices, and assist a prospective identification of nitrous oxide on the surfaces of Pluto and Triton.

  19. Optimization of operation conditions for the mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from aerobic nitrifying granular sludge system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ting; Wang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ming-Yu; Gao, Ming-Ming; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2016-05-01

    The optimization of operation parameters is a key consideration to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in biological nitrogen removal processes. So far, different parameters have only been investigated individually, making it difficult to compare their specific effects and combined influences. In this study, we applied the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) analysis to find the optimized condition for the mitigation of N2O release in a nitrifying granular sludge system. Seven parameters (temperature, pH, feeding strategy, C/N ratio, aeration rate, Cu(2+) concentration, and aeration mode) were tested in parallel. Five of them (other than chemical oxygen demand/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and Cu(2+) concentration) were selected as influential factors. Since the type of feeding strategies and aeration modes cannot be quantified, continuous feed strategy and anoxic/oxic aeration mode were applied for the following study. Influences of temperature, pH, and aeration rate on N2O emissions were tested with RSM analysis to further investigate the mutual interactions among the parameters and to identify the optimal values that would minimize N2O release. Results showed the minimum emission value could be obtained under the temperature of 22.3 °C, pH of 7.1 and aeration rate of 0.20 m(3)/h. Predicted results were then verified by subsequent validation experiments. The estimated N2O emission value of each design by RSM was also observed in good relationships with experimental result. PMID:26841778

  20. Vertical Profiles as Observational Constraints on Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in an Agricultural Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S.; Diskin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    We use diurnal variability in near-surface N2O vertical profiles to derive N2O emission rates. Our emissions estimates are ~3 times greater than are accounted for by inventories, a discrepancy in line with results from previous studies using different approaches. We quantify the surface N2O concentration's memory of local surface emissions on previous days to be 50-90%. We compare measured profiles both over and away from a dense N2O source region in the San Joaquin Valley, finding that profile shapes, diurnal variability, and changes in integrated near-surface column abundances are distinct according to proximity to source areas. To do this work, we use aircraft observations from the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ project in California's San Joaquin Valley, a region of intense agricultural activity.

  1. Evidence for Involvement of Gut-Associated Denitrifying Bacteria in Emission of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) by Earthworms Obtained from Garden and Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Carola; Grießhammer, Anja; Schmittroth, Martina; Drake, Harold L.

    1999-01-01

    Earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus, and Octolasion lacteum) obtained from nitrous oxide (N2O)-emitting garden soils emitted 0.14 to 0.87 nmol of N2O h−1 g (fresh weight)−1 under in vivo conditions. L. rubellus obtained from N2O-emitting forest soil also emitted N2O, which confirmed previous observations (G. R. Karsten and H. L. Drake, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:1878–1882, 1997). In contrast, commercially obtained Lumbricus terrestris did not emit N2O; however, such worms emitted N2O when they were fed (i.e., preincubated in) garden soils. A. caliginosa, L. rubellus, and O. lacteum substantially increased the rates of N2O emission of garden soil columns and microcosms. Extrapolation of the data to in situ conditions indicated that N2O emission by earthworms accounted for approximately 33% of the N2O emitted by garden soils. In vivo emission of N2O by earthworms obtained from both garden and forest soils was greatly stimulated when worms were moistened with sterile solutions of nitrate or nitrite; in contrast, ammonium did not stimulate in vivo emission of N2O. In the presence of nitrate, acetylene increased the N2O emission rates of earthworms; in contrast, in the presence of nitrite, acetylene had little or no effect on emission of N2O. In vivo emission of N2O decreased by 80% when earthworms were preincubated in soil supplemented with streptomycin and tetracycline. On a fresh weight basis, the rates of N2O emission of dissected earthworm gut sections were substantially higher than the rates of N2O emission of dissected worms lacking gut sections, indicating that N2O production occurred in the gut rather than on the worm surface. In contrast to living earthworms and gut sections that produced N2O under oxic conditions (i.e., in the presence of air), fresh casts (feces) from N2O-emitting earthworms produced N2O only under anoxic conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that gut-associated denitrifying bacteria are responsible for

  2. Evidence for involvement of gut-associated denitrifying bacteria in emission of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) by earthworms obtained from garden and forest soils.

    PubMed

    Matthies, C; Griesshammer, A; Schmittroth, M; Drake, H L

    1999-08-01

    Earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus, and Octolasion lacteum) obtained from nitrous oxide (N(2)O)-emitting garden soils emitted 0.14 to 0.87 nmol of N(2)O h(-1) g (fresh weight)(-1) under in vivo conditions. L. rubellus obtained from N(2)O-emitting forest soil also emitted N(2)O, which confirmed previous observations (G. R. Karsten and H. L. Drake, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:1878-1882, 1997). In contrast, commercially obtained Lumbricus terrestris did not emit N(2)O; however, such worms emitted N(2)O when they were fed (i.e., preincubated in) garden soils. A. caliginosa, L. rubellus, and O. lacteum substantially increased the rates of N(2)O emission of garden soil columns and microcosms. Extrapolation of the data to in situ conditions indicated that N(2)O emission by earthworms accounted for approximately 33% of the N(2)O emitted by garden soils. In vivo emission of N(2)O by earthworms obtained from both garden and forest soils was greatly stimulated when worms were moistened with sterile solutions of nitrate or nitrite; in contrast, ammonium did not stimulate in vivo emission of N(2)O. In the presence of nitrate, acetylene increased the N(2)O emission rates of earthworms; in contrast, in the presence of nitrite, acetylene had little or no effect on emission of N(2)O. In vivo emission of N(2)O decreased by 80% when earthworms were preincubated in soil supplemented with streptomycin and tetracycline. On a fresh weight basis, the rates of N(2)O emission of dissected earthworm gut sections were substantially higher than the rates of N(2)O emission of dissected worms lacking gut sections, indicating that N(2)O production occurred in the gut rather than on the worm surface. In contrast to living earthworms and gut sections that produced N(2)O under oxic conditions (i.e., in the presence of air), fresh casts (feces) from N(2)O-emitting earthworms produced N(2)O only under anoxic conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that gut

  3. Direct nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils under different land use in Brazil—a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurer, Katharina H. E.; Franko, Uwe; Stange, Claus F.; Dalla Rosa, Jaqueline; Madari, Beata E.; Jungkunst, Hermann F.

    2016-02-01

    Brazil typifies the land use changes happening in South America, where natural vegetation is continuously converted into agriculturally used lands, such as cattle pastures and croplands. Such changes in land use are always associated with changes in the soil nutrient cycles and result in altered greenhouse gas fluxes from the soil to the atmosphere. In this study, we analyzed literature values to extract patterns of direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soils of different ecosystems in Brazil. Fluxes from natural ecosystems exhibited a wide range: whereas median annual flux rates were highest in Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests (2.42 and 0.88 kg N ha-1), emissions from cerrado soils were close to zero. The decrease in emissions from pastures with increasing time after conversion was associated with pasture degradation. We found comparatively low N2O-N fluxes from croplands (-0.07 to 4.26 kg N ha-1 yr-1 , median 0.80 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and a low response to N fertilization. Contrary to the assumptions, soil parameters, such as pH, Corg, and clay content emerged as poor predictors for N2O fluxes. This could be a result of the formation of micro-aggregates, which strongly affect the hydraulic properties of the soil, and consequently define nitrification and denitrification potentials. Since data from croplands mainly derived from areas that had been under natural cerrado vegetation before, it could explain the low emissions under agriculture. Measurements must be more frequent and regionally spread in order to enable sound national estimates.

  4. Physiological and Genotypic Characteristics of Nitrous Oxide (N2O)-Emitting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Dent Corn Andisol Farmland in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Isoda, Reika; Wang, Mengcen; Hatano, Ryusuke; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Dent corn Andisol at the Hokkaido University Shizunai Livestock Experimental Farm actively emits nitrous oxide (N2O). In order to screen for culturable and active N2O emitters with high N2O emission potential, soft gel medium containing excess KNO3 was inoculated with soil suspensions from farm soil samples collected at different land managements. Dominant bacterial colonies were searched for among 20 of the actively N2O-emitting cultures from post-harvest soil and 19 from pre-tilled soil, and all isolates were subjected to the culture-based N2O emission assay. Ten active N2O-emitting bacteria, four from post-harvest soil and six from pre-tilled soil, out of 156 isolates were identified as genus Pseudomonas by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These N2O emitters showed clear responses to NO3− within a neutral pH range (5.5–6.7), and accelerated N2O production with 1.5–15 mM sucrose supplementation, suggesting the production of N2O during the denitrification process. However, the negative responses of 6 active N2O emitters, 3 from post-harvest soil and 3 from pre-tilled soil, out of the 10 isolates in the acetylene-blocking assay suggest that these 6 N2O emitters are incomplete denitrifiers that have lost their N2O reductase (N2OR) activity. Although the PCR assay for the denitrification-associated genes, narG and nirK/S, was positive in all 10 Pseudomonas isolates, those negative in the acetylene-blocking assay were nosZ-negative. Therefore, these results imply that the high N2O emission potential of dent corn Andisol is partly attributed to saprophytic, nosZ gene-missing pseudomonad denitrifiers. PMID:27109825

  5. High-resolution measurement of nitrous oxide in the Elbe estuary under hypoxia: Hot-spots of biological N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brase, Lisa; Lendt, Ralf; Sanders, Tina; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases. Its global warming potential exceeds that of CO2 by a factor of ˜300. Estuaries, being sites of intense biological N-turnover, are one of the major natural sources of N2O emissions. On two ship cruises in April and June 2015, concentrations of N2O were measured in the surface water using equilibrator laser based on-line measurements. Based on these high-resolution N2O profiles along the Elbe estuary, N2O saturation and N2O-fluxes between surface water and air were calculated. Additionally, DIN concentrations and dual stable isotopes of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) were analyzed. Concentration and water-to-air fluxes of N2O were highest in the Hamburg port region and dropped quickly further downstream. Highest water-to-air fluxes were up to 800μM/m2/d and 1600μM/m2/d in April and in June, respectively. Downstream of the port region, an N2O oversaturation of 150-200% was estimated over the entire estuary, with saturation approaching equilibrium (96-100%) only in the North Sea region. N2O production was much higher in June than in April 2015, likely coupled to lower oxygen saturation in the water column in June. Based on these measurements, the port of Hamburg region was identified as a hot-spot of N2O production. High N2O concentration and depleted values of nitrate isotopes suggest that nitrification is a significant source of N2O in the estuary, especially at low oxygen concentration. In the Elbe estuary, hypoxia obviously drastically increased the emissions of the greenhouse gas N2O.

  6. Physiological and Genotypic Characteristics of Nitrous Oxide (N2O)-Emitting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Dent Corn Andisol Farmland in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Isoda, Reika; Wang, Mengcen; Hatano, Ryusuke; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-25

    Dent corn Andisol at the Hokkaido University Shizunai Livestock Experimental Farm actively emits nitrous oxide (N2O). In order to screen for culturable and active N2O emitters with high N2O emission potential, soft gel medium containing excess KNO3 was inoculated with soil suspensions from farm soil samples collected at different land managements. Dominant bacterial colonies were searched for among 20 of the actively N2O-emitting cultures from post-harvest soil and 19 from pre-tilled soil, and all isolates were subjected to the culture-based N2O emission assay. Ten active N2O-emitting bacteria, four from post-harvest soil and six from pre-tilled soil, out of 156 isolates were identified as genus Pseudomonas by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These N2O emitters showed clear responses to NO3(-) within a neutral pH range (5.5-6.7), and accelerated N2O production with 1.5-15 mM sucrose supplementation, suggesting the production of N2O during the denitrification process. However, the negative responses of 6 active N2O emitters, 3 from post-harvest soil and 3 from pre-tilled soil, out of the 10 isolates in the acetylene-blocking assay suggest that these 6 N2O emitters are incomplete denitrifiers that have lost their N2O reductase (N2OR) activity. Although the PCR assay for the denitrification-associated genes, narG and nirK/S, was positive in all 10 Pseudomonas isolates, those negative in the acetylene-blocking assay were nosZ-negative. Therefore, these results imply that the high N2O emission potential of dent corn Andisol is partly attributed to saprophytic, nosZ gene-missing pseudomonad denitrifiers. PMID:27109825

  7. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) JJ Table JJ-7 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure...

  8. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) JJ Table JJ-7 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure...

  9. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) JJ Table JJ-7 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure...

  10. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) JJ Table JJ-7 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure...

  11. Assessment of nitric oxide (NO) redox reactions contribution to nitrous oxide (N2 O) formation during nitrification using a multispecies metabolic network model.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Chandran, Kartik; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-05-01

    Over the coming decades nitrous oxide (N2O) is expected to become a dominant greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone depleting substance. In wastewater treatment systems, N2O is majorly produced by nitrifying microbes through biochemical reduction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitric oxide (NO). However it is unknown if the amount of N2O formed is affected by alternative NO redox reactions catalyzed by oxidative nitrite oxidoreductase (NirK), cytochromes (i.e., P460 [CytP460] and 554 [Cyt554 ]) and flavohemoglobins (Hmp) in ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and NOB, respectively). In this study, a mathematical model is developed to assess how N2O formation is affected by such alternative nitrogen redox transformations. The developed multispecies metabolic network model captures the nitrogen respiratory pathways inferred from genomes of eight AOB and NOB species. The performance of model variants, obtained as different combinations of active NO redox reactions, was assessed against nine experimental datasets for nitrifying cultures producing N2O at different concentration of electron donor and acceptor. Model predicted metabolic fluxes show that only variants that included NO oxidation to NO2(-) by CytP460 and Hmp in AOB gave statistically similar estimates to observed production rates of N2O, NO, NO2(-) and nitrate (NO3(-)), together with fractions of AOB and NOB species in biomass. Simulations showed that NO oxidation to NO2(-) decreased N2O formation by 60% without changing culture's NO2(-) production rate. Model variants including NO reduction to N2O by Cyt554 and cNor in NOB did not improve the accuracy of experimental datasets estimates, suggesting null N2O production by NOB during nitrification. Finally, the analysis shows that in nitrifying cultures transitioning from dissolved oxygen levels above 3.8 ± 0.38 to <1.5 ± 0.8 mg/L, NOB cells can oxidize the NO produced by AOB through reactions catalyzed by oxidative NirK. PMID:26551878

  12. Revisiting the catalytic CuZ cluster of nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase. Evidence of a bridging inorganic sulfur.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Djinovic-Carugo, K; Haltia, T; Cabrito, I; Saraste, M; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Tegoni, M; Cambillau, C

    2000-12-29

    Nitrous-oxide reductases (N2OR) catalyze the two-electron reduction of N(2)O to N(2). The crystal structure of N2ORs from Pseudomonas nautica (Pn) and Paracoccus denitrificans (Pd) were solved at resolutions of 2.4 and 1.6 A, respectively. The Pn N2OR structure revealed that the catalytic CuZ center belongs to a new type of metal cluster in which four copper ions are liganded by seven histidine residues. A bridging oxygen moiety and two other hydroxide ligands were proposed to complete the ligation scheme (Brown, K., Tegoni, M., Prudencio, M., Pereira, A. S., Besson, S., Moura, J. J. G., Moura, I., and Cambillau, C. (2000) Nat. Struct. Biol. 7, 191-195). However, in the CuZ cluster, inorganic sulfur chemical determination and the high resolution structure of Pd N2OR identified a bridging inorganic sulfur instead of an oxygen. This result reconciles the novel CuZ cluster with the hitherto puzzling spectroscopic data. PMID:11024061

  13. Carbon dioxide(CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes in an agro-ecosystems under changing physical and biological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, L.; Eberwein, J.; Oikawa, P.; Jenerette, D.; Grantz, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Liyin Liang1, Jennifer Eberwein1, Patty Oikawa1, Darrel Jenerette1, David Grantz1 1Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA Carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the major greenhouse gases and together produce a strong positive radiative forcing in the atmosphere. The fluxes of CO2 and N2O from soil to atmosphere vary with physical and biological factors, e.g., temperature, soil moisture, pH value, soil organic carbon contents, microorganism communities and so on. Understanding the interactions among these factors is critical to estimation of CO2 and N2O emissions. We investigate these fluxes in an extreme production environment with very high maximum temperatures, at the agricultural experiment station of University of California-Desert Research Center in the Imperial Valley of southern California. In this research, we measured the CO2 and N2O fluxes from soil incubation under controlled laboratory conditions, in surface chambers under field conditions and by eddy covariance. We explore the variation of CO2 and N2O fluxes and relationship between them in this extreme biofuel production environment. The discrete chamber measurements showed that the N2O flux in our field sites is 2.39×0.70 μg N m-2 hr-1, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) from 0.86 to 3.92 μg N m-2 hr-1. Compared to the previous reported value (0.45~26.26 μg N m-2 hr-1) of N2O flux in California, the N2O flux from biofuel crop land is in the lower level, although more observations should be took to confirm it. The N2O flux also shows very high variability within a field of biomass Sorghum, ranging from 0.40 to 8.19 μg N m-2 hr-1 across 11 sites owning to the high variability of physical and biological factors. Soil incubation measurements will be conducted to identify the sources of this variability. The eddy covariance measurements will allow calculation of the CO2 and N2O emissions at the ecosystem level as a step in quantifying

  14. Lake acidification and oxygen depletion may synergistically enhance nitrous oxide (N2O) production by nitrifier denitrification in a subalpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, C. H.; Goepfert, T. J.; Rollog, M.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms are an important source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). They produce N2O through two mechanisms: by the decomposition of an intermediate in the ammonia (NH3) oxidation reaction, and by nitrifier denitrification, which is the enzymatic reduction of nitrite (NO2-). We investigated the impact of water pH and oxygen (O2) concentrations on rates of N2O production by these two mechanisms in the water column of Lake Lugano, a subalpine lake between Switzerland and Italy. Acidification of natural waters is known to reduce the rate of ammonia oxidation by forcing the equilibrium NH4+ ←→ NH3 + H+ away from NH3, the form that is preferentially taken up by ammonia oxidizers. In turn, this reduces the rate of N2O production by decomposition of the reaction intermediate during ammonia oxidation. However, using 15NH4+ and 15NO2- tracer additions during lake water incubations, we showed that reducing the pH from in situ values of 7.5 to 8 down to 6 to 7 actually increased the rate of N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. Hypoxia is thought to enhance N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. We did not observe nitrifier denitrification in incubations that were fully oxic (partial pressure of O2 = 20.9%) or had reduced O2 (partial pressure = 12%). However, when the incubation pH was lowered and the O2 reduced to 12%, N2O production by nitrifier denitrification was much greater than it was in incubations where only the pH was reduced or only the O2 concentration was reduced. Water for these experiments was drawn from depths just below the epilimnion of the monomictic south basin of Lugano, an environment whose pH, O2, and nutrient concentrations fluctuate throughout the water column on a seasonal basis and change in the shallower depths on a daily basis. We discuss the implications of these changes for the flux of shallow N2O into the atmosphere and a possible mechanism that explains the synergistic influence of O2 and pH on

  15. Factors Controlling Fluxes of Nitrous Oxide (N-N2O) in AN Upland Tropical Forest (atlantic Forest) - Brazil, Rio de Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, I.; de Mello, W. Z.; McDowell, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Atlantic Forest is located along the Brazilian coast and inland to Paraguay and Argentina. It has been largely devastated years ago by anthropogenic activities, such as agriculture and urbanization. Only ten percent of its original area remains (100.000 km2), which is concentrated on high lands. Atlantic Forest is a biodiversity hotspot that receives high nitrogen (N) input through atmospheric deposition in forests of Rio de Janeiro; however, not much is known about the consequences of this N addition. This study has been conducted in the Serra dos Orgaos National Park (SONP - 22.782 km2) located a few kilometers Northeast of Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Region, Sea Mountain. The forest, characterized as Tropical Moist Forest, is rigorously protected. Vegetation varies along the altitudinal gradient, where the highest peak is at 2,200m asl. Previous studies reported that N atmospheric deposition in SONP varies from 14 to 24 kg ha-1 year-1. The high N deposition on tropical forests increases emission to the atmosphere of N-N2O, a greenhouse gas. There is a lack of N-N2O measurements in tropical forests, mainly in upland tropical forests. We present fluxes of N-N2O from a Brazilian upland tropical forest, and assess the factors controlling N-N2O fluxes. Samples were collected from eight grids (48m2), between 330-451m asl (Subtropical vegetation) and eight grids between 1137-1251m (Montane vegetation), during the dry (July 2008) and wet (Jan-Feb 2009) seasons. Daily, N-N2O (N=372) and soil (N=185) were collected. Nitrous oxide emission was 0,7 (lower altitude) and 0,3 kgN ha-1 year-1 (higher altitude), which is lower than in other upland tropical forests, such as Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, where atmospheric N input (4 kg ha-1 year-1) is not as high as in SONP. Water filled pore space, soil temperature, phosphorus and C:N are the main factors controlling N-N2O fluxes. Manganese was not a good indicator for presence or absence of N-N2O. Higher N-N2O

  16. Characterizing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions over a Wheat-based Cropping System in the Northwest United States Using the Modified Bowen Ratio Technique and Static Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldo, Sarah; Kostyanovsky, Kirill; O'Keeffe, Patrick; Pressley, Shelley; Huggins, Dave; Stockle, Claudio; Lamb, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Agricultural soils are the primary source of N2O, which is created as a by-product of soil microbial processes. The production and emission of N2O is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability, or "hot spots" and "hot moments". These behaviors, along with limitations in instrument sensitivity to N2O, are challenges in characterizing emissions. Many studies have monitored N2O emissions using either static chambers or micrometeorological measurements or the two methods together. The two techniques are complementary: chamber methods have a lower detection limit and are more reliable as their operation does not depend on atmospheric conditions, but may not capture spatial variability even with multiple chambers. Tower-based methods are subject to relatively high data loss due to non-ideal conditions and to less sensitive detection limits, but have a larger measurement footprint and can characterize field-scale emissions. This study aims to characterize a long-term, field-scale N2O budget over two winter wheat fields located in the Inland Pacific Northwest of the United States, both in terms of an annual emission budget and in terms of understanding what causes hot moments. We combined continuous measurements of N2O emissions from a system of sixteen automated, static chambers with tower-based measurements of N2O fluxes. We used the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) technique with temperature as a tracer. Preliminary results indicate that freeze-thaw cycles in the winter make up a higher percentage of annual emissions than previously thought. Furthermore, comparison of the chamber results to the tower-based measurements imply that the chambers may be underestimating field-scale N2O fluxes because they are not adequately capturing hot spots of emissions. We are conducting ongoing work on how to integrate the two measurement techniques, as well as how the empirical measurements compare with

  17. Spatial variability of nitrous oxide and methane emissions from an MBT landfill in operation: strong N2O hotspots at the working face.

    PubMed

    Harborth, Peter; Fuss, Roland; Münnich, Kai; Flessa, Heinz; Fricke, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is an effective technique, which removes organic carbon from municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to deposition. Thereby, methane (CH4) production in the landfill is strongly mitigated. However, direct measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from full-scale MBT landfills have not been conducted so far. Thus, CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a German MBT landfill in operation as well as their concentrations in the landfill gas (LFG) were measured. High N2O emissions of 20-200gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1) magnitude (up to 428mgNm(-2)h(-1)) were observed within 20m of the working face. CH4 emissions were highest at the landfill zone located at a distance of 30-40m from the working face, where they reached about 10gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1). The MBT material in this area has been deposited several weeks earlier. Maximum LFG concentration for N2O was 24.000ppmv in material below the emission hotspot. At a depth of 50cm from the landfill surface a strong negative correlation between N2O and CH4 concentrations was observed. From this and from the distribution pattern of extractable ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate it has been concluded that strong N2O production is associated with nitrification activity and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate, which is initiated by oxygen input during waste deposition. Therefore, CH4 mitigation measures, which often employ aeration, could result in a net increase of GHG emissions due to increased N2O emissions, especially at MBT landfills. PMID:23453435

  18. Seasonal, inter-annual and decadal changes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Scheldt estuary (Belgium, The Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Middelburg, Jack J. B.; Chou, Lei; Kromkamp, Jacco; Houtekamer, Marco; Harlay, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    We carried out monthly cruises to study the seasonal and spatial variations of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide CO2 (pCO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations in the Scheldt estuary, a strongly human impacted system located in Belgium and the Netherlands. This survey was initiated in 2008 for pCO2, and from 2009 onwards for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). In the lower estuary, pCO2 strongly decreased and oxygen saturation level (%O2) strongly increased during the spring phytoplankton bloom. In the upper estuary, two yearly maxima of pCO2 coinciding with minima of %O2 occurred in spring and fall due to enhanced nitrification and/or net heterotrophy. In the upper estuary, pCO2 decreased in winter due to lower temperature (affecting solubility and inhibiting biological activity). pCO2 also decreased in summer due to increase in primary production and decrease of net heterotrophy. In the upper estuary, maxima of CH4 were observed in winter due to enhanced river inputs (high discharge) while in the lower estuary higher CH4 was observed in summer. This was probably due to inputs of CH4 from inter-tidal areas at the mouth of estuary that increased in summer due to higher temperatures and higher organic matter availability. N2O also showed higher values during winter in the upper estuary, but in summer N2O was low in the lower estuary due to decreased solubility due to higher temperature. During winter 2009, extremely high N2O values were observed in the upper estuary, up to 3257 nM (23738% saturation). This was related to the problems encountered by the Brussels North waste water treatment plant (WWTP) in late 2009. One of the collectors of the station was shut down in 25 November 2009, and by 8 December 2009, the whole WWTP was shut down and the waste-water was delivered directly to the Rupel. Extremely high N2O values were observed in the upper estuary on 7 December 2009, and abnormally high N2O values (compared to other years) persisted

  19. Nitrous oxide (N2O): the dominant ozone-depleting substance emitted in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Ravishankara, A R; Daniel, John S; Portmann, Robert W

    2009-10-01

    By comparing the ozone depletion potential-weighted anthropogenic emissions of N2O with those of other ozone-depleting substances, we show that N2O emission currently is the single most important ozone-depleting emission and is expected to remain the largest throughout the 21st century. N2O is unregulated by the Montreal Protocol. Limiting future N2O emissions would enhance the recovery of the ozone layer from its depleted state and would also reduce the anthropogenic forcing of the climate system, representing a win-win for both ozone and climate. PMID:19713491

  20. A new CuZ active form in the catalytic reduction of N(2)O by nitrous oxide reductase from Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Simone; Pauleta, Sofia R; Paes de Sousa, Patrícia M; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2010-08-01

    The final step of bacterial denitrification, the two-electron reduction of N(2)O to N(2), is catalyzed by a multi-copper enzyme named nitrous oxide reductase. The catalytic centre of this enzyme is a tetranuclear copper site called CuZ, unique in biological systems. The in vitro reconstruction of the activity requires a slow activation in the presence of the artificial electron donor, reduced methyl viologen, necessary to reduce CuZ from the resting non-active state (1Cu(II)/3Cu(I)) to the fully reduced state (4Cu(I)), in contrast to the turnover cycle, which is very fast. In the present work, the direct reaction of the activated form of Pseudomonas nautica nitrous oxide reductase with stoichiometric amounts of N(2)O allowed the identification of a new reactive intermediate of the catalytic centre, CuZ degrees , in the turnover cycle, characterized by an intense absorption band at 680 nm. Moreover, the first mediated electrochemical study of Ps. nautica nitrous oxide reductase with its physiological electron donor, cytochrome c-552, was performed. The intermolecular electron transfer was analysed by cyclic voltammetry, under catalytic conditions, and a second-order rate constant of (5.5 +/- 0.9) x 10(5) M(-1 )s(-1) was determined. Both the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of substrate and the electrochemical studies show that the active CuZ degrees species, generated in the absence of reductants, can rearrange to the resting non-active CuZ state. In this light, new aspects of the catalytic and activation/inactivation mechanism of the enzyme are discussed. PMID:20422435

  1. UV Absorption Cross Sections of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Between 210 and 350 K and the Atmospheric Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlon, Nabilah Rontu; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Newman, Paul A.; Burkholder, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Absorption cross sections of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) are reported at five atomic UV lines (184.95, 202.548, 206.200, 213.857, and 228.8 nm) at 27 temperatures in the range 210-350 K. In addition, UV absorption spectra of CCl4 are reported between 200-235 nm as a function of temperature (225-350 K). The results from this work are critically compared with results from earlier studies. For N2O, the present results are in good agreement with the current JPL recommendation enabling a reduction in the estimated uncertainty in the N2O atmospheric photolysis rate. For CCl4, the present cross section results are systematically greater than the current recommendation at the reduced temperatures most relevant to stratospheric photolysis. The new cross sections result in a 5-7% increase in the modeled CCl4 photolysis loss, and a slight decrease in the stratospheric lifetime, from 51 to 50 years, for present day conditions. The corresponding changes in modeled inorganic chlorine and ozone in the stratosphere are quite small. A CCl4 cross section parameterization for use in 37 atmospheric model calculations is presented.

  2. Comparison of nitrous oxide (N2O) analyzers for high-precision measurements of atmospheric mole fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebegue, Benjamin; Schmidt, Martina; Ramonet, Michel; Wastine, Benoit; Yver Kwok, Camille; Laurent, Olivier; Belviso, Sauveur; Guemri, Ali; Philippon, Carole; Smith, Jeremiah; Conil, Sebastien

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few decades, in situ measurements of atmospheric N2O mole fractions have been performed using gas chromatographs (GCs) equipped with electron capture detectors. This technique, however, becomes very challenging when trying to detect the small variations of N2O as the detectors are highly nonlinear and the GCs at remote stations require a considerable amount of maintenance by qualified technicians to maintain good short-term and long-term repeatability. With new robust optical spectrometers now available for N2O measurements, we aim to identify a robust and stable analyzer that can be integrated into atmospheric monitoring networks, such as the Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS). In this study, we present the most complete comparison of N2O analyzers, with seven analyzers that were developed and commercialized by five different companies. Each instrument was characterized during a time period of approximately 8 weeks. The test protocols included the characterization of the short-term and long-term repeatability, drift, temperature dependence, linearity and sensitivity to water vapor. During the test period, ambient air measurements were compared under field conditions at the Gif-sur-Yvette station. All of the analyzers showed a standard deviation better than 0.1 ppb for the 10 min averages. Some analyzers would benefit from improvements in temperature stability to reduce the instrument drift, which could then help in reducing the frequency of calibrations. For most instruments, the water vapor correction algorithms applied by companies are not sufficient for high-precision atmospheric measurements, which results in the need to dry the ambient air prior to analysis.

  3. High production of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) in a massive marine phytoplankton culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Leiva, L.; Tarifeño, E.; Cornejo, M.; Kiene, R.; Farías, L.

    2010-09-01

    The production of large amounts of algal biomass for different purposes such as aquaculture or biofuels, may cause impacts on the marine environment. One such impact is the production of radiatively active trace gases and aerosols with climate cooling (dimethyl sulfide DMS and its precursor DMSP) and warming (N2O and CH4) effects. Total and dissolved DMSP, N2O and CH4, together with other environmental variables were monitored daily for 46 days within a massive microalgae monoculture of Nannochloris (Chlorophyceae) in an open pond system. The growth of this green microalgae was stimulated by the addition of N- and P-rich salts, resulting in exponential growth (growth phase) during the first 17 days observed by cell abundance (1 × 106 to 4.4 × 106 cell mL-1) and Chl-a levels (from 1.4 to 96 mg Chl-a m-3) followed by a decrease in both Chl-a and cell abundance (senescence phase). Total DMSP (from 6.3 to 142 μmol m-3), dissolved DMSP i.e. 5.8 to 137 μmol m-3 and N2O (from 8 to 600 μmol m-3) abruptly peaked during the senescence phase, whereas CH4 steadily increased between 2 and 10 μmol m-3 during the growth phase. Different ratios between tracers and Chl-a during both phases reveal different biochemical processes involved in the cycling of these gases and tracers. Our results show that despite the consumption of large quantities of CO2 by the massive algal culture, a minor amount of DMS and huge amounts of greenhouse gases were produced, in particular N2O, which has a greater radiative effect per molecule than CO2. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical studies and for environmental management of aquaculture activities.

  4. Comparison of nitrous oxide (N2O) analyzers for high-precision measurements of atmospheric mole fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebegue, B.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Wastine, B.; Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Belviso, S.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Smith, J.; Conil, S.; Jost, H. J.; Crosson, E. R.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few decades, in-situ measurements of atmospheric N2O mole fractions have been performed using gas chromatographs (GCs) equipped with electron capture detectors (ECDs). When trying to meet the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) quality goal, this technique becomes very challenging as the detectors are highly non-linear and the GCs at remote stations require a considerable amount of maintenance by qualified technicians to maintain good short-term and long-term repeatability. With more robust optical spectrometers being now available for N2O measurements, we aim to identify a robust and stable analyzer that can be integrated into atmospheric monitoring networks, such as the Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS). In this study, we tested seven analyzers that were developed and commercialized from five different companies and compared the results with established techniques. Each instrument was characterized during a time period of approximately eight weeks. The test protocols included the characterization of the short-term and long-term repeatability, drift, temperature dependence, linearity and sensitivity to water vapor. During the test period, ambient air measurements were compared under field conditions at the Gif-sur-Yvette station. All of the analyzers showed a standard deviation better than 0.1 ppb for the 10 min averages. Some analyzers would benefit from improvements in temperature stability to reduce the instrument drift, which could then help in reducing the frequency of calibrations. For most instruments, the water vapor correction algorithms applied by companies are not sufficient for high-precision atmospheric measurements, which results in the need to dry the ambient air prior to analysis.

  5. Simultaneous determination of stable isotopic compositions of nitrous oxide (δ15N and δ18O of N2O) and methane (δ13C of CH4) in nanomolar quantities from a single water sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Komatsu, D. D.; Nakagawa, F.

    2010-12-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrous oxide (δ15N of N2O and δ18O of N2O, respectively) and methane (δ13C of CH4) have provided us with some interesting geochemical insights. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and automated analytical system to simultaneously determine the concentrations and stable isotopic compositions of nanomolar quantities of N2O and CH4 in the environmental water, by combining continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and a He-sparging system to extract and purify the dissolved gases. Our system, which is composed of a sparging bottle, a chemical trap, four cold traps and a capillary gas chromatograph that use ultra-pure helium as the carrier gas, achieves complete extraction of N2O and CH4 in a water sample and separation among N2O, CH4, and the other component gases. The flow path subsequent to gas chromatograph was periodically changed to pass the gases through the combustion furnace to convert CH4 and the other hydrocarbons into CO2, or to bypass the combustion furnace for the direct introduction of eluted N2O into the mass spectrometer, for determining the stable isotopic compositions through monitoring m/z = 44, 45, and 46, on the bases of CO2+ and N2O+, respectively. The analytical system can be operated automatically with sequential software programmed on a personal computer. The analytical precisions (the standard deviation of a single measurement) were better than 0.2‰ for δ15N of N2O and 0.3‰ for δ18O of N2O, in the case of more than 6.7 nmol N2O injection and better than 1.4‰ for δ15N of N2O and 2.6‰ for δ18O of N2O, in the case of more than 0.2 nmol N2O injection, respectively. Simultaneously, the analytical precisions were better than 0.07‰ for δ13C of CH4, in the case of more than 5.5 nmol CH4 infection and better than 2.1‰ for δ13C of CH4, when more than 0.024 nmol CH4 injection. In this manner, we can simultaneously determine stable isotopic compositions of a 120 mL water sample having

  6. Isotopic signature of N(2)O produced by marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Alyson E; Buchwald, Carolyn; McIlvin, Matthew R; Casciotti, Karen L

    2011-09-01

    The ocean is an important global source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a greenhouse gas that contributes to stratospheric ozone destruction. Bacterial nitrification and denitrification are thought to be the primary sources of marine N(2)O, but the isotopic signatures of N(2)O produced by these processes are not consistent with the marine contribution to the global N(2)O budget. Based on enrichment cultures, we report that archaeal ammonia oxidation also produces N(2)O. Natural-abundance stable isotope measurements indicate that the produced N(2)O had bulk δ(15)N and δ(18)O values higher than observed for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria but similar to the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values attributed to the oceanic N(2)O source to the atmosphere. Our results suggest that ammonia-oxidizing archaea may be largely responsible for the oceanic N(2)O source. PMID:21798895

  7. Nitrous oxide in fresh water systems: An estimate for the yield of atmospheric N2O associated with disposal of human waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, W. A.; Elkins, J. W.; Kolb, C. E.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Wofsy, S. C.; Duran, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The N2O content of waters in the Potomac and Merrimack Rivers was measured on a number of occasions over the period April to July 1977. The concentrations of dissolved N2O exceeded those which would apply in equilibrium with air by factors ranging from about 46 in the Potomac to 1.2 in the Merrimack. Highest concentrations of dissolved N2O were associated with sewage discharges from the vicinity of Washington, D. C., and analysis indicates a relatively high yield, 1.3 to 11%, for prompt conversion of waste nitrogen to N2O. Measurements of dissolved N2O in fresh water ponds near Boston demonstrated that aquatic systems provide both strong sources and sinks for atmospheric N2O.

  8. Reducing N2O Emission from a Domestic-Strength Nitrifying Culture by Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-07-19

    An increase of nitrite in the domestic-strength range is generally recognized to stimulate nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). It was found in this study, however, that N2O emission from a mainstream nitritation system (cyclic nitrite = 25-45 mg of N/L) that was established by free nitrous acid (FNA)-based sludge treatment was not higher but much lower than that from the initial nitrifying system with full conversion of NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N. Under dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of 2.5-3.0 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was 76% lower than that from the initial stage. Even when the DO level was reduced to 0.3-0.8 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was still 40% lower. An investigation of the mechanism showed that FNA treatment caused a shift of the stimulation threshold of nitrite on N2O emission. At the nitritation stage, the maximal N2O emission factor occurred at ∼16 mg of N/(L of nitrite). However, it increased with increasing nitrite in the range of 0-56 mg of N/L at the initial stage. FNA treatment decreased the biomass-specific N2O production rate, suggesting that the enzymes relevant to nitrifier denitrification were inhibited. Microbial analysis revealed that FNA treatment decreased the microbial community diversity but increased the abundances of AOB and denitrifiers. PMID:27294698

  9. Isotope signatures of N2O emitted from vegetable soil: Ammonia oxidation drives N2O production in NH4(+)-fertilized soil of North China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yuzhong; Xu, Chunying; Li, Qiaozhen; Lin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas. In North China, vegetable fields are amended with high levels of N fertilizer and irrigation water, which causes massive N2O flux. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of microbial processes to N2O production and characterize isotopic signature effects on N2O source partitioning. We conducted a microcosm study that combined naturally abundant isotopologues and gas inhibitor techniques to analyze N2O flux and its isotopomer signatures [δ(15)N(bulk), δ(18)O, and SP (intramolecular (15)N site preference)] that emitted from vegetable soil after the addition of NH4(+) fertilizers. The results show that ammonia oxidation is the predominant process under high water content (70% water-filled pore space), and nitrifier denitrification contribution increases with increasing N content. δ(15)N(bulk) and δ(18)O of N2O may not provide information about microbial processes due to great shifts in precursor signatures and atom exchange, especially for soil treated with NH4(+) fertilizer. SP and associated two end-member mixing model are useful to distinguish N2O source and contribution. Further work is needed to explore isotopomer signature stability to improve N2O microbial process identification. PMID:27387280

  10. Isotope signatures of N2O emitted from vegetable soil: Ammonia oxidation drives N2O production in NH4+-fertilized soil of North China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yuzhong; Xu, Chunying; Li, Qiaozhen; Lin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas. In North China, vegetable fields are amended with high levels of N fertilizer and irrigation water, which causes massive N2O flux. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of microbial processes to N2O production and characterize isotopic signature effects on N2O source partitioning. We conducted a microcosm study that combined naturally abundant isotopologues and gas inhibitor techniques to analyze N2O flux and its isotopomer signatures [δ15Nbulk, δ18O, and SP (intramolecular 15N site preference)] that emitted from vegetable soil after the addition of NH4+ fertilizers. The results show that ammonia oxidation is the predominant process under high water content (70% water-filled pore space), and nitrifier denitrification contribution increases with increasing N content. δ15Nbulk and δ18O of N2O may not provide information about microbial processes due to great shifts in precursor signatures and atom exchange, especially for soil treated with NH4+ fertilizer. SP and associated two end-member mixing model are useful to distinguish N2O source and contribution. Further work is needed to explore isotopomer signature stability to improve N2O microbial process identification. PMID:27387280

  11. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and...

  12. Synthetic chemistry with nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Severin, Kay

    2015-10-01

    This review article summarizes efforts to use nitrous oxide (N2O, 'laughing gas') as a reagent in synthetic chemistry. The focus will be on reactions which are carried out in homogeneous solution under (relatively) mild conditions. First, the utilization of N2O as an oxidant is discussed. Due to the low intrinsic reactivity of N2O, selective oxidation reactions of highly reactive compounds are possible. Furthermore, it is shown that transition metal complexes can be used to catalyze oxidation reactions, in some cases with high turnover numbers. In the final part of this overview, the utilization of N2O as a building block for more complex molecules is discussed. It is shown that N2O can be used as an N-atom donor for the synthesis of interesting organic molecules such as triazenes and azo dyes. PMID:26104268

  13. A search for interstellar nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Snyder, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive search for interstellar nitrous oxide (N2O) has been made at two different frequencies, 75.4 and 100.5 GHz, in a number of molecular sources. No N2O signal was detected; however, a number of other spectral lines including two new transitions of methyl formate and several new unidentified lines were measured.

  14. Nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation: an update.

    PubMed

    Brunick, Ann; Clark, Morris S

    2013-01-01

    This course will teach the desirable characteristics of nitrous oxide, indications and contraindications for N2O/O2 use, as well as facts and myths surrounding chronic exposure to nitrous oxide, the biologic effects associated with high levels of the gas, and ways to assess and minimize trace gas contamination in an outpatient setting. PMID:24003604

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commerical cattle feedlot in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), from open beef cattle feedlots is becoming a concern. Research measuring emission rates of N2O from open beef cattle feedlots, however, has been limited. This study was conducted to quantify the N2O emission rate from pen surfaces in a com...

  16. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification which converts N to N2O and dinitrog...

  17. Sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide from combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, W. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Beer, J. M.; Toqan, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) have been analyzed from industrial boilers and from a large experimental combustor burning natural gas, oil, or coal. Production of N2O and production of NO(x) were observed to be correlated, with an average molar ratio of 0.58:1 (N2O-N:NO). In conventional single-stage combustors, about 14 percent of fuel nitrogen is converted to N2O and 24 percent is converted to NO(x). Conversion of fuel nitrogen to N2O was much less efficient in a two-stage experimental combustor and in wood fires. A model is presented describing emissions of N2O globally, from the beginning of the industrial revolution to the present. It is expected that concentrations of N2O should rise more than 20 percent to about 367 ppb by the year 2050, based on conservative projections of world energy consumption.

  18. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production.

    PubMed

    Venterea, Rodney T; Clough, Timothy J; Coulter, Jeffrey A; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Wang, Ping; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4(+)) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3(-)) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2(-)) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2(-) oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2(-) was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2(-). Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2(-) oxidization leading to greater NO2(-) levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2(-), N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2(-) levels and N2O production. PMID:26179972

  19. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, R. T.; Sadowsky, M.; Breuillin-Sessoms, F.; Wang, P.; Clough, T. J.; Coulter, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  20. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-07-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  1. Greenhouse effect due to atmospheric nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Wang, W. C.; Lacis, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The greenhouse effect due to nitrous oxide in the present atmosphere is about 0.8 K. Increase in atmospheric N2O due to perturbation of the nitrogen cycle by man may lead to an increase in surface temperature as large as 0.5 K by 2025, or 1.0 K by 2100. Other climatic effects of N2O are briefly discussed.

  2. The effect of dissolved oxygen on N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Erler, Dirk; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is commonly recognized as an important factor influencing nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, it has been difficult to separate the true effect of DO from that of nitrite, as DO variation often affects nitrite accumulation. The effect of DO on N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated in this study. Nitrite accumulation was minimised by augmenting nitrite oxidation through the addition of an enriched NOB sludge. It was demonstrated that the specific N2O production rate increased from 0 to 1.9 ± 0.09 (n = 3) mg N2O-N/hr/g VSS with an increase of DO concentration from 0 to 3.0 mg O2/L, whereas N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) decreased from 10.6 ± 1.7% (n = 3) at DO = 0.2 mg O2/L to 2.4 ± 0.1% (n = 3) at DO = 3.0 mg O2/L. The site preference measurements indicated that both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways contributed to N2O production, and DO had an important effect on the relative contributions of the two pathways. This finding is supported by analysis of the process data using an N2O model describing both pathways. As DO increased from 0.2 to 3.0 mg O2/L, the contribution of AOB denitrification decreased from 92% - 95%-66% - 73%, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the contribution by the NH2OH oxidation pathway. PMID:25179869

  3. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of coal combustion as a significant global source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions was reexamined through on-line emission measurements from six pulverized-coal-fired utility boilers and from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors. The full-scale utility boilers yielded d...

  4. Nitrogen Source Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of N fertilizer source and tillage on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soils under several irrigated, crop management systems were evaluated. Irrigated corn production systems [conventional-till continuous corn (CT-CC); no-till continuous corn (NT-CC); NT corn-dry bean (NT-CDb); and NT cor...

  5. Isotope Effects Associated with N2O Production by Fungal and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductases: Implications for Enzyme Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegg, E. L.; Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is both a powerful greenhouse gas and a key participant in ozone destruction. Microbial activity accounts for over 70% of the N2O produced annually, and the atmospheric concentration of N2O continues to rise. Because the fungal and bacterial denitrification pathways are major contributors to microbial N2O production, understanding the mechanism by which NO is reduced to N2O will contribute to both N2O source tracing and quantification. Our strategy utilizes stable isotopes to probe the enzymatic mechanism of microbial N2O production. Although the use of stable isotopes to study enzyme mechanisms is not new, our approach is distinct in that we employ both measurements of isotopic preferences of purified enzyme and DFT calculations, thereby providing a synergistic combination of experimental and computational approaches. We analyzed δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom) of N2O produced by purified fungal cytochrome P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum as well as bacterial cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. P450nor exhibits an inverse kinetic isotope effect for Nβ (KIE = 0.9651) but a normal isotope effect for both Nα (KIE = 1.0127) and the oxygen atom (KIE = 1.0264). These results suggest a mechanism where NO binds to the ferric heme in the P450nor active site and becomes Nβ. Analysis of the NO-binding step indicated a greater difference in zero point energy in the transition state than the ground state, resulting in the inverse KIE observed for Nβ. Following protonation and rearrangement, it is speculated that this complex forms a FeIV-NHOH- species as a key intermediate. Our data are consistent with the second NO (which becomes Nα and O in the N2O product) attacking the FeIV-NHOH- species to generate a FeIII-N2O2H2 complex that enzymatically (as opposed to abiotically) breaks down to release N2O. Conversely, our preliminary data

  6. Photolytic Fractionation of Stratospheric Nitrous Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, G. A.; Liang, M.; Morgan, C. G.

    2002-05-01

    The isotopically light N2O produced by microbial activity is known to be balanced by the return of heavy stratospheric nitrous oxide. Present atmospheric models predict fractionation factors approximately half those observed, however, leaving open the possibility that unknown processes generate substantial quantities of isotopically enriched nitrous oxide. Here we present a rigorous Born-Oppenheimer analysis of the wavelength-dependent N2O photolytic fractionation and incorporate the resulting fractionation factors into two-dimensional simulations of the stratosphere. Excellent agreement is found between predictions and laboratory/stratospheric measurements, and implies that our understanding of the photochemical cycling of this important trace gas is sufficiently complete to permit quantitative determinations of the natural and anthropogenic sources of N2O using their isotopic signatures.

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, in hypoxic coastal zones remains poorly characterized due to a lack of data, though large nitrogen inputs and deoxygenation typical of these systems create the potential for large N2O emissions. We report the first N...

  8. AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON NITROUS OXIDE GAS EMISSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) gas is produced by micro-organisms during nitrification and/or denitrification of fertilizer nitrogen in soil. Atmospheric emissions of N2O can be important from an agronomic standpoint since any escape of N from the soil represents N that cannot be utilized by the crop. Once in ...

  9. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer types on nitrous oxide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The factors controlling nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions after fertilizer nitrogen (N) applications are well studied. This information can be used to choose appropriate fertilizer sources and placement methods in order to minimize direct fertilizer-induced N2O emissions in cropping systems. Several fie...

  10. Municipal gravity sewers: an unrecognised source of nitrous oxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a primary ozone-depleting substance and powerful greenhouse gas. N2O emissions from secondary-level wastewater treatment processes are relatively well understood as a result of intensive international research effort in recent times, yet little information...

  11. Modeling nitrous oxide emissions from bioenergy cropping systems using DAYCENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the largest greenhouse gas source from crop systems and quantifying it for the U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory is important. The objective of this study was to validate the ability of DAYCENT to simulate N2O emissions from bioenergy cropping systems. From weather, soil-texture c...

  12. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Cropping Systems in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on the effects of irrigated crop management practices on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions were monitored from irrigated cropping systems receiving N fertilizer rates ranging from 0 to 246 kg N ha-1 during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons. Cro...

  13. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most popular recreational drug after cannabis. In most countries, nitrous oxide is a legal drug that is widely available and cheap. Last month prevalence of use among clubbers and ravers ranges between 40 and almost 80 percent. Following one inhalation, mostly from a balloon, a euphoric, pleasant, joyful, empathogenic and sometimes hallucinogenic effect is rapidly induced (within 10 s) and disappears within some minutes. Recreational N2O use is generally moderate with most users taking less than 10 balloons of N2O per episode and about 80% of the users having less than 10 episodes per year. Side effects of N2O include transient dizziness, dissociation, disorientation, loss of balance, impaired memory and cognition, and weakness in the legs. When intoxicated accidents like tripping and falling may occur. Some fatal accidents have been reported due to due to asphyxia (hypoxia). Heavy or sustained use of N2O inactivates vitamin B12, resulting in a functional vitamin B12 deficiency and initially causing numbness in fingers, which may further progress to peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anemia. N2O use does not seem to result in dependence. Considering the generally modest use of N2O and its relative safety, it is not necessary to take legal measures. However, (potential) users should be informed about the risk of vitamin B12-deficiency related neurological and hematological effects associated with heavy use. PMID:26496821

  14. Nitrogen Source and Placement Affect Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Corn in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited information is available on the effects of N fertilizer source on soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. This article summarizes research conducted by the USDA-ARS from 2009-2011 on N fertilizer source effects on growing season soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from irrigated corn systems in...

  15. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    PubMed Central

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3−) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2−) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2− oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2− was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2−. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2− oxidization leading to greater NO2− levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2−, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2− levels and N2O production. PMID:26179972

  16. Effects of substrates on N2O emissions in an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) reactor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Wang, Dunqiu; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    N2O emission in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is of growing concern. In this study, effects of substrate concentrations on N2O emissions were investigated in an anammox reactor. Extremely high N2O emissions of 1.67 % were led by high NH4-N concentrations. Results showed that N2O emissions have a positive correlation with NH4-N concentrations in the anammox reactor. Reducing NH4-N concentrations by recycling pump resulted in decreasing N2O emissions. In addition, further studies were performed to identify a key biological process that is contributed to N2O emissions from the anammox reactor. Based on the results obtained, Nitrosomonas, which can oxidize ammonia to nitrite, was deemed as the main sources of N2O emissions. PMID:27376009

  17. A mesospheric source of nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Prasad, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    In the terrestrial atmosphere, nitrous oxide (N2O) has a major role in the chemistry of ozone. Current atmospheric models assume that N2O is produced only by fixation at the earth's surface and that there are no local sources in the stratosphere or mesosphere. It is pointed out here that a significant in situ N2O source does exist above 20 km due to the excitation of the metastable N2(A 3Sigma u +) state by resonance absorption of solar UV photons that penetrate deeply into the atmosphere through the 1,800-2,200 A O2-O3 window. This source significantly affects the NO altitude distribution in the mesosphere and, in the earth's prebiological atmosphere, made N2O an important stratospheric constituent.

  18. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitrate-rich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and deposit-feeders in eutrophic ecosystems. PMID:19255427

  19. ON-LINE MEASUREMENT OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES BY AUTOMATED GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses on-line measurement of nitrous oxide (N2O) from combustion sources by automated gas chromatography. ossil fuel combustion is suspected of contributing to measured increases in the ambient concentrations of N2O. haracterization of N2O emissions from fossil fuel...

  20. Split application of urea does not decrease and may increase nitrous oxide emissions in rainfed corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of nitrogen (N) fertilizer application timing within the growing season has the potential to reduce soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions but limited data are available to assess its effects. We compared cumulative growing season N2O emissions (cN2O) following urea applied to corn (Zea may...

  1. Contemporary and projected biogenic fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide in North American terrestrial ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in determining global climate change has been increasingly recognized, but terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets and the underlying mechanisms remain far from certain. Accurate estimation of terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets would be a critical step fo...

  2. Nitrous oxide fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), from open beef cattle feedlots is becoming an environmental concern; however, research measuring emission rates of N2O from open beef cattle feedlots has been limited. This study was conducted to quantify N2O emission fluxes as affected by...

  3. N2O FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers at three electric power generating stations. Six units were tested, two at each site, including sizes ranging from 165 to 700 MW. Several manufacturers and boiler firing type...

  4. Revision of N2O-producing pathways in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Jessica A; Price, Jennifer; Stein, Lisa Y

    2014-08-01

    Nitrite reductase (NirK) and nitric oxide reductase (NorB) have long been thought to play an essential role in nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. However, essential gaps remain in our understanding of how and when NirK and NorB are active and functional, putting into question their precise roles in N2O production by ammonia oxidizers. The growth phenotypes of the Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 wild-type and mutant strains deficient in expression of NirK, NorB, and both gene products were compared under atmospheric and reduced O2 tensions. Anoxic resting-cell assays and instantaneous nitrite (NO2 (-)) reduction experiments were done to assess the ability of the wild-type and mutant N. europaea strains to produce N2O through the nitrifier denitrification pathway. Results confirmed the role of NirK for efficient substrate oxidation of N. europaea and showed that NorB is involved in N2O production during growth at both atmospheric and reduced O2 tensions. Anoxic resting-cell assays and measurements of instantaneous NO2 (-) reduction using hydrazine as an electron donor revealed that an alternate nitrite reductase to NirK is present and active. These experiments also clearly demonstrated that NorB was the sole nitric oxide reductase for nitrifier denitrification. The results of this study expand the enzymology for nitrogen metabolism and N2O production by N. europaea and will be useful to interpret pathways in other ammonia oxidizers that lack NirK and/or NorB genes. PMID:24907318

  5. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  6. The combined effect of dissolved oxygen and nitrite on N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-04-15

    Both nitrite [Formula: see text] and dissolved oxygen (DO) play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, few studies focused on the combined effect of them on N2O production by AOB as well as the corresponding mechanisms. In this study, N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated under various [Formula: see text] and DO concentrations. At each investigated DO level, both the biomass specific N2O production rate and the N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) increased as [Formula: see text] concentration increased from 3 mg N/L to 50 mg N/L. However, at each investigated [Formula: see text] level, the maximum biomass specific N2O production rate occurred at DO of 0.85 mg O2/L, while the N2O emission factor decreased as DO increased from 0.35 to 3.5 mg O2/L. The analysis of the process data using a mathematical N2O model incorporating both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways indicated that the contribution of AOB denitrification pathway increased as [Formula: see text] concentration increased, but decreased as DO concentration increased, accompanied by a corresponding change in the contribution of NH2OH oxidation pathway to N2O production. The AOB denitrification pathway was predominant in most cases, with the NH2OH oxidation pathway making a comparable contribution only at high DO level (e.g. 3.5 mg O2/L). PMID:25644626

  7. Isotopic signatures of N2O produced by ammonia-oxidizing archaea from soils

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Man-Young; Well, Reinhard; Min, Deullae; Giesemann, Anette; Park, Soo-Je; Kim, Jong-Geol; Kim, So-Jeong; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    N2O gas is involved in global warming and ozone depletion. The major sources of N2O are soil microbial processes. Anthropogenic inputs into the nitrogen cycle have exacerbated these microbial processes, including nitrification. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are major members of the pool of soil ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. This study investigated the isotopic signatures of N2O produced by soil AOA and associated N2O production processes. All five AOA strains (I.1a, I.1a-associated and I.1b clades of Thaumarchaeota) from soil produced N2O and their yields were comparable to those of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The levels of site preference (SP), δ15Nbulk and δ18O -N2O of soil AOA strains were 13–30%, −13 to −35% and 22–36%, respectively, and strains MY1–3 and other soil AOA strains had distinct isotopic signatures. A 15N-NH4+-labeling experiment indicated that N2O originated from two different production pathways (that is, ammonia oxidation and nitrifier denitrification), which suggests that the isotopic signatures of N2O from AOA may be attributable to the relative contributions of these two processes. The highest N2O production yield and lowest site preference of acidophilic strain CS may be related to enhanced nitrifier denitrification for detoxifying nitrite. Previously, it was not possible to detect N2O from soil AOA because of similarities between its isotopic signatures and those from AOB. Given the predominance of AOA over AOB in most soils, a significant proportion of the total N2O emissions from soil nitrification may be attributable to AOA. PMID:24225887

  8. Isotopic signatures of N2O produced by ammonia-oxidizing archaea from soils.

    PubMed

    Jung, Man-Young; Well, Reinhard; Min, Deullae; Giesemann, Anette; Park, Soo-Je; Kim, Jong-Geol; Kim, So-Jeong; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-05-01

    N2O gas is involved in global warming and ozone depletion. The major sources of N2O are soil microbial processes. Anthropogenic inputs into the nitrogen cycle have exacerbated these microbial processes, including nitrification. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are major members of the pool of soil ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. This study investigated the isotopic signatures of N2O produced by soil AOA and associated N2O production processes. All five AOA strains (I.1a, I.1a-associated and I.1b clades of Thaumarchaeota) from soil produced N2O and their yields were comparable to those of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The levels of site preference (SP), δ(15)N(bulk) and δ(18)O -N2O of soil AOA strains were 13-30%, -13 to -35% and 22-36%, respectively, and strains MY1-3 and other soil AOA strains had distinct isotopic signatures. A (15)N-NH4(+)-labeling experiment indicated that N2O originated from two different production pathways (that is, ammonia oxidation and nitrifier denitrification), which suggests that the isotopic signatures of N2O from AOA may be attributable to the relative contributions of these two processes. The highest N2O production yield and lowest site preference of acidophilic strain CS may be related to enhanced nitrifier denitrification for detoxifying nitrite. Previously, it was not possible to detect N2O from soil AOA because of similarities between its isotopic signatures and those from AOB. Given the predominance of AOA over AOB in most soils, a significant proportion of the total N2O emissions from soil nitrification may be attributable to AOA. PMID:24225887

  9. N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge linearly depends on inorganic carbon concentration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    The effect of inorganic carbon (IC) on nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated over a concentration range of 0-12 mmol C/L, encompassing typical IC levels in a wastewater treatment reactors. The AOB culture was enriched along with nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to perform complete nitrification. Batch experiments were conducted with continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) stripping or at controlled IC concentrations. The results revealed a linear relationship between N2O production rate (N2OR) and IC concentration (R(2) = 0.97) within the IC range studied, suggesting a substantial effect of IC on N2O production by AOB. Similar results were also obtained with an AOB culture treating anaerobic sludge digestion liquor. The fundamental mechanism responsible for this dependency is unclear; however, in agreement with previous studies, it was observed that the ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) was also influenced by the IC concentration, which could be well described by the Monod kinetics. These resulted in an exponential relationship between N2OR and AOR, as previously observed in experiments where AOR was altered by varying dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. It is therefore possible that IC indirectly affected N2OR by causing a change in AOR. The observation in this study indicates that alkalinity (mostly contributed by IC) could be a significant factor influencing N2O production and should be taken into consideration in estimating and mitigating N2O emissions in wastewater treatment systems. PMID:25706224

  10. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Hall, Robert O.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Peterson, Bruce J.; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Cooper, Lee W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, Walter K.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Johnson, Sherri L.; McDowell, William H.; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Valett, H. Maurice; Arango, Clay P.; Bernot, Melody J.; Burgin, Amy J.; Crenshaw, Chelsea L.; Helton, Ashley M.; Johnson, Laura T.; O'Brien, Jonathan M.; Potter, Jody D.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Sobota, Daniel J.; Thomas, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowing waters. Here, we present the results of whole-stream 15N-tracer additions conducted in 72 headwater streams draining multiple land-use types across the United States. We found that stream denitrification produces N2O at rates that increase with stream water nitrate (NO3−) concentrations, but that <1% of denitrified N is converted to N2O. Unlike some previous studies, we found no relationship between the N2O yield and stream water NO3−. We suggest that increased stream NO3− loading stimulates denitrification and concomitant N2O production, but does not increase the N2O yield. In our study, most streams were sources of N2O to the atmosphere and the highest emission rates were observed in streams draining urban basins. Using a global river network model, we estimate that microbial N transformations (e.g., denitrification and nitrification) convert at least 0.68 Tg·y−1 of anthropogenic N inputs to N2O in river networks, equivalent to 10% of the global anthropogenic N2O emission rate. This estimate of stream and river N2O emissions is three times greater than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. PMID:21173258

  11. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaulieu, J.J.; Tank, J.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Wollheim, W.M.; Hall, R.O., Jr.; Mulholland, P.J.; Peterson, B.J.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, W.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Johnson, S.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Poole, G.C.; Maurice, Valett H.; Arango, C.P.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; O'Brien, J. M.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Sobota, D.J.; Thomas, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N 2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowing waters. Here, we present the results of whole-stream 15N-tracer additions conducted in 72 headwater streams draining multiple land-use types across the United States. We found that stream denitrification produces N2O at rates that increase with stream water nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, but that <1% of denitrified N is converted to N2O. Unlike some previous studies, we found no relationship between the N2O yield and stream water NO3-. We suggest that increased stream NO3- loading stimulates denitrification and concomitant N2O production, but does not increase the N2O yield. In our study, most streams were sources of N2O to the atmosphere and the highest emission rates were observed in streams draining urban basins. Using a global river network model, we estimate that microbial N transformations (e.g., denitrification and nitrification) convert at least 0.68 Tg??y -1 of anthropogenic N inputs to N2O in river networks, equivalent to 10% of the global anthropogenic N2O emission rate. This estimate of stream and river N2O emissions is three times greater than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  12. Sampling frequency affects estimates of annual nitrous oxide fluxes.

    PubMed

    Barton, L; Wolf, B; Rowlings, D; Scheer, C; Kiese, R; Grace, P; Stefanova, K; Butterbach-Bahl, K

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, a potent greenhouse gas, from soils is necessary to improve our knowledge of terrestrial N2O losses. Developing universal sampling frequencies for calculating annual N2O fluxes is difficult, as fluxes are renowned for their high temporal variability. We demonstrate daily sampling was largely required to achieve annual N2O fluxes within 10% of the 'best' estimate for 28 annual datasets collected from three continents--Australia, Europe and Asia. Decreasing the regularity of measurements either under- or overestimated annual N2O fluxes, with a maximum overestimation of 935%. Measurement frequency was lowered using a sampling strategy based on environmental factors known to affect temporal variability, but still required sampling more than once a week. Consequently, uncertainty in current global terrestrial N2O budgets associated with the upscaling of field-based datasets can be decreased significantly using adequate sampling frequencies. PMID:26522228

  13. Sampling frequency affects estimates of annual nitrous oxide fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, L.; Wolf, B.; Rowlings, D.; Scheer, C.; Kiese, R.; Grace, P.; Stefanova, K.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, a potent greenhouse gas, from soils is necessary to improve our knowledge of terrestrial N2O losses. Developing universal sampling frequencies for calculating annual N2O fluxes is difficult, as fluxes are renowned for their high temporal variability. We demonstrate daily sampling was largely required to achieve annual N2O fluxes within 10% of the ‘best’ estimate for 28 annual datasets collected from three continents—Australia, Europe and Asia. Decreasing the regularity of measurements either under- or overestimated annual N2O fluxes, with a maximum overestimation of 935%. Measurement frequency was lowered using a sampling strategy based on environmental factors known to affect temporal variability, but still required sampling more than once a week. Consequently, uncertainty in current global terrestrial N2O budgets associated with the upscaling of field-based datasets can be decreased significantly using adequate sampling frequencies.

  14. Synthesis of triazenes with nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Gregor; Riedel, Tina; Dyson, Paul J; Scopelliti, Rosario; Severin, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Triazenes are valuable compounds in organic chemistry and numerous applications have been reported. Furthermore, triazenes have been investigated extensively as potential antitumor drugs. Here, we describe a new method for the synthesis of triazenes. The procedure involves a reagent which is rarely used in synthetic organic chemistry: nitrous oxide (N2 O, "laughing gas"). Nitrous oxide mediates the coupling of lithium amides and organomagnesium compounds while serving as a nitrogen donor. Despite the very inert character of nitrous oxide, the reactions can be performed in solution under mild conditions. A key advantage of the new procedure is the ability to access triazenes with alkynyl and alkenyl substituents. These compounds are difficult to prepare by conventional methods because the required starting materials are unstable. Some of the new alkynyltriazenes were found to display high cytotoxicity in in vitro tests on ovarian and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:25336431

  15. Isotopic fractionation by a fungal P450 nitric oxide reductase during the production of N2O.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Gandhi, Hasand; Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Hegg, Eric L

    2014-09-16

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas with a 100-year global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2. Because microbes account for over 75% of the N2O released in the U.S., understanding the biochemical processes by which N2O is produced is critical to our efforts to mitigate climate change. In the current study, we used gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) to measure the δ(15)N, δ(18)O, δ(15)N(α), and δ(15)N(β) of N2O generated by purified fungal nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum. The isotope values were used to calculate site preference (SP) values (difference in δ(15)N between the central (α) and terminal (β) N atoms in N2O), enrichment factors (ε), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Both oxygen and N(α) displayed normal isotope effects during enzymatic NO reduction with ε values of -25.7‰ (KIE = 1.0264) and -12.6‰ (KIE = 1.0127), respectively. However, bulk nitrogen (average δ(15)N of N(α) and N(β)) and N(β) exhibited inverse isotope effects with ε values of 14.0‰ (KIE = 0.9862) and 36.1‰ (KIE = 0.9651), respectively. The observed inverse isotope effect in δ(15)N(β) is consistent with reversible binding of the first NO in the P450nor reaction mechanism. In contrast to the constant SP observed during NO reduction in microbial cultures, the site preference measured for purified H. capsulatum P450nor was not constant, increasing from ∼ 15‰ to ∼ 29‰ during the course of the reaction. This indicates that SP for microbial cultures can vary depending on the growth conditions, which may complicate source tracing during microbial denitrification. PMID:25121461

  16. Gross nitrous oxide production drives net nitrous oxide fluxes across a salt marsh landscape.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wendy H; Silver, Whendee L

    2016-06-01

    Sea level rise will change inundation regimes in salt marshes, altering redox dynamics that control nitrification - a potential source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2 O) - and denitrification, a major nitrogen (N) loss pathway in coastal ecosystems and both a source and sink of N2 O. Measurements of net N2 O fluxes alone yield little insight into the different effects of redox conditions on N2 O production and consumption. We used in situ measurements of gross N2 O fluxes across a salt marsh elevation gradient to determine how soil N2 O emissions in coastal ecosystems may respond to future sea level rise. Soil redox declined as marsh elevation decreased, with lower soil nitrate and higher ferrous iron in the low marsh compared to the mid and high marshes (P < 0.001 for both). In addition, soil oxygen concentrations were lower in the low and mid-marshes relative to the high marsh (P < 0.001). Net N2 O fluxes differed significantly among marsh zones (P = 0.009), averaging 9.8 ± 5.4 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) , -2.2 ± 0.9 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) , and 0.67 ± 0.57 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) in the low, mid, and high marshes, respectively. Both net N2 O release and uptake were observed in the low and high marshes, but the mid-marsh was consistently a net N2 O sink. Gross N2 O production was highest in the low marsh and lowest in the mid-marsh (P = 0.02), whereas gross N2 O consumption did not differ among marsh zones. Thus, variability in gross N2 O production rates drove the differences in net N2 O flux among marsh zones. Our results suggest that future studies should focus on elucidating controls on the processes producing, rather than consuming, N2 O in salt marshes to improve our predictions of changes in net N2 O fluxes caused by future sea level rise. PMID:26718748

  17. [The advantage and harmful effects of nitrous oxide in dental management].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yojiro; Misaki, Toru

    2011-03-01

    Frequency of using nitrous oxide (N2O) in anesthetic field decreased recently by the influence of the environmental problems and the widespread use of intravenous agents. In dental treatment, however, inhalation sedation using low concentration of N2O has been effectively used to relax dental patients. Nitrous oxide inhalation sedation for dental treatment generally involves the use of a combination of low-dose N2O and high-dose oxygen. Low-dose N2O induces the relaxation of psychological tension in dental patients who have "dental phobia". Also, high-dose oxygen would contribute to manage "(pre) syncope" due to pain stimuli. Thus, N2O inhalation sedation is effective for the dental treatment, although the leak of N2O affects the health of dental staffs. The present review described the advantage and harmful effects of N2O in dental management. PMID:21485102

  18. Detecting nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) genes in soil metagenomes: method development and implications for the nitrogen cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incomplete denitrification in soils represents a major source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. The key enzyme for mitigating N2O emissions is NosZ, which catalyzes N2O reduction to N2 and is generally attributed to denitrifiers. We recently described an “atypical” functional NosZ enz...

  19. Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Medium and Coarse Textured Soils from Corn Production Under Conventional and Alternative Fertilizer Treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers applied in corn production cause soil-to-atmosphere direct emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), a major greenhouse gas. Some of the added N that leaches into groundwater as nitrate (NO3-) can subsequently be transformed to N2O, which represents an indirect source of N2O emission...

  20. On-site wood-chip bioreactors could reduce indirect nitrous oxide emissions from tile drain waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions originating from nitrate-laden agricultural drainage waters represent approximately 21% of total N2O emissions in the USA. Typical strategies to mitigate indirect N2O emissions are either improving fertilization methods or on-site treatment of drainage water. R...

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions and herbage accumulation in smooth bromegrass pastures with nitrogen fertilizer and ruminant urine application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural soils contribute significantly to nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but little data is available on N2O emissions from smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.) pastures. This study evaluated soil N2O emissions and herbage accumulation from smooth bromegrass pasture in eastern Nebraska, US...

  2. Mitigating Sources of Indirect Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Tile Drain by On-Site Wood-Chip Bioreactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions originating from nitrate-laden agricultural drainage waters represent a substantial fraction of total N2O emissions in the USA. Typical strategies to mitigate indirect N2O emissions are either improving fertilization methods or on-site treatment of drainage wat...

  3. Nitrous oxide emissions from smooth bromegrass pasture under nitrogen fertilizer and bovine urine application in eastern Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas primarily produced in soils by denitrifying and nitrifying organisms. In terms of global warming potential (GWP), N2O has 310 times the GWP of carbon dioxide (CO2). Atmospheric N2O concentrations have increased by 18% since the industrial revolution with agr...

  4. Abiotic Nitrous Oxide Production in Natural and Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, H.; Stanton, C. L.; Cavazos, A. R.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean contributes approximately one third of global sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. While nitrification is thought to be the dominant pathway for marine N2O production, mechanisms remain unresolved. Previous studies have carried the implicit assumption that marine N2O originates directly from enzymatic sources. However, abiotic production of N2O is possible via chemical reactions between nitrogenous intermediates and redox active trace metals in seawater. In this study, we investigated N2O production and isotopic composition in treatments with and without added hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), intermediates in microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and Fe(III). Addition of substrates to sterile artificial seawater was compared with filtered and unfiltered seawater from Sapelo Island, coastal Georgia, USA. N2O production was observed immediately after addition of Fe(III) in the presence of NH2OH at pH 8 in sterile artificial seawater. Highest N2O production was observed in the presence of Fe(III), NO, and NH2OH. The isotopomer site preference of abiotically produced N2O was consistent with previous studies (31 ± 2 ‰). Higher abiotic N2O production was observed in sterile artificial seawater (salinity: 35 ppt) than filtered Sapelo Island seawater (salinity: 25 ppt) whereas diluted sterile artificial seawater (18 ppt) showed lowest N2O production, suggesting that higher salinity promotes enhanced abiotic N2O production. Addition of Fe(III) to unfiltered Sapelo Island seawater stimulated N2O production. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which lack known N2O producing enzymes, in Sapelo Island seawater was confirmed by successful amplification of the archaeal amoA gene, whereas ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which contain N2O-producing enzymes were undetected. Given the few Fe-containing proteins present in AOA, it is likely that Fe(III) addition promoted N2O production via an abiotic vs. enzymatic N2O mechanism

  5. Spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of pentammineruthenium(II) dinitrogen oxide and corresponding nitrosyl complexes: binding mode of N(2)O and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Paulat, Florian; Kuschel, Torben; Näther, Christian; Praneeth, V K K; Sander, Ole; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2004-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties and the electronic structure of the only nitrous oxide complex existing in isolated form, [Ru(NH(3))(5)(N(2)O)]X(2) (1, X = Br(-), BF(4)(-)), are investigated in detail in comparison to the nitric oxide precursor, [Ru(NH(3))(5)(NO)]X(3) (2). IR and Raman spectra of 1 and of the corresponding (15)NNO labeled complex are presented and assigned with the help of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) and density functional (DFT) calculations. This allows for the identification of the Ru-N(2)O stretch at approximately 300 cm(-)(1) and for the unambiguous definition of the binding mode of the N(2)O ligand as N-terminal. Obtained force constants are 17.3, 9.6, and 1.4 mdyn/A for N-N, N-O, and Ru-N(2)O, respectively. The Ru(II)-N(2)O bond is dominated by pi back-donation, which, however, is weak compared to the NO complex. This bond is further weakened by Coulomb repulsion between the fully occupied t(2g) shell of Ru(II) and the HOMO of N(2)O. Hence, nitrous oxide is an extremely weak ligand to Ru(II). Calculated free energies and formation constants for [Ru(NH(3))(5)(L)](2+) (L = NNO, N(2), OH(2)) are in good agreement with experiment. The observed intense absorption at 238 nm of 1 is assigned to the t(2g) --> pi(*) charge transfer transition. These data are compared in detail to the spectroscopic and electronic structural properties of NO complex 2. Finally, the transition metal centered reaction of nitrous oxide to N(2) and H(2)O is investigated. Nitrous oxide is activated by back-donation. Initial protonation leads to a weakening of the N-O bond and triggers electron transfer from the metal to the NN-OH ligand through the pi system. The implications of this mechanism for biological nitrous oxide reduction are discussed. PMID:15500336

  6. Nitrous oxide-induced hypothermia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, R.M.; Panek, R.W.; Kouchich, F.J.; Rosenthal, M.A.

    1987-08-10

    Exposure of rats to high levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen reduced body temperature in a concentration-related manner. The hypothermia was partly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. But in rats rendered tolerant to morphine by pellet implantation, exposure to 75% N2O/25% O2 evoked a marked hypothermia similar to that observed in morphine-naive animals. In another experiment, the hypothermic effect of chloral hydrate was also sensitive to antagonism by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. These observations lead the authors to suspect that N2O-induced hypothermia in rats is possibly not mediated by opiate receptors. The thermotropic activity of N2O may result from some non-opioid action of N2O. Its selective antagonism by naloxone (but not naltrexone) may be due to a unique non-opioid analeptic action of naloxone. 32 references, 4 figures.

  7. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  8. Nitrogen cycling. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions. PMID:26045434

  9. Production of nitrous oxide in the auroral D and E regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Prasad, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    A study of nitrous oxide formation mechanisms indicates that N2O concentrations greater than 10 to the 9th per cu cm could be produced in IBC III aurora or by lower-level activity lasting for many hours, and, in favorable conditions, the N2O concentration could exceed the local nitric oxide density. An upper limit on the globally averaged N2O production rate from auroral activity is estimated at 2 x 10 to the 27th per second.

  10. Grazing and Nitrous Oxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide emission rates are typically measured using ‘bottom up’ methods which involve placing airtight chambers over the soil surface and measuring the change in gas concentration over short time periods (e.g., 15-60 min.). Emission rates vary substantially both spatially and temporally and ma...

  11. Structure and Abundance of Nitrous Oxide Complexes in Earth's Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Steven R; de Lange, Katrina M; Lane, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the lowest energy structures and binding energies of a series of atmospherically relevant nitrous oxide (N2O) complexes using explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory. Specifically, we have considered complexes with nitrogen (N2-N2O), oxygen (O2-N2O), argon (Ar-N2O), and water (H2O-N2O). We have calculated rotational constants and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the complexes and the constituent monomers. Statistical mechanics was used to determine the thermodynamic parameters for complex formation as a function of temperature and pressure. These results, in combination with relevant atmospheric data, were used to estimate the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere as a function of altitude. We find that the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere is small but non-negligible, and we suggest that N2O complexes may contribute to absorption of terrestrial radiation and be relevant for understanding the atmospheric fate of N2O. PMID:26983553

  12. US agricultural nitrous oxide emissions: context, status, and trends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers have contributed to enormous increases in agricultural productivity in the US. However, nitrogen losses from agricultural systems have contributed to a number of deleterious environmental impacts, including a continuing increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhou...

  13. Up: The rise of nitrous oxide abuse. An international survey of contemporary nitrous oxide use.

    PubMed

    Kaar, Stephen J; Ferris, Jason; Waldron, Jon; Devaney, Madonna; Ramsey, John; Winstock, Adam R

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the recreational use of inhaled nitrous oxide gas (N2O) is becoming increasingly popular, yet little is known about the characteristics of its users or the effects they experience. This paper presents original research from the 2014 Global Drug Survey (GDS) (n=74,864). GDS runs the largest survey of recreational drug use in the world. The findings confirm N2O as a very common drug of use, in particular in the UK and US (38.6% and 29.4% lifetime prevalence). In the UK N2O was reported to be the eighth most commonly used substance. N2O was generally consumed via gas-filled balloons, at festivals and clubs where use of other substances was common. The vast majority of users use infrequently, and their use is not associated with significant harm. However, there appears to be a subpopulation of heavy users who may be using in a dependent pattern. Analysis of last year N2O users (n=4883), confirms that N2O is associated with hallucinations and confusion (which may be the desired effects) and persistent numbness and accidental injury (27.8%, 23.9%, 4.3% and 1.2% of last year users, respectively). Accidental injury is associated with the highest number of 'hits' per session, suggesting a dose-response relationship. The presence of significant harm is discussed in the light of public education on the risks of N2O use and harm-reduction strategies appropriate to N2O use. Further work needs to be completed to confirm the presence of persistent neurological symptoms in recreational users. PMID:26912510

  14. Modeled nitrous oxide emissions from corn fields in Iowa based on county level data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Corn Belt area has the capacity to generate high nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions due to medium to high annual precipitation, medium to heavy textured soils rich in organic matter, and high nitrogen (N) application rates. The purpose of this work was to estimate field N2O emissions from cornfiel...

  15. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions with enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers in rainfed system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of enhanced efficiency nitrogen (N) fertilizers can increase crop N utilization and lead to lower emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). To determine potential benefit of four enhanced efficiency fertilizers with rain-fed corn production in central Pennsylvania, USA, N2O emissi...

  17. Nitrous Oxide Gas Fluxes in a Potato Field Following Application of Urea and Coated Urea Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of urea and other forms of nitrogen (N) fertilizer can generate atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a potent greenhouse gas. Field experiments were conducted on a loamy sand soil in Becker, Minnesota to evaluate the effects of soluble and coated forms of urea on N2O fl...

  18. Challenges and opportunities for mitigating nitrous oxide emissions from fertilized cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) represents in many cases the largest single component of the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of individual cropping systems and for the U.S. agricultural sector as a whole. Reducing N2O emissions from cropping systems remains a research frontier largely because of biophysical factors...

  19. A geostatistical approach to identify and mitigate agricultural nitrous oxide emission hotspots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a trace gas with severe environmental costs, are greatest from agricultural soils amended with nitrogen (N) fertilizer. However, accurate N2O emission estimates at fine spatial scales are made difficult by their high variability, which represents a cr...

  20. Comparing Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Three Residential Landscapes under Different Management Schemes Following Natural Rainfall Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultural lawn management practices that produce aesthetically appealing landscapes may also create environmental conditions that stimulate soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of lawn management practices on N2O fluxes from ...

  1. Nitrite-driven nitrous oxide production under aerobic soil conditions: Kinetics and biochemical controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  2. Fertilizer management effects on nitrate leaching and indirect nitrous oxide emissions in irrigated potato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a nitrogen (N) intensive crop with high potential for nitrate (NO3-) losses, particularly when irrigated. The high leaching potential also represents a potential source of indirect nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions resulting from the transformation of NO3- to N2O after it leaves the fertilized...

  3. Estimating ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from dairy farms using milk urea nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy farms emit ammonia (NH3) from barns, manure storage, and soils, which can be hazardous to human and ecosystem health. Emissions of NH3 also contribute indirectly to emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Direct N2O emissions occur mostly from soil after application of ferti...

  4. Indirect nitrous oxide emissions from streams within the US Corn Belt scale with stream order

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the primary stratospheric ozone depleting substance. Its deleterious effects on the environment have prompted appeals to regulate emissions from agriculture, which represents the primary source in the global N2O budget. Successful implementation...

  5. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Bermudagrass Pasture: Interseeded Winter Rye and Poultry Litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of poultry litter applications and interseeded winter rye on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from pasture is not well documented. This study was conducted to estimate soil surface N2O fluxes as affect by poultry litter applications and interseeded winter rye as well as weather and soil vari...

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  7. Comparison of DAYCENT-Simulated and Measured Nitrous Oxide Emission from a Corn Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate assessment of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from soil requires continuous year-round and spatially extensive monitoring. Alternatively, simulation models can predict N2O fluxes based on climatic, soil and agricultural system input data. DAYCENT is an ecosystem model that simulates, among oth...

  8. Controls on nitrous oxide production and consumption in reservoirs of the Ohio River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic ecosystems are a globally significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, but estimates are largely based on studies conducted in streams and rivers with relatively less known about N2O dynamics in lakes and reservoirs. Due to long water residence tim...

  9. Fertilizer induced losses of nitrous oxide gas from Montana dryland cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization to crops contributes a significant portion of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. This information is, however, lacking in the dryland cropping system in the northern Great Plains. Soil N2O and methane (CH4) fluxes from May to No...

  10. Application of microbial inoculants as tools for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are increasing due to several factors, including increased use of nitrogen fertilizers. New management tools are needed to reduce N2O emissions from production agriculture. One potential such tool is the use of microbial inoculants, which are increasingly being used ...

  11. SIMULATION OF NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM DAIRY FARMS TO ASSESS GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION STRATEGIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farming practices can have a large impact on the net emission of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide (N**2O). The primary sources of N**2O from dairy farms are nitrification and denitrification processes in soil, with smaller contributions from manure storage and ba...

  12. Regional-scale controls on dissolved nitrous oxide in the Upper Mississippi River

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bottom-up estimates of riverine nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assume a constant emission factor (EF5r) that predicts N2O production from anthropogenic nitrogen inputs. This relation ignores any direct stream water biochemical charact...

  13. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Large, Impounded River: The Ohio River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models suggest that microbial activity in streams and rivers is a globally significant source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas and the leading cause of stratospheric ozone destruction. However, model estimates of N2O emissions are poorly constrained ...

  14. [Nitrous oxide fluxes of constructed wetlands to treat sewage wastewater].

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Wen-Lin; Xie, Hui-Jun; Roy, R Gu

    2009-11-01

    The nitrous oxide fluxes and ammonia-oxidizing bacterium in two typical constructed wetlands, i.e. subsurface flow (SF) and free water surface (FWS) were studied by the method of static chamber-gas chromatography. The results showed that the mean N2O fluxes were 296.5 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) and 28.2 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) respectively, and two typical wetlands were all the sources of atmosphere nitrous oxide as a whole. SF wetland exhibited a higher risk of N2O emissions, and the mean N2O flux in this system was higher than the values reported in the literature for ecosystems, e.g. farmland, forest, grassland and marsh. The nitrous oxide fluxes in test wetlands presented obvious seasonal and diurnal variation, and the highest N2O emission flux was in July. The highest flux was (762.9 +/- 239.3) microg x (m2 x h)(-1) and (91.9 +/- 20.3) microg x (m2 x h)(-1) in SF and FWS wetlands, respectively. The peak flux mostly occurred around midday, whereas the minimum flux likely occurred in the early morning. The results indicated that the growth of Phragmites australis and temperature were the key factors controlling the variation of N2O fluxes. The average N2O emission from the microsites above the inflow zones was higher than that above the outflow microsites. High influent strength promoted nitrification and denitrification, and high fluxes were obtained. The clone results showed that Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira were the main ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms contributing to N2O production in constructed wetlands. PMID:20063721

  15. Isotopic Fractionation of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Yung, Y. L.; Allen, M. A.; Blake, G. A.; Liang, N. C.

    2002-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Much effort has been made in using isotopic signatures as a way to constrain the magnitudes of the various sources of N2O. A necessary part of this task is to understand what effect the atmosphere, which is the major sink of N2O, has on these isotopic signatures. Using a two-dimensional (2-D) chemical transport model, we investigated the isotopic fractionation of N2O in the Earth's atmosphere, and we compared the results of our model with laboratory experiments and atmospheric observations. Isotopic fractionation of N2O can occur through photolytic destruction and through a reaction with singlet oxygen. We used three different methods of calculating photolytic cross-sections for each of the major isotopomers of N2O. We found that although the Yung and Miller approach (Science, 278, 1778 (1997)), which postulates that changes in the zero point energies between the isotopomers causes shifts in their respective absorption profiles, can model the pattern of enrichment factors for each isotopomer relative to each other, this approach underestimates the magnitude of the enrichment factors. The ab initio approach by Johnson et al. (JPCA, 105, 8672 (2001)) provided a better fit to the magnitudes of the enrichment factors, with the notable exception of the 15N14N16O isotopomer. A simpler, semi-empirical approach by Blake et al. (2002, in preparation) was able to model the magnitude of all the enrichment factors, including the one for the 15N14N16O isotopomer. We also explored the contributions and effects that the singlet oxygen reaction, climatology and transport have on atmospheric isotopic fractionation.

  16. Global agriculture and nitrous oxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, Dave S.; Davidson, Eric A.; Smith, Keith A.; Smith, Pete; Melillo, Jerry M.; Dentener, Frank; Crutzen, Paul J.

    2012-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas and agriculture represents its largest source. It is at the heart of debates over the efficacy of biofuels, the climate-forcing impact of population growth, and the extent to which mitigation of non-CO2 emissions can help avoid dangerous climate change. Here we examine some of the major debates surrounding estimation of agricultural N2O sources, and the challenges of projecting and mitigating emissions in coming decades. We find that current flux estimates -- using either top-down or bottom-up methods -- are reasonably consistent at the global scale, but that a dearth of direct measurements in some areas makes national and sub-national estimates highly uncertain. We also highlight key uncertainties in projected emissions and demonstrate the potential for dietary choice and supply-chain mitigation.

  17. Analysis of microbial populations, denitrification, and nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian buffers are used extensively to protect water bodies from nonpoint source nitrogen pollution. However there is relatively little information on the impact of these buffers on production of nitrous oxide (N2O). In this study, we assessed nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers of the so...

  18. Nitrous Oxide Production in an Eastern Cornbelt Soil: Sources and Redox Range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide derived from soils is a main contributor to the greenhouse gas effect and ozone layer depletion; however, sources and regulation are not clearly understood. This study was conducted to estimate magnitude and sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) production as affect by N source, soil water co...

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of (N_2O)_n^- and (N_2O)mO^- Cluster Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-06-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions, (N_2O)_n^- (n=7-11) and (N_2O)mO^- (m=1-13). Structural changes of the charge carrier in the clusters are driven by increasing levels of solvation. The spectra are interpreted by comparison with quantum chemical calculations.

  20. Modeling electron competition among nitrogen oxides reduction and N2O accumulation in denitrification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    Competition for electrons among different steps of denitrification has previously been shown to occur, and to play an important role in the accumulation and emission of N2O in wastewater treatment. However, this electron competition is not recognized in the current denitrification models, limiting their ability to predict N2O accumulation during denitrification. In this work, a new denitrification model is developed for wastewater treatment processes. It describes electron competition among the four steps of denitrification, through modeling the carbon oxidation and nitrogen reduction processes separately, in contrast to the existing models that directly couple these two types of processes. Electron carriers are introduced to link carbon oxidation, which donates electrons to carriers, and nitrogen oxides reduction, which receives electrons from these carriers. The relative ability of each denitrification step to compete for electrons is modeled through the use of different affinity constants with reduced carriers. Model calibration and validation results demonstrate that the developed model is able to reasonably describe the nitrate, nitrite, and N2O reduction rates of a methanol-utilizing denitrifying culture under various carbon and nitrogen oxides supplying conditions. The model proposed, while subject to further validation, is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O accumulation in denitrification. PMID:24001217

  1. Nitrous Oxide: A Greenhouse Gas That is Also an Ozone Layer Depleting Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide, N2O, is the major source of nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere, where these oxides playa critical roles in ozone layer depletion by itself and moderating ozone layer depletion by chlorinated chemicals. Thus N2O plays a complex role in the stratosphere. Nitrous oxide is also a greenhouse gas and it contributes to the radiative forcing of climate. Indeed, it is considered the third most important greenhouse gas next to carbon dioxide and methane. This dual role of nitrous oxide makes it an interesting gas for the atmosphere- it bridges the issue of ozone layer depletion and climate change. Nitrous oxide has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Therefore, one needs to consider this important distinction between natural and anthropogenic sources as well as its role in two related but separate environmental issues. Further, the sources of nitrous oxide are varied and diffuse, which makes it difficult to quantify different sources. However, it is clear that a majority of anthropogenic nitrous oxide comes from food production (including agricultural and animal growth practices), an activity that is at the heart of human existence. Thus, limiting N2O emissions is not a simple task! I will briefly summarize our understanding of these roles of nitrous oxide in the earth's atmosphere and touch on the possible ways to limit N2O emissions.

  2. Catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide monopropellant for hybrid motor ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an inexpensive and readily available non-toxic rocket motor oxidizer. It is the most commonly used oxidizer for hybrid bipropellant rocket systems, and several bipropellant liquid rocket designs have also used nitrous oxide. In liquid form, N2O is highly stable, but in vapor form it has the potential to decompose exothermically, releasing up to 1865 Joules per gram of vapor as it dissociates into nitrogen and oxygen. Consequently, it has long been considered as a potential "green" replacement for existing highly toxic and dangerous monopropellants. This project investigates the feasibility of using the nitrous oxide decomposition reaction as a monopropellant energy source for igniting liquid bipropellant and hybrid rockets that already use nitrous oxide as the primary oxidizer. Because nitrous oxide is such a stable propellant, the energy barrier to dissociation is quite high; normal thermal decomposition of the vapor phase does not occur until temperatures are above 800 C. The use of a ruthenium catalyst decreases the activation energy for this reaction to allow rapid decomposition below 400 C. This research investigates the design for a prototype device that channels the energy of dissociation to ignite a laboratory scale hybrid rocket motor.

  3. Nitrous oxide dynamics in low oxygen regions of the Pacific: insights from the MEMENTO database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, L. M.; Oschlies, A.; Bange, H. W.; Huebert, K. B.; Craig, J. D.; Kock, A.; Löscher, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern tropical Pacific (ETP) is believed to be one of the largest marine sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Future N2O emissions from the ETP are highly uncertain because oxygen minimum zones are expected to expand, affecting both regional production and consumption of N2O. Here we assess three primary uncertainties in how N2O may respond to changing O2 levels: (1) the relationship between N2O production and O2 (is it linear or exponential at low O2 concentrations?), (2) the cutoff point at which net N2O production switches to net N2O consumption (uncertainties in this parameterisation can lead to differences in model ETP N2O concentrations of more than 20%), and (3) the rate of net N2O consumption at low O2. Based on the MEMENTO database, which is the largest N2O dataset currently available, we find that N2O production in the ETP increases linearly rather than exponentially with decreasing O2. Additionally, net N2O consumption switches to net N2O production at ~ 10 μM O2, a value in line with recent studies that suggest consumption occurs on a larger scale than previously thought. N2O consumption is on the order of 0.01-1 mmol N2O m-3 yr-1 in the Peru-Chile Undercurrent. Based on these findings, it appears that recent studies substantially overestimated N2O production in the ETP. In light of expected deoxygenation and the higher than previously expected point at which net N2O production switches to consumption, there is enough uncertainty in future N2O production that even the sign of future changes is still unclear.

  4. The δ15N and δ18O values of N2O produced during the co-oxidation of ammonia by methanotrophic bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandernack, Kevin W.; Mills, Christopher T.; Johnson, Craig A.; Rahn, Thomas; Kinney, Chad

    2009-01-01

    via methanotrophic or autotrophic nitrifying bacteria can have very positive δ18ON2O values if the O2incorporated is previously enriched in 18O from high rates of respiration. Nitrous oxide was collected from various depths in soils overlying a coal-bed methane seep where methanotrophic bacteria are naturally enriched. In one sampling when soil methane concentrations were very high, the δ18OVSMOW values of the N2O were highly enriched (+ 50‰), consistent with our laboratory experiments. Thus, soils overlying methane seeps could provide an 18O-enriched source of atmospheric N2O.

  5. Denitirification and N2O emission in arable soils: Effect of tillage, N source and soil moisture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of understanding of how tillage, N source and moisture status control soil respiration, nitrous oxide and denitrification. A laboratory investigation was performed to quantify the interaction of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2)+N2O (representing denitrifi...

  6. Fertilizer Source Impacts on Nitrous and Nitric Oxide Emissions in Corn Cropping Systems of the Upper Midwest U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well-established that the application of nitrogen fertilizer to soil results in emissions of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O), which are gases that have important local, regional, and global air quality impacts. Despite hundreds of studies reporting measurements of NO and N2O emission...

  7. A UK inventory of nitrous oxide emissions from farmed livestock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, D. R.; Sneath, R. W.; Phillips, V. R.; Pain, B. F.

    A UK inventory of the nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions from farmed livestock was compiled to identify areas where potential abatement practices may be effective. Where possible, emission factors based on direct experimental data gathered under UK conditions were used, but published data were used when this was not feasible, together with statistical information, which included details of numbers of animals within each category of a species, animal liveweights, number of days housed, excretal rates and volumes of manures in stores. Total N 2O emissions were calculated for each component of livestock production systems, i.e. animal houses, manure stores, following application of manures to land and during grazing. Emissions were also estimated from land used for forage conservation and tillage. Total annual N 2O emissions from UK farmed livestock, based mainly on 1996 animal census data, were estimated to be 38.27 kt. The two main terms were 22.66 kt N 2O from mineral fertilisers after application to soils and 5.61 kt N 2O from stored manures (mainly in the form of farmyard manure). Within buildings, poultry were the largest contributors of N 2O, 2.97 kt, followed by cattle, 1.62 kt. Within the total emissions from stored manures, cattle were the largest contributors of N 2O, 3.58 kt, followed by poultry, 1.86 kt. Dietary manipulation and a move from solid manure based systems to slurry based systems appear to be promising abatement practices.

  8. Nitrous oxide and methane emissions from cryptogamic covers.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Katharina; Weber, Bettina; Elbert, Wolfgang; Steinkamp, Jörg; Clough, Tim; Crutzen, Paul; Pöschl, Ulrich; Keppler, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Cryptogamic covers, which comprise some of the oldest forms of terrestrial life on Earth (Lenton & Huntingford, ), have recently been found to fix large amounts of nitrogen and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (Elbert et al., ). Here we show that they are also greenhouse gas sources with large nitrous oxide (N2 O) and small methane (CH4 ) emissions. Whilst N2 O emission rates varied with temperature, humidity, and N deposition, an almost constant ratio with respect to respiratory CO2 emissions was observed for numerous lichens and bryophytes. We employed this ratio together with respiration data to calculate global and regional N2 O emissions. If our laboratory measurements are typical for lichens and bryophytes living on ground and plant surfaces and scaled on a global basis, we estimate a N2 O source strength of 0.32-0.59 Tg year(-1) for the global N2 O emissions from cryptogamic covers. Thus, our emission estimate might account for 4-9% of the global N2 O budget from natural terrestrial sources. In a wide range of arid and forested regions, cryptogamic covers appear to be the dominant source of N2 O. We suggest that greenhouse gas emissions associated with this source might increase in the course of global change due to higher temperatures and enhanced nitrogen deposition. PMID:26152454

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions from light duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Lisa A.; Belisle, Sheri L.; Rieger, Paul

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions measurements were made on light duty gasoline and light duty diesel vehicles during chassis dynamometer testing conducted at the Environment Canada and California Air Resources Board vehicle emissions laboratories between 2001 and 2007. Per phase and composite FTP emission rates were measured. A subset of vehicles was also tested using other driving cycles to characterize emissions as a function of different driving conditions. Vehicles were both new (<6500 km) and in-use (6500-160,000 km) and were tested on low sulfur gasoline (<30 ppm) or low sulfur diesel (<300 ppm). Measurements from selected published studies were combined with these new measurements to give a test fleet of 467 vehicles meeting both US EPA and California criteria pollutant emissions standards between Tier 0 and Tier 2 Bin 3 or SULEV. Aggregate distance-based and fuel-based emission factors for N 2O are reported for each emission standard and for each of the different test cycles. Results show that the distinction between light duty automobile and light duty truck is not significant for any of the emission standards represented by the test fleet and the distinction between new and aged catalyst is significant for vehicles meeting all emission standards but Tier 2. This is likely due to the relatively low mileage accumulated by the Tier 2 vehicles in this study as compared to the durability requirement of the standard. The FTP composite N 2O emission factors for gasoline vehicles meeting emission standards more stringent than Tier 1 are substantially lower than those currently used by both Canada and the US for the 2005 inventories. N 2O emission factors from test cycles other than the FTP illustrate the variability of emission factors as a function of driving conditions. N 2O emission factors are shown to strongly correlate with NMHC/NMOG emission standards and less strongly with NO X and CO emission standards. A review of several published reports on the effect

  10. N2O emission in short-cut simultaneous nitrification and denitrification process: dynamic emission characteristics and succession of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yingyan; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinhua; Zhu, Nengwu; Wu, Pingxiao; Wang, Xiangde

    2014-01-01

    A sequencing batch airlift reactor was used to investigate the characteristics of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and the succession of an ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community. The bioreactor could successfully switch from the complete simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) process to the short-cut SND process by increasing the influent pH from 7.0-7.3 to 8.0-8.3. The results obtained showed that, compared with the complete SND process, the TN removal rate and SND efficiency were improved in the short-cut SND process by approximately 13 and 11%, respectively, while the amount of N2O emission was nearly three times larger than that in the complete SND process. The N2O emission was closely associated to nitrite accumulation. Analysis of the AOB microbial community showed that nitrifier denitrification by Nitrosomonas-like AOB could be an important pathway for the enhancement of N2O emission in the short-cut SND process. PMID:24960019

  11. Understanding the sources and mitigation potential of nitrous oxide in agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.; Zhu, X.; Doane, T. A.; Burger, M.

    2014-12-01

    More than half of the global warming potential of GHG emissions from agriculture is attributed to nitrous oxide (N2O).. Many factors control the production and release of N2O from soils. In addition to fertilizer N, soil N, moisture and carbon availability control N2O emissions. In addition, a previously overlooked factor, iron, was recently found to be the most significant factor influencing N2O production. Controlled by soil and management factors, N2O production is attributed to multiple pathways, including ammonia oxidation (AO), denitrification, and abiotic chemical reactions. Ammonia oxidation or nitrifier activity N2O production, is a well known pathway, but it significance to total N2O production is also highly debated and soil conditions influencing its production are poorly understood. Studies in a variety of crops in California strongly suggest that this pathway contributes substantially to N2O emissions. It is well established that denitrification primarily occurs under O2- limiting conditions, while N2O produced from AO is also influenced by soil O2 content, with maximum production occurring at low O2 levels (~0.5%). Since emission of N2O can arise from both AO and denitrification activities at low O2 concentrations, it is difficult to discern the importance of each pathway under various soil conditions and management. Furthermore, both the N form and concentration are determinants of nitrifier N2O production. The nitrifier denitrification pathway has been shown to dominate over nitrifier nitrification and nitrification coupled denitrification pathways. Irrigation, rainfall, and fertilization events stimulate microbial activity, including AO and denitrification that produces N2O and although limited, these events contribute to the majority of annual emissions. This uncertainty and complexity surrounding N2O production pathways has hampered the development of practices to reduce N2O emissions. As agricultural production intensifies in developing

  12. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m−2 d−1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m−2 d−1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr−1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  13. Strategies to mitigate nitrous oxide emissions from herbivore production systems.

    PubMed

    Schils, R L M; Eriksen, J; Ledgard, S F; Vellinga, Th V; Kuikman, P J; Luo, J; Petersen, S O; Velthof, G L

    2013-03-01

    Herbivores are a significant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions. They account for a large share of manure-related N(2)O emissions, as well as soil-related N(2)O emissions through the use of grazing land, and land for feed and forage production. It is widely acknowledged that mitigation measures are necessary to avoid an increase in N(2)O emissions while meeting the growing global food demand. The production and emissions of N(2)O are closely linked to the efficiency of nitrogen (N) transfer between the major components of a livestock system, that is, animal, manure, soil and crop. Therefore, mitigation options in this paper have been structured along these N pathways. Mitigation technologies involving diet-based intervention include lowering the CP content or increasing the condensed tannin content of the diet. Animal-related mitigation options also include breeding for improved N conversion and high animal productivity. The main soil-based mitigation measures include efficient use of fertilizer and manure, including the use of nitrification inhibitors. In pasture-based systems with animal housing facilities, reducing grazing time is an effective option to reduce N(2)O losses. Crop-based options comprise breeding efforts for increased N-use efficiency and the use of pastures with N(2)-fixing clover. It is important to recognize that all N(2)O mitigation options affect the N and carbon cycles of livestock systems. Therefore, care should be taken that reductions in N(2)O emissions are not offset by unwanted increases in ammonia, methane or carbon dioxide emissions. Despite the abundant availability of mitigation options, implementation in practice is still lagging. Actual implementation will only follow after increased awareness among farmers and greenhouse gases targeted policies. So far, reductions in N(2)O emissions that have been achieved are mostly a positive side effect of other N-targeted policies. PMID:23031718

  14. Genetic and Environmental Controls on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation in Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Rissanen, Antti J.; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Tiirola, Marja

    2015-01-01

    We studied potential links between environmental factors, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation, and genetic indicators of nitrite and N2O reducing bacteria in 12 boreal lakes. Denitrifying bacteria were investigated by quantifying genes encoding nitrite and N2O reductases (nirS/nirK and nosZ, respectively, including the two phylogenetically distinct clades nosZI and nosZII) in lake sediments. Summertime N2O accumulation and hypolimnetic nitrate concentrations were positively correlated both at the inter-lake scale and within a depth transect of an individual lake (Lake Vanajavesi). The variability in the individual nirS, nirK, nosZI, and nosZII gene abundances was high (up to tenfold) among the lakes, which allowed us to study the expected links between the ecosystem’s nir-vs-nos gene inventories and N2O accumulation. Inter-lake variation in N2O accumulation was indeed connected to the relative abundance of nitrite versus N2O reductase genes, i.e. the (nirS+nirK)/nosZI gene ratio. In addition, the ratios of (nirS+nirK)/nosZI at the inter-lake scale and (nirS+nirK)/nosZI+II within Lake Vanajavesi correlated positively with nitrate availability. The results suggest that ambient nitrate concentration can be an important modulator of the N2O accumulation in lake ecosystems, either directly by increasing the overall rate of denitrification or indirectly by controlling the balance of nitrite versus N2O reductase carrying organisms. PMID:25756328

  15. Genetic and environmental controls on nitrous oxide accumulation in lakes.

    PubMed

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Rissanen, Antti J; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu; Lehmann, Moritz F; Tiirola, Marja

    2015-01-01

    We studied potential links between environmental factors, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation, and genetic indicators of nitrite and N2O reducing bacteria in 12 boreal lakes. Denitrifying bacteria were investigated by quantifying genes encoding nitrite and N2O reductases (nirS/nirK and nosZ, respectively, including the two phylogenetically distinct clades nosZI and nosZII) in lake sediments. Summertime N2O accumulation and hypolimnetic nitrate concentrations were positively correlated both at the inter-lake scale and within a depth transect of an individual lake (Lake Vanajavesi). The variability in the individual nirS, nirK, nosZI, and nosZII gene abundances was high (up to tenfold) among the lakes, which allowed us to study the expected links between the ecosystem's nir-vs-nos gene inventories and N2O accumulation. Inter-lake variation in N2O accumulation was indeed connected to the relative abundance of nitrite versus N2O reductase genes, i.e. the (nirS+nirK)/nosZI gene ratio. In addition, the ratios of (nirS+nirK)/nosZI at the inter-lake scale and (nirS+nirK)/nosZI+II within Lake Vanajavesi correlated positively with nitrate availability. The results suggest that ambient nitrate concentration can be an important modulator of the N2O accumulation in lake ecosystems, either directly by increasing the overall rate of denitrification or indirectly by controlling the balance of nitrite versus N2O reductase carrying organisms. PMID:25756328

  16. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Maher, Damien T; Sippo, James Z; Tait, Douglas R; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m(-2) d(-1), while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m(-2) d(-1). If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 10(8) mol yr(-1)) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  17. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m‑2 d‑1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m‑2 d‑1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr‑1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change.

  18. Tracking short-term effects of 15N addition on N2O fluxes using FTIR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) additions to soils have significantly increased atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration, and advanced methods are needed to track the amount of applied N that is transformed to N2O in the field. Here, we present a method for continuous measurement of N2O isotopologu...

  19. The Impact of Kura Clover Living Mulch on Nitrous Oxide Emissions in a Corn/Soybean System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone depleting substance. Produced primarily in agricultural soils, efforts to reduce N2O emissions are underway, but mitigation results thus far have been inconsistent. The leguminous perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bie...

  20. Fertilizer source and tillage effects on yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions in a corn cropping system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn production consumes approximately 50% of all nitrogen (N) fertilizers applied to agricultural crops in the U.S. and therefore represents a large potential source of emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) relative to other crops. Quantification of N2O emissions resulting from...

  1. Source Tracking of Nitrous Oxide using A Quantum Cascade Laser System in the Field and Laboratory Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Nitrification and denitrification are two major biological pathways that are responsible for soil emissions of N2O. However, source tracking of in-situ or laboratory N2O production is still challenging to...

  2. Testing DAYCENT Model Simulations of Corn Yields and Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Irrigated Tillage Systems in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural soils are responsible for the majority of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in the USA. Irrigated cropping, particularly in the western USA, is an important source of N2O emissions. However, the impacts of tillage intensity and N fertilizer amount and type have not been extensively studied ...

  3. Effect of urea application rate and water content on nitrous oxide emission from a sandy loam soil - a laboratory study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture is a major contributor to global anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O, a potent greenhouse gas) emission. Data from a pomegranate orchard indicate that N2O emission is highly variable with nitrogen application rates and irrigation methods. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect ...

  4. Nitrous Oxide Cycling and its Isotopic Signatures in South West Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullungal, M.; Van Hale, R.; Frew, R. D.; Law, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a significant greenhouse gas and is also involved in ozone depletion. The contribution of N2O to both these processes is expected to increase this century. The ocean contributes about 30% to the atmospheric N2O budget so there is strong interest in the oceanic N2O cycle. In the ocean N2O is produced via a number of different processes (e.g. bacterial nitrification, and denitrification). While coastal regions are well-studied there are limited data available for open ocean N2O especially in the Southern Ocean, with few studies of the relative contribution of different bacterial processes. Here we apply new stable isotope techniques and present a detailed overview of the distribution and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide from sampling sites in the southwest Pacific Ocean near New Zealand. Samples for nitrous oxide and nutrients were collected along the depth profiles from two biophysical mooring stations (subtropical and sub- Antarctic), four Geotraces stations (GP13, subtropical Pacific) and two bloom voyage stations in the subtropical front and subtropical pacific waters. The N2O saturation ranged from near equilibrium with air at the surface to a maximum value in the oxygen minimum zone. Thus the surface water masses are not a significant sink or atmospheric source for N2O .Multi-isotope characterization of N2O including d15Nbulk, d18O, d15Nα and its site preference (SP, the difference between d15Nα and d15Nβ)indicates that nitrification is the primary process responsible for nitrous oxide production in oxic waters whereas coupling between nitrification and denitrification may be an important mechanism for production in the oxygen minimum zone with a minor contribution by nitrification.

  5. Active N(2)O emission from bacterial microbiota of Andisol farmland and characterization of some N(2)O emitters.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hisahaya; Takahashi, Naoki; Hatano, Ryusuke; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2012-08-01

    Andisol in farmland located in Hokkaido, Japan, is known to actively flux nitrous oxide (N(2)O) during the spring to summer seasons. Using a culturing system which mimics farm soils, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emission potentials of the soils or soil microorganisms were investigated. A total of thirty-three soil samples from the farmland showed high N(2)O production potential, of which the maximum level of N(2)O emission was 3.69 μg per ml of the cultured medium per day (ml(-1) d(-1)) in the assay system. However, only three eubacteria (Leptothrix sp., Paenibacillus sp., and Streptomyces sp.) were isolated as culturable N(2)O emitters among a total of 92 bacterial isolates and 2 fungi obtained from the assayed soil suspensions. N(2)O production from all the isolated N(2)O emitters was more active within a weakly acidic region (pH 4.5-5.0) than neutral regions. However, unlike N(2)O emitters isolated from tropical peat soils, they did not respond to supplemental 0.5% sucrose. In the acetylene inhibition assay for the evaluation of complete denitrification, Leptothrix sp. P3-15D and Streptomyces sp. M2-0C indicated that these culturable N(2)O emitters are not effective denitrifiers but weak N(2)O emitters in the Andisol. Conversely, Rhodococcus sp. that was isolated from the Andisol collected in another season using a KNO(3)-enriched plate, showed 3.2-fold higher N(2)O emission with 10% C(2) H(2). Instead of the culturable bacteria, it is probable that the N(2)O emitters in viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state or obligately anaerobic denitrifiers are the major contributors to N(2)O emission from the vitric Andisol. PMID:22144290

  6. Nitrogen source effects on nitrous oxide emissions from irrigated cropping systems in Colorado. American Chemical Society Symposium Series

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is essential in most irrigated cropping systems to optimize crop yields and economic returns. Application of inorganic N fertilizers to these cropping systems generally results in increased nitrous oxide (N2O-N) emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions resulting from the appli...

  7. Nitrogen limitation of nitrous oxide fluxes in the tropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Y.; Diem, T.; Morley, N.; Baggs, E.

    2013-12-01

    Montane Peruvian ecosystems are a regional atmospheric source of nitrous oxide (N2O) releasing at least 0.80 × 0.44 kg N ha-1 a-1. Field and laboratory experiments across a 3000 m elevation gradient in the Kosñipata Valley, Manu National Park, Peru indicate that nitrogen (N) availability, particularly nitrate (NO3-) content, are central to regulating N2O fluxes. Water-filled pore space (WFPS), soil moisture content, and carbon (C) availability play a secondary role in modulating fluxes. Field-based flux measurements indicate that N2O emissions and NO3- availability were inversely proportional with altitude, with lower elevation ecosystems (premontane forest, lower montane forest) emitting significantly more N2O and containing more NO3- than higher elevation ones (upper montane forest, montane grasslands). In lower elevation ecosystems, where NO3- was more abundant, N2O fluxes were influenced by WFPS, soil moisture, and to lesser extent by C mineralization rates. In contrast, in higher elevation ecosystems, WFPS and soil moisture content played little or no role in modulating fluxes, and N2O fluxes appeared to be more strongly driven by N availability.

  8. Clumped isotope perturbation in tropospheric nitrous oxide from stratospheric photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2015-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is potent greenhouse gas and source of ozone depleting NO to the stratosphere. Recent advances in mass spectrometry allow accurate measurement of multiply substituted ("clumped") N2O isotopocules, providing new constraints on the N2O source budget. However, this requires a quantification of the "clumped" N2O fractionation from stratospheric photolysis (main sink). We use time-dependent quantum dynamics and a 1-D atmospheric model to determine the effect of stratospheric photolysis on the abundances of multisubstituted N2O isotopocules in the atmosphere. The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of 557 (i.e., 15N15N17O), 458, 548, 457, and 547 are presented for the first time and used to derive altitude-dependent photolysis rates and fractionation constants. We find that photolysis alters the N2O isotopic composition with multisubstituted mass 47 isotopocules being less abundant than expected from stochastics (Δ47 = -1.7‰ in the troposphere and down to -12‰ in the upper stratosphere).

  9. Advances in Understanding the Actions of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Quock, Raymond M

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has been used for well over 150 years in clinical dentistry for its analgesic and anxiolytic properties. This small and simple inorganic chemical molecule has indisputable effects of analgesia, anxiolysis, and anesthesia that are of great clinical interest. Recent studies have helped to clarify the analgesic mechanisms of N2O, but the mechanisms involved in its anxiolytic and anesthetic actions remain less clear. Findings to date indicate that the analgesic effect of N2O is opioid in nature, and, like morphine, may involve a myriad of neuromodulators in the spinal cord. The anxiolytic effect of N2O, on the other hand, resembles that of benzodiazepines and may be initiated at selected subunits of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. Similarly, the anesthetic effect of N2O may involve actions at GABAA receptors and possibly at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as well. This article reviews the latest information on the proposed modes of action for these clinicaleffects of N2O. PMID:17352529

  10. Soil formate regulates the fungal nitrous oxide emission pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, W K; Farrell, R E; Siciliano, S D

    2008-11-01

    Fungal activity is a major driver in the global nitrogen cycle, and mounting evidence suggests that fungal denitrification activity contributes significantly to soil emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O). The metabolic pathway and oxygen requirement for fungal denitrification are different from those for bacterial denitrification. We hypothesized that the soil N(2)O emission from fungi is formate and O(2) dependent and that land use and landforms could influence the proportion of N(2)O coming from fungi. Using substrate-induced respiration inhibition under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in combination with (15)N gas analysis, we found that formate and hypoxia (versus anaerobiosis) were essential for the fungal reduction of (15)N-labeled nitrate to (15)N(2)O. As much as 65% of soil-emitted N(2)O was attributable to fungi; however, this was found only in soils from water-accumulating landforms. From these results, we hypothesize that plant root exudates could affect N(2)O production from fungi via the proposed formate-dependent pathway. PMID:18791019

  11. Mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from soils by Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Manabu; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Shimomura, Yumi; Morimoto, Sho; Tago, Kanako; Wang, Yong; Hayakawa, Chihiro; Uetake, Yusuke; Sánchez, Cristina; Eda, Shima; Hayatsu, Masahito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2013-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas that is also capable of destroying the ozone layer. Agricultural soil is the largest source of N2O (ref. ). Soybean is a globally important leguminous crop, and hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) that can also produce N2O (ref. ). In agricultural soil, N2O is emitted from fertilizer and soil nitrogen. In soybean ecosystems, N2O is also emitted from the degradation of the root nodules. Organic nitrogen inside the nodules is mineralized to NH4+, followed by nitrification and denitrification that produce N2O. N2O is then emitted into the atmosphere or is further reduced to N2 by N2O reductase (N2OR), which is encoded by the nosZ gene. Pure culture and vermiculite pot experiments showed lower N2O emission by nosZ+ strains and nosZ++ strains (mutants with increased N2OR activity) of Bradyrhizobium japonicum than by nosZ- strains. A pot experiment using soil confirmed these results. Although enhancing N2OR activity has been suggested as a N2O mitigation option, this has never been tested in the field. Here, we show that post-harvest N2O emission from soybean ecosystems due to degradation of nodules can be mitigated by inoculation of nosZ+ and non-genetically modified organism nosZ++ strains of B. japonicum at a field scale.

  12. Nitrous oxide supersaturation at the liquid/air interface of animal waste.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Andra, Syam S; Hardy, Michael; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali; Bach, Stephan B H; Mullens, Conor P

    2009-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations around the globe generate large amounts of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in the surrounding atmosphere. Liquid animal waste systems have received little attention with respect to N(2)O emissions. We hypothesized that the solution chemistry of animal waste aqueous suspensions would promote conditions that lead to N(2)O supersaturation at the liquid/air interface. The concentration of dissolved N(2)O in poultry litter (PL) aqueous suspensions at 25 degrees C was 0.36 microg N(2)O mL(-1), at least an order of magnitude greater than that measured in water in equilibrium with ambient air, suggesting N(2)O supersaturation. There was a nonlinear increase in the N(2)O Henry constants of PL from 2810 atm/mole fraction at 35 degrees C to 17 300 atm/mole fraction at 41 degrees C. The extremely high N(2)O Henry constants were partially ascribed to N(2)O complexation with aromatic moieties. Complexed N(2)O structures were unstable at temperatures > 35 degrees C, supplying the headspace with additional free N(2)O concentrations. PMID:19573962

  13. Indirect emissions of nitrous oxide from regional aquifers in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, K M; Bateman, A S; Mühlherr, I H; Fukada, T; Dennis, P F

    2003-08-15

    Diffuse pollution of groundwater by agriculture has caused elevated concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in regional aquifers. N2O is an important "greenhouse" gas, yet there are few estimates of indirect emissions of N2O from regional aquifers. In this study, high concentrations of N2O (mean 602 nM) were measured in the unconfined Chalk aquifer of eastern England, in an area of intensive agriculture. In contrast, pristine groundwaters from upland regions of England and Scotland, with predominantly natural vegetation cover, were found to have much lower concentrations of N2O (mean 27 nM). A positive relationship between N2O and NO3- concentrations and delta18O-NO3 values of between 3.36 and 16.00/1000 suggest that nitrification is the principal source of N2O. A calculated emission factor (EF5-g) of 0.0019 for indirect losses of N2O from Chalk groundwater is an order of magnitude lower than the value of 0.015 currently used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology for assessing agricultural emissions. A flux of N2O from the major UK aquifers of 0.04 kg N2O-N ha(-1) a(-1) has been calculated using two approaches and suggests that indirect losses of N2O from regional aquifers are much less significant (<1%) than direct emissions from agricultural soils. PMID:12953859

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. An EC system was assembled with a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) and applied in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. Results showed that this N2O EC system provided reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O amount for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  15. Nitrous oxide generation in denitrifying phosphorus removal process: main causes and control measures.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Yingying; Zou, Yina

    2013-08-01

    Despite the many benefits of denitrifying phosphorus removal process, the significant generation of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, remains a problem for this innovative and promising process. To better understand and more effectively control N2O generation in denitrifying phosphorus removal process, batch experiments were carried out to investigate the main causes of N2O generation, based on which the control measures were subsequently proposed. The results showed that N2O generation accounted for 0.41 % of the total nitrogen removal in denitrifying phosphorus removal process, whereas, in contrast, almost no N2O was generated in conventional denitrification process. It was further demonstrated that the weak competition of N2O reductase for electrons and the high nitrite accumulation were the two main causes for N2O generation, evidenced by N2O production and reduction rates under different conditions. Accordingly, the reduction of N2O generation was successfully achieved via two control measures: (1) the use of continuous nitrate addition reducing N2O generation by around 91.4 % and (2) the use of propionate as the carbon source reducing N2O generation by around 69.8 %. PMID:23407928

  16. Kinetics of nitrous oxide production by denitrification in municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfu; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    As one of the Nitrous Oxide (N2O) production pathways, denitrification plays an important role in regulating the emission of N2O into the atmosphere. In this study, the influences of different substrate concentrations and transient conditions on the denitrification rate and N2O-reducing activities were investigated. Results revealed that N2O production rates (i.e. denitrification rates) were stimulated by increased total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, while it was restrained under high oxygen concentrations. Moreover, the impact of nitrate concentrations on N2O production rates depended on the TOC/NO3--N ratios. All the N2O production rate data fitted well to a multiplicative Monod equation, with terms describing the influence of TOC and nitrate concentrations, and an Arrhenius-type equation. Furthermore, results demonstrated that high temperatures minimized the N2O-reducing activities in aged municipal solid waste, resulting in an accumulation of N2O. On the other hand, a transient condition caused by changing O2 concentrations may strongly influence the N2O production rates and N2O-reducing activities in solid waste. Finally, based on the results, we believe that a landfill aeration strategy properly designed to prevent rising temperatures and to cycle air injection is the key to reducing emissions of N2O during remediation of old landfills by means of in situ aeration. PMID:25697806

  17. Aerobic nitrous oxide production through N-nitrosating hybrid formation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzler, Barbara; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa

    2014-05-01

    Soil emissions are largely responsible for the increase of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere and are generally attributed to the activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. However, the contribution of the recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to N2O production from soil is unclear as is the mechanism by which they produce it. Here we investigate the potential of Nitrososphaera viennensis, the first pure culture of AOA from soil, to produce N2O and compare its activity with that of a marine AOA and an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) from soil. N. viennensis produced N2O at a maximum yield of 0.09% N2O per molecule of nitrite under oxic growth conditions. N2O production rates of 4.6±0.6 amol N2O cell(-1) h(-1) and nitrification rates of 2.6±0.5 fmol NO2(-) cell(-1) h(-1) were in the same range as those of the AOB Nitrosospira multiformis and the marine AOA Nitrosopumilus maritimus grown under comparable conditions. In contrast to AOB, however, N2O production of the two archaeal strains did not increase when the oxygen concentration was reduced, suggesting that they are not capable of denitrification. In (15)N-labeling experiments we provide evidence that both ammonium and nitrite contribute equally via hybrid N2O formation to the N2O produced by N. viennensis under all conditions tested. Our results suggest that archaea may contribute to N2O production in terrestrial ecosystems, however, they are not capable of nitrifier-denitrification and thus do not produce increasing amounts of the greenhouse gas when oxygen becomes limiting. PMID:24401864

  18. Nitrous oxide in the atmosphere: First measurements of a lower thermospheric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheese, Patrick E.; Walker, Kaley A.; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.; Funke, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, as well as one of the most significant anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances in the stratosphere. The satellite-based instrument Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer has been observing the Earth's limb since 2004 and derives profiles of N2O volume mixing ratios in the upper troposphere to the lower thermosphere. The resulting climatology shows that N2O is continuously produced in the lower thermosphere via energetic particle precipitation and enhanced N2O is present at all latitudes, during all seasons. The results are consistent with an N2O production source peaking near or above 94 km via low-energy particles, as well as a polar wintertime source near 70 km via medium energy particles. N2O produced in the polar upper atmosphere descends each winter to as far down as ~40 km.

  19. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Ephemeral Wetland Soils are Correlated with Microbial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wai K.; Farrell, Richard E.; Siciliano, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential far exceeding that of CO2. Soil N2O emissions are a product of two microbially mediated processes: nitrification and denitrification. Understanding the effects of landscape on microbial communities, and the subsequent influences of microbial abundance and composition on the processes of nitrification and denitrification are key to predicting future N2O emissions. The objective of this study was to examine microbial abundance and community composition in relation to N2O associated with nitrification and denitrification processes over the course of a growing season in soils from cultivated and uncultivated wetlands. The denitrifying enzyme assay and N15O3− pool dilution methods were used to compare the rates of denitrification and nitrification and their associated N2O emissions. Functional gene composition was measured with restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and abundance was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The change in denitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) abundance and community composition was a good predictor of net soil N2O emission. However, neither ammonia oxidizing bacteria ammonia monooxygenase (bacterial amoA) gene abundance nor composition predicted nitrification-associated-N2O emissions. Alternative strategies might be necessary if bacterial amoA are to be used as predictive in situ indicators of nitrification rate and nitrification-associated-N2O emission. PMID:21712943

  20. CO oxidation at nickel centres by N2O or O2 to yield a novel hexanuclear carbonate.

    PubMed

    Horn, Bettina; Limberg, Christian; Herwig, Christian; Feist, Michael; Mebs, Stefan

    2012-08-25

    Reaction of a nickel(0) carbonyl complex, K(2)[L(tBu)NiCO](2), with N(2)O generates a cyclic carbonate compound composed of six [Ni(II)(CO(3))K](+) units. The same product can also be obtained using O(2) as the oxidant in a solid-state/gas reaction. These conversions represent unique examples of a nickel-bound CO oxidation by N(2)O and O(2), respectively. PMID:22785444

  1. Exchange of nitrous oxide within the Hudson Bay lowland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, C. L.; Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The source strength of atmospheric trace gases from natural ecosystems must be quantified in order to assess the effect of such inputs on the background tropospheric chemistry. A static chamber technique and a gas exchange technique were used to determine the emissions of nitrous oxide from five sites within the Hudson Bay Lowland, as part of the Northern Wetland Study. Two mechanisms, one diffusive and the other episodic, were found likely to be responsible for the emissions of nitrous oxide. The annual diffusive flux ranged from -3.8 mg(N2O)/sq m in a treed bog to 7.9 mg(N2O)/sq m in an open fen. The addition of the episodic flux, increased this range to -2.1 mg(N2O)/sq m and 18.5 mg(N2O)/sq m respectively. These episodic emissions occurred in from 2.5% to 16.7% of the samples during the late summer peak emission period. Since the gas exchange rate could not detect the episodic emissions, it was found to be a poor method for water emission rate determination within the wetland. LANDSAT-Thermatic Mapper (TM) imagery was used to scale the emissions, from the chamber level to an integrated average over the entire Hudson Bay Lowland. The total emission rate of N2O from the Hudson Bay Lowland, was determined to be 1.2 Gg(N2O)/year, of which 80% was attributed to episodic emissions.

  2. Patterns and controls of nitrous oxide emissions from waters draining a subtropical agricultural valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, John; Matson, Pamela

    2003-09-01

    Although nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from agricultural runoff is thought to constitute a globally important source of this greenhouse gas, N2O flux from polluted aquatic systems is poorly understood and scarcely reported, especially in low-latitude (0°-30°) regions where rapid agricultural intensification is occurring. We measured N2O emissions, dissolved N2O concentrations, and factors likely to control rates of N2O production in drainage canals receiving agricultural and mixed agricultural/urban inputs from the intensively farmed Yaqui Valley of Sonora, Mexico. Average per-area N2O flux in both purely agricultural and mixed urban/agricultural drainage systems (16.5 ng N2O-N cm-2 hr-1) was high compared to other fresh water fluxes, and extreme values ranged up to 244.6 ng N2O-N cm-2 hr-1. These extremely high N2O fluxes occurred during green algae blooms, when organic carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen concentrations were high, and only in canals receiving pig-farm and urban inputs, suggesting an important link between land-use and N2O emissions. N2O concentrations and fluxes correlated significantly with water column concentrations of nitrate, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, ammonium, and chlorophyll a, and a multiple linear regression model including ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon was the best predictor of [N2O] (r2 = 52%). Despite high per-area N2O fluxes, our estimate of regional N2O emission from surface drainage (20,869 kg N2O-N yr-1; 0.046% of N-fertilizer inputs) was low compared to values predicted by algorithms used in global budgets.

  3. Physical Processes and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Pre and Post-Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Giltrap, D.; Kirschbaum, M.; Mcmillan, A. M.; Savage, K. E.; Davidson, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes may be moderated by physical and biological processes, particularly when soils freeze and then thaw. There is a need to understand how physical processes affect above- canopy fluxes of N2O. There is also a need to understand the magnitude and duration of N2O emission peaks for agricultural fields, particularly the nitrogen-fixing legumes, which can produce and consume N2O in the plant root symbiosome. There are multiple potential sources of N2O, including bacteria and fungi in soil and in root symbiosomes. Further, N2O can be released when trapped in ice or dissolved in solution. These physical and biological processes can contribute to N2O fluxes measured above the canopy. In 2012-2013, we evaluated canopy, surface and belowground N2O data for a field seeded to lucerne (Medicago sativa). We used high-frequency data to determine above-canopy N2O fluxes using an Aerodyne Quantum Cascade Laser integrated with an eddy covariance system, and compared these with low-frequency flux and concentration data collected at the surface and belowground. Belowground moisture, temperature and soil data were used to partition measured N2O and CH4 into gaseous and dissolved phases. Pre and post-freeze data indicated the proportion of post-freeze flux previously trapped in ice. Nitrous oxide fluxes following a thaw event were compared with the amount of N2O trapped during freezing to determine the proportion of the flux resulting from previously trapped gases versus de novo N2O production.

  4. Nitrous oxide fluxes from upland soils in central Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhijian; Kimura, Sonoko D; Toma, Yo; Hatano, Ryusuke

    2008-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils were measured using the closed chamber method during the snow-free seasons (middle April to early November), for three years, in a total of 11 upland crop fields in central Hokkaido, Japan. The annual mean N2O fluxes ranged from 2.95 to 164.17 microgN/(m2 x h), with the lowest observed in a grassland and the highest in an onion field. The instantaneous N2O fluxes showed a large temporal variation with peak emissions generally occurring following fertilization and heavy rainfall events around harvesting in autumn. No clear common factor regulating instantaneous N2O fluxes was found at any of the study sites. Instead, instantaneous N2O fluxes at different sites were affected by different soil variables. The cumulative N2O emissions during the study period within each year varied from 0.15 to 7.05 kgN/hm2 for different sites, which accounted for 0.33% to 5.09% of the applied fertilizer N. No obvious relationship was observed between cumulative N2O emission and applied fertilizer N rate (P > 0.4). However, the cumulative N2O emission was significantly correlated with gross mineralized N as estimated by CO2 emissions from bare soils divided by C/N ratios of each soil, and with soil mineral N pool (i.e., the sum of gross mineralized N and fertilizer N) (P < 0.001). PMID:19202870

  5. Methane and nitrous oxide exchange over a managed hay meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörtnagl, L.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2014-12-01

    The methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) exchange of a temperate mountain grassland near Neustift, Austria, was measured during 2010-2012 over a time period of 22 months using the eddy covariance method. Exchange rates of both compounds at the site were low, with 97% of all half-hourly CH4 and N2O fluxes ranging between ±200 and ±50 ng m-2 s-1, respectively. The meadow acted as a sink for both compounds during certain time periods, but was a clear source of CH4 and N2O on an annual timescale. Therefore, both gases contributed to an increase of the global warming potential (GWP), effectively reducing the sink strength in terms of CO2 equivalents of the investigated grassland site. In 2011, our best guess estimate showed a net greenhouse gas (GHG) sink of -32 g CO2 equ. m-2 yr-1 for the meadow, whereby 55% of the CO2 sink strength of -71 g CO2 m-2 yr-1 was offset by CH4 (N2O) emissions of 7 (32) g CO2 equ. m-2 yr-1. When all data were pooled, the ancillary parameters explained 27 (42)% of observed CH4 (N2O) flux variability, and up to 62 (76)% on shorter timescales in-between management dates. In the case of N2O fluxes, we found the highest emissions at intermediate soil water contents and at soil temperatures close to 0 or above 14 °C. In comparison to CO2, H2O and energy fluxes, the interpretation of CH4 and N2O exchange was challenging due to footprint heterogeneity regarding their sources and sinks, uncertainties regarding post-processing and quality control. Our results emphasize that CH4 and N2O fluxes over supposedly well-aerated and moderately fertilized soils cannot be neglected when evaluating the GHG impact of temperate managed grasslands.

  6. Monitoring atmospheric nitrous oxide background concentrations at Zhongshan Station, east Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenjuan; Bian, Lingen; Wang, Can; Zhu, Renbin; Zheng, Xiangdong; Ding, Minghu

    2016-09-01

    At present, continuous observation data for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations are still lacking, especially in east Antarctica. In this paper, nitrous oxide background concentrations were measured at Zhongshan Station (69°22'25″S, 76°22'14″E), east Antarctica during the period of 2008-2012, and their interannual and seasonal characteristics were analyzed and discussed. The mean N2O concentration was 321.9nL/L with the range of 320.5-324.8nL/L during the five years, and it has been increasing at a rate of 0.29% year(-1). Atmospheric N2O concentrations showed a strong seasonal fluctuation during these five years. The concentrations appeared to follow a downtrend from spring to autumn, and then increased in winter. Generally the highest concentrations occurred in spring. This trend was very similar to that observed at other global observation sites. The overall N2O concentration at the selected global sites showed an increasing annual trend, and the mean N2O concentration in the Northern Hemisphere was slightly higher than that in the Southern Hemisphere. Our result could be representative of atmospheric N2O background levels at the global scale. This study provided valuable data for atmospheric N2O concentrations in east Antarctica, which is important to study on the relationships between N2O emissions and climate change. PMID:27593286

  7. Nitrous oxide uptake rates in boreal coniferous forests are associated with soil characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a significant contributor to the destruction of the ozone layer. The radiative forcing of N2O is considered to be 320 more efficient than carbon dioxide.The major portion of global N2O is emitted from agricultural soils. There are studies suggesting that N2O has also a sink in forest soils. However there is relatively limited knowledge on factors controlling N2O consumption in forest soils. Hence N2O consumption was studied in boreal coniferous forests having different forest cover, soil chemical and physical structure and land-use history. The N2O consumption was measured by static chamber technique in the field across spatio-seasonal sampling design. Typical and atypical denitrifiers were quantified with nosZ functional gene marker. Additionally chemical and physical environmental parameters were analyzed to link N2O flux, microbial community and composition of soils. Nitrous oxide uptake could be associated with specific ecosystem and environmental conditions. Soil physical structure and land-use history were shown to be prior factors determining the strength of the uptake rate.

  8. Flume experiments elucidate relationships between stream morphology, hyporheic residence time, and nitrous oxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Reeder, William Jeffrey; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele; Benner, Shawn G.

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is a potentially important producer of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. The location and magnitude of nitrous oxide generation within the hyporheic zone involves complex interactions between multiple nitrogen species, redox conditions, microbial communities, and hydraulics. To better understand nitrous oxide generation and emissions from streams, we conducted large-scale flume experiments in which we monitored pore waters along hyporheic flow paths within stream dune structures. Measurements of dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and dissolved nitrous oxide showed distinct spatial relationships reflecting redox changes along flow paths. Using residence times along a flow path, clear trends in oxygen conditions and nitrogen species were observed. Three dune sizes were modeled, resulting in a range of residence times, carbon reactivity levels and respiration rates. We found that the magnitude and location of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone is related to nitrate loading, dune morphology, and residence time. Specifically, increasing exogenous nitrate levels in surface water to approximately 3 mg/L resulted in an increase in dissolved N2O concentrations greater than 500% (up to 10 µg/L N-N2O) in distinct zones of specific residence times. We also found, however, that dissolved N2O concentrations decreased to background levels further along the flow path due to either reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen gas or degassing. The decrease in measurable N2O along a flow path strongly suggests an important relationship between dune morphology, residence time, and nitrous oxide emissions from within stream sediments. Relating streambed morphology and loading of nitrogen species allows for prediction of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone of natural systems.

  9. Assessment of nitrous oxide and methane emissions for California agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.; Burger, M.; Assa, Y.; Wilson, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) mandates comprehensive strategies to reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions. In agriculture crop production, sources of N2O are related to nitrogen fertilization while CH4 emission is associated with rice production. More than half the GHG emissions from agriculture are attributed to N2O production. Currently, baseline N2O emission data for most cropping systems in the State is lacking. Estimates of CH4 emission in rice have been established from previous studies, but a lack of information exists for its expansion into the San Joaquin Delta to address subsidence issues. The paucity of N2O emission data has hampered biogeochemical modeling efforts. The objectives of this assessment are to (1) measure annual N2O and CH4 emissions for major California crops (vineyards, almonds, tomato, wheat, alfalfa, lettuce, and rice) under typical management practices, (2) characterize the effects of environmental factors on the temporal profile of N2O and CH4 emissions, and (3) determine N2O emission factors. The growth of rice in Delta peat soils produced highly variable CH4 emissions depending on tillage intensity. In 2010, standard tillage produced 184 kg CH4-C/ha while in 2011 after deep plowing placing rice residue deeper into the soil, only 26 kg CH4-C/ha was observed. In processing tomato systems, an average 2.5 kg N2O-N/ha was emitted with standard fertilization (160 kg N / ha), similar to background emissions and those from a drip irrigated system, while 4.0 to 5.8 kg N2O-N /ha y-1 was emitted at fertilizer rates of 225 and 300 kg N /ha (see Fig. 1 for example of temporal sources of emissions). About half the annual emissions were emitted within 3 d after the first seasonal rainfall event. In other tomato studies, estimated losses of fertilizer N as N2O were 0.38 ± 0.03 kg/ha y-1 in a drip irrigated system and 1.79 ± 0.21 kg/ha y-1 in furrow irrigated system, which was equivalent to 0.19% and 0

  10. Fact and Fiction of Nitrous Oxide Production By Nitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Kozlowski, J.; Stieglmeier, M.; Klotz, M. G.; Schleper, C.

    2014-12-01

    An accepted dogma in nitrification research is that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) produce a modicum of nitrous oxide (N2O) during nitritation via incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine, and substantially more at low oxygen concentrations via nitrifier denitrification.The nitrifier denitrification pathway involves the reduction of nitrite to N2O via nitric oxide and was thought to require activities of a copper-containing nitrite reductase (NirK) and nitric oxide reductase (NorB); inventory encoded in most, but not all AOB genome sequences. The discovery of nirK genes in ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (AOA) resulted in a slew of publications stating that AOA must also perform nitrifier denitrification and, due to their high abundance, must control the majority of nitrification-linked N2O emissions. Prior to a publication by Stieglmeier et al. (2014), which definitively showed a lack of nitrifier denitrification by two axenic AOA cultures, other researchers relied on enrichment cultures, negative data, and heavy inferencing without direct demonstration of either a functional pathway or involvement of specific genes or enzymes. AOA genomes lack recognizable nitric oxide reductases and thermophilic AOA also lack nirK genes. Physiological and microrespirometry experiments with axenic AOB and AOA cultures allowed us to demonstrate that: 1) AOB produce N2O via nitrifier denitrification even though some lack annotated nirK and/or norB genes; 2) nitrifier denitrification by AOB is reliant on nitric oxide but ammonia oxidation is not; 3) ammonia oxidation by AOA is reliant on production of nitric oxide; 4) AOA are incapable of generating N2O via nitrifier denitrification; 5) N2O production by AOA is from chemical interactions between NO and media components, most likely not by enzyme activity. Our results reveal operation of different N oxide transformation pathways in AOB and AOA governed by different environmental controls and involving different mechanisms of N2O

  11. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source. PMID:26463891

  12. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source. PMID:26463891

  13. Meta-Analysis of Environmental Impacts on Nitrous Oxide Release in Response to N Amendment

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Emma L.; Allison, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) accounts for approximately 5% of the global greenhouse effect and destroys stratospheric ozone. Soils are the most important source of N2O, which is produced during nitrification and denitrification. To assess the impact of environmental variables and ecosystems on N2O flux, we performed a meta-analysis comparing N2O flux in N amended and matched control plots in non-agricultural soils. We found that N2O release increased with N amendment in the short term. Although there were few studies in shrubland, this ecosystem showed the greatest response. The N2O response to N amendment was greater in year-round studies and in studies with more measurements, but lower in longer studies. The N2O response was greater at higher latitudes and precipitation rates. We also observed an unexpected 55% decline in the N2O response to N amendment over the 23 years covered by the studies. This pattern may reflect a suppression of the N2O response from long-term N deposition accumulation, particularly in temperate regions. Although short term increases in reactive N entering natural systems may cause positive feedbacks to the release of N2O, this effect may diminish over time in locations with high rates of N deposition. PMID:22866053

  14. Microbial regulation of terrestrial nitrous oxide formation: understanding the biological pathways for prediction of emission rates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The continuous increase of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere due to increasing anthropogenic nitrogen input in agriculture has become a global concern. In recent years, identification of the microbial assemblages responsible for soil N2O production has substantially advanced with the development of molecular technologies and the discoveries of novel functional guilds and new types of metabolism. However, few practical tools are available to effectively reduce in situ soil N2O flux. Combating the negative impacts of increasing N2O fluxes poses considerable challenges and will be ineffective without successfully incorporating microbially regulated N2O processes into ecosystem modeling and mitigation strategies. Here, we synthesize the latest knowledge of (i) the key microbial pathways regulating N2O production and consumption processes in terrestrial ecosystems and the critical environmental factors influencing their occurrence, and (ii) the relative contributions of major biological pathways to soil N2O emissions by analyzing available natural isotopic signatures of N2O and by using stable isotope enrichment and inhibition techniques. We argue that it is urgently necessary to incorporate microbial traits into biogeochemical ecosystem modeling in order to increase the estimation reliability of N2O emissions. We further propose a molecular methodology oriented framework from gene to ecosystem scales for more robust prediction and mitigation of future N2O emissions. PMID:25934121

  15. The effect of soil moisture on nitrous oxide production rates in large enclosed ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haren, J.; Colodner, D.; Lin, G.; Murthy, R.

    2001-12-01

    On land, nitrous oxide (N2O) is mainly produced in soils by bacterial processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Once in the atmosphere N2O contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone destruction. Nitrification and denitrification are strongly dependent on soil moisture content, amongst other soil parameters. At Biosphere 2 Center we have begun to test the utility of meso-scale closed systems for understanding the relationship between soil properties and trace gas production at larger scales. We investigated the relationship between soil moisture content and soil N2O efflux in two large experimental closed systems (Tropical Rainforest (TR) and Intensive Forestry (IF) Mesocosms) at Biosphere 2 Center. N2O was measured every hour with an automated GC system. The daily N2O production rate was calculated as the rate of increase of N2O during the daytime, when the mesocosm was materially closed. We furthermore measured N2O and nitrate concentrations in the soil, as well as nitrate and N2O production rates in local areas. In the Rainforest Mesocosm, we found a very reproducible relationship between soil moisture content and N2O efflux, including the transient spikes in production rate upon wetting. In the Forestry Mesocosm the relation between soil moisture and N2O efflux was less clearcut.

  16. Recent advances in mathematical modeling of nitrous oxides emissions from wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-12-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be emitted from wastewater treatment contributing to its greenhouse gas footprint significantly. Mathematical modeling of N2O emissions is of great importance toward the understanding and reduction of the environmental impact of wastewater treatment systems. This article reviews the current status of the modeling of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment. The existing mathematical models describing all the known microbial pathways for N2O production are reviewed and discussed. These included N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) through the hydroxylamine oxidation pathway and the AOB denitrification pathway, N2O production by heterotrophic denitrifiers through the denitrification pathway, and the integration of these pathways in single N2O models. The calibration and validation of these models using lab-scale and full-scale experimental data is also reviewed. We conclude that the mathematical modeling of N2O production, while is still being enhanced supported by new knowledge development, has reached a maturity that facilitates the estimation of site-specific N2O emissions and the development of mitigation strategies for a wastewater treatment plant taking into the specific design and operational conditions of the plant. PMID:26451976

  17. Treatment of N2O in pulsed microwave torch discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiński, M.; Czylkowski, D.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2004-03-01

    Results of using a moderate-power (several hundred Watts) pulsed microwave torch plasma (MTP) to the conversion of atmospheric-pressure nitrous oxide (N2O) into nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2 and N2O4) are presented. The pulsed regime allowed to decrease the average power used, resulting in a higher value of energy efficiency by about 10% (reaching several hundred g[N2O]/kWh) at the same efficiency of the decomposition of N2O (70÷90%) as at the continuous operation of MTP. The removal rate increased up to 200 g[N2O]/h. The obtained results suggest the pulsed MTP promising for efficient decomposition of various gaseous pollutants, e.g. fluorocarbons.

  18. Multireference perturbation theory (MRPT2) study on N 2O capture and activation by excited states of Rh atom and cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Enrique; Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Bertin, Virineya

    2010-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) is an intermediate compound in three-ways exhaust-pipes catalysis. Rh and Rh + + N 2O reactions are calculated at ab initio MRPT2 level, in Cs symmetry and for many multiplicities to find N 2O capture and activation. Rh ground state does not capture N 2O; however some excited states spontaneously capture and activate it, where only RhN 2O (b 6A') and (e 8A″) activate N 2O: RhN 2O → RhO + N 2 and RhN 2O → RhN 2 + O, respectively but never break N-N bond. Rh + ground state weakly capture N 2O, but only one Rh + excited state captures and activates N 2O. N 2O activation by Rh atom and cation do not involve any transition states.

  19. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Soares, Johnny R; Cassman, Noriko A; Kielak, Anna M; Pijl, Agata; Carmo, Janaína B; Lourenço, Kesia S; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Cantarella, Heitor; Kuramae, Eiko E

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emissions, and to determine the impacts of the N sources on the soil microbiome. In a field experiment, nitrogen was applied as calcium nitrate, urea, urea with dicyandiamide or 3,4 dimethylpyrazone phosphate nitrification inhibitors (NIs), and urea coated with polymer and sulfur (PSCU). Urea caused the highest N2O emissions (1.7% of N applied) and PSCU did not reduce cumulative N2O emissions compared to urea. NIs reduced N2O emissions (95%) compared to urea and had emissions comparable to those of the control (no N). Similarly, calcium nitrate resulted in very low N2O emissions. Interestingly, N2O emissions were significantly correlated only with bacterial amoA, but not with denitrification gene (nirK, nirS, nosZ) abundances, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, via the nitrification pathway, were the main contributors to N2O emissions. Moreover, the treatments had little effect on microbial composition or diversity. We suggest nitrate-based fertilizers or the addition of NIs in NH4(+)-N based fertilizers as viable options for reducing N2O emissions in tropical soils and lessening the environmental impact of biofuel produced from sugarcane. PMID:27460335

  20. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Johnny R.; Cassman, Noriko A.; Kielak, Anna M.; Pijl, Agata; Carmo, Janaína B.; Lourenço, Kesia S.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Cantarella, Heitor; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emissions, and to determine the impacts of the N sources on the soil microbiome. In a field experiment, nitrogen was applied as calcium nitrate, urea, urea with dicyandiamide or 3,4 dimethylpyrazone phosphate nitrification inhibitors (NIs), and urea coated with polymer and sulfur (PSCU). Urea caused the highest N2O emissions (1.7% of N applied) and PSCU did not reduce cumulative N2O emissions compared to urea. NIs reduced N2O emissions (95%) compared to urea and had emissions comparable to those of the control (no N). Similarly, calcium nitrate resulted in very low N2O emissions. Interestingly, N2O emissions were significantly correlated only with bacterial amoA, but not with denitrification gene (nirK, nirS, nosZ) abundances, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, via the nitrification pathway, were the main contributors to N2O emissions. Moreover, the treatments had little effect on microbial composition or diversity. We suggest nitrate-based fertilizers or the addition of NIs in NH4+-N based fertilizers as viable options for reducing N2O emissions in tropical soils and lessening the environmental impact of biofuel produced from sugarcane.

  1. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Johnny R.; Cassman, Noriko A.; Kielak, Anna M.; Pijl, Agata; Carmo, Janaína B.; Lourenço, Kesia S.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Cantarella, Heitor; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emissions, and to determine the impacts of the N sources on the soil microbiome. In a field experiment, nitrogen was applied as calcium nitrate, urea, urea with dicyandiamide or 3,4 dimethylpyrazone phosphate nitrification inhibitors (NIs), and urea coated with polymer and sulfur (PSCU). Urea caused the highest N2O emissions (1.7% of N applied) and PSCU did not reduce cumulative N2O emissions compared to urea. NIs reduced N2O emissions (95%) compared to urea and had emissions comparable to those of the control (no N). Similarly, calcium nitrate resulted in very low N2O emissions. Interestingly, N2O emissions were significantly correlated only with bacterial amoA, but not with denitrification gene (nirK, nirS, nosZ) abundances, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, via the nitrification pathway, were the main contributors to N2O emissions. Moreover, the treatments had little effect on microbial composition or diversity. We suggest nitrate-based fertilizers or the addition of NIs in NH4+-N based fertilizers as viable options for reducing N2O emissions in tropical soils and lessening the environmental impact of biofuel produced from sugarcane. PMID:27460335

  2. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  3. Controls on nitrous oxide production and consumption in reservoirs of the Ohio River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Nietch, Christopher T.; Young, Jade L.

    2015-10-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are a globally significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, but estimates are largely based on studies conducted in streams and rivers with relatively less known about N2O dynamics in reservoirs. Due to long water residence times and high nitrogen (N) loading rates, reservoirs support substantial N processing and therefore may be particularly important sites of N2O production. Predicting N2O emissions from reservoirs is difficult due to complex interactions between microbial N processing in the oxygen-poor hypolimnion and oxygen-rich epilimnion. Here we present the results of a survey of N2O depth profiles in 20 reservoirs draining a broad range of land use conditions in four states in the U.S. Nitrous oxide was supersaturated in the epilimnion of 80% of the reservoirs and was undersaturated in only one, indicating that reservoirs in this region are generally a source of N2O to the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide was undersaturated in the hypolimnion of 10 reservoirs, supersaturated in 9, and transitioned from supersaturation to undersaturation in 1 reservoir that was monitored periodically from midsummer to fall. All reservoirs with a mean hypolimnion nitrate concentration less than 50 µg N L-1 showed evidence of net N2O consumption in the hypolimnion. All reservoirs sampled during lake turnover supported N2O production throughout the water column. These results indicate that N2O dynamics in reservoirs differ widely both among systems and through time but can be predicted based on N and oxygen availability and degree of thermal stratification.

  4. Aerobic Denitrifying Bacteria That Produce Low Levels of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Naoki; Catalan-Sakairi, Maria Antonina B.; Sakaguchi, Yasushi; Kato, Isao; Zhou, Zhemin; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    Most denitrifiers produce nitrous oxide (N2O) instead of dinitrogen (N2) under aerobic conditions. We isolated and characterized novel aerobic denitrifiers that produce low levels of N2O under aerobic conditions. We monitored the denitrification activities of two of the isolates, strains TR2 and K50, in batch and continuous cultures. Both strains reduced nitrate (NO3−) to N2 at rates of 0.9 and 0.03 μmol min−1 unit of optical density at 540 nm−1 at dissolved oxygen (O2) (DO) concentrations of 39 and 38 μmol liter−1, respectively. At the same DO level, the typical denitrifier Pseudomonas stutzeri and the previously described aerobic denitrifier Paracoccus denitrificans did not produce N2 but evolved more than 10-fold more N2O than strains TR2 and K50 evolved. The isolates denitrified NO3− with concomitant consumption of O2. These results indicated that strains TR2 and K50 are aerobic denitrifiers. These two isolates were taxonomically placed in the β subclass of the class Proteobacteria and were identified as P. stutzeri TR2 and Pseudomonas sp. strain K50. These strains should be useful for future investigations of the mechanisms of denitrifying bacteria that regulate N2O emission, the single-stage process for nitrogen removal, and microbial N2O emission into the ecosystem. PMID:12788710

  5. Suppression of chemotaxis to corneal inflammation by nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Kripke, B J; Kupferman, A; Luu, K C

    1987-11-01

    Immune competency is depressed in the perioperative period. The role of anesthetic agents in immune reactivity remains unclear. The chemotactic migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the cornea of rabbits injured by clove oil was studied. PMNs were previously radiolabeled with tritiated (3H) thymidine. Immediately following injury, the rabbits entered isolation chambers and breathed either air or air containing 10%, 20% or 40% nitrous oxide (N2O) for 24 hours. After sacrifice, the radioactivity of a 10 mm corneal button, removed by trephination, was determined by scintillation counting technique. Peripheral blood was obtained for hemoglobin, white cell and platelet count. The N2O dosage affected on the migration of PMNs to the cornea. 3H was decreased 15.4% by 20% N2O and 38.8% for 40% N2O-exposed rabbits. Peripheral blood values did not differ. N2O can suppress chemotaxis of PMNs in the rabbit, thereby adversely affecting the inflammatory component of immune defense. PMID:3130236

  6. Denitrifying kinetics and nitrous oxide emission under different copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangxue; Zhai, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Chengai; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    Denitrifying activities and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during denitrification can be affected by copper concentrations. Different denitrifiers were acclimated in sequencing batch reactors with acetate or methanol as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The effect of copper concentrations on the denitrifying activity and N2O emission for the acclimated denitrifiers was examined in batch experiments. Denitrifying activities of the acclimated denitrifiers declined with increasing copper concentrations, and the copper concentration exhibited a higher effect on denitrifiers acclimated with acetate than those acclimated with methanol. Compared with the control without the addition of copper, at the copper concentration of 1 mg/L, the acetate utilization rate reduced by 89% for acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, while the methanol utilization rate only reduced by 15% for methanol-acclimated denitrifiers. Copper also had different effects on N2O emission during denitrification carried out by various types of denitrifiers. For the acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission initially increased and then decreased with increasing copper concentrations, while for the methanol-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission decreased with increasing copper concentrations. PMID:24569272

  7. Nitrous oxide fluxes from three forest types of the tropical mountain rainforests on Hainan Island, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhenzhi; Yang, Gang; Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Chen, Dexiang; Li, Yide; Wang, Xu; Wu, Zhongmin; Zhou, Guangyi; Peng, Changhui

    2014-08-01

    Tropical rainforest soil is an important source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). However, there is still considerable uncertainty about the spatial and temporal variability of N2O fluxes. To understand these fluxes, we quantified the annual N2O emissions from three tropical mountain rainforests (primary mountain rainforest, PMR; secondary mountain rainforest, SMR; and Podocarpus imbricatus plantation, PIP) in the Jianfengling National Natural Reserve on Hainan Island, China. The average of N2O emissions in this area was 2.52 ± 0.33 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 (3.52 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the wet season and 1.62 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the dry season) during our study period, with highly seasonal variations. The mean N2O emission rates were significantly higher during the wet season (68% of the total average) than the dry season (32% of the total average) (P < 0.05). PIP had the highest N2O emission rate at 3.49 ± 0.61 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 (4.74 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the wet season and 2.32 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the dry season), followed by SMR at 3.03 ± 0.64 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 (4.16 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the wet season and 1.97 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the dry season), and then PMR at 1.53 ± 0.49 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 (2.21 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the wet season and 0.94 kg N-N2O ha-1 yr-1 in the dry season). We observed a significant Gaussian relationship between the N2O fluxes and soil temperature for SMR and PIP but no significant relationship in PMR. There was a significant exponential relationship between the N2O fluxes and water filled pore space (WFPS) in SMR and PIP but not in PMR.

  8. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-03-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N2O)nO- (n = 1-12) and (N2O)n- (n = 7-15) in the region 800-1600 cm-1. The charge carriers in these ions are NNO2- and O- for (N2O)nO- clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N2O- for (N2O)n- clusters. The N-N and N-O stretching vibrations of N2O- (solvated by N2O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm-1 and (894 ± 5) cm-1, respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael C; Weber, J Mathias

    2016-03-14

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N2O)nO(-) (n = 1-12) and (N2O)n (-) (n = 7-15) in the region 800-1600 cm(-1). The charge carriers in these ions are NNO2 (-) and O(-) for (N2O)nO(-) clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N2O(-) for (N2O)n (-) clusters. The N-N and N-O stretching vibrations of N2O(-) (solvated by N2O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm(-1) and (894 ± 5) cm(-1), respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory. PMID:26979688

  10. Effect of high frequency surface and subsurface drip irrigations on N2O emissions in orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fertilized agricultural soil is a source for greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. A sustainable agricultural practice needs to consider minimizing N2O emissions while increasing N use efficiency and maintaining crop economic yield and quality. In order to develop a sustainable crop producti...

  11. Partitioning N2O emissions within the US Corn Belt using an inverse modeling approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions within the US Corn Belt have been estimated to be 2- to 9-11 fold larger than predictions from emission inventories, implying that one or more source 12 categories in bottom-up approaches are underestimated. Here we interpret hourly N2O 13 mixing ratios measured during ...

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production during Denitrifying Phosphorus Removal Process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Chen, Xueming; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-07-21

    A denitrifying phosphorus removal process undergoes frequent alternating anaerobic/anoxic conditions to achieve phosphate release and uptake, during which microbial internal storage polymers (e.g., Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)) could be produced and consumed dynamically. The PHA turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during the denitrifying phosphorus removal process. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe N2O dynamics and the key role of PHA consumption on N2O accumulation during the denitrifying phosphorus removal process for the first time. In this model, the four-step anoxic storage of polyphosphate and four-step anoxic growth on PHA using nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), and N2O consecutively by denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organisms (DPAOs) are taken into account for describing all potential N2O accumulation steps in the denitrifying phosphorus removal process. The developed model is successfully applied to reproduce experimental data on N2O production obtained from four independent denitrifying phosphorus removal study reports with different experimental conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O accumulation, nitrogen reduction, phosphate release and uptake, and PHA dynamics for all systems, suggesting the validity and applicability of the model. The results indicated a substantial role of PHA consumption in N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate by using PHA during denitrifying phosphorus removal. PMID:26114730

  13. Nitrous oxide production by Alcaligenes faecalis under transient and dynamic aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, S.; Grobben, N.G.; Robertson, L.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Kuenen, J.G.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrous oxide production contributes to both greenhouse effect and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. A significant part of the global N2O emission can be attributed to microbial processes, especially nitrification and denitrification, used in biological wastewater treatment systems. This study looks at the efficiency of denitrification and the enzymes involved, with the emphasis on N2O production during the transient phase from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and vice versa. The effect of repetitive changing aerobic-anaerobic conditions on N2O was also studied. Alcaligenes faecalis was used as the model denitrofing organism. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Clinical experience with TENS and TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen. Report of 371 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Quarnstrom, F. C.; Milgrom, P.

    1989-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) alone or TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen (N2O) was administered for restorative dentistry without local anesthesia to 371 adult patients. A total of 55% of TENS alone and 84% of TENS/N2O visits were rated successful. A total of 53% of TENS alone and 82% of TENS/N2O patients reported slight or no pain. In multivariable analyses, pain reports were related to the anesthesia technique and patient fear and unrelated to sex, race, age, tooth, or depth of preparation. PMID:2604059

  15. Impact of biochar on nitrous oxide emissions from upland rice.

    PubMed

    Petter, Fabiano André; de Lima, Larissa Borges; Marimon Júnior, Ben Hur; Alves de Morais, Leidimar; Marimon, Beatriz Schwantes

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this research was to assess the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) from soil amended with biochar in the culture of upland rice. The experiment was conducted in the field in a Cerrado Haplic Plinthosol under randomized block experimental design. The treatments consisted of fertilization with 100 kg N ha(-1) split into two applications, 60% at sowing and 40% at 45 days after crop emergence, combined with four doses of biochar (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha(-1)), with four replications. The application of N and the emission of N2O, moisture retention and soil temperature, respiration (C-CO2), microbial biomass carbon in the soil (C-SMB), total nitrogen (TN), pH and agronomic efficiency in N use (AENu) were evaluated five years after the application of biochar. There was a significant correlation of the application of biochar with moisture retention (r = 0.94**), N2O emission (r = 0.86**) and soil pH (r = 0.65*), and N2O emissions showed a positive correlation (p < 0.05) with soil moisture (r = 0.77**) and pH (r = 0.66*). Thus the highest N2O emissions were observed shortly after N fertilization and in the treatments with 32 Mg ha(-1) of biochar. Despite the higher N2O emissions from the application of 32 Mg ha(-1) of biochar, the emission factor was lower (0.81%) than the maximum recommended by the IPCC. The higher N2O emissions with application of biochar are offset by more efficient use of N and consequently the possibility of reduction of applied doses. PMID:26716573

  16. Transatlantic equatorial distribution of nitrous oxide and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudot, Claude; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise; Mormiche, Claire; Guevel, Michael; Ternon, Jean-François; Le Corre, Pierre

    2002-07-01

    During January-March 1993, the vertical distributions of dissolved nitrous oxide (N 2O) and methane (CH 4), and their atmospheric mixing ratios were measured in the equatorial Atlantic on the WOCE lines A6 (7°30'N) and A7 (4°30'S). Measured mean N 2O and CH 4 atmospheric mixing ratios were 0.316 and 1.786 ppm respectively, with an analytical precision of 1%. Surface waters were everywhere supersaturated with both gases (mean excess ΔN 2O=8% and ΔCH 4=32%), with significantly higher values close to the continents. The N 2O vertical distributions on both sections display a broad maximum centred near 400 m depth, at the level of the oxygen minimum. The CH 4 vertical distributions also show a sharp subsurface maximum at the base of the mixed layer, associated with a chlorophyll a maximum. Computed N 2O and CH 4 sea-air fluxes are in the range 1.1-1.8 μmol m -2 d -1 and 1.2-2.0 μmol m -2 d -1 respectively. For N 2O, we calculate that the upward transport through the thermocline matches the horizontal transport in the mixed layer and the emission to the atmosphere. Hence, the N 2O budget is balanced within the experimental uncertainties. This is not the case for CH 4, whose vertical transport from the maximum concentration layer accounts for <10% of the sea-air flux. It follows that the CH 4 budget requires a sustained production within the mixed layer itself to maintain CH 4 supersaturation and balance its escape to the atmosphere.

  17. Stable isotopes in nitrous oxide emitted from tropical rain forest soils and agricultural fields: Implications for the global atmospheric nitrous oxide budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Tibisay Josefina

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and is the primary source of NOx in the stratosphere. Large uncertainties exist in the global N2O budget, mainly due to the high uncertainty associated with source estimates. Recently, stable isotopes of 15N and 18O have been proposed as a tool to better constrain the N2O global budget. This thesis develops analytical methods for constraining and measuring stable isotopes in N2O emitted from soils and reports initial investigations of N2O isotopes from the largest sources in the global N2O budget: tropical rain forest soils and agricultural fields. We found significant differences in the isotopic composition of N 2O emitted from tropical rain forest soils and fertilized agricultural fields. Differences were largest for 15N. Emission-weighted δ 15N-N2O were -26 +/- 2.5‰ s.d., n = 3 (Costa Rican forest), -6.6 +/- 11.3‰ s.d. n = 14 (Brazilian forest) and -36.7 +/- 9.2‰ s.d. n = 19 (Mexican agricultural field and Costa Rican Papaya plantation). We attribute the large range in δ 15N from tropical rain forests, where denitrification is the main source of N2O, to differences in the degree of N2O to N2 reduction. We attribute the very light δ15N values in fertilized agricultural fields to the enhanced nitrogen availability in the soils which facilitates higher fractionation between substrates and products. Similarly, in the Brazilian tropical forest lighter δ 15N-N2O from a local area of enhanced emission is attributed to locally more abundant N- substrate in that particular soil site. If the increase of N2O in the troposphere over the past 100 years is attributable to increased use of N fertilizer, and assuming that light δ 15N- N2O isotopic values are associated with agricultural practices, we expect the δ15N-N2O in the troposphere to have decreased since pre-industrial times. Theoretically, comparison of 15N and 18O signature of emitted N2O with precursors species (NO3 -, NH4+, H2O and O 2) should uniquely

  18. Catalytic oxidation of H2 by N2O in the gas phase: O-atom transport with atomic metal cations.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Bozović, Andrea; Orlova, Galina; Bohme, Diethard K

    2008-10-16

    Twenty-five atomic cations, M (+), that lie within the thermodynamic window for O-atom transport catalysis of the oxidation of hydrogen by nitrous oxide, have been checked for catalytic activity at room temperature with kinetic measurements using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Only 4 of these 25 atomic cations were seen to be catalytic: Fe (+), Os (+), Ir (+), and Pt (+). Two of these, Ir (+) and Pt (+), are efficient catalysts, while Fe (+) and Os (+) are not. Eighteen atomic cations (Cr (+), Mn (+), Co (+), Ni (+), Cu (+), Ge (+), Se (+), Mo (+), Ru (+), Rh (+), Sn (+), Te (+), Re (+), Pb (+), Bi (+), Eu (+), Tm (+), and Yb (+)) react too slowly at room temperature either in their oxidation with N 2O to form MO (+) or in the reduction of MO (+) by H 2. Many of these reactions are known to be spin forbidden and a few actually may lie outside the thermodynamic window. Three alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations, CaO (+), SrO (+), and BaO (+), were observed to favor MOH (+) formation in their reactions with H 2. A potential-energy landscape is computed for the oxidation of H 2 with N 2O catalyzed by Fe (+)( (6)D) that vividly illustrates the operation of an ionic catalyst and qualitatively accounts for the relative inefficiency of this catalyst. PMID:18808088

  19. Nitrous oxide production by nitrification and denitrification in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qixing; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    The Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (ETSP-OMZ) is a site of intense nitrous oxide (N2O) flux to the atmosphere. This flux results from production of N2O by nitrification and denitrification, but the contribution of the two processes is unknown. The rates of these pathways and their distributions were measured directly using 15N tracers. The highest N2O production rates occurred at the depth of peak N2O concentrations at the oxic-anoxic interface above the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) because slightly oxygenated waters allowed (1) N2O production from both nitrification and denitrification and (2) higher nitrous oxide production yields from nitrification. Within the ODZ proper (i.e., anoxia), the only source of N2O was denitrification (i.e., nitrite and nitrate reduction), the rates of which were reflected in the abundance of nirS genes (encoding nitrite reductase). Overall, denitrification was the dominant pathway contributing the N2O production in the ETSP-OMZ.

  20. Quantum cascade laser photoacoustic detection of nitrous oxide released from soils for biofuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, F. M.; Sthel, M. S.; Castro, M. P. P.; da Silva, M. G.; Rocha, M. V.; Tavares, J. R.; Veiga, C. F. M.; Vargas, H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the generation of greenhouse gases in sugarcane ethanol production chain, a comparative study of N2O emission in artificially fertilized soils and soils free from fertilizers was carried out. Photoacoustic spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser with an emission ranging from 7.71 to 7.88 µm and differential photoacoustic cell were applied to detect nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas emitted from soils cultivated with sugar cane. Owing to calibrate the experimental setup, an initial N2O concentration was diluted with pure nitrogen and detection limit of 50 ppbv was achieved. The proposed methodology was selective and sensitive enough to detect N2O from no fertilized and artificially fertilized soils. The measured N2O concentration ranged from ppmv to ppbv.

  1. Retrieval of the Nitrous Oxide Profiles using the AIRS Data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, P.; Tao, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, S.; Xiong, X.

    2014-12-01

    As an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance, the 100-year global warming potential of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is almost 300 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. However, there are still large uncertainties about the quantitative N2O emission and its feedback to climate change due to the coarse ground-based network. This approach attempts to retrieve the N2O profiles from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) data. First, the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and surface parameters between two spectral absorption bands were simulated by using the radiative transfer model. Second, the eigenvector regression algorithm is used to construct a priori state. Third, an optimal estimate method was developed based on the band selection of N2O. Finally, we compared our retrieved AIRS profiles with HIPPO data, and analyzed the seasonal and annual N2O distribution in China from 2004 to 2013.

  2. Incomplete Denitrification Causes Rapid Nitrous Oxide Cycling in the Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, A. R.; Ward, B. B.; Stocker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  3. Climate change reduces warming potential of nitrous oxide by an enhanced Brewer-Dobson circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, Daniela; Reick, Christian H.; Manzini, Elisa; Schultz, Martin G.; Stein, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), which is an important driver of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, is expected to accelerate with climate change. One particular consequence of this acceleration is the enhanced transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) from its sources at the Earth's surface toward its main sink region in the stratosphere, thus inducing a reduction in its lifetime. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas and the most relevant currently emitted ozone-depleting substance. Here we examine the implications of a reduced N2O lifetime in the context of climate change. We find a decrease in its global warming potential (GWP) and, due to a decline in the atmospheric N2O burden, also a reduction in its total radiative forcing. From the idealized transient global warming simulation we can identify linear regressions for N2O sink, lifetime, and GWP with temperature rise. Our findings are thus not restricted to a particular scenario.

  4. A review of nitrous oxide mitigation by farm nitrogen management in temperate grassland-based agriculture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dejun; Watson, Catherine J; Yan, Ming Jia; Lalor, Stan; Rafique, Rashid; Hyde, Bernard; Lanigan, Gary; Richards, Karl G; Holden, Nicholas M; Humphreys, James

    2013-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from grassland-based agriculture is an important source of atmospheric N2O. It is hence crucial to explore various solutions including farm nitrogen (N) management to mitigate N2O emissions without sacrificing farm profitability and food supply. This paper reviews major N management practices to lower N2O emission from grassland-based agriculture. Restricted grazing by reducing grazing time is an effective way to decrease N2O emissions from excreta patches. Balancing the protein-to-energy ratios in the diets of ruminants can also decrease N2O emissions from excreta patches. Among the managements of synthetic fertilizer N application, only adjusting fertilizer N rate and slow-released fertilizers are proven to be effective in lowering N2O emissions. Use of bedding materials may increase N2O emissions from animal houses. Manure storage as slurry, manipulating slurry pH to values lower than 6 and storage as solid manure under anaerobic conditions help to reduce N2O emissions during manure storage stage. For manure land application, N2O emissions can be mitigated by reducing manure N inputs to levels that satisfy grass needs. Use of nitrification inhibitors can substantially lower N2O emissions associated with applications of fertilizers and manures and from urine patches. N2O emissions from legume based grasslands are generally lower than fertilizer-based systems. In conclusion, effective measures should be taken at each step during N flow or combined options should be used in order to mitigate N2O emission at the farm level. PMID:23880433

  5. Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Eliza; Joss, Adriano; Emmenegger, Lukas; Kipf, Marco; Wolf, Benjamin; Mohn, Joachim; Wunderlin, Pascal

    2015-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production pathways in a single stage, continuously fed partial nitritation-anammox reactor were investigated using online isotopic analysis of offgas N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). N2O emissions increased when reactor operating conditions were not optimal, for example, high dissolved oxygen concentration. SP measurements indicated that the increase in N2O was due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor. The results of this study confirm that process control via online N2O monitoring is an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. Under normal operating conditions, the N2O isotopic site preference (SP) was much higher than expected - up to 40‰ - which could not be explained within the current understanding of N2O production pathways. Various targeted experiments were conducted to investigate the characteristics of N2O formation in the reactor. The high SP measurements during both normal operating and experimental conditions could potentially be explained by a number of hypotheses: i) unexpectedly strong heterotrophic N2O reduction, ii) unknown inorganic or anammox-associated N2O production pathway, iii) previous underestimation of SP fractionation during N2O production from NH2OH, or strong variations in SP from this pathway depending on reactor conditions. The second hypothesis - an unknown or incompletely characterised production pathway - was most consistent with results, however the other possibilities cannot be discounted. Further experiments are needed to distinguish between these hypotheses and fully resolve N2O production pathways in PN-anammox systems. PMID:26164660

  6. Aquatic sources and sinks for nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Kaplan, W. A.; Kolb, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Data are presented which suggest the complexity of the aquatic nitrogen cycle as it affects N2O. The data are from studies made in the central and south-east tropical regions of the Pacific Ocean and in Chesapeake Bay. The data indicate that oxidation of ammonium and amino nitrogen and nitrification form the principle source for marine N2O. It is estimated that the yearly global yield for oceanic N2O is less than about 10 to the 7th power tons. The consumption of atmospheric N2O by the open ocean has not been evidenced, although data from the south-east tropical Pacific and Chesapeake Bay show the consumption of dissolved N2O in low-oxygen conditions. Preliminary observations have also indicated the consumption of atmospheric N2O by aquatic systems such as freshwater pond and a tidal saltmarsh.

  7. Management controls on nitrous oxide emissions from row crop agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Shcherbak, I.; Millar, N.; Robertson, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture is a significant source of the potent greenhouse gas (GHG) nitrous oxide (N2O), accounting for ~70% of total anthropic N2O emissions in the US primarily as a result of N fertilizer application. Emissions of N2O are the largest contributor to the global warming potential of row-crop agriculture. Management, including choice of crop type and rotation strongly impacts N2O emissions, but continuous emissions data from row-crops over multiple rotations are lacking. Empirical quantification of these long-term emissions and the development of crop- and rotation-specific N2O emission factors are vital for improving estimates of agricultural GHG emissions, important for informing management practices to reduce agriculture's GHG footprint, and developing mitigation protocols for environmental markets. Over 20 years we measured soil N2O emissions and calculated crop and management specific emission factors in four continuous rotations of corn (Zea mays) - soybean (Glycine max) - wheat (Triticum aestivum) under conventional tillage (CT), zero tillage (NT), low chemical input (LI), and biologically (Org) based management. Two of these systems (LI and Org) included winter cover crops, red clover (Trifolium pratense) or ray (Secale cereale). While average soil N2O fluxes in all systems where similar (2.9±0.2 to 3.8±0.5 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1), there was a significant interaction of total emissions with crop and phase. Surprisingly, the lowest total emissions from the corn period of the rotation were from CT, and the highest from LI, with 608±4 and 983±8 g N2O-N ha-1 crop year-1, respectively. Total emissions during the wheat period of the rotation showed the opposite trend, with total emissions of 942±7 and 524±38 g N2O-N ha-1 crop year-1, for CT ant LI, respectively. Total emissions from the soybean period of the rotation were highest under NT and lowest under CT management (526±5 and 296±2 g N2O-N ha-1 crop year-1, respectively). Emission efficiency, N2O emitted

  8. Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seongeun; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Sweeney, Colm; Bianco, Laura; Wilczak, James M.; Fischer, Marc L.

    2012-08-01

    We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

  9. Effects of lignite application on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle pens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianlei; Bai, Mei; Shen, Jianlin; Griffith, David W T; Denmead, Owen T; Hill, Julian; Lam, Shu Kee; Mosier, Arvin R; Chen, Deli

    2016-09-15

    Beef cattle feedlots are a major source of ammonia (NH3) emissions from livestock industries. We investigated the effects of lignite surface applications on NH3 and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from beef cattle feedlot pens. Two rates of lignite, 3 and 6kgm(-2), were tested in the treatment pen. No lignite was applied in the control pen. Twenty-four Black Angus steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. We measured NH3 and N2O concentrations continuously from 4th Sep to 13th Nov 2014 using Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) NH3 analysers and a closed-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analyser (CP-FTIR) in conjunction with the integrated horizontal flux method to calculate NH3 and N2O fluxes. During the feeding period, 16 and 26% of the excreted nitrogen (N) (240gNhead(-1)day(-1)) was lost via NH3 volatilization from the control pen, while lignite application decreased NH3 volatilization to 12 and 18% of the excreted N, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Compared to the control pen, lignite application decreased NH3 emissions by approximately 30%. Nitrous oxide emissions from the cattle pens were small, 0.10 and 0.14gN2O-Nhead(-1)day(-1) (<0.1% of excreted N) for the control pen, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Lignite application increased direct N2O emissions by 40 and 57%, to 0.14 and 0.22gN2O-Nhead(-1)day(-1), for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. The increase in N2O emissions resulting from lignite application was counteracted by the lower indirect N2O emission due to decreased NH3 volatilization. Using 1% as a default emission factor of deposited NH3 for indirect N2O emissions, the application of lignite decreased total N2O emissions. PMID:27161136

  10. Shell biofilm-associated nitrous oxide production in marine molluscs: processes, precursors and relative importance.

    PubMed

    Heisterkamp, Ines M; Schramm, Andreas; Larsen, Lone H; Svenningsen, Nanna B; Lavik, Gaute; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2 O) from freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates has exclusively been ascribed to N2 O production by ingested denitrifying bacteria in the anoxic gut of the animals. Our study of marine molluscs now shows that also microbial biofilms on shell surfaces are important sites of N2 O production. The shell biofilms of Mytilus edulis, Littorina littorea and Hinia reticulata contributed 18-94% to the total animal-associated N2 O emission. Nitrification and denitrification were equally important sources of N2 O in shell biofilms as revealed by (15) N-stable isotope experiments with dissected shells. Microsensor measurements confirmed that both nitrification and denitrification can occur in shell biofilms due to a heterogeneous oxygen distribution. Accordingly, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were important drivers of N2 O production in the shell biofilm of the three mollusc species. Ammonium excretion by the animals was found to be sufficient to sustain N2 O production in the shell biofilm. Apparently, the animals provide a nutrient-enriched microenvironment that stimulates growth and N2 O production of the shell biofilm. This animal-induced stimulation was demonstrated in a long-term microcosm experiment with the snail H. reticulata, where shell biofilms exhibited the highest N2 O emission rates when the animal was still living inside the shell. PMID:22830624

  11. Measurement and mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from a high nitrogen input vegetable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Shu Kee; Suter, Helen; Davies, Rohan; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2015-02-01

    The emission and mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) from high nitrogen (N) vegetable systems is not well understood. Nitrification inhibitors are widely used to decrease N2O emissions in many cropping systems. However, most N2O flux measurements and inhibitor impacts have been made with small chambers and have not been investigated at a paddock-scale using micrometeorological techniques. We quantified N2O fluxes over a four ha celery paddock using open-path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model, in addition to using a closed chamber technique. The celery crop was grown on a sandy soil in southern Victoria, Australia. The emission of N2O was measured following the application of chicken manure and N fertilizer with and without the application of a nitrification inhibitor 3, 4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate (DMPP). The two techniques consistently demonstrated that DMPP application reduced N2O emission by 37-44%, even though the N2O fluxes measured by a micrometeorological technique were more than 10 times higher than the small chamber measurements. The results suggest that nitrification inhibitors have the potential to mitigate N2O emission from intensive vegetable production systems, and that the national soil N2O emission inventory assessments and modelling predictions may vary with gas measurement techniques.

  12. Measurement and mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from a high nitrogen input vegetable system.

    PubMed

    Lam, Shu Kee; Suter, Helen; Davies, Rohan; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2015-01-01

    The emission and mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) from high nitrogen (N) vegetable systems is not well understood. Nitrification inhibitors are widely used to decrease N2O emissions in many cropping systems. However, most N2O flux measurements and inhibitor impacts have been made with small chambers and have not been investigated at a paddock-scale using micrometeorological techniques. We quantified N2O fluxes over a four ha celery paddock using open-path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model, in addition to using a closed chamber technique. The celery crop was grown on a sandy soil in southern Victoria, Australia. The emission of N2O was measured following the application of chicken manure and N fertilizer with and without the application of a nitrification inhibitor 3, 4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate (DMPP). The two techniques consistently demonstrated that DMPP application reduced N2O emission by 37-44%, even though the N2O fluxes measured by a micrometeorological technique were more than 10 times higher than the small chamber measurements. The results suggest that nitrification inhibitors have the potential to mitigate N2O emission from intensive vegetable production systems, and that the national soil N2O emission inventory assessments and modelling predictions may vary with gas measurement techniques. PMID:25644694

  13. Pathway of nitrous oxide consumption in isolated Pseudomonas stutzeri strains under anoxic and oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Desloover, Joachim; Roobroeck, Dries; Heylen, Kim; Puig, Sebastià; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-01

    The microbial consumption of nitrous oxide (N2O) has gained great interest since it was revealed that this process could mitigate the greenhouse effect of N2O. The consumption of N2O results from its reduction to dinitrogen gas (N2) as part of the denitrification process. However, there is ongoing debate regarding an alternative pathway, namely reduction of N2O to NH4(+), or assimilatory N2O consumption. To date, this pathway is poorly investigated and lacks unambiguous evidence. Enrichment of denitrifying activated sludge using a mineral nitrogen-free medium rendered a mixed culture capable of anoxic and oxic N2O consumption. Dilution plating, isolation and deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprinting identified a collection of Pseudomonas stutzeri strains as dominant N2O consumers in both anaerobic and aerobic enrichments. A detailed isotope tracing experiment with a Pseudomonas stutzeri isolate showed that consumption of N2O via assimilatory reduction to NH4(+) was absent. Conversely, respiratory N2O reduction was directly coupled to N2 fixation. PMID:24447520

  14. Differentiating Nitrification and Denitrification Sources of Nitrous Oxide Based on the Isotopomeric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutka, R. L.; Pitt, A. J.; Ostrom, N. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; Gandhi, H.; Breznak, J.; Bergsma, T.

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O) are steadily increasing primarily due to microbial activity in the environment. This has prompted efforts to apportion microbial sources of N2O to specific microbial processes. We investigated the isotopomeric composition N2O as a possible aid in differentiating microbial production mechanisms. Isotopomer refers not only to the isotopic abundance of N2O (δ 15N and δ 18O), but also to the 15N abundance within each of the nitrogen atoms comprising this molecule. In the linear N2O molecule, the central atom is referred to as alpha (α ) and the terminal nitrogen atom is referred to as beta (β ). The site preference refers to the difference between δ 15Nα and δ 15Nβ . We conducted experiments with pure bacterial cultures and agricultural soil mesocosms. Four microbial pathways for the production of N2O were investigated including hydroxylamine oxidation via autotrophic nitrifiers and methane oxidizers and nitrite reduction via denitrifiers and autotrophic nitrifiers. We used concentrated cell suspensions of a nitrifier (Nitrosomonas europaea), a methane oxidizer (Methylococcus capsulatus Bath) and a denitrifier that lacks N2O reductase (Pseudomonas chlororaphis). The average site preference of N2O produced by the oxidation of hydroxylamine by M. capsulatus Bath (5.5 +/- 3.5 per mil) and N. europaea(-2.3 +/- 1.9 per mil) was significantly different. Nitrous oxide produced by the reduction of nitrite by N. europaea and P. chlororaphis had a site preference of -8.3 +/- 3.6 per mil and -8.1 +/- 3.4 per mil, respectively. These results demonstrate that site preference can distinguish N2O produced by hydroxylamine oxidation by two distinct organisms. Furthermore, N2O derived by hydroxylamine oxidation differed significantly from that derived from nitrite reduction by the same nitrifying organism. Soil mesocosm experiments were used to determine that consumption of N2O did not change the isotopomeric composition. Since

  15. Nitrous oxide formation during nitritation and nitrification of high-strength wastewater.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Yvonne; Beier, Maike; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) in nitritation and nitrification under stable, comparable and not limiting conditions typical for treatment of high-strength wastewater. A laboratory-scale aerated chemostat was operated with reject water at different sludge retention times, achieving suppression of nitrate formation by wash-out of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria for nitritation. The N2O formation factor during stable nitritation was higher (2.90% N2O-N /NH4(-)-Nox) than during nitrification (0.74%). The positive correlation of N2O formation rates and ammonium oxidation rates was linear and thus did not contribute to changes of the N2O formation factor. The dominant factor for N2O formation during stable operation was high nitrite concentration, which was positively correlated with N2O formation rates. The highest formation factors were observed during a transition phase from nitrification to nitritation with unstable process conditions (4.81%) and during a short-term experiment with increased pH of 7 (10.28%). The results indicate that even with operational conditions that are regarded favourable for the process of nitritation N2O formation can be limited but not avoided. PMID:23752381

  16. NITROGEN FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM IRRIGATED CROPPING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effects of N fertilization and irrigated crop management practices on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Emissions were monitored from several irrigated cropping systems receiving N fertilizer rates (0, 67, 134, and 246 kg N/ha) during the 2006 growing season and N rates of 0 and 246 ...

  17. Accuracy and Precision Analysis of Chamber-Based Nitrous Oxide Gas Flux Estimates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber-based estimates of soil-to-atmosphere nitrous oxide (N2O) gas flux tend to underestimate actual emission rates due to inherently non-linear time series data. In theory, this limitation can be minimized by adjusting measurement conditions to reduce non-linearity and/or by using flux-calculati...

  18. Evaluation of factors affecting nitrous oxide emission and N transformation in a sandy loam soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of the complex factors affecting nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and potential mitigation practices will assist in developing strategies to improve the sustainability of agricultural production systems. Using surface soil collected from a pomegranate orchard, a series of laborato...

  19. Nitrogen placement effects on soil nitrous oxide emissions from irrigated corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited information is available on how N fertilizer placement affects soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions under irrigated conditions in the semi-arid western U.S. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of surface banding (applied near corn row) and broadcasting of three N sources (urea, polymer...

  20. Nitrous oxide, methane emission, and yield-scaled emission from organically and conventionally managed systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a gap in empirical greenhouse gas (GHG) data from many regions of the USA including the northern Corn Belt. This study compared nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in diverse, low-tillage conventionally- and organically-managed systems. Both systems had a four-year rotation, mole-knife, strip till...

  1. AMMONIA REMOVAL AND NITROUS OXIDE PRODUCTION IN GAS-PHASE COMPOST BIOFILTERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofiltration technology is widely utilized for treating ammonia gas (NH3), with one of its potential detrimental by-products being nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas approximately 300 times more reactive to infrared than CO2. The present work intends to provide the relation between NH3 removal d...

  2. Cropping Sequence and Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Dryland Soil Nitrous Oxide Emission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas responsible for global warming, may be influenced by cropping and N fertilization management. The effects of three cropping sequences [no-tilled continuous malt barley (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (NTB-P), and conventional tilled malt bar...

  3. Tillage and Inorganic Nitrogen Source Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were monitored from irrigated corn production systems receiving different N sources at fertilizer rates of 246 kg N ha-1 when in corn (Zea mays L.), 56 kg N ha-1 when in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and 157 kg N ha-1 when in barley (Hordeum distichon L.). Croppin...

  4. Nitrogen, Tillage, and Crop Rotation Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of irrigated crop management practices on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Emissions were monitored from several irrigated cropping systems receiving N fertilizer rates ranging from 0 to 246 kg N ha-1 during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons. Cropping systems includ...

  5. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: A review of manure management options

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. This is the second in a series of reports commissioned by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to evaluate mitigation pra...

  6. Nitrous Oxide Production in an Eastern Corn Belt Soil: Sources and Redox Range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) derived from soils is a main contributor to the greenhouse gas effect and a precursor to ozone-depleting substrates; however, the source processes and interacting controls are not well established. This study was conducted to estimate magnitude and source (nitrification vs. denit...

  7. Nitrogen Source Affects Nitrous Oxide Emissions in a Strip-Tilled Continuous Corn Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effects of nitrogen (N) source on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a strip-till (ST), irrigated continuous corn field in 2009 near Fort Collins, CO. Emissions were monitored from plots receiving six different inorganic N fertilizer sources (urea, ESN®1, SuperU®, UAN, UAN+Agrotain...

  8. Nitrogen Source Affects Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated No-Till Corn in Colorado (USA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Nitrogen fertilization is essential for optimizing corn yields and economic returns in irrigated cropping systems in the USA Central Great Plains area (Maddux and Halvorson, 2008). However, N application generally increases nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from cropping systems (Mosier et...

  9. RECOMMENDED OPERATING PROCEDURE NO. 45: ANALYSIS OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recommended operating procedure (ROP) has been prepared for use in research activities conducted by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL). he procedure applies to the measurement of nitrous oxide (N2O) in dry gas samples extracted from gas streams where...

  10. Marine nitrous oxide emissions: An unknown liability for the international water sector

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reliable estimates of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are essential for setting effective climate policy at both the sector and national level. Current IPCC Guidelines for calculating nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from sewage management are both highly uncertain and ...