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Sample records for nk hacia los

  1. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W., II; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  2. CAM and NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    It is believed that tumor development, outgrowth and metastasis are under the surveillance of the immune system. Although both innate and acquired immune systems play roles, innate immunity is the spearhead against tumors. Recent studies have revealed the critical role of natural killer (NK) cells in immune surveillance and that NK cell activity is considerably influenced by various agents, such as environmental factors, stress, foods and drugs. Some of these NK cell stimulants have been used in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) since ancient times. Therefore, the value of CAM should be re-evaluated from this point of view. In this review, we overview the intimate correlation between NK cell functions and CAM agents, and discuss possible underlying mechanisms mediating this. In particular, neuro-immune crosstalk and receptors for CAM agents are the most important and interesting candidates for such mechanisms. PMID:15257322

  3. Transcriptional Control of NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that survey the environment and protect the host from infected and cancerous cells. As their name implies, NK cells represent an early line of defense during pathogen invasion by directly killing infected cells and secreting inflammatory cytokines. Although the function of NK cells was first described more than four decades ago, the development of this cytotoxic lineage is not well understood. In recent years, we have begun to identify specific transcription factors that control each stage of development and maturation, from ontogeny of the NK cell progenitor to the effector functions of activated NK cells in peripheral organs. This chapter highlights the transcription factors that are unique to NK cells, or shared between NK cells and other hematopoietic cell lineages, but govern the biology of this cytolytic lymphocyte. PMID:26177585

  4. Signalling through NK1.1 triggers NK cells to die but induces NK T cells to produce interleukin-4.

    PubMed Central

    Asea, A; Stein-Streilein, J

    1998-01-01

    In vivo inoculation of specific antibody is an accepted protocol for elimination of specific cell populations. Except for anti-CD3 and anti-CD4, it is not known if the depleted cells are eliminated by signalling through the target molecule or through a more non-specific mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with anti-natural killer (NK1.1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Thereafter spleen cells were harvested, stained for both surface and intracellular markers, and analysed by flow cytometry. As early as 2 hr post inoculation, NK cells were signalled to become apoptotic while signalling through the NK1.1 molecule activated NK1.1+ T-cell receptor (TCR)+ (NK T) cells to increase in number, and produce interleukin-4 (IL-4). Anti NK1.1 mAb was less efficient at signalling apoptosis in NK cells when NK T-cell deficient [beta 2-microglobulin beta 2m-deficient] mice were used compared with wild type mice. Efficient apoptotic signalling was restored when beta 2m-deficient mice were reconstituted with NK T cells. NK-specific antibody best signals the apoptotic process in susceptible NK cells when resistant NK T cells are present, activated, and secrete IL-4. Images Figure 4 PMID:9616382

  5. Development of Murine Hepatic NK Cells during Ontogeny: Comparison with Spleen NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    The phenotype of developing liver NK cells (CD3−NK1.1+) was investigated during mouse ontogeny comparing with spleen NK cells. The highest percentage of hepatic CD27−CD11b− NK cells occurred at the fetal stage. After birth, the percentage of CD27−CD11b−NK cells in both the liver and spleen gradually decreased to their lowest level at 6 weeks. More CD27+CD11b−NK cells were detected in the liver than that in spleen from week 1 to 6. Expression of NKG2A on liver NK cells was decreased but still much higher than that of spleen NK cells after 1 week. The NKG2D expression on liver NK cells increased to its highest level and was significantly higher than on spleen NK cells till 4 weeks. During mouse ontogeny, weaker expression of NKp46 and CD2 and stronger expression of CD69, CD11c, 2B4, and CD73 were observed on liver NK cells. Furthermore, neonatal liver NK cells express higher IFN-γ and perforin than adult .These results suggest that the maturation process of NK cells is unique in the livers, and liver microenvironments might play critical roles to keep NK cells in an immature status. PMID:22203859

  6. OCD metrology by floating n/k

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shinn-Sheng; Huang, Jacky; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng; Lin, Burn J.; Yen, Anthony; Lane, Lawrence; Vuong, Vi; Chen, Yan

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, one of the major contributions to the OCD metrology error, resulting from within-wafer variation of the refractive index/extinction coefficient (n/k) of the substrate, is identified and quantified. To meet the required metrology accuracy for the 65-nm node and beyond, it is suggested that n/k should be floating when performing the regression for OCD modeling. A feasible way of performing such regression is proposed and verified. As shown in the presented example, the measured CDU (3σ) with n/k fixed and n/k floating is 1.94 nm and 1.42 nm, respectively. That is, the metrology error of CDU committed by assuming n/k fixed is more than 35% of the total CDU.

  7. Mobilization of NK cells by exercise: downmodulation of adhesion molecules on NK cells by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Suzui, M; Takeda, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    2000-10-01

    The change of plasma catecholamine concentration correlates with the change of natural killer (NK) activity and NK cell number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during and after moderate exercise. We studied the causal relation between exercise-induced catecholamine and expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells during and after exercise. The expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was significantly reduced during exercise (P < 0.01). When PBMC were stimulated with 10(-8)M norepinephrine in vitro, the expression of these adhesion molecules on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was downmodulated within 30 min. The binding capacity of NK cells to a CD44 ligand, hyaluronate, was reduced by the stimulation with norepinephrine (P < 0.01). The intravenous injection of norepinephrine in mice decreased the expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells (P < 0.01) and increased the number of CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells in PBMC (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise-induced catecholamines modulate the expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells, resulting in the mobilization of NK cells into the circulation. PMID:11003990

  8. NK cell receptor imbalance and NK cell dysfunction in HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng; Sun, Haoyu; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third leading cause of cancer mortality and a common poor-prognosis malignancy due to postoperative recurrence and metastasis. There is a significant correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocarcinogenesis. As the first line of host defense against viral infections and tumors, natural killer (NK) cells express a large number of immune recognition receptors (NK receptors (NKRs)) to recognize ligands on hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells and Kupffer cells, which maintain the balance between immune response and immune tolerance of NK cells. Unfortunately, the percentage and absolute number of liver NK cells decrease significantly during the development and progression of HCC. The abnormal expression of NK cell receptors and dysfunction of liver NK cells contribute to the progression of chronic HBV infection and HCC and are significantly associated with poor prognosis for liver cancer. In this review, we focus on the role of NK cell receptors in anti-tumor immune responses in HCC, particularly HBV-related HCC. We discuss specifically how tumor cells evade attack from NK cells and how emerging understanding of NKRs may aid the development of novel treatments for HCC. Novel mono- and combination therapeutic strategies that target the NK cell receptor–ligand system may potentially lead to successful and effective immunotherapy in HCC. PMID:25308752

  9. Type I IFN promotes NK cell expansion during viral infection by protecting NK cells against fratricide.

    PubMed

    Madera, Sharline; Rapp, Moritz; Firth, Matthew A; Beilke, Joshua N; Lanier, Lewis L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-02-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is crucial in host antiviral defense. Previous studies have described the pleiotropic role of type I IFNs on innate and adaptive immune cells during viral infection. Here, we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells from mice lacking the type I IFN-α receptor (Ifnar(-/-)) or STAT1 (which signals downstream of IFNAR) are defective in expansion and memory cell formation after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Despite comparable proliferation, Ifnar(-/-) NK cells showed diminished protection against MCMV infection and exhibited more apoptosis compared with wild-type NK cells. Furthermore, we show that Ifnar(-/-) NK cells express increased levels of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands during viral infection and are susceptible to NK cell-mediated fratricide in a perforin- and NKG2D-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Ifnar(-/-) NK cells into NK cell-deficient mice reverses the defect in survival and expansion. Our study reveals a novel type I IFN-dependent mechanism by which NK cells evade mechanisms of cell death after viral infection. PMID:26755706

  10. A Modified NK Cell Degranulation Assay Applicable for Routine Evaluation of NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Shabrish, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Madkaikar, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important role in innate immunity against tumors and viral infections. Studies show that lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, CD107a) is a marker for degranulation of NK and cytotoxic T cells and its expression is a sensitive marker for the cytotoxic activity determination. The conventional methods of determination of CD107a on NK cells involve use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pure NK cells and K562 cells as stimulants. Thus, it requires large volume of blood sample which is usually difficult to obtain in pediatric patients and patients with cytopenia and also requires specialized laboratory for maintaining cell line. We have designed a flow cytometric assay to determine CD107a on NK cells using whole blood, eliminating the need for isolation of PBMC or isolate NK cells. This assay uses phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (Ca2+-ionophore) instead of K562 cells for stimulation and thus does not require specialized cell culture laboratory. CD107a expression on NK cells using modified NK cell degranulation assay compared to the conventional assay was significantly elevated (p < 0.0001). It was also validated by testing patients diagnosed with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) with defect in exocytosis. This assay is rapid, cost effective, and reproducible and requires significantly less volume of blood which is important for clinical evaluation of NK cells. PMID:27413758

  11. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive.

    PubMed

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Long, Eric O; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  12. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive

    PubMed Central

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L. Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M.; Long, Eric O.; Reyburn, Hugh T.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  13. PREJUICIO Y DISTANCIA SOCIAL HACIA PERSONAS HOMOSEXUALES POR PARTE DE JÓVENES UNIVERSITARIOS

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Rodríguez, María del C.; Squiabro, José Calderón

    2014-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal con el propósito de explorar actitudes de rechazo y distancia social hacia las personas gays y lesbianas (GL) en 565 universitarios. Se utilizó una escala para medir Prejuicio y otra escala para medir Distancia Social. Los participantes reflejaron niveles moderados de prejuicio y distancia social (DS) hacia las personas gays y lesbianas. Los varones (M=104.5, DT= 27.47) mostraron significativamente más prejuicio que las mujeres (M=98.8, DT= 23.41). Los hombres (M=22.7, DT= 7.00) mostraron significativamente mayor DS que las mujeres (M=21.1, DT= 5.41). Las personas que asisten con regularidad a la iglesia mostraron más prejuicio y DS que los que no asisten. Se analiza importancia de incluir el tema de la diversidad sexual a través del currículo para desmontar prejuicios hacia la comunidad homosexual. PMID:25606066

  14. Identification of both NK1 and NK2 receptors in guinea-pig airways.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, K. T.; Millar, L.; Rodger, I. W.; Metters, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. NK1 and NK2 receptors have been characterized in guinea-pig lung membrane preparations by use of [125I-Tyr8]-substance P and [125I]-neurokinin A binding assays in conjunction with tachykinin-receptor selective agonists ([Sar9Met(O2)11]substance P for NK1 and [beta Ala8]neurokinin A (4-10) for NK2) and antagonists (CP-99,994 for NK1 and SR48968 for NK2). 2. The presence of high affinity, G-protein-coupled NK1 receptors in guinea-pig lung parenchymal membranes has been confirmed. The rank order of affinity for competing tachykinins was as predicted for an NK1 receptor: substance P = [Sar9Met(O2)11]substance P > substance P-methyl ester = physalaemin > neurokinin A = neurokinin B >> [beta Ala8]neurokinin A (4-10). The novel NK1 antagonist CP-99,994 has a Ki of 0.4 nM at this NK1 site. 3. In order to characterize [125I]-neurokinin A binding to guinea-pig lung, the number of [125I]-neurokinin A specific binding sites was increased 3-4 fold by purification of the parenchymal membranes over discontinuous sucrose gradients. The rank order of affinity determined for NK1- and NK2-receptor agonists and antagonists in competition for these sites showed that the majority (80%) of [125I]-neurokinin A specific binding was also to the NK1 receptor. 4. Under conditions where the guinea-pig lung parenchymal NK1 receptor was fully occupied by a saturating concentration of either [Sar9Met(O2)11]substance P (1 microM) or CP-99,994 (2.7 microM), residual [125I]-neurokinin A specific binding was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by both [beta Ala8]neurokinin A and SR48968. This result shows that the NK2 receptor is also present in these preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7694756

  15. NK cells: tuned by peptide?

    PubMed

    Das, Jayajit; Khakoo, Salim I

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells express multiple receptors for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, including the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the C-type lectin-like CD94:NKG2 receptors. The KIR locus is extremely polymorphic, paralleling the diversity of its classical MHC class I ligands. Similarly, the conservation of the NKG2 family of receptors parallels the conservation of MHC-E, the ligand for CD94:NKG2A/C/E. Binding of both CD94:NKG2 heterodimers and KIR to their respective MHC class I ligand is peptide dependent, and despite the evolution of these receptors, they have retained the property of peptide selectivity. Such peptide selectivity affects these two systems in different ways. HLA-E binding non-inhibitory peptides augment inhibition at CD94:NKG2A, while HLA-C binding non-inhibitory peptides antagonize inhibition at KIR2DL2/3, implying that KIRs are specialized to respond positively to changes in peptide repertoire. Thus, while specific KIRs, such as KIR2DL3, are associated with beneficial outcomes from viral infections, viral peptides augment inhibition at CD94:NKGA. Conversely, NKG2A-positive NK cells sense MHC class I downregulation more efficiently than KIRs. Thus, these two receptor:ligand systems appear to have complementary functions in recognizing changes in MHC class I. PMID:26284480

  16. NK cell-based immunotherapy for malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Min; Chen, Yongyan; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immunity against cancer. In response, cancers develop mechanisms to escape NK cell attack or induce defective NK cells. Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to overcome NK cell paralysis using several approaches. One approach uses expanded allogeneic NK cells, which are not inhibited by self histocompatibility antigens like autologous NK cells, for adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Another adoptive transfer approach uses stable allogeneic NK cell lines, which is more practical for quality control and large-scale production. A third approach is genetic modification of fresh NK cells or NK cell lines to highly express cytokines, Fc receptors and/or chimeric tumor-antigen receptors. Therapeutic NK cells can be derived from various sources, including peripheral or cord blood cells, stem cells or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and a variety of stimulators can be used for large-scale production in laboratories or good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities, including soluble growth factors, immobilized molecules or antibodies, and other cellular activators. A list of NK cell therapies to treat several types of cancer in clinical trials is reviewed here. Several different approaches to NK-based immunotherapy, such as tissue-specific NK cells, killer receptor-oriented NK cells and chemically treated NK cells, are discussed. A few new techniques or strategies to monitor NK cell therapy by non-invasive imaging, predetermine the efficiency of NK cell therapy by in vivo experiments and evaluate NK cell therapy approaches in clinical trials are also introduced. PMID:23604045

  17. Murine peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pinhas, Nissim; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Chiossone, Laura; Shahaf, Gitit; Walzer, Thierry; Vivier, Eric; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-05-01

    Murine NK cells can be divided by the expression of two cell surface markers, CD27 and Mac-1 (a.k.a. CD11b), into four separate subsets. These subsets suggest a linear development model: CD27(-) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(+) → CD27(-) Mac-1(+) . Here, we used a combination of BrdU labeling experiments and mathematical modeling to gain insights regarding NK-cell development in mouse bone marrow (BM), spleen and liver. The modeling results that best fit the experimental data show that the majority of NK cells already express CD27 upon entering the NK-cell developmental pathway. Additionally, only a small fraction of NK cells exit the BM to other sites, suggesting that peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived mature NK cells. PMID:26919267

  18. Loss of STAT3 in murine NK cells enhances NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Dagmar; Putz, Eva M; Straka, Elisabeth; Kudweis, Petra; Biaggio, Mario; Poli, Valeria; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Sexl, Veronika

    2014-10-01

    The members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors modulate the development and function of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance is particularly important in the body's defense against hematological malignancies such as leukemia. STAT3 inhibitors are currently being developed, although their potential effects on NK cells are not clear. We have investigated the function of STAT3 in NK cells with Stat3(Δ/Δ)Ncr1-iCreTg mice, whose NK cells lack STAT3. In the absence of STAT3, NK cells develop normally and in normal numbers, but display alterations in the kinetics of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. We report that STAT3 directly binds the IFN-γ promoter. In various in vivo models of hematological diseases, loss of STAT3 in NK cells enhances tumor surveillance. The reduced tumor burden is paralleled by increased expression of the activating receptor DNAM-1 and the lytic enzymes perforin and granzyme B. Our findings imply that STAT3 inhibitors will stimulate the cytolytic activity of NK cells against leukemia, thereby providing an additional therapeutic benefit. PMID:25185262

  19. Conversion of peripheral blood NK cells to a decidual NK-like phenotype by a cocktail of defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Cerdeira, Ana Sofia; Rajakumar, Augustine; Royle, Caroline M.; Lo, Agnes; Husain, Zaheed; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Kopcow, Hernan D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells that populate the decidua are important regulators of normal placentation. In contrast to peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells, decidual NK cells (dNK) lack cytotoxicity, secrete pro-angiogenic factors and regulate trophoblast invasion. Here we show that exposure to a combination of hypoxia, transforming growth factor beta 1, and a demethylating agent, results in NK cells that express Killer cell Immunoglobulin like Receptors, the dNK cell markers CD9 and CD49a, and dNK pattern of chemokine receptors. These cells secrete vascular endothelial growth factor, a potent pro-angiogenic molecule, display reduced cytotoxicity and promote invasion of human trophoblast cell lines. These findings have potential therapeutic applications for placental disorders associated with altered NK cell biology. PMID:23487420

  20. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of chicken NK lysin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK lysin is an anti microbial and anti tumor protein expressed by NK cells and T lymphocytes. In a previous report, we identified a set of overlapping expressed sequence tags constituting a contiguous sequence (contig 171) homologous to mammalian NK lysins. In the current report, a cDNA encoding N...

  2. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M.; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D.; Skow, Loren C.; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E.; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E.

    2015-01-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30–35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer’s patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  3. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role during innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we ex...

  4. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D; Skow, Loren C; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E

    2015-12-29

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30-35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer's patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  5. Differential requirement for Nfil3 during NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Seillet, Cyril; Huntington, Nicholas D; Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Axelsson, Elin; Minnich, Martina; Brady, Hugh J M; Busslinger, Meinrad; Smyth, Mark J; Belz, Gabrielle T; Carotta, Sebastian

    2014-03-15

    NK cells can be grouped into distinct subsets that are localized to different organs and exhibit a different capacity to secrete cytokines and mediate cytotoxicity. Despite these hallmarks that reflect tissue-specific specialization in NK cells, little is known about the factors that control the development of these distinct subsets. The basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nfil3 (E4bp4) is essential for bone marrow-derived NK cell development, but it is not clear whether Nfil3 is equally important for all NK cell subsets or how it induces NK lineage commitment. In this article, we show that Nfil3 is required for the formation of Eomes-expressing NK cells, including conventional medullary and thymic NK cells, whereas TRAIL(+) Eomes(-) NK cells develop independently of Nfil3. Loss of Nfil3 during the development of bone marrow-derived NK cells resulted in reduced expression of Eomes and, conversely, restoration of Eomes expression in Nfil3(-/-) progenitors rescued NK cell development and maturation. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Nfil3 drives the formation of mature NK cells by inducing Eomes expression and reveal the differential requirements of NK cell subsets for Nfil3. PMID:24532575

  6. Natural Killer (NK)/melanoma cell interaction induces NK-mediated release of chemotactic High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) capable of amplifying NK cell recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Cantoni, Claudia; Averna, Monica; Patrone, Mauro; Cavaletto, Maria; Spertino, Stefano; Pende, Daniela; Balsamo, Mirna; Pietra, Gabriella; Sivori, Simona; Carlomagno, Simona; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Sparatore, Bianca; Vitale, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this study we characterize a new mechanism by which Natural Killer (NK) cells may amplify their recruitment to tumors. We show that NK cells, upon interaction with melanoma cells, can release a chemotactic form of High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) protein capable of attracting additional activated NK cells. We first demonstrate that the engagement of different activating NK cell receptors, including those mainly involved in tumor cell recognition can induce the active release of HMGB1. Then we show that during NK-mediated tumor cell killing two HMGB1 forms are released, each displaying a specific electrophoretic mobility possibly corresponding to a different redox status. By the comparison of normal and perforin-defective NK cells (which are unable to kill target cells) we demonstrate that, in NK/melanoma cell co-cultures, NK cells specifically release an HMGB1 form that acts as chemoattractant, while dying tumor cells passively release a non-chemotactic HMGB1. Finally, we show that Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products is expressed by NK cells and mediates HMGB1-induced NK cell chemotaxis. Proteomic analysis of NK cells exposed to recombinant HMGB1 revealed that this molecule, besides inducing immediate chemotaxis, also promotes changes in the expression of proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeletal network. Importantly, these modifications could be associated with an increased motility of NK cells. Thus, our findings allow the definition of a previously unidentified mechanism used by NK cells to amplify their response to tumors, and provide additional clues for the emerging role of HMGB1 in immunomodulation and tumor immunity. PMID:26587323

  7. NK Cell-extrinsic IL-18 Signaling Is Required for Efficient NK Cell Activation to Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brandstadter, Joshua D.; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    Summary NK cells are important for the control of vaccinia virus (VV) in vivo. Recent studies have shown that multiple pathways are required for effective activation of NK cells. These include both TLR-dependent and -independent pathways, as well as the NKG2D activating receptor that recognizes host stress-induced NKG2D ligands. However, it remains largely unknown what controls the upregulation of NKG2D ligands in response to VV infection. In this study, we first showed that IL-18 is critical for NK cell activation and viral clearance. We then demonstrated that IL-18 signaling on both NK cells and DCs is required for efficient NK cell activation upon VV infection in vitro. We further showed in vivo that efficient NK cell activation to VV is dependent on DCs and IL-18 signaling in non-NK cells, suggesting an essential role for NK cell-extrinsic IL-18 signaling in NK cell activation. Mechanistically, IL-18 signaling in DCs promotes expression of Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Collectively, our data reveal a previously unrecognized role for NK cell-extrinsic IL-18 signaling in NK cell activation through upregulation of NKG2D ligands. These observations may provide insights into the design of effective NK cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancer. PMID:24846540

  8. PTEN Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Cytolytic Function

    PubMed Central

    Briercheck, Edward L.; Trotta, Rossana; Chen, Li; Hartlage, Alex S.; Cole, Jordan P.; Cole, Tyler D.; Mao, Charlene; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Mace, Emily M.; Ciarlariello, David; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L.; Garcia-Cao, Isabel; Scoville, Steven D.; Yu, Lianbo; Pilarski, Robert; Carson, William E.; Leone, Gustavo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Yu, Jianhua; Orange, Jordan S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Human NK cells are characterized by their ability to initiate an immediate and direct cytolytic response to virally infected or malignantly transformed cells. Within human peripheral blood, the more mature CD56dim NK cell efficiently kills malignant targets at rest, whereas the less mature CD56bright NK cells cannot. In this study, we show that resting CD56bright NK cells express significantly more phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) protein when compared with CD56dim NK cells. Consistent with this, forced overexpression of PTEN in NK cells resulted in decreased cytolytic activity, and loss of PTEN in CD56bright NK cells resulted in elevated cytolytic activity. Comparable studies in mice showed PTEN overexpression did not alter NK cell development or NK cell–activating and inhibitory receptor expression yet, as in humans, did decrease expression of downstream NK activation targets MAPK and AKT during early cytolysis of tumor target cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that PTEN overexpression disrupts the NK cell’s ability to organize immunological synapse components including decreases in actin accumulation, polarization of the microtubule organizing center, and the convergence of cytolytic granules. In summary, our data suggest that PTEN normally works to limit the NK cell’s PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathway activation and the consequent mobilization of cytolytic mediators toward the target cell and suggest that PTEN is among the active regulatory components prior to human NK cells transitioning from the noncytolytic CD56bright NK cell to the cytolytic CD56dim NK cells. PMID:25595786

  9. Natural killer (NK) and mitogen (OKT3) augmented NK activity in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Schwartz, S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors examined NK and OKT3 augmented NK activity in 14 IDDM patients and 15 age matched controls (28 +/- 6 vs 28.5 +/- 6 yrs respectively) to evaluate this aspect of antigen nonspecific immunity. NK and augmented NK function were examined at various target to effector cell ratios (E/T) using the K562 cell line (as target) in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. Islet cell antibodies (ICA) were determined by standard methods. All of the diabetics (mean duration of disease 16 yrs) and controls were ICA (-). Their observations indicate that there is no significant difference between diabetic and control subjects in NK activity. The ability of OKT3 to augment NK activity (by a T-cell mediated process) is also not significantly different between the two groups. An abnormal immune response to beta cells has a central role in the pathogenesis of IDDM. The nature of this autoimmune defect is unclear. The authors' present observations indicate that antigen nonspecific immune function may be normal in patients with IDDM. They propose that IDDM is a disease only of abnormal antigen specific immunoregulation.

  10. Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Yamamura, T; Kondo, T; Fujiwara, M; Tabira, T

    1997-11-17

    In this report, we establish a regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated disease. Active sensitization of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide induces a mild form of monophasic EAE. When mice were deprived of NK cells by antibody treatment before immunization, they developed a more serious form of EAE associated with relapse. Aggravation of EAE by NK cell deletion was also seen in beta 2-microglobulin-/- (beta 2m-/-) mice, indicating that NK cells can play a regulatory role in a manner independent of CD8+ T cells or NK1.1+ T cells (NK-T cells). The disease enhancement was associated with augmentation of T cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines in response to MOG35-55. EAE passively induced by the MOG35-55-specific T cell line was also enhanced by NK cell deletion in B6, beta 2m-/-, and recombination activation gene 2 (RAG-2)-/- mice, indicating that the regulation by NK cells can be independent of T, B, or NK-T cells. We further showed that NK cells inhibit T cell proliferation triggered by antigen or cytokine stimulation. Taken together, we conclude that NK cells are an important regulator for EAE in both induction and effector phases. PMID:9362528

  11. Formaldehyde exposure impairs the function and differentiation of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Lee, Eun-Hee; Lee, Ki-Mo; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Jang, Ji-Hun; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yoon, Il-Joo; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2013-11-25

    We investigated the cytotoxic effects of formaldehyde (FA) on lymphocytes. FA-exposed mice showed a profound reduction not only in the number of natural killer (NK) cells but also in the expression of NK cell-specific receptors, but these mice did not exhibit decreases in the numbers of T or B lymphocytes. FA exposure also induced decreases in NK cytolytic activity and in the expression of NK cell-associated genes, such as IFN-γ, perforin and CD122. To determine the effect of FA on tumorigenicity, C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with B16F10 melanoma cells after FA exposure. The mass of the B16F10 tumor and the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes were greater than those in unexposed tumor-bearing control mice. The number and cytolytic activity of NK cells were also reduced in B16F10 tumor-bearing mice exposed to FA. To determine how FA reduces the NK cell number, NK precursor (pNK) cells were treated with FA, and the differentiation status of the NK cells was analyzed. NK cell differentiation was impaired by FA treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings indicate that FA exposure may promote tumor progression by impairing NK cell function and differentiation. PMID:24060340

  12. NK cells and exercise: implications for cancer immunotherapy and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic effectors of the innate immune system that are able to recognize and eradicate tumor cells without prior antigenic exposure. Tumor infiltration by NK-cells is associated with prolonged survival in cancer patients and high NK-cell cytotoxicity has been linked to decreased cancer risk. Allogeneic adoptive transfer of NK-cells from healthy donors to cancer patients has shown promise as a means of controlling or reversing the spread of multiple human malignancies including multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia. However, multiple issues remain that undermine the efficacy of long-term cancer treatment using adoptive transfer of NK-cells including loss of activating receptors and cytotoxic potential in transferred NK-cells. Moreover, chronic exercise has been linked to improved NK-cell cytotoxicity, prognosis, and survival in cancer patients, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is associated with enhanced NK-cell function after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and decreased relapse risk in AML patients. In this work, we explore the potential of exercise- and CMV-driven alterations in NK-cell phenotype and function to increase the efficacy of NK-cells for cancer immunotherapy and prolong survival in cancer patients. We conclude that acute exercise and CMV are both capable of enhancing NK-cell cytotoxicity through distinct mechanisms; however, these effects are not additive as CMV infection is associated with an impaired acute exercise response. Thus, we suggest that either acute exercise or in vitro expansion of NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK-cells (as seen in those with CMV) could serve as a simple strategy for enhancing the anti-tumor cytotoxicity of NK-cells for immunotherapy, and that exercise training could be used to improve survivorship in cancer patients being treated with either HSCT or NK-cell infusions. PMID:26175401

  13. CD19-CAR engineered NK-92 cells are sufficient to overcome NK cell resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Romanski, Annette; Uherek, Christoph; Bug, Gesine; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans; Wels, Winfried S; Ottmann, Oliver G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Many B-cell acute and chronic leukaemias tend to be resistant to killing by natural killer (NK) cells. The introduction of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) into T cells or NK cells could potentially overcome this resistance. Here, we extend our previous observations on the resistance of malignant lymphoblasts to NK-92 cells, a continuously growing NK cell line, showing that anti-CD19-CAR (αCD19-CAR) engineered NK-92 cells can regain significant cytotoxicity against CD19 positive leukaemic cell lines and primary leukaemia cells that are resistant to cytolytic activity of parental NK-92 cells. The 'first generation' CAR was generated from a scFv (CD19) antibody fragment, coupled to a flexible hinge region, the CD3ζ chain and a Myc-tag and cloned into a retrovirus backbone. No difference in cytotoxic activity of NK-92 and transduced αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells towards CD19 negative targets was found. However, αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells specifically and efficiently lysed CD19 expressing B-precursor leukaemia cell lines as well as lymphoblasts from leukaemia patients. Since NK-92 cells can be easily expanded to clinical grade numbers under current Good Manufactoring Practice (cGMP) conditions and its safety has been documented in several phase I clinical studies, treatment with CAR modified NK-92 should be considered a treatment option for patients with lymphoid malignancies. PMID:27008316

  14. The Human NK Cell Response to Yellow Fever Virus 17D Is Primarily Governed by NK Cell Differentiation Independently of NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Nicole; Ivarsson, Martin A; Blom, Kim; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Braun, Monika; Falconer, Karolin; Gustafsson, Rasmus; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Sandberg, Johan K; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    NK cells play an important role in the defense against viral infections. However, little is known about the regulation of NK cell responses during the first days of acute viral infections in humans. In this study, we used the live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D as a human in vivo model to study the temporal dynamics and regulation of NK cell responses in an acute viral infection. YFV induced a robust NK cell response in vivo, with an early activation and peak in NK cell function at day 6, followed by a delayed peak in Ki67 expression, which was indicative of proliferation, at day 10. The in vivo NK cell response correlated positively with plasma type I/III IFN levels at day 6, as well as with the viral load. YFV induced an increased functional responsiveness to IL-12 and IL-18, as well as to K562 cells, indicating that the NK cells were primed in vivo. The NK cell responses were associated primarily with the stage of differentiation, because the magnitude of induced Ki67 and CD69 expression was distinctly higher in CD57(-) NK cells. In contrast, NK cells expressing self- and nonself-HLA class I-binding inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors contributed, to a similar degree, to the response. Taken together, our results indicate that NK cells are primed by type I/III IFN in vivo early after YFV infection and that their response is governed primarily by the differentiation stage, independently of killer cell Ig-like receptor/HLA class I-mediated inhibition or education. PMID:26283480

  15. NK Cell Phenotypic Modulation in Lung Cancer Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jun-Wei; Li, Yang; Liu, Bin; Yu, Yan; Shi, Fu-Dong; Zhou, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Nature killer (NK) cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunotherapy. But it indicated that tumor cells impacted possibly on NK cell normal functions through some molecules mechanisms in tumor microenvironment. Materials and methods Our study analyzed the change about NK cells surface markers (NK cells receptors) through immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real-time PCR, the killed function from mouse spleen NK cell and human high/low lung cancer cell line by co-culture. Furthermore we certificated the above result on the lung cancer model of SCID mouse. Results We showed that the infiltration of NK cells in tumor periphery was related with lung cancer patients' prognosis. And the number of NK cell infiltrating in lung cancer tissue is closely related to the pathological types, size of the primary cancer, smoking history and prognosis of the patients with lung cancer. The expression of NK cells inhibitor receptors increased remarkably in tumor micro-environment, in opposite, the expression of NK cells activated receptors decrease magnificently. Conclusions The survival time of lung cancer patient was positively related to NK cell infiltration degree in lung cancer. Thus, the down-regulation of NKG2D, Ly49I and the up-regulation of NKG2A may indicate immune tolerance mechanism and facilitate metastasis in tumor environment. Our research will offer more theory for clinical strategy about tumor immunotherapy. PMID:25299645

  16. Models to study NK cell biology and possible clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Aguilar, Ethan G.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes resulting from the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. PMID:26237009

  17. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26237009

  18. Altered NK Cell Development and Enhanced NK Cell-Mediated Resistance to MCMV in NKG2D-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova, Biljana; Mandarić, Sanja; Antulov, Ronald; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonsson, Helena; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Jonjić, Stipan; Polić, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    Summary NKG2D is a potent activating receptor on NK cells which acts as a molecular sensor for stressed cells expressing NKG2D ligands such as infected or tumor transformed cells. Although NKG2D is expressed on NK cell precursors, its role in NK cell development is still not known. We have generated NKG2D-deficient mice by targeting the Klrk1 locus. Here we provide evidence for an important regulatory role of NKG2D in the development of NK cells. The absence of NKG2D causes faster division of NK cells, perturbation in size of some NK cell subpopulations and their augmented sensitivity to apoptosis. As expected, NKG2D−/− NK cells are less responsive to tumor targets expressing NKG2D ligands. NKG2D−/− mice, however, show an enhanced NK cell-mediated resistance to MCMV infection as a consequence of NK cell dysregulation. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for yet unknown regulatory function of NKG2D in NK cell physiology. PMID:19631564

  19. Natural killer cell (NK) subsets and NK-like T-cell populations in acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, N; Swerdlow, S H; TenEyck, S P; Boyiadzis, M; Felgar, R E

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the immune microenvironment on the behavior and therapeutic strategies for hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms is being increasingly recognized. Many functional studies of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic responses in myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exist, but with limited data on these lymphocyte proportions and related T-cell subsets. The proportions of these cells and their prognostic implications were therefore investigated in 89 AML, 51 MDS, and 20 control marrows by flow cytometry. The median proportion of NK cells (relative to the total lymphocytes) was lower in AML versus controls (P = 0.01). Among AML, a lower proportion of NK cells predicted better survival, whereas a higher NK cell proportion was associated with the poor prognostic AML category (P = 0.002). NK cell proportions were similar in MDS, MDS subgroups, and control marrows. The relative proportion of the mature NK cell subset (CD56(dim) CD16/57(bright) ) was lower in AML and MDS versus controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.0002, respectively). The proportion of mature NK cells was not a prognostic indicator although fewer were seen in poor prognosis AML. In contrast, a lower proportion of mature NK cells correlated with worse survival in MDS (P = 0.027). A higher proportion of NK-like T-cells (of total lymphoid cells) was found in MDS compared to controls (P = 0.01). A lower proportion of NK-like T-cells predicted better survival in AML but not in MDS. Thus, the proportions of NK, NK-cell subsets, and NK-like T-cells vary in myeloid neoplasms, may potentially impact immunomodulatory therapies, and may impact outcome. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26648320

  20. NK/T cell lymphoma associated with peripheral eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Yap, E; Wan Jamaluddin, W F; Tumian, N R; Mashuri, F; Mohammed, F; Tan, G C; Masir, N; Abdul Wahid, F S

    2014-12-01

    NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type is an aggressive and uncommon malignancy. Disease that occurs outside of the aerodigestive tract exhibits an even more aggressive clinical behaviour and does not respond as well to conventional therapy compared to its nasal counterpart. We report such a case of NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, that presented as an anterior chest wall mass, arising from the left pectoralis muscle. An interesting feature we wish to highlight is the associated eosinophilia that corresponded to disease activity, exhibiting fluctuations with surgical resection and chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge this is the third reported case of NK/T cell lymphoma that is associated with peripheral eosinophilia. Our case highlights the role of certain NK cell subsets that play a major role in eosinophilic activation in NK/T lymphomas and calls for more research into further classification of this disease by virtue of its NK cell subsets. PMID:25500520

  1. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection.

    PubMed

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors. PMID:27262760

  2. Bridging innate NK cell functions with adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Emanuela; Carlomagno, Simona; Pesce, Silvia; Moretta, Alessandro; Sivori, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) are major human NK receptors displaying either inhibitory or activating functions which recognize allotypic determinants of HLA-class I molecules. Surprisingly, NK cell treatment with CpG-ODN (TLR9 ligands) results in selective down-modulation of KIR3DL2, its co-internalization with CpG-ODN and its translocation to TLR9-rich early endosomes. This novel KIR-associated function may offer clues to better understand the possible role of certain KIRs and also emphasizes the involvement of NK cells in the course of microbial infections. NK cells are involved not only in innate immune responses against viruses and tumors but also participate in the complex network of cell-to cell interaction that leads to the development of adaptive immune responses. In this context the interaction of NK cells with DC appears to play a crucial role in the acquisition of CCR7, a chemokine receptor that enables NK cells to migrate towards lymph nodes in response to CCL19 and/or CCL21. Analysis of NK cell clones revealed that KIR-mismatched but not KIR-matched NK cells acquire CCR7. These data have important implications in haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), in which KIR-mismatched NK cells may acquire the ability to migrate to secondary lymphoid compartments (SLCs), where they can kill recipient's antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells thus preventing graft versus host (and host vs. graft) reactions. PMID:21842364

  3. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  4. A lack of functional NK1 receptors explains most, but not all, abnormal behaviours of NK1R-/- mice1

    PubMed Central

    Porter, A J; Pillidge, K; Tsai, Y C; Dudley, J A; Hunt, S P; Peirson, S N; Brown, L A; Stanford, S C

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display abnormal behaviours seen in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness). These abnormalities were evident when comparing the behaviour of separate (inbred: ‘Hom’) wildtype and NK1R-/- mouse strains. Here, we investigated whether the inbreeding protocol could influence their phenotype by comparing the behaviour of these mice with that of wildtype (NK1R+/+) and NK1R-/- progeny of heterozygous parents (‘Het’, derived from the same inbred strains). First, we recorded the spontaneous motor activity of the two colonies/genotypes, over 7 days. This continuous monitoring also enabled us to investigate whether the diurnal rhythm in motor activity differs in the two colonies/genotypes. NK1R-/- mice from both colonies were hyperactive compared with their wildtypes and their diurnal rhythm was also disrupted. Next, we evaluated the performance of the four groups of mice in the 5-Choice Serial Reaction-Time Task (5-CSRTT). During training, NK1R-/- mice from both colonies expressed more impulsive and perseverative behaviour than their wildtypes. During testing, only NK1R-/- mice from the Hom colony were more impulsive than their wildtypes, but NK1R-/- mice from both colonies were more perseverative. There were no colony differences in inattentiveness. Moreover, a genotype difference in this measure depended on time of day. We conclude that the hyperactivity, perseveration and, possibly, inattentiveness of NK1R-/- mice is a direct consequence of a lack of functional NK1R. However, the greater impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice depended on an interaction between a functional deficit of NK1R and other (possibly environmental and/or epigenetic) factors. PMID:25558794

  5. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  6. Potential of autologous NK cell therapy to eradicate leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL) patients are immunocompromised. We recently reported that functional natural killer (NK) cells can be grown from patient bone marrow and blood samples at diagnosis. Surprisingly, such NK cells exhibit cytotoxicity against autologous BP-ALL cells. Here, we outline unanswered questions, challenges and possible applications associated with these findings. PMID:25949882

  7. Increased NK Cell Maturation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Granjeaud, Samuel; Gondois-Rey, Françoise; Harbi, Samia; Orlanducci, Florence; Blaise, Didier; Vey, Norbert; Arnoulet, Christine; Fauriat, Cyril; Olive, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune alterations in cancer patients is a major challenge and requires precise phenotypic study of immune subsets. Improvement of knowledge regarding the biology of natural killer (NK) cells and technical advances leads to the generation of high dimensional dataset. High dimensional flow cytometry requires tools adapted to complex dataset analyses. This study presents an example of NK cell maturation analysis in Healthy Volunteers (HV) and patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with an automated procedure using the FLOCK algorithm. This procedure enabled to automatically identify NK cell subsets according to maturation profiles, with 2D mapping of a four-dimensional dataset. Differences were highlighted in AML patients compared to HV, with an overall increase of NK maturation. Among patients, a strong heterogeneity in NK cell maturation defined three distinct profiles. Overall, automatic gating with FLOCK algorithm is a recent procedure, which enables fast and reliable identification of cell populations from high-dimensional cytometry data. Such tools are necessary for immune subset characterization and standardization of data analyses. This tool is adapted to new immune cell subsets discovery, and may lead to a better knowledge of NK cell defects in cancer patients. Overall, 2D mapping of NK maturation profiles enabled fast and reliable identification of NK cell subsets. PMID:26594214

  8. NK cell development in bone marrow and liver: site matters.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, D; Prchal-Murphy, M; Seillet, C; Glasner, A; Mandelboim, O; Carotta, S; Sexl, V; Putz, E M

    2014-12-01

    The NKp46 protein is found on resting and activated natural killer (NK) cells and is involved in the recognition of malignant and infected cells. The expression of NKp46 is believed to precede that of DX5 in early NK cell development. We show that this is not the case in the bone marrow (BM). Here, NKp46 is predominantly expressed after DX5, whereas the liver harbors a subpopulation that expresses NKp46 but not DX5. NK cell precursors in the liver show much lower levels of Eomesodermin than NK cell precursors in the BM, although they express higher levels of granzymes and unlike the NK cell precursors in the BM are fully able to degranulate and produce interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The development of NK cells thus differs between the two organs. This needs to be considered when using NKp46 and DX5 as NK cell markers and when performing NK cell-specific gene deletion in Ncr1 transgenic mice. PMID:25319498

  9. NK Cell Subset Redistribution during the Course of Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lugli, Enrico; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Mavilio, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 as well as human cytomegalovirus infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of these two chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment. PMID:25177322

  10. Fully functional NK cells after unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beziat, V; Nguyen, S; Lapusan, S; Hervier, B; Dhedin, N; Bories, D; Uzunov, M; Boudifa, A; Trebeden-Negre, H; Norol, F; Marjanovic, Z; Marie, J-P; Vernant, J-P; Debre, P; Rio, B; Vieillard, V

    2009-04-01

    Promising results of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) from unrelated donors have been reported in patients with hematologic disorders. These transplants, having potential to trigger beneficial donor-versus-recipient natural killer (NK) cell-mediated alloreaction, we have conducted the first extensive analysis of the phenotypic and functional properties of NK cells after UCBT. NK cells from 25 patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies were compared with cells derived from both healthy adult and CB cells. We found that following UCBT, NK cells display not only some phenotypic features associated with maturity but also unique characteristics that make them fully functional against leukemic blasts. We propose that this full functionality of alloreactive donor-derived NK may drive graft-versus-leukemia reactions after UCBT. PMID:19151772

  11. Functional Analysis of Human NK cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bryceson, Yenan T.; Fauriat, Cyril; Nunes, João M.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Björkström, Niklas K.; Long, Eric O.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that contribute to innate immunity through cytokine secretion and target cell lysis. NK cell function is regulated by a multiplicity of activating and inhibitory receptors. The advance in instrumentation for multi-color flow cytometry and the generation of specific mAbs for different epitopes related to phenotypic and functional parameters have facilitated our understanding of NK cell responses. Here, we provide protocols for flow cytometric evaluation of degranulation and cytokine production by human NK cells from peripheral blood at the single cell level. In addition to offering insight into the regulation of human NK cell responses, these techniques are applicable to the assessment of various clinical conditions, including the diagnosis of immunodeficiency syndromes. PMID:20033652

  12. IL-2 induces STAT4 activation in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, but not in T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-01-01

    IL-2 exerts potent but distinct functional effects on two critical cell populations of the immune system, T cells and NK cells. Whereas IL-2 leads to proliferation in both cell types, it enhances cytotoxicity primarily in NK cells. In both T cells and NK cells, IL-2 induces the activation of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5. Given this similarity in intracellular signaling, the mechanism underlying the distinct response to IL-2 in T cells and NK cells is not clear. In this study, we show that in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, in addition to the activation of STAT1 and STAT5, IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT4, a STAT previously reported to be activated only in response to IL-12 and IFN-alpha. This activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 is not due to the autocrine production of IL-12 or IFN-alpha. STAT4 activated in response to IL-2 is able to bind to a STAT-binding DNA sequence, suggesting that in NK cells IL-2 is capable of activating target genes through phosphorylation of STAT4. IL-2 induces the activation of Jak2 uniquely in NK cells, which may underlie the ability of IL-2 to activate STAT4 only in these cells. Although the activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 occurs in primary resting and activated NK cells, it does not occur in primary resting T cells or mitogen-activated T cells. The unique activation of the STAT4-signaling pathway in NK cells may underlie the distinct functional effect of IL-2 on this cell population. PMID:9886399

  13. Exploring NK fitness landscapes using imitative learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanari, José F.

    2015-10-01

    The idea that a group of cooperating agents can solve problems more efficiently than when those agents work independently is hardly controversial, despite our obliviousness of the conditions that make cooperation a successful problem solving strategy. Here we investigate the performance of a group of agents in locating the global maxima of NK fitness landscapes with varying degrees of ruggedness. Cooperation is taken into account through imitative learning and the broadcasting of messages informing on the fitness of each agent. We find a trade-off between the group size and the frequency of imitation: for rugged landscapes, too much imitation or too large a group yield a performance poorer than that of independent agents. By decreasing the diversity of the group, imitative learning may lead to duplication of work and hence to a decrease of its effective size. However, when the parameters are set to optimal values the cooperative group substantially outperforms the independent agents.

  14. NK cell biology: An update and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kerry S.; Hasegawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a minor subset of normal lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses toward tumor and virus-infected cells. They can mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity toward these abnormal cells and rapidly secrete numerous cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. Significant progress has been made in the past two decades to improve our understanding of NK cell biology. Here we review recent discoveries, including a better comprehension of the “education” of NK cells to achieve functional competence during their maturation and the discovery of “memory” responses by NK cells suggesting that they may also contribute to adaptive immunity. The improved understanding of NK cell biology has forged greater awareness that these cells play integral early roles in immune responses. In addition, several promising clinical therapies have been used to exploit NK cell functions in treating cancer patients. As our molecular understanding improves, these and future immunotherapies should continue to provide promising strategies to exploit the unique functions of NK cells to treat cancer, infections, and other pathological conditions. PMID:23906377

  15. NK cells, autoantibodies, and immunologic infertility: a complex interplay.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Carlo; Perricone, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) are heterogeneous conditions that have been frequently explained with an immunological pathomechanism. A deeper insight into apparently unexplained infertility and RSA shows increasing evidences supporting both alloimmune and autoimmune mechanisms, in which natural killer (NK) cells and autoantibodies seem to play a relevant role. Successful pregnancy is considered as Th1-Th2 cooperation phenomenon, with a predominantly Th2-type lymphocytes response, together with the emerging role of interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, and IL-18 and of other unidentified soluble factors dependent on NK cells. Uterine NK cells comprise the largest population at implantation site, and their activity, characteristics, and abundance suggest that they participate at the "decidualization" process that, vice versa, induces NK activation and recruitment in each menstrual cycle. However, NK cell alteration may be associated with impaired pregnancy, and the modulation in the number of circulating NK cells is most likely to be a primary event rather than an active inflammation/drug administration consequence during an inflammatory/autoimmune process, thus playing an important role in the pathogenesis of immunological infertility. Relationships within immunological infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, autoantibodies, and NK cells will be reviewed herein. PMID:19908167

  16. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  17. Cancer-induced immunosuppression: IL-18-elicited immunoablative NK cells.

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Ullrich, Evelyn; Aymeric, Laetitia; Meinhardt, Kathrin; Coudert, Jérôme D; Desbois, Mélanie; Ghiringhelli, François; Viaud, Sophie; Ryffel, Bernard; Yagita, Hideo; Chen, Lieping; Mécheri, Salaheddine; Kaplanski, Gilles; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Kato, Masashi; Schultze, Joachim L; Tartour, Eric; Kroemer, Guido; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2012-06-01

    During cancer development, a number of regulatory cell subsets and immunosuppressive cytokines subvert adaptive immune responses. Although it has been shown that tumor-derived interleukin (IL)-18 participates in the PD-1-dependent tumor progression in NK cell-controlled cancers, the mechanistic cues underlying this immunosuppression remain unknown. Here, we show that IL-18 converts a subset of Kit(-) (CD11b(-)) into Kit(+) natural killer (NK) cells, which accumulate in all lymphoid organs of tumor bearers and mediate immunoablative functions. Kit(+) NK cells overexpressed B7-H1/PD-L1, a ligand for PD-1. The adoptive transfer of Kit(+) NK cells promoted tumor growth in two pulmonary metastases tumor models and significantly reduced the dendritic and NK cell pools residing in lymphoid organs in a B7-H1-dependent manner. Neutralization of IL-18 by RNA interference in tumors or systemically by IL-18-binding protein dramatically reduced the accumulation of Kit(+)CD11b(-) NK cells in tumor bearers. Together, our findings show that IL-18 produced by tumor cells elicits Kit(+)CD11b(-) NK cells endowed with B7-H1-dependent immunoablative functions in mice. PMID:22427351

  18. Hepatitis B virus antigens impair NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    An inadequate immune response of the host is thought to be a critical factor causing chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, as one of the key players in the eradication and control of viral infections, were functionally impaired in CHB patients, which might contribute to viral persistence. Here, we reported that HBV antigens HBsAg and HBeAg directly inhibited NK cell function. HBsAg and/or HBeAg blocked NK cell activation, cytokine production and cytotoxic granule release in human NK cell-line NK-92 cells, which might be related to the downregulation of activating receptors and upregulation of inhibitory receptor. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms likely involved the suppression of STAT1, NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings implicated that HBV antigen-mediated inhibition of NK cells might be an efficient strategy for HBV evasion, targeting the early antiviral responses mediated by NK cells and resulting in the establishment of chronic virus infection. Therefore, this study revealed the relationship between viral antigens and human immune function, especially a potential important interaction between HBV and innate immune responses. PMID:27341035

  19. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guohui; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal "self" cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a "two-edged weapon" and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  20. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell-based anticancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell-based clinical and preclinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance is summarized, and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed. PMID:27148271

  1. Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy – Advantages of the NK-92 Cell Line over Blood NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Toneguzzo, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent cytotoxic effector cells for cancer therapy and potentially for severe viral infections. However, there are technical challenges to obtain sufficient numbers of functionally active NK cells from a patient’s blood since they represent only 10% of the lymphocytes and are often dysfunctional. The alternative is to obtain cells from a healthy donor, which requires depletion of the allogeneic T cells to prevent graft-versus-host reactions. Cytotoxic cell lines have been established from patients with clonal NK-cell lymphoma. Those cells can be expanded in culture in the presence of IL-2. Except for the NK-92 cell line, though, none of the other six known NK cell lines has consistently and reproducibly shown high antitumor cytotoxicity. Only NK-92 cells can easily be genetically manipulated to recognize specific tumor antigens or to augment monoclonal antibody activity through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. NK-92 is also the only cell line product that has been infused into patients with advanced cancer with clinical benefit and minimal side effects. PMID:27014270

  2. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah E; Filak, Holly C; Guthrie, Brandon S; Schmidt, Rebecca L; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M; Raulet, David H; Lenz, Laurel L

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  3. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Gunesch, Justin T; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34(+) precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  4. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  5. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34+ precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  6. Human NK Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Ramifications of Ramification

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a unique lymphocyte lineage with remarkable agility in the rapid destruction of virus-infected cells. They are also the most poorly understood class of lymphocyte. A spectrum of activating and inhibitory receptors at the NK cell surface leads to an unusual and difficult-to-study mechanism of cellular recognition, as well as a very high capacity for diversity at the single-cell level. Here, we review the evidence for the role of NK cells in the earliest stage of human viral infection, and in its prevention. We argue that single-cell diversity is a logical evolutionary adaptation for their position in the immune response and contributes to their ability to kill virus-infected cells. Finally, we look to the future, where emerging single-cell technologies will enable a new generation of rigorous and clinically relevant studies on NK cells accounting for all of their unique and diverse characteristics. PMID:26973646

  7. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity. PMID:27226093

  8. Recognition and Regulation of T Cells by NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Pallmer, Katharina; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of T cell responses by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) is increasingly documented and studied. Direct or indirect crosstalk between ILCs and T cells early during and after T cell activation can affect their differentiation, polarization, and survival. Natural killer (NK) cells that belong to the ILC1 group were initially described for their function in recognizing and eliminating "altered self" and as source of early inflammatory cytokines, most notably type II interferon. Using signals conveyed by various germ-line encoded activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are geared to sense sudden cellular changes that can be caused by infection events, malignant transformation, or cellular stress responses. T cells, when activated by TCR engagement (signal 1), costimulation (signal 2), and cytokines (signal 3), commit to a number of cellular alterations, including entry into rapid cell cycling, metabolic changes, and acquisition of effector functions. These abrupt changes may alert NK cells, and T cells might thereby expose themselves as NK cell targets. Here, we review how activated T cells can be recognized and regulated by NK cells and what consequences such regulation bears for T cell immunity in the context of vaccination, infection, or autoimmunity. Conversely, we will discuss mechanisms by which activated T cells protect themselves against NK cell attack and outline the significance of this safeguard mechanism. PMID:27446081

  9. Recognition and Regulation of T Cells by NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pallmer, Katharina; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of T cell responses by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) is increasingly documented and studied. Direct or indirect crosstalk between ILCs and T cells early during and after T cell activation can affect their differentiation, polarization, and survival. Natural killer (NK) cells that belong to the ILC1 group were initially described for their function in recognizing and eliminating “altered self” and as source of early inflammatory cytokines, most notably type II interferon. Using signals conveyed by various germ-line encoded activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are geared to sense sudden cellular changes that can be caused by infection events, malignant transformation, or cellular stress responses. T cells, when activated by TCR engagement (signal 1), costimulation (signal 2), and cytokines (signal 3), commit to a number of cellular alterations, including entry into rapid cell cycling, metabolic changes, and acquisition of effector functions. These abrupt changes may alert NK cells, and T cells might thereby expose themselves as NK cell targets. Here, we review how activated T cells can be recognized and regulated by NK cells and what consequences such regulation bears for T cell immunity in the context of vaccination, infection, or autoimmunity. Conversely, we will discuss mechanisms by which activated T cells protect themselves against NK cell attack and outline the significance of this safeguard mechanism. PMID:27446081

  10. The role of vagal pathway and NK1 and NK2 receptors in cardiovascular and respiratory effects of neurokinin A.

    PubMed

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Jampolska, Monika; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Neurokinin A (NKA) is a peptide neurotransmitter that participates in the regulation of breathing and the cardiovascular system. The purpose of the current study was to determine the cardiorespiratory pattern exerted by the systemic injection of NKA, to look at the contribution of neurokinin NK1 and NK2 receptors, and to establish the engagement of the vagal pathway in mediation of these responses. The effects of intravenous injections of NKA (50 μg/kg) were studied in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats in the following experimental schemes: in neurally intact rats; and vagotomized at either midcervical or supranodosal level. Intravenous injections of NKA in the intact rats evoked sudden and short-lived increase in the respiratory rate concomitant with drop in tidal volume, followed by a prolonged depression, coupled with continuous augmentation of the tidal volume. Respiratory alterations were accompanied by transient tachycardia and prolonged hypotension. Midcervical vagotomy eliminated respiratory rate response and augmentation of tidal volume. Section of supranodosal vagi abrogated all respiratory reactions. NK2 receptor blockade abolished respiratory changes without affecting cardiovascular effects, whereas NK1 receptor blockade significantly reduced hypotension and increase in heart rate with no impact on the respiratory system. These results indicate that NKA induced changes in the breathing resulting from an excitation of the NK2 receptors on the vagal endings. A fall in blood pressure triggered by NKA occurs outside of the vagus nerve and is probably mediated via its direct action on vascular smooth muscles supplied with NK1 receptors. PMID:27199181

  11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew; Williams, James; Kurioka, Ayako; Gerry, Andrew B.; Jakobsen, Bent; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie

    2016-01-01

    In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors. PMID:27529554

  12. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. PMID:25786176

  13. Human breast cancer cells enhance self tolerance by promoting evasion from NK cell antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Mamessier, Emilie; Sylvain, Aude; Thibult, Marie-Laure; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Castellano, Rémy; Gonçalves, Anthony; André, Pascale; Romagné, François; Thibault, Gilles; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François; Moretta, Alessandro; Olive, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    NK cells are a major component of the antitumor immune response and are involved in controlling tumor progression and metastases in animal models. Here, we show that dysfunction of these cells accompanies human breast tumor progression. We characterized human peripheral blood NK (p-NK) cells and malignant mammary tumor-infiltrating NK (Ti-NK) cells from patients with noninvasive and invasive breast cancers. NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and normal breast tissue were used as controls. With disease progression, we found that expression of activating NK cell receptors (such as NKp30, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and CD16) decreased while expression of inhibitory receptors (such as NKG2A) increased and that this correlated with decreased NK cell function, most notably cytotoxicity. Importantly, Ti-NK cells had more pronounced impairment of their cytotoxic potential than p-NK cells. We also identified several stroma-derived factors, including TGF-β1, involved in tumor-induced reduction of normal NK cell function. Our data therefore show that breast tumor progression involves NK cell dysfunction and that breast tumors model their environment to evade NK cell antitumor immunity. This highlights the importance of developing future therapies able to restore NK cell cytotoxicity to limit/prevent tumor escape from antitumor immunity. PMID:21841316

  14. A Case of Aggressive NK/T-cell Lymphoma/Leukemia with Cutaneous Involvement in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Ho; Ko, Woo Tae; Ha, Gyoung Yim; Kim, Jung Ran

    2008-01-01

    NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is characterized by the expression of the NK-cell antigen CD56. Non-nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas are subdivided into primary cutaneous and 4 subtypes of secondary cutaneous lymphomas; nasal type, aggressive, blastic (blastoid), and other specific NK-like cell lymphoma. Aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma/leukemia is a rare leukemic variant of nasal type NKTCL. We herein report a rare case of aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma/leukemia with cutaneous involvement in adolescence. PMID:27303165

  15. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  16. Novel immune modulators used in hematology: impact on NK cells.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Stephanie; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    There is a wide range of important pharmaceuticals used in treatment of cancer. Besides their known effects on tumor cells, there is growing evidence for modulation of the immune system. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs(®)) play an important role in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome and have already demonstrated antitumor, anti-angiogenic, and immunostimulating effects, in particular on natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are directly targeting different kinases and are known to regulate effector NK cells and expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) on tumor cells. Demethylating agents, histone deacetylases, and proteasome inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic regulation and protein degradation of malignant cells. There are first hints that these drugs also sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy, radiation, and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by enhanced expression of TRAIL and NKG2DLs. However, these pharmaceuticals may also impair NK cell function in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In summary, this review provides an update on the effects of different novel molecules on the immune system focusing NK cells. PMID:23316191

  17. Novel immune modulators used in hematology: impact on NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Stephanie; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide range of important pharmaceuticals used in treatment of cancer. Besides their known effects on tumor cells, there is growing evidence for modulation of the immune system. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs®) play an important role in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome and have already demonstrated antitumor, anti-angiogenic, and immunostimulating effects, in particular on natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are directly targeting different kinases and are known to regulate effector NK cells and expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) on tumor cells. Demethylating agents, histone deacetylases, and proteasome inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic regulation and protein degradation of malignant cells. There are first hints that these drugs also sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy, radiation, and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by enhanced expression of TRAIL and NKG2DLs. However, these pharmaceuticals may also impair NK cell function in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In summary, this review provides an update on the effects of different novel molecules on the immune system focusing NK cells. PMID:23316191

  18. Human NK cell lytic granules and regulation of their exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form a subset of lymphocytes that play a key role in immuno-surveillance and host defense against cancer and viral infections. They recognize stressed cells through a variety of germline-encoded activating cell surface receptors and utilize their cytotoxic ability to eliminate abnormal cells. Killing of target cells is a complex, multi-stage process that concludes in the directed secretion of lytic granules, containing perforin and granzymes, at the immunological synapse. Upon delivery to a target cell, perforin mediates generation of pores in membranes of target cells, allowing granzymes to access target cell cytoplasm and induce apoptosis. Therefore, lytic granules of NK cells are indispensable for normal NK cell cytolytic function. Indeed, defects in lytic granule secretion lead or are related to serious and often fatal diseases, such as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) type 2–5 or Griscelli syndrome type 2. A number of reports highlight the role of several proteins involved in lytic granule release and NK cell-mediated killing of tumor cells. This review focuses on lytic granules of human NK cells and the advancements in understanding the mechanisms controlling their exocytosis. PMID:23162553

  19. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  20. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M; Melief, Cornelis J M; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-06-21

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that monobenzone induced a long-lasting, melanocyte-specific immune response that was dependent on NK cells, yet fully intact in the absence of T- and B cells. Consistent with the concept of "memory NK cells," monobenzone-induced NK cells resided in the liver and transfer of these cells conferred melanocyte-specific immunity to naive animals. Monobenzone-exposed skin displayed macrophage infiltration and cutaneous lymph nodes showed an inflammasome-dependent influx of macrophages with a tissue-resident phenotype, coinciding with local NK cell activation. Indeed, macrophage depletion or the absence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the adaptor protein ASC or interleukin-18 (IL-18) abolished monobenzone CHS, thereby establishing a non-redundant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome as a critical proinflammatory checkpoint in the induction of hapten-dependent memory NK cells. PMID:27287410

  1. Natural killer cell dysfunction in hepatocellular carcinoma and NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Sun, Hao-yu; Xiao, Wei-hua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhi-gang

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms linking hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells account for 25%-50% of the total number of liver lymphocytes, suggesting that NK cells play an important role in liver immunity. The number of NK cells in the blood and tumor tissues of HCC patients is positively correlated with their survival and prognosis. Furthermore, a group of NK cell-associated genes in HCC tissues is positively associated with the prolonged survival. These facts suggest that NK cells and HCC progression are strongly associated. In this review, we describe the abnormal NK cells and their functional impairment in patients with chronic HBV and HCV infection, which contribute to the progression of HCC. Then, we summarize the association of NK cells with HCC based on the abnormalities in the numbers and phenotypes of blood and liver NK cells in HCC patients. In particular, the exhaustion of NK cells that represents lower cytotoxicity and impaired cytokine production may serve as a predictor for the occurrence of HCC. Finally, we present the current achievements in NK cell immunotherapy conducted in mouse models of liver cancer and in clinical trials, highlighting how chemoimmunotherapy, NK cell transfer, gene therapy, cytokine therapy and mAb therapy improve NK cell function in HCC treatment. It is conceivable that NK cell-based anti-HCC therapeutic strategies alone or in combination with other therapies will be great promise for HCC treatment. PMID:26073325

  2. Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma Causing Cardiorespiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma is an uncommon malignancy usually involving the sinonasal area. We report an unusual case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma diagnosed in a 62-year-old Caucasian male who died of progressive cardiorespiratory failure but had no clinically detectable upper respiratory system lesions. The initial diagnosis was made cytologically on a sample of pericardial fluid that contained neoplastic lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, and Epstein-Barr virus and negative for CD56. The diagnosis was confirmed at the autopsy, which disclosed lymphoma infiltrates in the myocardium, lungs, stomach, and pancreas. The death was caused by heart and lung failure due to uncontrollable arrhythmia and respiratory insufficiency due to the lymphoma infiltrates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma presenting with cardiopulmonary failure. PMID:27493813

  3. [Nasal NK/T lymphoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ladeb, Saloua; Gaulard, Philippe; Ben Othmen, Tarek; Abd Alsamad, Issam; Delfau-Larue, Marie Hélène; Abdelkefi, Abderrahmen; Torjmen, Lamia; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2003-04-01

    We report a case of nasal NK/T lymphoma occurring in a 42 year old man, after a 2 year history of nasal obstruction initially related to chronic sinusitis. A first superficial biopsy was not contributive. Twenty months later, a second nasal biopsy led to the diagnosis of nasal NK/T cell lymphoma in view of the presence of a pleomorphic lymphoid infiltrate associated with necrosis and angiocentric features. Extensive immunohistochemical studies performed on paraffin and frozen sections together with genotypic analysis supported the NK cell origin of the neoplastic cells. In addition, EBV infection was established by in situ hybridization which showed EBERs transcripts in the nuclei of virtually all neoplastic cells. The tumour rapidly progressed and the patient died six months after diagnosis. PMID:12843969

  4. Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma Causing Cardiorespiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiting; Damjanov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma is an uncommon malignancy usually involving the sinonasal area. We report an unusual case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma diagnosed in a 62-year-old Caucasian male who died of progressive cardiorespiratory failure but had no clinically detectable upper respiratory system lesions. The initial diagnosis was made cytologically on a sample of pericardial fluid that contained neoplastic lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, and Epstein-Barr virus and negative for CD56. The diagnosis was confirmed at the autopsy, which disclosed lymphoma infiltrates in the myocardium, lungs, stomach, and pancreas. The death was caused by heart and lung failure due to uncontrollable arrhythmia and respiratory insufficiency due to the lymphoma infiltrates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma presenting with cardiopulmonary failure. PMID:27493813

  5. NAP-2 Secreted by Human NK Cells Can Stimulate Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Caires, Hugo R.; Vasconcelos, Daniela P.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Strategies for improved homing of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to a place of injury are being sought and it has been shown that natural killer (NK) cells can stimulate MSC recruitment. Here, we studied the chemokines behind this recruitment. Assays were performed with bone marrow human MSCs and NK cells freshly isolated from healthy donor buffy coats. Supernatants from MSC-NK cell co-cultures can induce MSC recruitment but not to the same extent as when NK cells are present. Antibody arrays and ELISA assays confirmed that NK cells secrete RANTES (CCL5) and revealed that human NK cells secrete NAP-2 (CXCL7), a chemokine that can induce MSC migration. Inhibition with specific antagonists of CXCR2, a receptor that recognizes NAP-2, abolished NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment. This capacity of NK cells to produce chemokines that stimulate MSC recruitment points toward a role for this immune cell population in regulating tissue repair/regeneration. PMID:27052313

  6. Opportunities and limitations of NK cells as adoptive therapy for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O. J.; Stringaris, Kate; Barrett, John A.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-01-01

    While NK cells can be readily generated for adoptive therapy with current techniques, their optimal application to treat malignant diseases requires an appreciation of the dynamic balance between signals that either synergise with, or antagonise each other. Individuals display wide differences in NK function which determine their therapeutic efficacy. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. The selection of NK cells with a predominant activating profile is critical for delivering successful antitumor activity. This can be achieved through selection of KIR mismatched NK donors and by using blocking molecules against inhibitory pathways. Optimum NK cytotoxicity may require licensing or priming with tumor cells. Recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of NK cells inform in the design of new strategies, including adjuvant therapies, to maximise the cytotoxic potential of NK cells for adoptive transfer to treat human malignancies. PMID:24856895

  7. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sachin R.; Krause, John R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, which is rare in the United States and Europe. It is more prevalent in Asians and Native Americans of Mexico, Central America, and South America. A 30-year-old Southeast Asian man with facial swelling, fever, and unintentional weight loss was found to have leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. He underwent endoscopic sinus surgery, which confirmed extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, and a blood and bone marrow examination, which was negative for involvement but yielded the diagnosis of alpha-E thalassemia. The patient received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and a stem cell transplant with 100% engraftment. PMID:21738302

  8. Lung tumor microenvironment induces specific gene expression signature in intratumoral NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gillard-Bocquet, Mélanie; Caer, Charles; Cagnard, Nicolas; Crozet, Lucile; Perez, Mikael; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells, however whether they contribute to tumor immunosurveillance is still debated. Our previous studies demonstrated the presence of NK cells in human lung tumors. Their comparison with NK cells from non-tumoral lung tissues and with blood NK cells from the same individuals revealed a decreased expression of some NK receptors and impaired ex vivo cytotoxic functions occurring specifically in NK cells isolated from the tumor microenvironment. The aim of the present study was to characterize the transcriptional profile of such intratumoral NK cells, by comparative microarray analysis of sorted NK cells isolated from non-tumoral (Non-Tum-NK) and tumoral (Tum-NK) lung tissues of 12 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients. Our results reveal a specific gene expression signature of Tum-NK cells particularly in activation processes and cytotoxicity, confirming that tumor environment induces modifications in NK cells biology. Indeed, intratumoral NK cells display higher expression levels of NKp44, NKG2A, Granzymes A and K, and Fas mRNA. A particular pattern of receptors involved in chemotaxis was also observed, with an overexpression of CXCR5 and CXCR6, and a lower expression of CX3CR1 and S1PR1 genes in Tum-NK as compared to Non-Tum-NK cells. The precise identification of the molecular pathways modulated in the tumor environment will help to decipher the role of NK cells in tumor immunosurveillance and will open future investigations to manipulate their antitumoral functions. PMID:23382731

  9. NK cells activated by Interleukin-4 in cooperation with Interleukin-15 exhibit distinctive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kiniwa, Tsuyoshi; Enomoto, Yutaka; Terazawa, Natsumi; Omi, Ai; Miyata, Naoko; Ishiwata, Kenji; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to be activated by Th1-type cytokines, such as IL-2, -12, or -18, and they secrete a large amount of IFN-γ that accelerates Th1-type responses. However, the roles of NK cells in Th2-type responses have remained unclear. Because IL-4 acts as an initiator of Th2-type responses, we examined the characteristics of NK cells in mice overexpressing IL-4. In this study, we report that IL-4 overexpression induces distinctive characteristics of NK cells (B220(high)/CD11b(low)/IL-18Rα(low)), which are different from mature conventional NK (cNK) cells (B220(low)/CD11b(high)/IL-18Rα(high)). IL-4 overexpression induces proliferation of tissue-resident macrophages, which contributes to NK cell proliferation via production of IL-15. These IL-4-induced NK cells (IL4-NK cells) produce higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and GM-CSF, and exhibit high cytotoxicity compared with cNK cells. Furthermore, incubation of cNK cells with IL-15 and IL-4 alters their phenotype to that similar to IL4-NK cells. Finally, parasitic infection, which typically causes strong Th2-type responses, induces the development of NK cells with characteristics similar to IL4-NK cells. These IL4-NK-like cells do not develop in IL-4Rα KO mice by parasitic infection. Collectively, these results suggest a novel role of IL-4 in immune responses through the induction of the unique NK cells. PMID:27551096

  10. Establishing the reference intervals of NK cell functions in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hongyan; Mao, Lie; Wang, Juan; Liu, Weiyong; Lu, Yanfang; Yu, Jing; Zhou, Yu; Mao, Liyan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Ziyong

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in host defense against microbial pathogens. Establishing the reference intervals (RIs) of NK cell functions would be valuable in assessing the immune status of hosts. We evaluated the NK cell activity in healthy adults. We further established and validated the RIs of representative NK cell functions. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate the cytokine production and CD107a degranulation of NK cells. Levels of soluble IFN-γ in the culture supernatants were evaluated by ELISA. Our results demonstrated that the intracellular IFN-γ production of NK cells was positively correlated with CD107a expression and soluble IFN-γ levels. There were no significant differences in NK cell functions between different age and gender groups. The mean values and RIs of representative NK cell functions are as following: IFN-γ(+) NK cells (%): 28.09 (11.3-51.95); CD107a(+) NK cells (%): 17.90 (9.852-27.56); soluble IFN-γ (pg/ml): 330.4 (41.38-717.8). In addition, the intracellular IFN-γ production and degranulation activity of NK cells in patients with colorectal cancer were significantly lower than that in healthy adults. Our study has established the RIs of NK cell functions in healthy adults, which might be used for monitoring the immune status of the hosts. PMID:27236137

  11. The characteristics of NK cells in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mouse spleens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Cha, Hefei; Yu, Xiuxue; Xie, Hongyan; Wu, Changyou; Dong, Nuo; Huang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are classic innate immune cells that play roles in many types of infectious disease. Recently, some new characteristics of NK cells were discovered. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 5-6 weeks and lymphocytes were isolated from the spleen to detect some of the NK cell characteristics by multiparametric flow cytometry. The results revealed that the S. japonicum infection induced a large amount of NK cells, although the percentage of NK cells was not increased significantly. At the same time, the results showed that infected mouse splenic NK cells expressed increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and produced more IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17 and less IFN-γ after stimulation with PMA and ionomycin. This meant that NK cells played a role in S. japonicum infection. Moreover, decreased NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression levels were detected on the surface of NK cells from infected mouse spleens, which might serve as a NK cell activation mechanism. Additionally, high levels of IL-10, but not PD-1, were expressed on the infected mouse NK cells, which implied that functional exhaustion might exist in the splenic NK cells from S. japonicum-infected mice. Collectively, our results suggest that NK cells play important roles in the course of S. japonicum infection. PMID:26319521

  12. Functional NK cell repertoires are maintained through IL-2Rα and FasL

    PubMed Central

    Felices, Martin; Lenvik, Todd R.; Ankarlo, Dave E.M.; Foley, Bree; Curtsinger, Julie; Luo, Xianghua; Blazar, Bruce R.; Anderson, Stephen K.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of a functional natural killer (NK) cell repertoire, known as education or licensing, is a complex process mediated through inhibitory receptors that recognize self. We found that NK cells containing self-killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) for cognate HLA-ligand in vivo were less susceptible to apoptosis. In vitro IL-15 withdrawal showed that uneducated NK cells upregulated Bim and Fas. Conversely, educated NK cells upregulated FasL under these conditions. Induction of cell death and Bim expression on uneducated cells correlated with increased IL-2Rα expression. Overexpression and knockdown studies showed that higher IL-2Rα limits NK cell survival in a novel manner that is independent from the role of IL-2 in activation induced cell death (AICD). To study the role of FasL in induction of IL-2Rαhi NK cell death, a co-culture assay with FasL blocking antibodies was used. IL-15 withdrawal led to FasL dependent killing of IL-2Rαhi NK cells by more educated IL-2Rαlo NK cells. Finally, CMV reactivation induces a potent long-lasting population of licensed NK cells with enhanced survival. These findings show education dependent NK cell survival advantages and killing of uneducated NK result in the maintenance of a functional repertoire, which may be manipulated to exploit NK cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634493

  13. Reduction of the CD16−CD56bright NK Cell Subset Precedes NK Cell Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Shim, Doo Hee; Yang, Chang Mo; Lee, Saet-Byul; Kim, Shi Mun; Shin, Tae Young; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yoon, Ho Geun; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Jae Myun; Hong, Sung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural cytotoxicity, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells plays an important role in the inhibition and elimination of malignant tumor cells. To investigate the immunoregulatory role of NK cells and their potential as diagnostic markers, NK cell activity (NKA) was analyzed in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with particular focus on NK cell subset distribution. Methods Prospective data of NKA and NK cell subset distribution patterns were measured from 51 patients initially diagnosed with PCa and 54 healthy controls. NKA was represented by IFN-γ levels after stimulation of the peripheral blood with Promoca®. To determine the distribution of NK cell subsets, PBMCs were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Then, CD16+CD56dim and CD16−CD56bright cells gated on CD56+CD3− cells were analyzed using a flow-cytometer. Results NKA and the proportion of CD56bright cells were significantly lower in PCa patients compared to controls (430.9 pg/ml vs. 975.2 pg/ml and 2.3% vs. 3.8%, respectively; p<0.001). Both tended to gradually decrease according to cancer stage progression (p for trend = 0.001). A significantly higher CD56dim-to-CD56bright cell ratio was observed in PCa patients (41.8 vs. 30.3; p<0.001) along with a gradual increase according to cancer stage progression (p for trend = 0.001), implying a significant reduction of CD56bright cells in relation to the alteration of CD56dim cells. The sensitivity and the specificity of NKA regarding PCa detection were 72% and 74%, respectively (best cut-off value at 530.9 pg/ml, AUC = 0.786). Conclusions Reduction of CD56bright cells may precede NK cell dysfunction, leading to impaired cytotoxicity against PCa cells. These observations may explain one of the mechanisms behind NK cell dysfunction observed in PCa microenvironment and lend support to the development of future cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:24223759

  14. Biological and Pharmacological Aspects of the NK1-Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Recio, Susana; Gascón, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) is the main receptor for the tachykinin family of peptides. Substance P (SP) is the major mammalian ligand and the one with the highest affinity. SP is associated with multiple processes: hematopoiesis, wound healing, microvasculature permeability, neurogenic inflammation, leukocyte trafficking, and cell survival. It is also considered a mitogen, and it has been associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Tachykinins and their receptors are widely expressed in various human systems such as the nervous, cardiovascular, genitourinary, and immune system. Particularly, NK-1R is found in the nervous system and in peripheral tissues and are involved in cellular responses such as pain transmission, endocrine and paracrine secretion, vasodilation, and modulation of cell proliferation. It also acts as a neuromodulator contributing to brain homeostasis and to sensory neuronal transmission associated with depression, stress, anxiety, and emesis. NK-1R and SP are present in brain regions involved in the vomiting reflex (the nucleus tractus solitarius and the area postrema). This anatomical localization has led to the successful clinical development of antagonists against NK-1R in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The first of these antagonists, aprepitant (oral administration) and fosaprepitant (intravenous administration), are prescribed for high and moderate emesis. PMID:26421291

  15. IRX-2, a novel immunotherapeutic, enhances and protects NK-cell functions in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, B.; Halstead, E. S.; Schuler, P.; Harasymczuk, M.; Egan, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background IRX-2 is a primary biologic which has been used for the therapy of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) with promising clinical results. Since NK-cell function is compromised in HNSCC patients, we tested the effects of IRX-2 on the restoration of human NK-cell functions in vitro. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 23 HNSCC patients and 10 normal controls (NC). The NK-cell phenotype and functions were compared before and after culture ± IRX-2 or ± 50 IU/ml rhIL-2. Flow cytometry was used to study the NK-cell phenotype, cytotoxic activity and cytokine expression. Results Impaired NK-cell cytotoxicity in HNSCC patients was related to lower expression of NKG2D, NKp30 and NKp46 receptors (P < 0.05) and not to a decreased frequency of NK cells. Incubation of patients’ NK cells with IRX-2 up-regulated the percentage of receptor-positive NK cells (P < 0.05). It also up-regulated cytotoxicity of patients’ NK cells (P < 0.01) more effectively than rhIL-2 (P < 0.01). IRX-2, but not rhIL-2, protected NK cells from suppression mediated by TGF-β, and it restored (P < 0.05) expression of activating NK-cell receptors and NK-cell cytotoxicity suppressed by TGF-β. Expression of pSMAD was decreased in NK cells treated with IRX-2 but not in those treated with rhIL-2. Conclusions IRX-2 was more effective than IL-2 in enhancing NK-cell cytotoxicity and protecting NK-cell function of HNSCC patients in vitro, emphasizing the potential advantage of IRX-2 as a component of future therapies for HNSCC. PMID:22270713

  16. Comparison of the phenotype of NK1R-/- mice with pharmacological blockade of the substance P (NK1 ) receptor in assays for antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Carlson, E J; Webb, J K; Harrison, T; Porsolt, R D; Roux, S; de Felipe, C; Hunt, S P; Oates, B; Wheeldon, A

    2001-11-01

    The phenotype of NK1R-/- mice was compared with that of acute pharmacological blockade of the tachykinin NK1 receptor on sensorimotor function and in assays relevant to depressive illness and anxiety. The dose range for L-760735 and GR205171 that was associated with functional blockade of central NK1 receptors in the target species was established by antagonism of the behavioural effects of intracerebroventricular NK1 agonist challenge in gerbils, mice and rats. The caudal grooming and scratching response to GR73632 was absent in NK1R-/- mice, confirming that the receptor had been genetically ablated. There was no evidence of sedation or motor impairment in NK1R-/- mice or following administration of L-760735 to gerbils, even at doses in excess of those required for central NK1 receptor occupancy. In the resident-intruder and forced swim test, the behaviour of NK1R-/- mice, or animals treated acutely with L-760735 or GR205171, resembled that seen with the clinically used antidepressant drug fluoxetine. However, the effects of GR205171 were not clearly enantioselective in mice. In contrast, although NK1R-/- mice also exhibited an increase in the duration of struggle behaviour in the tail suspension test, this was not observed following pharmacological blockade with L-760735 in gerbils or GR205171 in mice, suggesting that this may reflect a developmental alteration in the knockout mouse. There was no effect of NK1 receptor blockade with L-760735 in guinea-pigs or GR205171 in rats, or deletion of the NK1 receptor in mice, on behaviour in the elevated plus-maze test for anxiolytic activity. These findings extend previous observations on the phenotype of the NK1R-/- mouse and establish a broadly similar profile following acute pharmacological blockade of the receptor. These studies also serve to underscore the limitations of currently available antagonists that are suitable for use in rat and mouse behavioural assays. PMID:11742144

  17. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T; Higano, Celestia S; Plymate, Stephen R; Greenberg, Norman M; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D

    2013-10-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of "humanized" bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in "humanized" mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  18. NK cell killing of AML and ALL blasts by Killer-Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) negative NK cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H.; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R.; McGlave, Philip B.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Although NK cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of KIR, we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53±13% and 36±18% of normal NK cells, plays a role in NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR− cells, which comprise nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibited tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both AML and ALL targets could be rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR− NK cells when inhibitory receptor-MHC class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies demonstrating that these cells were functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slight increases in killing, while combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR− NK cells showing that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR− NK cells is determined by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemia. PMID:20139023

  19. Absence of circulating natural killer (NK) cells in a child with erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis lacking NK cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, H.; Komiyama, A.; Aoyama, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1988-06-01

    A 5-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis died at age 9 years. Peripheral lymphocytes from the patient persistently lacked natural killer (NK) cell activity during the 4-year observation period: the percent lysis values as measured by a 4-hr /sup 51/Cr release assay at a 40:1 effector:target ratio were below 1.0% against K562 and Molt-4 cells as compared with the normal lymphocyte value (mean +/- SD) of 46.2% +/- 5.8% and 43.9% +/- 6.7%, respectively. The patient's lymphocytes never developed NK cell activity by their incubation with target cells for longer time periods or by their stimulation with interferon-alpha, interleukin-2, or polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid. Single cell-in-agarose assay showed the absence of target-binding cells (TBCs): TBC numbers were below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 8.1% +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SD). Flow cytometry showed a marked decrease in Leu-7+ cells (1.7%) and the absence of Leu-11+ cells (0.4%) in the peripheral blood. These results first demonstrate a case of erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in which there is the lack of NK cell activity due to the absence of circulating NK cells.

  20. Expansion of NK Cells Using Genetically Engineered K562 Feeder Cells.

    PubMed

    Phan, Minh-Trang Thi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Ki; Cho, Duck

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can be expanded upon activation by proliferative cytokines (such as IL-2 and IL-15). The NK cell expansion can be greatly enhanced by proteins from feeder cells such as tumor cell lines or PBMCs. Therefore, coculture systems of irradiated feeder cells and NK cells in media containing IL-2 and IL-15 have been developed to generate large numbers of NK cells, although NK cell expansion protocol using anti-CD3 antibody (OKT-3) without feeder cells has also been developed. Commonly used feeder cell lines are RPMI8866, Epstein-Barr lymphoblastoid cell line (EBV-LCL), and K562. Stimulation with NK-sensitive K562 cells is known to augment NK cell proliferation to IL-2, IL-15, and IL-21 in combination.Recently, remarkable NK cell-expansion rates are achieved when genetically engineered (GE) feeder cells are used. Dr. Dario Campana's group found that membrane-bound IL-15 and 4-1BBL, coexpressed by K562 cells, acted synergistically to augment K562-specific NK stimulatory capacity, resulting in vigorous expansion of peripheral blood CD56(+) CD3(-) NK cells without concomitant growth of T lymphocytes. Here, we describe an in vitro expansion method of human NK cells among PBMCs by coculturing with GE_K562 cells. PMID:27177665

  1. Licensed and Unlicensed NK Cells: Differential Roles in Cancer and Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Megan M.; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I – which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy – as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the “licensing” hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors – Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans – and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans, which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially “unlicensed.” While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors. PMID:27199990

  2. Licensed and Unlicensed NK Cells: Differential Roles in Cancer and Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Tu, Megan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I - which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy - as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the "licensing" hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors - Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans - and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans, which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially "unlicensed." While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors. PMID:27199990

  3. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine. PMID:26810567

  4. Uterine NK cells: active regulators at the maternal-fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy presents an immunological conundrum because two genetically different individuals coexist. The maternal lymphocytes at the uterine maternal-fetal interface that can recognize mismatched placental cells are T cells and abundant distinctive uterine NK (uNK) cells. Multiple mechanisms exist that avoid damaging T cell responses to the fetus, whereas activation of uNK cells is probably physiological. Indeed, genetic epidemiological data suggest that the variability of NK cell receptors and their MHC ligands define pregnancy success; however, exactly how uNK cells function in normal and pathological pregnancy is still unclear, and any therapies aimed at suppressing NK cells must be viewed with caution. Allorecognition of fetal placental cells by uNK cells is emerging as the key maternal-fetal immune mechanism that regulates placentation. PMID:24789879

  5. CD52-Negative NK Cells Are Abundant in the Liver and Less Susceptible to Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Muraoka, Izumi; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Ruiz, Phillip; Ricordi, Camillo; Vianna, Rodrigo; Ohdan, Hideki; Waldmann, Herman; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cell depleting strategies have become an integral part of immunosuppressive regimens in organ transplantation. Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, a cell-surface antigen on several immune cells. It has been suggested that lymphocyte depletion increases the risk of serious infections. However, this has not been observed with short-term alemtuzumab treatment in an organ transplant setting. For induction therapy using alemtuzumab following liver transplantation, we found that T- and B-cell numbers declined rapidly after alemtuzumab therapy; however, the natural killer (NK) cell number was sustained. NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity. Since the effects of alemtuzumab on NK cell functions, especially those of liver NK cells, are unknown, this study aimed to investigate this in detail. Methods To assess the effect of alemtuzumab on NK cells, samples were obtained from 7 organ donors and examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Phenotypical and functional differences within subsets of NK cells with different levels of CD52 expression were determined by flow cytometry and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Results CD52 expression on NK cells was lower than that on other lymphocyte subsets. The liver contained a large number of CD52− NK cells compared with the peripheral blood. In vitro treatment of liver-derived NK cells with alemtuzumab did not result in cell death. In contrast, co-incubation with alemtuzumab induced cell death in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and non-NK cells in the liver. Furthermore, CD52− liver NK cells were more cytotoxic and produced more IFN-γ than CD52+ NK cells after cytokine activation. Conclusion The liver contains a large number of CD52− NK cells. These cells are refractory to alemtuzumab and have robust activity. These findings indicate that CD52− NK cells persist and could protect against infection after alemtuzumab-based lymphocyte depletion. PMID

  6. MicroRNA transcriptomes of distinct human NK cell populations identify miR-362-5p as an essential regulator of NK cell function

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Fang; Guo, Chuang; Sun, Rui; Fu, Binqing; Yang, Yue; Wu, Lele; Ren, Sitong; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are critical effectors in the immune response against malignancy and infection, and microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in NK cell biology. Here we examined miRNA profiles of human NK cells from different cell compartments (peripheral blood, cord blood, and uterine deciduas) and of NKT and T cells from peripheral blood, and we identified a novel miRNA, miR-362-5p, that is highly expressed in human peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells. We also demonstrated that CYLD, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling, was a target of miR-362-5p in NK cells. Furthermore, we showed that the over-expression of miR-362-5p enhanced the expression of IFN-γ, perforin, granzyme-B, and CD107a in human primary NK cells, and we found that silencing CYLD with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) mirrored the effect of miR-362-5p over-expression. In contrast, the inhibition of miR-362-5p had the opposite effect in NK cells, which was abrogated by CYLD siRNA, suggesting that miR-362-5p promotes NK-cell function, at least in part, by the down-regulation of CYLD. These results provide a resource for studying the roles of miRNAs in human NK cell biology and contribute to a better understanding of the physiologic significance of miRNAs in the regulation of NK cell function. PMID:25909817

  7. Multifocal primary cutaneous extranodal NK/T lymphoma nasal type*

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Pedro; Ferreira, Cristina; Soares-Almeida, Luís; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity according to the World Health Organization classification. Although 60% to 90% of patients with this disease present with a destructive mass in the midline facial tissues, it may also primarily or secondarily involve extranasal sites, like the skin. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient that came to our department with erythematous plaques of the right leg and eczematous lesions of the trunk. These lesions were biopsied and the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. He was treated with multi-agent systemic chemotherapy but died 5 months after diagnosis. This case highlights the rarity and variability of cutaneous features of this disease and its aggressive course and poor prognosis. PMID:27192524

  8. Rational design of high affinity tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S; Guard, S; Higginbottom, M; Horwell, D C; Howson, W; McKnight, A T; Martin, K; Pritchard, M C; O'Toole, J; Raphy, J

    1994-05-01

    The rational design of a non-peptide tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, [(2-benzofuran)-CH2OCO]-(R)-alpha-MeTrp-(S)-NHCH(CH3)P h (28, PD 154075) is described. Compound 28 has a Ki = 9 and 0.35 nM for the NK1 receptor binding site in guinea-pig cerebral cortex membranes and human IM9, cells respectively (using [125I] Bolton-Hunter-SP as the radioligand). It is a potent antagonist in vitro where it antagonises the contractions mediated by SPOMe in the guinea-pig ileum (KB = 0.3 nM). Compound 28 is active in vivo in the guinea-pig plasma extravasation model, where it is able to block the SPOMe-induced protein plasma extravasation (monitored by Evans Blue) in the bladder with an ID50 of 0.02 mg kg-1 iv. PMID:7922147

  9. Proapoptotic Bim regulates antigen-specific NK cell contraction and the generation of the memory NK cell pool after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Bezman, Natalie A; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2014-06-30

    Apoptosis is critical for the elimination of activated lymphocytes after viral infection. Proapoptotic factor Bim (Bcl2l11) controls T lymphocyte contraction and the formation of memory T cells after infection. Natural killer (NK) cells also undergo antigen-driven expansion to become long-lived memory cells after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection; therefore, we examined the role of Bim in regulating the MCMV-driven memory NK cell pool. Despite responding similarly early after infection, Bcl2l11(-/-) Ly49H(+) NK cells show impaired contraction and significantly outnumber wild-type (WT) cells after the expansion phase. The inability to reduce the effector pool leads to a larger Bcl2l11(-/-) NK memory subset, which displays a less mature phenotype (CD11b(lo), CD27(+)) and lower levels of NK cell memory-associated markers KLRG1 and Ly6C. Bcl2l11(-/-) memory NK cells demonstrate a reduced response to m157-mediated stimulation and do not protect as effectively as WT memory NK cells in an MCMV challenge model. Thus, Bim-mediated apoptosis drives selective contraction of effector NK cells to generate a pool of mature, MCMV-specific memory cells. PMID:24958849

  10. Enhancement of anti-leukemia activity of NK cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibition of leukemia cell-induced NK cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Arriga, Roberto; Caratelli, Sara; Coppola, Andrea; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Venditti, Adriano; Amadori, Sergio; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Palomba, Patrizia; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Capuani, Barbara; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induce, in vitro, NK cell abnormalities (NKCAs) including apoptosis and activating receptor down-regulation. The potential negative impact of AML cells on the therapeutic efficacy of NK cell-based strategies prompted us to analyze the mechanisms underlying NKCAs and to develop approaches to protect NK cells from NKCAs. NKCA induction by the AML leukemia cells target a subpopulation of peripheral blood NK cells and is interleukin-2 independent but is abrogated by a long-term culture of NK (LTNK) cells at 37°C. LTNK cells displayed a significantly enhanced ability to damage AML cells in vitro and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of ML-2 cells grafted into CB17 SCID mice. Actinomycin D restored the susceptibility of LTNK cells to NKCAs while TAPI-0, a functional analog of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3, inhibits ML-2 cell-induced NKCAs suggesting that the generation of NK cell resistance to NKCAs involves RNA transcription and metalloproteinase (MPP) inactivation. This conclusion is supported by the reduced susceptibility to AML cell-induced NKCAs of LTNK cells in which TIMP3 gene and protein are over-expressed. This information may contribute to the rational design of targeted strategies to enhance the efficacy of NK cell-based-immunotherapy of AML with haploidentical NK cells. PMID:26655503

  11. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  12. Modification of Expanded NK Cells with Chimeric Antigen Receptor mRNA for Adoptive Cellular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yaya; Flower, Allyson; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are bone marrow-derived cytotoxic lymphocytes that play a major role in the rejection of tumors and cells infected by viruses. The regulation of NK activation vs inhibition is regulated by the expression of a variety of NK receptors (NKRs) and specific NKRs' ligands expressed on their targets. However, factors limiting NK therapy include small numbers of active NK cells in unexpanded peripheral blood and lack of specific tumor targeting. Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) usually include a single-chain Fv variable fragment from a monoclonal antibody, a transmembrane hinge region, and a signaling domain such as CD28, CD3-zeta, 4-1BB (CD137), or 2B4 (CD244) endodimers. Redirecting NK cells with a CAR will circumvent the limitations of the lack of NK targeting specificity. This chapter focuses on the methods to expand human NK cells from peripheral blood by co-culturing with feeder cells and to modify the expanded NK cells efficiently with the in vitro transcribed CAR mRNA by electroporation and to test the functionality of the CAR-modified expanded NK cells for use in adoptive cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27177669

  13. The nature of the natural killer (NK) cell of human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; Jewell, D P

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of the mononuclear cell (MNC) from human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node mediating anti-K-562 activity with that of peripheral blood has been assessed. Depletion of macrophages did not alter the measured cytotoxicity confirming that the effector cells were lymphocytes. Complement lysis of Leu 7 and Leu 11b coated cells reduced intestinal natural killer (NK) activity by a similar degree to that of peripheral blood but mesenteric lymph node NK activity was affected to a lesser extent. The response in NK activity of mucosal and nodal MNC to short incubation with lymphoblastoid interferon was similar to that for peripheral blood MNC. Twenty-four hours incubation of MNC with low concentrations of purified interleukin-2 (IL-2) consistently augmented intestinal and nodal NK activity but failed to augment that of peripheral blood MNC. No differences between the inhibitory effects of cAMP and prostaglandin E2 on NK activity from the three sites were seen. In addition, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase activity with indomethacin had no effect on NK activity of intestinal and peripheral blood MNC while the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, suppressed intestinal and peripheral blood NK activity similarly. In conclusion, anti-K-562 activity by intestinal MNC is mediated by NK cells with similar phenotypic and functional properties to those of peripheral blood. However, the increased sensitivity of mucosal NK cells to IL-2 suggests that higher proportions of NK cell precursors may be present in intestinal MNC populations. PMID:2412737

  14. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner. PMID:27521338

  15. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated “Missing-Self” Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells’ ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated “missing-self” reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors. PMID:27054584

  16. NK Cell Subgroups, Phenotype, and Functions After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Benedikt; Tognarelli, Sara; Poller, Kerstin; Bader, Peter; Mackensen, Andreas; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with consecutive autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) is a well-established treatment option for patients suffering from malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Natural killer (NK) cells are an important part of the immune surveillance, and their cell number after autoSCT is predictive for progression-free and overall survival. To improve knowledge about the role of NK cells after autoSCT, we investigated different NK cell subgroups, their phenotype, and their functions in patients treated with autoSCT. Directly after leukocyte regeneration (>1000 leukocytes/μl) following autoSCT, CD56++ NK cells were the major NK cell subset. Surprisingly, these cells showed unusually high surface expression levels of CD57 and killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) compared to expression levels before or at later time points after autoSCT. Moreover, these NK cells strongly upregulated KIR2DL2/3/S2 and KIR3DL1, whereas KIR2DL1/S1 remained constant, indicating that this cell population arose from more immature NK cells instead of from activated mature ones. Remarkably, NK cells were already able to degranulate and produce IFN-γ and MIP-1β upon tumor interaction early after leukocyte regeneration. In conclusion, we describe an unusual upregulation of CD57 and KIRs on CD56++ NK cells shortly after autoSCT. Importantly, these NK cells were functionally competent upon tumor interaction at this early time point. PMID:26635797

  17. NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy: from basic biology to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yin, Jie; Li, Ting; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Leavenworth, JianMei; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize and kill target cells independent of antigen specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, play pivotal roles in immune defence against tumors. However, tumor cells often acquire the ability to escape NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Thus, understanding mechanisms underlying regulation of NK cell phenotype and function within the tumor environment is instrumental for designing new approaches to improve the current cell-based immunotherapy. In this review, we elaborate the main biological features and molecular mechanisms of NK cells that pertain to regulation of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. We further overview current clinical approaches regarding NK cell-based cancer therapy, including cytokine infusion, adoptive transfer of autologous or allogeneic NK cells, applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing NK cells and adoptive transfer of memory-like NK cells. With these promising clinical outcomes and fuller understanding the basic questions raised in this review, we foresee that NK cell-based approaches may hold great potential for future cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26588912

  18. Transcription factor KLF2 regulates homeostatic NK cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Rabacal, Whitney; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Hoek, Kristen L; Cendron, Delphine; Guo, Yin; Maseda, Damian; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-05-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and lyse virally infected or transformed cells. This latter property is being pursued in clinics to treat leukemia with the hope that further breakthroughs in NK cell biology can extend treatments to other cancers. At issue is the ability to expand transferred NK cells and prolong their functionality within the context of a tumor. In terms of NK cell expansion and survival, we now report that Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a key transcription factor that underpins both of these events. Excision of Klf2 using gene-targeted mouse models promotes spontaneous proliferation of immature NK cells in peripheral tissues, a phenotype that is replicated under ex vivo conditions. Moreover, KLF2 imprints a homeostatic migration pattern on mature NK cells that allows these cells to access IL-15-rich microenvironments. KLF2 accomplishes this feat within the mature NK cell lineage via regulation of a subset of homing receptors that respond to homeostatic ligands while leaving constitutively expressed receptors that recognize inflammatory cytokines unperturbed. Under steady-state conditions, KLF2-deficient NK cells alter their expression of homeostatic homing receptors and subsequently undergo apoptosis due to IL-15 starvation. This novel mechanism has implications regarding NK cell contraction following the termination of immune responses including the possibility that retention of an IL-15 transpresenting support system is key to extending NK cell activity in a tumor environment. PMID:27114551

  19. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  20. NK cell regulation of CD4 T cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Hazzan, Marc; Weatherly, Kathleen; Gaudray, Florence; Salmon, Isabelle; Braun, Michel Y

    2010-06-15

    CD3-negative NK cells are granular lymphocytes capable of producing inflammatory cytokines and killing malignant, infected, or stressed cells. We have recently observed a new role for NK cells in the control of the proliferation of CD4 T cells under persistent antigenic stimulation. Monoclonal anti-male CD4 T cells transferred into Rag2-/- male recipients did not expand or were rapidly eliminated. Remarkably, T cells transferred into NK cell-deficient Rag2-/- Il-2Rgammac-/- male hosts expanded extensively and mediated tissue lesions usually observed in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). T cell failure to proliferate and to induce chronic GVHD was the result of NK cell activity, because depletion of the recipient's NK1.1+ cells by Ab treatment induced T cell expansion and chronic GVHD. T cells under chronic Ag stimulation upregulated ligands of the activating receptor NKG2D, and regulatory activity of NK cells was inhibited by the injection of Abs directed to NKG2D. On the contrary, blocking NKG2A inhibitory receptors did not increase NK cell regulatory activity. Finally, we show that NK regulation of T cell expansion did not involve perforin-mediated lytic activity of NK cells, but depended on T cell surface expression of a functional Fas molecule. These results highlight the potential role played by NK cells in controlling the Ag-specific CD4+ T cells responsible for chronic GVHD. PMID:20488796

  1. [THE TECHNQUE OF FLOW CYTOMETRY IN EVALUATION OF NK-CELLS AND THEIR ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Abakushina, E V

    2015-11-01

    The review presents main characteristics of human natural killer cells (NK-cells), their phenotype and methods of detection of functional activities using flow cytometry. The NK-cells play important role in inherent and adaptive immunity against infections and tumors. Initially these cells were characterized on the basis of capacity to lyse malignant and infected cells without preliminary sensibilization or immunization. The human NK-cells have phenotype CD3-CD56+CD16+ and can be separated in two subpopulations depending on level of expression CD56. The CD56 bright NK-cells predominantly participates immuno-regulation producing cytokines. The CD56dim NK-cells predominantly have cytolytic activity. The NK-cells mediate destruction of infected and neoplastic cells through several effector mechanisms: by means of perforins/granzyme containing granules, receptors of apoptosis, antibody-depended cellular mediated cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicicty of NK-cells and production of cytokines provide regulatory role of NK-cells as important participants of adaptive immune system. The NK-cells are fitted with various receptors stimulating and inhibiting their activity. The activation of NK-cells depends on balance between inhibiting and activating receptors. The activation of NK-cells depends on balance between inhibiting and activating receptors. "The golden standard" of detection offunctional activity of human NK-cells is a test of releasing of radioactive chrome from target cells. To apply this technique in clinical practice is not an easy task because of difficulties of utilization of radioactive waste products, short half lifetime, expensiveness and complicated standardization. The article presents cyto-fluorimetric techniques for clinical detection of activity of NK-cells. These techniques permit to avoid a number of problems related to application of radioactivity. They also are fast and can be standardized. PMID:26999864

  2. Genetic deletion of Cxcl14 in mice alters uterine NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qichen; Chen, Hua; Deng, Zhili; Yue, Jingwen; Chen, Qi; Cao, Yujing; Ning, Lina; Lei, Xiaohua; Duan, Enkui

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •We first examined the expression of Cxcl14 in MLAp and DB of uterus. •We found the uNK cells in MLAp and decidua express Cxcl14. •In Cxcl14{sup −/−} placenta, we found significantly decreased uNK cells. •We first performed microarray to compare the gene expression in MLAp and DB. -- Abstract: The uterine natural killer cells (uNK cells) are the major immune cells in pregnant uterus and the number of uNK cells is dramatically increased during placentation and embryo development. The uNK cells are necessary for the immune tolerance, cytokine secretion and angiogenesis of placenta. Former studies indicated that the population expansion of uNK cells was accomplished through recruitment of NK cell precursors from the spleen and bone marrow, but not proliferation of NK cells. However, the necessary molecules within this process were little understood. Here in our study, we found the co-localized expression of Cxcl14 protein with uNK cells in E13.5 pregnant uterus. Moreover, we used Cxcl14 knockout mice to examine uNK cells in mesometrial lymphoid aggregate of pregnancy (MLAp) and decidua basalis (DB) of E13.5 pregnant uterus and found significantly decreased uNK cells in Cxcl14{sup −/−} pregnant uteri compared with Cxcl14{sup +/−} pregnant uteri. To further explorer the molecular change in MLAp and DB after Cxcl14 knockout, we isolated the MLAp and DB from Cxcl14{sup +/+} and Cxcl14{sup −/−} pregnant uteri and performed microarray analysis. We found many genes were up and down regulated after Cxcl14 knockout. In conclusion, our results suggested the important function of Cxcl14 in uNK cells and the proper level of Cxcl14 protein were required to recruit NK cells to pregnant uterus.

  3. NK Cell-based Immunotherapies in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Kimberly A.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; DeSantes, Kenneth B.; Capitini, Christian M.; Otto, Mario; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen several anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies transition from “promising preclinical models” to treatments with proven clinical activity or benefit. In 2013, the journal Science selected the field of Cancer Immunotherapy as the overall number-1 breakthrough for the year in all of scientific research. In the setting of cancer immunotherapy for adult malignancies, many of these immunotherapy strategies have relied on the cancer patient’s endogenous anti-tumor T cell response. While much promising research in pediatric oncology is similarly focused on T cell reactivity, several pediatric malignancies themselves, or the chemo-radiotherapy used to achieve initial responses, can be associated with profound immune suppression, particularly of the T cell system. A separate component of the immune system, also able to mediate anti-tumor effects and less suppressed by conventional cancer treatment, is the NK cell system. In recent years, several distinct immunotherapeutic approaches that rely on the activity of NK cells have moved from preclinical development into clinical testing, and some have shown clear antitumor benefit. This review provides an overview of NK cell-based immunotherapy efforts that are directed towards childhood malignancies, with an emphasis on protocols that are already in clinical testing. PMID:25590232

  4. Cancer-Induced Alterations of NK-Mediated Target Recognition: Current and Investigational Pharmacological Strategies Aiming at Restoring NK-Mediated Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Le Roy, Aude; Vey, Norbert; Prebet, Thomas; Blaise, Didier; Fauriat, Cyril; Olive, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence of cancer immune-surveillance, which plays a key role in tumor rejection, cancer cells can escape immune recognition through different mechanisms. Thus, evasion to Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated anti-tumor activity is commonly described and is mediated by various mechanisms, mainly cancer cell-induced down-regulation of NK-activating receptors (NCRs, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and CD16) as well as up-regulation of inhibitory receptors (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, KIRs, NKG2A). Alterations of NK cells lead to an impaired recognition of tumor cells as well as a decreased ability to interact with immune cells. Alternatively, cancer cells downregulate expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors and up-regulate expression of the ligands for inhibitory receptors. A better knowledge of the extent and the mechanisms of these defects will allow developing pharmacological strategies to restore NK cell ability to recognize and lyse tumor cells. Combining conventional chemotherapy and immune modulation is a promising approach likely to improve clinical outcome in diverse neoplastic malignancies. Here, we overview experimental approaches as well as strategies already available in the clinics that restore NK cell functionality. Yet successful cancer therapies based on the manipulation of NK cell already have shown efficacy in the context of hematologic malignancies. Additionally, the ability of cytotoxic agents to increase susceptibility of tumors to NK cell lysis has been studied and may require improvement to maximize this effect. More recently, new strategies were developed to specifically restore NK cell phenotype or to stimulate NK cell functions. Overall, pharmacological immune modulation trends to be integrated in therapeutic strategies and should improve anti-tumor effects of conventional cancer therapy. PMID:24715892

  5. “Natural Regulators”: NK Cells as Modulators of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Andoniou, Christopher E.; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known as frontline responders capable of rapidly mediating a response upon encountering transformed or infected cells. Recent findings indicate that NK cells, in addition to acting as innate effectors, can also regulate adaptive immune responses. Here, we review recent studies on the immunoregulatory function of NK cells with a specific focus on their ability to affect the generation of early, as well as long-term antiviral T cell responses, and their role in modulating immune pathology and disease. In addition, we summarize the current knowledge of the factors governing regulatory NK cell responses and discuss origin, tissue specificity, and open questions about the classification of regulatory NK cells as classical NK cells versus group 1 innate lymphoid cells. PMID:27379097

  6. Revisiting the Prominent Anti-Tumoral Potential of Pre-mNK Cells.

    PubMed

    Guimont-Desrochers, Fanny; Lesage, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) were first described for their outstanding anti-tumoral properties. The "IKDC" terminology implied the description of a novel DC subset and initiated a debate on their cellular lineage origin. This debate shifted the focus away from their notable anti-tumoral potential. IKDC were recently redefined as precursors to mature NK (mNK) cells and consequently renamed pre-mNK cells. Importantly, a putative human equivalent of pre-mNK cells was recently associated with improved disease outcome in cancer patients. It is thus timely to revisit the functional attributes as well as the therapeutic potential of pre-mNK cells in line with their newly defined NK-cell precursor function. PMID:24376447

  7. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a

    PubMed Central

    Grauwet, K.; Vitale, M.; De Pelsmaeker, S.; Jacob, T.; Laval, K.; Moretta, L.; Parodi, M.; Parolini, S.; Cantoni, C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The

  8. Escape of HIV-1-infected dendritic cells from TRAIL-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity during NK-DC cross-talk--a pivotal role of HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Saïdi, Héla; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2010-04-01

    Early stages of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection are associated with local recruitment and activation of important effectors of innate immunity, i.e. natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs (iDCs) capture HIV-1 through specific receptors and can disseminate the infection to lymphoid tissues following their migration, which is associated to a maturation process. This process is dependent on NK cells, whose role is to keep in check the quality and the quantity of DCs undergoing maturation. If DC maturation is inappropriate, NK cells will kill them ("editing process") at sites of tissue inflammation, thus optimizing the adaptive immunity. In the context of a viral infection, NK-dependent killing of infected-DCs is a crucial event required for early elimination of infected target cells. Here, we report that NK-mediated editing of iDCs is impaired if DCs are infected with HIV-1. We first addressed the question of the mechanisms involved in iDC editing, and we show that cognate NK-iDC interaction triggers apoptosis via the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-Death Receptor 4 (DR4) pathway and not via the perforin pathway. Nevertheless, once infected with HIV-1, DC(HIV) become resistant to NK-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This resistance occurs despite normal amounts of TRAIL released by NK cells and comparable DR4 expression on DC(HIV). The escape of DC(HIV) from NK killing is due to the upregulation of two anti-apoptotic molecules, the cellular-Flice like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (c-IAP2), induced by NK-DC(HIV) cognate interaction. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an alarmin and a key mediator of NK-DC cross-talk, was found to play a pivotal role in NK-dependent upregulation of c-FLIP and c-IAP2 in DC(HIV). Finally, we demonstrate that restoration of DC(HIV) susceptibility to NK-induced TRAIL killing can be obtained either by silencing c-FLIP and c-IAP2 by specific si

  9. (19)F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Ludwig, Kai D; Gordon, Jeremy W; Kutz, Matthew P; Bednarz, Bryan P; Fain, Sean B; Capitini, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 ((19)F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of (19)F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL (19)F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL (19)F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL (19)F. Higher doses of (19)F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved (19)F signal by MRI with 3 × 10(11) (19)F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL (19)F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. (19)F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When (19)F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The (19)F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  10. The transcription factor E4BP4 is not required for extramedullary pathways of NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Crotta, Stefania; Gkioka, Annita; Male, Victoria; Duarte, João H; Davidson, Sophia; Nisoli, Ilaria; Brady, Hugh J M; Wack, Andreas

    2014-03-15

    NK cells contribute to antitumor and antiviral immunosurveillance. Their development in the bone marrow (BM) requires the transcription factor E4BP4/NFIL3, but requirements in other organs are less well defined. In this study, we show that CD3(-)NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CD122(+) NK cells of immature phenotype and expressing low eomesodermin levels are found in thymus, spleen, and liver of E4BP4-deficient mice, whereas numbers of mature, eomesodermin(high) conventional NK cells are drastically reduced. E4BP4-deficient CD44(+)CD25(-) double-negative 1 thymocytes efficiently develop in vitro into NK cells with kinetics, phenotype, and functionality similar to wild-type controls, whereas no NK cells develop from E4BP4-deficient BM precursors. In E4BP4/Rag-1 double-deficient (DKO) mice, NK cells resembling those in Rag-1-deficient controls are found in similar numbers in the thymus and liver. However, NK precursors are reduced in DKO BM, and no NK cells develop from DKO BM progenitors in vitro. DKO thymocyte precursors readily develop into NK cells, but DKO BM transfers into nude recipients and NK cells in E4BP4/Rag-1/IL-7 triple-KO mice indicated thymus-independent NK cell development. In the presence of T cells or E4BP4-sufficient NK cells, DKO NK cells have a selective disadvantage, and thymic and hepatic DKO NK cells show reduced survival when adoptively transferred into lymphopenic hosts. This correlates with higher apoptosis rates and lower responsiveness to IL-15 in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrate E4BP4-independent development of NK cells of immature phenotype, reduced fitness, short t1/2, and potential extramedullary origin. Our data identify E4BP4-independent NK cell developmental pathways and a role for E4BP4 in NK cell homeostasis. PMID:24534532

  11. NK Cells during Dengue Disease and Their Recognition of Dengue Virus-Infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Davis; López-Vergès, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune response, in addition to the B- and T-cell response, plays a role in protection against dengue virus (DENV) infection and the degree of disease severity. Early activation of natural killer (NK) cells and type-I interferon-dependent immunity may be important in limiting viral replication during the early stages of DENV infection and thus reducing subsequent pathogenesis. NK cells may also produce cytokines that reduce inflammation and tissue injury. On the other hand, NK cells are also capable of inducing liver injury at early-time points of DENV infection. In vitro, NK cells can kill antibody-coated DENV-infected cells through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, NK cells may directly recognize DENV-infected cells through their activating receptors, although the increase in HLA class I expression may allow infected cells to escape the NK response. Recently, genome-wide association studies have shown an association between MICB and MICA, which encode ligands of the activating NK receptor NKG2D, and dengue disease outcome. This review focuses on recognition of DENV-infected cells by NK cells and on the regulation of expression of NK cell ligands by DENV. PMID:24829565

  12. NKp46 Clusters at the Immune Synapse and Regulates NK Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Uzi; Thauland, Timothy J.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Butte, Manish J.; Porgador, Angel; Krams, Sheri M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in first-line defense against tumor and virus-infected cells. The activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a repertoire of cell surface expressed inhibitory and activating receptors. NKp46 is a major NK cell-activating receptor that is involved in the elimination of target cells. NK cells form different types of synapses that result in distinct functional outcomes: cytotoxic, inhibitory, and regulatory. Recent studies revealed that complex integration of NK receptor signaling controls cytoskeletal rearrangement and other immune synapse-related events. However, the distinct nature by which NKp46 participates in NK immunological synapse formation and function remains unknown. In this study, we determined that NKp46 forms microclusters structures at the immune synapse between NK cells and target cells. Over-expression of human NKp46 is correlated with increased accumulation of F-actin mesh at the immune synapse. Concordantly, knock-down of NKp46 in primary human NK cells decreased recruitment of F-actin to the synapse. Live cell imaging experiments showed a linear correlation between NKp46 expression and lytic granules polarization to the immune synapse. Taken together, our data suggest that NKp46 signaling directly regulates the NK lytic immune synapse from early formation to late function. PMID:26441997

  13. Critical Role of Tumor Microenvironment in Shaping NK Cell Functions: Implication of Hypoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hasmim, Meriem; Messai, Yosra; Ziani, Linda; Thiery, Jerome; Bouhris, Jean-Henri; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Chouaib, Salem

    2015-01-01

    Blurring the boundary between innate and adaptive immune system, natural killer (NK) cells, a key component of the innate immunity, are recognized as potent anticancer mediators. Extensive studies have been detailed on how NK cells get activated and recognize cancer cells. In contrast, few studies have been focused on how tumor microenvironment-mediated immunosubversion and immunoselection of tumor-resistant variants may impair NK cell function. Accumulating evidences indicate that several cell subsets (macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressive cells, T regulatory cells, dendritic cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts, and tumor cells), their secreted factors, as well as metabolic components (i.e., hypoxia) have immunosuppressive roles in the tumor microenvironment and are able to condition NK cells to become anergic. In this review, we will describe how NK cells react with different stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. This will be followed by a discussion on the role of hypoxic stress in the regulation of NK cell functions. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the tumor microenvironment impairs NK cell functions, thereby limiting the use of NK cell-based therapy, and we will attempt to suggest more efficient tools to establish a more favorable tumor microenvironment to boost NK cell cytotoxicity and control tumor progression. PMID:26441986

  14. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic. PMID:26113846

  15. Repression of GSK3 restores NK cell cytotoxicity in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Moreton, Stephen A.; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hou, Yongchun; Lee, Dean A.; Gupta, Kalpana; deLima, Marcos; Beck, Rose C.; Wald, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients (AML-NK) show a dramatic impairment in cytotoxic activity. The exact reasons for this dysfunction are not fully understood. Here we show that the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) expression is elevated in AML-NK cells. Interestingly, GSK3 overexpression in normal NK cells impairs their ability to kill AML cells, while genetic or pharmacological GSK3 inactivation enhances their cytotoxic activity. Mechanistic studies reveal that the increased cytotoxic activity correlates with an increase in AML-NK cell conjugates. GSK3 inhibition promotes the conjugate formation by upregulating LFA expression on NK cells and by inducing ICAM-1 expression on AML cells. The latter is mediated by increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α production by NK cells. Finally, GSK3-inhibited NK cells show significant efficacy in human AML mouse models. Overall, our work provides mechanistic insights into the AML-NK dysfunction and a potential NK cell therapy strategy. PMID:27040177

  16. FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Huang, Guanling; Zhu, Pingping; Liu, Jing; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert a crucial role in early immune responses as a major innate effector component. However, the underlying mechanisms of NK cell development remain largely elusive. Here we show that robust autophagy appears in the stage of immature NK cells (iNKs), which is required for NK cell development. Autophagy defects result in damaged mitochondria and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that leads to apoptosis of NK cells. Autophagy protects NK cell viability during development through removal of damaged mitochondria and intracellular ROS. Phosphorylated Forkhead box O (FoxO)1 is located to the cytoplasm of iNKs and interacts with Atg7, leading to induction of autophagy. FoxO1 deficiency or an inactive FoxO1(AAA) mutant abrogates autophagy initiation in iNKs and impairs NK cell development and viral clearance. Therefore we conclude that FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and NK cell-induced innate immunity. PMID:27010363

  17. Microchip Screening Platform for Single Cell Assessment of NK Cell Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guldevall, Karolin; Brandt, Ludwig; Forslund, Elin; Olofsson, Karl; Frisk, Thomas W.; Olofsson, Per E.; Gustafsson, Karin; Manneberg, Otto; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Brismar, Hjalmar; Kärre, Klas; Uhlin, Michael; Önfelt, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a screening platform for assessment of the cytotoxic potential of individual natural killer (NK) cells within larger populations. Human primary NK cells were distributed across a silicon–glass microchip containing 32,400 individual microwells loaded with target cells. Through fluorescence screening and automated image analysis, the numbers of NK and live or dead target cells in each well could be assessed at different time points after initial mixing. Cytotoxicity was also studied by time-lapse live-cell imaging in microwells quantifying the killing potential of individual NK cells. Although most resting NK cells (≈75%) were non-cytotoxic against the leukemia cell line K562, some NK cells were able to kill several (≥3) target cells within the 12-h long experiment. In addition, the screening approach was adapted to increase the chance to find and evaluate serial killing NK cells. Even if the cytotoxic potential varied between donors, it was evident that a small fraction of highly cytotoxic NK cells were responsible for a substantial portion of the killing. We demonstrate multiple assays where our platform can be used to enumerate and characterize cytotoxic cells, such as NK or T cells. This approach could find use in clinical applications, e.g., in the selection of donors for stem cell transplantation or generation of highly specific and cytotoxic cells for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27092139

  18. CD16 polymorphisms and NK activation induced by monoclonal antibody-coated target cells.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Julie A; Weiner, George J

    2005-09-01

    CD16 and natural killer (NK) cells appear to play a central role in mediating the anti-tumor effects of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy, yet little is known about changes in NK cells that result from interaction of the NK cells with mAb-coated tumor cells under physiologic conditions. We developed a system using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and either transformed B cells or breast cancer cells to assess how mAbs impact on NK cell phenotype. Rituximab, apolizumab and trastuzumab induced modulation of CD16 and upregulation of CD54 on NK cells when the appropriate target cells were present. Higher concentrations of mAb were needed to induce these changes on NK cells from subjects with the lower affinity CD16 polymorphism. Phenotypic changes were greater in NK cells from subjects with the higher affinity polymorphism even when saturating concentrations of mAb were used, demonstrating increased concentration of mAb can overcome some, but not all, of the influence CD16 polymorphisms have on NK activation. These studies provide a straightforward and easily reproducible technique to measure the ability of mAb-coated tumor cells to activate NK cells in vitro which should be particularly useful as mAbs with varying affinity for both target antigen and Fc receptor (FcR) are developed. PMID:16109421

  19. Critical Role of Tumor Microenvironment in Shaping NK Cell Functions: Implication of Hypoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Hasmim, Meriem; Messai, Yosra; Ziani, Linda; Thiery, Jerome; Bouhris, Jean-Henri; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Chouaib, Salem

    2015-01-01

    Blurring the boundary between innate and adaptive immune system, natural killer (NK) cells, a key component of the innate immunity, are recognized as potent anticancer mediators. Extensive studies have been detailed on how NK cells get activated and recognize cancer cells. In contrast, few studies have been focused on how tumor microenvironment-mediated immunosubversion and immunoselection of tumor-resistant variants may impair NK cell function. Accumulating evidences indicate that several cell subsets (macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressive cells, T regulatory cells, dendritic cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts, and tumor cells), their secreted factors, as well as metabolic components (i.e., hypoxia) have immunosuppressive roles in the tumor microenvironment and are able to condition NK cells to become anergic. In this review, we will describe how NK cells react with different stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. This will be followed by a discussion on the role of hypoxic stress in the regulation of NK cell functions. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the tumor microenvironment impairs NK cell functions, thereby limiting the use of NK cell-based therapy, and we will attempt to suggest more efficient tools to establish a more favorable tumor microenvironment to boost NK cell cytotoxicity and control tumor progression. PMID:26441986

  20. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV. PMID:23522639

  1. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic. PMID:26113846

  2. Studies on insecticidal activities and action mechanism of novel benzoylphenylurea candidate NK-17.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Qin, Yaoguo; Yang, Na; Sun, Yufeng; Yang, Xinling; Sun, Ranfeng; Wang, Qingmin; Ling, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of NK-17 was evaluated both in laboratory and in field. It was found that the toxicity of NK-17 against S. exigua was 1.93 times and 2.69 times those of hexaflumuron and chlorfluazuron respectively, and the toxicity of NK-17 against P. xylostella was 1.36 times and 1.90 times those of hexaflumuron and chlorfluazuron respectively, and the toxicity of NK-17 against M. separate was 18.24 times those of hexaflumuron in laboratory, and 5% NK-17 EC at 60 g a.i ha(-1) can control S. exigua and P. xylostella with the best control efficiency of about 89% and over 88% respectively in Changsha and Tianjin in field. The insecticidal mechanism of NK-17 was explored for the first time by utilizing the fluorescence polarization method. NK-17 could bind to sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) of B. germanica with stronger affinity comparing to diflubenzuron and glibenclamide, which suggested that NK-17 may also act on the site of SUR to inhibit the chitin synthesis in insect body and the result can well explain that NK-17 exhibited stronger toxicity against B. germanica than diflubenzuron and glibenclamide in vivo. PMID:23776644

  3. Studies on Insecticidal Activities and Action Mechanism of Novel Benzoylphenylurea Candidate NK-17

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Qin, Yaoguo; Yang, Na; Sun, Yufeng; Yang, Xinling; Sun, Ranfeng; Wang, Qingmin; Ling, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of NK-17 was evaluated both in laboratory and in field. It was found that the toxicity of NK-17 against S. exigua was 1.93 times and 2.69 times those of hexaflumuron and chlorfluazuron respectively, and the toxicity of NK-17 against P. xylostella was 1.36 times and 1.90 times those of hexaflumuron and chlorfluazuron respectively, and the toxicity of NK-17 against M. separate was 18.24 times those of hexaflumuron in laboratory, and 5% NK-17 EC at 60 g a.i ha−1 can control S. exigua and P. xylostella with the best control efficiency of about 89% and over 88% respectively in Changsha and Tianjin in field. The insecticidal mechanism of NK-17 was explored for the first time by utilizing the fluorescence polarization method. NK-17 could bind to sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) of B. germanica with stronger affinity comparing to diflubenzuron and glibenclamide, which suggested that NK-17 may also act on the site of SUR to inhibit the chitin synthesis in insect body and the result can well explain that NK-17 exhibited stronger toxicity against B. germanica than diflubenzuron and glibenclamide in vivo. PMID:23776644

  4. Evaluation of Functional NK Cell Responses in Vaccinated and SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Ying, Olivia; Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are crucial components of the innate immune system due to their capacity to exert rapid cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function in the absence of prior sensitization. NK cells can become activated by exposure to target cells and/or by cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined the effects of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine regimen and subsequent SIV infection on the cytotoxic and immunomodulatory functions of circulatory NK cells. While vaccination did not significantly impact the capacity of NK cells to kill MHC-devoid 721.221 target cells, SIV-infection led to a significant decrease in target cell killing. NK cells from uninfected macaques were responsive to a low dose (5 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation, leading to significant increases in their cytotoxic potential, however, NK cells from SIV-infected macaques required a higher dose (50 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation in order to significantly increase their cytotoxic potential. By contrast, no differences were observed in the capacity of NK cells from vaccinated and SIV-infected macaques to respond to IL-12 and IL-18. Similarly, NK cells both before and after infection exhibited equivalent responses to Fc-mediated activation. Collectively, our results show that early SIV-infection impairs the natural cytotoxic capacity of circulatory NK cells without affecting Fc-mediated or cytokine-producing function.

  5. Transcription Factor Foxo1 Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G.; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes through upregulating CD62L expression, and impaired late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21+/− mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions. PMID:25769609

  6. FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Huang, Guanling; Zhu, Pingping; Liu, Jing; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert a crucial role in early immune responses as a major innate effector component. However, the underlying mechanisms of NK cell development remain largely elusive. Here we show that robust autophagy appears in the stage of immature NK cells (iNKs), which is required for NK cell development. Autophagy defects result in damaged mitochondria and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that leads to apoptosis of NK cells. Autophagy protects NK cell viability during development through removal of damaged mitochondria and intracellular ROS. Phosphorylated Forkhead box O (FoxO)1 is located to the cytoplasm of iNKs and interacts with Atg7, leading to induction of autophagy. FoxO1 deficiency or an inactive FoxO1AAA mutant abrogates autophagy initiation in iNKs and impairs NK cell development and viral clearance. Therefore we conclude that FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and NK cell-induced innate immunity. PMID:27010363

  7. NKG2D is a Key Receptor for Recognition of Bladder Cancer Cells by IL-2-Activated NK Cells and BCG Promotes NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuesta, Eva María; López-Cobo, Sheila; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Esteso, Gloria; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Rey, Mercedes; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Linares, Ana; Valés-Gómez, Alejandro; Reyburn, Hugh Thomson; Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after transurethral resection) or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ), reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, natural killer (NK), and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient. PMID:26106390

  8. Chimeric NK-receptor–bearing T cells mediate antitumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Lemoi, Bethany A.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2005-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating cell-surface receptor expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and some T-cell subsets. Its ligands are primarily expressed on tumor cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether chimeric NK-receptor—bearing T cells would directly kill tumor cells and lead to induction of host immunity against tumors. Chimeric NK receptors were produced by linking NKG2D or DNAX activating protein of 10 kDa (Dap10) to the cytoplasmic portion of the CD3ζ chain. Our results showed that chimeric (ch) NKG2D-bearing T cells responded to NKG2D-ligand–bearing tumor cells (RMA/Rae-1β, EG7) but not to wild-type tumor cells (RMA). This response was dependent upon ligand expression on the target cells but not on expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, and the response could be blocked by anti-NKG2D antibodies. These T cells produced large amounts of T-helper 1 (Th1) cytokines and proinflammatory chemokines and killed ligand–expressing tumor cells. Adoptive transfer of chNKG2D-bearing T cells inhibited RMA/Rae-1β tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, mice that had remained tumor-free were resistant to subsequent challenge with the wild-type RMA tumor cells, suggesting the generation of immunity against other tumor antigens. Taken together, our findings indicate that modification of T cells with chimeric NKG2D receptors represents a promising approach for immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:15890688

  9. Influenza Vaccination Generates Cytokine-Induced Memory-like NK Cells: Impact of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Martin R; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Lusa, Chiara; Nielsen, Carolyn M; Darboe, Alansana; Moldoveanu, Ana L; White, Matthew J; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M

    2016-07-01

    Human NK cells are activated by cytokines, immune complexes, and signals transduced via activating ligands on other host cells. After vaccination, or during secondary infection, adaptive immune responses can enhance both cytokine-driven and Ab-dependent NK cell responses. However, induction of NK cells for enhanced function after in vitro exposure to innate inflammatory cytokines has also been reported and may synergize with adaptive signals to potentiate NK cell activity during infection or vaccination. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on NK cell function and phenotype in 52 previously unvaccinated individuals. Enhanced, IL-2-dependent, NK cell IFN-γ responses to Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus were detected up to 4 wk postvaccination and higher in human CMV (HCMV)-seronegative (HCMV(-)) individuals than in HCMV-seropositive (HCMV(+)) individuals. By comparison, robust NK cell degranulation responses were observed both before and after vaccination, due to high titers of naturally occurring anti-influenza Abs in human plasma, and did not differ between HCMV(+) and HCMV(-) subjects. In addition to these IL-2-dependent and Ab-dependent responses, NK cell responses to innate cytokines were also enhanced after influenza vaccination; this was associated with proliferation of CD57(-) NK cells and was most evident in HCMV(+) subjects. Similar enhancement of cytokine responsiveness was observed when NK cells were cocultured in vitro with Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus, and this was at least partially dependent upon IFN-αβR2. In summary, our data indicate that attenuated or live viral vaccines promote cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells and that this process is influenced by HCMV infection. PMID:27233958

  10. Influenza Vaccination Generates Cytokine-Induced Memory-like NK Cells: Impact of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goodier, Martin R.; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Lusa, Chiara; Nielsen, Carolyn M.; Darboe, Alansana; Moldoveanu, Ana L.; White, Matthew J.; Behrens, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are activated by cytokines, immune complexes, and signals transduced via activating ligands on other host cells. After vaccination, or during secondary infection, adaptive immune responses can enhance both cytokine-driven and Ab-dependent NK cell responses. However, induction of NK cells for enhanced function after in vitro exposure to innate inflammatory cytokines has also been reported and may synergize with adaptive signals to potentiate NK cell activity during infection or vaccination. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on NK cell function and phenotype in 52 previously unvaccinated individuals. Enhanced, IL-2–dependent, NK cell IFN-γ responses to Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus were detected up to 4 wk postvaccination and higher in human CMV (HCMV)-seronegative (HCMV−) individuals than in HCMV-seropositive (HCMV+) individuals. By comparison, robust NK cell degranulation responses were observed both before and after vaccination, due to high titers of naturally occurring anti-influenza Abs in human plasma, and did not differ between HCMV+ and HCMV− subjects. In addition to these IL-2–dependent and Ab-dependent responses, NK cell responses to innate cytokines were also enhanced after influenza vaccination; this was associated with proliferation of CD57− NK cells and was most evident in HCMV+ subjects. Similar enhancement of cytokine responsiveness was observed when NK cells were cocultured in vitro with Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus, and this was at least partially dependent upon IFN-αβR2. In summary, our data indicate that attenuated or live viral vaccines promote cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells and that this process is influenced by HCMV infection. PMID:27233958

  11. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection. PMID:27183639

  12. Ly49C Impairs NK Cell Memory in Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Catherine A; Scalzo, Anthony A; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Coudert, Jerome D

    2016-07-01

    NK cells possess inhibitory receptors that are responsible for self-MHC class I recognition; beyond their inhibitory function, accumulating evidence indicates that such receptors confer NK cell functional competence through an unclear process termed "licensing." Ly49C is the main self-specific inhibitory Ly49 receptor in H-2(b) C57BL/6 (B6) mice. We used B6 Ly49C-transgenic and B6 β2 microglobulin (β2m)-knockout Ly49C-transgenic mice to investigate the impact of licensing through this inhibitory receptor in precursor and mature NK cells. We found that self-specific inhibitory receptors affected NK cell precursor survival and proliferation at particular developmental stages in an MHC class I-dependent manner. The presence of Ly49C impacted the NK cell repertoire in a β2m-dependent manner, with reduced Ly49A(+), Ly49G2(+), and Ly49D(+) subsets, an increased DNAM-1(+) subset, and higher NKG2D expression. Licensed NK cells displayed a skewed distribution of the maturation stages, which was characterized by differential CD27 and CD11b expression, toward the mature phenotypes. We found that Ly49C-mediated licensing induced a split effect on NK cell functions, with increased cytokine-production capabilities following engagement of various activating receptors while cytotoxicity remained unchanged. Analysis of licensed NK cell functions in vivo, in a system of mouse CMV infection, indicated that licensing did not play a major role in the NK cell antiviral response during acute infection, but it strongly impaired the generation and/or persistence of memory NK cells. This study unravels multifaceted effects of licensing on NK cell populations and their functions. PMID:27233959

  13. Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived NK Cells as an Immunotherapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Eguizabal, Cristina; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Monge, Jorge; Santos, Silvia; Vesga, Miguel Angel; Maruri, Natalia; Arrieta, Arantza; Riñón, Marta; Tamayo-Orbegozo, Estibaliz; Amo, Laura; Larrucea, Susana; Borrego, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. Over the last years, the progress made in the NK-cell biology field and in deciphering how NK-cell function is regulated, is driving efforts to utilize NK-cell-based immunotherapy as a promising approach for the treatment of malignant diseases. Therapies involving NK cells may be accomplished by activating and expanding endogenous NK cells by means of cytokine treatment or by transferring exogenous cells by adoptive cell therapy and/or by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. NK cells that are suitable for adoptive cell therapy can be derived from different sources, including ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells, unstimulated or expanded allogeneic NK cells from peripheral blood, derived from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood, and NK-cell lines. Besides, genetically modified NK cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors or cytokines genes may also have a relevant future as therapeutic tools. Recently, it has been described the derivation of large numbers of functional and mature NK cells from pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, which adds another tool to the expanding NK-cell-based cancer immunotherapy arsenal. PMID:25309538

  14. Uptake of poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes and decline of functions in mouse NK cells undergoing activation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anwar; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNT) with NK cells undergoing activation was examined. Exposure to AF-SWCNT during NK activation in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2, and in vivo by Poly(I:C) significantly lowered cytotoxic activity generated against YAC-1 tumor cells. Recoveries of spleen NK1.1(+) cells as well as the activated subset of NK cells (NK1.1(+)CD69(+) cells) were significantly reduced by the AF-SWCNT exposure. The proportion of apoptotic NK cells (NK1.1(+) phosphatidylserine(+)) in the spleen cell preparations activated in vitro was also significantly elevated. Expression levels of CD107a [for assessing NK cell degranulation] as well as of FasL marker [mediating non-secretory pathway of NK cell killing] were significantly lower in cells exposed to AF-SWCNT during the activation phase. Intracellular levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the cells were also significantly reduced. Fluorescent AF-SWCNT (FAF-SWCNT) were internalized by the NK cells and uptake was significantly greater in activated cells. Confocal microscopy indicated the internalized FAF-SWCNT were localized to the cytoplasm of the NK cells. These results indicated that AF-SWCNT were internalized by NK cells and caused a general down-regulation of a variety of parameters associated with NK cell cytotoxicity and other cellular functions. PMID:27416475

  15. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arapović, Maja; Brizić, Ilija; Popović, Branka; Jurković, Slaven; Jordan, Stefan; Krmpotić, Astrid; Arapović, Jurica; Jonjić, Stipan

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK) cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Here, we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in the regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections. PMID:27092144

  16. Recombinant LPG3 Stimulates IFN-Γ and TNF-A Secretion by Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    RASOLZADEH, Sanaz; HAJI FATAHALIHA, Mostafa; HOSSEINI, Maryam; JAFARI, Reza; MIAHIPOUR, Abolfazl; MOVASSAGHPOUR, Ali Akbar; BABALO, Zohreh; RAFATI, Sima; YOUSEFI, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in early stages of innate immune responses against viral and tumoral attacks. Activation of NK cells by leishmaniasis results in secretion of cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, which enhances the phagocytosis and clearance of parasite. Lipophosphoglycan 3 (LPG3), the Leishmania homologous with GRP94 (glucose regulated protein 94), a member of HSP90 family, contributes to LPG assembly as the most abundant macromolecule on the surface of Leishmania promastigotes. Methods: We purified NK cells from healthy individuals (n=10) using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) technology. Purified NK cells were co-incubated with different concentrations of recombinant LPG3 (rLPG3), and its N-terminal (NT) and C-terminal (CT) fragments. Finally, the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by NK cells were measured by ELISA. Results: Recombinant LPG3 but not its fragments (CT and NT), can significantly enhance the production of TNF-α by NK cells (P<0.05). Moreover, rLPG3, CT, and NT fragments were markedly stimulated the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells (P<0.001). Conclusion: The Leishmania LPG3 antigen can effectively activate NK cells, in vitro. Leishmania LPG3 participates in the innate immunity against leishmaniasis and thereby improves the effective parasite destruction. However, its efficiency should be tested in vivo. PMID:26811721

  17. Recombinant LPG3 Stimulates IFN-Γ and TNF-Α Secretion by Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    RASOLZADEH, Sanaz; HAJI FATAHALIHA, Mostafa; HOSSEINI, Maryam; JAFARI, Reza; MIAHIPOUR, Abolfazl; SADREDDINI, Sevil; BABALO, Zohreh; SAMADI KAFIL, Hossein; YOUSEFI, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in early stages of innate immune responses against viral and tumoral attacks. Activation of NK cells by leishmaniasis results in secretion of cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, which enhance the phagocytosis and clearance of parasite. Lipophosphoglycan 3 (LPG3), the Leishmania homologous with GRP94 (glucose regulated protein 94), a member of HSP90 family, contributes to LPG assembly as the most abundant macromolecule on the surface of Leishmania promastigotes. Methods: We purified NK cells from healthy individuals (n=10) using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) technology. Purified NK cells were co-incubated with different concentrations of recombinant LPG3 (rLPG3), and its N-terminal (NT) and C-terminal (CT) fragments. Finally, the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by NK cells were measured by ELISA. Results: Recombinant LPG3 but not its fragments (CT and NT), could significantly enhance the production of TNF-α by NK cells (P<0.05). Moreover, rLPG3, CT, and NT fragments were markedly stimulated the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells (P<0.001). Conclusion: The Leishmania LPG3 antigen could effectively activate NK cells, in vitro. Leishmania LPG3 participates in the innate immunity against leishmaniasis and thereby improves the effective parasite destruction. However, its efficiency should be tested in vivo. PMID:26622301

  18. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been descri...

  19. Mechanism of natural killer (NK) cell regulatory role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Fazekas, Gyorgy; Hara, Hideo; Tabira, Takeshi

    2005-06-01

    The mechanism of natural killer (NK) cell regulatory role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in SJL/J mice. In vivo experiments showed that NK cell depletion by anti-NK1.1 monoclonal antibody treatment enhanced EAE in mice. To investigate the mechanism, we cultured proteolipid protein (PLP)136-150 peptide-specific, encephalitogenic T cell lines, which were used as the NK cell target. Our results show that NK cells exert a direct cytotoxic effect on autoantigen-specific, encephalitogenic T cells. Furthermore, cytotoxicity to PLP-specific, encephalitogenic T line cells was enhanced by using enriched NK cells as effector cells. However, the cytotoxic effect of NK cells to ovalbumin-specific T line cells and ConA-stimulated T cells could also be detected with a lesser efficiency. Our studies indicate that NK cells play a regulatory role in EAE through killing of syngeneic T cells which include myelin antigen-specific, encephalitogenic T cells, and thus ameliorate EAE. PMID:15885305

  20. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is a cationic anti-microbial peptide that plays a critical role in innate immunity against infectious pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been described but its location in the chicken genome prior this study was unknown. A 6000 rad ...

  1. Altered effector functions of NK cells in chronic hepatitis C are associated with IFNL3 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Markova, Antoaneta A; Taranta, Andrzej; Lunemann, Sebastian; Schlaphoff, Verena; Flisiak, Robert; Manns, Michael P; Cornberg, Markus; Kraft, Anke R M; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    Interferon α-mediated effector functions of NK cells may contribute to the control of HCV replication and the pathogenesis of liver disease. The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860 near IFNL3 (previously known as IL28B) is important in response to IFN-α treatment and in spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C. The role of the IFNL3 polymorphism in NK cell function is unclear. Thus, we investigated the role of IFNL3 polymorphism in type I IFN-dependent regulation of NK cell functions in patients with cHC and healthy control subjects. We demonstrated a marked polarization of NK cells toward cytotoxicity in response to IFN-α stimulation in patients with hepatitis C. That TRAIL up-regulation was present, particularly in patients with the IFNL3-TT allele, was supported by a shift in the pSTAT-1:pSTAT-4 ratios toward pSTAT-1. In patients bearing the IFNL3-TT allele, NK cell effector function correlated with liver disease activity. In contrast, higher cytokine production of NK cells was observed in healthy individuals with the IFNL3-CC genotype, which may support spontaneous HCV clearance in acute infection. Overall, these findings show that the role of NK cells may differ in chronic infection vs. early antiviral defense and that the IFNL3 genotype differentially influences NK cell function. PMID:26034208

  2. Human immunodeficiency-causing mutation defines CD16 in spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Jennifer T.; Forbes, Lisa R.; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Oshinsky, Jennifer; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Moody, Curtis; Pandey, Rahul; Campbell, Kerry S.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2012-01-01

    The Fc receptor on NK cells, FcγRIIIA (CD16), has been extensively studied for its role in mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). A homozygous missense mutation in CD16 (encoding a L66H substitution) is associated with severe herpesvirus infections in rare patients. Here, we identified a new patient with this CD16 mutation and compared the patient’s NK cells to those of the originally reported patient. Patients with the L66H mutation had intact ADCC, but deficient spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity and decreased surface expression of CD2, a coactivation receptor. Mechanistic studies in a human NK cell line, NK-92, demonstrated that CD16 expression correlated with CD2 surface levels and enabled killing of a melanoma cell line typically resistant to CD16-deficient NK-92 cells. An association between CD16 and CD2 was identified biochemically and at the immunological synapse, which elicited CD16 signaling after CD2 engagement. Stable expression of CD16 L66H in NK-92 cells recapitulated the patient phenotype, abrogating association of CD16 with CD2 as well as CD16 signaling after CD2 ligation. Thus, CD16 serves a role in NK cell–mediated spontaneous cytotoxicity through a specific association with CD2 and represents a potential mechanism underlying a human congenital immunodeficiency. PMID:23006327

  3. miR-150 regulates the development of NK and iNKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Bezman, Natalie A.; Chakraborty, Tirtha; Bender, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) and invariant NK T (iNKT) cells are critical in host defense against pathogens and for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. miRNAs play important roles in NK and iNKT cell development, maturation, and function, but the roles of specific miRNAs are unclear. We show that modulation of miR-150 expression levels has a differential effect on NK and iNKT cell development. Mice with a targeted deletion of miR-150 have an impaired, cell lineage–intrinsic defect in their ability to generate mature NK cells. Conversely, a gain-of-function miR-150 transgene promotes the development of NK cells, which display a more mature phenotype and are more responsive to activation. In contrast, overexpression of miR-150 results in a substantial reduction of iNKT cells in the thymus and in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The transcription factor c-Myb has been shown to be a direct target of miR-150. Our finding of increased NK cell and decreased iNKT cell frequencies in Myb heterozygous bone marrow chimeras suggests that miR-150 differentially controls the development of NK and iNKT cell lineages by targeting c-Myb. PMID:22124110

  4. Genetic and environmental determinants of human NK cell diversity revealed by mass cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Amir; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Leipold, Michael; Kubo, Jessica; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Dogan, Ozge C.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Mackey, Sally; Maecker, Holden; Swan, Gary E.; Davis, Mark M.; Norman, Paul J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Desai, Manisha; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play critical roles in immune defense and reproduction, yet remain the most poorly understood major lymphocyte population. Because their activation is controlled by a variety of combinatorially expressed activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cell diversity and function are closely linked. To provide an unprecedented understanding of NK cell repertoire diversity, we used mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze 35 parameters, including 28 NK cell receptors, on peripheral blood NK cells from five sets of monozygotic twins and twelve unrelated donors of defined HLA and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotype. This analysis revealed a remarkable degree of NK cell diversity, with an estimated 6,000-30,000 phenotypic populations within an individual and >100,000 phenotypes in this population. Genetics largely determined inhibitory receptor expression, whereas activation receptor expression was heavily environmentally influenced. Therefore, NK cells may maintain self-tolerance through strictly regulated expression of inhibitory receptors, while using adaptable expression patterns of activating and costimulatory receptors to respond to pathogens and tumors. These findings further suggest the possibility that discrete NK cell subpopulations could be harnessed for immunotherapeutic strategies in the settings of infection, reproduction, and transplantation. PMID:24154599

  5. CD45 Isoform Profile Identifies Natural Killer (NK) Subsets with Differential Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Cornillon, Amelie; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Rene, Celine; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Pasero, Christine; Olive, Daniel; Fegueux, Nathalie; Ceballos, Patrick; Hicheri, Yosr; Sobecki, Michal; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The leucocyte-specific phosphatase CD45 is present in two main isoforms: the large CD45RA and the short CD45RO. We have recently shown that distinctive expression of these isoforms distinguishes natural killer (NK) populations. For example, co-expression of both isoforms identifies in vivo the anti tumor NK cells in hematological cancer patients. Here we show that low CD45 expression associates with less mature, CD56bright, NK cells. Most NK cells in healthy human donors are CD45RA+CD45RO-. The CD45RA-RO+ phenotype, CD45RO cells, is extremely uncommon in B or NK cells, in contrast to T cells. However, healthy donors possess CD45RAdimRO- (CD45RAdim cells), which show immature markers and are largely expanded in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Blood borne cancer patients also have more CD45RAdim cells that carry several features of immature NK cells. However, and in opposition to their association to NK cell progenitors, they do not proliferate and show low expression of the transferrin receptor protein 1/CD71, suggesting low metabolic activity. Moreover, CD45RAdim cells properly respond to in vitro encounter with target cells by degranulating or gaining CD69 expression. In summary, they are quiescent NK cells, with low metabolic status that can, however, respond after encounter with target cells. PMID:27100180

  6. Epirubicin pretreatment enhances NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Dong, Ying; Wu, Jing; Qiao, Yuan; Zhu, Ge; Jin, Haofan; Cui, Jiuwei; Li, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Jingtao; Song, Yanqiu

    2016-01-01

    Anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a conventional treatment for breast cancer. However, it can negatively affect host immune function and thereby impair patients’ quality of life. Boosting the host immune system and reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy are important for effective cancer treatment. Natural killer (NK) cells stimulate immune responses against cancer; autologous immune enhancement therapy with NK cells prolongs patient survival without significant adverse effects. This study investigated the effects of combined treatment with the anthracycline agent epirubicin (EPI) and NK cells on human breast cancer cells. NK cells were obtained by autologous adoptive cell transfer from breast cancer patients and amplified for 14 days in vitro. The cytotoxicity of NK cells against breast cancer cells was higher following EPI (5.0 μg/ml) pretreatment than without EPI pretreatment or application of EPI alone. The expression of NKG2D ligands [unique long 16-binding protein (ULBP) 1, ULBP2, and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A] in breast cancer cells was upregulated by pretreatment with EPI, which also increased the secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and expression of perforin and granzyme B in NK cells. These results indicate that EPI-NK cell treatment has synergistic cytotoxic effects against breast cancer cells, and suggest that anthracycline-based chemotherapy and NK cell-based immunotherapy can be combined for more effective breast cancer treatment. PMID:27158340

  7. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  8. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  9. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  10. Neurokinin-1 Receptor (NK1-R) Expression in the Brains of SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Alvarez, Xavier; Buza, Elizabeth; Borda, Juan T.; Mohan, Mahesh; Aye, Pyone P.; Tuluc, Florin; Douglas, Steven D.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a link between neuropsychiatric disorders and HIV/SIV infection. Most evidence indicates that monocytes/macrophages are the primary cell type infected within the CNS and that they contribute to CNS inflammation and neurological disease. Substance P (SP), a pleotropic neuropeptide implicated in inflammation, depression, and immune modulation via interaction with its cognate receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R), is produced by monocyte/macrophages. While the presence of NK1-R on neurons is well known, its role on cells of the immune system such as monocyte/macrophages is just beginning to emerge. Therefore, we have examined the expression of SP and NK1-R and their relationship to SIV/HIV encephalitis (SIVE/HIVE) lesions and SIV-infected cells. These studies demonstrated intense expression of SP and NK1-R in SIVE lesions, with macrophages being the principal cell expressing NK1-R. Interestingly, all of the SIV-infected macrophages expressed NK1-R. Additionally, we examined the functional role of SP as a proinflammatory mediator of monocyte activation and chemotaxis. These studies demonstrated that treatment of monocytes with SP elicited changes in cell-surface expression for CCR5 and NK1-R in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, pretreatment with SP enhanced both SP- and CCL5-mediated chemotaxis. All of these findings suggest that SP and NK1-R are important in SIV infection of macrophages and the development of SIVE lesions. PMID:20671267

  11. A case of lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells: aggressive immunophenotype but indolent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Savage, Natasha M; Salman, Huda; Morice, William G

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Distinguishing chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells from aggressive NK-cell leukemia is critical because they have distinct clinical course and management. Immunophenotyping plays a key role in distinguishing these two entities, however, it could not be used as sole criteria and clinical/laboratory findings are equally important. PMID:26401278

  12. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Arapović, Maja; Brizić, Ilija; Popović, Branka; Jurković, Slaven; Jordan, Stefan; Krmpotić, Astrid; Arapović, Jurica; Jonjić, Stipan

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK) cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Here, we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in the regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections. PMID:27092144

  13. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  14. Maternal decidual macrophages inhibit NK cell killing of invasive cytotrophoblasts during human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Co, Elizabeth C; Gormley, Matthew; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Rosen, David B; Scott, Marvin A; Stolp, Haley A R; McMaster, Michael; Lanier, Lewis L; Bárcena, Alicia; Fisher, Susan J

    2013-06-01

    Human pregnancy is an immunological paradox. Semiallogeneic (fetal) placental cells (extravillous cytotrophoblasts [CTBs]) invade the uterine lining (decidua), which contains a unique decidual natural killer (dNK) cell population, identified by the cell surface phenotype CD56(bright) CD16(-) CD3(-) and CD14(+) CD206(+) macrophages (dMac). Previous reports suggested that human dNK cells are not a threat to the fetoplacental unit because they are anergic. In contrast, here we showed that purified and exogenously stimulated dNK cells are capable killers of cellular targets, including semiallogeneic CTBs. However, dMacs in the decidual leukocyte (DL) population restrained dNK killing through a transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1)-dependent mechanism. Our findings support a new model whereby dNK cells, capable of killing CTBs, are prevented from doing so by neighboring macrophages, thus protecting the fetal cells from NK cell attack. We speculate that this mechanism would inhibit dNK cell-mediated killing, even under conditions where high levels of cytokines may stimulate dNK cells, which could pose a threat to the developing placenta. PMID:23553431

  15. Epigenetic suppression of the antitumor cytotoxicity of NK cells by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiumin; Li, Min; Cui, Meizi; Niu, Chao; Xu, Jianting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Wei; Gao, Yushun; Kong, Weisheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Hu, Jifan; Jin, Haofan

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. The therapeutic use of autologous NK cells has been exploited to treat human malignancies, yet only limited antitumor activity is observed in cancer patients. In this study, we sought to augment the antitumor activity of NK cells using epigenetic approaches. Four small molecules that have been known to promote epigenetic reprogramming were tested for their ability to enhance the activity of NK cells. Using a tumor cell lysis assay, we found that the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and vitamin C did not significantly affect the tumor killing ability of NK cells. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) slightly increased the activity of NK cells. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), however, inhibited NK cell lytic activity against leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment using VPA reduced IFNγ secretion, impaired CD107a degranulation, and induced apoptosis by activating the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. VPA downregulated the expression of the activating receptor NKG2D (natural-killer group 2, member D) by inducing histone K9 hypermethylation and DNA methylation in the gene promoter. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been developed as anticancer agents for use as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Our data suggest that the activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors on NK cell activity should be considered in drug development. PMID:27152238

  16. [Recent progress of diagnosis and treatment in NK cell neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Fumihiro

    2015-06-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a malignant disorder of mature NK cells that is relatively common in East Asia. It is associated with Epstein-Barr virus in more than 80% of patients. The median survival is not more than three months after diagnosis. In a recent survey of 34 cases with ANKL, the median patient age was 40 years and the age distribution followed a bimodal pattern. Morphologically, the ANKL cells varied from large granular lymphocytes to atypical cells with pleomorphic-like appearances. Clinical characteristics include fever, liver dysfunction, hemophagocytic syndrome, and a rapidly progressive course. In one third of patients, tumor cells in peripheral blood or the bone marrow are below 20% at initial presentation, which might lead to diagnostic delay. L-asparaginase-based chemotherapy plus allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potential therapeutic option with curative intent.  As for extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, HSCT could be anticipated to provide survival benefit or a chance of cure for patients in clinical stage II to IV with complete remission at transplantation. However, the optimal stem cell source, timing of transplantation, and preconditioning regimen require further elucidation. PMID:26256874

  17. NK-lysin, a novel effector peptide of cytotoxic T and NK cells. Structure and cDNA cloning of the porcine form, induction by interleukin 2, antibacterial and antitumour activity.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M; Gunne, H; Agerberth, B; Boman, A; Bergman, T; Sillard, R; Jörnvall, H; Mutt, V; Olsson, B; Wigzell, H

    1995-01-01

    A 78 residue antimicrobial, basic peptide, NK-lysin, with three intrachain disulfide bonds was purified from pig small intestine and characterized. A corresponding clone was isolated from a porcine bone marrow cDNA library. The 780 bp DNA sequence had a reading frame of 129 amino acids which corresponded to NK-lysin. The clone was used to show that stimulation with human interleukin-2 induced synthesis of NK-lysin-specific mRNA in a lymphocyte fraction enriched for T and NK cells. Lower levels of mRNA were detected in tissues known to contain T and NK cells, such as small intestine, spleen and colon. Interleukin-2 also induced both proliferation of the lymphocyte fraction and cytolytic function in these cells. Immunostaining showed that NK-lysin was present in cells positive for CD8, CD2 and CD4. NK-lysin showed high anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium and moderate activity against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The peptide showed a marked lytic activity against an NK-sensitive mouse tumour cell line, YAC-1, but it did not lyse red blood cells. The amino acid sequence of NK-lysin exhibits 33% identity with a putative human preproprotein, NKG5, of unknown function but derived from a cDNA clone of activated NK cells. We suggest that NK-lysin is a new effector molecule of cytotoxic T and NK cells. Images PMID:7737114

  18. NK cell maturation to CD56(dim) subset associated with high levels of NCRs overrides the inhibitory effect of NKG2A and recovers impaired NK cell cytolytic potential after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Mehran; Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat; Schwarer, Anthony P; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    NK cell cytotoxicity against residual leukemic cells is crucial for immune system reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since immune recovery after transplant still remains a major concern, we studied the counterbalance of NK cell receptors after HSCT and its importance in NK cell functional recovery. We investigated NK cell reconstitution in 27 acute leukemia patients at different time points following HLA-matched allogeneic HSCT compared to those of donors. NK cells were evaluated for their cytotoxicity in a standard (51)Cr-release assay against target cells and also analyzed for their receptors expression using flow cytometry. Early after transplant, we found higher percentage of CD56(bright) NK cells, increased levels of NKG2A and NCRs as well as decreased levels of KIRs expression on NK cells associated with an impaired cytotoxicity of these cells. All the abnormalities were normalized by one year after HSCT when CD56(bright) NK cells gradually differentiated into CD56(dim) subset. Collectively, we confirmed a gradual increase of CD56(dim) NK cells expressing NCRs with the significant decrease in NKG2A expression on NK cells. This finding was also associated with the recovery of NK cell cytotoxicity that suggests an important role for the kinetics of NK cell receptors during cell maturation in HSCT outcome. PMID:26856773

  19. mRNA Transfection to Improve NK Cell Homing to Tumors.

    PubMed

    Levy, Emily R; Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of natural killer (NK) cells to mediate antitumor effects following adoptive transfer is dependent on their capacity to traffic to the microenvironment where tumors reside. Recent studies have shown that cytokine-activated and ex vivo-expanded NK cells lack or express at low levels homing receptors required to achieve tissue-specific tumor targeting by cells administered intravenously. In this chapter, we describe a method to enhance NK cell homing toward specific chemoattractants expressed in secondary lymphoid tissues through genetic modification of NK cells using mRNA electroporation. The method described here is scalable, cGMP-compliant, and offers a strategy to bolster the efficacy of adoptive NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of hematological malignancies in the clinic. PMID:27177670

  20. Coordinated expression of DNAM-1 and LFA-1 in educated NK cells.

    PubMed

    Enqvist, Monika; Ask, Eivind Heggernes; Forslund, Elin; Carlsten, Mattias; Abrahamsen, Greger; Béziat, Vivien; Andersson, Sandra; Schaffer, Marie; Spurkland, Anne; Bryceson, Yenan; Önfelt, Björn; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-05-01

    The functional capacity of NK cells is dynamically tuned by integrated signals from inhibitory and activating cell surface receptors in a process termed NK cell education. However, the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this functional tuning is limited. In this study, we show that the expression of the adhesion molecule and activation receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1) correlates with the quantity and quality of the inhibitory input by HLA class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptors and CD94/NKG2A as well as with the magnitude of functional responses. Upon target cell recognition, the conformational state of LFA-1 changed in educated NK cells, associated with rapid colocalization of both active LFA-1 and DNAM-1 at the immune synapse. Thus, the coordinated expression of LFA-1 and DNAM-1 is a central component of NK cell education and provides a potential mechanism for controlling cytotoxicity by functionally mature NK cells. PMID:25825444

  1. Development of novel NK3 receptor antagonists with reduced environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koki; Okazaki, Shiho; Ohno, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Fuko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Fujii, Nobutaka; Oishi, Shinya

    2016-08-15

    The neurokinin B (NKB)-neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) signaling positively regulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. The NK3R-selective antagonists may suppress the reproductive functions of mammals. For development of novel NK3R antagonists with reduced environmental toxicity, a structure-activity relationship study of an NK3R antagonist, talnetant, was carried out. Among several talnetant derivatives with labile functional groups in the natural environment, 3-mercaptoquinoline 2f exhibited a comparable biological activity to that of the parent talnetant. Additionally, compound 2f was converted into the disulfide 3f or isothiazolone 8 by air-oxidation, both of which showed no binding affinity to NK3R. PMID:27298001

  2. A role for pre-mNK cells in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Rosinsky, Carolyn; Antony, Paul Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems have evolved together to fight infection and cancerous tissues. The innate immune system emerges first with the adaptive immune system following, both ostensibly being bridged by dendritic cells (DC). Recently cells have emerged that possess characteristics of both innate and adaptive immune cell qualities, termed interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs). These cells have an indistinct origin that is not well understood. They appear to have more NK cell attributes than DC but purportedly can regulate the immune system similar to immunoregulatory NK cells. Because of this, they have been renamed pre-mNK cells (pre-mature NK cells). We argue in this commentary that pre-mNK cells may contribute to cancer recurrence. PMID:26981246

  3. Cytokine secretion and NK cell activity in human ADAM17 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chavkin, Maor; Schmiedel, Dominik; Wong, Eitan; Werner, Marion; Yaacov, Barak; Averbuch, Diana; Molho-Pessach, Vered; Stepensky, Polina; Kaynan, Noa; Bar-On, Yotam; Seidel, Einat; Yamin, Rachel; Sagi, Irit; Elpeleg, Orly; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies provide insights into gene function in humans. Here we describe a patient with a very rare genetic deficiency of ADAM17. We show that the patient's PBMCs had impaired cytokine secretion in response to LPS stimulation, correlating with the clinical picture of severe bacteremia from which the patient suffered. ADAM17 was shown to cleave CD16, a major NK killer receptor. Functional analysis of patient's NK cells demonstrated that his NK cells express normal levels of activating receptors and maintain high surface levels of CD16 following mAb stimulation. Activation of individual NK cell receptors showed that the patient's NK cells are more potent when activated directly by CD16, albeit no difference was observed in Antibody Depedent Cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays. Our data suggest that ADAM17 inhibitors currently considered for clinical use to boost CD16 activity should be cautiously applied, as they might have severe side effects resulting from impaired cytokine secretion. PMID:26683521

  4. VEGFR2-targeted fusion antibody improved NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance against K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueyan; Xie, Wei; Wang, Youfu; Xu, Menghuai; Liu, Fang; Tang, Mingying; Li, Chenchen; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA), which is normally expressed on cancer cells, activates NK cells via NK group 2-member D pathway. However, some cancer cells escape NK-mediated immune surveillance by shedding membrane MICA causing immune suppression. To address this issue, we designed an antibody-MICA fusion targeting tumor-specific antigen (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, VEGFR2) based on our patented antibody (mAb04) against VEGFR2. In vitro results demonstrate that the fusion antibody retains both the antineoplastic and the immunomodulatory activity of mAb04. Further, we revealed that it enhanced NK-mediated immunosurveillance against K562 cells through increasing degranulation and cytokine production of NK cells. The overall data suggest our new fusion protein provides a promising approach for cancer-targeted immunotherapy and has prospects for potential application of chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:27154226

  5. T-bet and Eomesodermin in NK Cell Development, Maturation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta, Federico; Pradier, Amandine; Roosnek, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports give insights into the role of the T-box transcription factors, T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes), in NK cell biology. In this mini-review, we recapitulate the initial reports that delineate T-bet and Eomes as master regulators of NK cell development, maturation, and function. We discuss how T-bet and Eomes expression is regulated during NK cell development and peripheral maturation. Furthermore, we summarize the current literature on the role of T-bet and Eomes in the transcriptional regulation of NK cell function and review possible effects of T-box transcription factor anomalies during aging, infection, cancer, and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We discuss how the current data argue in favor of a model of T-bet and Eomes synergy in transcriptional regulation of NK cell function and identify T-box transcription factors as potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27379101

  6. Human NK cells proliferate and die in vivo more rapidly than T cells in healthy young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Charles T; Karapetyan, Anush; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Shelton, Brent J; Holt, Kimberly J; Tucker, Jason H; Presnell, Steven R

    2011-04-15

    NK cells are essential for health, yet little is known about human NK turnover in vivo. In both young and elderly women, all NK subsets proliferated and died more rapidly than T cells. CD56(bright) NK cells proliferated rapidly but died relatively slowly, suggesting that proliferating CD56(bright) cells differentiate into CD56(dim) NK cells in vivo. The relationship between CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) proliferating cells indicates that proliferating CD56(dim) cells both self-renew and are derived from proliferating CD56(bright) NK cells. Our data suggest that some dying CD56(dim) cells become CD16(+)CD56(-) NK cells and that CD16(-)CD56(low) NK cells respond rapidly to cellular and cytokine stimulation. We propose a model in which all NK cell subsets are in dynamic flux. About half of CD56(dim) NK cells expressed CD57, which was weakly associated with low proliferation. Surprisingly, CD57 expression was associated with higher proliferation rates in both CD8(+) and CD8(-) T cells. Therefore, CD57 is not a reliable marker of senescent, nonproliferative T cells in vivo. NKG2A expression declined with age on both NK cells and T cells. Killer cell Ig-like receptor expression increased with age on T cells but not on NK cells. Although the percentage of CD56(bright) NK cells declined with age and the percentage of CD56(dim) NK cells increased with age, there were no significant age-related proliferation or apoptosis differences for these two populations or for total NK cells. In vivo human NK cell turnover is rapid in both young and elderly adults. PMID:21402893

  7. Influenza Virus Targets Class I MHC-Educated NK Cells for Immunoevasion

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Tu, Megan M.; Wight, Andrew; Zein, Haggag S.; Rahim, Mir Munir A.; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Sekhon, Harman S.; Brown, Earl G.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response to influenza virus infection comprises both innate and adaptive defenses. NK cells play an early role in the destruction of tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells express a variety of inhibitory receptors, including those of the Ly49 family, which are functional homologs of human killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Like human KIR, Ly49 receptors inhibit NK cell-mediated lysis by binding to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules that are expressed on normal cells. During NK cell maturation, the interaction of NK cell inhibitory Ly49 receptors with their MHC-I ligands results in two types of NK cells: licensed (“functional”), or unlicensed (“hypofunctional”). Despite being completely dysfunctional with regard to rejecting MHC-I-deficient cells, unlicensed NK cells represent up to half of the mature NK cell pool in rodents and humans, suggesting an alternative role for these cells in host defense. Here, we demonstrate that after influenza infection, MHC-I expression on lung epithelial cells is upregulated, and mice bearing unlicensed NK cells (Ly49-deficient NKCKD and MHC-I-deficient B2m-/- mice) survive the infection better than WT mice. Importantly, transgenic expression of an inhibitory self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 receptor in NKCKD mice restores WT influenza susceptibility, confirming a direct role for Ly49. Conversely, F(ab’)2-mediated blockade of self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 inhibitory receptors protects WT mice from influenza virus infection. Mechanistically, perforin-deficient NKCKD mice succumb to influenza infection rapidly, indicating that direct cytotoxicity is necessary for unlicensed NK cell-mediated protection. Our findings demonstrate that Ly49:MHC-I interactions play a critical role in influenza virus pathogenesis. We suggest a similar role may be conserved in human KIR, and their blockade may be protective in humans. PMID:26928844

  8. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Sturtzel, Caterina; Tordoir, Marleen; Schlechta, Bernhard; Groenewegen, Dirk; Hofer, Erhard

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+) stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim) peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim) than CD56(bright) peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+)NKG2A(+) NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies. PMID:24498025

  9. Involvement of substance P and the NK-1 receptor in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-death for both men and women and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. Thus, it is urgent to investigate new antitumor drugs to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The peptide substance P (SP) has a widespread distribution throughout the body. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, SP regulates biological functions related to cancer, such as tumor cell proliferation, neoangiogenesis, the migration of tumor cells for invasion, infiltration and metastasis, and it exerts an antiapoptotic effects on tumor cells. It is known that the SP/NK-1 receptor system is involved in pancreatic cancer progression: (1) pancreatic cancer cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; (2) the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells in comparison with non-tumor cells; (3) nanomolar concentrations of SP induce pancreatic cancer cell proliferation; (4) NK-1 receptor antagonists inhibit pancreatic cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, at a certain concentration, these antagonists inhibit 100% of tumor cells; (5) this antitumor action is mediated through the NK-1 receptor, and tumor cells die by apoptosis; and (6) NK-1 receptor antagonists inhibit angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer xenografts. All these data suggest that the SP/NK-1 receptor system could play an important role in the development of pancreatic cancer; that the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer, and that NK-1 receptor antagonists could improve the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24605029

  10. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  11. Analysis on correlation between SP and NK-1R and intranasal mucosal contact point headache.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guomin; Yin, Jinshu; Peng, Hong; Wang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion Distribution of SP and NK-1R, especially NK-1R, in nasal mucosal tissue at contact point was higher compared with non-contact point. It was suggested that SP and NK-1R were associated with mucosal contact point headache. Objectives To observe difference of substance P (SP) and NK-1 receptor (NK-1R) expression in tissues at contact point and non-contact point among the patients with intranasal mucosal contact point headache and speculate the role of SP and NK-1R in mucosal contact point headache. Methods SP and NK-1R in tissues of contact point and non-contact point among 40 patients with intranasal mucosal contact point headache were stained histologically by immunohistochemistry, and the mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. Results SP was located in cytoplasm of acini epithelial cells, distributed in nasal mucosa tissues at both contact point and non-contact point. However, stain intensity was significantly increased at contact point (Z = -2.554, p < 0.05). NK-1R was located in the cytoplasm of acinar epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and nerve fibers of contact point; only in cytoplasm of acinar epithelial cells and nerve fibers of non-contact point. Tinctorial rate of NK-1R increased significantly at contact point (χ(2) = 40.438, p < 0.01). mRNA level of SP and NK-1R was up-regulated in nasal mucosa at contact point compared with non-contact point. PMID:26817501

  12. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  13. IL-2/IL-2 Ab Therapy Induces Target Organ NK Cells that Inhibit CNS Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Junwei; Campagnolo, Denise; Liu, Ruolan; Piao, Wenhua; Shi, Samuel; Hu, Baoyong; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Qinghua; Vollmer, Timothy; Van Kaer, Luc; La Cava, Antonio; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Objective The role of natural killer (NK) cells in regulating multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. Additional studies with NK cells might provide insight into the mechanism of action of MS therapies such as daclizumab, an antibody against the IL-2R α-chain, which induces expansion of CD56bright NK cells. Methods In a relapsing-remitting form of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS induced in SJL mice, we expanded NK cells with IL-2 coupled with an anti-IL-2 mAb and evaluated the effects of these NK cells on EAE. Further, we investigated the effect of the human version of IL-2/IL-2 mAb on NK cells from MS patients and its effect on CNS inflammation and pathology in a human-mouse chimera model and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Results IL-2/IL-2 mAb dramatically expands NK cells both in the peripheral lymphoid organs and in the central nervous system (CNS), and attenuates CNS inflammation and neurological deficits. Disease protection is conferred by CNS-resident NK cells. Importantly, the human version of IL-2/IL-2 mAb restored the defective CD56+ NK cells from MS patients in a human-mouse chimera model. Both the CD56bright and CD56dim subpopulations were required to attenuate disease in this model. Interpretation These findings unveil the immunotherapeutic potential of NK cells, which can act as critical suppressor cells in target organs of autoimmunity. These results also have implications to better understand the mechanism of action of daclizumab in MS. PMID:21425186

  14. Decreased NK cells in patients with head and neck cancer determined in archival DNA

    PubMed Central

    Accomando, William P.; Wiencke, John K.; Houseman, E Andres; Butler, Rondi; Zheng, Shichun; Nelson, Heather H.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Natural killer (NK) cells are a key element of the innate immune system implicated in human cancer. To examine NK cell levels in archived bloods from a study of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), a new DNA-based quantification method was developed. Experimental Design NK cell-specific DNA methylation was identified by analyzing DNA methylation and mRNA array data from purified blood leukocyte subtypes (NK, T, B, monocytes, granulocytes), and confirmed via pyrosequencing and quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP). NK cell levels in archived whole blood DNA from 122 HNSCC patients and 122 controls were assessed by qMSP. Results Pyrosequencing and qMSP confirmed that a demethylated DNA region in NKp46 distinguishes NK cells from other leukocytes, and serves as a quantitative NK cell marker. Demethylation of NKp46 was significantly lower in HNSCC patient bloods compared with controls (p < 0.001). Individuals in the lowest NK tertile had over 5-fold risk of being a HNSCC case, controlling for age, gender, HPV16 status, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and BMI (OR = 5.6, 95% CI: 2.0, 17.4). Cases did not show differences in NKp46 demethylation based on tumor site or stage. Conclusions The results of this study indicate a significant depression in NK cells in HNSCC patients that is unrelated to exposures associated with the disease. DNA methylation biomarkers of NK cells represent an alternative to conventional flow cytometry that can be applied in a wide variety of clinical and epidemiologic settings including archival blood specimens. PMID:23014525

  15. In vivo tumor surveillance by NK cells requires TYK2 but not TYK2 kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Witalisz-Siepracka, Agnieszka; Bednarik, Karoline T; Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Meissl, Katrin; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias; Strobl, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a Janus kinase (JAK) that is crucially involved in inflammation, carcinogenesis and defense against infection. The cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells in TYK2-deficient (Tyk2−/−) mice is severely reduced, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Using Tyk2−/− mice and mice expressing a kinase-inactive version of TYK2 (Tyk2K923E), we show that NK cell function is partly independent of the enzymatic activity of TYK2. Tyk2−/− and Tyk2K923E NK cells develop normally in the bone marrow, but the maturation of splenic Tyk2−/− NK cells (and to a lesser extent of Tyk2K923E NK cells) is impaired. In contrast, the production of interferon γ (IFNγ) in response to interleukin 12 (IL-12) or to stimulation through NK cell-activating receptors strictly depends on the presence of enzymatically active TYK2. The cytotoxic activity of Tyk2K923E NK cells against a range of target cells in vitro is higher than that of Tyk2−/− NK cells. Consistently, Tyk2K923E mice control the growth of NK cell-targeted tumors significantly better than TYK2-deficient mice, showing the physiological relevance of the finding. Inhibitors of TYK2's kinase activity are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancers, but their effects on tumor immune surveillance have not been investigated. Our finding that TYK2 has kinase-independent functions in vivo suggests that such inhibitors will leave NK cell mediated tumor surveillance largely intact and that they will be suitable for use in cancer therapy. PMID:26451322

  16. Interleukin-21 enhances NK cell activation in response to antibody-coated targets.

    PubMed

    Roda, Julie M; Parihar, Robin; Lehman, Amy; Mani, Aruna; Tridandapani, Susheela; Carson, William E

    2006-07-01

    NK cells express an activating FcR (FcgammaRIIIa) that mediates Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and the production of immune modulatory cytokines in response to Ab-coated targets. IL-21 has antitumor activity in murine models that depends in part on its ability to promote NK cell cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma secretion. We hypothesized that the NK cell response to FcR stimulation would be enhanced by the administration of IL-21. Human NK cells cultured with IL-21 and immobilized IgG or human breast cancer cells coated with a therapeutic mAb (trastuzumab) secreted large amounts of IFN-gamma. Increased secretion of TNF-alpha and the chemokines IL-8, MIP-1alpha, and RANTES was also observed under these conditions. NK cell IFN-gamma production was dependent on distinct signals mediated by the IL-21R and the FcR and was abrogated in STAT1-deficient NK cells. Supernatants derived from NK cells that had been stimulated with IL-21 and mAb-coated breast cancer cells were able to drive the migration of naive and activated T cells in an in vitro chemotaxis assay. IL-21 also enhanced NK cell lytic activity against Ab-coated tumor cells. Coadministration of IL-21 and Ab-coated tumor cells to immunocompetent mice led to synergistic production of IFN-gamma by NK cells. Furthermore, the administration of IL-21 augmented the effects of an anti-HER2/neu mAb in a murine tumor model, an effect that required IFN-gamma. These findings demonstrate that IL-21 significantly enhances the NK cell response to Ab-coated targets and suggest that IL-21 would be an effective adjuvant to administer in combination with therapeutic mAbs. PMID:16785506

  17. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  18. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  19. Antibody-mediated response of NKG2Cbright NK cells against human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Costa-Garcia, Marcel; Vera, Andrea; Moraru, Manuela; Vilches, Carlos; López-Botet, Miguel; Muntasell, Aura

    2015-03-15

    Human CMV (HCMV) infection promotes a variable and persistent expansion of functionally mature NKG2C(bright) NK cells. We analyzed NKG2C(bright) NK cell responses triggered by Abs from HCMV(+) sera against HCMV-infected MRC5 fibroblasts. Specific Abs promoted the degranulation (i.e., CD107a expression) and the production of cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) by a significant fraction of NK cells, exceeding the low natural cytotoxicity against HCMV-infected targets. NK cell-mediated Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was limited by viral Ag availability and HLA class I expression on infected cells early postinfection and increased at late stages, overcoming viral immunoevasion strategies. Moreover, the presence of specific IgG triggered the activation of NK cells against Ab-opsonized cell-free HCMV virions. As compared with NKG2A(+) NK cells, a significant proportion of NKG2C(bright) NK cells was FcεR γ-chain defective and highly responsive to Ab-driven activation, being particularly efficient in the production of antiviral cytokines, mainly TNF-α. Remarkably, the expansion of NKG2C(bright) NK cells in HCMV(+) subjects was related to the overall magnitude of TNF-α and IFN-γ cytokine secretion upon Ab-dependent and -independent activation. We show the power and sensitivity of the anti-HCMV response resulting from the cooperation between specific Abs and the NKG2C(bright) NK-cell subset. Furthermore, we disclose the proinflammatory potential of NKG2C(bright) NK cells, a variable that could influence the individual responses to other pathogens and tumors. PMID:25667418

  20. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  1. NOVEL ANTI-MICROBIAL PEPTIDE, NK-LYSIN, IS PRODUCED LOCALLY IN THE GUT OF EIMERIA-INFECTED HOST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an anti-microbial and anti-tumor protein produced by NK cells and T lymphocytes in mammals and is considered to be an important component of the local innate immune response to pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin consists of an 868 bp DNA sequence with an ORF of 140 amino acids with a predicted ...

  2. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J Henry; Crespo, Ângela C; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-10-27

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal-fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G-negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  3. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal–fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J. Henry; Crespo, Ângela C.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal–fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G–negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  4. Regulatory Considerations for NK Cells Used in Human Immunotherapy Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Translating cellular therapy from the laboratory to the clinic is a complicated process that involves scale-up of procedures to generate clinically relevant cell numbers, adaptation to reagents and equipment that are qualified for human use, establishing parameters of safety for reagents and equipment that are not already qualified for human use, codifying these processes into standards of practice and rules of conduct, and obtaining approval from regulatory bodies based on those codified standards and rules. As the laws and regulations that apply to cellular therapy will vary by time and geography, this chapter reviews some common key principles for the manufacturing of NK cells for human use that will need to be considered within the constraints of local policies and regulations. PMID:27177680

  5. Role of alloreactive KIR2DS1(+) NK cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Emanuela; Carlomagno, Simona; Pesce, Silvia; Della Chiesa, Mariella; Moretta, Alessandro; Sivori, Simona

    2011-10-01

    In allo-HSCT, donor-derived, "alloreactive" NK cells have been shown to play a crucial role in the treatment of acute leukemia, contributing to eradication of leukemic blasts (GvL effect) and to clearance of residual recipient DCs and T lymphocytes (thus, preventing GvHD and graft rejection, respectively). Such alloreactive NK cells do not express CD94/NKG2A but express inhibitory KIRs, specific for HLA class I allotypes, present in the donor but lacking in the recipient. This review is focused on the role of the activating KIR2DS1 receptor (specific for the C2-epitope of HLA-C) in haplo-HSCT. Recent data indicate that KIR2DS1 expression in HSC donors may represent a remarkable advantage in alloreactive NK responses. This is a result of a substantial increase in the NK-mediated capability to kill, not only recipients' leukemic cells but also DCs and T cell blasts. The beneficial effects mediated by alloreactive KIR2DS1(+) NK cells may occur after de novo expression of CCR7 upon interaction with allogeneic, KIR ligand-mismatched CCR7(+) cells. As a consequence, they can be redirected to LNs, where they can prevent priming of donor T cells and induction of GvHD. Finally, KIR2DS1 expression may also significantly amplify the size of the alloreactive NK cell subset by switching a subset of "not alloreactive" NK cells into potent alloreactive cells. PMID:21791599

  6. Sequential recovery of NK cell receptor repertoire after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Giebel, S; Dziaczkowska, J; Czerw, T; Wojnar, J; Krawczyk-Kulis, M; Nowak, I; Holowiecka, A; Segatti, A; Kyrcz-Krzemien, S; Kusnierczyk, P; Holowiecki, J

    2010-06-01

    Alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to the GVL reaction after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). However, various procedure-related factors may affect NK cell maturation and their ability to recognize and kill leukemic cells. In this study, we prospectively evaluated expression of NK cell inhibitory receptors in 83 adults treated with myeloablative, killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR)-ligand-matched allo-HSCT. NK cell maturation was evaluated by comparing the phenotypic patterns after allo-HSCT with the donor ones. The frequencies of KIR3DL1 were comparable to the donor ones on day +28, while they decreased significantly starting from day +100. The expression of KIR2DL2/3 was significantly lower in patients compared with donors up to day +100. The expression of KIR2DL1, despite continues growth, remained significantly decreased for 1 year after allo-HSCT. NKG2A was over-expressed up to day +180. Within 1 year after allo-HSCT, the NK cell phenotypic pattern tended to recapitulate the donor type. The process was disturbed by the use of steroids with significant differences observed on days +56 (P=0.01) and +100 (P=0.04). Up to day +100, reconstitution of NK cell receptor repertoire correlated with the absolute numbers of circulating CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells. Our observations should be taken into account when trying to predict potential benefit from NK cell alloreactivity. PMID:20118994

  7. NK cell education after allogeneic transplantation: dissociation between recovery of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed

    Foley, Bree; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Curtsinger, Julie; Luo, Xianghua; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells mediate GVL effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) by the production of inflammatory cytokines and by direct target lysis. The acquisition of both functions was presumed to be developmentally linked, but this linkage remained unstudied after allo-HCT. We tested the cytokine production and degranulation of reconstituting NK cells after adult unrelated donor or umbilical cord blood grafting. Recipients of T cell-depleted transplants, receiving no immune suppression, showed diminished NK cell degranulation. In contrast, degranulation was normal or increased after T-cell replete transplants given with immune suppression. Strikingly, target cell-induced IFNγ production was markedly diminished in all transplant settings, especially with T cell-depleted or naive T cell-containing umbilical cord blood grafts, suggesting a role for T cells in NK education. Although degranulation was similar in the KIR(+) and KIR(-) populations that coexpressed NKG2A, target cell-induced IFNγ production was limited to the subset of NK cells expressing KIR inhibited by self-ligands. Thus, cytokine production and cytotoxic function do not consistently coexist in NK cells reconstituting after allo-HCT. Exposure to IL-15 rapidly increased target-inducible IFNγ production, indicative of IL-15's potential as a therapeutic tool to enhance NK cell function to protect against infection and relapse after allo-HCT. PMID:21757615

  8. Human Decidual Natural Killer Cells Are a Unique NK Cell Subset with Immunomodulatory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Louise A.; Kopcow, Hernan D.; Rybalov, Basya; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Schatz, Frederick; Masch, Rachel; Lockwood, Charles J.; Schachter, Asher D.; Park, Peter J.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute 50–90% of lymphocytes in human uterine decidua in early pregnancy. Here, CD56bright uterine decidual NK (dNK) cells were compared with the CD56bright and CD56dim peripheral NK cell subsets by microarray analysis, with verification of results by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Among the ∼10,000 genes studied, 278 genes showed at least a threefold change with P ≤ 0.001 when comparing the dNK and peripheral NK cell subsets, most displaying increased expression in dNK cells. The largest number of these encoded surface proteins, including the unusual lectinlike receptors NKG2E and Ly-49L, several killer cell Ig-like receptors, the integrin subunits αD, αX, β1, and β5, and multiple tetraspanins (CD9, CD151, CD53, CD63, and TSPAN-5). Additionally, two secreted proteins, galectin-1 and progestagen-associated protein 14, known to have immunomodulatory functions, were selectively expressed in dNK cells. PMID:14568979

  9. NK Cells Respond to Haptens by the Activation of Calcium Permeable Plasma Membrane Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grandclément, Camille; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity to infected and transformed cells. Yet, NK cells can also mount hapten-specific recall responses thereby contributing to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). However, since NK cells lack antigen receptors that are used by the adaptive immune system to recognize haptens, it is not clear if NK cells respond directly to haptens and, if so, what mediates these responses. Here we show that among four haptens the two that are known to induce NK cell-dependent CHS trigger the rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ into NK cells and lymphocyte cell lines. Thus lymphocytes can respond to haptens independent of antigen presentation and antigen receptors. We identify the Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPC3 as a component of the lymphocyte response to one of these haptens. These data suggest that the response to the second hapten is based on a distinct mechanism, consistent with the capacity of NK cells to discriminate haptens. These findings raise the possibility that antigen-receptor independent activation of immune cells contributes to CHS. PMID:26963818

  10. Cutting edge: stage-specific requirement of IL-18 for antiviral NK cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-02-15

    Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, recent studies have demonstrated the ability of Ag-experienced NK cells to become long-lived and contribute to potent recall responses similar to T and B cells. The precise signals that promote the generation of a long-lived NK cell response are largely undefined. In this article, we demonstrate that NK cells require IL-18 signaling to generate a robust primary response during mouse CMV (MCMV) infection but do not require this signal for memory cell maintenance or recall responses. IL-12 signaling and STAT4 in activated NK cells increased the expression of the adaptor protein MyD88, which mediates signaling downstream of the IL-18 and IL-1 receptors. During MCMV infection, NK cells required MyD88, but not IL-1R, for optimal expansion. Thus, an IL-18-MyD88 signaling axis facilitates the prolific expansion of NK cells in response to primary viral infection, but not recall responses. PMID:25589075

  11. Stage-specific requirement of IL-18 for antiviral NK cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells are considered part of the innate immune system, recent studies have demonstrated the ability of antigen-experienced NK cells to become long-lived and contribute to potent recall responses similar to T and B cells. The precise signals that promote the generation of a long-lived NK cell response are largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells require interleukin (IL)-18 signaling to generate a robust primary response during mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, but do not require this signal for memory cell maintenance or recall responses. IL-12 signaling and STAT4 in activated NK cells increased the expression of the adaptor protein MyD88, which mediates signaling downstream of the IL-18 and IL-1 receptors. During MCMV infection, NK cells required MyD88 but not IL-1 receptor for optimal expansion. Thus, an IL-18-MyD88 signaling axis facilitates the prolific expansion of NK cells in response to primary viral infection, but not recall responses. PMID:25589075

  12. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  13. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  14. The Self-Specific Activation Receptor SLAM Family Is Critical for NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shasha; Yang, Meixiang; Du, Juan; Li, Dan; Li, Zehua; Cai, Chenxu; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-08-16

    NK cell education, a term describing a process for NK cell acquisition of functional competence, is primarily achieved by self-MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors. In this study, we have demonstrated that SLAM family receptors (SFRs) redundantly expressed on hematopoietic cells function as self-specific activation receptors critical for NK cell education. To overcome gene redundancy, we generated mice simultaneously lacking seven SFRs, revealing that NK-cell-mediated rejection of semi-allogeneic hematopoietic cells largely depended on the presence of SFRs on target cells. This stimulatory effect was determined by the presence of SFR-coupled adaptors; however, SFR-deficient mice displayed enhanced reactivity to hematopoietic cells. These findings demonstrate that SFRs endow NK cells with an ability to kill hematopoietic cells during the effector phase; however, the sustained engagement of SFRs can desensitize NK cell responses during an education process. Therefore, self-specific activating ligands may be "tolerogens" for NK cells, akin to self-antigens that induce T cell tolerance. PMID:27521267

  15. Dynamics of the NK-cell subset redistribution induced by cytomegalovirus infection in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Alarcón, Ana; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Muntasell, Aura; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; García, Jordi; Mur, Antonio; Fortuny, Claudia; López-Botet, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection promotes an expansion of NK-cells expressing the CD94/NKG2C receptor. We prospectively monitored the effects of HCMV on the NK-cell receptor (NKG2C, NKG2A, KIR, LILRB1) distribution in preterm infants. As compared to non-infected moderately preterm newborns (n=19, gestational age: 32-37 weeks), very preterm infants (n=5, gestational age: <32 weeks) suffering symptomatic postnatal HCMV infection displayed increased numbers of NKG2C+, KIR+ NK-cells, encompassed by a reduction of NKG2A+ NK-cells. A similar profile was observed in HCMV-negative newborns (n=4) with asymptomatic infection, during follow-up at ~4 and 10 months of age. Of note, viremia remained detectable in three symptomatic cases at ~10 months despite the persistent expansion of NKG2C+ NK-cells. Our study provides original insights on the dynamics of the imprint exerted by primary HCMV infection on the NK-cell compartment, revealing that the expansion of NKG2C+ NK-cells may be insufficient to control viral replication in very preterm infants. PMID:25636568

  16. Toll-like receptor 3 regulates NK cell responses to cytokines and controls experimental metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Guillerey, Camille; Chow, Melvyn T; Miles, Kim; Olver, Stuart; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist poly(I:C) is a promising adjuvant for cancer vaccines due to its induction of potent antitumor responses occurring primarily through the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NK) cells. However, little is known about the role of TLR3 sensing of endogenous ligands in innate tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we investigated whether TLR3 could modulate immune responses and facilitate tumor control without administration of an agonist. We observed only limited impact of TLR3 deficiency on spontaneous carcinogenesis and primary growth of B16F10, E0771 or MC38 tumors when injected subcutaneously to mice. Nevertheless, TLR3 was observed to limit experimental B16F10 lung metastasis, an immunologic constraint dependent on both IFNγ secretion and NK cells. Interestingly, we observed that NK cells derived from Tlr3 null (Tlr3−/−) mice were hyporesponsive to cytokine stimulation. Indeed, compared with NK cells with intact TLR3, Tlr3−/− NK cells produced significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ, when incubated in the presence of different combinations of IL-12, IL-18 and IL-15. Bone-marrow chimera experiments established that competent NK cell responses required TLR3 sensing on radio-sensitive immune cells. Intriguingly, although CD8α DCs robustly express high levels of TLR3, we found that those cells were not necessary for efficient IFNγ production by NK cells. Moreover, the defective NK cell phenotype of Tlr3−/− mice appeared to be independent of the gut microbiota. Altogether, our data demonstrate a pivotal role of endogenous TLR3 stimulation for the acquisition of full NK cell functions and immune protection against experimental metastasis. PMID:26405596

  17. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Morris, Zachary S.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be “specifically activated” through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies. PMID:26284063

  18. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  19. Dysregulation of regulatory CD56(bright) NK cells/T cells interactions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Laroni, Alice; Armentani, Eric; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Ivaldi, Federico; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Sivori, Simona; Gandhi, Roopali; Weiner, Howard L; Moretta, Alessandro; Mancardi, Giovanni L; Uccelli, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence has shown that CD56(bright) NK cells, a subset of NK cells abundant in lymph nodes, may have an immunoregulatory function. In multiple sclerosis (MS), expansion of CD56(bright) NK cells has been associated to successful response to different treatments and to remission of disease during pregnancy; how whether they exert immunoregulation in physiologic conditions and whether this is impaired in MS is not known. We dissected the immunoregulatory role of CD56(bright) NK cells function in healthy subjects (HS) and compared it with that of untreated MS subjects or patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS (CIS). We found that CD56(bright) NK cells from HS acquire, upon inflammatory cues, the capability of suppressing autologous CD4+T cell proliferation through direct cytotoxicity requiring engagement of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and secretion of granzyme B. CD56(bright) NK cells from patients with MS/CIS did not differ in frequency and share a similar phenotype but displayed a significantly lower ability to inhibit autologous T cell proliferation. This impairment was not related to deficient expression of NCRs or granzyme B by CD56(bright) NK cells, but to increased HLA-E expression on T cells from MS/CIS subjects, which could enhance the inhibitory effect mediated by NKG2A that is homogeneously expressed on CD56(bright) NK cells. The defect in controlling autologous T cells by CD56(bright) NK cells in MS/CIS might contribute to the excess of autoimmune response that is associated to disease development. PMID:27157273

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans Directly Stimulates Perforin Production and Rearms NK Cells for Enhanced Anticryptococcal Microbicidal Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Kaleb J.; Jones, Gareth J.; Zheng, Chunfu; Huston, Shaunna M.; Timm-McCann, Martina; Islam, Anowara; Berenger, Byron M.; Ma, Ling Ling; Wiseman, Jeremy C. D.; Mody, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    NK cells, in addition to possessing antitumor and antiviral activity, exhibit perforin-dependent microbicidal activity against the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the factors controlling this response, particularly whether the pathogen itself provides an activation or rearming signal, are largely unknown. The current studies were performed to determine whether exposure to this fungus alters subsequent NK cell anticryptococcal activity. NK cells lost perforin and mobilized lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 to the cell surface following incubation with the fungus, indicating that degranulation had occurred. Despite a reduced perforin content during killing, NK cells acquired an enhanced ability to kill C. neoformans, as demonstrated using auxotrophs that allowed independent assessment of the killing of two strains. De novo protein synthesis was required for optimal killing; however, there was no evidence that a soluble factor contributed to the enhanced anticryptococcal activity. Exposure of NK cells to C. neoformans caused the cells to rearm, as demonstrated by increased perforin mRNA levels and enhanced loss of perforin when transcription was blocked. Degranulation alone was insufficient to provide the activation signal as NK cells lost anticryptococcal activity following treatment with strontium chloride. However, NK cells regained the activity upon prolonged exposure to C. neoformans, which is consistent with activation by the microbe. The enhanced cytotoxicity did not extend to tumor killing since NK cells exposed to C. neoformans failed to kill NK-sensitive tumor targets (K562 cells). These studies demonstrate that there is contact-mediated microbe-specific rearming and activation of microbicidal activity that are necessary for optimal killing of C. neoformans. PMID:19307209

  1. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception Through May 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; James Francfort; Randall Solomon

    2004-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric vehicles for transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month per vehicle. The first Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for returning the vehicles include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles have been returned to Ford as their leases have completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Through May 2004, participants in the Clean Commute Program have driven their vehicles over 370,000 miles, avoiding the use of over 17,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through May 2004.

  2. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Final Report - Inception through December 2004

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Don Karner

    2005-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased at total of 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month. First Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May, 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for leaving the Program include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles were returned to Ford when the lease was completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Mileage accumulation dropped in the last quarter of the program as vehicle leases were returned to Ford. The impact of the program overall was significant as participants in the Clean Commute Program drove their vehicles over 406,074 miles, avoiding the use of over 18,887 gallons of gasoline. During the active portion of the program, the TH!NK city vehicles were driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month. Over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replaced trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through December 2004.

  3. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human NK cells developing after umbilical cord blood transplantation: a role for human cytomegalovirus?

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Falco, Michela; Podestà, Marina; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Lorenzo; Frassoni, Francesco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2012-01-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in early immunity after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because they are the first lymphocyte subset recovering after the allograft. In this study, we analyzed the development of NK cells after intrabone umbilical cord blood (CB) transplantation in 18 adult patients with hematologic malignancies. Our data indicate that, also in this transplantation setting, NK cells are the first lymphoid population detectable in peripheral blood. However, different patterns of NK-cell development could be identified. Indeed, in a group of patients, a relevant fraction of NK cells expressed a mature phenotype characterized by the KIR(+)NKG2A(-) signature 3-6 months after transplantation. In other patients, most NK cells maintained an immature phenotype even after 12 months. A possible role for cytomegalovirus in the promotion of NK-cell development was suggested by the observation that a more rapid NK-cell maturation together with expansion of NKG2C(+) NK cells was confined to patients experiencing cytomegalovirus reactivation. In a fraction of these patients, an aberrant and hyporesponsive CD56(-)CD16(+)p75/AIRM1(-) NK-cell subset (mostly KIR(+)NKG2A(-)) reminiscent of that described in patients with viremic HIV was detected. Our data support the concept that cytomegalovirus infection may drive NK-cell development after umbilical CB transplantation. PMID:22096237

  4. IL-33 receptor ST2 amplifies the expansion of NK cells and enhances host defense during mouse cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tsukasa; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-15

    NK cells provide important host defense against viruses and can differentiate into self-renewing memory NK cells after infection, alloantigen stimulation, and cytokine stimulation. In this study, we investigated the role of the IL-33 receptor ST2 in the differentiation of NK cells during mouse CMV (MCMV) infection. Although ST2-deficient (Il1rl1 (-/-)) Ly49H(+) NK cells develop normally and differentiate into memory cells after MCMV infection, naive and memory Il1rl1 (-/-) Ly49H(+) NK cells exhibited profound defects in MCMV-specific expansion, resulting in impaired protection against MCMV challenge. Additionally, IL-33 enhanced m157 Ag-specific proliferation of Ly49H(+) NK cells in vitro. Thus, an IL-33/ST2 signaling axis in NK cells contributes to host defense against MCMV. PMID:25926677

  5. Involvement of the appendix in a relapsed case of primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, H; Takagi, T; Tamaru, J; Sakai, C

    2000-05-01

    We report here a 20-year-old man presenting with primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma which showed an aggressive clinical course spreading to the spleen and skin despite various treatments. Eight months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, acute appendicitis with perforation occurred and the patient underwent appendectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was NK/T-cell lymphoma of the appendix. Lymphoma of the appendix is extremely rare and the majority of appendiceal lymphomas are of B-cell origin. This is the first report of involvement of appendix by nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. PMID:11042526

  6. Unique Eomes+ NK Cell Subsets Are Present in Uterus and Decidua During Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Chiossone, Laura; Croxatto, Daniele; Loiacono, Fabrizio; Martini, Stefania; Ferrero, Simone; Walzer, Thierry; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Decidual and uterine natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to contribute to the successful pregnancy both in humans and mice. NK cells represent “cytotoxic” group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and are distinct from the recently described “helper” ILC1. Here, we show that both in humans and mice the majority of group 1 ILC in endometrium/uterus and decidua express Eomesodermin (Eomes), thus suggesting that they are developmentally related to conventional NK cells. However, they differ from peripheral NK cells. In humans, Eomes+ decidual NK (dNK) cells express CD49a and other markers of tissue residency, including CD103, integrin β7, CD9, and CD69. The expression of CD103 allows the identification of different subsets of IFNγ-producing Eomes+ NK cells. We show that TGFβ can sustain/induce CD103 and CD9 expression in dNK cells and decidual CD34-derived NK cells, indicating that the decidual microenvironment can instruct the phenotype of Eomes+ NK cells. In murine decidua and uterus, Eomes+ cells include CD49a−CD49b+ conventional NK cells and CD49a+ cells. Notably, Eomes+CD49a+ cells are absent in spleen and liver. Decidual and uterine Eomes+CD49a+ cells can be dissected in two peculiar cell subsets according to CD49b expression. CD49a+CD49b− and CD49a+CD49b+ cells are enriched in immature CD11blowCD27high cells, while CD49a−CD49b+ cells contain higher percentages of mature CD11bhighCD27low cells, both in uterus and decidua. Moreover, Eomes+CD49a+CD49b− cells decrease during gestation, thus suggesting that this peculiar subset may be required in early pregnancy rather than on later phases. Conversely, a minor Eomes−CD49a+ ILC1 population present in decidua and uterus increases during pregnancy. CD49b−Eomes± cells produce mainly TNF, while CD49a−CD49b+ conventional NK cells and CD49a+CD49b+ cells produce both IFNγ and TNF. Thus, human and murine decidua contains unique subsets of group 1 ILCs, including Eomes+ and Eomes− cells, with

  7. TLR7/8 agonists promote NK-DC cross-talk to enhance NK cell anti-tumor effects in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixia; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Cai

    2015-12-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer death. Immunotherapy is considered a promising treatment with the aim to boost or arouse HCC-specific immune responses. TLR7 and TLR8 agonists are effective immunomodulators and have been applied topically for the treatment of certain skin tumors and viral infections. Here, we explored the role of TLR7 and TLR8 agonists on the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NK) cells. We demonstrated that these agonists could directly activate NK cells, promoting the maturation of immature DCs. Meanwhile, DCs also assisted in the function of NK cells, resulting in enhanced anti-tumor immune responses to HCC. Importantly, the combination therapy with NK cells stimulated with DCs and TLR7/8 agonist Gardiquimod (GDQ) significantly suppresses the growth of human HepG2 liver carcinoma xenografts. This study provides a new immunotherapeutic approach for human HCC based on DC-NK cross-talk and also suggests that TLR7 and/or TLR8 agonists, particularly GDQ, may serve as potent innate and adaptive immune response immunomodulators in tumor therapy. PMID:26433159

  8. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  9. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:27622064

  10. Adenovirus type 35, but not type 5, stimulates NK cell activation via plasmacytoid dendritic cells and TLR9 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens H W; Verhoeven, Dirk H J; Kwappenberg, Kitty M C; Vellinga, Jort; Lankester, Arjan C; van Tol, Maarten J D; Schilham, Marco W

    2012-05-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, disseminated adenoviral infections during the first two months after HSCT can lead to severe complications and fatal outcome. Since NK cells are usually the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and have been implicated in the clearance of adenovirus-infected cells, it was investigated whether NK cells are activated by adenovirus in vitro. Exposure of PBMC to human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) or HAdV35 resulted in the up-regulation of the activation marker CD69 on NK cells and enhanced the cytolytic activity of NK cells. HAdV5-induced NK cell activation relied on the contribution of T cells as the depletion of T cells from PBMC abolished NK cell activation. In contrast, NK cell activation in response to HAdV35 occurred in the absence of T cells. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were necessary and sufficient to mediate NK cell activation. HAdV35 induced significantly more interferon-α (IFN-α) production by pDC than HAdV5. The increased IFN-α production and NK cell activation correlated with a higher infection efficiency of viruses with the type 35 fiber. The IFN-α response of pDC was enhanced by the presence of NK cells, suggesting a reciprocal interaction between pDC and NK cells. Incubation with a TLR9 antagonist impaired the IFN-α production by pDC as well as NK cell activation, implying that TLR9 signaling is critically involved in the IFN-α response of pDC and NK cell activation after HAdV35 exposure. In conclusion, two human adenovirus serotypes from two different species differ considerably in their capacity to stimulate pDC and NK cells. PMID:22424784

  11. NK Cell-Specific Gata3 Ablation Identifies the Maturation Program Required for Bone Marrow Exit and Control of Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Alaa Kassim; Oh, Jun Seok; Vivier, Eric; Busslinger, Meinrad; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-02-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes capable of eliciting an innate immune response to pathogens. NK cells develop and become mature in the bone marrow (BM) before they migrate out to peripheral organs. Although the developmental program leading to mature NK cells has been studied in the context of several transcription factors, the stage-specific role of GATA3 in NK cell development has been incompletely understood. Using NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice in which Gata3 deficiency was induced as early as the immature stage of NK cell differentiation, we demonstrated that GATA3 is required for the NK cell maturation beyond the CD27 single-positive stage and is indispensable for the maintenance of liver-resident NK cells. The frequencies of NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice were found higher in the BM but lower in peripheral organs compared with control littermates, indicating that GATA3 controls the maturation program required for BM egress. Despite the defect in maturation, upon murine CMV infection, NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice expanded vigorously, achieving NK cell frequencies surpassing those in controls and therefore provided comparable protection. The heightened proliferation of NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice was cell intrinsic and associated with enhanced upregulation of CD25 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GATA3 is a critical regulator for NK cell terminal maturation and egress out of the BM and that immature NK cells present in the periphery of NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice can rapidly expand and provide a reservoir of NK cells capable of mounting an efficient cytotoxic response upon virus infection. PMID:26773150

  12. NK1 receptor and the ventral medulla of the rat: bulbospinal and catecholaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Makeham, J M; Goodchild, A K; Pilowsky, P M

    2001-12-01

    Bulbospinal C1 neurons are sympathoexcitatory and excited by substance P. However the substance P receptor (NK1 receptor), has been reported to be absent from the somata of C1 neurons. In this study, using double and triple labelling immunofluorescence and retrograde tracing, we provide evidence that the NK1 receptor is present on 5.3% of C1 neurons, and that 4.7% of C1 neurons receive close oppositions from NK1 receptor immunoreactive terminals, indicating a pre-synaptic and post-synaptic site for the action of substance P. These results provide support for the sympathoexcitatory actions of substance P on C1 neurons. We also demonstrate the NK1 receptor on bulbospinal neurons of the ventral respiratory group, in a region overlapping the pre-Bötzinger Complex. PMID:11726770

  13. Activation of NK cells in subjects exposed to mild hyper- or hypothermic load.

    PubMed

    Lackovic, V; Borecký, L; Vigas, M; Rovenský, J

    1988-06-01

    The effect of mild hyper- and hypothermic stress on release of selected hormones (somatotropin, noradrenaline, etc.), interferon (IFN), and activity of NK cells in the blood was examined in groups of young males during a 30 min exposure to 39 degrees C and 4 degrees C. A quick release of somatotropin was registered in 44% of examinees in the hyperthermic group, while the persons exposed to 4 degrees C reacted with a release of noradrenaline only. Concurrently, an elevation of NK cell activity was observed both in the subgroup releasing somatotropin after hyperthermic stress and in the group exposed to cold. Since these forms of mild stress did not lead to an appearance of IFN in the serum, the possibility of an NK cell activating effect of somatotropin and/or the adrenal hormones was tested. While the adrenal hormones stimulated the NK cell activity in vitro, no support for a similar role for somatotropin was found. PMID:2457640

  14. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  15. NK cell tolerance as the final endorsement of prenatal tolerance after in utero hematopoietic cellular transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alhajjat, Amir M.; Lee, Amanda E.; Strong, Beverly S.; Shaaban, Aimen F.

    2015-01-01

    The primary benefits of in utero hematopoietic cellular transplantation (IUHCT) arise from transplanting curative cells prior to the immunologic maturation of the fetus. However, this approach has been routinely successful only in the treatment of congenital immunodeficiency diseases that include an inherent NK cell deficiency despite the existence of normal maternal immunity in either setting. These observations raise the possibility that fetal NK cells function as an early barrier to allogeneic IUHCT. Herein, we summarize the findings of previous studies of prenatal NK cell allospecific tolerance in mice and in humans. Cumulatively, this new information reveals the complexity of the fetal immune response in the setting of rejection or tolerance and illustrates the role for fetal NK cells in the final endorsement of allospecific prenatal tolerance. PMID:25852555

  16. NK cell imaging by in vitro and in vivo labelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Galli, F; Histed, S; Aras, O

    2014-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a particular lymphocyte subset with a documented cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Evidence of NK antitumoral effect led researchers to focus on the development of immunotherapies aimed at augmenting NK recruitment and infiltration into tumor and their anti-cancer functions. Studies in animal models proved that the right combination of drugs, cytokines, chemokines and other factors might be used to enhance or suppress tumor targeting by NK cells. Therefore, it would be necessary to have a tool to non-invasively monitor the efficacy of such novel therapies. Available imaging techniques comprise magnetic resonance, optical and nuclear medicine imaging with a pool of compounds that ranges from radiolabelled nanoparticles and radiopharmaceuticals to fluorescent probes. Each tracer and technique has its own pros and cons, but till now, no one emerged as superior among the others. PMID:25265248

  17. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Bilbao, Érica Rojas; Garate, Gonzalo Martín; de los Ángeles Vicente Repáraz, María; del Olmo, Mercedes; Casali, Claudia Érica; Zerga, Marta Elisa; Chirife, Ana María; Cicco, Juan Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DA-EPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease. PMID:23772308

  18. NK cells and type 1 innate lymphoid cells: partners in host defense.

    PubMed

    Spits, Hergen; Bernink, Jochem H; Lanier, Lewis

    2016-06-21

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are effectors and regulators of innate immunity and tissue modeling and repair. Researchers have identified subsets of ILCs with differing functional activities, capacities to produce cytokines and transcription factors required for development and function. Natural killer (NK) cells represent the prototypical member of the ILC family. Together with ILC1s, NK cells constitute group 1 ILCs, which are characterized by their capacity to produce interferon-γ and their functional dependence on the transcription factor T-bet. NK cells and ILC1s are developmentally distinct but share so many features that they are difficult to distinguish, particularly under conditions of infection and inflammation. Here we review current knowledge of NK cells and the various ILC1 subsets. PMID:27328005

  19. Chemokine Receptor Expression on Normal Blood CD56+ NK-Cells Elucidates Cell Partners That Comigrate during the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses and Identifies a Transitional NK-Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida; Leander, Magdalena; Santos, Marlene; Santos, Ana Helena; Lau, Catarina; Queirós, Maria Luís; Gonçalves, Marta; Fonseca, Sónia; Moura, João; Teixeira, Maria dos Anjos; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Studies of chemokine receptors (CKR) in natural killer- (NK-) cells have already been published, but only a few gave detailed information on its differential expression on blood NK-cell subsets. We report on the expression of the inflammatory and homeostatic CKR on normal blood CD56+low CD16+ and CD56+high  CD16−/+low NK-cells. Conventional CD56+low and CD56+high NK-cells present in the normal PB do express CKR for inflammatory cytokines, although with different patterns CD56+low NK-cells are mainly CXCR1/CXCR2+ and CXCR3/CCR5−/+, whereas mostly CD56+high NK-cells are CXCR1/CXCR2− and CXCR3/CCR5+. Both NK-cell subsets have variable CXCR4 expression and are CCR4− and CCR6−. The CKR repertoire of the CD56+low NK-cells approaches to that of neutrophils, whereas the CKR repertoire of the CD56+high NK-cells mimics that of Th1+ T cells, suggesting that these cells are prepared to migrate into inflamed tissues at different phases of the immune response. In addition, we describe a subpopulation of NK-cells with intermediate levels of CD56 expression, which we named CD56+int NK-cells. These NK-cells are CXCR3/CCR5+, they have intermediate levels of expression of CD16, CD62L, CD94, and CD122, and they are CD57− and CD158a−. In view of their phenotypic features, we hypothesize that they correspond to a transitional stage, between the well-known CD56+high and CD56+low NK-cells populations. PMID:26543875

  20. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  1. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  2. Viral MHC class I-like molecule allows evasion of NK cell effector responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pyzik, Michal; Dumaine, Anne; Dumaine, Anne A; Charbonneau, Benoît; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Jonjic, Stipan; Vidal, Silvia M

    2014-12-15

    The outcome of mouse CMV (MCMV) infection varies among different inbred mouse strains depending on NK cell effector functions governed through recognition receptor triggering. NK cells from different mouse strains possess diverse repertoires of activating or inhibitory Ly49 receptors, which share some of their polymorphic MHC class I (MHC-I) ligands. By examining the NK cell response to MCMV infection in novel BALB substrains congenic for different MHC (or H-2 in mice) haplotypes, we show that recognition of viral MHC-I-like protein m157 by inhibitory Ly49C receptor allows escape from NK cell control of viral replication. Dominant inhibition by Ly49C bound to self-H-2(b) encoded MHC-I molecules masks this effect, which only becomes apparent in distinct H-2 haplotypes, such as H-2(f). The recognition of m157-expressing cells by Ly49C resulted in both decreased NK cell killing in vitro and reduced rejection in vivo. Further, control of infection with m157-deletant (Δm157) MCMV was improved in mice carrying H-2 molecules unrecognized by Ly49C but allowing expansion of NK cell effectors expressing activating Ly49L receptors. Hence, our study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that MHC-I mimicry strategies used by MCMV to avoid NK cell control are biologically relevant during in vivo viral infection. Of value for human studies is that only a few genetic assortments conditional on the repertoires of viral MHC-I-like proteins/host NK receptors/MHC haplotypes should allow efficient protection against CMV infection. PMID:25392524

  3. Role of the NK Cell-Activating Receptor CRACC in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Benjamin; Kebschull, Moritz; Nowak, Michael; Demmer, Ryan T.; Haupt, Manuela; Körner, Christian; Perner, Sven; Jepsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent, biofilm-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that results in the loss of the tooth-supporting tissues. It features two major clinical entities: chronic periodontitis, which is more common, and aggressive periodontitis, which usually has an early onset and a rapid progression. Natural killer (NK) cells are a distinct subgroup of lymphocytes that play a major role in the ability of the innate immune system to steer immune responses. NK cells are abundant in periodontitis lesions, and NK cell activation has been causally linked to periodontal tissue destruction. However, the exact mechanisms of their activation and their role in the pathophysiology of periodontitis are elusive. Here, we show that the predominant NK cell-activating molecule in periodontitis is CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cells (CRACC). We show that CRACC induction was significantly more pronounced in aggressive than chronic periodontitis and correlated positively with periodontal disease severity, subgingival levels of specific periodontal pathogens, and NK cell activation in vivo. We delineate how Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral pathogen that is causally associated with aggressive periodontitis, indirectly induces CRACC on NK cells via activation of dendritic cells and subsequent interleukin 12 (IL-12) signaling. In contrast, we demonstrate that fimbriae from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a principal pathogen in chronic periodontitis, actively attenuate CRACC induction on NK cells. Our data suggest an involvement of CRACC-mediated NK cell activation in periodontal tissue destruction and point to a plausible distinction in the pathobiology of aggressive and chronic periodontitis that may help explain the accelerated tissue destruction in aggressive periodontitis. PMID:23250953

  4. Maternal uterine NK cell-activating receptor KIR2DS1 enhances placentation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiqiu; Sharkey, Andrew M; Kennedy, Philippa R; Gardner, Lucy; Farrell, Lydia E; Chazara, Olympe; Bauer, Julien; Hiby, Susan E; Colucci, Francesco; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-10-01

    Reduced trophoblast invasion and vascular conversion in decidua are thought to be the primary defect of common pregnancy disorders including preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Genetic studies suggest these conditions are linked to combinations of polymorphic killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes expressed by maternal decidual NK cells (dNK) and HLA-C genes expressed by fetal trophoblast. Inhibitory KIR2DL1 and activating KIR2DS1 both bind HLA-C2, but confer increased risk or protection from pregnancy disorders, respectively. The mechanisms underlying these genetic associations with opposing outcomes are unknown. We show that KIR2DS1 is highly expressed in dNK, stimulating strong activation of KIR2DS1+ dNK. We used microarrays to identify additional responses triggered by binding of KIR2DS1 or KIR2DL1 to HLA-C2 and found different responses in dNK coexpressing KIR2DS1 with KIR2DL1 compared with dNK only expressing KIR2DL1. Activation of KIR2DS1+ dNK by HLA-C2 stimulated production of soluble products including GM-CSF, detected by intracellular FACS and ELISA. We demonstrated that GM-CSF enhanced migration of primary trophoblast and JEG-3 trophoblast cells in vitro. These findings provide a molecular mechanism explaining how recognition of HLA class I molecules on fetal trophoblast by an activating KIR on maternal dNK may be beneficial for placentation. PMID:24091323

  5. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  6. A novel Ncr1-Cre mouse reveals the essential role of STAT5 for NK-cell survival and development.

    PubMed

    Eckelhart, Eva; Warsch, Wolfgang; Zebedin, Eva; Simma, Olivia; Stoiber, Dagmar; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Mueller, Mathias; Casanova, Emilio; Sexl, Veronika

    2011-02-01

    We generated a transgenic mouse line that expresses the Cre recombinase under the control of the Ncr1 (p46) promoter. Cre-mediated recombination was tightly restricted to natural killer (NK) cells, as revealed by crossing Ncr1-iCreTg mice to the eGFP-LSLTg reporter strain. Ncr1-iCreTg mice were further used to study NK cell-specific functions of Stat5 (signal transducers and activators of transcription 5) by generating Stat5(f/f) Ncr1-iCreTg animals. Stat5(f/f) Ncr1-iCreTg mice were largely devoid of NK cells in peripheral lymphoid organs. In the bone marrow, NK-cell maturation was abrogated at the NK cell-precursor stage. Moreover, we found that in vitro deletion of Stat5 in interleukin 2-expanded NK cells was incompatible with NK-cell viability. In vivo assays confirmed the complete abrogation of NK cell-mediated tumor control against B16F10-melanoma cells. In contrast, T cell-mediated tumor surveillance against MC38-adenocarcinoma cells was undisturbed. In summary, the results of our study show that STAT5 has a cell-intrinsic role in NK-cell development and that Ncr1-iCreTg mice are a powerful novel tool with which to study NK-cell development, biology, and function. PMID:21127177

  7. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Dante; Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra; Montoya, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  8. Shared alterations in NK cell frequency, phenotype, and function in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3- CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56(dim) cell fraction compared to CD56(bright) cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56(dim) NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  9. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  10. Human NK cell repertoire diversity reflects immune experience and correlates with viral susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Fukuyama, Julia; Liang, Emily C.; Yao, Yi; Jarrell, Justin A.; Drake, Alison L.; Kinuthia, John; Montgomery, Ruth R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Holmes, Susan; Blish, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Innate natural killer (NK) cells are diverse at the single-cell level because of variegated expressions of activating and inhibitory receptors, yet the developmental roots and functional consequences of this diversity remain unknown. Because NK cells are critical for antiviral and antitumor responses, a better understanding of their diversity could lead to an improved ability to harness them therapeutically. We found that NK diversity is lower at birth than in adults. During an antiviral response to either HIV-1 or West Nile virus, NK diversity increases, resulting in terminal differentiation and cytokine production at the cost of cell division and degranulation. In African women matched for HIV-1 exposure risk, high NK diversity is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition. Existing diversity may therefore decrease the flexibility of the antiviral response. Collectively, the data reveal that human NK diversity is a previously undefined metric of immune history and function that may be clinically useful in forecasting the outcomes of infection and malignancy. PMID:26203083