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Sample records for nm diamond nanocrystals

  1. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  2. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed.more » Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.« less

  3. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.

  4. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  5. Formation mechanism of diamond nanocrystal from catalysed carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Li, Tingju; Dong, Chuang; Zhang, Xingguo; Yao, Shan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dehe; Ji, Shouhua; Jin, Junze

    2004-10-01

    Recently, our group has synthesized nanocrystal n-diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) from catalysed carbon black. Based on the results of XRD, TGA and DTA, a formation mechanism has been proposed to explain the phase transformation from carbon black to diamond nanocrystal. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, agr-Fe, ggr-Fe, then liquid iron. When the carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, DLC or graphite separates out of the liquid iron. With decrease of temperature, the carbon in ggr-Fe is separated out, and n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

  6. Photophysics of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthel, Martin; Mollet, Oriane; Dantelle, Géraldine; Gacoin, Thierry; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    A study of the photophysical properties of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond nanocrystals of size 50 nm or below is carried out by means of second-order time-intensity photon correlation and cross-correlation measurements as a function of the excitation power for both pure charge states, neutral and negatively charged, as well as for the photochromic state, where the center switches between both states at any power. A dedicated three-level model implying a shelving level is developed to extract the relevant photophysical parameters coupling all three levels. Our analysis confirms the very existence of the shelving level for the neutral NV center. It is found that it plays a negligible role on the photophysics of this center, whereas it is responsible for an increasing photon bunching behavior of the negative NV center with increasing power. From the photophysical parameters, we infer a quantum efficiency for both centers, showing that it remains close to unity for the neutral center over the entire power range, whereas it drops with increasing power from near unity to approximately 0.5 for the negative center. The photophysics of the photochromic center reveals a rich phenomenology that is to a large extent dominated by that of the negative state, in agreement with the excess charge release of the negative center being much slower than the photon emission process.

  7. Nucleation, growth, and graphitization of diamond nanocrystals during chlorination of carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Sascha; Gogotsi, Yury; McNallan, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    Synthesis of nano- and microcrystalline sp3-bonded carbon (diamond) with cubic and hexagonal structure by extraction of silicon from silicon carbide in chlorine-containing gases has been reported recently. This process is attractive because it can produce diamond at ambient pressure and temperatures below 1000 °C. No plasma or other high-energy activation is required, thus providing an opportunity for large-scale synthesis. However, the mechanism of diamond formation has not been previously analyzed. This work reports on the formation mechanisms of diamond as well as the transformation of diamond to graphite and onionlike carbon upon heating. Study of SiC/carbon interfaces showed that direct epitaxial growth of diamond on SiC is possible, in agreement with previous molecular-dynamics simulation. However, random nucleation of diamond from amorphous sp3-bonded carbon produced as the result of extraction of Si from SiC has also been demonstrated. It has been shown that the presence of hydrogen in the environment is not required for diamond synthesis. However, hydrogen can stabilize the nanocrystals and lead to the growth of thick diamond layers. If no hydrogen is added, diamond nanocrystals transform to graphite, forming carbon onions and other curved graphitic nanostructures.

  8. The hemocompatibility of oxidized diamond nanocrystals for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hung-Cheng; Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Chen, Ching-Pin; Chang, Ming-Yao; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.; Chen, Chia-Chun; Hung, Shain-Un; Wu, Che-Chih; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Low-dimensional carbon-based nanomaterials have recently received enormous attention for biomedical applications. However, increasing evidence indicates that they are cytotoxic and can cause inflammatory responses in the body. Here, we show that monocrystalline nanodiamonds (NDs) synthesized by high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) methods and purified by air oxidation and strong oxidative acid treatments have excellent hemocompatibility with negligible hemolytic and thrombogenic activities. Cell viability assays with human primary endothelial cells suggested that the oxidized HPHT-NDs (dimensions of 35-500 nm) are non-cytotoxic. No significant elevation of the inflammatory cytokine levels of IL-1β and IL-6 was detected in mice after intravenous injection of the nanocrystals in vivo. Using a hindlimb-ischemia mouse model, we demonstrated that 35-nm NDs after covalent conjugation with polyarginine are useful as a drug delivery vehicle of heparin for prolonged anticoagulation treatment. The present study lays a solid foundation for further therapeutic applications of NDs in biomedicine.

  9. Photoconductive response of type IIa diamond in the 222-353-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Lipatov, Evgenii E. I.; Parks, D.; Panchenko, Alexei N.; Schein, Jochen; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Thompson, J.

    2004-05-01

    Diamond radiation detectors (DRDs) operate on the principle of photoconductive response of the normally insulating, Type IIa diamond when dosed by electromagnetic radiation or high energy particles. As detectors, they offer fast response (~100 ps) and can handle high radiation doses (~1 GGy) without degradation. Diamond also offers significant advantages over semiconducting materials as a compact, bi-polar, high voltage switching medium because of its high dielectric strength and thermal conductivity. However, the wide band-gap of diamond and its normally insulating state impose stringent requirements on the trigger radiation that is used to make the diamond conductive. This paper describes a simple model for conduction in diamond, and compares this model with experimental conductivity as measured in a natural diamond Type IIa radiation detector that was irradiated by laser excitation at various wavelengths from 222-353 nm. The DRD geometry consisted of a 3x1x0.5 mm3 Type IIa diamond with metallization on the 3x0.5mm2 sides. The DRD was exposed to laser light in the orthogonal 3x1 mm2 plane. Agreement with the measured data is achieved by fitting a parameter (defined here as β) at the various irradiation wavelengths. This fitting parameter is itself a function of two physical quantities: α, the absorption coefficient of the diamond and ɛo, the ionization cost to produce a hole-pair. Using published values of α, we deduce values of ɛo and compare them with published values for Type IIa diamond in the deep UV to soft x-ray regions. This model also provides a basis for design of high voltage diamond switches that are triggered by near-bandgap (220-250 nm) UV radiation.

  10. Simulation of ultraviolet- and soft X-ray-pulse generation as a result of cooperative recombination of excitons in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.

    2013-11-15

    Using numerical simulation, it is shown that the recombination of free excitons photoexcited in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film can occur in the cooperative mode. It is found that this mode can be implemented despite the fact that diamond is an 'indirect' semiconductor. It is shown that the power of the generated radiation at the pulse peak during the cooperative recombination of free excitons can exceed that of the incoherent spontaneous emission of the same initial number of free excitons by more than an order of magnitude. Finally, it is shown that the process under consideration can be used to generate picosecond pulses of ultraviolet and soft X-ray electromagnetic field at a wavelength of 235 nm.

  11. Cooling the Motion of Diamond Nanocrystals in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap in High Vacuum.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W; D'Urso, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. We demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K. PMID:27444654

  12. Cooling the Motion of Diamond Nanocrystals in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap in High Vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; D’Urso, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. We demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K. PMID:27444654

  13. Novel optical signatures of sub-3 nm rare earth sesquioxide nanocrystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, James; Mahajan, Sameer

    2008-03-01

    Europium and terbium based sesquioxide nanomaterials, known for their characteristic red and green luminescence, respectively, have recently garnered much research attention due to their size-dependent optical properties. Here, we present systematic investigation of the size-dependent optical properties Eu2O3, Tb2O3, and Gd2O3:Eu^3+ / Tb^3+ nanocrystals (NCs) in the size range of 1-3 nm in diameter. We observe a new luminescence peak at 620 nm in Eu2O3 and Gd2O3:Eu^3+ NCs, which represents modulation of the ^7F2 transition in Eu^3+ ion. Intensity modulation with respect to the 612 nm is observed as a function of nanocrystal size. For the Tb2O3 NCs, a new luminescence signature at 548 nm characterizes modulation of the ^7F5 transition in Tb^3+ ion. In addition, we probe the effect of NC size on the luminescence efficiencies of the doped and pure sesquioxide NCs. The concentration quenching effect, which leads to low luminescence efficiencies in bulk, pure sesquioxides, is explored in sub-3 nm sesquioxides.

  14. Cooling the motion of diamond nanocrystals in a magneto-gravitational trap in high vacuum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hsu, Jen -Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; D’Urso, Brian

    2016-07-22

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamondmore » nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. Furthermore, we demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K.« less

  15. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under 1064-nm laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    The photophysics and charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has been extensively investigated, but is still not fully understood. In contrast to previous work, we find that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with low power near-infrared (1064-nm) light, resulting in increased photoluminescence from the NV- state. We used a combination of spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments and rate-equation modeling to conclude that NV0 converts to NV- via absorption of 1064-nm photons from the valence band of diamond. We report fast quenching and recovery of the photoluminescence from both charge states of the NV center under low power 1064-nm laser excitation, which has not been previously observed. We also find, using optically detected magnetic resonance experiments, that the charge transfer process mediated by the 1064-nm laser is spin dependent.

  16. Three-dimensional controlled growth of monodisperse sub-50 nm heterogeneous nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deming; Xu, Xiaoxue; Du, Yi; Qin, Xian; Zhang, Yuhai; Ma, Chenshuo; Wen, Shihui; Ren, Wei; Goldys, Ewa M.; Piper, James A.; Dou, Shixue; Liu, Xiaogang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate frontier in nanomaterials engineering is to realize their composition control with atomic scale precision to enable fabrication of nanoparticles with desirable size, shape and surface properties. Such control becomes even more useful when growing hybrid nanocrystals designed to integrate multiple functionalities. Here we report achieving such degree of control in a family of rare-earth-doped nanomaterials. We experimentally verify the co-existence and different roles of oleate anions (OA-) and molecules (OAH) in the crystal formation. We identify that the control over the ratio of OA- to OAH can be used to directionally inhibit, promote or etch the crystallographic facets of the nanoparticles. This control enables selective grafting of shells with complex morphologies grown over nanocrystal cores, thus allowing the fabrication of a diverse library of monodisperse sub-50 nm nanoparticles. With such programmable additive and subtractive engineering a variety of three-dimensional shapes can be implemented using a bottom-up scalable approach.

  17. Cooling of the Mechanical Motion of Diamond Nanocrystals in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap in High Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; D'Urso, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We present a magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable trapping from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Characterization and feedback cooling of the mechanical motion of the trapped particle are described. This static trap is achieved by permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole pieces. The magnetic field confines the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension relies on gravity. The weak trapping forces result in mechanical oscillation frequencies in the extremely low to super low frequency range and exceptionally high sensitivity to external forces. Particles can be trapped for an indefinite length of time without active cooling. With feedback, the mechanical motion can be cooled by several orders of magnitude. With trapped diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy centers, the system has potential as a platform for experiments in quantum nanomechanics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1540879.

  18. Partially Oxidized Sub-10 nm MnO Nanocrystals with High Activity for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Hui-Yun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Yong-Sun; Yang, Ki Dong; Kumar Pradhan, Gajendra; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Hee Kim, Sun; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is considered a major bottleneck in the overall water electrolysis process. In this work, highly active manganese oxide nano-catalysts were synthesized via hot injection. Facile surface treatment generated Mn(III) species on monodisperse 10 nm MnO nanocrystals (NCs). Size dependency of MnO NCs on OER activity was also investigated. Surprisingly, the partially oxidized MnO NCs only required 530 mV @ 5 mA cm−2 under near neutral conditions. PMID:25998696

  19. Partially Oxidized Sub-10 nm MnO Nanocrystals with High Activity for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Hui-Yun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Yong-Sun; Yang, Ki Dong; Kumar Pradhan, Gajendra; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Hee Kim, Sun; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is considered a major bottleneck in the overall water electrolysis process. In this work, highly active manganese oxide nano-catalysts were synthesized via hot injection. Facile surface treatment generated Mn(III) species on monodisperse 10 nm MnO nanocrystals (NCs). Size dependency of MnO NCs on OER activity was also investigated. Surprisingly, the partially oxidized MnO NCs only required 530 mV @ 5 mA cm-2 under near neutral conditions.

  20. Photosensitivity of a diamond detector to laser radiation in the 220 - 355-nm region

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, E I; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Shein, J; Krishnan, M

    2001-12-31

    The photosensitivity of detectors of laser radiation based on the natural type IIa diamond (Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, USA) are studied at the wavelengths 222, 308, 337, and 353 nm. The limiting intensities (0.5 - 4 MW cm{sup -2}) of UV laser radiation are determined at which the detectors operate in a linear regime. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Nanocrystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  2. Nanocrystal structures

    DOEpatents

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  3. Three-dimensional controlled growth of monodisperse sub-50 nm heterogeneous nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Deming; Xu, Xiaoxue; Du, Yi; Qin, Xian; Zhang, Yuhai; Ma, Chenshuo; Wen, Shihui; Ren, Wei; Goldys, Ewa M.; Piper, James A.; Dou, Shixue; Liu, Xiaogang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate frontier in nanomaterials engineering is to realize their composition control with atomic scale precision to enable fabrication of nanoparticles with desirable size, shape and surface properties. Such control becomes even more useful when growing hybrid nanocrystals designed to integrate multiple functionalities. Here we report achieving such degree of control in a family of rare-earth-doped nanomaterials. We experimentally verify the co-existence and different roles of oleate anions (OA−) and molecules (OAH) in the crystal formation. We identify that the control over the ratio of OA− to OAH can be used to directionally inhibit, promote or etch the crystallographic facets of the nanoparticles. This control enables selective grafting of shells with complex morphologies grown over nanocrystal cores, thus allowing the fabrication of a diverse library of monodisperse sub-50 nm nanoparticles. With such programmable additive and subtractive engineering a variety of three-dimensional shapes can be implemented using a bottom–up scalable approach. PMID:26743184

  4. Three-dimensional controlled growth of monodisperse sub-50 nm heterogeneous nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deming; Xu, Xiaoxue; Du, Yi; Qin, Xian; Zhang, Yuhai; Ma, Chenshuo; Wen, Shihui; Ren, Wei; Goldys, Ewa M; Piper, James A; Dou, Shixue; Liu, Xiaogang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate frontier in nanomaterials engineering is to realize their composition control with atomic scale precision to enable fabrication of nanoparticles with desirable size, shape and surface properties. Such control becomes even more useful when growing hybrid nanocrystals designed to integrate multiple functionalities. Here we report achieving such degree of control in a family of rare-earth-doped nanomaterials. We experimentally verify the co-existence and different roles of oleate anions (OA(-)) and molecules (OAH) in the crystal formation. We identify that the control over the ratio of OA(-) to OAH can be used to directionally inhibit, promote or etch the crystallographic facets of the nanoparticles. This control enables selective grafting of shells with complex morphologies grown over nanocrystal cores, thus allowing the fabrication of a diverse library of monodisperse sub-50 nm nanoparticles. With such programmable additive and subtractive engineering a variety of three-dimensional shapes can be implemented using a bottom-up scalable approach. PMID:26743184

  5. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongchun; Xiao Yunfeng; Li Beibei; Jiang Xuefeng; Li Yan; Gong Qihuang

    2011-07-15

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan et al. [Science 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal's azimuthal position.

  6. Designing Upconversion Nanocrystals Capable of 745 nm Sensitization and 803 nm Emission for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liangliang; Xie, Xiaoji; Loong, Daniel Teh Boon; All, Angelo Homayoun; Huang, Ling; Liu, Xiaogang

    2016-07-25

    A crystal design strategy is described that generates hexagonal-phased NaYF4 :Nd/Yb@NaYF4 :Yb/Tm luminescent nanocrystals with the ability to emit light at 803 nm when illuminated at 745 nm. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the large absorption cross-section of Nd(3+) between 720 and 760 nm plus efficient spatial energy transfer and migration through Nd(3+) →Yb(3+) →Yb(3+) →Tm(3+) . Mechanistic investigations suggest that a cascaded two-photon energy transfer upconversion process underlies the emission mechanism. This protocol enables deep-tissue imaging to be achieved while mitigating the attenuation effect associated with the visible emission and the overheating constraint imposed by conventional 980 nm excitation. PMID:27245472

  7. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Li, Bei-Bei; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-07-01

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1152261 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal’s azimuthal position.

  8. Injection characterization of packaged bi-directional diamond shaped ring lasers at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussjager, Rebecca; Erdmann, Reinhard; Kovanis, Vassillios; McKeon, Brian; Fanto, Michael; Johns, Steve; Hayduk, Michael; Osman, Joseph; Morrow, Alan; Green, Malcolm; Stoffel, Nancy; Tan, Songsheng; Shick, Charles; Bacon, Wesley; Beaman, Bryan

    2006-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Binoptics Corp., and Infotonics Technology Center worked collaboratively to package and characterize recently developed diode based ring lasers that operate at 1550 nm in a diamond shaped cavity. The laser modes propagate bi-directionally; however, uniaxial propagation may be induced by optical injection or by integrating a mirror. Round trip cavity length was 500 μm in 3.5 μm wide ridge waveguides, and four polarization-maintaining lensed fibers provided access to the input and output modes. A signal from a tunable diode laser, incident at one port, served to injection lock both of the counter-propagating circulating modes. When the input signal was time-encoded by an optical modulator, the encoding was transferred to both modes with an inverted time-intensity profile. Performance, in terms of fidelity and extinction ratio, is characterized for selected pulsed and monochromatic formats from low frequencies to those exceeding 12 GHz. A rate equation model is proposed to account for certain aspects of the observed behavior and analog and digital applications are discussed.

  9. External-cavity diamond Raman laser performance at 1240 nm and 1485 nm wavelengths with high pulse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, V. P.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Gorbashova, M. A.; Yurov, V. Yu; Konov, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    We report on an external-cavity diamond Raman laser (DRL) pumped with a Q-switched Nd:YAG and generating at 1st and 2nd Stokes (1240 nm and 1485 nm) with enhanced output energy. The slope efficiency of 54% and output energy as high as 1.2 mJ in single pulse at 1240 nm have been achieved with optimized cavity, while the pulse energy of 0.70 mJ was obtained in the eye-safe spectral region at 1485 nm. Calculations of thermal lensing effect indicate it as a possible reason for the observed decrease in conversion efficiency at the highest pump energies.

  10. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-03-15

    Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

  11. Electrochemically Seed-Mediated Synthesis of Sub-10 nm Tetrahexahedral Pt Nanocrystals Supported on Graphene with Improved Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Tian, Na; Xie, Ai-Yun; Du, Jia-Huan; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Sun, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Zhi-Ying; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-05-11

    Controlling the surface structure of Pt nanocrystals (NCs), especially creating high-index facets with abundant active step sites, is an effective approach to enhance catalytic performances. However, the available high-index faceted Pt NCs have large particle sizes, which severely impedes their practical applications. In this study, we reported a new electrochemically seed-mediated method, by which sub-10 nm tetrahexahedral Pt NCs (THH Pt NCs) enclosed with {210} high-index facets supported on graphene were synthesized. Pt nanoparticles of ∼3 nm in size as high-density crystal seeds play a key role in the small-sized control. The obtained THH Pt NCs exhibited a higher mass activity than commercial Pt/C catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation. We further demonstrated that this method is also valid for reshaping commercial Pt/C, to create high-index facets on surfaces and thus to improve both mass activity and stability. PMID:27063648

  12. Transparency of the strong shock-compressed diamond for 532 nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jiamin

    2016-04-01

    An optical reflectivity and transmissivity model for the shock-compressed diamond is established and used to calculate the optical reflectivity and transmissivity of the diamond under different shock compressions. The simulated results indicate that the reflection occurs at the shock front and does not depend on the thickness of the compressed diamond, but the transmissivity decreases with the thickness. The simulated reflectivity is consistent with the experimental results in the literature, which validates the model. It is shown that the diamond keeps transparent when the shock pressure is lower than 2.00 Mbar, and becomes opaque but does not reflect the probe laser as the shock pressure increases from 2.00 Mbar to 4.60 Mbar and reflects the probe laser markedly when the shock pressure is higher than 4.60 Mbar.

  13. Silicon nanocrystals at elevated temperatures: retention of photoluminescence and diamond silicon to β-silicon carbide phase transition.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Clare E; Hannah, Daniel C; Demortière, Arnaud; Yang, Jihua; Cook, Russell E; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Kortshagen, Uwe; Schaller, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    We report the photoluminescence (PL) properties of colloidal Si nanocrystals (NCs) up to 800 K and observe PL retention on par with core/shell structures of other compositions. These alkane-terminated Si NCs even emit at temperatures well above previously reported melting points for oxide-embedded particles. Using selected area electron diffraction (SAED), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), liquid drop theory, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we show that melting does not play a role at the temperatures explored experimentally in PL, and we observe a phase change to β-SiC in the presence of an electron beam. Loss of diffraction peaks (melting) with recovery of diamond-phase silicon upon cooling is observed under inert atmosphere by XRD. We further show that surface passivation by covalently bound ligands endures the experimental temperatures. These findings point to covalently bound organic ligands as a route to the development of NCs for use in high temperature applications, including concentrated solar cells and electrical lighting. PMID:25181589

  14. Sub-10 nm Platinum Nanocrystals with Size and Shape Control: Catalytic Study for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Huang, Wenyu; Aliaga, Cesar; Hung, Ling-I; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-03-02

    Platinum nanocubes and nanopolyhedra with tunable size from 5 to 9 nm were synthesized by controlling the reducing rate of metal precursor ions in a one-pot polyol synthesis. A two-stage process is proposed for the simultaneous control of size and shape. In the first stage, the oxidation state of the metal ion precursors determined the nucleation rate and consequently the number of nuclei. The reaction temperature controlled the shape in the second stage by regulation of the growth kinetics. These well-defined nanocrystals were loaded into MCF-17 mesoporous silica for examination of catalytic properties. Pt loadings and dispersions of the supported catalysts were determined by elemental analysis (ICP-MS) and H2 chemisorption isotherms, respectively. Ethylene hydrogenation rates over the Pt nanocrystals were independent of both size and shape and comparable to Pt single crystals. For pyrrole hydrogenation, the nanocubes enhanced ring-opening ability and thus showed a higher selectivity to n-butylamine as compared to nanopolyhedra.

  15. Optical properties of colloidal germanium nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-05-01

    Highly crystalline germanium (Ge) nanocrystals in the size range 2--10 nm were grown in inverse micelles and purified and size-separated by high pressure liquid chromatography with on-line optical and electrical diagnostics. The nanocrystals retain the diamond structure of bulk Ge down to at least 2.0 nm (containing about 150 Ge atoms). The background- and impurity-free extinction and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these nanocrystals revealed rich structure which was interpreted in terms of the bandstructure of Ge shifted to higher energies by quantum confinement. The shifts ranged from {minus}0.1 eV to over 1 eV for the various transitions. PL in the range 350--700 nm was observed from nanocrystals 2--5 nm in size. The 2.0 nm nanocrystals yielded the most intense PL (at 420 nm) which is believed to be intrinsic and attributed to direct recombination at {Gamma}. Excitation at high energy (250 nm) populates most of the conduction bands resulting in competing recombination channels and the observed broad PL spectra.

  16. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  17. Sub-10 nm lanthanide doped BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals: Shape controllable synthesis, tunable multicolor emission and enhanced near-infrared upconversion luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ling; Lu, Wei; Wang, Haibo; Yi, Zhigao; Zeng, Songjun; Li, Zheng

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Sub-10 nm cubic phase BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals were synthesized by a hydrothermal method for the first time. • Tunable multicolor from yellow to yellow-green was achieved by controlling Gd{sup 3+} content in BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Er system. • Intense near-infrared upconversion luminescence in BaLuF{sub 5}:Gd/Yb/Tm nanocrystal. • The enhancement near-infrared luminescence can be realized by adjusting the content of Gd{sup 3+} in BaLuF{sub 5}:Gd/Yb/Tm system. - Abstract: In this study, sub-10 nm BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals with cubic phase structure were synthesized by a solvothermal method using oleic acid as the stabilizing agent. The as-prepared BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analyzed by the upconversion (UC) spectra. The TEM results reveal that these samples present high uniformity. Compared with Gd-free samples, the size of BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Er doped with 10% Gd{sup 3+} decreased to 5.6 nm. In addition, BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Tm/Gd upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) presented efficient near-infrared (NIR)-NIR UC luminescence. Therefore, it is expected that these ultra-small BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals with well-controlled shape, size, and UC emission have potential applications in biomedical imaging fields.

  18. Sensitivity of Raman spectra excited at 325 nm to surface treatments of undoped polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, S.; Deneuville, A.; Tromson, D.; Bergonzo, P.; Bustarret, E.; Ballutaud, D.

    2006-08-01

    About 20 m thick films were deposited in the same run by MPCVD at 900 °C on Si substrates and then hydrogenated in situ during 30 min with a hydrogen plasma at the same temperature. Their surfaces were kept as prepared or more or less strongly oxidized by annealing at 600 °C under ambient atmosphere or by sulphochromic acid or aqua regia treatments. Raman spectra were excited at 325 and 632.8 nm. Spectra of the as-prepared sample exhibit structures around 2835 and 2895 cm-1 from monohydride carbon-hydrogen ascribed to the atomically flat (111) and (100) areas, respectively, on the facets of the sample surface crystallites. The decrease of these structures in the normalized spectra after the various oxidation treatments confirms these assignments. The decrease is smaller for the aqua regia treatment than for the two other treatments which give similar effects. Other Raman signals from sp2 C around 1589 cm-1 and CHx bonds around 2930, 2952, 3025 and 3050 cm-1 originate from species at the surface and within the films. Their variation with the oxidizing treatments indicates a significant contribution from the surface species.

  19. Preparation of freestanding germanium nanocrystals by ultrasonic aerosol pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoldt, Conrad R.; Haag, Michael A.; Larsen, Brian A.

    2008-07-01

    This letter reports a synthetic route adaptable for the continuous, large-scale production of germanium (Ge) nanocrystals for emerging electronic and optoelectronic applications. Using an ultrasonic aerosol pyrolysis approach, diamond cubic Ge nanocrystals with dense, spherical morphologies and sizes ranging from 3to14nm are synthesized at 700°C from an ultrasonically generated aerosol of tetrapropylgermane (TPG) precursor and toluene solvent. The ultimate crystal size demonstrates a near linear relationship within the range of TPG concentrations investigated, while the shape of the measured size distributions predicts multiple particle formation mechanisms during aerosol decomposition and condensation.

  20. Highly stable sub-5 nm Sn6O4(OH)4 nanocrystals with ultrahigh activity as advanced photocatalytic materials for photodegradation of methyl orange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Wu, Q. L.; Liu, P.; Liang, Y.; Li, H. B.; Wu, M. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-04-01

    Among numerous active photocatalytic materials, Sn-based oxide nanomaterials are promising photocatalytic materials in environmental protection measures such as water remediation due to their excellent physicochemical property. Research on photocatalytic nanomaterials for photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) so far has focused on TiO2-based nanostructures; e.g., TiO2-P25 is recognized to be the best commercial photocatalyst to date, rather than Sn-based oxide nanomaterials, in spite of their impressive acid- and alkali-resistant properties and high stability. Here, we demonstrate very high photocatalytic activity of highly stable sub-5 nm hydromarchite (Sn6O4(OH)4) nanocrystals synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly laser-based technique. These Sn6O4(OH)4 nanocrystals exhibit ultrahigh photocatalytic performance for photodegradation of MO and their degradation efficiency is far superior to that of TiO2-P25. The detailed investigations demonstrated that the great photocatalytic activity results from the ultrafine size and unique surface activity induced by the laser-based technique. Mass production of reactive species of hydroxyl radicals was detected in the experiments due to the appropriate bandgap of Sn6O4(OH)4 nanocrystals. These findings actually open a door to applications of Sn-based oxide nanomaterials as advanced photocatalytic materials.

  1. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  2. A conversion model of graphite to ultrananocrystalline diamond via laser processing at ambient temperature and normal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Yang, H. M.; Zheng, L. M.; Tang, S. X.; Ren, N. F.; Xu, S. D.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2014-07-14

    The synthesis mechanism of ultrananocrystalline diamond via laser shock processing of graphite suspension was presented at room temperature and normal pressure, which yielded the ultrananocrystalline diamond in size of about 5 nm. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and laser Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the nano-crystals. The transformation model and growth restriction mechanism of high power density with short-pulsed laser shocking of graphite particles in liquid was put forward.

  3. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Roesgaard, Søren; Chevallier, Jacques; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Jensen, Pia Bomholt; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Balling, Peter; Julsgaard, Brian; Gaiduk, Peter I.; Svane, Axel

    2015-07-15

    Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y}, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 {sup ∘}C to 900 {sup ∘}C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 {sup ∘}C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  4. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-01

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2-6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  5. Synthesis of 10 nm β-NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 Core/Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals with 5 nm Particle Cores.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Thorben; Raj, Athira Naduviledathu; Dühnen, Simon; Haase, Markus

    2016-01-18

    A new method is presented for preparing gram amounts of very small core/shell upconversion nanocrystals without additional codoping of the particles. First, ca. 5 nm β-NaYF4:Yb,Er core particles are formed by the reaction of sodium oleate, rare-earth oleate, and ammonium fluoride, thereby making use of the fact that a high ratio of sodium to rare-earth ions promotes the nucleation of a large number of β-phase seeds. Thereafter, a 2 nm thick NaYF4 shell is formed by using 3-4 nm particles of α-NaYF4 as a single-source precursor for the β-phase shell material. In contrast to the core particles, however, these α-phase particles are prepared with a low ratio of sodium to rare-earth ions, which efficiently suppresses an undesired nucleation of β-NaYF4 particles during shell growth. PMID:26633748

  6. Grain boundaries and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films.

    SciTech Connect

    Busmann, H.-G.; Pageler, A.; Gruen, D. M.

    1999-08-06

    Phase-pure nanocrystalline diamond thin films grown from plasmas of a hydrogen-poor carbon argon gas mixture have been analyzed regarding their hardness and elastic moduli by means of a microindentor and a scanning acoustic microscope.The films are superhard and the moduli rival single crystal diamond. In addition, Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm shows a peak at 1438 l/cm and no peak above 1500 l/cm, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy a shake-up loss at 4.2 eV. This gives strong evidence for the existence of solitary double bonds in the films. The hardness and elasticity of the films then are explained by the assumption, that the solitary double bonds interconnect the nanocrystals in the films, leading to an intergrain boundary adhesion of similar strength as the intragrain diamond cohesion. The results are in good agreement with recent simulations of high-energy grain boundaries.

  7. Nanocrystal-Powered Nanomotor

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, B.C.; Aloni, S.; Jensen, K.; Ritchie, R.O.; Zettl, A.

    2005-07-05

    We have constructed and operated a nanoscale linear motorpowered by a single metal nanocrystal ram sandwiched between mechanicallever arms. Low-level electrical voltages applied to the carbon nanotubelever arms cause the nanocrystal to grow or shrink in a controlledmanner. The length of the ram is adjustable from 0 to more than 150 nm,with extension speeds exceeding 1900 nm/s. The thermodynamic principlesgoverning motor operation resemble those driving frost heave, a naturalsolid-state linear motor.

  8. Natural occurrence of pure nano-polycrystalline diamond from impact crater.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Litasov, Konstantin D; Yamashita, Tomoharu; Isobe, Futoshi; Afanasiev, Valentin P; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P

    2015-01-01

    Consolidated bodies of polycrystalline diamond with grain sizes less than 100 nm, nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD), has been experimentally produced by direct conversion of graphite at high pressure and high temperature. NPD has superior hardness, toughness and wear resistance to single-crystalline diamonds because of its peculiar nano-textures, and has been successfully used for industrial and scientific applications. Such sintered nanodiamonds have, however, not been found in natural mantle diamonds. Here we identified natural pure NPD, which was produced by a large meteoritic impact about 35 Ma ago in Russia. The impact diamonds consist of well-sintered equigranular nanocrystals (5-50 nm), similar to synthetic NPD, but with distinct [111] preferred orientation. They formed through the martensitic transformation from single-crystal graphite. Stress-induced local fragmentation of the source graphite and subsequent rapid transformation to diamond in the limited time scale result in multiple diamond nucleation and suppression of the overall grain growth, producing the unique nanocrystalline texture of natural NPD. A huge amount of natural NPD is expected to be present in the Popigai crater, which is potentially important for applications as novel ultra-hard material. PMID:26424384

  9. Natural occurrence of pure nano-polycrystalline diamond from impact crater

    PubMed Central

    Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Yamashita, Tomoharu; Isobe, Futoshi; Afanasiev, Valentin P.; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidated bodies of polycrystalline diamond with grain sizes less than 100 nm, nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD), has been experimentally produced by direct conversion of graphite at high pressure and high temperature. NPD has superior hardness, toughness and wear resistance to single-crystalline diamonds because of its peculiar nano-textures, and has been successfully used for industrial and scientific applications. Such sintered nanodiamonds have, however, not been found in natural mantle diamonds. Here we identified natural pure NPD, which was produced by a large meteoritic impact about 35 Ma ago in Russia. The impact diamonds consist of well-sintered equigranular nanocrystals (5–50 nm), similar to synthetic NPD, but with distinct [111] preferred orientation. They formed through the martensitic transformation from single-crystal graphite. Stress-induced local fragmentation of the source graphite and subsequent rapid transformation to diamond in the limited time scale result in multiple diamond nucleation and suppression of the overall grain growth, producing the unique nanocrystalline texture of natural NPD. A huge amount of natural NPD is expected to be present in the Popigai crater, which is potentially important for applications as novel ultra-hard material. PMID:26424384

  10. Solvothermal synthesis and upconversion properties of about 10 nm orthorhombic LuF₃: Yb³⁺, Er³⁺ rectangular nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guotao; Zhang, Jiahua; Hao, Zhendong; Zhang, Xia; Pan, Guo-Hui; Chen, Li; Luo, Yongshi; Lü, Shaozhe; Zhao, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    The Yb(3+) and Er(3+) codoped orthorhombic LuF3 rectangular nanocrystals (NCs) with the size of about 10nm were synthesized by a facile and effective solvothermal process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), upconversion (UC) luminescence spectra and decay curves were used to characterize the resulting samples. Compared with YF3 and α-NaYF4 NCs, owning the similar size and the same doping levels of Yb(3+) ions and Er(3+) ions as LuF3 NCs, the green UC emission of LuF3 NCs is 18.7 times and 5.1 times stronger than that of YF3 and α-NaYF4 NCs respectively; the red UC emission of LuF3 NCs is 13.2 times and 0.6 times stronger than that of YF3 and α-NaYF4 NCs respectively. Under 980 nm wavelength excitation, the decay curves of both (4)S3/2→(4)I15/2 transition and (4)F9/2→(4)I15/2 transition exhibit a single exponential function, resulting from the fast energy migrations among Yb(3+) ions caused by the high concentration of Yb(3+) ions (20 mol%). Meanwhile, at relatively low power density, the slopes of the linear plots between log(I) and log(P) for green UC and red UC are 1.7 and 1.9 respectively, which are less than 2 due to the quenching of the thermal effect, indicating a two-photon process for them. At high power density, the slopes are decreased caused by the saturation effect. In addition, we proved the existence of the thermal effect by the pump power dependence of the intensity ratio of (2)H11/2→(4)I15/2 transition to (4)S3/2→(4)I15/2 transition. PMID:26298284

  11. Simple Preparation and Stabilization of Nickel Nanocrystals on Cellulose Nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Bae, In-Tae; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2007-06-01

    Nickel nanocrystals were simply prepared on the carbon through a thermal reduction process at 400-500oC under N2 after Ni(II) ions were deposited and stabilized on cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) surface. Hydroxyl groups on the CNXL anchor and stabilize Ni(II) ions. Well-dispersed Ni nanocrystals on the carbonized CNXL were about 5-12 nm in size. XRD, FESEM, and TEM were employed to characterize the products.

  12. Solution Sythesis Of Geranium Nanocrystals: Success And Open Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Casula, M; Galli, G; Saw, C; Zaitseva, N; Gerion, D; van Buuren, T; Fakra, S

    2003-12-15

    We present a two-steps synthesis route that yields nanometer size crystalline germanium in the form of a black powder. It relies on high temperature decomposition of tetraethylgermane (TEG) in organic solvents. The presence of pure germanium with diamond structure is unambiguously attested by powder XRD measurements. Low resolution TEM indicates that the particles are between {approx}5 to 30 nm in size depending on the synthesis conditions. The as-synthesized Ge powders can be stored in air for months and no oxidation occurs. The Ge powders are sparingly soluble in conventional solvents because Ge nanocrystals are likely embedded in a matrix, composed mainly of C=C, C-C, and C-H bonds. The presence of residual organic by-products impedes probing of the optical properties of the dots. Also, we discuss drawbacks and open challenges in high temperature solution synthesis of Ge nanocrystals that could also be faced in the synthesis of Si nanocrystals. Overall, our results call for a cautious interpretation of reported optical properties of Ge and Si nanocrystals obtained by high temperature solution methods.

  13. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  14. Micrometer-scale cavities in fibrous and cloudy diamonds — A glance into diamond dissolution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Wirth, Richard; Navon, Oded

    2007-12-01

    Micrometer sized internal cavities in diamonds preserve evidence of diamond dissolution events. Combining the methods of focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables these features to be studied in detail. Micrometer-scale cavities are found in the inner parts of fibrous and cloudy kimberlitic diamonds. Their filling consists of amorphous matrix, secondary nano-crystals, volatiles and in some cases larger resorbed crystals. Trapped minerals include corundum, Kappa-alumina, quartz, olivine, moissanite-6H and Ca-Mg carbonates. This is the first observation of Kappa-alumina in nature. Secondary nano-minerals are observed within the amorphous matrix and include carbonates, Al-oxide, fluorite, ilmenite and secondary diamond crystals. The amorphous matrix is spongy and its composition is dominated by amorphous carbon, nitrogen, chlorine and also contains water. When no crystalline phases are observed, the matrix is also enriched in alumina, silica and in some cases calcium. We propose that micrometer scale cavities in diamonds form during dissolution events induced by the introduction of oxidizing hydrous fluids into the diamond growth area. Hydrous fluids are the main dissolving agents for most kimberlitic diamonds [Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Semenets, E., 2007. Mechanisms of diamond oxidation and their bearing on the fluid composition in kimberlite magmas. Am. Mineral. 92, 1200-1212]. At diamond forming conditions silica and alumina are enriched in hydrous fluids that are in equilibrium with eclogites [Kessel, R., Ulmer, P., Pettke, T., Schmidt, M.W., Thompson, A.B., 2005. The water-basalt system at 4 to 6 GPa: Phase relations and second critical endpoint in a K-free eclogite at 700 to 1400 °C. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 237, 873-892]; this is consistent with the increased solubility of alumina with increased pressure and temperature in the Na-Cl bearing fluids [Manning, C.E., 2006. Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  16. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  17. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media.Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07940c

  18. Transient photoresponse of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond electrodes in saline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnood, Arman; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Laird, Jamie S.; Maturana, Matias I.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Stacey, Alastair; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Spiccia, Leone; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Beyond conventional electrically-driven neuronal stimulation methods, there is a growing interest in optically-driven approaches. In recent years, nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) has emerged as a strong material candidate for use in electrically-driven stimulation electrodes. This work investigates the electrochemical activity of N-UNCD in response to pulsed illumination, to assess its potential for use as an optically-driven stimulation electrode. Whilst N-UNCD in the as-grown state exhibits a weak photoresponse, the oxygen plasma treated film exhibits two orders of magnitude enhancement in its sub-bandgap open circuit photovoltage response. The enhancement is attributed to the formation of a dense network of oxygen-terminated diamond nanocrystals at the N-UNCD surface. Electrically connected to the N-UNCD bulk via sub-surface graphitic grain boundaries, these diamond nanocrystals introduce a semiconducting barrier between the sub-surface graphitic semimetal and the electrolyte solution, leading to a photovoltage under irradiation with wavelengths of λ = 450 nm and shorter. Within the safe optical exposure limit of 2 mW mm-2, charge injection capacity of 0.01 mC cm-2 is achieved using a 15 × 15 μm electrode, meeting the requirements for extracellular and intercellular stimulation. The nanoscale nature of processes presented here along with the diamond's biocompatibility and biostability open an avenue for the use of oxygen treated N-UNCD as optically driven stimulating electrodes.

  19. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale.

    PubMed

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-21

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH(-) to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. PMID:26693587

  20. Size dependence of cubic to trigonal structural distortion in silver micro- and nanocrystals under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qixum; Zhao, Yusheng; Zin, Zhijun; Wang, Zhongwu; Skrabalak, Sara E; Xia, Younan

    2008-01-01

    Silver micro- and nanocrystals with sizes of {approx}2--3.5 {mu}m and {approx}50--100 nm were uniaxially compressed under nonhydrostatic pressures (strong deviatoric stress) up to {approx}30 GPa at room temperature in a symmetric diamond-anvil cell and studied in situ using angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A cubic to trigonal structural distortion along a 3-fold rotational axis was discovered by careful and comprehensive analysis of the apparent lattice parameter and full width at half-maximum, which are strongly dependent upon the Miller index and crystal size.

  1. Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

  2. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  3. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  4. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-05

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2–6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  5. Copper selenide nanocrystals for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Colin M; Pattani, Varun P; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-06-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) M(-1) at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 min of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm(2), demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  6. Copper Selenide Nanocrystals for Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Colin M.; Pattani, Varun; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G.; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu2−xSe) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 107 cm−1 M−1 at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu2−xSe nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 minutes of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm2, demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  7. Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2010-09-16

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

  8. Diamond nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Tokano, Yuji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Komuro, Masanori; Hiroshima, Hiroshi

    2002-10-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and oxygen gas reactive ion etching (RIE) were used to fabricate fine patterns in a diamond mould. To prevent charge-up during EB lithography, thin conductive polymer was spin-coated over the PMMA resist, yielding dented line patterns 2 μ m wide and 270 nm deep. The diamond mould was pressed into PMMA on a silicon substrate heated to 130, 150 and 170ºC at 43.6, 65.4 and 87.2 MPa. All transferred PMMA convex line patterns were 2 μ m wide. Imprinted pattern depth increased with rising temperature and pressure. PMMA patterns on diamond were transferred by the diamond mould at 150ºC and 65.4 MPa, yielding convex line patterns 2 μ m wide and 200 nm high. Direct aluminium and copper patterns were obtained using the diamond mould at room temperature and 130.8 MPa. The diamond mould is thus useful for replicating patterns on PMMA and metals.

  9. Nanocrystalline diamond synthesized from C60

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Langehorst, F.; Jacobsen, S.; Liebske, C.

    2010-11-30

    A bulk sample of nanocrystalline cubic diamond with crystallite sizes of 5-12 nm was synthesized from fullerene C{sub 60} at 20(1) GPa and 2000 C using a multi-anvil apparatus. The new material is at least as hard as single crystal diamond. It was found that nanocrystalline diamond at high temperature and ambient pressure kinetically is more stable with respect to graphitization than usual diamonds.

  10. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  12. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  13. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  14. Optical Properties of CdSe/ZnS Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; DeRose, Paul; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the absorbance, fluorescence emission, fluorescence quantum yield, and fluorescence lifetime of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs). The study included three groups of nanocrystals whose surfaces were either passivated with organic molecules, modified further with carboxyl groups, or conjugated with CD14 mouse anti-human antibodies. The surface modifications had observable effects on the optical properties of the nanocrystals. The oscillator strength (OS) of the band edge transition was about 1.0 for the nanocrystals emitting at 565 nm, 605 nm, and 655 nm. The OS could not be determined for QDs with emission at 700 nm and 800 nm. The fluorescence lifetimes varied from 26 ns for nanocrystals emitting near 600 nm to 150 ns for nanocrystals emitting near 800 nm. The quantum yield ranged between 0.4 and 0.9 for the nanocrystals in this study. A brightness index (BI) was used to evaluate the suitability of the nanocrystal labels for flow cytometer measurements. Most QD labels are at least as bright as fluorescein for applications in flow cytometer assays with 488 nm excitation. For optimal brightness the QDs should be excited with 405 nm light. We observed a strong dependence of the QD absorbance at 250 nm on the surface modification of the QD. PMID:26601047

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  16. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Ł.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Mélin, T.

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (ND≈1020-1021cm-3) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2-50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as ND-1/3, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as ND1/3. We thus establish a "nanocrystal counterpart" of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  17. Silicon and germanium nanocrystals: properties and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Coutinho, José

    2014-01-01

    Summary Group-IV nanocrystals have emerged as a promising group of materials that extends the realm of application of bulk diamond, silicon, germanium and related materials beyond their traditional boundaries. Over the last two decades of research, their potential for application in areas such as optoelectronic applications and memory devices has been progressively unraveled. Nevertheless, new challenges with no parallel in the respective bulk material counterparts have arisen. In this review, we consider what has been achieved and what are the current limitations with regard to growth, characterization and modeling of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and related materials. PMID:25383290

  18. Nanocrystal-polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Wendy Uyen

    The ability to structure materials on a nanometer dimension enables the processes of solar energy conversion to be optimized at their most fundamental length scale. In semiconducting nanocrystals, optical absorption and electrical transport can be tailored by changing their radius and length, respectively. The unique features of quantum confinement and shape manipulation characteristic for inorganic nanocrystals can be utilized to fabricate solar cells with properties not observed in organic or conventional inorganic solar cells. Furthermore, their solution processibility provides fabrication advantages in the production of low cost, large area, and flexible solar cells. By blending organic conjugated polymers with CdSe nanocrystals efficient thin film solar cells have been constructed. Intimate contact for efficient charge transfer between the polymer and nanocrystal components of the blend was achieved by removing the organic ligands on the surface of the nanocrystal and by using solvent mixtures. Control of the nanocrystal length and therefore the distance on which electrons are transported directly through a thin film device enabled the creation of direct pathways for the transport of electrons. In addition, tuning the band gap by altering the nanocrystal radius as well as using alternate materials such as CdTe the overlap between the absorption spectrum of the cell and the solar emission spectrum could be optimized. A photovoltaic device consisting of 7nm by 60nm CdSe nanorods and the conjugated polymer poly-3(hexylthiophene) was assembled from solution with an external quantum efficiency of over 54% and a monochromatic power conversion efficiency of up to 7% under illumination at low light intensity. Under AM 1.5 Global solar conditions, we obtained a power conversion efficiency of 1.7%.

  19. Tailorable, Visible Light Emission From Silicon Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Wilcoxon, J.P.

    1999-07-20

    J. P. Wilcoxon and G. A. Samara Crystalline, size-selected Si nanocrystals in the size range 1.8-10 nm grown in inverse micellar cages exhibit highly structured optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) across the visible range of the spectrum. The most intense PL for the smallest nanocrystals produced This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. to induce a useful level of visible photoluminescence (PL) from silicon (Si). The approaches understood. Visible PL has been observed from Si nanocrystals, or quantum dots, produced by a variety of techniques including aerosols,2 colloids,3 and ion implantation.4 However, all of The optical absorption spectra of our nanocrystals are much richer in spectral features spectrum of bulk Si where the spectral features reflect the details of the band structure shown in nanocrystals estimated to have a Si core diameter of 1-2 nm. These measured quantum those in the spectrum of bulk Si in Fig. 1 are striking indicating that nanocrystals of this size 8-Room temperature PL results on an HPLC size-selected, purified 2 nm nanocrystals but blue shifted by -0.4 eV due to quantum confinement. Excitation at 245 nm yields

  20. Continuous Growth of Metal Oxide Nanocrystals: Enhanced Control of Nanocrystal Size and Radial Dopant Distribution.

    PubMed

    Jansons, Adam W; Hutchison, James E

    2016-07-26

    The ability to precisely control the composition of nanocrystals, similar to the way organic chemists control the structure of small molecules, remains an important challenge in nanoscience. Rather than dictating nanocrystal size through the nucleation event, growth of nanocrystals through continuous precursor addition would allow fine structural control. Herein, we present a method of growth for indium oxide nanocrystals that relies on the slow addition of an indium carboxylate precursor into hot oleyl alcohol. Nanocrystal size and structure can be governed at a subnanometer scale, and it is possible to precisely control core size over a range of three to at least 22 nm with dispersities as low as 7%. Growth can be stopped and restarted repeatedly without aggregation or passivation. We show that the volume of the nanocrystal core (and thus molecular weight) increases linearly with added monomer and the number of nanocrystals remains constant throughout the growth process, yielding an extremely predictable approach to size control. It is also possible to place metal oxide shells (e.g., Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO)) at various radial positions within the nanocrystal, and we use this approach to synthesize ITO/In2O3 core/shell nanocrystals as well as In2O3/ITO/In2O3 core/shell/shell nanocrystals. PMID:27328328

  1. Study of nanocrystals in the dynamic slip zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Kireenkova, S. M.; Morozov, Yu. A.; Smul'skaya, A. I.; Vettegren, V. I.; Kulik, V. B.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2012-09-01

    Mineral composition is studied and a search to detect nanocrystals is conducted in the surface layers of slickensides formed due to dynamic slip in arkose sandstone. The infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the slickensided layer is composed of nanocrystals of montmorillonite and anatase measuring ≈15 nm and 3 nm, respectively. The crystalline lattice of the nanocrystals of montmorillonite is stretched by ≈2.5% while the lattice of the nanocrystals of anatase is compressed by ≈0.12%. Deeper than 3 mm below the slickenside surface, the sandstone contains nanocrystals of montmorillonite, beidellite and nontronite, quartz, plagioclase, and anatase. The nanocrystals of anatase have a linear size of ≈8 nm. Their crystalline lattice is compressed by ≈0.03%. It is supposed that montmorillonite in the slickensides was formed due to hydrolytic decomposition of silicates under friction of the fault planes sliding past each other.

  2. Diamond Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175 deg.n C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin ({approx}1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  3. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  4. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lončar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310 nm and 632 nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300 pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  5. Observation of Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Photoluminescence under High Vacuum in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Hsu, Jen-Feng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of photoluminescence from nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond nanocrystals levitated in a magneto-gravitational trap. The trap utilizes a combination of strong magnetic field gradients and gravity to confine diamagnetic particles in three dimensions. The well-characterized NV centers in trapped diamond nanocrystals provide an ideal built-in sensor to measure the trap magnetic field and the temperature of the trapped diamond nanocrystal. In the future, the NV center spin state could be coupled to the mechanical motion through magnetic field gradients, enabling in an ideal quantum interface between NV center spin and the mechanical motion. National Science Foundation, Grant No. 1540879.

  6. Ferrimagnetic nanocrystal assemblies as versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediators.

    PubMed

    Sakellari, D; Brintakis, K; Kostopoulou, A; Myrovali, E; Simeonidis, K; Lappas, A; Angelakeris, M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystal assemblies (nanoclusters), consisting of 13 nm iron oxide nanocrystals, were synthesized in various sizes (45-98 nm), and were investigated as heating mediators for magnetic particle hyperthermia. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters show enhanced heating efficiency in comparison with their constituent primary iron oxide nanocrystals due to collective magnetic features. The fine tuning of intra-cluster magnetic interactions results to the domination of the hysteresis losses mechanism over the relaxation loss heating contributions and eventually to a versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediator. PMID:26478302

  7. Analysis of Short and Long Range Atomic Order in Nanocrystalline Diamonds with Application of Powder Diffractometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Neuefiend, J.; Weber, H.-P.; Proffen, T.; VonDreele, R.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental limitations, with respect to nanocrystalline materials, of the traditional elaboration of powder diffraction data like the Rietveld method are discussed. A tentative method of the analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nanocrystals is introduced which is based on the examination of the variation of lattice parameters calculated from individual Bragg lines (named the "apparent lattice parameter", alp). We examine the application of our methodology using theoretical diffraction patterns computed for models of nanocrystals with a perfect crystal lattice and for grains with a two-phase, core-shell structure. We use the method for the analysis of X-ray and neutron experimental diffraction data of nanocrystalline diamond powders of 4, 6 and 12 nm in diameter. The effects of an internal pressure and strain at the grain surface is discussed. This is based on the dependence of the alp values oil the diffraction vector Q and on the PDF analysis. It is shown, that the experimental results support well the concept of the two-phase structure of nanocrystalline diamond.

  8. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  9. Magnetic relaxation of diluted and self-assembled cobalt nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Wen, G. H.; Xiao, Gang; Sun, Shouheng

    2003-04-01

    We have studied the magnetic relaxation of monodispersed 4 nm cubic ɛ-cobalt nanocrystals in both randomly oriented and pre-aligned assemblies. The blocking temperature TB, for the closely packed Co nanocrystal assemblies, is 30% higher than that of the highly diluted and well-dispersed Co nanocrystal-organic composites. This increase is attributed to the strong magnetic dipole interaction induced from the close packing of the nanocrystals. It is found that the frequency-dependent susceptibility data, obtained from the diluted samples, can be fitted to the half-circle Argand Diagrams, indicating a single barrier (or very narrow energy distribution) of the nanocrystals. This agrees well with the physical observation from TEM that the nanocrystals are monodispersed. The long time magnetic relaxation measurements reveal that energy barrier distribution in a pre-aligned nanocrystal assembly is significantly different from that in a randomly oriented one.

  10. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-03-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  11. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  12. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  13. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  14. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  16. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  17. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under near-infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-05-01

    The negatively charged NV defect center (NV-) in diamond has become prominent for applications in quantum information, nanoscale magnetic and electric field sensing, and fluorescent biological markers. Switching between NV- and neutral charge states (NV0) have been extensively studied and modeled using exciting laser wavelengths that are shorter than the NV- zero-phonon line (ZPL), and typically result in decreased fluorescence from the NV- state. In this work, we report on the experimental observation that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with near-infrared (1064 nm) light, resulting in increased fluorescence from the NV- state. We have observed this effect in both ensembles of NVs in bulk diamond, and in diamond nanocrystals, and find that it is robust both at room and low temperature. We carried out microwave and two-color excitation combined with spectral and time-resolved experimental studies. We used rate-equation modeling and find evidence for competition between one-photon and two-photon processes for hole and electron ionization. This finding may help elucidate the study of the NV energy level structure, and impact recently emerging research in single-shot measurement of the NV- spin state via spin-to-charge conversion.

  18. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ~3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ~5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ~200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  19. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  20. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  1. Controlling PbS nanocrystal aggregation in conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jamie H; Watt, Andrew A R; Tilley, Richard D

    2005-10-01

    PbS nanocrystals were synthesized directly in the conducting polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl). Transmission electron microscopy shows that the PbS nanocrystals are faceted and relatively uniform in size with a mean size of 10 nm. FFT analysis of the atomic lattice planes observed in TEM and selected area electron diffraction confirm that the nanocrystals have the PbS rock salt structure. The synthesis conditions are explored to show control over the aggregation of PbS nanocrystals in the thiophene conducting polymer. PMID:20818021

  2. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  3. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  4. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  5. Beyond entropy: magnetic forces induce formation of quasicrystalline structure in binary nanocrystal superlattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhijie; Wei, Jingjing; Bonville, Pierre; Pileni, Marie-Paule

    2015-04-01

    Here, it is shown that binary superlattices of Co/Ag nanocrystals with the same size, surface coating, differing by their type of crystallinity are governed by Co-Co magnetic interactions. By using 9 nm amorphous-phase Co nanocrystals and 4 nm polycrystalline Ag nanocrystals at 25 °C, triangle-shaped NaCl-type binary nanocrystal superlattices are produced driven by the entropic force, maximizing the packing density. By contrast, using ferromagnetic 9 nm single domain (hcp) Co nanocrystals instead of amorphous-phase Co, dodecagonal quasicrystalline order is obtained, together with less-packed phases such as the CoAg13 (NaZn13-type), CoAg (AuCu-type), and CoAg3 (AuCu3-type) structures. On increasing temperature to 65 °C, 9 nm hcp Co nanocrystals become superparamagnetic, and the system yields the CoAg3 (AuCu3-type) and CoAg2 (AlB2-type) structures, as observed with 9 nm amorphous Co nanocrystals. Furthermore, by decreasing the Co nanocrystal size from 9 to 7 nm, stable AlB2-type binary nanocrystal superlattices are produced, which remain independent of the crystallinity of Co nanocrystals with the superparamagnetic state. PMID:25785302

  6. Mixed semiconductor nanocrystal compositions

    DOEpatents

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Schaller, Richard D.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-02-15

    Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and wherein the ratio of the number of energy donors to the number of energy acceptors is from about 2:1 to about 1000:1.

  7. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  8. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of the Atomic Structure of Nanocrystals: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (ALP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of standard methods of elaboration of powder diffraction data for determination of the structure of nano-size crystallites is analysed. Based on our theoretical calculations of powder diffraction data we show, that the assumption of the infinite crystal lattice for nanocrystals smaller than 20 nm in size is not justified. Application of conventional tools developed for elaboration of powder diffraction data, like the Rietveld method, may lead to erroneous interpretation of the experimental results. An alternate evaluation of diffraction data of nanoparticles, based on the so-called 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) is introduced. We assume a model of nanocrystal having a grain core with well-defined crystal structure, surrounded by a surface shell with the atomic structure similar to that of the core but being under a strain (compressive or tensile). The two structural components, the core and the shell, form essentially a composite crystal with interfering, inseparable diffraction properties. Because the structure of such a nanocrystal is not uniform, it defies the basic definitions of an unambiguous crystallographic phase. Consequently, a set of lattice parameters used for characterization of simple crystal phases is insufficient for a proper description of the complex structure of nanocrystals. We developed a method of evaluation of powder diffraction data of nanocrystals, which refers to a core-shell model and is based on the 'apparent lattice parameter' methodology. For a given diffraction pattem, the alp values are calculated for every individual Bragg reflection. For nanocrystals the alp values depend on the diffraction vector Q. By modeling different a0tomic structures of nanocrystals and calculating theoretically corresponding diffraction patterns using the Debye functions we showed, that alp-Q plots show characteristic shapes which can be used for evaluation of the atomic structure of the core-shell system. We show, that using a simple

  9. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of Short- and Long-Range Atomic Order in Nanocrystalline Diamond and SiC: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (alp)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of the analysis of powder diffraction patterns of diamond and SiC nanocrystals are presented: (a) examination of changes of the lattice parameters with diffraction vector Q ('apparent lattice parameter', alp) which refers to Bragg scattering, and (b), examination of changes of inter-atomic distances based on the analysis of the atomic Pair Distribution Function, PDF. Application of these methods was studied based on the theoretical diffraction patterns computed for models of nanocrystals having (i) a perfect crystal lattice, and (ii), a core-shell structure, i.e. constituting a two-phase system. The models are defined by the lattice parameter of the grain core, thickness of the surface shell, and the magnitude and distribution of the strain field in the shell. X-ray and neutron experimental diffraction data of nanocrystalline SiC and diamond powders of the grain diameter from 4 nm up to micrometers were used. The effects of the internal pressure and strain at the grain surface on the structure are discussed based on the experimentally determined dependence of the alp values on the Q-vector, and changes of the interatomic distances with the grain size determined experimentally by the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis. The experimental results lend a strong support to the concept of a two-phase, core and the surface shell structure of nanocrystalline diamond and SiC.

  10. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  11. Macroscopic Crystallization of Nanocrystals into Supercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Toshio; Nagasawa, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Minoru; Komatsu, Teruo; Isoda, Seiji; Nelson, Jon

    2004-03-01

    We report here the crystallization of spherical, 4.7-nm-diameter Ag nanocrystals, passivated with a fatty-acid surface coating, into well-facetted supercrystals up to 500-μm across and about 1-μm thick.

  12. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  13. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  14. Growth and characterization of GE nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S., Naval Research Laboratory

    1998-05-01

    We have synthesized Ge nanocrystals of sizes 4, 8, and 12 nm by ion-implanting Ge+ ions into thermally grown Si0{sub 2} films and subsequent annealing of the films at 8300 C for 30 min in nitrogen. These films were characterized by x-ray, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. A distribution of particle size was identified by TEM in a 1 00 nm band below the surface. Particle sizes were estimated by these 3 techniques.

  15. Diamond Molecules Found in Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. M. K.; Dahl, J. E. P.; Liu, S. G.; Olmstead, M. M.; Buerki, P. R.; Gat, R.

    We recently reported [1,2] the discovery and isolation of new members of the hydrogen-terminated diamond series, ˜1 to ˜2 nm sized higher diamondoids from petroleum. Crystallographic studies [1,2] revealed a wealth of diamond molecules that are nanometer-sized rods, helices, discs, pyramids, etc. Highly rigid, well-defined, readily derivatizable structures make them valuable molecular building blocks for nanotechnology. We now produce certain higher diamondoids in gram quantities. Although more stable than graphite particles of comparable size, higher diamondoids are extraordinarily difficult to synthesize. Attempts to synthesize them were abandoned in the 1980's. We examined extracts of diamond-containing materials synthesized by CO2 laser-induced gas-phase synthesis [3] and commercial CVD in an attempt to detect diamantane to undecamantane. However, high-sensitivity GCMS detected no diamondoids in these materials.

  16. Deep ultraviolet diamond Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Granados, Eduardo; Spence, David J; Mildren, Richard P

    2011-05-23

    We present a synchronously pumped diamond Raman laser operating at 275.7 nm pumped by the 4th harmonic of a mode locked Nd:YVO4 laser. The laser had a threshold pump pulse energy of 5.8 nJ and generated up to 0.96 nJ pulses at 10.3% conversion efficiency. The results agree well with a numerical model that includes two-photon absorption of the pump and Stokes beams and uses a Raman gain coefficient of diamond of 100 cm/GW. We also report on the observation of nanometer scale two-photon assisted etching of the diamond crystal surfaces. PMID:21643343

  17. Superconductivity in colloidal lead nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotavin, Pavlo

    Monodisperse colloidal lead nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4.4 to 20 nm were prepared by a self-limiting growth method. The nanoparticles are protected from oxidation by an amorphous lead-tin oxide shell of 1.5-2 nm thickness. The magnetic susceptibility of the particles was measured as a function of size, temperature and magnetic field. The Meissner effect was observed indicating the superconducting transition. For the 20 and 16 nm particles, the critical temperature is suppressed to 6.9 K from the bulk value of 7.2 K and is further reduced for smaller particles. Depending on the size of the particles, the critical field is enhanced by 60 to 140 times. The coupling between particles was in situ controlled through the conversion of the oxides present on the surface of the nanoparticles to chalcogenides. This transformation allows for a 109-fold increase in the conductivity. The temperature of the onset of the superconductivity was found to depend upon the degree of coupling of the nanoparticles in the vicinity of the insulator - superconductor transition. The critical current density of the best sample of Pb/PbSe nanocrystals at zero magnetic field was determined to be 4 x 103 A/cm 2. In turn, the critical field of the sample shows 50-fold enhancement compared to bulk Pb. A method to convert the original Pb/PbO nanocrystals into colloidal Pb/PbS (Se, Te) particle was developed. This alleviates the necessity of chemical post processing and provides a truly colloidal superconductor. Paramagnetic Meissner effect of abnormally large amplitude is observed for Pb/PbTe nanocrystal assemblies. The material described in this manuscript is the first nanostructured superconductor prepared by the bottom-up approach starting from colloidal nanoparticles.

  18. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  19. Biocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Lawton, D; Thompson, M R; Liu, Q

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste as a reinforcement and vapor barrier additive. The nanocrystals were derived from cellulosic material in the potato peel by alkali treatment and subsequently acid hydrolysis. TEM images revealed the average fiber length of the nanocrystals was 410 nm with an aspect ratio of 41; its aspect ratio being considerably larger than cotton-derived nanocrystals prepared using similar reaction conditions. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)-filled polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and thermoplastic starch (TPS) films were prepared by solution casting method to maintain uniform dispersion of the 1-2% (w/w) filler content. An increase of 19% and 33% (starch composite) and 38% and 49% (PVA composite) in tensile modulus was observed for the 1% and 2% CNC-reinforced composites, respectively. Water vapor transmission measurements showed a marginal reduction of water permeability for the PVA composite, whereas no effect was observed for the thermoplastic starch composite. PMID:24751097

  20. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sooyeon

    stable at room temperature after four months. The non-hydrolytic hot solution synthesis technique was used to grow monodispersed ternary oxide nanospheres (˜5nm) of ZnGa2O 4: Eu3+ from a variety of metal precursors. Using Gd acetate dehydrate, large (˜20nm) complex shaped (triangle and rectangle) ZnGa2O4: Eu3+ nanocrystals were obtained. Based on X-ray diffraction data, the nanocrystals had a cubic spinel structure with no impurity phases. The size of the ZnGa2O4: Eu 3+ nanospheres could be varied by changing the molar ratio of Zn to surfactants, with higher concentrations of surfactant resulting in smaller nanocrystals. Analysis of the PL emission suggests that the Eu3+ ions were incorporated into the ZnGa2O4 host.

  1. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  2. Diamonds in an Archean greenstone belt: Diamond suites in unconventional rocks of Wawa, Northern Ontario (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Ryder, John

    2010-05-01

    population. Diamonds from the conglomerate have nitrogen contents below 400 ppm N, with 47% of the suite being Type IaA stones. Approximately one third of the conglomerate and breccia diamonds belongs to Type II having no measurable N. The two suites of Wawa diamonds, according to the morphology and nitrogen studies, are deemed to be different. The conglomerate diamonds are significantly less resorbed and contain less aggregated N. The diamonds that occur in the Wawa breccia and conglomerate have different primary volcanic sources. We suggest that the primary volcanic rock of the conglomerate diamonds may be a kimberlite, as kimberlitic indicator minerals are found in the matrix of the conglomerate. These indicator minerals garnet, Cr diopside and ilmenite are absent from the diamoniferous lamprophyric breccias. The hypothetical kimberlites may have occured in proximity to the conglomerates as suggested by low mechanical abrasion of the conglomerate diamonds and indicator minerals, and the preservation of garnet kelyphitic rims and Cr-diopside. Our study infers an episode of the Archean, pre-2.7 Ga kimberlite magmatism in MGB, which also experienced multiple emplacement episodes of the 2.7 Ga syn-orogenic diamondiferous calc-alkaline lamprophyres. Despite the distinct origins of the breccia and conglomerate diamonds, they all have similar red-orange-green cathodoluminescence colours controlled by the CL emission mainly at 520 nm. This contrasts with the prevalent CL emission at 415-440 nm commonly observed in kimberlitic and detrital diamonds. We ascribe the red-orange-green CL colours of the two diamond suites of Wawa to the late imprint of metamorphism.

  3. Electrochromic nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shim, M; Guyot-Sionnest, P

    2001-03-23

    Incorporating nanocrystals into future electronic or optoelectronic devices will require a means of controlling charge-injection processes and an understanding of how the injected charges affect the properties of nanocrystals. We show that the optical properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots can be tuned by an electrochemical potential. The injection of electrons into the quantum-confined states of the nanocrystal leads to an electrochromic response, including a strong, size-tunable, midinfrared absorption corresponding to an intraband transition, a bleach of the visible interband exciton transitions, and a quench of the narrow band-edge photoluminescence. PMID:11264530

  4. Self-Organized Ultrathin Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Ziyang; Tsung, Chia-kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Fardy, Melissa; Yan, Ruoxue; Li, Yadong; Yang, Piedong; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2009-01-08

    Sub-2-nm (down to one-unit cell) uniform oxide nanocrystals and highly ordered superstructures were obtained in one step using oleylamine and oleic acid as capping and structure directing agents. The cooperative nature of the nanocrystal growth and assembly resulted in mesoscopic one-dimensional ribbon-like superstructures made of these ultrathin nanocrystals. The process reported here is general and can be readily extended to the production of many other transition metal (TiO2, ZnO, Nb2O5) and rare earth oxide (Eu2O3, Sm2O3, Er2O3, Y2O3, Tb2O3, and Yb2O3) systems.

  5. Photoinduced laser etching of a diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Komlenok, M S; Pimenov, S M; Konov, V I

    2007-11-30

    Nongraphitising ablation of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by nanosecond UV laser pulses is studied experimentally. For laser fluences below the diamond graphitisation threshold, extremely low diamond etching rates (less than 1nm/1000 pulses) are obtained and the term nanoablation is used just for this process. The dependence of the nanoablation rate on the laser fluence is studied for samples irradiated both in air and in oxygen-free atmosphere. The effect of external heating on the nanoablation rate is analysed and a photochemical mechanism is proposed for describing it. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. DNA attachment to nanocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenmackers, S.; Christiaens, P.; Daenen, M.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; van Deven, M.; Vermeeren, V.; Michiels, L.; Ameloot, M.; Wagner, P.

    2005-09-01

    A biochemical method to immobilize DNA on synthetic diamond for biosensor applications is developed. Nanocrystalline diamond is grown using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. On the hydrogen-terminated surface 10-undecenoic acid is tethered photochemically under 254 nm illumination, followed by 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide crosslinker-mediated attachment of amino modified DNA. The attachment is functionally confirmed by comparison of supernatant fluorescence and gel electrophoresis. The linking procedure allowed for 35 denaturation and rehybridisation steps.

  7. Open-tubular electrochromatographic chiral separation of amino acids using an organic nanocrystals immobilized capillary.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Sudaki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Otsuka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of cinchonidine (CCND) nanocrystals and their immobilization onto the inner surface of a fused silica capillary was investigated for use in the enantioseparation by capillary electrochromatography. The CCND nanocrystals were prepared by an emulsion method that utilizes crystal growth in an oil-in-water emulsion without a stabilizer. As a result, white-colored aqueous dispersions of organic nanoparticles were obtained. SEM images showed that the prepared CCND nanocrystals were from 300 to 700 nm in size. When the obtained dispersion was introduced into a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) coated capillary, the nanocrystals were strongly adsorbed onto the inner surface due to an electrostatic interaction between cationic PDDAC and the negatively charged organic nanocrystals. In CCND nanocrystals coated capillary, CEC enantioseparations of racemic amino acids were successfully achieved. The reproducibilities of the detection times were acceptable with a relative standard deviation of less than 7%, indicating that stable nanocrystal coating could be obtained by our proposed method. PMID:23303094

  8. Silicon nanocrystal growth under irradiation of electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Qin, Cao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    In our experiment, it was observed that silicon nanocrystal rapidly grows with irradiation of electron beam on amorphous silicon film prepared by pulsed laser deposition, and shape of silicon nanocrystal is usually sphere in smaller nanoscale with less exposure time under electron beam, in which the quantum dots are prepared in nanoscale near 3 nm. In the electron interaction process, it was investigated that the various crystals structures in different orientations occur in the same time and the condensed structures of silicon nanocrystal are changed with different impurity atoms in silicon film. PMID:26608069

  9. Biomineralization: Nanocrystals by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Nanocrystals with precisely defined structures offer promise as components of advanced materials yet they are challenging to create. Now, a nanocrystal made up of seven cadmium and twelve chloride ions has been synthesized via a biotemplating approach that uses a de novo designed protein.

  10. Doping semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Steven C; Zu, Lijun; Haftel, Michael I; Efros, Alexander L; Kennedy, Thomas A; Norris, David J

    2005-07-01

    Doping--the intentional introduction of impurities into a material--is fundamental to controlling the properties of bulk semiconductors. This has stimulated similar efforts to dope semiconductor nanocrystals. Despite some successes, many of these efforts have failed, for reasons that remain unclear. For example, Mn can be incorporated into nanocrystals of CdS and ZnSe (refs 7-9), but not into CdSe (ref. 12)--despite comparable bulk solubilities of near 50 per cent. These difficulties, which have hindered development of new nanocrystalline materials, are often attributed to 'self-purification', an allegedly intrinsic mechanism whereby impurities are expelled. Here we show instead that the underlying mechanism that controls doping is the initial adsorption of impurities on the nanocrystal surface during growth. We find that adsorption--and therefore doping efficiency--is determined by three main factors: surface morphology, nanocrystal shape, and surfactants in the growth solution. Calculated Mn adsorption energies and equilibrium shapes for several nanocrystals lead to specific doping predictions. These are confirmed by measuring how the Mn concentration in ZnSe varies with nanocrystal size and shape. Finally, we use our predictions to incorporate Mn into previously undopable CdSe nanocrystals. This success establishes that earlier difficulties with doping are not intrinsic, and suggests that a variety of doped nanocrystals--for applications from solar cells to spintronics--can be anticipated. PMID:16001066

  11. Diamond cutters' grinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, B. F.

    1985-03-01

    The development of diamond tool designs is determined by the development of the technology for the synthesis of artificial diamonds. The technology of syntehsizing artificial diamonds involves the production of mono and polycrystalline diamonds and composition diamond-containing materials. High strength and thermally stable monocrystalline diamonds brands AS30 to AS80 in a size of up to 800 micrometers, and polycrystalline diamonds: black diamonds, ballas (Synthetic Fiber) in a size up to 10mm, are manufactured. Production of single-layer and double-layer diamond plates used in cutting tools is organized. The raw materials base with the constant decrease in the use of natural diamonds is the basis for the development of the manufacture of a wide array of diamond tools. New areas of applications for tools using natural diamonds, such as diamond cutters for turning high-precision parts, straightening tools, hardness gages are outlined. Diamond cutters with natural diamonds are used to grind surfaces which have exceptionally high requirements with respect to the reflecting capacity and roughness.

  12. Nanocrystal targeting in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkerman, Maria E.; Chan, Warren C. W.; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-10-01

    Inorganic nanostructures that interface with biological systems have recently attracted widespread interest in biology and medicine. Nanoparticles are thought to have potential as novel intravascular probes for both diagnostic (e.g., imaging) and therapeutic purposes (e.g., drug delivery). Critical issues for successful nanoparticle delivery include the ability to target specific tissues and cell types and escape from the biological particulate filter known as the reticuloendothelial system. We set out to explore the feasibility of in vivo targeting by using semiconductor quantum dots (qdots). Qdots are small (<10 nm) inorganic nanocrystals that possess unique luminescent properties; their fluorescence emission is stable and tuned by varying the particle size or composition. We show that ZnS-capped CdSe qdots coated with a lung-targeting peptide accumulate in the lungs of mice after i.v. injection, whereas two other peptides specifically direct qdots to blood vessels or lymphatic vessels in tumors. We also show that adding polyethylene glycol to the qdot coating prevents nonselective accumulation of qdots in reticuloendothelial tissues. These results encourage the construction of more complex nanostructures with capabilities such as disease sensing and drug delivery.

  13. Twinning of cubic diamond explains reported nanodiamond polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Péter; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The unusual physical properties and formation conditions attributed to h-, i-, m-, and n-nanodiamond polymorphs has resulted in their receiving much attention in the materials and planetary science literature. Their identification is based on diffraction features that are absent in ordinary cubic (c-) diamond (space group: Fd-3m). We show, using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of natural and synthetic nanodiamonds, that the diffraction features attributed to the reported polymorphs are consistent with c-diamond containing abundant defects. Combinations of {113} reflection and <011> rotation twins produce HRTEM images and d-spacings that match those attributed to h-, i-, and m-diamond. The diagnostic features of n-diamond in TEM images can arise from thickness effects of c-diamonds. Our data and interpretations strongly suggest that the reported nanodiamond polymorphs are in fact twinned c-diamond. We also report a new type of twin (<11> rotational), which can give rise to grains with dodecagonal symmetry. Our results show that twins are widespread in diamond nanocrystals. A high density of twins could strongly influence their applications. PMID:26671288

  14. Twinning of cubic diamond explains reported nanodiamond polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2015-12-01

    The unusual physical properties and formation conditions attributed to h-, i-, m-, and n-nanodiamond polymorphs has resulted in their receiving much attention in the materials and planetary science literature. Their identification is based on diffraction features that are absent in ordinary cubic (c-) diamond (space group: Fd-3m). We show, using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of natural and synthetic nanodiamonds, that the diffraction features attributed to the reported polymorphs are consistent with c-diamond containing abundant defects. Combinations of {113} reflection and <011> rotation twins produce HRTEM images and d-spacings that match those attributed to h-, i-, and m-diamond. The diagnostic features of n-diamond in TEM images can arise from thickness effects of c-diamonds. Our data and interpretations strongly suggest that the reported nanodiamond polymorphs are in fact twinned c-diamond. We also report a new type of twin (<11> rotational), which can give rise to grains with dodecagonal symmetry. Our results show that twins are widespread in diamond nanocrystals. A high density of twins could strongly influence their applications.

  15. Twinning of cubic diamond explains reported nanodiamond polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Németh, Péter; Garvie, Laurence A J; Buseck, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The unusual physical properties and formation conditions attributed to h-, i-, m-, and n-nanodiamond polymorphs has resulted in their receiving much attention in the materials and planetary science literature. Their identification is based on diffraction features that are absent in ordinary cubic (c-) diamond (space group: Fd-3m). We show, using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of natural and synthetic nanodiamonds, that the diffraction features attributed to the reported polymorphs are consistent with c-diamond containing abundant defects. Combinations of {113} reflection and <011> rotation twins produce HRTEM images and d-spacings that match those attributed to h-, i-, and m-diamond. The diagnostic features of n-diamond in TEM images can arise from thickness effects of c-diamonds. Our data and interpretations strongly suggest that the reported nanodiamond polymorphs are in fact twinned c-diamond. We also report a new type of twin (<121> rotational), which can give rise to grains with dodecagonal symmetry. Our results show that twins are widespread in diamond nanocrystals. A high density of twins could strongly influence their applications. PMID:26671288

  16. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  17. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  18. Size dependence of the pressure-induced gamma to alpha structuraltransition in iron oxide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.M.; Prilliman, S.G.; Erdonmez, C.K.; Rockenberger, J.; Zaziski, D.J.; Kwong, J.; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2005-09-01

    The size trend for the pressure-induced gamma-Fe2O3(maghemite) to alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) structural phase transition in nanocrystals has been observed. The transition pressure was found to increase with decreasing nanocrystal size: 7 nm nanocrystals transformed at 272GPa, 5 nm at 343GPa and 3 nm at 372GPa. Annealing of a bulk sample of gamma-Fe2O3 was found to reduce the transition pressure from 352 to242GPa. The bulk modulus was determined to be 2626GPa for 7 nm nanocrystals of gamma-Fe2O3, which is significantly higher than for the value of 1906 GPa that we measured for bulk samples. For alpha-Fe2O3, the bulk moduli for 7 nm nanocrystals (3365) and bulk (30030) were found to be almost the same within error. The bulk modulus for the gamma phase was found to decrease with decreasing particle size between 10 and 3.2 nm particle size. Values for the ambient pressure molar volume were found within 1 percent to be: 33.0 cm3/mol for bulk gamma-Fe2O3, 32.8 cm3/mol for 7 nm diameter gamma-Fe2O3 nanocrystals, 30.7 cm3/mol for bulk alpha-Fe2O3 and 30.6 cm3/mol for alpha-Fe2O3 nanocrystals.

  19. Ultrahigh throughput plasma processing of free standing silicon nanocrystals with lognormal size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Ilker; Kramer, Nicolaas J.; Westermann, Rene H. J.; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Dohnalova, Katerina; Gregorkiewicz, Tom; Smets, Arno H. M.; Sanden, Mauritius C. M. van de

    2013-04-07

    We demonstrate a method for synthesizing free standing silicon nanocrystals in an argon/silane gas mixture by using a remote expanding thermal plasma. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal that the distribution has a bimodal shape consisting of two distinct groups of small and large silicon nanocrystals with sizes in the range 2-10 nm and 50-120 nm, respectively. We also observe that both size distributions are lognormal which is linked with the growth time and transport of nanocrystals in the plasma. Average size control is achieved by tuning the silane flow injected into the vessel. Analyses on morphological features show that nanocrystals are monocrystalline and spherically shaped. These results imply that formation of silicon nanocrystals is based on nucleation, i.e., these large nanocrystals are not the result of coalescence of small nanocrystals. Photoluminescence measurements show that silicon nanocrystals exhibit a broad emission in the visible region peaked at 725 nm. Nanocrystals are produced with ultrahigh throughput of about 100 mg/min and have state of the art properties, such as controlled size distribution, easy handling, and room temperature visible photoluminescence.

  20. Nanocrystalline diamond nanoelectrode arrays and ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hees, Jakob; Hoffmann, René; Kriele, Armin; Smirnov, Waldemar; Obloh, Harald; Glorer, Karlheinz; Raynor, Brian; Driad, Rachid; Yang, Nianjun; Williams, Oliver A; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-04-26

    In this report, the fabrication of all-nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) by e-beam lithography as well as of all-diamond nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) using nanosphere lithography is presented. In this way, nanostructuring techniques are combined with the excellent properties of diamond that are desirable for electrochemical sensor devices. Arrays and ensembles of recessed disk electrodes with radii ranging from 150 to 250 nm and a spacing of 10 μm have been fabricated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as well as cyclic voltammetry was conducted to characterize arrays and ensembles with respect to different diffusion regimes. One outstanding advantage of diamond as an electrode material is the stability of specific surface terminations influencing the electron transfer kinetics. On changing the termination from hydrogen- to oxygen-terminated diamond electrode surface, we observe a dependence of the electron transfer rate constant on the charge of the analyte molecule. Ru(NH(3))(6)(+2/+3) shows faster electron transfer on oxygen than on hydrogen-terminated surfaces, while the anion IrCl(6)(-2/-3) exhibits faster electron transfer on hydrogen-terminated surfaces correlating with the surface dipole layer. This effect cannot be observed on macroscopic planar diamond electrodes and emphasizes the sensitivity of the all-diamond NEAs and NEEs. Thus, the NEAs and NEEs in combination with the efficiency and suitability of the selective electrochemical surface termination offer a new versatile system for electrochemical sensing. PMID:21413786

  1. Saturation of CVD Diamond Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucile S. Dauffy; Richard A. Lerche; Greg J. Schmid; Jeffrey A. Koch; Christopher Silbernagel

    2005-01-01

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its surrounding electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 µJ, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (Ebandgap = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  2. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  3. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  4. Toward deep blue nano hope diamonds: heavily boron-doped diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Steffen; Janssen, Wiebke; Turner, Stuart; Lu, Ying-Gang; Yeap, Weng Siang; Verbeeck, Jo; Haenen, Ken; Krueger, Anke

    2014-06-24

    The production of boron-doped diamond nanoparticles enables the application of this material for a broad range of fields, such as electrochemistry, thermal management, and fundamental superconductivity research. Here we present the production of highly boron-doped diamond nanoparticles using boron-doped CVD diamond films as a starting material. In a multistep milling process followed by purification and surface oxidation we obtained diamond nanoparticles of 10-60 nm with a boron content of approximately 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3). Aberration-corrected HRTEM reveals the presence of defects within individual diamond grains, as well as a very thin nondiamond carbon layer at the particle surface. The boron K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure demonstrates that the B atoms are tetrahedrally embedded into the diamond lattice. The boron-doped diamond nanoparticles have been used to nucleate growth of a boron-doped diamond film by CVD that does not contain an insulating seeding layer. PMID:24738731

  5. Formulation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of puerarin nanocrystals for intravenous delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Ma, Yi; Ma, Yingying; Du, Yongli; Liu, Zhaoping; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-08-01

    Puerarin is a very widely used drug for treating coronary heart disease. Owing to its poor water solubility and the adverse drug reactions caused by cosolvents having been confirmed by SFDA, the aim of present study was to construction and evaluation the puerarin nanocrystals in vitro and in vivo. The nanocrystals prepared were characterized using PCS, AFM, TEM, SEM and DSC. For the assessment of the pharmacokinetic parameters the developed formulations have been intravenous administered to beagle dogs. Results revealed that a narrow size distributed nanocrystals composed of crystallized spherical particles with a mean particle size of 423.6 +/- 17.3 nm, a poly-dispersity index of 0.13 +/- 0.07 and a negative charges around -30 mV was obtained. Puerarin dissolution velocity and saturation solubility were enhanced by the nanocrystals. DSC analysis revealed that the crystallinity of the puerarin was preserved during the high pressure homogenization and freeze-drying processes. Administration of the nanocrystals led to a mean plasma profile with almost similarly low variations in comparison to the reference solution, however with no initial blood peak as observed with the solution formulation. The puerarin nanocrystals exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Cmax and clearance, and a significantly (P < 0.05) greater MRT, clearance and elimination half-life compared to the puerarin solution. These results revealed the opportunity to formulate puerarin in nanocrystals for intravenous delivery with higher safety. PMID:22962724

  6. Enhanced oral bioavailability of glycyrrhetinic acid via nanocrystal formulation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yaya; Kong, Yindi; Sui, Hong; Feng, Jun; Zhu, Rongyue; Wang, Wenping

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare solid nanocrystals of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) for improved oral bioavailability. The anti-solvent precipitation-ultrasonication method followed by freeze-drying was adopted for the preparation of GA nanocrystals. The physicochemical properties, drug dissolution and pharmacokinetic of the obtained nanocrystals were investigated. GA nanocrystals showed a mean particle size of 220 nm and shaped like short rods. The analysis results from differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction indicated that GA remained in crystalline state despite a huge size reduction. The equilibrium solubility and dissolution rate of GA nanocrystal were significantly improved in comparison with those of the coarse GA or the physical mixture. The bioavailability of GA nanocrystals in rats was 4.3-fold higher than that of the coarse GA after oral administration. With its rapid dissolution and absorption performance, the solid nanocrystal might be a more preferable formulation for oral administration of poorly soluble GA. PMID:27206446

  7. Charge transport in silicon nanocrystal superlattices in the terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, H.; Zajac, V.; Kužel, P.; Malý, P.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2015-05-01

    Silicon nanocrystals prepared by thermal decomposition of silicon-rich 2-5-nm-thick SiOx layers (0.64 ≤x ≤1 ) are investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. The samples consist of a superlattice of isolated monolayers composed of Si nanocrystals with controlled variable size and filling fraction. Experiments with variable optical pump fluence over almost two orders of magnitude allow us to determine the depolarization fields in the structure. Careful consideration of the local fields along with Monte Carlo calculations of the microscopic conductivity of Si nanocrystals supported by structural characterization of the samples provide detailed information about the electrical connectivity of nanocrystals and about the charge transport among them. Well below the percolation threshold, nanocrystals grow mostly isolated from each other. In thicker or in more Si-enriched layers, nanocrystals merge during their growth and form tens-of-nanometer-sized photoconducting Si structures with a good electrical connection. In addition, in thick SiOx layers, imperfectly connected clusters of Si nanocrystals are observed which develop probably at the end of the growth process and allow only limited charge transport due to energy barriers.

  8. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  9. Ultradispersity of diamond at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Galli, Giulia

    2003-12-01

    Nanometre-sized diamond has been found in meteorites, protoplanetary nebulae and interstellar dusts, as well as in residues of detonation and in diamond films. Remarkably, the size distribution of diamond nanoparticles seems to be peaked around 2-5 nm, and to be largely independent of preparation conditions. We have carried out ab initio calculations of the stability of nanodiamond as a function of surface hydrogen coverage and of size. We have found that at about 3 nm, and for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, particles with bare, reconstructed surfaces become thermodynamically more stable than those with hydrogenated surfaces, thus preventing the formation of larger grains. Our findings provide an explanation of the size distribution of extraterrestrial and of terrestrial nanodiamond found in ultradispersed and ultracrystalline diamond films. They also provide an atomistic structural model of these films, based on the topology and structure of 2-3-nm dimond clusters consisting of a diamond core surrounded by a fullerene-like carbon network. PMID:14634641

  10. Dependence of the stimulated luminescence threshold in ZnO nanocrystals on their geometric shape

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzintsev, A. N. Redkin, A. N.; Barthou, C.

    2010-05-15

    The effect of the shape and dimensions of zinc oxide nanocrystals on the spontaneous luminescence decay times and the thresholds of stimulated luminescence in the ultraviolet spectral region is studied. It is shown that the columnar nanocrystals with hexagonal faceting exhibit the lowest threshold power of optical excitation for the diameters of the nanocavities are 100-200 nm, comparable to the absorption length for the excitation light. Different mechanisms of lasing are established for nanocrystals shaped as prisms and pyramids with a hexagonal base. Variations in the decay times and lasing thresholds can be attributed to different local densities of photon states in regularly shaped nanocrystals.

  11. Efficient Carrier Multiplication in Colloidal CuInSe2 Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Stolle, C Jackson; Schaller, Richard D; Korgel, Brian A

    2014-09-18

    Transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) was used to study carrier multiplication (CM) (also called multiexciton generation (MEG)) in solvent-dispersed colloidal CuInSe2 nanocrystals with diameters as small as 4.5 nm. Size-dependent carrier cooling rates, absorption cross sections, and Auger lifetimes were also determined. The energy threshold for CM in the CuInSe2 nanocrystals was found to be 2.4 ± 0.2 times the nanocrystal energy gap (Eg) and the CM efficiency was 36 ± 6% per unit Eg. This is similar to other types of nanocrystal quantum dot materials. PMID:26276328

  12. [Preliminary Study on the Unique Spectroscopic Characteristics of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Wang, Xiao-xiang; Tao, Jin-bo; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Xian-chao

    2015-10-01

    A systematic comparative study on the natural diamond, the natural diamond treated by heat or irradiation and synthetic diamond prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or High temperature and high pressure (HTHP) were carried out by UV-Vis-NIR absorption and FTIR spectra. The results showed that: natural diamond, treated natural samples such as irradiated or annealed ones under high temperature and the HTHP synthetic diamond, the reflection coefficient is obviously variation between 200 nm and 1100 nm in UV-Vis-NIR spectra of above samples. In contrast, the reflection coefficient of CVD synthetic diamond is relatively smaller than the former. Infrared spectra showed that synthetic diamonds, especially for CVD synthetic diamonds have no obvious absorption peak between 800 and 1 600 cm(-1). In additional, the results of DiamondView detection are different for different kinds of diamonds. Generally speaking, some CVD synthetic diamonds treated by HTHP appears some parallel dislocation lines, and show light-blue fluorescence. HPHT synthetic diamonds exhibit strong blocky geometrical shapes whereas some natural diamonds exhibit more tree-ring type fluorescence patterns, the color of diamonds' fluorescence image may change after treated by HTHP or irradiation. In a word, in view of the diversity and innovation of the synthesis technologies for diamond, the natural and synthetic diamonds have some similar spectra characteristic in term of UV-Vis-NIR and FTIR spectra, some special natural diamonds without typical spectra characteristic of natural ones need to be further supplemented with DiamondView, photoluminescence spectra and other instruments. PMID:26904807

  13. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  14. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles. PMID:16851825

  15. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  16. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  17. Cathodoluminescence of diamond as an indicator of its metamorphic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Longo, Micaela; Ryder, John; Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa

    2010-05-01

    Diamond displays a supreme resistance to chemical and mechanical weathering, ensuring its survival through complex and prolonged crustal processes, including metamorphism and exhumation. For these reasons, volcanic sources and secondary and tertiary collectors for detrital placer diamonds, like Ural or Bingara diamonds, may be difficult to determine. If metamorphic processes leave their marks on diamond, they can be used to reconstruct crustal geologic processes and ages of primary diamondiferous volcanics. Four diamond suites extracted from metamorphic rocks have been characterized using optical CL, infrared and CL spectroscopy, and photoluminescence at the liquid nitrogen temperature. The studied diamonds are from the ~2.7 Ga sedimentary conglomerate and lamprophyric breccia metamorphosed in the greenschist facies (Wawa, Northern Ontario, Canada) during the 2.67 Ga Kenoran orogeny, and from the ultra-high pressure (UHP) terranes of Kokchetav (Kazakhstan) and Erzgebirge (Germany) exhumated in the Paleozoic. Wawa diamonds (Type IaAB and Type II) displayed green, yellow, orange, and red CL colours controlled by the CL emittance at 520, 576 nm, and between 586 and 664 nm. The UHP terranes diamonds show much weaker CL; few luminescent stones display CL peaks at 395, 498, 528 nm and a broad band at 580-668 nm. In contrast, most common diamonds found in unmetamorphosed rocks, i.e. octahedrally grown Type IaAB stones, luminescence blue emitting light at ~415-440 nm and 480-490 nm. There is a noticeable difference between cathodoluminescence of these diamonds and diamonds in metamorphic rocks. The studied diamonds that experienced metamorphism show a shift of CL emission to longer wavelengths (above 520 nm) and to green, yellow and red CL colours. Photoluminescence has the high resolution necessary to assign luminescence to specific optical centers of diamond. Diamonds in metamorphic rocks contain H3 (pairs of substitutional nitrogen atoms separated by a vacancy) and NVo

  18. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  19. Polycrystalline Diamond Schottky Diodes and Their Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ganming

    In this work, four-hot-filament CVD techniques for in situ boron doped diamond synthesis on silicon substrates were extensively studied. A novel tungsten filament shape and arrangement used to obtain large-area, uniform, boron doped polycrystalline diamond thin films. Both the experimental results and radiative heat transfer analysis showed that this technique improved the uniformity of the substrate temperature. XRD, Raman and SEM studies indicate that large area, uniform, high quality polycrystalline diamond films were obtained. Schottky diodes were fabricated by either sputter deposition of silver or thermal evaporation of aluminum or gold, on boron doped diamond thin films. High forward current density and a high forward-to-reverse current ratio were exhibited by silver on diamond Schottky diodes. Schottky barrier heights and the majority carrier concentrations of both aluminum and gold contacted diodes were determined from the C-V measurements. Furthermore, a novel theoretical C-V-f analysis of deep level boron doped diamond Schottky diodes was performed. The analytical results agree well with the experimental results. Compressive stress was found to have a large effect on the forward biased I-V characteristics of the diamond Schottky diodes, whereas the effect on the reverse biased characteristics was relatively small. The stress effect on the forward biased diamond Schottky diode was attributed to piezojunction and piezoresistance effects. The measured force sensitivity of the diode was as high as 0.75 V/N at 1 mA forward bias. This result shows that CVD diamond device has potential for mechanical transducer applications. The quantitative photoresponse characteristics of the diodes were studied in the spectral range of 300 -1050 nm. Semi-transparent gold contacts were used for better photoresponse. Quantum efficiency as high as 50% was obtained at 500 nm, when a reverse bias of over 1 volt was applied. The Schottky barrier heights between either gold or

  20. Frequency upconverted lasing of nanocrystal quantum dots in microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunfeng; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, An; Kimball, Brian; Wang, Andrew Y.; Xu, Jian

    2009-11-01

    Stable, frequency upconverted lasing of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots was demonstrated in silica microbeads under two-photon pumping conditions. Upon infrared excitation, the stimulated emission of the nanocrystal-doped microbeads exhibits sharp peaks at λ ˜610 nm with narrow line widths of ≤1 nm. The lasing action has been attributed to the biexciton gain coupled to the whispering gallery modes in spherical cavities, as confirmed by time-resolved photoluminescence spectra. The lasing lifetime characterized in term of pulse numbers (˜106 pulses) was two orders of magnitude longer than that of the dye salt-based two-photon lasers.

  1. Optical properties of an indium doped CdSe nanocrystal: A density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salini, K.; Mathew, Thomas; Mathew, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of a CdSe nanocrystal doped with n-type impurity atom. First principle calculations of the CdSe nanocrystal based on the density functional theory (DFT), as implemented in the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used in the calculations. We have introduced a single Indium impurity atom into CdSe nanocrystal with 1.3 nm diameter. Nanocrystal surface dangling bonds are passivated with hydrogen atom. The band-structure, density of states and absorption spectra of the doped and undopted nanocrystals were discussed. Inclusion of the n-type impurity atom introduces an additional electron in conduction band, and significantly alters the electronic and optical properties of undoped CdSe nanocrystal. Indium doped CdSe nannocrystal have potential applications in optoelectronic devices.

  2. Chains, Sheets and Droplets: Assemblies of Hydrophobic Gold Nanocrystals with Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Lipid and Squalene

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Michael R.; Bosoy, Christian; Yu, Yixuan; Korgel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Assemblies of saturated 1,2-diacyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid and hydrophobic dodecanethiol-capped 1.8 nm diameter gold nanocrystals were studied as a function of lipid chain length and the addition of the naturally-occurring oil, squalene. The gold nanocrystals formed various lipid-stabilized agglomerates, sometimes fusing with lipid vesicle bilayers. The nanocrystal assembly structure depended on the hydrocarbon chain length of the lipid fatty acids. Lipid with the shortest fatty acid length studied, dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine, created extended chains of gold nanocrystals. Lipid with slightly longer fatty acid chains created planar sheets of nanocrystals. Further increases of the fatty acid chain length led to spherical agglomerates. The inclusion of squalene led to lipid- and nanocrystal-coated oil droplets. PMID:23033891

  3. Enhancement of cellular uptake, transport and oral absorption of protease inhibitor saquinavir by nanocrystal formulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Xia, Deng-ning; Li, Qiu-xia; Tao, Jin-song; Gan, Yong; Wang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Saquinavir (SQV) is the first protease inhibitor for the treatment of HIV infection, but with poor solubility. The aim of this study was to prepare a colloidal nanocrystal suspension for improving the oral absorption of SQV. Methods: SQV nanocrystals were prepared using anti-solvent precipitation–high pressure homogenization method. The nanocrystals were characterized by a Zetasizer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their dissolution, cellular uptake and transport across the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) monolayer were investigated. Bioimaging of ex vivo intestinal sections of rats was conducted with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in rats administered nanocrystal SQV suspension (50 mg/kg, ig), and the plasma SQV concentrations were measured with HPLC. Results: The SQV nanocrystals were approximately 200 nm in diameter, with a uniform size distribution. The nanocrystals had a rod-like shape under TEM. The dissolution, cellular uptake, and transport across a Caco-2 monolayer of the nanocrystal formulation were significantly improved compared to those of the coarse crystals. The ex vivo intestinal section study revealed that the fluorescently labeled nanocrystals were located in the lamina propria and the epithelium of the duodenum and jejunum. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) was 2.16-fold of that for coarse crystalline SQV suspension, whereas the area under the curve (AUC) of nanocrystal SQV suspension was 1.95-fold of that for coarse crystalline SQV suspension. Conclusion: The nanocrystal drug delivery system significantly improves the oral absorption of saquinavir. PMID:26256404

  4. Size-dependent structural transition from multiple-twinned particles to epitaxial fcc nanocrystals and nanocrystal decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Huang, W. J.; Bohra, F.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Tedjasaputra, A. P.; Zuo, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    The size dependence of structural transition from multiple-twinned particles (MTP) to epitaxial face centered cubic nanocrystals was investigated for Ag nanoparticles formed on Si(001) surfaces by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The transition from MTP to nanocrystals was promoted by postdeposition annealing. Clear particle size dependence is found in the epitaxial formation temperatures (TE) , which is about 2/3 of the calculated, size-dependent, melting temperature (TM) using the value of surface energy γS=1.2J/m2 for larger particles (>2nm) . Once nanocrystals are formed, they decay and disappear in a narrow temperature range between 795 and 850K . No evidence of nanocrystal melting was detected from the reflection high-energy electron diffraction observations.

  5. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions. PMID:19745488

  6. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  7. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  8. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  9. Diamond stabilization of ice multilayers at human body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2007-08-01

    Diamond is a promising material for wear-resistant medical coatings. Here we report a remarkable increase in the melting point of ice resting on a diamond (111) surface modified with a submonolayer of Na+ . Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the interfacial ice bilayer melts at a temperature 130K higher than in free ice, and relatively thick ice films ( 2.6nm at 298K and 2.2nm at 310K ) are stabilized by dipole interactions with the substrate. This unique physical effect may enable biocompatibility-enhancing ice overcoatings for diamond at human body temperature.

  10. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  11. The Nanocrystal Superlattice Pressure Cell: A Novel Approach To Study Molecular Bundles under Uniaxial Compression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ordered assemblies of inorganic nanocrystals coated with organic linkers present interesting scientific challenges in hard and soft matter physics. We demonstrate that a nanocrystal superlattice under compression serves as a nanoscopic pressure cell to enable studies of molecular linkers under uniaxial compression. We developed a method to uniaxially compress the bifunctional organic linker by attaching both ends of aliphatic chains to neighboring PbS nanocrystals in a superlattice. Pressurizing the nanocrystal superlattice in a diamond anvil cell thus results in compression of the molecular linkers along their chain direction. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering during the compression provide insights into the structure of the superlattice and nanocrystal cores under compression, respectively. We compare density functional theory calculations of the molecular linkers as basic Hookean springs to the experimental force–distance relationship. We determine the density of linkers on the nanocrystal surfaces. We demonstrate our method to probe the elastic force of single molecule as a function of chain length. The methodology introduced in this paper opens doors to investigate molecular interactions within organic molecules compressed within a nanocrystal superlattice. PMID:25046038

  12. The nanocrystal superlattice pressure cell: a novel approach to study molecular bundles under uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Bian, Kaifu; Singh, Arunima K; Hennig, Richard G; Wang, Zhongwu; Hanrath, Tobias

    2014-08-13

    Ordered assemblies of inorganic nanocrystals coated with organic linkers present interesting scientific challenges in hard and soft matter physics. We demonstrate that a nanocrystal superlattice under compression serves as a nanoscopic pressure cell to enable studies of molecular linkers under uniaxial compression. We developed a method to uniaxially compress the bifunctional organic linker by attaching both ends of aliphatic chains to neighboring PbS nanocrystals in a superlattice. Pressurizing the nanocrystal superlattice in a diamond anvil cell thus results in compression of the molecular linkers along their chain direction. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering during the compression provide insights into the structure of the superlattice and nanocrystal cores under compression, respectively. We compare density functional theory calculations of the molecular linkers as basic Hookean springs to the experimental force-distance relationship. We determine the density of linkers on the nanocrystal surfaces. We demonstrate our method to probe the elastic force of single molecule as a function of chain length. The methodology introduced in this paper opens doors to investigate molecular interactions within organic molecules compressed within a nanocrystal superlattice. PMID:25046038

  13. Novel silica stabilization method for the analysis of fine nanocrystals using coherent X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Monteforte, Marianne; Estandarte, Ana K; Chen, Bo; Harder, Ross; Huang, Michael H; Robinson, Ian K

    2016-07-01

    High-energy X-ray Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) is a well established synchrotron-based technique used to quantitatively reconstruct the three-dimensional morphology and strain distribution in nanocrystals. The BCDI technique has become a powerful analytical tool for quantitative investigations of nanocrystals, nanotubes, nanorods and more recently biological systems. BCDI has however typically failed for fine nanocrystals in sub-100 nm size regimes - a size routinely achievable by chemical synthesis - despite the spatial resolution of the BCDI technique being 20-30 nm. The limitations of this technique arise from the movement of nanocrystals under illumination by the highly coherent beam, which prevents full diffraction data sets from being acquired. A solution is provided here to overcome this problem and extend the size limit of the BCDI technique, through the design of a novel stabilization method by embedding the fine nanocrystals into a silica matrix. Chemically synthesized FePt nanocrystals of maximum dimension 20 nm and AuPd nanocrystals in the size range 60-65 nm were investigated with BCDI measurement at beamline 34-ID-C of the APS, Argonne National Laboratory. Novel experimental methodologies to elucidate the presence of strain in fine nanocrystals are a necessary pre-requisite in order to better understand strain profiles in engineered nanocrystals for novel device development. PMID:27359144

  14. Effects of high pressure and temperature on the properties of nanocrystals in rocks: Evidences from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Genshaft, Yu. S.; Kireenkova, S. M.; Morozov, Yu. A.; Smul'Skaya, A. I.; Vettegren', V. I.; Kulik, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    A search is conducted to detect nanocrystals in a sample of apogranitic pseudotachylite, which is a product of extremely strong crushing of granite in a seismogenic fault. Raman spectroscopy revealed nanocrystals of quartz measuring approximately 17 to 25 nm and low-temperature albite ranging from 8 to 30 nm. The crystallographic cell in the nanocrystals is deformed. The internal stresses which might have been responsible for these deformations vary from approximately -300 (compression) to +480 (tension) MPa. It is found that after having been exposed to high pressure (1 GPa) and temperature (470-500°C for 10 minutes and 550-600°C for 16 minutes), the nanocrystals of quartz reduced in size to ≈10 nm, and the nanocrystals of albite, to 13 nm. At the same time, the level of tension in the lattice spacing of quartz increased.

  15. Patterning of nanocrystalline diamond films for diamond microstructures useful in MEMS and other devices

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Busmann, Hans-Gerd; Meyer, Eva-Maria; Auciello, Orlando; Krauss, Alan R.; Krauss, Julie R.

    2004-11-02

    MEMS structure and a method of fabricating them from ultrananocrystalline diamond films having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm and feature resolution of less than about one micron . The MEMS structures are made by contacting carbon dimer species with an oxide substrate forming a carbide layer on the surface onto which ultrananocrystalline diamond having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm is deposited. Thereafter, microfabrication process are used to form a structure of predetermined shape having a feature resolution of less than about one micron.

  16. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  17. Size control and quantum confinement in Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ankur; Wills, Andrew W; Ammerman, Lauren M; Norris, David J; Aydil, Eray S

    2011-11-14

    Starting with metal dithiocarbamate complexes, we synthesize colloidal Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) nanocrystals with diameters ranging from 2 to 7 nm. Structural and Raman scattering data confirm that CZTS is obtained rather than other possible material phases. The optical absorption spectra of nanocrystals with diameters less than 3 nm show a shift to higher energy due to quantum confinement. PMID:21952415

  18. Nonlinear optical properties of lead sulfide nanocrystals in polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. W.; Sohling, U.; Mennig, M.; Schmidt, H.

    2002-10-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanocrystals with a particle size of 3.3 +/- 0.7 nm have been synthesized in a poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) coating on fused silica glass substrates. The coating was dip-coated from a PVA aqueous solution, in which PbS nanocrystals were precipitated and stabilized in the polymer matrix. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of PbS nanocrystals is dependent on the wavelength with its maximum located near the first excitonic absorption peak resulting from the quantum confinement effect, according to the results of degenerate four wave-mixing. This suggests an enhancement of the nonlinear optical property by excitonic resonance. The maximum figure of merit, χ(3) /α, is as high as 2.91 × 10-12 esu m as measured at 595 nm.

  19. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  20. Solution-processable white-light-emitting germanium nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shirahata, Naoto

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an efficient chemical route for the synthesis of visible light emitting nanocrystals of germanium (ncGe). The synthesis started by heating Ge(II) iodide at 300 °C in argon atmosphere. Spectroscopic characterizations confirmed the formation of diamond cubic lattice structures of ncGe. By grafting hydrophobic chains on the ncGe surface, the dispersions in nonpolar solvents of the ncGe became very stable. The as-synthesized ncGe showed the bluish white photoluminescence (PL) feature, but it was found that the PL spectrum is composed of many different emission spectra. Therefore, the color-tuning of white light emission is demonstrated through the witting removal of extra ncGe with unfavorable emission feature by making full use of column chromatographic techniques. - Highlights: • Visible light emitting nanocrystals of germanium was synthesized by chemical reduction of germanium iodide. • White light emission was achieved by control over size distribution of germanium nanocrystals. • Tuning the color of white light was achieved by separation of nanocrystals by emission.

  1. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  2. Enhanced photothermal effect of surface oxidized silicon nanocrystals anchored to reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshani, Parichehr; Moussa, Sherif; Atkinson, Garrett; Kisurin, Vitaly Y.; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of the photothermal effects of silicon nanocrystals and graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water. Using laser irradiation (532 nm or 355 nm) of suspended Si nanocrystals in an aqueous solution of GO, the synthesis of surface oxidized Si-reduced GO nanocomposites (SiOx/Si-RGO) is reported. The laser reduction of GO is accompanied by surface oxidation of the Si nanocrystals resulting in the formation of the SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites. The SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites are proposed as promising materials for photothermal therapy and for the efficient conversion of solar energy into usable heat for a variety of thermal and thermomechanical applications.

  3. Infrared photoluminescence from GeSi nanocrystals embedded in a germanium–silicate matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Volodin, V. A. Gambaryan, M. P.; Cherkov, A. G.; Vdovin, V. I.; Stoffel, M.; Rinnert, H.; Vergnat, M.

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the structural and optical properties of GeO/SiO{sub 2} multilayers obtained by evaporation of GeO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} powders under ultrahigh vacuum conditions on Si(001) substrates. Both Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy measurements indicate the formation of GeSi nanocrystals after postgrowth annealing at 800°C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy characterizations show that the average size of the nanocrystals is about 5 nm. For samples containing GeSi nanocrystals, photoluminescence is observed at 14 K in the spectral range 1500–1600 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence is studied.

  4. Effects of PEGylated paclitaxel nanocrystals on breast cancer and its lung metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Hu, Hongxiang; Zhang, Haoran; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xinglin; Wang, Xueqing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    As an attractive strategy developed rapidly in recent years, nanocrystals are used to deliver insoluble drugs. PEGylation may further prolong the circulation time of nanoparticles and improve the therapeutic outcome of drugs. In this study, paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals (PTX-NCs) and PEGylated PTX nanocrystals (PEG-PTX-NCs) were prepared using antisolvent precipitation augmented by probe sonication. The characteristics and antitumor efficacy of nanocrystals were investigated. The results indicated that the nanocrystals showed rod-like morphology, and the average particle size was 240 nm and 330 nm for PTX-NCs and PEG-PTX-NCs, respectively. The PEG molecules covered the surface of nanocrystals with an 11.54 nm fixed aqueous layer thickness (FALT), much higher than that of PTX-NCs (0.2 nm). PEG-PTX-NCs showed higher stability than PTX-NCs under both storage and physiological conditions. In breast cancer xenografted mice, PEG-PTX-NCs showed significantly better tumor inhibition compared to saline (p < 0.001) and PTX-NC groups (p < 0.05) after intravenous administration. In a model of lung tumor metastasis quantified by the luciferase activity, the PEG-PTX-NCs group showed higher anticancer efficacy not only than saline and PTX-NCs groups, but also than Taxol®, achieving an 82% reduction at the end of the experiment. These studies suggested the potential advantages of PEGylated PTX nanocrystals as alternative drug delivery systems for anticancer therapy.

  5. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond coated on titanium for osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pareta, Rajesh; Yang, Lei; Kothari, Abhishek; Sirinrath, Sirivisoot; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-10-01

    Diamond coatings with superior chemical stability, antiwear, and cytocompatibility properties have been considered for lengthening the lifetime of metallic orthopedic implants for over a decade. In this study, an attempt to tailor the surface properties of diamond films on titanium to promote osteoblast (bone forming cell) adhesion was reported. The surface properties investigated here included the size of diamond surface features, topography, wettability, and surface chemistry, all of which were controlled during microwave plasma enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition (MPCVD) processes using CH4-Ar-H2 gas mixtures. The hardness and elastic modulus of the diamond films were also determined. H2 concentration in the plasma was altered to control the crystallinity, grain size, and topography of the diamond coatings, and specific plasma gases (O2 and NH3) were introduced to change the surface chemistry of the diamond coatings. To understand the impact of the altered surface properties on osteoblast responses, cell adhesion tests were performed on the various diamond-coated titanium. The results revealed that nanocrystalline diamond (grain sizes <100 nm) coated titanium dramatically increased surface hardness, and the introduction of O2 and NH3 during the MPCVD process promoted osteoblast adhesion on diamond and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic applications. PMID:20540097

  6. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  7. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  8. Biomedical Nanocrystal Agents: Design, Synthesis, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung

    In these days, nanomaterials are applied in a variety of biomedical applications including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cell imaging, drug delivery, and cell separation. Most MRI contrast agents affect the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2 ) of water protons in the tissue and result in increased positive or negative contrast. Here, we report the optimization of r1 (1/T 1) or r2 (1/T2) relaxivity dynamics with diameter controlled gadolinium oxide nanocrystals (2˜22 nm) and iron based magnetic nanocrystals (4 ˜33 nm). The r1 and r2 MR relaxivity values of hydrated nanocrystals were optimized and examined depending on their core diameter, surface coating, and compositions; the high r1 value of gadolinium oxide was 40-60 S-1mM-1, which is 10-15 fold higher than that of commercial Gd (III) chelates (4.3˜4.6 S-1mM-1). Moreover, in vitro toxicological studies revealed that polymer coated nanocrystals suspensions had no significant effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells even at high concentration. Towards multimodal imaging or multifunctional ability, we developed the iron oxide/QDs complexes, which consist of cores of iron oxide that act as nucleation sites for fluorescent QDs. The choice of variable QDs helped to visualize and remove large iron oxide materials in a magnetic separation. Additionally, diluted materials concentrated on the magnet could be fluorescently detected even at very low concentration. The designed MRI or multifunctional nanomaterials will give great and powerful uses in biomedical applications.

  9. Temperature-induced phase transition in quartz nanocrystals dispersed in pseudotachylite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren, V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Sobolev, G. A.; Kireenkova, S. M.; Morozov, Yu. A.; Smul'skaya, A. I.

    2013-05-01

    The size and concentration of α-quartz nanocrystals dispersed in samples of pseudotachylite and the internal stresses in these nanocrystals have been determined using infrared spectroscopy in the temperature range 300-800 K. Pseudotachylite is a product of intense crushing of granite that undergoes in the Earth's crust faults. It has been found that the size of the nanocrystals is ˜20 nm and does not depend on temperature. As the temperature increases, their concentration decreases monotonically and tends to zero at ˜650 K. This process is paralleled by a growth of the concentration of β-quartz nanocrystals. The α-quartz nanocrystal concentration regains its initial level with decreasing temperature. Thus, the α → β phase transition in quartz nanocrystals in pseudotachylite starts at temperatures lower by ˜500 K than that in the bulk of the macrocrystal (846 K), and is stretched by ˜350 K. At room temperature, the unit cell of nanocrystals is compressed by surface tension forces. These forces retard the α → β phase transition. The thermal expansion coefficient of nanocrystals is larger than that of macrocrystals, which entails a decrease of compression and a monotonic decrease of the concentration of α-quartz nanocrystals with increasing temperature.

  10. One-step DNA-programmed growth of luminescent and biofunctionalized nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2009-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are widely used as lumiphores in biological imaging because their luminescence is both strong and stable, and because they can be biofunctionalized. During synthesis, nanocrystals are typically passivated with hydrophobic organic ligands, so it is then necessary either to replace these ligands or encapsulate the nanocrystals with hydrophilic moieties to make the lumiphores soluble in water. Finally, biological labels must be added to allow the detection of nucleic acids, proteins and specific cell types. This multistep process is time- and labour-intensive and thus out of reach of many researchers who want to use luminescent nanocrystals as customized lumiphores. Here, we show that a single designer ligand-a chimeric DNA molecule-can controllably program both the growth and the biofunctionalization of the nanocrystals. One part of the DNA sequence controls the nanocrystal passivation and serves as a ligand, while another part controls the biorecognition. The synthetic protocol reported here is straightforward and produces a homogeneous dispersion of nanocrystal lumiphores functionalized with a single biomolecular receptor. The nanocrystals exhibit strong optical emission in the visible region, minimal toxicity and have hydrodynamic diameters of ~6 nm, which makes them suitable for bioimaging. We show that the nanocrystals can specifically bind DNA, proteins or cells that have unique surface recognition markers.

  11. Influence of Eu doping on the microstructure and photoluminescence of CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kexin; Yu, Yaxin; Sun, Shuqing

    2012-07-01

    The CdS:Eu nanocrystals with a strong white emission have been synthesized by solvothemal method using ethylene glycol as solvents. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis it was observed that the average diameter of the CdS:Eu nanocrystals is about 5 nm. The traces of groups adsorbed on CdS:Eu nanocrystals were confirmed via FT-IR spectra. UV-visible spectroscopy study was carried out to determine the band gap of the nanocrystals and the absorbance peaks showed blue shift with respect to the bulk CdS. From photoluminescence (PL) studies at λex = 398 nm, the PL emission intensity of CdS:Eu nanocrystals enhanced by doping Eu3+ ions. In addition, the synthesis parameters including the concentration of doped Eu3+ ions, the reaction time, and the reaction temperature have influence on the optical properties of CdS:Eu nanocrystals. The charge compensation agent is a decisive factor for PL emission intensity of CdS:Eu nanocrystals. Furthermore, the storage time and condition on the fluorescence of CdS:Eu nanocrystals were also investigated.

  12. Latent laser-induced graphitization of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Basic features and mechanism of femtosecond laser graphitization of diamond surface were studied in the two regimes of irradiation: (1) by an intensive (>10 J/cm2) single shot and (2) by a train of pulses with near-threshold intensity (~1-10 J/cm2). Special attention was paid to the so-called accumulative regime, when multipulse laser treatment results in prolonged delay of an appearance of crystal modification of the crystal. The light absorption mechanisms dominating in each regime are discussed. The experiments with fundamental (800 nm), second (400 nm) and third (266 nm) harmonics of Ti-sapphire laser (100 fs) have revealed that thermally stimulated processes play an essential role in latent diamond graphitization.

  13. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (<20 nm in diameter) in diameter. Essential to our approach is an understanding of the nanoparticle as a building block, combined with an ability to integrate them into thin films that have uniform and characteristic electrical properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3

  14. Multilayer diamond coated WC tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.D.; Jagannaham, K.; Narayan, J.

    1995-12-31

    To increase adhesion of diamond coatings, a multilayer structure was developed. The multilayer diamond coating consisted of a first discontinuous diamond layer, an interposing layer, and a top continuous diamond layer. The diamond layer was grown on WC substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition and the interposing layer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. Machining tests were used to characterize adhesion properties of the multilayer diamond coatings on WC(Co) substrates. Results indicate that diamond coatings exhibit good adhesion on the WC tool substrates. The wear resistance of the WC tool is improved significantly by the diamond coatings.

  15. Nanoscale topography of nanocrystalline diamonds promotes differentiation of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kalbacova, M; Rezek, B; Baresova, V; Wolf-Brandstetter, C; Kromka, A

    2009-10-01

    The excellent mechanical, tribological and biochemical properties of diamond coatings are promising for improving orthopedic or stomatology implants. A crucial prerequisite for such applications is an understanding and control of the biological response of the diamond coatings. This study concentrates on the correlation of diamond surface properties with osteoblast behavior. Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films (grain size up to 200 nm, surface roughness 20 nm) were deposited on silicon substrates of varying roughnesses (1, 270 and 500 nm) and treated by oxygen plasma to generate a hydrophilic surface. Atomic force microscopy was used for topographical characterization of the films. As a reference surface, tissue culture polystyrene (PS) was used. Scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining was used to visualize cell morphological features as a function of culture time. Metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium and phosphate deposition was also monitored. The results show an enhanced osteoblast adhesion as well as increased differentiation (raised alkaline phosphatase activity and mineral deposition) on NCD surfaces (most significantly on RMS 20 nm) compared to PS. This is attributed mainly to the specific surface topography as well as to the biocompatible properties of diamond. Hence the controlled (topographically structured) diamond coating of various substrates is promising for preparation of better implants, which offer faster colonization by specific cells as well as longer-term stability. PMID:19433140

  16. Germanium Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Zachary Charles

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are approaching historically unprecedented levels from burning fossil fuels to meet the ever-increasing world energy demand. A rapid transition to clean energy sources is necessary to avoid the potentially catastrophic consequences of global warming. The sun provides more than enough energy to power the world, and solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity are commercially available. However, the high cost and low efficiency of current solar cells prevent their widespread implementation, and grid parity is not anticipated to be reached for at least 15 years without breakthrough technologies. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) show promise for cheap multi-junction photovoltaic devices. To compete with photovoltaic materials that are currently commercially available, NCs need to be inexpensively cast into dense thin films with bulk-like electrical mobilities and absorption spectra that can be tuned by altering the NC size. The Group II-VI and IV-VI NC communities have had some success in achieving this goal by drying and then chemically treating colloidal particles, but the more abundant and less toxic Group IV NCs have proven more challenging. This thesis reports thin films of plasma-synthesized Ge NCs deposited using three different techniques, and preliminary solar cells based on these films. Germanium tetrachloride is dissociated in the presence of hydrogen in a nonthermal plasma to nucleate Ge NCs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the particles are nearly monodisperse (standard deviations of 10-15% the mean particle diameter) and the mean diameter can be tuned from 4-15 nm by changing the residence time of the Ge NCs in the plasma. In the first deposition scheme, a Ge NC colloid is formed by reacting nanocrystalline powder with 1-dodecene and dispersing the functionalized NCs in a solvent. Films are then formed on substrates by drop-casting the colloid and allowing it to dry

  17. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination. PMID:25472530

  18. Color Centers in Silic On-Doped Diamond Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedov, V. S.; Krivobok, V. S.; Khomich, A. V.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Khomich, A. A.; Martyanov, A. K.; Nikolaev, S. N.; Poklonskaya, O. N.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon-doped microcrystalline diamond films of 1 μm thickness were grown by chemical vapor deposition in microwave plasma from mixtures of methane-hydrogen-silane on substrates of aluminum nitride, tungsten, and silicon. The diamond films were found to contain optically active silicon vacancy (SiV) centers giving rise to the 737-nm band in the photoluminescence spectra. The spectral features of a newly discovered narrow band of comparable intensity at 720-722 nm were studied. It is shown that the band at 720-722 nm occurs in the photoluminescence spectra only in the presence of silica in the diamond, regardless of the substrate material. The temperature dynamics of the photoluminescence spectra in the range of 5-294 K were investigated. The possible nature and mechanisms of formation of the color centers responsible for the 720-722 nm band are discussed.

  19. Calpain inhibitor nanocrystals prepared using Nano Spray Dryer B-90

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. Among attractive drugs, calpain inhibitor that inhibits programmed cell death ‘apoptosis’ is a candidate for curing apoptosis-mediated intractable diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, the preparation of calpain inhibitor nanocrystals using Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle sizes were controlled by means of selecting mesh aperture sizes. The obtained average particle sizes were in the range of around 300 nm to submicron meter. PMID:22863139

  20. Calpain inhibitor nanocrystals prepared using Nano Spray Dryer B-90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-08-01

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. Among attractive drugs, calpain inhibitor that inhibits programmed cell death `apoptosis' is a candidate for curing apoptosis-mediated intractable diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In this study, the preparation of calpain inhibitor nanocrystals using Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle sizes were controlled by means of selecting mesh aperture sizes. The obtained average particle sizes were in the range of around 300 nm to submicron meter.

  1. Calpain inhibitor nanocrystals prepared using Nano Spray Dryer B-90.

    PubMed

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. Among attractive drugs, calpain inhibitor that inhibits programmed cell death 'apoptosis' is a candidate for curing apoptosis-mediated intractable diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In this study, the preparation of calpain inhibitor nanocrystals using Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle sizes were controlled by means of selecting mesh aperture sizes. The obtained average particle sizes were in the range of around 300 nm to submicron meter. PMID:22863139

  2. Characterization of fluoride nanocrystals for optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Quintanilla, Marta; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Nemova, Galina; Kummara, Venkata Krishaniah; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of nanocrystalline powders of ytterbium doped YLiF4 for applications in optical refrigeration. Here we used powders with nanocrystals of Yb 3+ concentrations of (10, 15, 20) mol % and lengths (70, 66, 96) nm. Our preliminary spectroscopic measurements did not show an enhancement in the absorption at the long-wavelength tail of the spectra of the nanocrystalline powder when compared with bulk Yb:YLiF4, indicating that the increase of the phonon-assisted excitation is not large enough to play a significant role in cooling in the present conditions. One advantage of nanocrystalline powders over bulk crystals is the possibility of enhancing the absorption by the realization of cavity-less pump recycling through photon localization [1]. While photon localization also increases the reabsorption of the fluorescence depending on the quantum efficiency of the material and can mitigate cooling, it allows the use of crystals of low enough concentrations to avoid deleterious effects such as ion-ion energy transfer followed by quenching. The pump intensity enhancement favors upconversion luminescence to visible wavelengths, which can be used for optical refrigeration and extends the scope of the application for the material. We observed both green and blue emission from the samples and investigate the processes which lead to it. We present the experimental investigation of the nanocrystals' absorption and emission spectra and the first excited state lifetime measurements, which are used to estimate the nanocrystal's photoluminescence quantum efficiency.

  3. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOEpatents

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  4. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  5. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  6. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  7. Kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in K-Na-Mg-Ca-Carbonate-Carbon melt-solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solopova, N. A.; Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Nekrasov, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    The kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in multicomponent K-Na-Mg-Ca-carbonate-carbon system have been studied in conditions of diamond stability at 1500-1800°C and 7.5-8.5 GPa. It has been established that the diamond phase nucleation density at a fixed temperature of 1600°C decreases from 1.3 × 105 nuclei/mm3 at 8.5 GPa to 3.7 × 103 nuclei/mm3 at 7.5 GPa. The fluorescence spectra of obtained diamond crystals contain peaks at 504 nm ( H3-defect), 575 nm (NV-center), and 638 nm (NV-defect), caused by the presence of nitrogen impurity. In the cathodoluminescence spectra, an A-band with the maximum at 470 nm is present. The obtained data make it possible to assign the synthesized diamonds in the carbonate-carbon system to the mixed Ia + Ib type.

  8. Nanocrystal Inks without Ligands: Stable Colloids of Bare Germanium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Zachary C.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2011-05-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals typically have ligands attached to their surfaces that afford solubility in common solvents but hinder charge transport in nanocrystal films. Here, an alternative route is explored in which bare germanium nanocrystals are solubilized by select solvents to form stable colloids without the use of ligands. A survey of candidate solvents shows that germanium nanocrystals are completely solubilized by benzonitrile, likely because of electrostatic stabilization. Films cast from these dispersions are uniform, dense, and smooth, making them suitable for device applications without postdeposition treatment.

  9. Thermal and mechanical properties of bio-nanocomposites reinforced by Luffa cylindrica cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gilberto; Bras, Julien; Follain, Nadège; Belbekhouche, Sabrina; Marais, Stéphane; Dufresne, Alain

    2013-01-16

    Cellulose nanocrystals have been prepared by acid hydrolysis of Luffa cylindrica fibers. The acid-resistant residue consisted of rod-like nanoparticles with an average length an diameter around 242 and 5.2nm, respectively (aspect ratio around 46). These cellulose nanocrystals have been used as a reinforcing phase for the processing of bio-nanocomposites using polycaprolactone (PCL) as matrix. To promote interfacial filler/matrix interactions the surface of cellulose nanocrystals was chemically modified with n-octadecyl isocyanate (C(18)H(37)NCO). Evidence of the grafting was supported by infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to confirm the integrity of cellulose nanocrystals after chemical modification. Both unmodified and chemically modified nanocrystals were used to prepare nanocomposites. The thermal properties of these materials were determined from differential scanning calorimetry and their mechanical behavior was evaluated in both the linear and non-linear range. PMID:23121968

  10. Growth and stability of oxidation resistant Si nanocrystals formed by decomposition of alkyl silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Hamel, S; Dai, Z R; Saw, C; Williamson, A J; Galli, G

    2007-01-12

    The synthesis and characterization of 1-10 nm Si nanocrystals highly resistant to oxidation is described. The nanocrystals were prepared by thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane at 680 C, or in a gold- induced catalytic process at lower temperatures down to 400-450 C using trioctylamine as an initial solvent. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of samples obtained in the presence of gold show that the nanocrystals form via solid-phase epitaxial attachment of Si to the gold crystal lattice. The results of computational modeling performed using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that the enhanced stability of nanocrystals to oxidation is due to the presence of N or N-containing groups on the surface of nanocrystals.

  11. Ion-Implanted Diamond Films and Their Tribological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Korenyi-Both, Andras L.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 microns) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C(+) (m/e = 12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 10(exp 17) ions/sq cm. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10(exp -7)Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C(+) ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments.

  12. Nanofocusing optics for synchrotron radiation made from polycrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Fox, O J L; Alianelli, L; Malik, A M; Pape, I; May, P W; Sawhney, K J S

    2014-04-01

    Diamond possesses many extreme properties that make it an ideal material for fabricating nanofocusing x-ray optics. Refractive lenses made from diamond are able to focus x-ray radiation with high efficiency but without compromising the brilliance of the beam. Electron-beam lithography and deep reactive-ion etching of silicon substrates have been used in a transfer-molding technique to fabricate diamond optics with vertical and smooth sidewalls. Latest generation compound refractive lenses have seen an improvement in the quality and uniformity of the optical structures, resulting in an increase in their focusing ability. Synchrotron beamline tests of two recent lens arrays, corresponding to two different diamond morphologies, are described. Focal line-widths down to 210 nm, using a nanocrystalline diamond lens array and a beam energy of E = 11 keV, and 230 nm, using a microcrystalline diamond lens at E = 15 keV, have been measured using the Diamond Light Source Ltd. B16 beamline. This focusing prowess is combined with relatively high transmission through the lenses compared with silicon refractive designs and other diffractive optics. PMID:24718141

  13. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  14. Brown diamonds from an eclogite xenolith from Udachnaya kimberlite, Yakutia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Aleksandr S; Korsakov, Andrey V; Yuryeva, Olga P; Nadolinniy, Vladimir A; Perraki, Maria; De Gussem, Kris; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2011-10-01

    We have performed petrographic and spectroscopic studies of brown diamonds from an eclogite xenolith from the Udachnaya pipe (Yakutia, Russia). Brown diamonds are randomly intermixed with colorless ones in the rock and often located at the grain boundaries of clinopyroxene and garnet. Brown diamonds can be characterized by a set of defects (H4, N2D and a line at 490.7 nm) which are absent in colorless diamonds. This set of defects is typical for plastically deformed diamonds and indicates that diamonds were likely annealed for a relatively short period after deformation had occurred. Excitation of brown colored zones with a 632.8 nm He-Ne laser produced the typical diamond band plus two additional bands at 1730 cm(-1) and 3350 cm(-1). These spectral features are not genuine Raman bands, and can be attributed to photoluminescence at ∼710 nm (1.75 eV) and ∼802 nm (1.54 eV). No Raman peak corresponding to graphite was observed in regions of brown coloration. Comparison with previous reports of brown diamonds from eclogites showed our eclogitic sample to have a typical structure without signs of apparent deformation. Two mechanisms with regard to diamond deformation are proposed: deformation of eclogite by external forces followed by subsequent recrystallization of silicates or, alternatively, deformation by local stress arising due to decompression and expansion of silicates during ascent of the xenolith to surface conditions. PMID:21324732

  15. Diamond turning of lithium niobate for optical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Syn, C.; Velsko, S.P. )

    1992-09-20

    We have investigated the surfae finishing of lithium niobate by using the single-point diamond turning technique. Surface finishes of better than 5 nm rms on {ital z}-oriented samples have been achieved. However, tool wear and spalling are much more significant with lithium niobate than with materials such as the crystals KDP and LAP. We present preliminary results comparing the optical damage thresholds of polished and diamond-turned samples.

  16. Colloidal Nanocrystals: A Model System for the Study of Phase Transformations Since 1950

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Joshua

    2011-06-01

    Shock waves provide a means of rapidly compressing a condensed phase sample and studying the resulting structural changes. However, shock studies to date have focused on bulk materials, in which multiple uncorrelated nucleation events lead to complex transformation kinetics. An individual nanocrystal, by comparison, can transform completely with ~10ps following nucleation of the daughter phase, reducing the likelihood that a second nucleation event will occur during the transformation time. In a diamond anvil cell, the wurtzite to rocksalt phase transformation in CdSe nanocrystals, for example, has been shown to follow simple first-order kinetics. The slow, ensemble kinetics observed in those experiments, however, obscured the dynamics within each nanocrystal. Rapidly compressing a nanocrystalline sample using a laser-driven shock wave, the pressure around each nanocrystal can rise on a timescale comparable to that for a sound wave to traverse the crystal. Shock experiments on nanoscale materials therefore have the potential to elucidate aspects of the transformation mechanism inaccessible to further quasi-static diamond anvil cell measurements behavior of CdSe nanocrystals under shock stresses of 2--3.75 GPa has been studied. Above 3 GPa a near-complete disappearance of the first excitonic feature and broadening of the low-energy absorption edge were observed, consistent with a wurtzite to rocksalt structural transformation. The transformation pressure was reduced relative to hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell, and the rate increased, attributed to shock induced shear stress along the reaction coordinate. The especially rapid rate observed for a 3.75 GPa shock suggests multiple nucleation events occurring in each particle.

  17. Room-temperature single-photon sources based on nanocrystal fluorescence in photonic/plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, S. G.; Winkler, J. M.; Bissell, L. J.; Mihaylova, D.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Shi, Z.; Goldberg, D.; Menon, V. M.; Boyd, R. W.; Chen, G.; Prasad, P.

    2014-10-01

    Results are presented here towards robust room-temperature SPSs based on fluorescence in nanocrystals: colloidal quantum dots, color-center diamonds and doped with trivalent rare-earth ions (TR3+). We used cholesteric chiral photonic bandgap and Bragg-reflector microcavities for single emitter fluorescence enhancement. We also developed plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas and 2D-Si-photonic bandgap microcavities. The paper also provides short outlines of other technologies for room-temperature single-photon sources.

  18. Electronic states in spherical GaN nanocrystals embedded in various dielectric matrices: The k ṡ p-calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, A. A.; Filatov, D. O.; Korolev, D. S.; Belov, A. I.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.; Kumar, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Using the envelope-function approximation, the single-particle states of electrons and holes in spherical GaN nanocrystals embedded in different amorphous dielectric matrices (SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2 and Si3N4) have been calculated. Ground state energies of electrons and holes in GaN nanocrystals are determined using the isotropic approximation of the k ṡ p -Hamiltonian. All the ground state energies are found to increase with lowering the nanocrystal size and are proportional to the R-n, where R is the nanocrystal radius, n =1.5-1.9 for electrons and 1.7-2.0 for holes. The optical gap of GaN nanocrystals changes from 3.8 to 5 eV for the nanocrystal radius ranging from 3 to 1 nm.

  19. Synthesis and characterisation of magnetic iron sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, John H.L.; Etchegoin, Pablo G.; Tilley, Richard D.

    2012-05-15

    Fe{sub 1-x}S and Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystals with a variety of morphologies and average sizes were synthesised by the reaction of iron(II) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac){sub 2}) and elemental sulfur in oleylamine. Reaction at 200 Degree-Sign C for 240 min produced extremely thin Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} sheets, which displayed low coercivities (14 kA m{sup -1}) suggestive of pseudosingle-domain or multidomain particles. Reaction temperatures {>=}300 Degree-Sign C for 30 min produced 70 nm Fe{sub 1-x}S nanocrystals with hexagonal plate and hexagonal prism morphologies, which displayed high magnetic coercivities (110 kA m{sup -1}) characteristic of single magnetic domain particles. Rapid injection of sulfur solution at 280 Degree-Sign C followed by immediate cooling produced a mixture of Fe{sub 1-x}S nanocrystals and spherical, polydisperse {approx}5 nm Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystals, which displayed superparamagnetism above an average blocking temperature of 55 K. - Graphical abstract: Reaction of Fe(acac){sub 2} and sulfur in oleylamine produces Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystals at 200 Degree-Sign C and Fe{sub 1-x}S nanocrystals at 310 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Fe{sub 1-x}S and Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystals from Fe(acac){sub 2} and sulfur. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} sheets formed after 4 h at 200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 1-x}S nanocrystals formed above 200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five nanometre Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} formed by rapid injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five nanometre Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystals superparamagnetic above blocking temperature of 55 K.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent aluminium selenide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Balitskii, O.A.; Demchenko, P.Yu.; Mijowska, E.; Cendrowski, K.

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis procedure of size and sharp controlled Al{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystals is introduced. ► Obtained nanoparticles are highly crystalline of hexagonal wurtzite type. ► Colloidal Al{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystals are highly luminescent in the near UV spectral region. ► They can be implemented in light emitters/collectors, concurring with II–VI nanodots. -- Abstract: We propose the synthesis and characterization of colloidal aluminium selenide nanocrystals using trioctylphosphine as a solvent. The nanoparticles have several absorption bands in the spectral region 330–410 nm and are bright UV-blue luminescent, which is well demanded in light collecting and emitting devices, e.g. for tuning their spectral characteristics to higher energy solar photons.

  1. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  2. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M. Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33–41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  3. Nanocrystal formation via yttrium ion implantation into sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, E.M.; Hampikian, J.M.; Poker, D.B.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation has been used to form nanocrystals in the near surface of single crystal {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The ion fluence was 5 x 10{sup 16} Y{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, and the implant energies investigated were 100, 150, and 170 keV. The morphology of the implanted region was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling. The implantation causes the formation of an amorphous surface layer which contains spherical nanosized crystals with a diameter of {approximately}13 nm. The nanocrystals are randomly oriented and exhibit a face-centered cubic structure with a lattice parameter of {approximately}4.1 A {+-} .02 A. Preliminary chemical analysis shows that these nanocrystals are rich in aluminum and yttrium and poor in oxygen relative to the amorphous matrix.

  4. Alkyl Passivation and Amphiphilic Polymer Coating of Silicon Nanocrystals for Diagnostic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Colin M.; Rasch, Michael R.; Hueso, Jose L.; Goodfellow, Brian W.; Akhavan, Vahid A.; Puvanakrishnan, Priyaveena; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    We show a method to produce biocompatible polymer-coated silicon (Si) nanocrystals for medical imaging. Silica-embedded Si nanocrystals are formed by HSQ thermolysis. The nanocrystals are then liberated from the oxide and terminated with Si-H bonds by HF etching, followed by alkyl monolayer passivation by thermal hydrosilylation. The Si nanocrystals have an average diameter of 2.1 ± 0.6 nm and photoluminesce (PL) with a peak emission wavelength of 650 nm, which lies within the transmission window of 650–900 nm that is useful for biological imaging. The hydrophobic Si nanocrystals are then coated with an amphiphilic polymer for dispersion in aqueous media with pH ranging between 7 and 10 and ionic strength between 30 mM and 2 M, while maintaining a bright and stable PL and a hydrodynamic radius of only 20 nm. Fluorescence imaging of polymer-coated Si nanocrystals in a biological tissue host is demonstrated, showing the potential for in vivo imaging. PMID:20818646

  5. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  6. Ln(3+)-doped hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: controllable synthesis and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Meiying; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi; Ma, Haixia; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yaoyu; Wei, Yen

    2015-08-21

    In this paper we report two different doping strategies to prepare a series of novel HAp:Ln(3+) (Ln = Eu or Tb) nanocrystals with tunable aspect ratios via facile hydrothermal synthetic routes. Adopting a one-pot synthetic strategy, with increasing rare-earth doping dosage, the as-prepared nanocrystals have relatively weak fluorescence intensity, and change from nanorods with lengths of about 150 nm into nanowires with lengths of about 2 μm. Using the synthetic pure HAp nanorods as matrices, they are endowed with bright green or red luminescent properties by doping Tb(3+) or Eu(3+) ions via a second hydrothermal process, and simultaneously retain their original morphologies (diameter 8 nm, length 150 nm). The hydrophobic HAp:Ln(3+) nanorods with strong optical properties are converted into hydrophilic particles with a surfactant (Pluronic F127) and successfully applied to live cell imaging. PMID:26190155

  7. Strongly bound citrate stabilizes the apatite nanocrystals in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.-Y.; Rawal, A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-10-12

    Nanocrystals of apatitic calcium phosphate impart the organic-inorganic nanocomposite in bone with favorable mechanical properties. So far, the factors preventing crystal growth beyond the favorable thickness of ca. 3 nm have not been identified. Here we show that the apatite surfaces are studded with strongly bound citrate molecules, whose signals have been identified unambiguously by multinuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. NMR reveals that bound citrate accounts for 5.5 wt% of the organic matter in bone and covers apatite at a density of about 1 molecule per (2 nm){sup 2}, with its three carboxylate groups at distances of 0.3 to 0.45 nm from the apatite surface. Bound citrate is highly conserved, being found in fish, avian, and mammalian bone, which indicates its critical role in interfering with crystal thickening and stabilizing the apatite nanocrystals in bone

  8. Size-Dependent Melting Behavior of Colloidal In, Sn, and Bi Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals are a technologically important class of nanostructures whose phase change properties have been largely unexplored. Here we report on the melting behavior of In, Sn, and Bi nanocrystals dispersed in a polymer matrix. This polymer matrix prevents the nanocrystals from coalescing with one another and enables previously unaccessed observations on the melting behavior of colloidal nanocrystals. We measure the melting temperature, melting enthalpy, and melting entropy of colloidal nanocrystals with diameters of approximately 10 to 20 nm. All of these properties decrease as nanocrystal size decreases, although the depression rate for melting temperature is comparatively slower than that of melting enthalpy and melting entropy. We also observe an elevated melting temperature during the initial melt-freeze cycle that we attribute to surface stabilization from the organic ligands on the nanocrystal surface. Broad endothermic melting valleys and very large supercoolings in our calorimetry data suggest that colloidal nanocrystals exhibit a significant amount of surface pre-melting and low heterogeneous nucleation probabilities during freezing. PMID:26573146

  9. Hyperoside nanocrystals for HBV treatment: process optimization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baode; Wu, Na; Shen, Chengying; Zhang, Fucheng; Wu, Yan; Xu, Pinghua; Zhang, Lihong; Wu, Wei; Lu, Yi; Han, Jin; Wang, Yonggang; Yuan, Hailong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop hyperoside (Hyp) nanocrystals to enhance its dissolution rate, oral bioavailability and anti-HBV activity. Hyp nanocrystals were prepared using high pressure homogenization technique followed by lyophilization. A Box-Behnken design approach was employed for process optimization. The physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics and anti-HBV activity in vivo of Hyp nanocrystal prepared with the optimized formulation were systematically investigated. Hyp nanocrystals prepared with the optimized formulation was found to be rod shaped with particle size of 384 ± 21 nm and PDI of 0.172 ± 0.027. XRPD studies suggested slight crystalline change in drug. Dissolution rate obtained from Hyp nanocrystals were markedly higher than pure Hyp. The nanocrystals exhibited enhanced Cmax (7.42 ± 0.73 versus 3.80 ± 0.66 mg/L) and AUC0 - t (193.61 ± 16.30 versus 91.92 ± 17.95 mg·h/L) with a 210.63% increase in relative bioavailability. Hyp nanocrystals exhibited significantly greater anti-HBV activity than Hyp. These results suggested that the developed nanocrystals formulation had a great potential as a viable approach to enhance the bioavailability of Hyp. PMID:27032257

  10. Size-Dependent Melting Behavior of Colloidal In, Sn, and Bi Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals are a technologically important class of nanostructures whose phase change properties have been largely unexplored. Here we report on the melting behavior of In, Sn, and Bi nanocrystals dispersed in a polymer matrix. This polymer matrix prevents the nanocrystals from coalescing with one another and enables previously unaccessed observations on the melting behavior of colloidal nanocrystals. We measure the melting temperature, melting enthalpy, and melting entropy of colloidal nanocrystals with diameters of approximately 10 to 20 nm. All of these properties decrease as nanocrystal size decreases, although the depression rate for melting temperature is comparatively slower than that of melting enthalpy and melting entropy. We also observe an elevated melting temperature during the initial melt-freeze cycle that we attribute to surface stabilization from the organic ligands on the nanocrystal surface. Broad endothermic melting valleys and very large supercoolings in our calorimetry data suggest that colloidal nanocrystals exhibit a significant amount of surface pre-melting and low heterogeneous nucleation probabilities during freezing.

  11. Synthesis of discrete aluminophosphate -CLO nanocrystals in a eutectic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shuo; Xu, Renshun; Li, Xiaolei; Li, Dawei; Ma, Huaijun; Wang, Donge; Xu, Yunpeng; Tian, Zhijian

    2015-08-01

    Extra-large-pore aluminophosphate -CLO (i.e., DNL-1) nanocrystals were synthesized in a eutectic mixture composed of diethylamine hydrochloride (DEAC) and ethylene glycol (EG) with 1-methylimidazole (1-MIm) as an additional amine using both conventional and microwave heating. The effects of the synthesis parameters, such as the amount of 1-MIm and the P/Al ratio, on the formation of DNL-1 nanocrystals were studied. The products were characterized using a variety of techniques. XRD, DLS, SEM and TEM results indicate that the as-synthesized DNL-1 nanocrystals have good crystallinity and narrow particle size distributions, and their average particle size was controlled in the 100-220nm range by simply adjusting the amount of 1-MIm. TG-DSC and N2 adsorption analyses reveal that the as-synthesized DNL-1 nanocrystals exhibit good thermal stability and the calcined samples possess high BET surface areas and large pore volumes. In addition, the cooperative structure-directing effects of 1-MIm and the eutectic mixture cation (DEA(+)) in the formation of DNL-1 nanocrystals were discussed. PMID:25897847

  12. Diamond nanowires and the insulator-metal transition in ultrananocrystalline diamond films.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, R.; Bruno, P.; Miller, D. J.; Bleuel, M.; Lai, J.; Gruen, D. M.

    2007-05-01

    Further progress in the development of the remarkable electrochemical, electron field emission, high-temperature diode, and optical properties of n-type ultrananocrystalline diamond films requires a better understanding of electron transport in this material. Of particular interest is the origin of the transition to the metallic regime observed when about 10% by volume of nitrogen has been added to the synthesis gas. Here, we present data showing that the transition to the metallic state is due to the formation of partially oriented diamond nanowires surrounded by an sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon sheath. These have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy techniques (high-resolution mode, selected area electron diffraction, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering. The nanowires are 80-100 nm in length and consist of {approx}5 nm wide and 6-10 nm long segments of diamond crystallites exhibiting atomically sharp interfaces. Each nanowire is enveloped in a sheath of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon that provides the conductive path for electrons. Raman spectroscopy on the films coupled with a consideration of plasma chemical and physical processes reveals that the sheath is likely composed of a nanocarbon material resembling in some respects a polymer-like mixture of polyacetylene and polynitrile. The complex interactions governing the simultaneous growth of the diamond core and the sp{sup 2} sheath responsible for electrical conductivity are discussed as are attempts at a better theoretical understanding of the transport mechanism.

  13. Selective decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Martis, P.; Venugopal, B.R.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2011-05-15

    A simple route to selective decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using nickel acetylacetonate (NAA) was successfully achieved for the first time. The homogeneously decorated nanocrystals on MWCNTs were investigated for their structure and morphology by various techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that the size distributions of the nanocrystals on MWCNTs ranged from 8 to 15 nm and they were well resolved. The precursor, NAA, was effectively employed to impregnate the MWCNTs, which on calcination at suitable temperatures and in the presence of hydrogen and nitrogen atmosphere gave rise to nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: Nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals were selectively and homogeneously decorated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nickel acetylacetonate, as a precursor in a simple and efficient route. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} A simple route for decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on MWCNTs. {yields} Nickel acetylacetonate used as nickel source for the first time to impregnate on MWCNTs. {yields} Selective decoration was achieved by calcination in hydrogen and nitrogen atmospheres. {yields} The as-decorated nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals are in the range of 8-15 nm.

  14. Nanocrystals of medium soluble actives--novel concept for improved dermal delivery and production strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-08-15

    After use in oral pharmaceutical products, nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to improve the dermal penetration of cosmetic actives (e.g. rutin, hesperidin) and of drugs. By now, nanocrystals are only dermally applied made from poorly soluble actives. The novel concept is to formulate nanocrystals also from medium soluble actives, and to apply a dermal formulation containing additionally nanocrystals. The nanocrystals should act as fast dissolving depot, increase saturation solubility and especially accumulate in the hair follicles, to further increase skin penetration. Caffeine was used as model compound with relevance to market products, and a particular process was developed for the production of caffeine nanocrystals to overcome the supersaturation related effect of crystal growth and fiber formation - typical with medium soluble compounds. It is based on low energy milling (pearl milling) in combination with low dielectric constant dispersion media (water-ethanol or ethanol-propylene glycol mixtures) and optimal stabilizers. Most successful was Carbopol(®) 981 (e.g. 20% caffeine in ethanol-propylene glycol 3:7 with 2% Carbopol, w/w). Nanocrystals with varied sizes can now be produced in a controlled process e.g. 660 nm (optimal for hair follicle accumulation) to 250 nm (optimal for fast dissolution). The short term test proved stability over 2 months of the present formulation being sufficient to perform in vivo testing of the novel concept. PMID:24813782

  15. Accessible and green manufacturing of magnetite (ferrous ferric oxide) nanocrystals and their use in magnetic separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Cafer Tayyar

    This work describes the first size dependent magnetic separation in nanoscale. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals of high quality and uniform size were synthesized with monodispersity below 10%. Magnetite nanocrystals of 4 nm to 33 nm (average diameter) were produced. Batch synthesis was shown to go up to 20 grams which is more than 10 times of a standard nanocrystal synthesis, without loosing the quality and monodispersity. Reactor design for mass (1 gram per hour) production of magnetite nanocrystals is reported for the first time. The cost of a kg of lab purity magnetite nanocrystals was shown to be 2600. A green synthesis that utilizes rust and edible oils was developed. The cost of a kg was brought down to 22. Size dependency of magnetism was shown in nanoscale for the first time. Reversible aggregation theory was developed to explain the low field magnetic separation and solution behavior of magnetite nanocrystals. Arsenic was removed from drinking water with magnetite nanocrystals 200 times better than commercial adsorbents. Silica coating was successfully applied to enable the known silica related biotechnologies. Magnetite-silica nanoshells were functionalized with amino groups. For the first time, silver was coated on the magnetite-silica nanoshells to produce triple multishells. Anti-microbial activity of multishells is anticipated.

  16. Magnetic and upconverted luminescent properties of multifunctional lanthanide doped cubic KGdF4 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, L W; Zhang, Y Y; Li, J J; Li, Y; Zhong, J X; Chu, Paul K

    2010-12-01

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doped KGdF4 (Ln=Yb3+, Er3+, Ho3+, Tm3+) nanocrystals with a mean diameter of approximately 12 nm were synthesized by a hydrothermal method using oleic acid as a stabilizing agent at 180 °C. The nanocrystals crystallize in the cubic phase as α-NaGdF4. When excited by a 980 nm laser, these Ln3+ doped nanocrystals exhibit multicolor up-conversion (UC) emissions in red, yellow, blue and white. The calculated color coordinates demonstrate that white UC emission (CIE-X=0.352, CIE-Y=0.347) can be obtained by varying the dopant concentrations in the Yb3+/Ho3+/Tm3+ triply-doped nanocrystals to yield different RGB emission intensities. The measured field dependence of magnetization (M-H curves) of the KGdF4 nanocrystals shows their paramagnetic characteristics that can be ascribed to the non-interacting localized nature of the magnetic moment of Gd3+ ions. Moreover, low temperature thermal treatment can enhance UC properties, magnetization and magnetic mass susceptibility of Ln3+ doped KGdF4 nanocrystals. The multifunctional Ln3+ doped KGdF4 nanocrystals have potential applications in color displays, bioseparation, and optical-magnetic dual modal nanoprobes in biomedical imaging. PMID:20877853

  17. Phase control in the synthesis of magnetic iron sulfide nanocrystals from a cubane-type Fe-S cluster.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, P V; O'Brien, Paul

    2008-12-24

    Phase control has been achieved in the synthesis of magnetic iron sulfide nanocrystals by the use of a single source precursor, a cubane type Fe-S cluster, bis(tetra-n-butylammonium) tetrakis[benezenethiolato-mu3-sulfido-iron]. This cluster cleanly decomposes in alkylamines to yield nanocrystals whose composition, structure, and dimensions are dependent on the temperature employed. At low temperatures, pyrrhotite type Fe7S8 nanocrystals with an average diameter of 5.6 nm are obtained. Higher temperatures yield griegite-Fe3S4 nanocrystals whose dimensions are tunable in the range 2.5-4.5 nm. All the obtained nanocrystals are superparamagnetic at room temperature. PMID:19035629

  18. Nanocrystal growth of single-phase Si1-xGex alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Nguyen Truong; Cong, Le Thanh; Dung, Nguyen Duc; Quang, Tran Van; Ha, Ngo Ngoc

    2016-06-01

    We present the formation of single-phase Si1-xGex (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8) alloy nanocrystals dispersed in a SiO2 matrix. The studied samples were prepared by co-sputtering with excess Si1-xGex in SiO2 of approximately 33 at%. Upon heat treatment, crystallization of Si1-xGex alloys was examined by using X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Single structure of face-centered cubic nanocrystals in a space group Fd-3m was concluded. The average nanocrystal size (from 2 nm to 10 nm) and the lattice constant a of the single-phase Si1-xGex nanocrystals were found to increase with the Ge composition parameter x. Density functional theory-generalized gradient approximation calculation showed the replacement of Ge into the Si sites and vice versa.

  19. Processing of functionally graded tungsten carbide-cobalt-diamond composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Mohit

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDCs) are widely used as drill bit cutters in rock drilling and as tool bits in machining non-ferrous materials. A typical PDC comprises a thin layer of sintered polycrystalline diamond bonded to a tungsten carbide-cobalt substrate. A well recognized failure mechanism is delamination at the interface between diamond and cemented carbide. High stresses at the diamond/carbide interface, due to thermal expansion and modulus mismatch, are the primary cause of in-service failure under impact loading conditions. This work was undertaken to develop a tungsten carbide-cobalt-diamond composite, which has a continuously graded interface between the diamond and tungsten carbide. The process developed comprised the following steps: (i) generation of a pore size gradient by electrochemical etching of cobalt from the surface of a partially sintered tungsten carbide-cobalt preform; (ii) chemical vapor infiltration of the porous preform with carbon by catalytic decomposition of a methane/hydrogen mixture, resulting in a graded carbon concentration; and (iii) consolidation of the carbon infiltrated preforms at 8GPa/1500°C to complete densification and to transform the carbon into diamond. Thus, the final product consists of a functionally graded WC-Co-diamond composite, with controlled distribution of the constituent phases. Tungsten carbide-cobalt powders with mean tungsten carbide particle size of 0.8mum(micro-grain) and 100 nm(nano-grain) were used as starting materials. Processing conditions were adjusted to obtain an optimal distribution of carbon in porous preforms. After high pressure/high temperature consolidation, both micro- and nano-composites showed a diffused interface between inner and outer regions of the fully dense materials. A micro-composite showed columnar-like tungsten carbide grains and faceted diamond grains in the outer region of the sintered material. The grain size of the diamond in this region was ˜2mum, and the

  20. Cadmium sulfide nanocrystals via two-step hydrothermal process in microemulsions: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Lian

    2003-10-15

    CdS nanocrystals with an average diameter of 16 nm were synthesized in the CTAB/n-C(5)H(11)OH/n-C(6)H(14)/water quaternary microemulsions by a two-step hydrothermal process at 90 and 130 degrees C. The reaction of carbamide and carbon disulfide was employed as the sulfur source for the preparation of CdS nanocrystals. The resulting crystals were characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A unique core/shell structure of CdS nanocrystals was suggested for the explanation of the interesting phenomenon. PMID:14527472

  1. Femtosecond transient absorption dynamics of close-packed gold nanocrystal monolayer arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Eah, S.-K.; Jaeger, H. M.; Scherer, N. F.; Lin, X.-M.; Weiderrecht, G. P.; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-03-11

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate hot electron dynamics of close-packed 6 nm gold nanocrystal monolayers. Morphology changes of the monolayer caused by the laser pump pulse are monitored by transmission electron microscopy. At low pump power, the monolayer maintains its structural integrity. Hot electrons induced by the pump pulse decay through electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling inside the nanocrystals with a decay constant that is similar to the value for bulk films. At high pump power, irreversible particle aggregation and sintering occur in the nanocrystal monolayer, which cause damping and peak shifting of the transient bleach signal.

  2. Evidence of reaction rate influencing cubic and hexagonal phase formation process in CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Kuldeep; Kalita, M. P. C.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanocrystals are synthesized by co-precipitation method using 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as capping agent. Cubic, hexagonal and their mixture are obtained by varying the ME concentration. Lower (higher) ME concentration results in cubic (hexagonal) phase. The crystallite sizes are in the range 3-7 nm. Increase in ME concentration lead to lower reaction rate between Cd2+ and S2- of the precursors, and slower reaction rate is found to favor hexagonal phase formation over the cubic one in CdS nanocrystals. Role of reaction rate in the phase formation process provides a way to synthesize CdS nanocrystals in desired crystal phase.

  3. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  4. Photoemission studies of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K. S.; Roth, R.; Alivisatos, A. P.

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have been the focus of much attention in the last ten years due predominantly to their size dependent optical properties. Namely, the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a shift to higher energy with decreasing size due to quantum confinement effects. Research in this field has employed primarily optical techniques to study nanocrystals, and in this respect this system has been investigated extensively. In addition, one is able to synthesize monodisperse, crystalline particles of CdS, CdSe, Si, InP, InAs, as well as CdS/HgS/CdS and CdSe/CdS composites. However, optical spectroscopies have proven ambiguous in determining the degree to which electronic excitations are interior or surface admixtures or giving a complete picture of the density of states. Photoemission is a useful technique for understanding the electronic structure of nanocrystals and the effects of quantum confinement, chemical environments of the nanocrystals, and surface coverages. Of particular interest to the authors is the surface composition and structure of these particles, for they have found that much of the behavior of nanocrystals is governed by their surface. Previously, the authors had performed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on CdSe nanocrystals. XPS has proven to be a powerful tool in that it allows one to determine the composition of the nanocrystal surface.

  5. Method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-23

    A method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals is disclosed which in one embodiment includes forming a solution of iron (III) diethyl dithiophosphate and tetra-alkyl-ammonium halide in water. The solution is heated under pressure. Pyrite nanocrystal particles are then recovered from the solution.

  6. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites

  7. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  8. Examination of Short- and Long-Range Atomic Order Nanocrystalline SiC and Diamond by Powder Diffraction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Stelmakh, S.; Gierlotka, S.; Weber, H.-P.; Proffen, T.; Palosz, W.

    2002-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines unique, key properties of the materials. Determination of the structure presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard powder diffraction techniques when applied to nanocrystals. Alternate methodology of the structural analysis of nanocrystals (several nanometers in size) based on Bragg-like scattering and called the "apparent lattice parameter" (alp) is proposed. Application of the alp methodology to examination of the core-shell model of nanocrystals will be presented. The results of application of the alp method to structural analysis of several nanopowders were complemented by those obtained by determination of the Atomic Pair Distribution Function, PDF. Based on synchrotron and neutron diffraction data measured in a large diffraction vector of up to Q = 25 Angstroms(exp -1), the surface stresses in nanocrystalline diamond and SiC were evaluated.

  9. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  10. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)