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Sample records for nmr solution structure

  1. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  2. Using NMR to Determine Protein Structure in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnero, Silvia

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a marvelous spectroscopic technique that chemists, physicists, and biochemists routinely employ for their research around the world. This year half of the Nobel Prize for chemistry went to Kurt Wüthrich, who was recognized for the development of NMR-based techniques that lead to the structure determination of biomolecules in solution. In addition to implementing novel pulse sequences and software packages, Wüthrich also applied his methods to several biological systems of key importance to human health. These include the prion protein, which is heavily involved in the spongiform encephalopathy (best known as 'mad cow disease'), which recently caused numerous human deaths, particularly in the UK, due to ingestion of contaminated meat. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) is the most intriguing new NMR method recently developed by Wüthrich and coworkers. This and other closely related pulse sequences promise to play a pivotal role in the extension of NMR to the conformational analysis of very large (up to the megadalton range) macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. More exciting new developments are expected in the near future.

  3. Solution NMR Structure of Membrane-Integral Diacylglycerol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Kim, Hak-Jun; Ellis, Charles D.; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Karra, Murthy D.; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) represents a family of integral membrane enzymes that is unrelated to all other phosphotransferases. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the DAGK homotrimer using solution NMR. The third transmembrane helix from each subunit is domain-swapped with the first and second transmembrane segments from an adjacent subunit. Each of DAGK’s three active sites resembles a portico. The cornice of the portico appears to be the determinant of DAGK’s lipid substrate specificity and overhangs the site of phosphoryl transfer near the water-membrane interface. Mutations to cysteine that caused severe misfolding were located in or near the active site, indicating a high degree of overlap between sites responsible for folding and for catalysis. PMID:19556511

  4. The NMR solution structure of recombinant RGD-hirudin

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xia; Mo, Wei; Liu, Xingang; Zhu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomin; Song, Houyan . E-mail: hysong@shmu.edu.cn; Dai, Linsen . E-mail: lsdai@fudan.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    The solution structure of a new recombinant RGD-hirudin, which has the activities of anti-thrombin and anti-platelet aggregation, was determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared with the conformations of recombinant wild-type hirudin and hirudin (variant 2, Lys47) of the hirudin thrombin complex. On the basis of total 1284 distance and dihedral angle constraints derived from a series of NMR spectra, 20 conformers were computed with ARIA/CNS programs. The structure of residues 3-30 and 37-48 form a molecular core with two antiparallel {beta}-sheets as the other two hirudins. However, significant differences were found in the surface electrostatic charge distributions among the three hirudins, especially in the RGD segment of recombinant RGD-hirudin. This difference may be greatly beneficial to its additional function of anti-platelet aggregation. The difference in extended C-terminal makes its both ionic and hydrophobic interactions with the fibrinogen recognition exosite of thrombin more effective.

  5. NMR solution structure of the neurotrypsin Kringle domain.

    PubMed

    Ozhogina, Olga A; Grishaev, Alexander; Bominaar, Emile L; Patthy, László; Trexler, Maria; Llinás, Miguel

    2008-11-25

    Neurotrypsin is a multidomain protein that serves as a brain-specific serine protease. Here we report the NMR structure of its kringle domain, NT/K. The data analysis was performed with the BACUS (Bayesian analysis of coupled unassigned spins) algorithm. This study presents the first application of BACUS to the structure determination of a 13C unenriched protein for which no prior experimental 3D structure was available. NT/K adopts the kringle fold, consisting of an antiparallel beta-sheet bridged by an overlapping pair of disulfides. The structure reveals the presence of a surface-exposed left-handed polyproline II helix that is closely packed to the core beta-structure. This feature distinguishes NT/K from other members of the kringle fold and points toward a novel functional role for a kringle domain. Functional divergence among kringle domains is discussed on the basis of their surface and electrostatic characteristics. PMID:18956887

  6. Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist: beyond macromolecular solution structure determination.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Michael; Kwan, Ann H; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Mackay, Joel P; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-03-01

    A strength of NMR spectroscopy is its ability to monitor, on an atomic level, molecular changes and interactions. In this review, which is intended for non-spectroscopist, we describe major uses of NMR in protein science beyond solution structure determination. After first touching on how NMR can be used to quickly determine whether a mutation induces structural perturbations in a protein, we describe the unparalleled ability of NMR to monitor binding interactions over a wide range of affinities, molecular masses and solution conditions. We discuss the use of NMR to measure the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and over a wide range of timescales. Finally, we outline new and expanding areas such as macromolecular structure determination in multicomponent systems, as well as in the solid state and in vivo. PMID:21214861

  7. Perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy for structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckel, Sina; Hiller, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses future perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy to study structures and functions of integral membrane proteins at atomic resolution, based on a review of recent progress in this area. Several selected examples of structure determinations, as well as functional studies of integral membrane proteins are highlighted. We expect NMR spectroscopy to make future key scientific contributions to understanding membrane protein function, in particular for large membrane protein systems with known three-dimensional structure. Such situations can benefit from the fact that functional NMR studies have substantially less limitations by molecular size than a full de novo structure determination. Therefore, the general potential for NMR spectroscopy to solve biologic key questions associated with integral membrane proteins is very promising.

  8. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  9. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:26068746

  10. Solution structure of sialyl Lewis X mimics studied by two-dimensional NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Makoto; Noda, Masatoshi; Kajimoto, Tetsuya; Uchiyama, Taketo; Umemoto, Kimiko; Wong, Chi-Huey; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    A structure of the peptidic mimic of sialyl Lewis X (Sle X) (α- N-acetyl-neuraminyl-(2,3)-β- D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-[α- L-fucopyranosyl-(1,3)-β- D- N-acetyl-glucosamine]) in an aqueous solution was studied using two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignments of 1H NMR chemical shift of the SLe X mimic have been performed. The presence of three conformers of the SLe X mimic in a solution was proposed by using distance geometry calculation based on NOE constraints, which were obtained from NOESY experiments. In addition, intermolecular interaction between the mimic and the crystal structure of E-selectin was refined using molecular dynamics. This suggested the conformational rearrangement of the functional groups of the conformers to the active sites of E-selectin. The relationship between the binding activities toward E-selectin and the three-dimensional structures of other mimics was also discussed.

  11. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  12. Crystal versus solution structures of enzymes: NMR spectroscopy of a crystalline serine protease.

    PubMed

    Smith, S O; Farr-Jones, S; Griffin, R G; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-05-26

    The hydrogen-bonding status of His57 in the catalytic triad (Asp-His-Ser) of serine protease has important mechanistic implications for this class of enzymes. Recent nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of alpha-lytic protease find His57 and Ser195 to be strongly hydrogen-bonded, a result that conflicts with the corresponding crystallographic studies, thereby suggesting that the crystal and solution structures may differ. This discrepancy is addressed and resolved in a nitrogen-15 NMR study of the enzyme in the crystalline state. The results show that the His-Ser and Asp-His interactions are identical in crystals and solutions, but that in crystals His57 titrates with a pKa of 7.9, nearly one pKa unit higher than in solution. This elevated pKa accounts for the absence of the His-Ser hydrogen bond in previous x-ray studies. PMID:2499045

  13. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  14. Solution State Structure Determination of Silicate Oligomers by 29Si NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, Johnathan P.; Shah, Neil K.; Dixon, David A.

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by 29Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of 29Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the 29Si–29Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated crosspeaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stability of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  15. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations. PMID:16478188

  16. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  17. NMR Solution Structure and Condition-Dependent Oligomerization of the Antimicrobial Peptide Human Defensin 5

    PubMed Central

    Wommack, Andrew J.; Robson, Scott A.; Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Wan, Andrea; Turner, Christopher J.; Wagner, Gerhard; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Human defensin 5 (HD5) is a 32-residue host-defense peptide expressed in the gastrointestinal, reproductive, and urinary tracts that has antimicrobial activity. It exhibits six cysteine residues that are regiospecifically oxidized to form three disulfide bonds (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, and Cys10—Cys30) in the oxidized form (HD5ox). To probe the solution structure and oligomerization properties of HD5ox, and select mutant peptides lacking one or more disulfide bonds, NMR solution studies and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments are reported in addition to in vitro peptide stability assays. The NMR solution structure of HD5ox, solved at pH 4 in 90:10 H2O/D2O, is presented (PDB: 2LXZ). Relaxation T1/T2 measurements and the rotational correlation time (Tc) estimated from a [15N,1H]-TRACT experiment demonstrate that HD5ox is dimeric under these experimental conditions. Exchange broadening of the Hα signals in the NMR spectra suggests that residues 19-21 (Val19-Cys20-Glu21) contribute to the dimer interface in solution. Exchange broadening is also observed for residues 7-14 comprising the loop. Sedimentation velocity and equilibrium studies conducted in buffered aqueous solution reveal that the oligomerization state of HD5ox is pH-dependent. Sedimentation coefficients of ca. 1.8 S and a molecular weight of 14,363 Da were determined for HD5ox at pH 7, supporting a tetrameric form ([HD5ox] ≥ 30 μM). At pH 2, a sedimentation coefficient of ca. 1.0 S and a molecular weight of 7,079 Da, corresponding to a HD5ox dimer, were obtained. Millimolar concentrations of NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2 have negligible effect on the HD5ox sedimentation coefficients in buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH. Removal of a single disulfide bond results in a loss of peptide fold and quaternary structure. These biophysical investigations highlight the dynamic and environment-sensitive behavior of HD5ox in solution, and provide important insights into HD5ox structure

  18. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  19. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    PubMed Central

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  20. NMR solution structure of the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Keniry, M. A.; Berthon, H. A.; Yang, J. Y.; Miles, C. S.; Dixon, N. E.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic core of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III contains three tightly associated subunits (alpha, epsilon, and theta). The theta subunit is the smallest, but the least understood of the three. As a first step in a program aimed at understanding its function, the structure of the theta subunit has been determined by triple-resonance multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Although only a small protein, theta was difficult to assign fully because approximately one-third of the protein is unstructured, and some sections of the remaining structured parts undergo intermediate intramolecular exchange. The secondary structure was deduced from the characteristic nuclear Overhauser effect patterns, the 3J(HN alpha) coupling constants and the consensus chemical shift index. The C-terminal third of the protein, which has many charged and hydrophilic amino acid residues, has no well-defined secondary structure and exists in a highly dynamic state. The N-terminal two-thirds has three helical segments (Gln10-Asp19, Glu38-Glu43, and His47-Glu54), one short extended segment (Pro34-Ala37), and a long loop (Ala20-Glu29), of which part may undergo intermediate conformational exchange. Solution of the three-dimensional structure by NMR techniques revealed that the helices fold in such a way that the surface of theta is bipolar, with one face of the protein containing most of the acidic residues and the other face containing most of the long chain basic residues. Preliminary chemical shift mapping experiments with a domain of the epsilon subunit have identified a loop region (Ala20-Glu29) in theta as the site of association with epsilon. PMID:10794414

  1. NMR Solution Structure and DNA Binding Model of the DNA Binding Domain of Competence Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Carey A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Perego, Marta; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    Competence protein A (ComA) is a response regulator protein involved in the development of genetic competence in the Gram-positive spore forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as well as the regulation of the production of degradative enzymes and antibiotic synthesis. ComA belongs to the NarL family of proteins which are characterized by a C-terminal transcriptional activator domain that consists of a bundle of four helices, where the second and third helices (α8 and α9) form a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of ComA (ComAC) has been determined. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and NMR protein-DNA titration experiments allowed for the analysis of the interaction of ComAC with its target DNA sequences. Combining the solution structure and biochemical data, a model of ComAC bound to the ComA recognition sequences on the srfA promoter has been developed. The model shows that for DNA binding, ComA uses the conserved helix-turn-helix motif present in other NarL family members. However, the model also reveals that ComA may use a slightly different part of the helix-turn-helix motif and there appears to be some associated domain re-orientation. These observations suggest a basis for DNA binding specificity within the NarL family. PMID:20302877

  2. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K R; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wemmer, David E

    2016-04-01

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. Here we report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our solution NMR results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGH β-sheet. PMID:26998642

  3. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  4. Influence of glass composition and alteration solution on leached silicate glass structure: A solid-state NMR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Frédéric; Gaillard, Marina; Jollivet, Patrick; Charpentier, Thibault

    2006-05-01

    A multinuclear solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of the amorphous alteration products (so called gels) that form during the aqueous alteration of silicate glasses is reported. The studied glass compositions are of increasing complexity, with addition of aluminum, calcium, and zirconium to a sodium borosilicate glass. Two series of gels were obtained, in acidic and in basic solutions, and were analyzed using 1H, 29Si, and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques have been employed such as 1H- 29Si and 1H- 27Al cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, 1H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and 27Al multiple quantum (MQ) MAS NMR. Under acidic conditions, 29Si CP MAS NMR data show that the repolymerized silicate networks have similar configuration. Zirconium as a second nearest neighbor increases the 29Si isotropic chemical shift. The gel porosity is influenced by the pristine glass composition, modifying the silicon-proton interactions. From 1H DQ and 1H- 29Si CP MAS NMR experiments, it was possible to discriminate between silanol groups (isolated or not) and physisorbed molecular water near Si (Q 2), Si (Q 3), and Si (Q 4) sites, as well as to gain insight into the hydrogen-bonding interaction and the mobility of the proton species. These experiments were also carried out on heated samples (180 °C) to evidence hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl groups on molecular water. Alteration in basic media resulted in a gel structure that is more dependent on the initial glass composition. 27Al MQMAS NMR data revealed an exchange of charge compensating cations of the [AlO 4] - groups during glass alteration. 1H- 27Al CP MAS NMR data provide information about the proximities of these two nuclei and two aluminum environments have been distinguished. The availability of these new structural data should provide a better understanding of the impact of glass composition on the gel structure depending on the nature of the alteration solution.

  5. NMR investigation of phenanthridine dyes self-association in aqueous solution. Structural and thermodynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Lantushenko, A. O.

    2002-12-01

    Phenanthridine dyes have pronounced mutagenic activity due to their intercalative binding with double-helical DNA. Although the structural significance in the interacalation process of the phenanthridinium chromophore is well established, the role ofits side chains is still under discussion. The comparative analysis of complexation with DNA of phenanthridinium dyes - ethidium bormide (EB) and its two photosensitive analogues: 3-amino-8-azido-5-ethyl-6-phenyl phenanthridinium bormide (EMB) and 3,80diazido-5-ethyl-6-phenyl phenanthridinium chloride (EDC) has shown that they have different affinities of binding with nucleotide sequences in aqueous salt solution. In order to test the role of azido-groups in side chains of EB chromophore on the drug-DNA affinity, the self-association of EB and its two azido-analogues have been studied in this work by one- and two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectrosocpy. Self-association of the aromatic drug molecuels has been studied using concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts. The equilibrium reaction constants, cooperativity parameters, the limiting values of proton chemical shifts and thermodynamical parameters-enthalpy and entropy of drug self-association have been determined for all the molecular system studied.

  6. Use of proline mutants to help solve the NMR solution structure of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Davies, P. L.; Sykes, B. D.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    To help understand the structure/function relationships in antifreeze proteins (AFP), and to define the motifs required for ice binding, a Type III AFP suitable for two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies was produced in Escherichia coli. A synthetic gene for one of the Type III AFP isoforms was assembled in a T7 polymerase-directed expression vector. The 67-amino acid-long gene product differed from the natural AFP by inclusion of an N-terminal methionine but was indistinguishable in activity. The NMR spectra of this AFP were complicated by cis-trans proline isomerization from the C-terminal sequence YPPA. Substitution of this sequence by YAA eliminated isomer signals without altering the activity or structure of the mutant AFP. This variant (rQAE m1.1) was selected for sequential assignment and the secondary structure determination using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Nine beta-strands are paired to form two triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and one double-stranded antiparallel sheet. Two further proline replacements, P29A and P33A, were made to delineate the role of conserved prolines in Type III AFP. These mutants were valuable in clarifying ambiguous NMR spectral assignments amongst the remaining six prolines of rQAE m1.1. In contrast to the replacement of the C-terminal prolyl residues, the exchange of P29 and P33 caused some structural changes and significantly decreased protein solubility and antifreeze activity. PMID:8401227

  7. Aggregation in five-coordinate high-spin natural hemins: Determination of solution structure by sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, S.; Mitra, S. )

    1990-01-25

    {sup 1}H NMR measurements (at 500 MHz) of nuclear spin-spin relaxation time T{sub 2} (from NMR line width) at different temperatures are reported for aggregates of several five-coordinate high-spin iron(III) complexes of proto-, deutero-, and coproporphyrins in solution and are utilized to determine their solution structure. Extensive aggregation of these complexes in solution is observed, and the dominant form of the aggregates is shown to be dimers. The degree of aggregation for these iron(III) porphyrins follows the order proto- >> deutero- > copro-. The line width of the heme methyl resonances was analyzed by using a nonlinear least-squares fit program working in finite difference algorithm. The values of T{sub 2} were used to determine the structural details of the dimer.

  8. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cusumano, Zachary T; Pinkner, Jerome S; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J; Frieden, Carl

    2016-06-28

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG-CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  9. NMR solution structure and function of the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor.

    PubMed

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Ivanova, Elena V; Birdsall, Berry; Alkalaeva, Elena Z; Kryuchkova, Polina N; Kelly, Geoff; Frolova, Ludmila Y; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2010-06-01

    Termination of translation in eukaryotes is triggered by two polypeptide chain release factors, eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor (eRF1) and eukaryotic class 2 polypeptide chain release factor 3. eRF1 is a three-domain protein that interacts with eukaryotic class 2 polypeptide chain release factor 3 via its C-terminal domain (C-domain). The high-resolution NMR structure of the human C-domain (residues 277-437) has been determined in solution. The overall fold and the structure of the beta-strand core of the protein in solution are similar to those found in the crystal structure. The structure of the minidomain (residues 329-372), which was ill-defined in the crystal structure, has been determined in solution. The protein backbone dynamics, studied using (15)N-relaxation experiments, showed that the C-terminal tail 414-437 and the minidomain are the most flexible parts of the human C-domain. The minidomain exists in solution in two conformational states, slowly interconverting on the NMR timescale. Superposition of this NMR solution structure of the human C-domain onto the available crystal structure of full-length human eRF1 shows that the minidomain is close to the stop codon-recognizing N-terminal domain. Mutations in the tip of the minidomain were found to affect the stop codon specificity of the factor. The results provide new insights into the possible role of the C-domain in the process of translation termination. PMID:20553496

  10. Solution structure of hyaluronic acid oligomers by experimental and theoretical NMR, and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Donati, A; Magnani, A; Bonechi, C; Barbucci, R; Rossi, C

    2001-11-01

    The conformational properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligomers in aqueous solution were investigated by combining high-resolution NMR experimental results, theoretical simulation of NMR two-dimensional (2D) spectra by Complete Relaxation Matrix Analysis (CORMA), and molecular dynamics calculations. New experimental findings recorded for the tetra- and hexasaccharides enabled the stiffness of the HA and its viscoelastic properties to be interpreted. In particular, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy spectra provided new information about the arrangement of the glycosidic linkage. From (13)C NMR relaxation the rotational correlation time (tau(c)) were determined. The tau(c) were employed in the calculation of geometrical constraints, by using the MARDIGRAS algorithm. Restrained simulated annealing and 1 ns of unrestrained molecular dynamic simulations were performed on the hexasaccharide in a box of 1215 water molecules. The beta(1 --> 3) and beta(1 --> 4) glycosidic links were found to be rigid. The lack of rotational degree of freedom is due to direct and/or water-mediated interresidue hydrogen bonding. Both single or tandem water bridges were found between carboxylate group and N-acetil group. The carboxylate group of glucuronic acid is not involved in a direct link with the amide group of N-acetyl glucosamine and this facilitated bonding between the residue and the water molecules. PMID:11598878

  11. The present and future of solution NMR in investigating the structure and dynamics of channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Chou, James J

    2013-08-01

    Membrane channels, transporters and receptors constitute essential means for cells to maintain homeostasis and communicate with the surroundings. Investigation of their molecular architecture and the dynamic process of transporting substrate or transmitting signals across the membrane barrier has been one of the frontiers in biomedical research. The past decade has seen numerous successes in the use of X-ray or electron crystallography in determining atomic-resolution structures of membrane proteins, and in some cases, even snapshots of different physiological states of the same protein have been obtained. But there are also many cases in which long-standing efforts to crystallize proteins have yet to succeed. Therefore we have practical needs for developing complementary biophysical tools such as NMR spectroscopy and electron microscopy for tackling these systems. This paper provides a number of key examples where the utility of solution NMR was pivotal in providing structural and functional information on ion channels and transporters. PMID:23628285

  12. Spatial structure of fibrinopeptide B in water solution with DPC micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Fayzullina, Adeliya R.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinopeptide B (GluFib) is one of the factors of thrombosis. Normal blood protein soluble, fibrinogen (fibrinopeptide A and fibrinopeptide B), is transformed into the insoluble, fibrin, which in the form of filaments adheres to the vessel wall at the site of injury, forming a grid. However, the spatial structure of this peptide has not been established till now. In this article, GluFib peptide is investigated together with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles which were used for mimicking the environment of peptide in blood vessels. The spatial structure was obtained by applying 1D and 2D 1H-1H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY, NOESY). It was shown that the fibrinopeptide B does not have a secondary structure but we can distinguish the fragment Gly 9 - Arg 14 with a good convergence (the backbone RMSD for the Gly9 - Arg14 is 0.18 ± 0.08 Å).

  13. Solution NMR of MPS-1 reveals a random coil cytosolic domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Shi, Pan; Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134-256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  14. Solution NMR of MPS-1 Reveals a Random Coil Cytosolic Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134–256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  15. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  16. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  17. Understanding the structural specificity of Tn antigen for its receptor: an NMR solution study.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Coslovi, Anna; Rossi, Marco; Uggeri, Fulvio; Paoletti, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    The present work aims at understanding the structural basis of the biological recognition of Tn antigen (GalNAc-α-O-L-Ser), a specific epitope expressed by tumor cells, and the role of its amino acidic moiety in the interaction with its receptor (the isolectin B4 extracted from Vicia villosa). An NMR structural characterization of the α and β anomers, based on J couplings and molecular modeling revealed a structure in very good agreement with data reported in literature for variants of the same molecules. In order to demonstrate the involvement of the amino acid in the ligand-receptor recognition, also GalNAc-α-O-D-Ser was studied; the change in the stereochemistry is in fact expected to impact on the interaction only in case the serine is part of the epitope. Relaxation properties in the presence of the receptor clearly indicated a selective recognition of the natural L form, probably due to the formation of a water-mediated hydrogen bond with Asn 129 of the protein. PMID:22341503

  18. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-06-14

    CV{_}2116 from Chromobacterium violaceum is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV{_}2116 protein sequence as a query identified only two hits, both with amino acid sequence identities of less than 40%. After the CV{_}2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid and transformed into E. coli, the desired CV{_}2116 protein was expressed and purified. A high quality solution structure of CV{_}2116 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The tertiary structure of CV{_}2116 adopts a novel alpha + beta fold containing two anti-parallel beta sheets and one alpha helix in the C-terminal end. CV{_}2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence families and no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. To date, no function of CV{_}2116 can be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches.

  19. Solution structures of psoralen monoadducted and cross-linked DNA oligomers by NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Dwyer, T.J.; Hearst, J.E. |

    1995-10-10

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structures of the 4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) furanside monoadducted (MAf) and the photoisomeric HMT interstrand cross-linked (XL) DNA oligonucleotide d(t{prime}-GCGTACGC-3{prime}){sub 2}. The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for both the MAf and XL from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. 80 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Solution Structure of Molecular Associations Investigated Using NMR for Polysaccharides: Xanthan/Galactomannan Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Takemasa, Makoto; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2016-03-31

    Although the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) signal was valuable to elucidate molecular association structure, it could not always be observed for associated molecules due to the short spin-spin relaxation time T2 in NMR measurements, especially for high molar mass systems. While almost no study has been reported for high molar mass polymers (>1 × 10(6)), especially for polysaccharide-polysaccharide interactions, NOE signals were observed for the first time between two different types of polysaccharides, xanthan and galactomannan (locust bean gum), forming a synergistic gel, as a direct evidence of intermolecular binding of polysaccharides. The NOE peak was found between pyruvic acid in xanthan and anomeric proton of mannose of galactomannan. This NOE signal was observed only when mixing time >0.5 s, indicating indirect NOEs caused by spin diffusion. Therefore, this NOE could not be used to construct the molecular models. However, it is a direct evidence for the binding between two different types of polysaccharide to elucidate the synergistic gelation. This NOE signal was observed only for low molar mass galactomannans (1.4 × 10(4)). T2 of pyruvate methyl drastically decreased at low temperatures in the presence of synergistic interaction, suggesting that pyruvate group at terminal end of side chain in xanthan plays an essential role in synergistic interaction. PMID:26943259

  1. Simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics using CONGEN: energy refinement of the NMR solution structures of epidermal and type-alpha transforming growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, R.; Bassolino-Klimas, D.; Bruccoleri, R. E.; Montelione, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    The new functionality of the program CONGEN (Bruccoleri RE, Karplus M, 1987, Biopolymers 26:137-168; Bassolino-Klimas D et al., 1996, Protein Sci 5:593-603) has been applied for energy refinement of two previously determined solution NMR structures, murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF) and human type-alpha transforming growth factor (hTGF alpha). A summary of considerations used in converting experimental NMR data into distance constraints for CONGEN is presented. A general protocol for simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics is applied to generate NMR solution structures using CONGEN together with real experimental NMR data. A total of 730 NMR-derived constraints for mEGF and 424 NMR-derived constraints for hTGF alpha were used in these energy-refinement calculations. Different weighting schemes and starting conformations were studied to check and/or improve the sampling of the low-energy conformational space that is consistent with all constraints. The results demonstrate that loosened (i.e., "relaxed") sets of the EGF and hTGF alpha internuclear distance constraints allow molecules to overcome local minima in the search for a global minimum with respect to both distance restraints and conformational energy. The resulting energy-refined structures of mEGF and hTGF alpha are compared with structures determined previously and with structures of homologous proteins determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography. PMID:8845748

  2. Solution NMR studies provide structural basis for endotoxin pattern recognition by the innate immune receptor CD14

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Seth; Chen Bin; Holbrook, Kristen; Jain, Nitin U.

    2008-04-04

    CD14 functions as a key pattern recognition receptor for a diverse array of Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell-wall components in the host innate immune response by binding to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) at partially overlapping binding site(s). To determine the potential contribution of CD14 residues in this pattern recognition, we have examined using solution NMR spectroscopy, the binding of three different endotoxin ligands, lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and a PGN-derived compound, muramyl dipeptide to a {sup 15}N isotopically labeled 152-residue N-terminal fragment of sCD14 expressed in Pichia pastoris. Mapping of NMR spectral changes upon addition of ligands revealed that the pattern of residues affected by binding of each ligand is partially similar and partially different. This first direct structural observation of the ability of specific residue combinations of CD14 to differentially affect endotoxin binding may help explain the broad specificity of CD14 in ligand recognition and provide a structural basis for pattern recognition. Another interesting finding from the observed spectral changes is that the mode of binding may be dynamically modulated and could provide a mechanism for binding endotoxins with structural diversity through a common binding site.

  3. Solution NMR structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of influenza A M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Pielak, Rafal M.; Chou, James J.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper reports the structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of the M2 channel of influenza A virus. {yields} High quality NMR data allowed a better-defined structure for the C-terminal region of the M2 channel. {yields} Using the structure, we propose a proton transfer pathway during M2 proton conduction. {yields} Structural comparison between the wildtype, V27A and S31N variants allowed an in-depth analysis of possible modes of drug resistance. {yields} Distinct feature of the V27A channel pore also provides an explanation for its faster rate of proton conduction. -- Abstract: The M2 protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective channel that is required for viral replication. It is the target of the anti-influenza drugs, amantadine and rimantadine. Widespread drug resistant mutants, however, has greatly compromised the effectiveness of these drugs. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the highly pathogenic, drug resistant mutant V27A. The structure reveals subtle structural differences from wildtype that maybe linked to drug resistance. The V27A mutation significantly decreases hydrophobic packing between the N-terminal ends of the transmembrane helices, which explains the looser, more dynamic tetrameric assembly. The weakened channel assembly can resist drug binding either by destabilizing the rimantadine-binding pocket at Asp44, in the case of the allosteric inhibition model, or by reducing hydrophobic contacts with amantadine in the pore, in the case of the pore-blocking model. Moreover, the V27A structure shows a substantially increased channel opening at the N-terminal end, which may explain the faster proton conduction observed for this mutant. Furthermore, due to the high quality NMR data recorded for the V27A mutant, we were able to determine the structured region connecting the channel domain to the C-terminal amphipathic helices that was not determined in the wildtype structure. The new structural

  4. αB-Crystallin. A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi M.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2008-11-14

    Atomic-level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an ~580-kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An ~100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α- crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64–162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer–monomer transition over the pH range 7.5–6.8. This steep pHdependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally (e.g., to preserve the filament integrity

  5. αB-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-Solution State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi R.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2009-01-01

    Summary Atomic level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small Heat Shock Protein (sHSP) family has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse, oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on ∼ 580 kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue, 20 kDa subunits. An ∼100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all sHSPs and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α-crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and the Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64-162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid- and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid- and solution-state indicating a similar structure for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of inter-subunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid- and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H-15N HSQC spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer-monomer transition over the pH range of 7.5 to 6.8. This steep pH-dependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally, e.g., to preserve the filament integrity of cardiac muscle proteins such as actin and desmin during cardiac ischemia which

  6. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  7. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    PubMed

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-01

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. PMID:27349871

  8. Simultaneous use of solution NMR and X-ray data in REFMAC5 for joint refinement/detection of structural differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldelli, Mauro; Ravera, Enrico; Calderone, Vito; Parigi, Giacomo; Murshudov, Garib N.; Luchinat, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings can now be used in the program REFMAC5 from CCP4 as structural restraints together with X-ray crystallographic data. These NMR restraints can reveal differences between solid state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. The program REFMAC5 from CCP4 was modified to allow the simultaneous use of X-ray crystallographic data and paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and/or diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings. Incorporation of these long-range NMR restraints in REFMAC5 can reveal differences between solid-state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. Since NMR and X-ray data are complementary, when a single structure is consistent with both sets of data and still maintains reasonably ‘ideal’ geometries, the reliability of the derived atomic model is expected to increase. The program was tested on five different proteins: the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase 1, GB3, ubiquitin, free calmodulin and calmodulin complexed with a peptide. In some cases the joint refinement produced a single model consistent with both sets of observations, while in other cases it indicated, outside the experimental uncertainty, the presence of different protein conformations in solution and in the solid state.

  9. Solution structure of the two-iron rubredoxin of Pseudomonas oleovorans determined by NMR spectroscopy and solution X-ray scattering and interactions with rubredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Perry, Ashlee; Tambyrajah, Winston; Grossmann, J Günter; Lian, Lu-Yun; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2004-03-23

    Here we provide insights into the molecular structure of the two-iron 19-kDa rubredoxin (AlkG) of Pseudomonas oleovorans using solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small-angle X-ray scattering studies. Sequence alignment and biochemical studies have suggested that AlkG comprises two rubredoxin folds connected by a linker region of approximately 70 amino acid residues. The C-terminal domain (C-Rb) of this unusual rubredoxin, together with approximately 35 amino acid residues of the predicted linker region, was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified in the one-iron form and the structure of the cadmium-substituted form determined at high-resolution by NMR spectroscopy. The structure shows that the C-Rb domain is similar in fold to the conventional one-iron rubredoxins from other organisms, whereas the linker region does not have any discernible structure. This tandem "flexible-folded" structure of the polypeptide chain derived for the C-Rb protein was confirmed using solution X-ray scattering methods. X-ray scattering studies of AlkG indicated that the 70-amino acid residue linker forms a structured, yet mobile, polypeptide segment connecting the globular N- and C-terminal domains. The X-ray scattering studies also showed that the N-terminal domain (N-Rb) has a molecular conformation similar to that of C-Rb. The restored molecular shape indicates that the folded N-Rb and C-Rb domains of AlkG are noticeably separated, suggesting some domain movement on complex formation with rubredoxin reductase to allow interdomain electron transfer between the metal centers in AlkG. This study demonstrates the advantage of combining X-ray scattering and NMR methods in structural studies of dynamic, multidomain proteins that are not suited to crystallographic analysis. The study forms a structural foundation for functional studies of the interaction and electron-transfer reactions of AlkG with rubredoxin reductase, also reported herein. PMID:15023067

  10. Solution NMR and X-ray Crystal Structures of Membrane-associated Lipoprotein-17 Domain Reveal a Novel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    R Mani; S Vorobiev; G Swapna; H Neely; H Janjua; C Ciccosanti; D Xiao; J Hunt; G Montelione; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The conserved Lipoprotein-17 domain of membrane-associated protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA from Ureaplasma parvum was selected for structure determination by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, as part of the Protein Structure Initiative's program on structure-function analysis of protein domains from large domain sequence families lacking structural representatives. The 100-residue Lipoprotein-17 domain is a 'domain of unknown function' (DUF) that is a member of Pfam protein family PF04200, a large domain family for which no members have characterized biochemical functions. The three-dimensional structure of the Lipoprotein-17 domain of protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA was determined by both solution NMR and by X-ray crystallography at 2.5 {angstrom}. The two structures are in good agreement with each other. The domain structure features three {alpha}-helices, {alpha}1 through {alpha}3, and five {beta}-strands. Strands {beta}1/{beta}2, {beta}3/{beta}4, {beta}4/{beta}5 are anti-parallel to each other. Strands {beta}1 and {beta}2 are orthogonal to strands {beta}3, {beta}4, {beta}5, while helix {alpha}3 is formed between the strands {beta}3 and {beta}4. One-turn helix {alpha}2 is formed between the strands {beta}1 and {beta}2, while helix {alpha}1 occurs in the N-terminal polypeptide segment. Searches of the Protein Data Bank do not identify any other protein with significant structural similarity to Lipoprotein-17 domain of Q9PRA0{_}UREPA, indicating that it is a novel protein fold.

  11. NMR Solution Structure of Rat Aβ(1–16): Toward Understanding the Mechanism of Rats' Resistance to Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to reveal the mechanism of rats' resistance to Alzheimer's disease, we determined the structure of the metal-binding domain 1–16 of rat β-amyloid (rat Aβ(1–16)) in solution in the absence and presence of zinc ions. A zinc-induced dimerization of the domain was detected. The zinc coordination site was found to involve residues His-6 and His-14 of both peptide chains. We used experimental restraints obtained from analyses of NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry data to perform structure calculations. The calculations employed an explicit water environment and a simulated annealing molecular-dynamics protocol followed by quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical optimization. We found that the C-tails of the two polypeptide chains of the rat Aβ(1–16) dimer are oriented in opposite directions to each other, which hinders the assembly of rat Aβ dimers into oligomeric aggregates. Thus, the differences in the structure of zinc-binding sites of human and rat Aβ(1–16), their ability to form regular cross-monomer bonds, and the orientation of their hydrophobic C-tails could be responsible for the resistance of rats to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22225807

  12. 1H NMR structural and thermodynamical analysis of the hetero-association of daunomycin and novatrone in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Rozvadovskaya, A. O.; Hernandez Santiago, A.; Zubchenok, O. V.; Djimant, L. N.; Davies, D. B.

    2004-09-01

    The complexation of antitumour antibiotics novatrone (NOV) and daunomycin (DAU) in aqueous solution has been studied by one- and two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy (500 MHz) in order to elucidate the probable molecular mechanism of the action of aromatic antitumour drugs in combination chemotherapy. The equilibrium reaction constants, thermodynamical parameters (Δ H, Δ S) of hetero-association of NOV with DAU and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules in the hetero-complexes have been determined from the experimental concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts of the aromatic molecules. The most favourable structure of the 1:1 NOV-DAU hetero-association complex has been determined using both the molecular mechanics methods (X-PLOR software) and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules. The obtained results have shown that intermolecular complexes between NOV and DAU molecules are mainly stabilized by stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. It is likely that there is an additional stabilization of the NOV-DAU hetero-complexes by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. It is concluded that aromatic molecules of antibiotics may form energetically stable hetero-association complexes in aqueous solution and hence effect their medical-biological (and probably toxic) activity.

  13. Solution structures of nisin A and its two major degradation products determined by n.m.r.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, L Y; Chan, W C; Morley, S D; Roberts, G C; Bycroft, B W; Jackson, D

    1992-01-01

    The conformations of nisin and two major degradation products, nisin-(1-32)-peptide (nisin1-32) and des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 (where delta Ala is alpha beta-didehydroalanine), in aqueous solution have been determined from n.m.r. data. Sequential assignments of the peptides using correlation spectroscopy ('COSY'), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy ('HOHAHA'), nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY), relayed NOESY and rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments are presented, including stereospecific assignments of beta-methylene protons of the lanthionine residues. ROESY experiments are also used to detect flexible regions in the polypeptide chain. A dynamic-stimulated-annealing approach is used for structural determination. It can be concluded that all these peptides are flexible in aqueous solution, with no experimental evidence of preferred overall conformations; the only defined conformational features are imposed by the presence of the lanthionine residues. Low-temperature studies also reveal that des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 adopts conformations similar to those when the ring is intact, suggesting that the loss of activity of this degradation product is due to the absence of the delta Ala5 residue rather than to the conformational consequences of ring-opening. PMID:1575686

  14. Determination of solution structures of proteins up to 40 kDa using CS-Rosetta with sparse NMR data from deuterated samples

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Song, Yifan; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Aramini, James M.; Ertekin, Asli; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an approach for determining NMR structures of proteins over 20 kDa that utilizes sparse distance restraints obtained using transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy experiments on perdeuterated samples to guide RASREC Rosetta NMR structure calculations. The method was tested on 11 proteins ranging from 15 to 40 kDa, seven of which were previously unsolved. The RASREC Rosetta models were in good agreement with models obtained using traditional NMR methods with larger restraint sets. In five cases X-ray structures were determined or were available, allowing comparison of the accuracy of the Rosetta models and conventional NMR models. In all five cases, the Rosetta models were more similar to the X-ray structures over both the backbone and side-chain conformations than the “best effort” structures determined by conventional methods. The incorporation of sparse distance restraints into RASREC Rosetta allows routine determination of high-quality solution NMR structures for proteins up to 40 kDa, and should be broadly useful in structural biology. PMID:22733734

  15. Solution structure of Ln(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands through theoretical evaluation of 1H NMR contact shifts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Aurora; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Botta, Mauro; Tripier, Raphaël; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-12-17

    Herein, we present a new approach that combines DFT calculations and the analysis of Tb(III)-induced (1)H NMR shifts to quantitatively and accurately account for the contact contribution to the paramagnetic shift in Ln(III) complexes. Geometry optimizations of different Gd(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands were carried out using the hybrid meta-GGA TPSSh functional and a 46 + 4f(7) effective core potential (ECP) for Gd. The complexes investigated include [Ln(Me-DODPA)](+) (H(2)Me-DODPA = 6,6'-((4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diyl)bis(methylene))dipicolinic acid, [Ln(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-) (H(4)DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate), [Ln(DOTAM)(H(2)O)](3+) (DOTAM = 1,4,7,10- tetrakis[(carbamoyl)methyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), and related systems containing pyridyl units (Ln = Gd, Tb). Subsequent all-electron relativistic calculations based on the DKH2 approximation, or small-core ECP calculations, were used to compute the (1)H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) at the ligand nuclei (A(iso) values). The calculated A(iso) values provided direct access to contact contributions to the (1)H NMR shifts of the corresponding Tb(III) complexes under the assumption that Gd and Tb complexes with a given ligand present similar HFCCs. These contact shifts were used to obtain the pseudocontact shifts, which encode structural information as they depend on the position of the nucleus with respect to the lanthanide ion. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and calculated pseudocontact shifts using the DFT-optimized geometries as structural models of the complexes in solution, which demonstrates that the computational approach used provides (i) good structural models for the complexes, (ii) accurate HFCCs at the ligand nuclei. The methodology presented in this work can be classified in the context of model-dependent methods, as it relies on the use of a specific molecular structure obtained from DFT

  16. Solution structure of a DNA complex with the fluorescent bis-intercalator TOTO determined by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Wemmer, D.E.; Jacobsen, J.P.

    1995-07-11

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the DNA oligonucleotide d(5{prime}-CGCTAGCG-3{prime}){sub 2} complexed with the bis-intercalating dye 1,1{prime}-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diazaundecamethylene)bis[4-(3-methyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo-1,3-thiazolyl-2-methylidene)qui nonlinium] tetraiodide (TOTO). The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for the TOTO complex from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the coordinates for the 40 structures of the complex was 1.45{angstrom}. The local DNA structure is distorted in the complex. The helix is unwound by 60{degrees} and has an overall helical repeat of 12 base pairs, caused by bis-intercalation of TOTO. The poly(propylenamine) linker chain is located in the minor groove of dsDNA. Calculations indicate that the benzothiazole ring system is twisted relative to the quinoline in the uncomplexed TOTO molecule. The site selectivity of TOTO for the CTAG{center_dot}CTAG site is explained by its ability to adapt to the base pair propeller twist of dsDNA to optimize stacking and the hydrophobic interaction between the thymidine methyl group and the benzothiazole ring. There is a 3000-fold fluorescence enhancement upon binding of TOTO to dsDNA. Rotation about the cyanine methine bonds is possible in free TOTO, allowing relaxation nonradiatively. 44 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Solution structural characteristics of cyanometmyoglobin: resonance assignment of heme cavity residues by two-dimensional NMR.

    PubMed

    Emerson, S D; La Mar, G

    1990-02-13

    Steady-state nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE), two-dimensional (2D) nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and 2D spin correlation spectroscopy (COSY) have been applied to the fully paramagnetic low-spin, cyanide-ligated complex of sperm whale ferric myoglobin to assign the majority of the heme pocket side-chain proton signals and the remainder of the heme signals. It is shown that the 2D NOESY map reveals essentially all dipolar connectivities observed in ordinary 1D NOE experiments and expected on the basis of crystal coordinates, albeit often more weakly than in a diamagnetic analogue. For extremely broad (approximately 600-Hz) and rapidly relaxing (Tf1 approximately 3 ms) signals which show no NEOSY peaks, we demonstrate that conventional steady-state NOEs obtained under very rapid pulsing conditions still allow detection of the critical dipoar connectivities that allow unambiguous assignments. The COSY map was found to be generally less useful for the hyperfine-shifted residues, with cross peaks detected only for protons greater than 6 A from the iron. Nevertheless, numerous critical COSY cross peaks between strongly hyperfine-shifted peaks were resolved and assigned. In all, 95% (53 of 56 signals) of the total proton sets within approximately 7.5 A of the iron, the region experiencing the strongest hyperfine shifts and paramagnetic relaxation, are now unambiguously assigned. Hence it is clear that the 2D methods can be profitably applied to paramagnetic proteins. The scope and limitations of such application are discussed. The resulting hyperfine shift pattern for the heme confirmed expectations based on model compounds. In contrast, while exhibiting fortuitous 1H NMR spectral similarities, a major discrepancy was uncovered between the hyperfine shift pattern of the axially bound (F8 histidyl) imidazole in the protein and that of the imidazole in a relevant model compound [Chacko, V.P., & La Mar, G. N. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 7002

  18. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, CongBao

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  19. Solution NMR Structure of the 48-kDa IIAMannose-HPr Complex of the Escherichia coli Mannose Phosphotransferase System*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David C.; Cai, Mengli; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Peterkofsky, Alan; Clore, G. Marius

    2005-01-01

    The solution structure of the 48-kDa IIAMan-HPr complex of the mannose branch of the Escherichia coli phosphotransferase system has been solved by NMR using conjoined rigid body/torsion angle-simulated annealing on the basis of intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement data and residual dipolar couplings. IIAMan is dimeric and has two symmetrically related binding sites per dimer for HPr. A convex surface on HPr, formed primarily by helices 1 and 2, interacts with a deep groove at the interface of the two subunits of IIAMan. The interaction surface on IIAMan is predominantly helical, comprising helix 3 from the subunit that bears the active site His-10 and helices 1, 4, and 5 from the other subunit. The total buried accessible surface area at the protein-protein interface is 1450 Å2. The binding sites on the two proteins are complementary in terms of shape and distribution of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged residues. The active site histidines, His-10 of IIAMan and His-15 (italics indicate HPr residues) of HPr, are in close proximity. An associative transition state involving a pentacoordinate phosphoryl group with trigonal bipyramidal geometry bonded to the N-ε2 atom of His-10 and the N-δ1 atom of His-15 can be readily formed with negligible displacement in the backbone coordinates of the residues immediately adjacent to the active site histidines. Comparing the structures of complexes of HPr with three other structurally unrelated phosphotransferase system proteins, enzymes I, IIAglucose, and IIAmannitol, reveals a number of common features that provide a molecular basis for understanding how HPr specifically recognizes a wide range of diverse proteins. PMID:15788390

  20. Three-dimensional solution structure of mouse [Cd7]-metallothionein-1 by homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, K.; Oz, G.; Otvos, J. D.; Armitage, I. M.

    1999-01-01

    Sequential 1H-NMR assignments of mouse [Cd7]-metallothionein-1 (MT1) have been carried out by standard homonuclear NMR methods and the use of an accordion-heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (HMQC) experiment for establishing the metal, 113Cd2+, to cysteine connectivities. The three-dimensional structure was then calculated using the distance constraints from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy spectra and the Cys-Cd connectivities as input for a distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing protocol in X-PLOR 3.851. Similar to the mammalian MT2 isoforms, the homologous primary structure of MT1 suggested two separate domains, each containing one metal cluster. Because there were no interdomain constraints, the structure calculation for the N-terminal beta- and the C-terminal alpha-domain were carried out separately. The structures are based on 409 NMR constraints, consisting of 381 NOEs and 28 cysteine-metal connectivities. The only elements of regular secondary structure found were two short stretches of 3(10) helices along with some half-turns in the alpha-domain. Structural comparison with rat liver MT2 showed high similarity, with the beta-domain structure in mouse MT1 showing evidence of increased flexibility compared to the same domain in MT2. The latter was reflected by the presence of fewer interresidue NOEs, no slowly exchanging backbone amide protons, and enhanced cadmium-cadmium exchange rates found in the beta-domain of MT1. PMID:10631978

  1. Crystal versus solution structure of enzymes: NMR spectroscopy of a peptide boronic acid-serine protease complex in the crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Farr-Jones, S; Smith, S O; Kettner, C A; Griffin, R G; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-09-01

    The effectiveness of boronic acids as inhibitors of serine proteases has been widely ascribed to the ability of the boronyl group to form a tetrahedral adduct with the active-site serine that closely mimics the putative tetrahedral intermediate or transition state formed with substrates. However, recent 15N NMR studies of alpha-lytic protease (EC 3.4.21.12) in solution have shown that some boronic acids and peptide boronic acids form adducts with the active-site histidine instead of with the serine. Such histidine-boron adducts have not thus far been reported in x-ray diffraction studies of boronic acid-serine protease complexes. Here, we report an 15N NMR study of the MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-boroPhe complex of alpha-lytic protease in the crystalline state using magic-angle spinning. Previous 15N NMR studies have shown this complex involves the formation of a histidine-boron bond in solution. The 15N NMR spectra of the crystalline complex are essentially identical to those of the complex in solution, thereby showing that the structure of this complex is the same in solution and in the crystal and that both involve formation of a histidine-boron adduct. PMID:2780549

  2. Structural and dynamical characterization of the Miz-1 zinc fingers 5-8 by solution-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bernard, David; Bédard, Mikaël; Bilodeau, Josée; Lavigne, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz-1) is a BTB/POZ transcription factor that activates the transcription of cytostatic genes, such as p15(INK4B) or p21(CIP1). The C-terminus of Miz-1 contains 13 consensus C2H2 zinc finger domains (ZF). ZFs 1-4 have been shown to interact with SMAD3/4, while the remaining ZFs are expected to bind the promoters of target genes. We have noted unusual features in ZF 5 and the linker between ZFs 5 and 6. Indeed, a glutamate is found instead of the conserved basic residue two positions before the second zinc-coordinating histidine on the ZF 5 helix, and the linker sequence is DTDKE in place of the classical TGEKP sequence. In a canonical ββα fold, such unusual primary structure elements should cause severe electrostatic repulsions. In this context, we have characterized the structure and the dynamics of a Miz-1 construct comprising ZFs 5-8 (Miz 5-8) by solution-state NMR. Whilst ZFs 5, 7 and 8 were shown to adopt the classical ββα fold for C2H2 ZFs, the number of long-range NOEs was insufficient to define a classical fold for ZF 6. We show by using (15)N-relaxation dispersion experiments that this lack of NOEs is due to the presence of extensive motions on the μs-ms timescale. Since this negatively charged region would have to be located near the phosphodiester backbone in a DNA complex, we propose that in addition to promoting conformational searches, it could serve as a hinge region to keep ZFs 1-4 away from DNA. PMID:23975355

  3. Solution NMR structure of yeast succinate dehydrogenase flavinylation factor Sdh5 reveals a putative Sdh1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Jeong, Mi-Young; Kim, Hyung; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Xiao, Rong; Pagliarini, David J; Prestegard, James H; Winge, Dennis R; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2012-10-30

    The yeast mitochondrial protein Sdh5 is required for the covalent attachment of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to protein Sdh1, a subunit of the heterotetrameric enzyme succinate dehydrogenase. The NMR structure of Sdh5 represents the first eukaryotic structure of Pfam family PF03937 and reveals a conserved surface region, which likely represents a putative Sdh1-Sdh5 interaction interface. Point mutations in this region result in the loss of covalent flavinylation of Sdh1. Moreover, chemical shift perturbation measurements showed that Sdh5 does not bind FAD in vitro, indicating that it is not a simple cofactor transporter in vivo. PMID:23062074

  4. Hybrid Approaches to Structural Characterization of Conformational Ensembles of Complex Macromolecular Systems Combining NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings and Solution X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Egner, Timothy K; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Solving structures or structural ensembles of large macromolecular systems in solution poses a challenging problem. While NMR provides structural information at atomic resolution, increased spectral complexity, chemical shift overlap, and short transverse relaxation times (associated with slow tumbling) render application of the usual techniques that have been so successful for medium sized systems (<50 kDa) difficult. Solution X-ray scattering, on the other hand, is not limited by molecular weight but only provides low resolution structural information related to the overall shape and size of the system under investigation. Here we review how combining atomic resolution structures of smaller domains with sparse experimental data afforded by NMR residual dipolar couplings (which yield both orientational and shape information) and solution X-ray scattering data in rigid-body simulated annealing calculations provides a powerful approach for investigating the structural aspects of conformational dynamics in large multidomain proteins. The application of this hybrid methodology is illustrated for the 128 kDa dimer of bacterial Enzyme I which exists in a variety of open and closed states that are sampled at various points in the catalytic cycles, and for the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:26739383

  5. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  6. Solution NMR Structure of Lin0431 Protein from Listeria innocua Reveals High Structural Similarity with Domain II of Bacterial Transcription Antitermination Protein NusG

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Xiao, Rong; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Janjua, Haleema; Lee, Dong Yup; Everett, John K.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Acton, Thomas B.; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2010-01-01

    Lin0431 protein from Listeria innocua (UniProtKB/TrEMBL ID Q92EM7/Q92EM7_LISIN) was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: LkR112). Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this protein which is the first representative for a member of DUF1312 domain family. Lin0431 protein exhibits a β-sandwich topology. Four anti-parallel β-strands form one face of the sandwich and the other three anti-parallel β-strands together with a short α-helix form the other face of the sandwich. Structure alignment by Dali reveals an unexpected structural similarity with domain II of NusG from Aquifex aeolicus. Analyses of the electrostatic protein surface potential and searches for protein surface cavities reveal the conserved basic charged surface cavities of both the Lin0431 and domain II of AaeNusG, suggesting they may bind the negatively charged nucleic acids and/or and other binding partners. The high structural similarity and similar surface features, despite the lack of recognizable sequence similarity, between Lin0431 and AaeNusG domain II suggest that the domain II of NusG and DUF1312 domains have a homologous relationship and may share similar biochemical functions. PMID:20602357

  7. Glyphosate complexation to aluminium(III). An equilibrium and structural study in solution using potentiometry, multinuclear NMR, ATR-FTIR, ESI-MS and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Purgel, Mihály; Takács, Zoltán; Jonsson, Caroline M; Nagy, Lajos; Andersson, Ingegärd; Bányai, István; Pápai, Imre; Persson, Per; Sjöberg, Staffan; Tóth, Imre

    2009-11-01

    The stoichiometries and stability constants of a series of Al(3+)-N-phosponomethyl glycine (PMG/H(3)L) complexes have been determined in acidic aqueous solution using a combination of precise potentiometric titration data, quantitative (27)Al and (31)P NMR spectra, ATR-FTIR spectrum and ESI-MS measurements (0.6M NaCl, 25 degrees C). Besides the mononuclear AlH(2)L(2+), Al(H(2)L)(HL), Al(HL)(2)(-) and Al(HL)L(2-), dimeric Al(2)(HL)L(+) and trinuclear Al(3)H(5)L(4)(2+) complexes have been postulated. (1)H and (31)P NMR data show that different isomers co-exist in solution and the isomerization reactions are slow on the (31)P NMR time scale. The geometries of monomeric and dimeric complexes likely double hydroxo bridged and double phosphonate bridged isomers have been optimized using DFT ab initio calculations starting from rational structural proposals. Energy calculations using the PCM solvation method also support the co-existence of isomers in solutions. PMID:19766319

  8. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  9. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  10. New Views of Functionally Dynamic Proteins by Solution NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kay, Lewis E

    2016-01-29

    In the past several decades solution NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins, providing detailed insights into biomolecular function. Herein, I provide a summary of two important areas of application, focusing on NMR studies of (i) supramolecular systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons and of (ii) sparsely populated and transiently formed protein states that are thermally accessible from populated ground-state conformers. The critical role of molecular dynamics in function is emphasized, highlighting the utility of the NMR technique in providing such often elusive information. PMID:26707200

  11. A survey of diamagnetic probes for copper2+ binding to the prion protein. 1H NMR solution structure of the palladium2+ bound single octarepeat.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Anthony P; Jones, Christopher E; Viles, John H

    2006-01-21

    The prion protein (PrP(C)) is a copper binding cell surface glycoprotein which when misfolded causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The cooperative binding of Cu2+ to an unstructured octarepeat sequence within PrP(C) causes profound folding of this region. The use of NMR to determine the solution structure of the octarepeat region of PrP with Cu2+ bound has been hampered by the paramagnetic nature of the Cu2+ ions. Using NMR we have investigated the binding of candidate diamagnetic replacement ions, to the octarepeat region of PrP. We show that Pd2+ forms diamagnetic complexes with the peptides HGGG, HGGGW and QPHGGGWGQ with 1:1 stoichiometry. The 1H NMR spectra indicate that these peptides are in slow-exchange between free and bound Pd2+ on the chemical-shift time-scale. We demonstrate that the Pd-peptide complex forms slowly with a time taken to reach half-maximal signal of 3 hours. Other candidate metal ions, Ni2+, Pt2+ and Au3+, were investigated but only the Pd2+ complexes gave resolvable 1H NMR spectra. We have determined the solution structure of the QPHGGGWGQ-Pd 1:1 complex using 71 NOE distance restraints. A backbone RMSD of 0.30 A was observed over residues 3 to 7 in the final ensemble. The co-ordinating ligands consist of the histidine imidazole side chain N epsilon, the amide N of the second and third glycines with possibly H2O as the fourth ligand. The co-ordination geometry differs markedly from that of the HGGGW-Cu crystal structure. This survey of potential replacement metal ions to Cu2+ provides insight into the metal specificity and co-ordination chemistry of the metal bound octarepeats. PMID:16395451

  12. Solution structure of Fe(II) cytochrome c551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as determined by two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Detlefsen, D.J.; Thanabal, V.; Wagner, G. ); Pecoraro, V.L. )

    1991-09-17

    The solution structure of Fe(II) cytochrome c551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on 2D{sup 1}H NMR data is reported. Two sets of structure calculations were completed with a combination of simulated annealing and distance geometry calculations: one set of 20 structures included the heme-peptide covalent linkages, and one set of 10 structures excluded them. The main-chain atoms were well constrained within the two structural ensembles (1.30 and 1.35 {angstrom} average RMSD, respectively) except for two regions spanning residues 30-40 and 60-70. The results were essentially the same when global fold comparisons were made between the ensembles with an average RMSD of 1.33 {angstrom}. In total, 556 contraints were used, including 479 NOEs, 53 volume constraints, and 24 other distances. This report represents the first solution structure determination of a heme protein by 2D {sup 1}H NMR and should provide a basis for the application of these techniques to other proteins containing large prosthetic groups or cofactors.

  13. Secondary structure and side-chain sup 1 H and sup 13 C resonance assignments of calmodulin in solution by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Spera, S.; Barbato, G.; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A. ); Krinks, M. )

    1991-09-24

    Heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR experiments were carried out on recombinant Drosophila calmodulin (CaM), a protein of 148 residues and with molecular mass of 16.7 kDa, that is uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C to a level of > 95%. Nearly complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C side-chain assignments for all amino acid residues are obtained by using the 3D HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY experiments that rely on large heteronuclear one-bond scalar couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. The secondary structure of this protein in solution has been elucidated by a qualitative interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects, hydrogen exchange data, and {sup 3}J{sub HNH{alpha}} coupling constants. A clear correlation between the {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift and secondary structure is found. The secondary structure in the two globular domains of Drosophila CaM in solution is essentially identical with that of the X-ray crystal structure of mammalian CaM which consists of two pairs of a helix-loop-helix motif in each globular domain. The existence of a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet between the two loops in each domain has been confirmed. The eight {alpha}-helix segments identified from the NMR data are located at Glu-6 to Phe-19, thr-29 to Ser-38, Glu-45 to Glu-54, Phe-65 to Lys-77, Glu-82 to Asp-93, Ala-102 to Asn-111, Asp-118 to Glu-127, and Tyr-138 to Thr-146. Although the crystal structure has a long central helix from Phe-65 to Phe-92 that connects the two globular domains, NMR data indicate that residues Asp-78 to Ser-81 of this central helix adopt a nonhelical conformation with considerable flexibility.

  14. Solution NMR structures of Immunoglobulin-like domains 7 and 12 from Obscurin-like protein 1 contribute to the structural coverage of the human cancer protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Pulavarti, Surya VSRK; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Pederson, Kari; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality solution NMR structures of immunoglobulin-like domains 7 and 12 from human Obscurin-like protein 1 were solved. The two domains share 30 % sequence identity and their structures are, as expected, rather similar. The new structures contribute to structural coverage of human cancer associated proteins. Mutations of Arg 812 in domain 7 cause the rare 3-M syndrome, and this site is located in a surface area predicted to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PMID:24989974

  15. Combining NMR ensembles and molecular dynamics simulations provides more realistic models of protein structures in solution and leads to better chemical shift prediction.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Tuppurainen, Kari; Hassinen, Tommi; Laatikainen, Reino; Peräkylä, Mikael

    2012-03-01

    While chemical shifts are invaluable for obtaining structural information from proteins, they also offer one of the rare ways to obtain information about protein dynamics. A necessary tool in transforming chemical shifts into structural and dynamic information is chemical shift prediction. In our previous work we developed a method for 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts in which molecular motions, the 4th dimension, were modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although the approach clearly improved the prediction, the X-ray structures and single NMR conformers used in the model cannot be considered fully realistic models of protein in solution. In this work, NMR ensembles (NMRE) were used to expand the conformational space of proteins (e.g. side chains, flexible loops, termini), followed by MD simulations for each conformer to map the local fluctuations. Compared with the non-dynamic model, the NMRE+MD model gave 6-17% lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors for different backbone nuclei. The improved prediction indicates that NMR ensembles with MD simulations can be used to obtain a more realistic picture of protein structures in solutions and moreover underlines the importance of short and long time-scale dynamics for the prediction. The RMS errors of the NMRE+MD model were 0.24, 0.43, 0.98, 1.03, 1.16 and 2.39 ppm for (1)Hα, (1)HN, (13)Cα, (13)Cβ, (13)CO and backbone (15)N chemical shifts, respectively. The model is implemented in the prediction program 4DSPOT, available at http://www.uef.fi/4dspot. PMID:22314705

  16. The structure and dipole moment of globular proteins in solution and crystalline states: use of NMR and X-ray databases for the numerical calculation of dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Takashima, S

    2001-04-01

    The large dipole moment of globular proteins has been well known because of the detailed studies using dielectric relaxation and electro-optical methods. The search for the origin of these dipolemoments, however, must be based on the detailed knowledge on protein structure with atomic resolutions. At present, we have two sources of information on the structure of protein molecules: (1) x-ray databases obtained in crystalline state; (2) NMR databases obtained in solution state. While x-ray databases consist of only one model, NMR databases, because of the fluctuation of the protein folding in solution, consist of a number of models, thus enabling the computation of dipole moment repeated for all these models. The aim of this work, using these databases, is the detailed investigation on the interdependence between the structure and dipole moment of protein molecules. The dipole moment of protein molecules has roughly two components: one dipole moment is due to surface charges and the other, core dipole moment, is due to polar groups such as N--H and C==O bonds. The computation of surface charge dipole moment consists of two steps: (A) calculation of the pK shifts of charged groups for electrostatic interactions and (B) calculation of the dipole moment using the pK corrected for electrostatic shifts. The dipole moments of several proteins were computed using both NMR and x-ray databases. The dipole moments of these two sets of calculations are, with a few exceptions, in good agreement with one another and also with measured dipole moments. PMID:11180053

  17. Study of electrostatic potential surface distribution of wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis solution structure determined by homonuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Celda, Bernardo

    2003-10-01

    Plastocyanin is a small (approximately 10 kDa), type I blue copper protein that works as an electron donor to photosystem I from cytochrome f in both chloroplast systems and in some strains of cyanobacteria. Comparative studies of the kinetic mechanisms of plastocyanins in different organisms show that the electron transfer from photosystem I happens by simple collision in cyanobacteria but through a intermediate transition complex in green algae and superior plants. Previous work has proved that this effect cannot be explained by structural variations across the different plastocyanins but it can be explained by differences in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. In that case, minor conformational errors at the amino acid side chain level may imply an important effect in the electrostatic potential distribution calculation. In this work we present a high resolution study of side chain conformation by homonuclear NMR for the reduced wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis using intensity ratios for 2D-NOESY and 2D-H,H-TOCSY cross peaks at different mixing times. We also present the corresponding comparison with different plastocyanin structures and the effect in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. We discuss the importance of indirect J-coupling information from TOCSY-type experiments as complement for intraresidue distances derived from NOESY experiments in the determination of side chain orientation and stereo-specific assignments. PMID:14517909

  18. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  19. Structural Biology by NMR: Structure, Dynamics, and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Malliavin, Thérèse; Nilges, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data. PMID:18818721

  20. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  1. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  2. Solution NMR Structure of the Ca2+-bound N-terminal Domain of CaBP7

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Hannah V.; Patel, Pryank; Herbert, Andrew P.; Lian, Lu-Yun; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Haynes, Lee P.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-binding protein 7 (CaBP7) is a member of the calmodulin (CaM) superfamily that harbors two high affinity EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. CaBP7 has been previously shown to interact with and modulate phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-β (PI4KIIIβ) activity in in vitro assays and affects vesicle transport in neurons when overexpressed. Here we show that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of CaBP7 is sufficient to mediate the interaction of CaBP7 with PI4KIIIβ. CaBP7 NTD encompasses the two high affinity Ca2+ binding sites, and structural characterization through multiangle light scattering, circular dichroism, and NMR reveals unique properties for this domain. CaBP7 NTD binds specifically to Ca2+ but not Mg2+ and undergoes significant conformational changes in both secondary and tertiary structure upon Ca2+ binding. The Ca2+-bound form of CaBP7 NTD is monomeric and exhibits an open conformation similar to that of CaM. Ca2+-bound CaBP7 NTD has a solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface that is more expansive than observed in CaM or CaBP1. Within this hydrophobic pocket, there is a significant reduction in the number of methionine residues that are conserved in CaM and CaBP1 and shown to be important for target recognition. In CaBP7 NTD, these residues are replaced with isoleucine and leucine residues with branched side chains that are intrinsically more rigid than the flexible methionine side chain. We propose that these differences in surface hydrophobicity, charge, and methionine content may be important in determining highly specific interactions of CaBP7 with target proteins, such as PI4KIIIβ. PMID:22989873

  3. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in μM-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  4. Structure and topology of the huntingtin 1-17 membrane anchor by a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Matthias; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2013-08-01

    The very amino-terminal domain of the huntingtin protein is directly located upstream of the protein's polyglutamine tract, plays a decisive role in several important properties of this large protein and in the development of Huntington's disease. This huntingtin 1-17 domain is on the one hand known to markedly increase polyglutamine aggregation rates and on the other hand has been shown to be involved in cellular membrane interactions. Here, we determined the high-resolution structure of huntingtin 1-17 in dodecyl phosphocholine micelles and the topology of its helical domain in oriented phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Using two-dimensional solution NMR spectroscopy the low-energy conformations of the polypeptide were identified in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine detergent micelles. In a next step a set of four solid-state NMR angular restraints was obtained from huntingtin 1-17 labeled with (15)N and (2)H at selected sites. Of the micellar ensemble of helical conformations only a limited set agrees in quantitative detail with the solid-state angular restraints of huntingtin 1-17 obtained in supported planar lipid bilayers. Thereby, the solid-state NMR data were used to further refine the domain structure in phospholipid bilayers. At the same time its membrane topology was determined and different motional regimes of this membrane-associated domain were explored. The pronounced structural transitions of huntingtin 1-17 upon membrane-association result in a α-helical conformation from K6 to F17, i.e., up to the very start of the polyglutamine tract. This amphipathic helix is aligned nearly parallel to the membrane surface (tilt angle ∼77°) and is characterized by a hydrophobic ridge on one side and an alternation of cationic and anionic residues that run along the hydrophilic face of the helix. This arrangement facilitates electrostatic interactions between huntingtin 1-17 domains and possibly with the proximal polyglutamine tract. PMID:23931318

  5. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  6. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  7. Sensitivity Enhancement in Solution NMR: Emerging Ideas and New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Okuno, Yusuke; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Modern NMR spectroscopy has reached an unprecedented level of sophistication in the determination of biomolecular structure and dynamics at atomic resolution in liquids. However, the sensitivity of this technique is still too low to solve a variety of cutting-edge biological problems in solution, especially those that involve viscous samples, very large biomolecules or aggregation-prone systems that need to be kept at low concentration. Despite the challenges, a variety of efforts have been carried out over the years to increase sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy in liquids. This review discusses basic concepts, recent developments and future opportunities in this exciting area of research. PMID:24656077

  8. ¹¹³Cd NMR experiments reveal an unusual metal cluster in the solution structure of the yeast splicing protein Bud31p.

    PubMed

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Yang, Ji-Chun; Mathieu, Daniel; Bermel, Wolfgang; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Neuhaus, David

    2015-04-13

    Establishing the binding topology of structural zinc ions in proteins is an essential part of their structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. Using (113)Cd NMR experiments with (113)Cd-substituted samples is a useful approach but has previously been limited mainly to very small protein domains. Here we used (113)Cd NMR spectroscopy during structure determination of Bud31p, a 157-residue yeast protein containing an unusual Zn3Cys9 cluster, demonstrating that recent hardware developments make this approach feasible for significantly larger systems. PMID:25703931

  9. 113Cd NMR Experiments Reveal an Unusual Metal Cluster in the Solution Structure of the Yeast Splicing Protein Bud31p**

    PubMed Central

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Yang, Ji-Chun; Mathieu, Daniel; Bermel, Wolfgang; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Neuhaus, David

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the binding topology of structural zinc ions in proteins is an essential part of their structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. Using 113Cd NMR experiments with 113Cd-substituted samples is a useful approach but has previously been limited mainly to very small protein domains. Here we used 113Cd NMR spectroscopy during structure determination of Bud31p, a 157-residue yeast protein containing an unusual Zn3Cys9 cluster, demonstrating that recent hardware developments make this approach feasible for significantly larger systems. PMID:25703931

  10. Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Biomass using Solution-State 2 D NMR with a Mixture of Deuterated Dimethylsulfoxide and Hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Li, Mi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-05-23

    Recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6 ) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18 ). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. The structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6 /HMPA-d18 ; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. It also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities. PMID:27116696

  11. Solution NMR characterization of chemokine CXCL8/IL-8 monomer and dimer binding to glycosaminoglycans: structural plasticity mediates differential binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Prem Raj B; Mosier, Philip D; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-11-15

    Chemokine CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays a crucial role in directing neutrophils and oligodendrocytes to combat infection/injury and tumour cells in metastasis development. CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers and interaction of both forms with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate these diverse cellular processes. However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying CXCL8-GAG interactions. There are conflicting reports on the affinities, geometry and whether the monomer or dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. To resolve these issues, we characterized the binding of a series of heparin-derived oligosaccharides [heparin disaccharide (dp2), heparin tetrasaccharide (dp4), heparin octasaccharide (dp8) and heparin 14-mer (dp14)] to the wild-type (WT) dimer and a designed monomer using solution NMR spectroscopy. The pattern and extent of binding-induced chemical shift perturbation (CSP) varied between dimer and monomer and between longer and shorter oligosaccharides. NMR-based structural models show that different interaction modes coexist and that the nature of interactions varied between monomer and dimer and oligosaccharide length. MD simulations indicate that the binding interface is structurally plastic and provided residue-specific details of the dynamic nature of the binding interface. Binding studies carried out under conditions at which WT CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers provide unambiguous evidence that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. Together, our data indicate that a set of core residues function as the major recognition/binding site, a set of peripheral residues define the various binding geometries and that the structural plasticity of the binding interface allows multiplicity of binding interactions. We conclude that structural plasticity most probably regulates in vivo CXCL8 monomer/dimer-GAG interactions and function. PMID:26371375

  12. Solution NMR characterization of chemokine CXCL8/IL-8 monomer and dimer binding to glycosaminoglycans: structural plasticity mediates differential binding interactions

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Prem Raj B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Desai, Umesh R.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays a crucial role in directing neutrophils and oligodendrocytes to combat infection/injury and tumour cells in metastasis development. CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers and interaction of both forms with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate these diverse cellular processes. However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying CXCL8–GAG interactions. There are conflicting reports on the affinities, geometry and whether the monomer or dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. To resolve these issues, we characterized the binding of a series of heparin-derived oligosaccharides [heparin disaccharide (dp2), heparin tetrasaccharide (dp4), heparin octasaccharide (dp8) and heparin 14-mer (dp14)] to the wild-type (WT) dimer and a designed monomer using solution NMR spectroscopy. The pattern and extent of binding-induced chemical shift perturbation (CSP) varied between dimer and monomer and between longer and shorter oligosaccharides. NMR-based structural models show that different interaction modes coexist and that the nature of interactions varied between monomer and dimer and oligosaccharide length. MD simulations indicate that the binding interface is structurally plastic and provided residue-specific details of the dynamic nature of the binding interface. Binding studies carried out under conditions at which WT CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers provide unambiguous evidence that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. Together, our data indicate that a set of core residues function as the major recognition/binding site, a set of peripheral residues define the various binding geometries and that the structural plasticity of the binding interface allows multiplicity of binding interactions. We conclude that structural plasticity most probably regulates in vivo CXCL8 monomer/dimer–GAG interactions and function. PMID:26371375

  13. X-ray structure, NMR and stability-in-solution study of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine - A new active compound for cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walla, Jan; Szüčová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Doležal, Karel; Greplová, Jarmila; Massino, Frank J.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine ( 1) was determined at 150(2) K. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic P2 1/ c space group with a = 10.5642(2), b = 13.6174(3), c = 10.3742(2) Å, V = 1460.78(5) Å 3, Z = 4, R( F) = for 3344 unique reflections. The purine moiety and furfuryl ring are planar and the tetrahydropyran-2-yl is disordered in the ratio 1:3, probably due to the chiral carbon atom C(17). The individual 1H and 13C NMR signals were assigned by 2D correlation experiments such as 1H- 1H COSY and ge-2D HSQC. Stability-in-solution was determined in methanol/water in acidic pH (3-7).

  14. High-resolution solution structure of the beta chemokine hMIP-1 beta by multidimensional NMR.

    PubMed

    Lodi, P J; Garrett, D S; Kuszewski, J; Tsang, M L; Weatherbee, J A; Leonard, W J; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1994-03-25

    The three-dimensional structure of a member of the beta subfamily of chemokines, human macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (hMIP-1 beta), has been determined with the use of solution multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Human MIP-1 beta is a symmetric homodimer with a relative molecular mass of approximately 16 kilodaltons. The structure of the hMIP-1 beta monomer is similar to that of the related alpha chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). However, the quaternary structures of the two proteins are entirely distinct, and the dimer interface is formed by a completely different set of residues. Whereas the IL-8 dimer is globular, the hMIP-1 beta dimer is elongated and cylindrical. This provides a rational explanation for the absence of cross-binding and reactivity between the alpha and beta chemokine subfamilies. Calculation of the solvation free energies of dimerization suggests that the formation and stabilization of the two different types of dimers arise from the burial of hydrophobic residues. PMID:8134838

  15. Internal Nanoparticle Structure of Temperature-Responsive Self-Assembled PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM Triblock Copolymers in Aqueous Solutions: NMR, SANS, and Light Scattering Studies.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Bogomolova, Anna; Kaberov, Leonid; Velychkivska, Nadiia; Starovoytova, Larisa; Cernochova, Zulfiya; Rogers, Sarah E; Lau, Wing Man; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Cook, Michael T

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report detailed information on the internal structure of PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM nanoparticles formed from self-assembly in aqueous solutions upon increase in temperature. NMR spectroscopy, light scattering, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to monitor different stages of nanoparticle formation as a function of temperature, providing insight into the fundamental processes involved. The presence of PEG in a copolymer structure significantly affects the formation of nanoparticles, making their transition to occur over a broader temperature range. The crucial parameter that controls the transition is the ratio of PEG/PNIPAM. For pure PNIPAM, the transition is sharp; the higher the PEG/PNIPAM ratio results in a broader transition. This behavior is explained by different mechanisms of PNIPAM block incorporation during nanoparticle formation at different PEG/PNIPAM ratios. Contrast variation experiments using SANS show that the structure of nanoparticles above cloud point temperatures for PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM copolymers is drastically different from the structure of PNIPAM mesoglobules. In contrast with pure PNIPAM mesoglobules, where solidlike particles and chain network with a mesh size of 1-3 nm are present, nanoparticles formed from PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM copolymers have nonuniform structure with "frozen" areas interconnected by single chains in Gaussian conformation. SANS data with deuterated "invisible" PEG blocks imply that PEG is uniformly distributed inside of a nanoparticle. It is kinetically flexible PEG blocks which affect the nanoparticle formation by prevention of PNIPAM microphase separation. PMID:27159129

  16. Solution structures of active and inactive forms of the DP IV (CD26) inhibitor Pro-boroPro determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Günther, U L; Gutheil, W G; Coutts, S J; Snow, R J; Barton, R W; Bachovchin, W W

    1994-10-18

    Synthesis of the boronic acid analog of the dipeptide Pro-Pro yields a mixture of diastereomers Pro-L-boroPro and Pro-D-boroPro, one of which is a potent inhibitor [Ki = 16 pM; Gutheil, W. G., & Bachovchin, W. W. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 8723-8731] of dipeptidyl amino peptidase type IV (DP IV), also known as CD26. The structures of both diasteremers are determined here in aqueous solution by means of 1D and 2D NMR of 1H, 13C, and 11B, and force-field calculations, and the inhibitor is proven to have the L-L configuration. At low pH values (approximately 2), both diastereomers are trans with respect to the peptide bond. Populations of proline ring conformers are determined by pseudorotation analysis, using vicinal proton spin-coupling constants obtained by computer analysis of 1D1H NMR spectral fine structure. At neutral pH values, the Pro-boroPro inhibitor of DP IV undergoes slow, reversible inactivation (Gutheil & Bachovchin, 1993). By structural determination of the decomposition products of both diasteromers, the process is shown here to involve formation of a six-membered ring between the residues by means of trans-cis conversion and formation of a B-N bond, producing chiral nitrogen atoms in both cases having the S configuration. Analogy to cyclic dipeptides suggests the new compounds be named cyclo(Pro-L-boroPro) and cyclo(Pro-D-boroPro). PMID:7918465

  17. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  18. Solution structure of the carboxyl-terminal domain of RAP74 and NMR characterization of the FCP1-binding sites of RAP74 and human TFIIB.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Chen, Hung-Ta; Kobor, Michael S; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2003-02-18

    FCP1 (TFIIF-associated CTD phosphatase) is the only known phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNAP II. The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is strongly enhanced by the carboxyl-terminal domain of RAP74 (cterRAP74, residues 436-517), and this stimulatory effect of TFIIF can be blocked by TFIIB. It has been shown that cterRAP74 and the core domain of hTFIIB (TFIIBc, residues 112-316) directly interact with the carboxyl-terminal domain of hFCP1 (cterFCP, residues 879-961), and these interactions may be responsible for the regulatory activities of TFIIF and TFIIB on FCP1. We have determined the NMR solution structure of human cterRAP74, and we have used NMR methods to map the cterFCP-binding sites for both cterRAP74 and human TFIIB. We show that cterFCP binds to a groove of cterRAP74 between alpha-helices H2 and H3, without affecting the secondary structure of cterRAP74. We also show that cterFCP binds to a groove of TFIIBc between alpha-helices D1 and E1 in the first cyclin repeat. We find that the cterFCP-binding site of TFIIBc is very similar to the binding site for the HSV transcriptional activator protein VP16 on the first cyclin repeat of TFIIBc. The cterFCP-binding sites of both RAP74 and TFIIBc form shallow grooves on the protein surface, and they are both rich in hydrophobic and positively charged amino acid residues. These results provide new information about the recognition of acidic-rich activation domains involved in transcriptional regulation, and provide insights into how TFIIF and TFIIB regulate the FCP1 phosphatase activity in vivo. PMID:12578358

  19. NMR solution structure of the glucagon antagonist [desHis1, desPhe6, Glu9]glucagon amide in the presence of perdeuterated dodecylphosphocholine micelles.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Jacobsen, Neil E; Brown, Michael F; Hruby, Victor J

    2003-03-18

    Glucagon, a 29-residue peptide hormone, plays an important role in glucose homeostasis and in diabetes mellitus. Several glucagon antagonists and agonists have been developed, but limited structural information is available to clarify the basis of their biological activity. The solution structure of the potent glucagon antagonist, [desHis1, desPhe6, Glu9]glucagon amide, was determined by homonuclear 2D NMR spectroscopy at pH 6.0 and 37 degrees C in perdeuterated dodecylphosphocholine micelles. The overall backbone root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) for the structured portion (residues 7-29, glucagon numbering) of the micelle-bound 27-residue peptide is 1.36 A for the 15 lowest-energy structures, after restrained molecular dynamics simulation. The structure consists of four regions (segment backbone rmsd in A): an unstructured N-terminal segment between residues 2 and 5 (1.68), an irregular helix between residues 7 and 14 (0.79), a hinge region between residues 15 and 18 (0.54), and a well-defined alpha-helix between residues 19 and 29 (0.33). The two helices form an L-shaped structure with an angle of about 90 degrees between the helix axes. There is an extended hydrophobic cluster, which runs along the inner surface of the L-structure and incorporates the side chains of the hydrophobic residues of each of the amphipathic helices. The outer surface contains the hydrophilic side chains, with two salt bridges (D15-R18 and R17-D21) implied from close approach of the charged groups. This result is the first clear indication of an overall tertiary fold for a glucagon analogue in the micelle-bound state. The relationship of the two helical structural elements may have important implications for the biological activity of the glucagon antagonist. PMID:12627948

  20. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  1. Manganese Tetraboride, MnB4: High-Temperature Crystal Structure, p-n Transition, (55)Mn NMR Spectroscopy, Solid Solutions, and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Knappschneider, Arno; Litterscheid, Christian; Brgoch, Jakoah; George, Nathan C; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Hu, Jerry G; Seshadri, Ram; Albert, Barbara

    2015-05-26

    The structural and electronic properties of MnB4 were studied by high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction and measurements of the conductivity and Seebeck coefficient on spark-plasma-sintered samples. A transition from the room-temperature monoclinic structure (space group P2(1)/c) to a high-temperature orthorhombic structure (space group Pnnm) was observed at about 650 K. The material remained semiconducting after the transition, but its behavior changed from p-type to n-type. (55)Mn NMR measurements revealed an isotropic chemical shift of -1315 ppm, confirming an oxidation state of Mn close to I. Solid solutions of Cr(1-x)Mn(x)B4 (two phases in space groups Pnnm and P2(1)/c) were synthesized for the first time. In addition, nanoindentation studies yielded values of (496±26) and (25.3±1.7) GPa for the Young's modulus and hardness, respectively, compared to values of 530 and 37 GPa obtained by DFT calculations. PMID:25891681

  2. X-ray diffraction and (1)H NMR in solution: structural determination of lanthanide complexes of a Py(2)N(6)Ac(4) ligand.

    PubMed

    Valencia, L; Martinez, J; Macías, A; Bastida, R; Carvalho, R A; Geraldes, C F G C

    2002-10-01

    Complexes between the Py(2)N(6)Ac(4) (H(4)L) ligand containing four carboxylate pendant arms and trivalent lanthanide ions have been synthesized, and structural studies have been made both in the solid state and aqueous solution. The crystal structures of the La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu complexes, with chemical formulas [LaH(2)L](NO(3)).3H(2)O (1), [Ce(4)L(2)](NO(3))(4).30H(2)O (2), [SmHL].EtOH.3H(2)O (5), [TbHL].EtOH.3H(2)O (8), [DyHL].2EtOH.2H(2)O (9), [HoHL].3H(2)O (10), [ErHL].EtOH.3H(2)O (11) [TmHL].EtOH.3H(2)O (12), and [LuHL].3H(2)O (14), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. In the solid state, the complexes of the lighter lanthanide ions La(3+)-Dy(3+) show a 10-coordinated geometry close to a distorted bicapped antiprism, where the carboxylate pendants are situated alternatively above and below the best plane that contains the nitrogen donor atoms. The complexes of the heavier ions, Ho(3+)-Lu(3+), have a 9-coordinated geometry close to distorted tricapped trigonal prism, with one of the pendant carboxylate groups uncoordinated. The ligand is in a "twist-fold" conformation, where the twisting of the pyridine units is accompanied by an overall folding of the major ring of the macrocycle so that the pyridine nitrogen atoms and the metal are far from linear. The aqueous solution structures of the complexes were thoroughly characterized, the diamagnetic ones (La(3+) and Lu(3+)) by their COSY NMR spectra, and the paramagnetic complexes using a linear least-squares fitting of the (1)H LIS (lanthanide-induced shift) and LIR (lanthanide-induced relaxation) data with rhombic magnetic susceptibility tensors. The solution structures obtained for the La(3+)-Dy(3+) complexes (10-coordinate) and for the Tm(3+)-Lu(3+) complexes (9-coordinate) are in very good agreement with the corresponding crystal structures. However, the 10-coordinate structure is still exclusive in solution for the Ho(3+) complex and predominant for the Er(3

  3. Structure and lipid interactions of an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic 10 residue Class G* Apolipoprotein J peptide using solution NMR#

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod K.; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N.; Hudson, Jason S.; Shin, Ronald; Keenum, Tamara D.; Rama Krishna, N.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The surprising observation that a 10 residue class G* peptide from apolipoprotein J, [113-122]apoJ, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties prompted us to delineate its structural characteristics in the presence of normal and oxidized lipid. Towards this, we have determined high resolution structure of [113-122]apoJ in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and studied its interaction with lipids, including oxidized lipids, using a number of biophysical methods. Circular dichroism and NMR studies established that in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelle this peptide adopts amphipathic α helical structure. The observed Nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that the amphipathic helical structure of the peptide is stabilized by the N-terminal acetyl and C-terminal amide blocking groups. We used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure binding enthalpy of the peptide with DPC micelle, an oxidized lipid, 1-(palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine (KOdiA-PC), and the mixture of these two lipids (5mol% KOdiA-PC in DPC micelle). We find that the peptide binding with DPC micelle is associated with an enthalpy change (-16.75±0.16 Kcal/mol) much larger than that resulting from the binding with KodiA-PC (-3.67±0.13 Kcal/mol). Incorporation of a small amount of KOdiA-PC (5mol %) in DPC micelle also results in the lowering of peptide binding enthalpy (-13.43±0.18 Kcal/mol). These results are consistent with overall negative charge and altered conformational properties of oxidized sn-2 chain of KOdiA-PC. Our results have unambiguously established the amphipathic α helical structure of [113-122]apoJ peptide in the presence of DPC micelle as well as its ability to bind oxidized lipid. These in vitro results help explain the previously observed anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic properties of this peptide. PMID:20970404

  4. The NMR solution structure of the 30S ribosomal protein S27e encoded in gene RS27_ARCFU of Archaeoglobus fulgidis reveals a novel protein fold

    PubMed Central

    Herve du Penhoat, Catherine; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Shen, Yang; Liu, Gaohua; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Li, Zhaohui; Murray, Diana; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Archaeoglobus fulgidis gene RS27_ARCFU encodes the 30S ribosomal protein S27e. Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this archaeal protein, which comprises a C4 zinc finger motif of the CX2CX14-16CX2C class. S27e was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: GR2), and its three-dimensional structure is the first representative of a family of more than 116 homologous proteins occurring in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. As a salient feature of its molecular architecture, S27e exhibits a β-sandwich consisting of two three-stranded sheets with topology B(↓), A(↑), F(↓), and C(↑), D(↓), E(↑). Due to the uniqueness of the arrangement of the strands, the resulting fold was found to be novel. Residues that are highly conserved among the S27 proteins allowed identification of a structural motif of putative functional importance; a conserved hydrophobic patch may well play a pivotal role for functioning of S27 proteins, be it in archaeal or eukaryotic cells. The structure of human S27, which possesses a 26-residue amino-terminal extension when compared with the archaeal S27e, was modeled on the basis of two structural templates, S27e for the carboxy-terminal core and the amino-terminal segment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L37Ae for the extension. Remarkably, the electrostatic surface properties of archaeal and human proteins are predicted to be entirely different, pointing at either functional variations among archaeal and eukaryotic S27 proteins, or, assuming that the function remained invariant, to a concerted evolutionary change of the surface potential of proteins interacting with S27. PMID:15096641

  5. NMR of small solutes in liquid crystals and molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylihautala, Mika Petri

    The present thesis deals with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of small solutes applied to the studies of liquid crystals and molecular sieves. In this method, changes induced by the investigated environment to the static spectral parameters (i.e. nuclear shielding, indirect and direct spin-spin coupling and quadrupole coupling) of the solute are measured. The nuclear shielding of dissolved noble gases is utilized for the studies of thermotropic liquid crystals. The relation between the symmetry properties of mesophases and the nuclear shielding is described. The different interaction mechanisms perturbing the observed noble gas nuclear shielding are discussed, particularly, the role of long-range attractive van der Waals interactions is brought out. The suitability of the noble gas NMR spectroscopy to the studies of Iyotropic liquid crystals is investigated in terms of nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling interactions. In molecular sieve systems, the effect of inter- and intracrystalline motions of solutes on their NMR spectra is discussed. A novel method for the measurement of the intracrystalline motions is developed. The distinctions in the 13C shielding of methane adsorbed in AlPO4-11 and SAPO-11, two structurally similar molecular sieves differing in composition, are indicated.

  6. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  7. Delineation of conformational and structural features of the amikacin-Cu(II) complex in water solution by 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni; Marini, Domenico; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Manetti, Cesare; Delfini, Maurizio

    1998-12-01

    The copper (II) complex of amikacin in water solution at pH 5.5 was investigated by 13C-NMR. The temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rates was measured and fast exchange conditions were shown to apply. The motional correlation time of the complex was approximated by the pseudo-isotropic rotational correlation time of free amikacin in water solution ( τc=0.17 ns at 300 K). Formation of a pseudo-tetrahedral 1:1 complex was demonstrated by relaxation rates analysis and also by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Two amino nitrogens of amikacin, together with the amide nitrogen and the hydroxyl in the hydroxyl-aminopropyl carbonyl side chain, were assigned as the copper-binding sites and a model of the complex was built by using copper-carbon distances obtained by NMR analysis as input parameters.

  8. Structural characterization of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Harri; Hakala, Ullastiina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Decontamination solutions, which are usually composed of strong alkaline chemicals, are used for efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The analysis of CWA degradation products directly in decontamination solutions is challenging due to the nature of the matrix. Furthermore, occasionally an unforeseen degradation pathway can result in degradation products which could be eluded to in standard analyses. Here, we present the results of the application of proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy, i.e., band-selective 1D (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and band-selective 2D (1)H-(31)P HSQC-total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), for ester side chain characterization of organophosphorus nerve agent degradation products in decontamination solutions. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with a test mixture of typical degradation products of nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX. The proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy is also applied in characterization of unusual degradation products of VX in GDS 2000 solution. PMID:20507069

  9. 1H NMR studies of maltose, maltoheptaose, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, and complexes in aqueous solutions with hydroxy protons as structural probes.

    PubMed

    Bekiroglu, Somer; Kenne, Lennart; Sandström, Corine

    2003-03-01

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and exchange rates have been measured for the hydroxy protons of aqueous solutions of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, maltose, and maltoheptaose. In cyclodextrins (CDs), the high chemical shift of the O(3)H signal and its small (3)J(OH,CH) value suggest that O(3)H is involved in a hydrogen bond. The small temperature coefficients and rate of exchange values of O(2)H and O(3)H confirm the involvement of O(3)H in hydrogen bonding and indicate that O(2)H is the hydrogen bond partner. In maltose, two distinct NMR signals with two different vicinal coupling constants are found for O(2')H. A cross-peak in the ROESY spectrum indicates chemical exchange between the O(2')H and O(3)H protons. The existence of two distinct NMR signals with different J values for O(2')H shows the influence of anomeric configuration on the O(2')H-O(3)H interaction. The effect of complexation with methyl benzoate, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid, adamantane-1-ol, and l- and d-tryptophane on the NMR spectra of the hydroxy protons of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins and of maltose has been investigated. No significant spectral changes were observed upon addition of methyl benzoate and adamantane-1-carboxylic acid. The addition of adamantane-1-ol resulted in an upfield shift and a strong broadening of the O(2)H signal from alpha-CD, and a small temperature coefficient was measured upon complexation. The O(2)H and O(3)H signals in beta-CD were broadened and shifted downfield upon addition of l- and d-tryptophane. PMID:12608778

  10. Allochromatium vinosum DsrC: Solution-State NMR Structure, Redox Properties and Interaction with DsrEFH, a Protein Essential for Purple Sulfur Bacterial Sulfur Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Cort, John R.; Selan, Ute; Schulte, Andrea; Grimm, Frauke; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Sequenced genomes of dissimilatory sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria containing genes coding for DsrAB, the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, inevitably also contain the gene coding for the 12-kDa DsrC protein. DsrC is thought to have a yet unidentified role associated with the activity of DsrAB. Here we report the solution structure of DsrC from the sulfur-oxidizing purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum determined with NMR spectroscopy in reducing conditions, and describe the redox behavior of two conserved cysteine residues upon transfer to an oxidizing environment. In reducing conditions, the DsrC structure is disordered in the highly conserved carboxy-terminus. We present multiple lines of evidence that in oxidizing conditions, a strictly conserved cysteine (Cys111) at the penultimate position in the sequence forms an intramolecular disulfide bond with Cys100, which is conserved in DsrC in all organisms with DsrAB. While an intermolecular Cys111-Cys111 disulfide-bonded dimer is rapidly formed under oxidizing conditions, the intramolecularly disulfide-bonded species (Cys100-Cys111) is the thermodynamically stable form of the protein under these conditions. Treatment of the disulfidic forms with reducing agent regenerates the monomeric species that was structurally characterized. Using a band-shift technique under non-denaturing conditions evidence was obtained for interaction of DsrC with heterohexameric DsrEFH, a protein encoded in the same operon. Mutation of Cys100 to serine prevented formation of the DsrC species assigned as an intramolecular disulfide in oxidizing conditions, while still allowing formation of the intermolecular Cys111-Cys111 dimer. In the reduced form this mutant protein still interacted with DsrEFH. This was not the case for the Cys111Ser and the Cys100Ser/Cys111Ser mutants, both of which also did not form protein dimers. Our observations highlight the central importance of the carboxy-terminal Dsr

  11. NMR investigations of protein-carbohydrate interactions binding studies and refined three-dimensional solution structure of the complex between the B domain of wheat germ agglutinin and N,N', N"-triacetylchitotriose.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J F; Asensio, J L; García, J L; Laynez, J; Bruix, M; Wright, C; Siebert, H C; Gabius, H J; Cañada, F J; Jiménez-Barbero, J

    2000-07-01

    The specific interaction of the isolated B domain of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-B) with N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose has been analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The association constants for the binding of WGA-B to this trisaccharide have been determined from both 1H-NMR titration experiments and microcalorimetry methods. Entropy and enthalpy of binding have been obtained. The driving force for the binding process is provided by a negative DeltaH which is partially compensated by negative DeltaS. These negative signs indicate that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces are the major interactions stabilizing the complex. NOESY NMR experiments in water solution provided 327 protein proton-proton distance constraints. All the experimental constraints were used in a refinement protocol including restrained molecular dynamics in order to determine the refined solution conformation of this protein/carbohydrate complex. With regard to the NMR structure of the free protein, no important changes in the protein NOEs were observed, indicating that carbohydrate-induced conformational changes are small. The average backbone rmsd of the 35 refined structures was 1.05 A, while the heavy atom rmsd was 2.10 A. Focusing on the bound ligand, two different orientations of the trisaccharide within WGA-B binding site are possible. It can be deduced that both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts confer stability to both complexes. A comparison of the three-dimensional structure of WGA-B in solution to that reported in the solid state and to those deduced for hevein and pseudohevein in solution has also been performed. PMID:10866795

  12. New methods of structure refinement for macromolecular structure determination by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Clore, G. Marius; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in multidimensional NMR methodology have permitted solution structures of proteins in excess of 250 residues to be solved. In this paper, we discuss several methods of structure refinement that promise to increase the accuracy of macromolecular structures determined by NMR. These methods include the use of a conformational database potential and direct refinement against three-bond coupling constants, secondary 13C shifts, 1H shifts, T1/T2 ratios, and residual dipolar couplings. The latter two measurements provide long range restraints that are not accessible by other solution NMR parameters. PMID:9600889

  13. Structural model of the transmembrane Fo rotary sector of H+-transporting ATP synthase derived by solution NMR and intersubunit cross-linking in situ.

    PubMed

    Fillingame, Robert H; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2002-10-11

    H(+)-transporting, F(1)F(o)-type ATP synthases utilize a transmembrane H(+) potential to drive ATP formation by a rotary catalytic mechanism. ATP is formed in alternating beta subunits of the extramembranous F(1) sector of the enzyme, synthesis being driven by rotation of the gamma subunit in the center of the F(1) molecule between the alternating catalytic sites. The H(+) electrochemical potential is thought to drive gamma subunit rotation by first coupling H(+) transport to rotation of an oligomeric rotor of c subunits within the transmembrane F(o) sector. The gamma subunit is forced to turn with the c-oligomeric rotor due to connections between subunit c and the gamma and epsilon subunits of F(1). In this essay we will review recent studies on the Escherichia coli F(o) sector. The monomeric structure of subunit c, determined by NMR, shows that subunit c folds in a helical hairpin with the proton carrying Asp(61) centered in the second transmembrane helix (TMH). A model for the structural organization of the c(10) oligomer in F(o) was deduced from extensive cross-linking studies and by molecular modeling. The model indicates that the H(+)-carrying carboxyl of subunit c is occluded between neighboring subunits of the c(10) oligomer and that two c subunits pack in a "front-to-back" manner to form the H(+) (cation) binding site. In order for protons to gain access to Asp(61) during the protonation/deprotonation cycle, we propose that the outer, Asp(61)-bearing TMH-2s of the c-ring and TMHs from subunits composing the inlet and outlet channels must turn relative to each other, and that the swiveling motion associated with Asp(61) protonation/deprotonation drives the rotation of the c-ring. The NMR structures of wild-type subunit c differs according to the protonation state of Asp(61). The idea that the conformational state of subunit c changes during the catalytic cycle is supported by the cross-linking evidence in situ, and two recent NMR structures of functional

  14. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  15. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  16. A method for helical RNA global structure determination in solution using small-angle x-ray scattering and NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbu; Zuo, Xiaobing; Yu, Ping; Xu, Huan; Starich, Mary R; Tiede, David M; Shapiro, Bruce A; Schwieters, Charles D; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2009-10-30

    We report a "top-down" method that uses mainly duplexes' global orientations and overall molecular dimension and shape restraints, which were extracted from experimental NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering data, respectively, to determine global architectures of RNA molecules consisting of mostly A-form-like duplexes. The method is implemented in the G2G (from global measurement to global structure) toolkit of programs. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method by determining the global structure of a 71-nt RNA using experimental data. The backbone root-mean-square deviation of the ensemble of the calculated global structures relative to the X-ray crystal structure is 3.0+/-0.3 A using the experimental data and is only 2.5+/-0.2 A for the three duplexes that were orientation restrained during the calculation. The global structure simplifies interpretation of multidimensional nuclear Overhauser spectra for high-resolution structure determination. The potential general application of the method for RNA structure determination is discussed. PMID:19666030

  17. Solution NMR studies of recombinant Aβ(1-42): from the presence of a micellar entity to residual β-sheet structure in the soluble species.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Orts, Julien; Vögeli, Beat; Campioni, Silvia; Riek, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is the major component found in senile plaques of Alzheimer's disease patients. The 42-residue fragment Aβ(1-42) is proposed to be one of the most pathogenic species therein. Here, the soluble Aβ(1-42) species were analyzed by various liquid-state NMR methods. Transient formation of a micelle species was observed at the onset of the aggregation kinetics. This micelle is dissolved after approximately one day. Subsequent loss of this species and the formation of protofibrils are proposed to be the route of fibril formation. Consequently, the observed micelle species is suggested to be on an off-pathway mechanism. Furthermore, characterization of the NMR-observable soluble species shows that it is a random-coil-like entity with low propensities for four β-strands. These β-strands correlate with the β-strand segments observed in Aβ fibrils. This finding indicates that the 3D structure of the fibrils might already be predisposed in the soluble species. PMID:25676345

  18. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  19. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  20. Solution NMR of membrane proteins in bilayer mimics: Small is beautiful, but sometimes bigger is better

    PubMed Central

    Poget, Sébastien F.; Girvin, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently on solution NMR studies of multi-transmembrane helix membrane protein systems of increasing size. Careful correlation of structure with function has validated the physiological relevance of these studies in detergent micelles. However, larger micelle and bicelle systems are sometimes required to stabilize the active forms of dynamic membrane proteins, such as the bacterial small multidrug resistance transporters. Even in these systems with aggregate molecular weights well over 100 kDa, solution NMR structural studies are feasible – but challenging. PMID:17961504

  1. Solution NMR of membrane proteins in bilayer mimics: small is beautiful, but sometimes bigger is better.

    PubMed

    Poget, Sébastien F; Girvin, Mark E

    2007-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently on solution NMR studies of multi-transmembrane helix membrane protein systems of increasing size. Careful correlation of structure with function has validated the physiological relevance of these studies in detergent micelles. However, larger micelle and bicelle systems are sometimes required to stabilize the active forms of dynamic membrane proteins, such as the bacterial small multidrug resistance transporters. Even in these systems with aggregate molecular weights well over 100 kDa, solution NMR structural studies are feasible-but challenging. PMID:17961504

  2. Solid state NMR strategy for characterizing native membrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Das, Nabanita; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-09-17

    Unlike water soluble proteins, the structures of helical transmembrane proteins depend on a very complex environment. These proteins sit in the midst of dramatic electrical and chemical gradients and are often subject to variations in the lateral pressure profile, order parameters, dielectric constant, and other properties. Solid state NMR is a collection of tools that can characterize high resolution membrane protein structure in this environment. Indeed, prior work has shown that this complex environment significantly influences transmembrane protein structure. Therefore, it is important to characterize such structures under conditions that closely resemble its native environment. Researchers have used two approaches to gain protein structural restraints via solid state NMR spectroscopy. The more traditional approach uses magic angle sample spinning to generate isotropic chemical shifts, much like solution NMR. As with solution NMR, researchers can analyze the backbone chemical shifts to obtain torsional restraints. They can also examine nuclear spin interactions between nearby atoms to obtain distances between atomic sites. Unfortunately, for membrane proteins in lipid preparations, the spectral resolution is not adequate to obtain complete resonance assignments. Researchers have developed another approach for gaining structural restraints from membrane proteins: the use of uniformly oriented lipid bilayers, which provides a method for obtaining high resolution orientational restraints. When the bilayers are aligned with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer, researchers can obtain orientational restraints in which atomic sites in the protein are restrained relative to the alignment axis. However, this approach does not allow researchers to determine the relative packing between helices. By combining the two approaches, we can take advantage of the information acquired from each technique to minimize the challenges and maximize the quality of the

  3. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  4. Solution- and solid-state NMR studies of GPCRs and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Goddard, Alan D; Oates, Joanne; Willis, Christine L; Watts, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the major targets of new drugs on the market given their roles as key membrane receptors in many cellular signalling pathways. Structure-based drug design has potential to be the most reliable method for novel drug discovery. Unfortunately, GPCR-ligand crystallisation for X-ray diffraction studies is very difficult to achieve. However, solution- and solid-state NMR approaches have been developed and have provided new insights, particularly focussing on the study of protein-ligand interactions which are vital for drug discovery. This review provides an introduction for new investigators of GPCRs/ligand interactions using NMR spectroscopy. The guidelines for choosing a system for efficient isotope labelling of GPCRs and their ligands for NMR studies will be presented, along with an overview of the different sample environments suitable for generation of high resolution structural information from NMR spectra. PMID:20951674

  5. MOTOR: model assisted software for NMR structure determination.

    PubMed

    Schieborr, Ulrich; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Elshorst, Bettina; Maurer, Marcus; Saxena, Krishna; Stehle, Tanja; Kudlinzki, Denis; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Schwalbe, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic proteins with important biological function can be partially unstructured, conformational flexible, or heterogenic. Crystallization trials often fail for such proteins. In NMR spectroscopy, parts of the polypeptide chain undergoing dynamics in unfavorable time regimes cannot be observed. De novo NMR structure determination is seriously hampered when missing signals lead to an incomplete chemical shift assignment resulting in an information content of the NOE data insufficient to determine the structure ab initio. We developed a new protein structure determination strategy for such cases based on a novel NOE assignment strategy utilizing a number of model structures but no explicit reference structure as it is used for bootstrapping like algorithms. The software distinguishes in detail between consistent and mutually exclusive pairs of possible NOE assignments on the basis of different precision levels of measured chemical shifts searching for a set of maximum number of consistent NOE assignments in agreement with 3D space. Validation of the method using the structure of the low molecular-weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase A (MptpA) showed robust results utilizing protein structures with 30-45% sequence identity and 70% of the chemical shift assignments. About 60% of the resonance assignments are sufficient to identify those structural models with highest conformational similarity to the real structure. The software was benchmarked by de novo solution structures of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and the extracellular fibroblast growth factor receptor domain FGFR4 D2, which both failed in crystallization trials and in classical NMR structure determination. PMID:23852655

  6. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. An investigation of the structure and bond rotational potential of some fluorinated ethanes by NMR spectroscopy of solutions in nematic liquid crystalline solvents.

    PubMed

    Emsley, J W; Longeri, M; Merlet, D; Pileio, G; Suryaprakash, N

    2006-06-01

    NMR spectra of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane and 1-bromo-2-iodo-tetrafluoroethane dissolved in nematic liquid crystalline solvents have been analysed to yield the magnitudes and signs of the scalar couplings, J(ij), and total anisotropic couplings, T(ij), between all the (1)H, (19)F, and (13)C nuclei, except for those between two (13)C nuclei. The values obtained for T(ij) in principle contain a contribution from J(ij)(aniso), the component along the static applied magnetic field of the anisotropic part of the electron-mediated spin-spin coupling. Neglecting this contribution allows partially averaged dipolar couplings, D(ij), to be extracted from the T(ij), and these were used to determine the structure, orientational order, and the conformational distribution generated by rotation about the C-C bond. The values obtained are compared with the results of calculations by ab initio and density functional methods. The differences found are no greater than those obtained for similar compounds which do not contain fluorine, so that there is no definitive evidence for significant contributions from J(CF)(aniso) or J(FF)(aniso) in the two compounds studied. PMID:16554180

  8. An investigation of the structure and bond rotational potential of some fluorinated ethanes by NMR spectroscopy of solutions in nematic liquid crystalline solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsley, J. W.; Longeri, M.; Merlet, D.; Pileio, G.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2006-06-01

    NMR spectra of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane and 1-bromo-2-iodo-tetrafluoroethane dissolved in nematic liquid crystalline solvents have been analysed to yield the magnitudes and signs of the scalar couplings, Jij, and total anisotropic couplings, Tij, between all the 1H, 19F, and 13C nuclei, except for those between two 13C nuclei. The values obtained for Tij in principle contain a contribution from Jijaniso, the component along the static applied magnetic field of the anisotropic part of the electron-mediated spin-spin coupling. Neglecting this contribution allows partially averaged dipolar couplings, Dij, to be extracted from the Tij, and these were used to determine the structure, orientational order, and the conformational distribution generated by rotation about the C-C bond. The values obtained are compared with the results of calculations by ab initio and density functional methods. The differences found are no greater than those obtained for similar compounds which do not contain fluorine, so that there is no definitive evidence for significant contributions from JCFaniso or JFFaniso in the two compounds studied.

  9. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Acton, Thomas B.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta.1 Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints, have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the RPF scores. Upon further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared to the X-ray structure MR performance were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures, demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of non-bivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in NMR structures with improved MR performance PMID:18816799

  10. NMR studies of structure and dynamics in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Stark, R E; Yan, B; Ray, A K; Chen, Z; Fang, X; Garbow, J R

    2000-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are support polymers involved in waterproofing the leaves and fruits of higher plants, regulating the flow of nutrients among various plant organs, and minimizing the deleterious impact of microbial pathogens. Despite the complexity and intractable nature of these plant biopolyesters, their molecular structure and development are amenable to study by suitable solid-state and solution-state NMR techniques. Interactions of tomato cutin with water were examined by solid-state 2H and 13C NMR, showing that water films enhance rapid segmental motions of the acyl chains and are associated with a fivefold increase in surface elasticity upon cutin hydration. The suberization of wounded potato tissues was studied by solid-state 13C NMR, revealing the likely phenylpropanoid structures that permit dense cross-linking of the suberin structure and their proximity to the cell-wall polysaccharides. Finally, two new approaches were developed to elucidate the molecular structures of these biopolymers: partial depolymerization followed by spectroscopic analysis of the soluble oligomers; and swelling of the intact materials followed by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR analysis. PMID:10811427

  11. High resolution 1H NMR of a lipid cubic phase using a solution NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle-Roden, E.; Hoefer, N.; Dey, K. K.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Caffrey, M.

    2007-11-01

    The cubic mesophase formed by monoacylglycerols and water is an important medium for the in meso crystallogenesis of membrane proteins. To investigate molecular level lipid and additive interactions within the cubic phase, a method was developed for improving the resolution of 1H NMR spectra when using a conventional solution state NMR probe. Using this approach we obtained well-resolved J-coupling multiplets in the one-dimensional NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase prepared with hydrated monoolein. A high resolution t-ROESY two-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase is also reported. Using this new methodology, we have investigated the interaction of two additive molecules, L-tryptophan and ruthenium-tris(2,2-bipyridyl) dichloride (rubipy), with the cubic mesophase. Based on the measured chemical shift differences when changing from an aqueous solution to the cubic phase, we conclude that L-tryptophan experiences specific interactions with the bilayer interface, whereas rubipy remains in the aqueous channels and does not associate with the lipid bilayer.

  12. Solution NMR structure of the Ca2+-bound N-terminal domain of CaBP7: a regulator of golgi trafficking.

    PubMed

    McCue, Hannah V; Patel, Pryank; Herbert, Andrew P; Lian, Lu-Yun; Burgoyne, Robert D; Haynes, Lee P

    2012-11-01

    Calcium-binding protein 7 (CaBP7) is a member of the calmodulin (CaM) superfamily that harbors two high affinity EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. CaBP7 has been previously shown to interact with and modulate phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-β (PI4KIIIβ) activity in in vitro assays and affects vesicle transport in neurons when overexpressed. Here we show that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of CaBP7 is sufficient to mediate the interaction of CaBP7 with PI4KIIIβ. CaBP7 NTD encompasses the two high affinity Ca(2+) binding sites, and structural characterization through multiangle light scattering, circular dichroism, and NMR reveals unique properties for this domain. CaBP7 NTD binds specifically to Ca(2+) but not Mg(2+) and undergoes significant conformational changes in both secondary and tertiary structure upon Ca(2+) binding. The Ca(2+)-bound form of CaBP7 NTD is monomeric and exhibits an open conformation similar to that of CaM. Ca(2+)-bound CaBP7 NTD has a solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface that is more expansive than observed in CaM or CaBP1. Within this hydrophobic pocket, there is a significant reduction in the number of methionine residues that are conserved in CaM and CaBP1 and shown to be important for target recognition. In CaBP7 NTD, these residues are replaced with isoleucine and leucine residues with branched side chains that are intrinsically more rigid than the flexible methionine side chain. We propose that these differences in surface hydrophobicity, charge, and methionine content may be important in determining highly specific interactions of CaBP7 with target proteins, such as PI4KIIIβ. PMID:22989873

  13. The Local Structural State of Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions: An Investigation of Grospydite Garnet from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite Using Paramagnetically Shifted 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most rock-forming silicates are substitutional solid solutions. Over the years extensive research has been done to determine their structural and crystal chemical properties. Here, the distribution of cations, or order-disorder behavior, is of central importance. In the case of aluminosilicate garnet solid solutions (X3Al2Si3O12 with X = Mg, Fe2+, Mn2+ and Ca) it has been shown that both synthetic and natural crystals have random long-range X-cation disorder in space group Ia-3d, as given by X-ray single-crystal diffraction measurements. However, the structural state of natural garnets at the local scale is not known. Garnet from a grospydite xenolith from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, South Africa, was studied by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. The research thrust was placed on measuring and analyzing paramagnetically shifted resonances to determine the local (short range) structural state of the X-cations in a grossular-rich ternary aluminosilicate garnet solid solution. The garnet crystals are compositionally homogeneous based on microprobe analysis, showing no measurable zoning, and have the formula Grs46.7Prp30.0Alm23.3. The garnet is cubic with the standard garnet space group Ia-3d. The 27Al MAS NMR spectrum shows a very broad asymmetric resonance located between about 100 and -50 ppm. It consists of a number of individual overlapping paramagnetically shifted resonances, which are difficult to analyze quantitatively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectrum, showing better resolution, has two observable resonances termed S0 and S4. S0 is located between about -60 ppm and -160 ppm and S4 is centered at roughly 95 ppm. Both S0 and S4 are composite resonances in nature containing many overlapping individual peaks. S0 contains information on local cation configurations whereby an isolated SiO4 group in the garnet structure does not have an edge-shared Fe2+-containing dodecahedron. S4 involves local configurations where there is one edge-shared dodecahedron containing Fe2

  14. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  15. Solution NMR structure of putidaredoxin-cytochrome P450cam complex via a combined residual dipolar coupling-spin labeling approach suggests a role for Trp106 of putidaredoxin in complex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Pochapsky, Susan S; Pochapsky, Thomas C; Jain, Nitin U

    2008-12-12

    The 58-kDa complex formed between the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, putidaredoxin (Pdx), and cytochrome P450cam (CYP101) from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida has been investigated by high-resolution solution NMR spectroscopy. Pdx serves as both the physiological reductant and effector for CYP101 in the enzymatic reaction involving conversion of substrate camphor to 5-exo-hydroxycamphor. In order to obtain an experimental structure for the oxidized Pdx-CYP101 complex, a combined approach using orientational data on the two proteins derived from residual dipolar couplings and distance restraints from site-specific spin labeling of Pdx has been applied. Spectral changes for residues in and near the paramagnetic metal cluster region of Pdx in complex with CYP101 have also been mapped for the first time using (15)N and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, leading to direct identification of the residues strongly affected by CYP101 binding. The new NMR structure of the Pdx-CYP101 complex agrees well with results from previous mutagenesis and biophysical studies involving residues at the binding interface such as formation of a salt bridge between Asp38 of Pdx and Arg112 of CYP101, while at the same time identifying key features different from those of earlier modeling studies. Analysis of the binding interface of the complex reveals that the side chain of Trp106, the C-terminal residue of Pdx and critical for binding to CYP101, is located across from the heme-binding loop of CYP101 and forms non-polar contacts with several residues in the vicinity of the heme group on CYP101, pointing to a potentially important role in complex formation. PMID:18835276

  16. The three-dimensional NMR-solution structure of the polypeptide fragment 195-286 of the LFB1/HNF1 transcription factor from rat liver comprises a nonclassical homeodomain.

    PubMed Central

    Leiting, B; De Francesco, R; Tomei, L; Cortese, R; Otting, G; Wüthrich, K

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional backbone fold of a polypeptide fragment from the rat LFB1/HNF1 transcription factor was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in solution. This fragment contains an amino acid sequence that is approximately 22% homologous to the well known homeodomains, but which contains 81 amino acid residues as compared with 60 residues in 'typical' homeodomains. For the present studies we used a recombinant 99 amino acid polypeptide containing this sequence in positions 10-90, which was uniformly labelled with 15N and also doubly labelled with 15N and 13C. The NMR structure of this polypeptide contains three alpha-helices comprising the residues 18-29, 36-50 and 71-84, a loop formed by residues 30-35, and a long stretch of non-regular secondary structure linking the second and third helices. The relative location and orientation of the helices is very similar to that in the Antennapedia (Antp) homeodomain structure, despite the fact that helix II is elongated by about one turn. This confirms a recently advanced hypothesis based on sequence comparisons that this polypeptide segment of LFB1/HNF1 might represent a homeodomain-like structural element. The helix-turn-helix motif, which has been shown to comprise the DNA recognition helix in the Antp homeodomain, can readily be recognized in the LFB1/HNF1 homeodomain, in spite of an extensive modification of the primary structure. The two residues of the tight turn in the Antp homeodomain are replaced by a 23 residue linker region between the two helices in LFB1/HNF1, which bulges out from the rest of the molecule and thus enables the formation of a non-classical helix--turn--helix motif. Images PMID:8491172

  17. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  18. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future. PMID:26920831

  19. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  20. Solid-state structure and solution conformation of the nootropic agent N[2-( N,N-Diisopropylamino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate. X-ray and homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandoli, Giuliano; Nicolini, Marino; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno

    1987-04-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the nootropic agent N-[2-( N,N-diisopropyl-amino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate was determined by X-ray analysis. The conformational properties in the solution state were deduced from the 1H-NMR spectrum run in 2H 2O at 500 MHz. Spectral assignments were made with the aid of the COSY 45 shift correlation experiment. Crystals were triclinic with unit cell dimensions a = 13.410(10), b = 11.382(8), c = 6.697(4) », α = 83.80(3), β = 88.61(3)and γ = 72.25(6)° ; space group Poverline1. The structure was determined from 1047 three-dimensional counter data and refined to a value of 7.5% for the conventional discrepancy factor R. One molecule of the solvent acetonitrile is incorporated per two of the (C 14H 28N 3O 2) +-(HSO 4) -. The five-membered heterocyclic ring is in an envelope ( Cs) conformation and the "flap" atom deviates by 0.31 » from the plane of the other four. This plane forms a dihedral angle of 71.4° with the amide group, with the CO fragment directed toward the ring. All bond angles and distances are in good agreement with expected standard values. A strong OH⋯O intermolecular bond (2.61 ») links the cation of the hydrogen-sulphate anion, while the loosely held MeCN molecule is trapped in the polar pockets. The molecular conformation in the solid was compared with results from 1H NMR spectral analysis which showed that in solution wide torsional oscillations can occur about the bonds of the chain bonded to the N(1) atom.

  1. NMR structure improvement: A structural bioinformatics & visualization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Jeremy N.

    The overall goal of this project is to enhance the physical accuracy of individual models in macromolecular NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) structures and the realism of variation within NMR ensembles of models, while improving agreement with the experimental data. A secondary overall goal is to combine synergistically the best aspects of NMR and crystallographic methodologies to better illuminate the underlying joint molecular reality. This is accomplished by using the powerful method of all-atom contact analysis (describing detailed sterics between atoms, including hydrogens); new graphical representations and interactive tools in 3D and virtual reality; and structural bioinformatics approaches to the expanded and enhanced data now available. The resulting better descriptions of macromolecular structure and its dynamic variation enhances the effectiveness of the many biomedical applications that depend on detailed molecular structure, such as mutational analysis, homology modeling, molecular simulations, protein design, and drug design.

  2. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  3. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  4. The Use of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles in Solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallick, D. A.; Tessmer, M. R.; Watts, C. R.; Li, C. Y.

    Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles are useful as a model membrane system for solution NMR. Several new observations on dodecylphosphocholine micelles and their interactions with opioid peptides are described. The optimal lipid concentration has been investigated for small peptide NMR studies in DPC micelles for two opioid peptides, a 5-mer and a 17-mer. In contrast to reports in the literature, identical 2D spectra have been observed at low and high lipid concentrations. The chemical shift of resolved peptide proton resonances has been followed as a function of added lipid and indicates that there are changes in the chemical shifts above the critical micelle concentration and up to a ratio of 7:1 (lipid:peptide) for the 17-mer, and 9.6:1 for the 5-mer. These results suggest that conformational changes occur in the peptide significantly above the critical micelle concentration, up to a lipid:peptide ratio which is dependent upon the peptide, here ranging from 7:1 to 9.6:1. To address the stoichiometry more directly, the diffusion coefficients of the lipid alone and the lipid with peptide have been measured using pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR experiments. These data have been used to calculate the hydrodynamic radius and the aggregation number of the micelle with and without peptide and show that the aggregation number of the peptide-lipid complex increases at high lipid concentrations without a concomitant change in the peptide conformation. Last, several protonated impurities have been observed in the commercial preparation of DPC which resonate in the amide proton region of the NMR spectrum. These results are significant for researchers using DPC micelles and illustrate that both care in sample preparation and the stoichiometry are important issues with the use of DPC as a model membrane.

  5. Expression and Purification of Src-family Kinases for Solution NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Cowburn, David; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2012-01-01

    Summary NMR analyses of the structure, dynamics and interactions of the Src family kinases (SFKs) have been hindered by the limited ability to obtain sufficient amounts of properly folded, soluble protein from bacterial expression systems, to allow these studies to be performed in an economically viable manner. In this chapter we detail our attempts to overcome these difficulties using the catalytic domain (SrcCD) of c-Src, the prototypical SFK, as an illustrative example. We describe in detail two general methods to express and purify SrcCD from E. coli expression systems in both fully active wild-type and kinase-deficient mutant forms, allowing the efficient and cost-effective labeling by NMR-active isotopes for solution NMR studies. PMID:22167671

  6. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  7. Mesh size analysis of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels using solute exclusion and PFG-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jowkarderis, Leila; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-12-21

    The pore structure of TEMPO-mediated oxidized CNF hydrogels, chemically cross-linked with water-soluble diamines, is studied. A solute exclusion method and pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used to estimate the mesh size distribution in the gel network in its hydrated state. Dextran fractions with the nominal molecular weights in the range of 10-2000 kDa are used as probes. The results show a nonuniform network structure, consisting of a group of large openings that contain ∼50% of water, and regions with a more compact structure and smaller mesh units that restrict the diffusivity of the dextran molecules. A biexponential model is proposed for the NMR echo amplitude decay due to the probe diffusion into the gel network. A typical single exponential model does not fit the experimental data when the probe molecular size is comparable to the network mesh size. The results obtained with NMR, using the proposed biexponential model, are in very good agreement with those determined with solute exclusion. Precise mesh size estimation with solute exclusion using pore models is subject to restrictions, and vary with the assumed pore geometry. The average mesh size obtained using a spherical pore model, ∼35 nm, in the compact regions of the hydrogel, is in good agreement with the theoretical value in a network of rodlike particles. Neglecting the wall effects leads to underestimation of the mesh size with both techniques. PMID:26417984

  8. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  9. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed – neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  10. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  11. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  12. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  13. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  14. NMR Structure of a Viral Peptide Inserted in Artificial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galloux, Marie; Libersou, Sonia; Alves, Isabel D.; Marquant, Rodrigue; Salgado, Gilmar F.; Rezaei, Human; Lepault, Jean; Delmas, Bernard; Bouaziz, Serge; Morellet, Nelly

    2010-01-01

    Nonenveloped virus must penetrate the cellular membrane to access the cytoplasm without the benefit of membrane fusion. For birnavirus, one of the peptides present in the virus capsid, pep46 for infectious bursal disease virus, is able to induce pores into membranes as an intermediate step of the birnavirus-penetration pathway. Using osmotic protection experiments, we demonstrate here that pep46 and its pore-forming N-terminal moiety (pep22) form pores of different diameters, 5–8 and 2–4 nm, respectively, showing that both pep46 moieties participate to pore formation. The solution structures of pep46, pep22, and pep24 (the pep46 C-terminal moiety) in different hydrophobic environments and micelles determined by 1H NMR studies provide structural insights of the pep46 domain interaction. In CDCl3/CD3OH mixture and in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the N-terminal domain of pep46 is structured in a long kinked helix, although the C terminus is structured in one or two helices depending upon the solvents used. We also show that the folding and the proline isomerization status of pep46 depend on the type of hydrophobic environment. NMR spectroscopy with labeled phospholipid micelles, differential scanning calorimetry, and plasmon waveguide resonance studies show the peptides lie parallel to the lipid-water interface, perturbing the fatty acid chain packing. All these data lead to a model in which the two domains of pep46 interact with the membrane to form pores. PMID:20385550

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR OF UNFRACTIONATED PLANT CELL WALLS: POTENTIAL FOR BIOMASS SELECTION AND PROCESS OPTIMIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With new methods for dissolution of,...

  16. Three-dimensional structure of the complexes of ribonuclease A with 2',5'-CpA and 3',5'-d(CpA) in aqueous solution, as obtained by NMR and restrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Toiron, C.; González, C.; Bruix, M.; Rico, M.

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the complexes of ribonuclease A with cytidyl-2',5'-adenosine (2',5'-CpA) and deoxycytidyl-3',5'-deoxyadenosine [3',5'-d(CpA)] in aqueous solution has been determined by 1H NMR methods in combination with restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty-three intermolecular NOE cross-corrections for the 3',5'-d(CpA) complex and 19 for the 2',5'-CpA, together with about 1,000 intramolecular NOEs assigned for each complex, were translated into distance constraints and used in the calculation. No significant changes in the global structure of the enzyme occur upon complex formation. The side chains of His 12, Thr 45, His 119, and the amide backbone group of Phe 120 are involved directly in the binding of the ligands at the active site. The conformation of the two bases is anti in the two complexes, but differs from the crystal structure in the conformation of the two sugar rings in 3',5'-d(CpA), shown to be in the S-type region, as deduced from an analysis of couplings between the ribose protons. His 119 is found in the two complexes in only one conformation, corresponding to position A in the free protein. Side chains of Asn 67, Gln 69, Asn 71, and Glu 111 from transient hydrogen bonds with the adenine base, showing the existence of a pronounced flexibility of these enzyme side chains at the binding site of the downstream adenine. All other general features on the structures coincide clearly with those observed in the crystal state. PMID:8844852

  17. Structural heterogeneity in microcrystalline ubiquitin studied by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Shi, Chaowei; Giller, Karin; Wolff, Sebastian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By applying [1-13C]- and [2-13C]-glucose labeling schemes to the folded globular protein ubiquitin, a strong reduction of spectral crowding and increase in resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectra could be achieved. This allowed spectral resonance assignment in a straightforward manner and the collection of a wealth of long-range distance information. A high precision solid-state NMR structure of microcrystalline ubiquitin was calculated with a backbone rmsd of 1.57 to the X-ray structure and 1.32 Å to the solution NMR structure. Interestingly, we can resolve structural heterogeneity as the presence of three slightly different conformations. Structural heterogeneity is most significant for the loop region β1-β2 but also for β-strands β1, β2, β3, and β5 as well as for the loop connecting α1 and β3. This structural polymorphism observed in the solid-state NMR spectra coincides with regions that showed dynamics in solution NMR experiments on different timescales. PMID:25644665

  18. Solution NMR characterization of Sgf73(1-104) indicates that Zn ion is required to stabilize zinc finger motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chaohua; Wu, Minhao; Li, Pan; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Zang, Jianye

    2010-07-02

    Zinc finger motif contains a zinc ion coordinated by several conserved amino acid residues. Yeast Sgf73 protein was identified as a component of SAGA (Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase) multi-subunit complex and Sgf73 protein was known to contain two zinc finger motifs. Sgf73(1-104), containing the first zinc finger motif, was necessary to modulate the deubiquitinase activity of SAGA complex. Here, Sgf73(1-104) was over-expressed using bacterial expression system and purified for solution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) structural studies. Secondary structure and site-specific relaxation analysis of Sgf73(1-104) were achieved after solution NMR backbone assignment. Solution NMR and circular dichroism analysis of Sgf73(1-104) after zinc ion removal using chelation reagent EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid) demonstrated that zinc ion was required to maintain stable conformation of the zinc finger motif.

  19. Optimization and stabilization of Rho small GTPase proteins for solution NMR studies: The case of Rnd1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Buck, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Rho GTPases of the Ras superfamily have important roles in regulating the organization of the actin filament system, morphogenesis and migration of cells. Structural details for these proteins are still emerging, and information on their dynamics in solution is much needed to understand the mechanisms underlying their signaling functions. This report reviews conditions for solution NMR studies of Rho GTPases and describes our optimization and stabilization of Rnd1 for such experiments. Rnd1 belongs to the Rnd protein subfamily branch of Rho small GTPases and functions in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development and in axon guidance. However, as we report here, solution NMR studies of this protein are challenging. Multiple methods have been employed to enhance the stability of Rnd1, including by cleavage of an N-terminal His expression tag and by addition of non-hydrolysable GMPPNP (β: γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate) nucleotide. Further stabilization of Rnd1 against aggregation was achieved through a structure informed point mutation while maintaining its conformation and binding affinity for a partner protein. The NMR spectrum of the optimized protein reveals significant improvement in NMR signal dispersion and intensity. This work paves the way for structural and protein-protein/protein-ligand interaction studies of Rnd1 by solution NMR and also provides a guide for optimization and stabilization of other Rho GTPases. PMID:22545226

  20. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  1. Solution NMR of a 463-Residue Phosphohexomutase: Domain 4 Mobility, Substates, and Phosphoryl Transfer Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Akella V. S.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Kelm, Allek; Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Wei, Yirui; Qin, Peiwu; Lee, Yingying; Berjanskii, Mark V.; Mick, Jacob A.; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2012-01-05

    Phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase contributes to the infectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, retains and reorients its intermediate by 180°, and rotates domain 4 to close the deep catalytic cleft. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the backbone of wild-type and S108C-inactivated enzymes were assigned to at least 90%. 13C secondary chemical shifts report excellent agreement of solution and crystallographic structure over the 14 α-helices, C-capping motifs, and 20 of the 22 β-strands. Major and minor NMR peaks implicate substates affecting 28% of assigned residues. These can be attributed to the phosphorylation state and possibly to conformational interconversions. The S108C substitution of the phosphoryl donor and acceptor slowed transformation of the glucose 1-phosphate substrate by impairing kcat. Addition of the glucose 1,6-bisphosphate intermediate accelerated this reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude, somewhat bypassing the defect and apparently relieving substrate inhibition. The S108C mutation perturbs the NMR spectra and electron density map around the catalytic cleft while preserving the secondary structure in solution. Diminished peak heights and faster 15N relaxation suggest line broadening and millisecond fluctuations within four loops that can contact phosphosugars. 15N NMR relaxation and peak heights suggest that domain 4 reorients slightly faster in solution than domains 1–3, and with a different principal axis of diffusion. Finally, this adds to the crystallographic evidence of domain 4 rotations in the enzyme, which were previously suggested to couple to reorientation of the intermediate, substrate binding, and product release.

  2. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulkmore » IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  3. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  4. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  5. Optimizing nanodiscs and bicelles for solution NMR studies of two β-barrel membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kucharska, Iga; Edrington, Thomas C.; Liang, Binyong

    2015-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy has become a robust method to determine structures and explore the dynamics of integral membrane proteins. The vast majority of previous studies on membrane proteins by solution NMR have been conducted in lipid micelles. Contrary to the lipids that form a lipid bilayer in biological membranes, micellar lipids typically contain only a single hydrocarbon chain or two chains that are too short to form a bilayer. Therefore, there is a need to explore alternative more bilayer-like media to mimic the natural environment of membrane proteins. Lipid bicelles and lipid nanodiscs have emerged as two alternative membrane mimetics that are compatible with solution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we have conducted a comprehensive comparison of the physical and spectroscopic behavior of two outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OprG and OprH, in lipid micelles, bicelles, and nanodiscs of five different sizes. Bicelles stabilized with a fraction of negatively charged lipids yielded spectra of almost comparable quality as in the best micellar solutions and the secondary structures were found to be almost indistinguishable in the two environments. Of the five nanodiscs tested, nanodiscs assembled from MSP1D1ΔH5 performed the best with both proteins in terms of sample stability and spectral resolution. Even in these optimal nanodiscs some broad signals from the membrane embedded barrel were severely overlapped with sharp signals from the flexible loops making their assignments difficult. A mutant OprH that had two of the flexible loops truncated yielded very promising spectra for further structural and dynamical analysis in MSP1D1ΔH5 nanodiscs. PMID:25869397

  6. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P. )

    1988-09-01

    The pore structures of two types of catalyst support material were studied: {gamma}-alumina and silica aerogel. The alumina samples were commercial catalyst supports made in 1/8 inch diameter pellet form by Harshaw Chemical. Aerogels were prepared by forming a gel in a two-step, base-catalyzed process using TEOS, followed by supercritical drying to form the aerogel. Two different aerogels were made, one undergoing the drying process immediately after gel formation (non-aged), and the other being aged in the gel state for two weeks in a basic solution of 0.1 molar NH{sub 4}OH at 323 K before being supercritically dried (aged). The aging process is believed to alter the aerogel pore structure. The pore size distribution of the alumina material was determined via NMR and compared to results obtained by mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption/condensation techniques. The pore size distributions of the two aerogel samples were measured via NMR and nitrogen adsorption/condensation; the material was too compressible for porosimetry.

  7. New theoretical methodology for elucidating the solution structure of peptides from NMR data. II. Free energy of dominant microstates of Leu-enkephalin and population-weighted average nuclear Overhauser effects intensities.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, E; Meirovitch, H

    1996-01-01

    A small linear peptide in solution may populate several stable states (called here microstates) in thermodynamic equilibrium; elucidating its dynamic three dimensional structure by multi- dimensional nmr is complex since the experimentally measured nuclear Overhauser effect intensities (NOEs) represent averages over the individual contributions. We propose a new methodology based on statistical mechanical considerations for analyzing nmr data of such peptides. In a previous paper (called paper I, H. Meirovitch et al. (1995) Journal of Physical Chemistry, 99, 4847-4854] we have developed theoretical methods for determining the contribution to the partition function Z of the most stable microstates, i.e. those that pertain to a given energy range above the global energy minimum (GEM). This relatively small set of dominant microstates provides the main contribution to medium- and long-range NOE intensities. In this work the individual populations and NOEs of the dominant microstates are determined, and then weighted averages are calculated and compared with experiment. Our methodology is applied to the pentapeptide Leu-enkephalin H-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH, described by the potential energy function ECEPP. Twenty one significantly different energy minimized structures are first identified within the range of 2 kcal/mol above the GEM by an extensive conformational search; this range has been found in paper I to contribute 0.6 of Z. These structures then become "seeds" for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations designed to keep the molecule relatively close to its seed. Indeed, the MC samples (called MC microstates) illustrate what we define as intermediate chain flexibility; some dihedral angles remain in the vicinity of their seed value, while others visit the full range of [-180 degrees, 180 degrees]. The free energies of the MC microstates (which lead to the populations) are calculated by the local states method, which (unlike other techniques) can handle any chain flexibility

  8. Solution structure of R(2)Sn(IV)-beta-N-acetyl-neuraminate (R = Me, Bu) complexes in D(2)O and DMSO-d(6): experimental NMR and DFT computational study.

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Nuccio; Casella, Girolamo; Ferrante, Francesco; Pellerito, Lorenzo; Rotondo, Archimede; Rotondo, Enrico

    2007-04-14

    Two diorganotin(IV)-NANA complexes (NANA (1) = beta-N-acetyl-Neuraminic Acid = 5-amino-3,5-dideoxy-D-glycero-beta-D-galactononulosic acid) with formula Me(2)Sn(iv)NANA (2) and Bu(2)Sn(IV)NANA (3) were synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn NMR spectroscopy, both in D(2)O and DMSO-d(6) solutions. The experimental data in DMSO suggested the monosaccharide bidentate chelation via O1 carboxylate and vicinal O2 alkoxide atoms, which, in D(2)O, can be dynamically extended to a third binding site (O8 atom) of the pendant chain. Coordination at the tin atom is discussed on the basis of experimental NMR data and DFT calculation. PMID:17387406

  9. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  10. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  11. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  12. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  13. Solid State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid state NMR methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid state NMR techniques and technology. PMID:21219138

  14. Determination of Membrane Protein Structure by Rotational Resonance NMR: Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuzet, F.; McDermott, A.; Gebhard, R.; van der Hoef, K.; Spijker-Assink, M. B.; Herzfeld, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Levitt, M. H.; Griffin, R. G.

    1991-02-01

    Rotationally resonant magnetization exchange, a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique for measuring internuclear distances between like spins in solids, was used to determine the distance between the C-8 and C-18 carbons of retinal in two model compounds and in the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Magnetization transfer between inequivalent spins with an isotropic shift separation, δ, is driven by magic angle spinning at a speed ω_r that matches the rotational resonance condition δ = nω_r, where n is a small integer. The distances measured in this way for both the 6-s-cis- and 6-s-trans-retinoic acid model compounds agreed well with crystallographically known distances. In bacteriorhodopsin the exchange trajectory between C-8 and C-18 was in good agreement with the internuclear distance for a 6-s-trans configuration [4.2 angstroms (overset{circ}{mathrm A})] and inconsistent with that for a 6-s-cis configuration (3.1 overset{circ}{mathrm A}). The results illustrate that rotational resonance can be used for structural studies in membrane proteins and in other situations where diffraction and solution NMR techniques yield limited information.

  15. {sup 19}F NMR spectra and structures of halogenated porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Hodge, J.A.; Grinstaff, M.W.

    1995-07-05

    Fluorine-19 NMR spectra of a series of halogenated porphyrins have been used to create a spectral library of different types of fluorine splitting patterns for tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrins (TFPP) complexed with diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions. The paramagnetic shift, line broadening, and fine structure of the resonances form the peripheral pentafluorophenyl rings are dependent on the symmetry and core environment of the porphyrin macrocycles. In combination with crystal structure data, {sup 19}F NMR helps define the behavior of halogenated porphyrins in solution. Six new crystal structures for TFPP and octahalo-TFPP derivatives are reported: H{sub 2}TFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.327(4) {Angstrom}, c = 15.261(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 103.87(2){degrees}, V = 2227.6(13) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; CuTFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.358(5), c = 14.678(2) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 88.97(1), {beta}=76.05(1){degrees}, {gamma} = 71.29(1){degrees}, V = 2181.4(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; ZnTFPPCl{sub 8} in tetragonal space group P42, c, a = 19.502(20), c = 10.916(8) {Angstrom}, V = 4152(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; H{sub 2}TFPPBr{sub 8} in monoclinic space group C2, a = 27.634(6) {Angstrom}, b = 6.926(2) {Angstrom}, c = 14.844(3) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 109.64(2){degrees}, V = 2675.8(11) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2.

  16. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  17. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  18. Determination of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in amikacin in water solution by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni; Marini, Domenico; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Delfini, Maurizio

    1995-10-01

    An NMR investigation has been carried out on amikacin in water solution in the physiological pH range. Two-dimenstional heterocorrelated maps provide 1H NMR chemical shifts from the unambiguous assignment of the 13C NMR spectrum. Reorientational dynamics at the molecular level are interpreted in terms of a pseudoisotropic motion with a correlation time of 0.17 ns at 300 K. The pH and temperature dependences of 13C NMR chemical shifts are interpreted to delineate protonation equilibria (all p Ks are determined) and to assess the occurrence of two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which are confirmed by molecular modelling.

  19. A ladder coordination polymer based on Ca(2+) and (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonic acid): crystal structure and solution-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Venkatramaiah, Nutalapati; Mendes, Ricardo F; Silva, Artur M S; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of coordination polymers (CPs) based on either transition metal centres or rare-earth cations has grown considerably in recent decades. The different coordination chemistry of these metals allied to the use of a large variety of organic linkers has led to an amazing structural diversity. Most of these compounds are based on carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing ligands. More recently, a wide range of molecules containing phosphonic acid groups have been reported. For the particular case of Ca(2+)-based CPs, some interesting functional materials have been reported. A novel one-dimensional Ca(2+)-based coordination polymer with a new organic linker, namely poly[[diaqua[μ4-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)][μ3-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)]dicalcium(II)] tetrahydrate], {[Ca2(C8H4N2O6P2)2(H2O)2]·4H2O}n, has been prepared at ambient temperature. The crystal structure features one-dimensional ladder-like ∞(1)[Ca2(H2cpp)2(H2O)2] polymers [H2cpp is (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonate)], which are created by two distinct coordination modes of the anionic H2cpp(2-) cyanophosphonate organic linkers: while one molecule is only bound to Ca(2+) cations via the phosphonate groups, the other establishes an extra single connection via a cyano group. Ladders close pack with water molecules through an extensive network of strong and highly directional O-H...O and O-H...N hydrogen bonds; the observed donor-acceptor distances range from 2.499 (5) to 3.004 (6) Å and the interaction angles were found in the range 135-178°. One water molecule was found to be disordered over three distinct crystallographic positions. A detailed solution-state NMR study of the organic linker is also provided. PMID:27585932

  20. NMR solution structure of an N2-guanine DNA adduct derived from the potent tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene: Intercalation from the minor groove with ruptured Watson-Crick base pairing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yijin; Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Lin, Chin H.; Cai, Yuqin; Rodriguez, Fabian A.; Sayer, Jane M.; Jerina, Donald M.; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    The most potent tumorigen identified among the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is the non-planar fjord region dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). It is metabolically activated in vivo through the widely-studied diol epoxide (DE) pathway to form covalent adducts with DNA bases, predominantly guanine and adenine. The (+)-11S,12R,13R,14S DE enantiomer forms adducts via its C14-position with the exocyclic amino group of guanine. Here, we present the first NMR solution structure of a DB[a,l]P-derived adduct, the 14R (+)-trans-anti-DB[a,l]P–N2-dG (DB[a,l]P-dG) lesion in double-stranded DNA. In contrast to the stereochemically identical benzo[a]pyrene-derived N2-dG adduct (B[a]P-dG) in which the B[a]P rings reside in the B-DNA minor groove on the 3’-side of the modifed deoxyguanosine, in the DB[a,l]P-derived adduct the DB[a,l]P rings intercalate into the duplex on the 3’-side of the modified base from the sterically crowded minor groove. Watson-Crick base pairing of the modified guanine with the partner cytosine is broken, but these bases retain some stacking with the bulky DB[a,l]P ring system. This new theme in PAH DE - DNA adduct conformation differs from: (1) the classical intercalation motif where Watson-Crick base-pairing is intact at the lesion site, and (2) the base-displaced intercalation motif in which the damaged base and its partner are extruded from the helix . The structural considerations that lead to the intercalated conformation of the DB[a,l]P-dG lesion in contrast to the minor groove alignment of the B[a]P-dG adduct, and the implications of the DB[a,l]P-dG conformational motif for the recognition of such DNA lesions by the human nucleotide excision repair apparatus, are discussed. PMID:23121427

  1. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Crystallography & NMR system: A new software suite for macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Brünger, A T; Adams, P D; Clore, G M; DeLano, W L; Gros, P; Grosse-Kunstleve, R W; Jiang, J S; Kuszewski, J; Nilges, M; Pannu, N S; Read, R J; Rice, L M; Simonson, T; Warren, G L

    1998-09-01

    A new software suite, called Crystallography & NMR System (CNS), has been developed for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In contrast to existing structure-determination programs, the architecture of CNS is highly flexible, allowing for extension to other structure-determination methods, such as electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. CNS has a hierarchical structure: a high-level hypertext markup language (HTML) user interface, task-oriented user input files, module files, a symbolic structure-determination language (CNS language), and low-level source code. Each layer is accessible to the user. The novice user may just use the HTML interface, while the more advanced user may use any of the other layers. The source code will be distributed, thus source-code modification is possible. The CNS language is sufficiently powerful and flexible that many new algorithms can be easily implemented in the CNS language without changes to the source code. The CNS language allows the user to perform operations on data structures, such as structure factors, electron-density maps, and atomic properties. The power of the CNS language has been demonstrated by the implementation of a comprehensive set of crystallographic procedures for phasing, density modification and refinement. User-friendly task-oriented input files are available for nearly all aspects of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography and solution NMR. PMID:9757107

  3. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  4. NMR structural analysis of Sleeping Beauty transposase binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    E Carpentier, Claire; Schreifels, Jeffrey M; Aronovich, Elena L; Carlson, Daniel F; Hackett, Perry B; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2014-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is the most widely used DNA transposon in genetic applications and is the only DNA transposon thus far in clinical trials for human gene therapy. In the absence of atomic level structural information, the development of SB transposon relied primarily on the biochemical and genetic homology data. While these studies were successful and have yielded hyperactive transposases, structural information is needed to gain a mechanistic understanding of transposase activity and guides to further improvement. We have initiated a structural study of SB transposase using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the DNA-binding domain of SB transposase in solution. We show that at physiologic salt concentrations, the SB DNA-binding domain remains mostly unstructured but its N-terminal PAI subdomain forms a compact, three-helical structure with a helix-turn-helix motif at higher concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, we show that the full-length SB DNA-binding domain associates differently with inner and outer binding sites of the transposon DNA. We also show that the PAI subdomain of SB DNA-binding domain has a dominant role in transposase's attachment to the inverted terminal repeats of the transposon DNA. Overall, our data validate several earlier predictions and provide new insights on how SB transposase recognizes transposon DNA. PMID:24243759

  5. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed. PMID:23991940

  6. The intrinsic mechanics of B-DNA in solution characterized by NMR.

    PubMed

    Imeddourene, Akli Ben; Xu, Xiaoqian; Zargarian, Loussiné; Oguey, Christophe; Foloppe, Nicolas; Mauffret, Olivier; Hartmann, Brigitte

    2016-04-20

    Experimental characterization of the structural couplings in free B-DNA in solution has been elusive, because of subtle effects that are challenging to tackle. Here, the exploitation of the NMR measurements collected on four dodecamers containing a substantial set of dinucleotide sequences provides new, consistent correlations revealing the DNA intrinsic mechanics. The difference between two successive residual dipolar couplings (ΔRDCs) involving C6/8-H6/8, C3'-H3' and C4'-H4' vectors are correlated to the(31)P chemical shifts (δP), which reflect the populations of the BI and BII backbone states. The δPs are also correlated to the internucleotide distances (Dinter) involving H6/8, H2' and H2″ protons. Calculations of NMR quantities on high resolution X-ray structures and controlled models of DNA enable to interpret these couplings: the studied ΔRDCs depend mostly on roll, while Dinterare mainly sensitive to twist or slide. Overall, these relations demonstrate how δP measurements inform on key inter base parameters, in addition to probe the BI↔BII backbone equilibrium, and shed new light into coordinated motions of phosphate groups and bases in free B-DNA in solution. Inspection of the 5' and 3' ends of the dodecamers also supplies new information on the fraying events, otherwise neglected. PMID:26883628

  7. The intrinsic mechanics of B-DNA in solution characterized by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Imeddourene, Akli Ben; Xu, Xiaoqian; Zargarian, Loussiné; Oguey, Christophe; Foloppe, Nicolas; Mauffret, Olivier; Hartmann, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Experimental characterization of the structural couplings in free B-DNA in solution has been elusive, because of subtle effects that are challenging to tackle. Here, the exploitation of the NMR measurements collected on four dodecamers containing a substantial set of dinucleotide sequences provides new, consistent correlations revealing the DNA intrinsic mechanics. The difference between two successive residual dipolar couplings (ΔRDCs) involving C6/8-H6/8, C3′-H3′ and C4′-H4′ vectors are correlated to the 31P chemical shifts (δP), which reflect the populations of the BI and BII backbone states. The δPs are also correlated to the internucleotide distances (Dinter) involving H6/8, H2′ and H2″ protons. Calculations of NMR quantities on high resolution X-ray structures and controlled models of DNA enable to interpret these couplings: the studied ΔRDCs depend mostly on roll, while Dinter are mainly sensitive to twist or slide. Overall, these relations demonstrate how δP measurements inform on key inter base parameters, in addition to probe the BI↔BII backbone equilibrium, and shed new light into coordinated motions of phosphate groups and bases in free B-DNA in solution. Inspection of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the dodecamers also supplies new information on the fraying events, otherwise neglected. PMID:26883628

  8. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  9. Conformational solution studies of neuropeptide gamma using CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Brzozowskl, Krzysztof; Legowska, Anna; Liwo, Adam; Silbering, Jerzy; Smoluch, Marek; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2002-05-01

    Neuropeptide gamma is one of the largest members of the tachykinin family of peptides, exhibiting strong agonistic activity towards the NK-2 tachykinin receptor. This peptide was synthesized by the solid-phase method using the Fmoc chemistry. Circular-dichroism spectroscopy (CD) investigations of this peptide were performed in phosphate buffer, in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles and trifluoroethanol (TFE) solutions and in DMSO-d6 using the 2D NMR technique in conjunction with two different theoretical approaches. The first assumes multiconformational equilibrium of the peptide studied characterized by the values of statistical weights of low-energy conformations. These calculations were performed using three different force fields ECEPP/3, AMBER4.1 and CHARMM (implemented in the X-PLOR program). The second method incorporates interproton distance and dihedral angle constraints into the starting conformation using the Simulated Annealing algorithm (X-PLOR program). The CD experiments revealed that although the peptide studied is flexible in polar solvents, a tendency to adopt a helical structure was observed in the hydrophobic environment. The NMR data (NOE effects) indicate a helical or reverse structure in the Ile7-His12 fragment of the peptide studied in DMSO-d6 solution. The results obtained cannot be interpreted in terms of a single conformation. Most of the conformations obtained with the ECEPP/3 force field possess a high content of a helical structure. None of the conformers, obtained with the AMBER4.1 and CHARMM force fields, can be considered as the dominant one. In all conformations several beta-turns were detected and in some cases gamma-turns were also found. But in fact, it is rather difficult to select the position of the secondary element(s) present in the structure of NPgamma in solution. All conformers calculated with the X-PLOR program (with using NMR derived distance and torsion angle constraints) are stabilized by several

  10. An NMR structural study of nickel-substituted rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian J; Duarte, Iven C N; Macedo, Anjos L; Volkman, Brian F; Nunes, Sofia G; Moura, I; Markley, John L; Moura, José J G

    2010-03-01

    The Ni(II) and Zn(II) derivatives of Desulfovibrio vulgaris rubredoxin (DvRd) have been studied by NMR spectroscopy to probe the structure at the metal centre. The beta CH(2) proton pairs from the cysteines that bind the Ni(II) atom have been identified using 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) difference spectra and sequence specifically assigned via NOE correlations to neighbouring protons and by comparison with the published X-ray crystal structure of a Ni(II) derivative of Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin. The solution structures of DvRd(Zn) and DvRd(Ni) have been determined and the paramagnetic form refined using pseudocontact shifts. The determination of the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy tensor allowed the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed chemical shifts to be obtained. Analysis of the pseudocontact and contact chemical shifts of the cysteine H beta protons and backbone protons close to the metal centre allowed conclusions to be drawn as to the geometry and hydrogen-bonding pattern at the metal binding site. The importance of NH-S hydrogen bonds at the metal centre for the delocalization of electron spin density is confirmed for rubredoxins and can be extrapolated to metal centres in Cu proteins: amicyanin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, azurin and pseudoazurin. PMID:19997764

  11. Overview on the use of NMR to examine protein structure.

    PubMed

    Breukels, Vincent; Konijnenberg, Albert; Nabuurs, Sanne M; Doreleijers, Jurgen F; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Vuister, Geerten W

    2011-04-01

    Any protein structure determination process contains several steps, starting from obtaining a suitable sample, then moving on to acquiring data and spectral assignment, and lastly to the final steps of structure determination and validation. This unit describes all of these steps, starting with the basic physical principles behind NMR and some of the most commonly measured and observed phenomena such as chemical shift, scalar and residual coupling, and the nuclear Overhauser effect. Then, in somewhat more detail, the process of spectral assignment and structure elucidation is explained. Furthermore, the use of NMR to study protein-ligand interaction, protein dynamics, or protein folding is described. PMID:21488042

  12. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid-state NMR and computational structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Ash, Jason T.; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P.; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this new method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized. PMID:21134646

  13. Deuterium NMR Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Gramicidin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Andrew William

    1990-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the membrane peptide gramicidin are investigated by deuterium NMR. A specific structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the alpha carbon of the third alanine residue. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on this analog in oriented lipid bilayers indicate that the c_alpha- ^2H bond makes an angle relative to the helical axis that is in agreement with the bond angle predicted by the beta^{6.3} helical model. A second structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the formyl group of two different analogs. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on these analogs show that the spectra of the two analogs are very similar. However, the analog possessing D-leucine as the second residue also appears to exist in a second, minor conformation which does not seem to exist for the analog possessing glycine as the second residue.

  14. NMR-spectroscopic analysis of mixtures: from structure to function

    PubMed Central

    Forseth, Ry R.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy as a particularly information-rich method offers unique opportunities for improving the structural and functional characterization of metabolomes, which will be essential for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Whereas traditionally NMR spectroscopy was mostly relegated to the characterization of pure compounds, the last few years have seen a surge of interest in using NMR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing complex metabolite mixtures. Development of new methods was motivated partly by the realization that using NMR for the analysis of metabolite mixtures can help identify otherwise inaccessible small molecules, for example compounds that are prone to chemical decomposition and thus cannot be isolated. Furthermore, comparative metabolomics and statistical analyses of NMR-spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the range of NMR spectroscopic techniques recently developed for characterizing metabolite mixtures, including methods used in discovery-oriented natural product chemistry, in the study of metabolite biosynthesis and function, or for comparative analyses of entire metabolomes. PMID:21071261

  15. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  16. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. PMID:9761684

  17. Solution NMR of polypeptides hyperpolarized by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Mukundan; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization of nuclear spins through techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can greatly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in NMR measurements, thus eliminating the need for signal averaging. This enables the study of many dynamic processes which would otherwise not be amenable to study by NMR spectroscopy. A report of solid- to liquid-state DNP of a short peptide, bacitracin A, as well as of a full-length protein, L23, is presented here. The polypeptides are hyperpolarized at low temperature and dissolved for NMR signal acquisition in the liquid state in mixtures of organic solvent and water. Signal enhancements of 300-2000 are obtained in partially deuterated polypeptide when hyperpolarized on (13)C and of 30-180 when hyperpolarized on (1)H. A simulated spectrum is used to identify different resonances in the hyperpolarized (13)C spectra, and the relation between observed signal enhancement for various groups in the protein and relaxation parameters measured from the hyperpolarized samples is discussed. Thus far, solid- to liquid-state DNP has been used in conjunction with small molecules. The results presented here, however, demonstrate the feasibility of hyperpolarizing larger proteins, with potential applications toward the study of protein folding or macromolecular interactions. PMID:21651293

  18. Effects of Phe-to-Trp mutation and fluorotryptophan incorporation on the solution structure of cardiac troponin C, and analysis of its suitability as a potential probe for in situ NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Mercier, Pascal; Letourneau, Paul-Jean; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool for probing protein properties in situ. However, results obtained using this technique are relevant only if the 19F probe offers minimal perturbation to the surrounding environment. In this paper, we examine the effect of 5-fluorotryptophan (5fW) incorporation on the three-dimensional structure of cardiac troponin-C (cTnC), with the intention of developing a 19F-labeled TnC for use in in situ 19FNMR. We find that, in general, 5fW does not perturb the structure of the protein significantly. Replacement of residue Phe 153 with 5fW produces no noticeable change in protein conformation. However, replacement of residue Phe 104 with 5fW produces a folding behavior that is dependent on the Escherichia coli strain used to express the mutant. The orientations of the indole rings in these mutants are such that the Trp residue adopts a χ2 of ~90° in the F104W mutant and ~−100° in the F153W mutant. Using results from 19F-1H heteronuclear NOE experiment, we show the replacement of L-Trp with 5fW at these positions does not change the orientation of the indole ring and the spread of the 5fW side-chain dihedral angles increases moderately for the F104(5fW) mutant and not at all for the F153(5fW) mutant. Based on these structures, we conclude that the substitution of Phe by 5fW at these two positions has minimal effects on the structure of cTnC and that the 5fW indole rings in both mutants have well defined orientation, making the two mutants viable candidates for use in in situ 19F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16131667

  19. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  20. NMR Studies of Enzyme Structure and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, Albert

    2006-03-01

    At least three NMR methodologies pioneered by Al Redfield, have greatly benefited enzymology: (1) the suppression of strong water signals without pre-saturation; (2) sequence specific NH/ND exchange; and (3) dynamic studies of mobile loops of proteins. Water suppression has enabled us to identify unusually short, strong H-bonds at the active sites of five enzymes (three isomerases and two esterases), and to measure their lengths from both the chemical shifts and D/H fractionation factors of the deshielded protons involved (J. Mol. Struct. 615, 163 (2002)). Backbone NH exchange studies were used to detect regions of an NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in which NH groups became selectively protected against exchange on Mg(2+) binding, and further protected on product (NMP) binding, thus locating binding sites as well as conformationally linked remote sites (Biochemistry 42, 10140 (2003)). Dynamic studies were used to elucidate the frequency of motion of a flexible loop of GDP-mannose hydrolase (66,000/sec) containing the catalytic base His-124, from exchange broadening of the side chain NH signals of His-124 in the free enzyme. The binding of Mg(2+) and GDP-mannose lock His-124 in position to deprotonate the entering water and complete the reaction.

  1. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used.

  2. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used. PMID:26363581

  3. Structural NMR of Protein Oligomers using Hybrid Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Solving structures of native oligomeric protein complexes using traditional high resolution NMR techniques remains challenging. However, increased utilization of computational platforms, and integration of information from less traditional NMR techniques with data from other complementary biophysical methods, promises to extend the boundary of NMR-applicable targets. This article reviews several of the techniques capable of providing less traditional and complementary structural information. In particular, the use of orientational constraints coming from residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy offsets are shown to simplify the construction of models for oligomeric complexes, especially in cases of weak homo-dimers. Combining this orientational information with interaction site information supplied by computation, chemical shift perturbation, paramagnetic surface perturbation, cross-saturation and mass spectrometry allows high resolution models of the complexes to be constructed with relative ease. Non-NMR techniques, such as mass spectrometry, EPR and small angle X-ray scattering, are also expected to play increasingly important roles by offering alternative methods of probing the overall shape of the complex. Computational platforms capable of integrating information from multiple sources in the modeling process are also discussed in the article. And finally a new, detailed example on the determination of a chemokine tetramer structure will be used to illustrate how a non-traditional approach to oligomeric structure determination works in practice. PMID:21074622

  4. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; York, Darrin M.; Case, David A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson–Crick stem and the “canonical” UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9–G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. PMID:25805858

  5. Solution 1H NMR investigation of the active site molecular and electronic structures of substrate-bound, cyanide-inhibited HmuO, a bacterial heme oxygenase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Syvitski, Ray T; Chu, Grace C; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Mar, Gerd N La

    2003-02-28

    The molecular structure and dynamic properties of the active site environment of HmuO, a heme oxygenase (HO) from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, have been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the human HO (hHO) complex as a homology model. It is demonstrated that not only the spatial contacts among residues and between residues and heme, but the magnetic axes that can be related to the direction and magnitude of the steric tilt of the FeCN unit are strongly conserved in the two HO complexes. The results indicate that very similar contributions of steric blockage of several meso positions and steric tilt of the attacking ligand are operative. A distal H-bond network that involves numerous very strong H-bonds and immobilized water molecules is identified in HmuO that is analogous to that previously identified in hHO (Li, Y., Syvitski, R. T., Auclair, K., Wilks, A., Ortiz de Montellano, P. R., and La Mar, G. N. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 33018-33031). The NMR results are completely consistent with the very recent crystal structure of the HmuO.substrate complex. The H-bond network/ordered water molecules are proposed to orient the distal water molecule near the catalytically key Asp(136) (Asp(140) in hHO) that stabilizes the hydroperoxy intermediate. The dynamic stability of this H-bond network in HmuO is significantly greater than in hHO and may account for the slower catalytic rate in bacterial HO compared with mammalian HO. PMID:12480929

  6. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  7. Paramagnetic relaxation of long-lived coherences in solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Srinivas, Chinthalapalli; Deb, Mayukh; Kurur, Narayanan D

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLCs) are known to have lifetimes much longer than transverse magnetization or single quantum coherences (SQCs). The effect of paramagnetic ions on the relaxation of LLCs is not known. This is particularly important, as LLCs have potential applications in various fields like analytical NMR, in vivo NMR and MR imaging methods. We study here the behaviour of LLCs in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation agents. The stepwise increase in the concentration of the metal ion is followed by measuring various relaxation rates. The effect of paramagnetic ions is analysed in terms of the external random field's contribution to the relaxation of two coupled protons in 2,3,6-trichlorobenzaldehyde. The LLCs relax faster than ordinary SQCs in the presence of paramagnetic ions of varying character. This is explained on the basis of an increase in the contribution of the external random field to relaxation due to a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism. Comparison is also made with ordinary Zeeman relaxation rates like R1, R2, R1ρ and also with rate of relaxation of long-lived states RLLS which are known to be less sensitive to paramagnetically induced relaxation. Also, the extent of correlation of random fields at two proton sites is studied and is found to be strongly correlated with each other. The obtained correlation constant is found to be independent of the nature of added paramagnetic impurities. PMID:24151221

  8. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  9. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe. PMID:18956898

  10. NMR structural determination of unique invertebrate glycosaminoglycans endowed with medical properties.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are sulfated polysaccharides of complex structure endowed with numerous biomedical functions. Although ubiquitously distributed in vertebrates, GAGs can also occur in certain terrestrial or marine invertebrates. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been the analytical technique mostly employed in structural characterization of GAGs from any source. This review aims at illustrating the application of NMR in structural determination of few representative invertebrate GAG examples of unique structures and endowed with therapeutic actions. They are the holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, the acharan sulfate isolated from the snail Achatina fulica, the dermatan sulfates with distinct sulfation patterns extracted from ascidian species, the sulfated glucuronic acid-containing heparan sulfate isolated from the gastropode Nodipecten nodosum, and the hybrid heparin/heparan sulfate molecule obtained from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. These invertebrate GAGs exhibit distinct structures when compared to those extracted from mammalian GAGs. The distinct structures of the invertebrate GAGs lead also to different mechanisms of actions as compared to the mammalian GAG standards. Invertebrate GAGs comprise promising therapeutic candidates in fights against diseases. Solution NMR has been playing a pivotal role in this carbohydrate-based drug research, discovery and development. PMID:26083200

  11. Effects of the introduction of L-nucleotides into DNA. Solution structure of the heterochiral duplex d(G-C-G-(L)T-G-C-G).d(C-G-C-A-C-G-C) studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blommers, M J; Tondelli, L; Garbesi, A

    1994-06-28

    The effect of the substitution of a L-nucleoside for a D-nucleoside in the duplex d(G-C-G-T-G-C-G).d(C-G-C-A-C-G-C) was studied by UV and NMR spectroscopy. These unnatural oligonucleotides have potential for antisense DNA technology [Damha, M. J., Giannaris, P. A., & Marfey, P. (1994) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. The thermal stability of such duplexes is lower than that of the natural one and is dependent on the nucleotide type and/or sequence. Interestingly, inversion of the chirality of thymidine but not adenosine coincides with a large stabilizing enthalpy change. The structure of the heterochiral duplex d(G1-C2-G3-(L)T4-G5-C6-G7).d(C8-G9-C10-A11-C12-G13- C14), where (L)T denotes the mirror image of the natural thymidine, has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The sugar conformation was determined using the sum of coupling constants and the distances using a model free relaxation matrix approach. The torsion angles of the backbone follow from 3JHH, 3JHP, and 4JHP coupling constants. The structure of the duplex was calculated by metric matrix distance geometry followed by simulated annealing. The structure is close to that of B-DNA. The base pair formed by (L)T and A is of the Watson-Crick type. All sugars adopt an S-type pucker. The incorporation of the L-sugar in the duplex is accomplished by changes in the backbone torsion angles around the phosphates and the glycosidic torsion angle of (L)T. The modification induces changes in the natural strand as well. The structure exhibits an unusual interaction between the aromatic rings of the (L)T4.A11 and G3.C12 base pairs, which provides a plausible explanation of the unusual thermodynamic properties of the duplex. PMID:8011651

  12. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure. PMID:26365800

  13. {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

  14. NMR study of thymulin, a lymphocyte differentiating thymic nonapeptide. Conformational states of free peptide in solution.

    PubMed

    Laussac, J P; Cung, M T; Pasdeloup, M; Haran, R; Marraud, M; Lefrancier, P; Dardenne, M; Bach, J F

    1986-06-15

    The nonapeptide less than Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn (formerly called serum thymic factor) is a factor produced by the thymic epithelium, which needs a zinc ion to express its immunoregulatory properties. We report here on 1H and 13C NMR investigation of the conformational properties of the free peptide in aqueous medium and in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 solution by a combination of homo- and heteronuclear one- and two-dimensional experiments. The various resonances have been assigned in a straightforward manner on the basis of 1H,1H COSY spectroscopy for the recognition of the proton spin systems; two-dimensional NOESY spectra with the correlation peaks across amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; 13C,1H COSY experiments using selective polarization transfer from 1H- to 13C-nucleus via the 13C,1H long-range couplings for the attribution of the carboxyl and carbonyl groups; and 13C,1H COSY experiments with selective polarization transfer via the 13C,1H direct couplings for the assignment of all the aliphatic carbons. Other experiments such as pH-dependent chemical shifts, combined use of multiple and selective proton-decoupled 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the temperature and the concentration dependence of the proton shifts of the amide resonances, the solvent dependences of peptide carbonyl carbon resonances, and comparison of the spectra with three different analogues were performed. In aqueous solution, the data are compatible with the assumption of a highly mobile dynamic equilibrium among different conformations, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6, a more rigid structure is found involving three internal hydrogen bonds. These observations provide an insight into the conformational tendencies of this peptidic hormone in two different media. PMID:3711109

  15. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  16. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  17. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure–activity relationship, protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement’s (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10–13, pp. 176–187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277–298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111–138). Our approach uses NVR’s scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR’s data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR’s assignment accuracy on NVR’s test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs. PMID:25580019

  18. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced. PMID:24409001

  19. Understanding the Mechanism of Prosegment-catalyzed Folding by Solution NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenlin; Horimoto, Yasumi; Dee, Derek R.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2014-01-01

    Multidomain protein folding is often more complex than a two-state process, which leads to the spontaneous folding of the native state. Pepsin, a zymogen-derived enzyme, without its prosegment (PS), is irreversibly denatured and folds to a thermodynamically stable, non-native conformation, termed refolded pepsin, which is separated from native pepsin by a large activation barrier. While it is known that PS binds refolded pepsin and catalyzes its conversion to the native form, little structural details are known regarding this conversion. In this study, solution NMR was used to elucidate the PS-catalyzed folding mechanism by examining the key equilibrium states, e.g. native and refolded pepsin, both in the free and PS-bound states, and pepsinogen, the zymogen form of pepsin. Refolded pepsin was found to be partially structured and lacked the correct domain-domain structure and active-site cleft formed in the native state. Analysis of chemical shift data revealed that upon PS binding refolded pepsin folds into a state more similar to that of pepsinogen than to native pepsin. Comparison of pepsin folding by wild-type and mutant PSs, including a double mutant PS, indicated that hydrophobic interactions between residues of prosegment and refolded pepsin lower the folding activation barrier. A mechanism is proposed for the binding of PS to refolded pepsin and how the formation of the native structure is mediated. PMID:24265313

  20. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  1. Synthesis of 3,4-di-O-acetyl-2,5-anhydro-1,6-dideoxy-1,6-diiodo-D-mannitol. Comparison of NMR spectral results for the solid state and solution with those of the X-ray structural determination.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M A; Fronczek, F R; Lee, Y; Younathan, E S

    1995-04-19

    3,4-Di-O-acetyl-2,5-anhydro-1,6-dideoxy-1,6-diiodo-D-mannitol (3) is prepared from 2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol (1) in three steps. The solution and solid-state NMR spectra of 3 indicate considerable variation in conformation. In solution, it adopts, on average, a symmetric 4T3 conformation, whereas in the solid state it adopts an asymmetric conformation as revealed by 13C NMR cross polarization and magic angle spinning techniques. A single-crystal X-ray structure analysis confirmed the asymmetric conformation of 3 in a monoclinic crystal, space group P2(1) with a = 8.9608(4), b = 8.6348(5), c = 9.6468(4) A, beta = 96.139(4) degrees, V = 742.1(1) A3, Dc = 2.085 g cm-3, mu (MoK alpha) = 4.2 mm-1, and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R = 0.039 and Rw = 0.047 for 5181 observed reflections. The furanoid ring of 3 adopts an envelope E5 conformation slightly distorted towards 4T5, with puckering parameters psi = 313.49 degrees and q = 0.37 A. The asymmetric conformation is rationalized in terms of the weak packing forces in the crystal. PMID:7780989

  2. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  3. Unfolding the mechanism of the AAA+ unfoldase VAT by a combined cryo-EM, solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Ripstein, Zev A; Augustyniak, Rafal; Lazniewski, Michal; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Kay, Lewis E; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-07-19

    The AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) enzymes play critical roles in a variety of homeostatic processes in all kingdoms of life. Valosin-containing protein-like ATPase of Thermoplasma acidophilum (VAT), the archaeal homolog of the ubiquitous AAA+ protein Cdc48/p97, functions in concert with the 20S proteasome by unfolding substrates and passing them on for degradation. Here, we present electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) maps showing that VAT undergoes large conformational rearrangements during its ATP hydrolysis cycle that differ dramatically from the conformational states observed for Cdc48/p97. We validate key features of the model with biochemical and solution methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopY (TROSY) NMR experiments and suggest a mechanism for coupling the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to substrate unfolding. These findings illustrate the unique complementarity between cryo-EM and solution NMR for studies of molecular machines, showing that the structural properties of VAT, as well as the population distributions of conformers, are similar in the frozen specimens used for cryo-EM and in the solution phase where NMR spectra are recorded. PMID:27402735

  4. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  5. Comparison of phosphorus forms in three extracts of dairy feces by solution 31P NMR analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using solution 31P NMR spectroscopy, we compared three extractants, deionized water, sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) with fresh sodium dithionite (NaAc-SD), and 0.25 M NaOH-0.05 M EDTA (NaOH-EDTA), for the profile of P compounds in two dairy fecal samples. Phosphorus extracted was 35% for water, and...

  6. Mechanochemical and solution synthesis, X-ray structure and IR and 31P solid state NMR spectroscopic studies of copper(I) thiocyanate adducts with bulky monodentate tertiary phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Hanna, John V; Hart, Robert D; Healy, Peter C; King, Scott P; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Skelton, Brian W; Tabacaru, Aurel; White, Allan H

    2012-07-01

    A number of adducts of copper(I) thiocyanate with bulky tertiary phosphine ligands, and some nitrogen-base solvates, were synthesized and structurally and spectroscopically characterised. CuSCN:PCy3 (1:2), as crystallized from pyridine, is shown by a single crystal X-ray study to be a one-dimensional polymer ...(Cy3P)2CuSCN(Cy3P)2CuSCN... (1) with the four-coordinate copper atoms linked end-on by S-SCN-N bridging thiocyanate groups. A second form (2), obtained from acetonitrile, was also identified and shown by IR and 31P CPMAS NMR spectroscopy to be mononuclear, with the magnitude of the dν(Cu) parameter measured from the 31P CPMAS and the ν(CN) value from the IR clearly establishing this compound as three-coordinate [(Cy3P)2CuNCS]. Two further CuSCN/PCy3 compounds CuSCN:PCy3 (1:1) (3), and CuSCN:PCy3:py (1:1:1) (4) were also characterized spectroscopically, with the dν(Cu) parameters indicating three- and four-coordinate copper sites, respectively. Attempts to obtain a 1:2 adduct with tri-t-butylphosphine have yielded, from pyridine, the 1:1 adduct as a dimer [(Bu(t)3P)((SCN)(NCS))Cu(PBu(t)3)] (5), while similar attempts with tri-o-tolylphosphine (from acetonitrile and pyridine (= L)) resulted in solvated 1:1:1 CuSCN:P(o-tol)3:L forms as dimeric [{(o-tol)3P}LCu((SCN)(NCS))CuL{P(o-tol)3}] (6 and 8). The solvent-free 1:1 CuSCN:P(o-tol)3 adduct (7), obtained by desolvation of 6, was characterized spectroscopically and dν(Cu) measurements from the 31P CPMAS NMR data are consistent with the decrease in coordination number of the copper atom from four (for 6) (P,N(MeCN)Cu,S,N) to three (for 7) (PCuS,N) upon loss of the acetonitrile of solvation. These results are compared with those previously reported for mononuclear and binuclear PPh3 adducts which demonstrate a clear tendency for the copper centre to remain four-coordinate. The IR spectroscopic measurements on these compounds show that bands in the far-IR spectra provide a much more definitive criterion for

  7. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  8. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  9. NMR and restrained molecular dynamics study of the three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel, isolated from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M J; Pascaud, F; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1995-05-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a 60-residue polypeptide isolated from the venom of black mamba snake (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis), has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using 600 NOE constraints and 55 dihedral angle constraints, a set of 20 structures obtained from distance-geometry calculations was further refined by molecular dynamics calculations using a combined simulated annealing-restrained MD protocol. The resulting 20 conformers, taken to represent the solution structure, give an average rmsd of 1.2 A for their backbone atoms, relative to the average structure. The overall resulting three-fingered structure is similar to those already observed in several postsynaptic neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and fasciculins, which all share with toxin FS2 the same network of four disulfide bridges. The overall concavity of the molecule, considered as a flat bottomed dish, is oriented toward the C-terminal loop of the molecule. This orientation is similar to that of fasciculins and cardiotoxins but opposite to that of neurotoxins. On the basis of the local rms displacements between the 20 conformers, the structure of the first loop appears to be less well defined in FS2 than in the previously reported neurotoxin structures, but fasciculin 1 shows a similar trend with particularly high temperature factors for this part of the X-ray structure. The concave side which presents most of the positively charged residues is quite similar in FS2 and fasciculin 1. The main difference is shown by the convex side of the third loop, mostly hydrophobic in FS2, in contrast to the pair of negatively charged aspartates in fasciculin 1. This difference could be one of the factors leading to the distinct pharmacological properties-L-type calcium channel blocker for FS2 and cholinesterase inhibitor for fasciculin--observed for these two subgroups of the "angusticeps-type" toxins. PMID:7727450

  10. Isotope-Filtered 4D NMR Spectroscopy for Structure Determination of Humic Substances**

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nicholle G A; Michalchuk, Adam A L; Blackburn, John W T; Graham, Margaret C; Uhrín, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Humic substances, the main component of soil organic matter, could form an integral part of green and sustainable solutions to the soil fertility problem. However, their global-scale application is hindered from both scientific and regulatory perspectives by the lack of understanding of the molecular make-up of these chromatographically inseparable mixtures containing thousands of molecules. Here we show how multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of isotopically tagged molecules enables structure characterization of humic compounds. We illustrate this approach by identifying major substitution patterns of phenolic aromatic moieties of a peat soil fulvic acid, an operational fraction of humic substances. Our methodology represents a paradigm shift in the use of NMR active tags in structure determination of small molecules in complex mixtures. Unlike previous tagging methodologies that focused on the signals of the tags, we utilize tags to directly probe the identity of the molecules they are attached to. PMID:26036217

  11. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  12. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  13. Cadmium(II) complex formation with selenourea and thiourea in solution: an XAS and 113Cd NMR study.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Amini, Zahra; Parmar, Karnjit

    2012-10-15

    The complexes formed in methanol solutions of Cd(CF(3)SO(3))(2) with selenourea (SeU) or thiourea (TU), for thiourea also in aqueous solution, were studied by combining (113)Cd NMR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At low temperature (~200 K), distinct (113)Cd NMR signals were observed, corresponding to CdL(n)(2+) species (n = 0-4, L = TU or SeU) in slow ligand exchange. Peak integrals were used to obtain the speciation in the methanol solutions, allowing stability constants to be estimated. For cadmium(II) complexes with thione (C═S) or selone (C═Se) groups coordinated in Cd(S/Se)O(5) or Cd(S/Se)(2)O(4) (O from MeOH or CF(3)SO(3)(-)) environments, the (113)Cd chemical shifts were quite similar, within 93-97 ppm and 189-193 ppm, respectively. However, the difference in the chemical shift for the Cd(SeU)(4)(2+) (578 pm) and Cd(TU)(4)(2+) (526 ppm) species, with CdSe(4) and CdS(4) coordination, respectively, shows less chemical shielding for the coordinated Se atoms than for S, in contrast to the common trend with increasing shielding in the following order: O > N > Se > S. In solutions dominated by mono- and tetra-thiourea/selenourea complexes, their coordination and bond distances could be evaluated by Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At ~200 K and high excess of thiourea, a minor amount (up to ~30%) of [Cd(TU)(5-6)](2+) species was detected by an upfield shift of the (113)Cd NMR signal (up to 423 ppm) and an amplitude reduction of the EXAFS oscillation. The amount was estimated by fitting linear combinations of simulated EXAFS spectra for [Cd(TU)(4)](2+) and [Cd(TU)(6)](2+) complexes. At room temperature, [Cd(TU)(4)](2+) was the highest complex formed, also in aqueous solution. Cd L(3)-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of cadmium(II) thiourea solutions in methanol were used to follow changes in the CdS(x)O(y) coordination. The correlations found from the current and previous studies between (113

  14. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Selenourea and Thiourea in Solution: An XAS and 113Cd NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Amini, Zahra; Parmar, Karnjit

    2012-01-01

    The complexes formed in methanol solutions of Cd(CF3SO3)2 with selenourea (SeU) or thiourea (TU), for thiourea also in aqueous solution, were studied by combining 113Cd NMR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At low temperature (~200 K) distinct 113Cd NMR signals were observed, corresponding to CdLn2+ species (n = 0 - 4, L = TU or SeU) in slow ligand exchange. Peak integrals were used to obtain the speciation in the methanol solutions, allowing stability constants to be estimated. For cadmium(II) complexes with thione (C=S) or selone (C=Se) groups coordinated in Cd(S/Se)O5 or Cd(S/Se)2O4 (O from MeOH or CF3SO3-) environments the 113Cd chemical shifts were quite similar, within 93-97 ppm and 189 – 193 ppm, respectively. However, the difference in the chemical shift for the Cd(SeU)42+ (578 pm) and Cd(TU)42+ (526 ppm) species, with CdSe4 and CdS4 coordination, respectively, shows less chemical shielding for the coordinated Se atoms than for S, in contrast to the common trend with increasing shielding in the order: O > N > Se >S. In solutions dominated by mono- and tetra-thiourea / selenourea complexes, their coordination and bond distances could be evaluated by Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At ~200 K and high excess of thiourea a minor amount (up to ~30%) of [Cd(TU)5-6]2+ species was detected by an upfield shift of the 113Cd NMR signal (up to 423 ppm) and an amplitude reduction of the EXAFS oscillation. The amount was estimated by fitting linear combinations of simulated EXAFS spectra for [Cd(TU)4]2+ and [Cd(TU)6]2+ complexes. At room temperature, [Cd(TU)4]2+ was the highest complex formed, also in aqueous solution. Cd L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of cadmium(II) thiourea solutions in methanol were used to follow changes in the CdSxOy coordination at room temperature. The correlations found from the current and previous studies between 113Cd NMR chemical shifts and different Cd(II) coordination

  15. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, , 119 , 5241 - 5249 ). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action. PMID:26862689

  16. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  17. NMR study on the network structure of a mixed gel of kappa and iota carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bingjie; Du, Lei; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2016-10-01

    The temperature dependencies of the (1)H T2 and diffusion coefficient (D) of a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan were measured by NMR. Rheological and NMR measurements suggested an exponential formation of rigid aggregates of kappa-carrageenan and a gradual formation of fine aggregates of iota-carrageenan during two step increases of G'. The results also suggested that longer carrageenan chains are preferentially involved in aggregation, thus resulting in a decrease in the average Mw of solute carrageenans. The results of diffusion measurements for poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) suggested that kappa-carrageenan formed thick aggregates that decreased hindrance to PEO diffusion by decreasing the solute kappa-carrageenan concentration in the voids of the aggregated chains, and that iota-carrageenan formed fine aggregates that decreased the solute iota-carrageenan concentration less. DPEO in a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan suggested two possibilities for the microscopic network structure: an interpenetrating network structure, or micro-phase separation. PMID:27312613

  18. Quantum chemical 13Cα chemical shift calculations for protein NMR structure determination, refinement, and validation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Aramini, James M.; Rossi, Paolo; Kuzin, Alexandre; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A recently determined set of 20 NMR-derived conformations of a 48-residue all-α-helical protein, (PDB ID code 2JVD), is validated here by comparing the observed 13Cα chemical shifts with those computed at the density functional level of theory. In addition, a recently introduced physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distance constraints together with observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, was applied to determine a new set of 10 conformations, (Set-bt), as a blind test for the same protein. A cross-validation of these two sets of conformations in terms of the agreement between computed and observed 13Cα chemical shifts, several stereochemical quality factors, and some NMR quality assessment scores reveals the good quality of both sets of structures. We also carried out an analysis of the agreement between the observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts for a slightly longer construct of the protein solved by x-ray crystallography at 2.0-Å resolution (PDB ID code 3BHP) with an identical amino acid residue sequence to the 2JVD structure for the first 46 residues. Our results reveal that both of the NMR-derived sets, namely 2JVD and Set-bt, are somewhat better representations of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution than the 3BHP crystal structure. In addition, the 13Cα-based validation analysis appears to be more sensitive to subtle structural differences across the three sets of structures than any other NMR quality-assessment scores used here, and, although it is computationally intensive, this analysis has potential value as a standard procedure to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. PMID:18787110

  19. Analytical solution of the time-dependent Bloch NMR flow equations: a translational mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awojoyogbe, O. B.

    2004-08-01

    Various biological and physiological properties of living tissue can be studied by means of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Unfortunately, the basic physics of extracting the relevant information from the solution of Bloch nuclear magnetic resource (NMR) equations to accurately monitor the clinical state of biological systems is still not yet fully understood. Presently, there are no simple closed solutions known to the Bloch equations for a general RF excitation. Therefore the translational mechanical analysis of the Bloch NMR equations presented in this study, which can be taken as definitions of new functions to be studied in detail may reveal very important information from which various NMR flow parameters can be derived. Fortunately, many of the most important but hidden applications of blood flow parameters can be revealed without too much difficulty if appropriate mathematical techniques are used to solve the equations. In this study we are concerned with a mathematical study of the laws of NMR physics from the point of view of translational mechanical theory. The important contribution of this study is that solutions to the Bloch NMR flow equations do always exist and can be found as accurately as desired. We shall restrict our attention to cases where the radio frequency field can be treated by simple analytical methods. First we shall derive a time dependant second-order non-homogeneous linear differential equation from the Bloch NMR equation in term of the equilibrium magnetization M0, RF B1( t) field, T1 and T2 relaxation times. Then, we would develop a general method of solving the differential equation for the cases when RF B1( t)=0, and when RF B1( t)≠0. This allows us to obtain the intrinsic or natural behavior of the NMR system as well as the response of the system under investigation to a specific influence of external force to the system. Specifically, we consider the case where the RF B1 varies harmonically with time. Here the complete

  20. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  1. Solution structure of human sorting nexin 22.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Zhao, Kate Qin; Newman, Carrie L Loushin; Vinarov, Dmitriy A; Markley, John L

    2007-05-01

    The sorting nexins (SNXs) constitute a large group of PX domain-containing proteins that play critical roles in protein trafficking. We report here the solution structure of human sorting nexin 22 (SNX22). Although SNX22 has <30% sequence identity with any PX domain protein of known structure, it was found to contain the alpha/beta fold and compact structural core characteristic of PX domains. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of SNX22 by NMR relaxation measurements revealed that the two walls of the ligand binding cleft undergo internal motions: on the picosecond timescale for the beta1/beta2 loop and on the micro- to millisecond timescale for the loop between the polyproline motif and helix alpha2. Regions of the SNX22 structure that differ from those of other PX domains include the loop connecting strands beta1 and beta2 and the loop connecting helices alpha1 and alpha2, which appear to be more mobile than corresponding loops in other known structures. The interaction of dibutanoyl-phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (dibutanoyl-PtdIns(3)P) with SNX22 was investigated by an NMR titration experiment, which identified the binding site in a basic cleft and indicated that ligand binding leads only to a local structural rearrangement as has been found with other PX domains. Because motions in the loops are damped out when dibutanoyl-PtdIns(3)P binds, entropic effects could contribute to the lower affinity of SNX22 for this ligand compared to other PX domains. PMID:17400918

  2. 2D NMR Methods for Structural Delineation of Copper(II) Complexes of Penicillin and Pilocarpine

    PubMed Central

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for delineating the structure of paramagnetic metal complexes. The selective disappearance of cross-peaks in proton-carbon shift correlated 2D NMR maps was shown to uniquely depend upon the scalar and/or dipolar interaction between ligand nuclei and the unpaired electron(s), thus providing a means of identifying binding sites. Copper(II) was shown to form metal complexes with both Penicillin (PNC) and Pilocarpine (PLC) and the structure of the two 1:2 complexes in water solution at physiological pH were determined. PMID:18476239

  3. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having −Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed 1H-15N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0–28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution. PMID:27524944

  4. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) interactions in solution studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    De Biasio, Alfredo; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Sánchez, Ricardo; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Castillo, Francisco; Luque, Irene; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    PCNA is an essential factor for DNA replication and repair. It forms a ring shaped structure of 86 kDa by the symmetric association of three identical protomers. The ring encircles the DNA and acts as a docking platform for other proteins, most of them containing the PCNA Interaction Protein sequence (PIP-box). We have used NMR to characterize the interactions of PCNA with several other proteins and fragments in solution. The binding of the PIP-box peptide of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 to PCNA is consistent with the crystal structure of the complex. A shorter p21 peptide binds with reduced affinity but retains most of the molecular recognition determinants. However the binding of the corresponding peptide of the tumor suppressor ING1 is extremely weak, indicating that slight deviations from the consensus PIP-box sequence dramatically reduce the affinity for PCNA, in contrast with a proposed less stringent PIP-box sequence requirement. We could not detect any binding between PCNA and the MCL-1 or the CDK2 protein, reported to interact with PCNA in biochemical assays. This suggests that they do not bind directly to PCNA, or they do but very weakly, with additional unidentified factors stabilizing the interactions in the cell. Backbone dynamics measurements show three PCNA regions with high relative flexibility, including the interdomain connector loop (IDCL) and the C-terminus, both of them involved in the interaction with the PIP-box. Our work provides the basis for high resolution studies of direct ligand binding to PCNA in solution. PMID:23139781

  5. Effects of Anesthetic Membrane Solutes on Orientational Order in Lecithin Bilayer Membranes: a Deuterium NMR Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phonphok, Nason

    The interaction of eight n-alkanols and three volatile anesthetics with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (^2H NMR). At comparable temperatures and concentrations of solute in the bilayer, order parameters measured at the 1-methylene segment of the n-alkanols, and average order parameters for the whole alkyl chain, show a maximum for n-dodecanol. This maximum in orientational ordering also occurs for n-dodecanol at the much lower levels of solute concentration which produce anesthesia. For both n-dodecanol and n-tetradecanol, orientational ordering shows a maximum at the C-4 to C-7 methylene segments, with labels at both ends of the n-alkanol exhibiting reduced order. Unlike the longer chain n-alkanols, ordering in n-butanol decreases from the hydroxyl group end to the methyl group end of the molecule. The quadrupole splittings observed in DMPC-water systems containing perdeuterated ether, chloroform and n-hexane show that these volatile anesthetics are also ordered in the bilayer in the L _{alpha} phase. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting ^2H_2O in DMPC bilayers at low hydration indicates that both the n-alkanols and volatile anesthetics do not affect water structure in the L_alpha phase, but they do so below the main phase transition. Orientational ordering at nine inequivalent sites in the headgroup region of DMPC, as well as the acyl chains, has also been measured. Every anesthetic produces a disordering at the beta-methylene of the choline, the 3-methylene segment and the 1-R site (except chloroform) of the glycerol backbone. Molecular and conformational ordering at the interfacial region of DMPC in the L _alpha phase have been examined by analysing ^2H-NMR data from multiple sites in the most rigid region of the DMPC molecule. It was found that these anesthetics change the conformation at the glycerol moiety of DMPC without changing the molecular order parameter rm S

  6. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  7. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  8. Improved Accuracy from Joint X-ray and NMR Refinement of a Protein-RNA Complex Structure.

    PubMed

    Carlon, Azzurra; Ravera, Enrico; Hennig, Janosch; Parigi, Giacomo; Sattler, Michael; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-02-10

    Integrated experimental approaches play an increasingly important role in structural biology, taking advantage of the complementary information provided by different techniques. In particular, the combination of NMR data with X-ray diffraction patterns may provide accurate and precise information about local conformations not available from average-resolution X-ray structures alone. Here, we refined the structure of a ternary protein-protein-RNA complex comprising three domains, Sxl and Unr, bound to a single-stranded region derived in the msl2 mRNA. The joint X-ray and NMR refinement reveals that-despite the poor quality of the fit found for the original structural model-the NMR data can be largely accommodated within the uncertainty in the atom positioning (structural noise) from the primary X-ray data and that the overall domain arrangements and binding interfaces are preserved on passing from the crystalline state to the solution. The refinement highlights local conformational differences, which provide additional information on specific features of the structure. For example, conformational dynamics and heterogeneity observed at the interface between the CSD1 and the Sxl protein components in the ternary complex are revealed by the combination of NMR and crystallographic data. The joint refinement protocol offers unique opportunities to detect structural differences arising from various experimental conditions and reveals static or dynamic differences in the conformation of the biomolecule between the solution and the crystals. PMID:26761154

  9. 1H NMR structure of the heme pocket of HNO-myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sulc, Filip; Fleischer, Everly; Farmer, Patrick J; Ma, Dejian; La Mar, Gerd N

    2003-02-01

    The unique (1)H NMR signal of nitrosyl hydride at 14.8 ppm is used to obtain a solution structure of the distal pocket of Mb-HNO, a rare nitroxyl adduct with a half-life of several months at room temperature. (1)H NMR, NOESY and TOCSY data were obtained under identical experimental conditions on solutions of the diamagnetic HNO and CO complexes of equine Mb, allowing direct comparison of NMR data to a crystallographically characterized structure. Twenty NOEs between the nitrosyl hydride and protein and heme-based signals were observed. The HNO orientation obtained by modeling the experimental (1)H NMR NOESY data yielded an orientation of ca. -104 degrees referenced to the N-Fe-N vector between alpha and beta mesoprotons. An essentially identical orientation was obtained by simple energy minimization of the HNO adduct using ESFF potentials, suggesting steric control of the orientation. Differences in chemical shifts are seen for protons on residues Phe43(CD1) and Val68(E11), but both exhibit virtually identical NOESY contacts to other residues, and thus are attributed to small movements of ca. 0.1 A within the strong ring current. The most significant differences are seen in the NOESY peak intensities and chemical shifts for the ring non-labile protons of the distal His64(E7). The orientation of the His64(E7) in Mb-HNO was analyzed on the basis of the NOESY cross-peak changes and chemical shift changes, predicting a ca. 20 degrees rotation about the beta-gamma bond. The deduced HNO and His64(E7) orientations result in geometry where the His64(E7) ring can serve as the donor for a significant H-bond to the oxygen atom of the bound HNO. PMID:12589571

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF NON-DERIVATIZED PLANT CELL WALLS USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been logically modified to utilize perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-nmr-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent ...

  11. Towards Automated Structure-Based NMR Resonance Assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    We propose a general framework for solving the structure-based NMR backbone resonance assignment problem. The core is a novel 0-1 integer programming model that can start from a complete or partial assignment, generate multiple assignments, and model not only the assignment of spins to residues, but also pairwise dependencies consisting of pairs of spins to pairs of residues. It is still a challenge for automated resonance assignment systems to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention. To test the feasibility of this for structure-based assignment, we integrated our system with our automated peak picking and sequence-based resonance assignment system to obtain an assignment for the protein TM1112 with 91% recall and 99% precision without manual intervention. Since using a known structure has the potential to allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data, we work towards the goal of automated structure-based assignment using only such labeled data. Our system reduced the assignment error of Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey-Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which to our knowledge is the most error-tolerant method for this problem, by 5 folds on average. By using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for Ubiquitin, where the type prediction accuracy is 83%, we achieved 91% assignment accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy that was obtained without correcting for typing errors.

  12. Protein structure determination by combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary couplings

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hopf, Thomas A.; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate protein structure determination by NMR is challenging for larger proteins, for which experimental data is often incomplete and ambiguous. Fortunately, the upsurge in evolutionary sequence information and advances in maximum entropy statistical methods now provide a rich complementary source of structural constraints. We have developed a hybrid approach (EC-NMR) combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary residue-residue couplings, and demonstrate accurate structure determination for several 6 to 41 kDa proteins. PMID:26121406

  13. Improving the quality of NMR and crystallographic protein structures by means of a conformational database potential derived from structure databases.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, J; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1996-06-01

    A new conformational database potential involving dihedral angle relationships in databases of high-resolution highly refined protein crystal structures is presented as a method for improving the quality of structures generated from NMR data. The rationale for this procedure is based on the observation that uncertainties in the description of the nonbonded contacts present a key limiting factor in the attainable accuracy of protein NMR structures and that the nonbonded interaction terms presently used have poor discriminatory power between high- and low-probability local conformations. The idea behind the conformational database potential is to restrict sampling during simulated annealing refinement to conformations that are likely to be energetically possible by effectively limiting the choices of dihedral angles to those that are known to be physically realizable. In this manner, the variability in the structures produced by this method is primarily a function of the experimental restraints, rather than an artifact of a poor nonbonded interaction model. We tested this approach with the experimental NMR data (comprising an average of about 30 restraints per residue and consisting of interproton distances, torsion angles, 3JHN alpha coupling constants, and 13C chemical shifts) used previously to calculate the solution structure of reduced human thioredoxin (Qin J, Clore GM, Gronenborn AM, 1994, Structure 2:503-522). Incorporation of the conformational database potential into the target function used for refinement (which also includes terms for the experimental restraints, covalent geometry, and nonbonded interactions in the form of either a repulsive, repulsive-attractive, or 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential) results in a significant improvement in various quantitative measures of quality (Ramachandran plot, side-chain torsion angles, overall packing). This is achieved without compromising the agreement with the experimental restraints and the deviations from

  14. Electrostatic influence on rotational mobilities of sol-gel-encapsulated solutes by NMR and EPR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Korin E; Lees, Nicholas S; Gurbiel, Ryszard J; Hatch, Shelby L; Nocek, Judith M; Hoffman, Brian M

    2004-10-20

    The rotational mobilities of small solute molecules encapsulated in tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) sol-gels have been investigated by EPR spectroscopy of encapsulated nitroxide probes and by high-resolution NMR spectroscopic measurements of transferred NOE's (trNOE's), of T(1)'s, and of T(1)'s in the rotating frame (T(1)rho). The two spectroscopic methods are sensitive to motions on different time scales and hence, are nicely complementary. Suites of neutral, positively, and negatively charged nitroxide probes (EPR) and of simple diamagnetic small molecules (NMR) were selected to disclose influences of electrostatic interactions with the sol-gel walls and to probe the presence of multiple populations of molecules in distinct regions of the sol-gel pores. For neutral and negatively charged solute probes, both techniques disclose a single population with a significantly increased average rotational correlation time, which we interpret at least in part as resulting from exchange between free-volume and transiently immobilized surface populations. The electrostatic attraction between cationic probes and the negatively charged sol-gel walls causes the positively charged probes to be more effectively immobilized and/or causes a greater percentage of probes to undergo this transient immobilization. The EPR spectra directly disclose a population of cationic probes which are immobilized on the X-band EPR time scale: tau(c) greater than or approximately equal 10(-7) s. However, NMR measurements of trNOE's and of T(1)rho demonstrate that this population does exchange with the free-volume probes on the slower time scale of NMR. This approach is equally applicable to the study of solutes within other types of confined spaces, as well. PMID:15479102

  15. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  16. Molecular structure from a single NMR sequence (fast-PANACEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2010-09-01

    The PANACEA experiment combines three standard NMR pulse sequences (INADEQUATE, HSQC and HMBC) into a single entity, and is designed for spectrometers with two or more receivers operating in parallel. For small molecules it offers a direct route to molecular structure. Often the INADEQUATE feature is the rate-determining step, being limited by the low natural abundance of directly coupled 13C sbnd 13C pairs. This new version, fast-PANACEA, speeds up this measurement by two alternative schemes. In the first, the individual 13C sites are excited by selective radiofrequency pulses acting on double-quantum coherence, and encoded according to the rows of a Hadamard matrix. The columns of this matrix are used to decode the experimental data into separate F 2 spectra. This reduction in the number of required scans secures a faster result than the conventional stepwise exploration of the evolution dimension where the Nyquist condition and the resolution requirements must both be satisfied. The second scheme makes use of multiple aliasing in the evolution dimension. Significant speed improvements are achieved by either technique, illustrated by measurements made on samples of menthol and cholesterol. A new stabilization scheme (i-lock) is introduced. This is a software program that corrects the final NMR frequencies based on the observed frequency of a strong X-spin signal. It replaces the conventional deuterium lock, permitting measurements on neat liquids such as peanut oil and silicone oil, and offering advantages where deuterated solvents are undesirable.

  17. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water. PMID:24595457

  18. Solution structure of leptospiral LigA4 Big domain.

    PubMed

    Mei, Song; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2015-11-13

    Pathogenic Leptospiraspecies express immunoglobulin-like proteins which serve as adhesins to bind to the extracellular matrices of host cells. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein A (LigA), a surface exposed protein containing tandem repeats of bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, has been proved to be involved in the interaction of pathogenic Leptospira with mammalian host. In this study, the solution structure of the fourth Big domain of LigA (LigA4 Big domain) from Leptospira interrogans was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structure of LigA4 Big domain displays a similar bacterial immunoglobulin-like fold compared with other Big domains, implying some common structural aspects of Big domain family. On the other hand, it displays some structural characteristics significantly different from classic Ig-like domain. Furthermore, Stains-all assay and NMR chemical shift perturbation revealed the Ca(2+) binding property of LigA4 Big domain. PMID:26449456

  19. A Novel MHC-I Surface Targeted for Binding by the MCMV m06 Immunoevasin Revealed by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; May, Nathan A; Boyd, Lisa F; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad; Margulies, David H

    2015-11-27

    As part of its strategy to evade detection by the host immune system, murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes three proteins that modulate cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules: the MHC-I homolog m152/gp40 as well as the m02-m16 family members m04/gp34 and m06/gp48. Previous studies of the m04 protein revealed a divergent Ig-like fold that is unique to immunoevasins of the m02-m16 family. Here, we engineer and characterize recombinant m06 and investigate its interactions with full-length and truncated forms of the MHC-I molecule H2-L(d) by several techniques. Furthermore, we employ solution NMR to map the interaction footprint of the m06 protein on MHC-I, taking advantage of a truncated H2-L(d), "mini-H2-L(d)," consisting of only the α1α2 platform domain. Mini-H2-L(d) refolded in vitro with a high affinity peptide yields a molecule that shows outstanding NMR spectral features, permitting complete backbone assignments. These NMR-based studies reveal that m06 binds tightly to a discrete site located under the peptide-binding platform that partially overlaps with the β2-microglobulin interface on the MHC-I heavy chain, consistent with in vitro binding experiments showing significantly reduced complex formation between m06 and β2-microglobulin-associated MHC-I. Moreover, we carry out NMR relaxation experiments to characterize the picosecond-nanosecond dynamics of the free mini-H2-L(d) MHC-I molecule, revealing that the site of interaction is highly ordered. This study provides insight into the mechanism of the interaction of m06 with MHC-I, suggesting a structural manipulation of the target MHC-I molecule at an early stage of the peptide-loading pathway. PMID:26463211

  20. Solution Structures of Two Homologous Venom Peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Loening, Nikolaus M.; Wilson, Zachary N.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Binford, Greta J.

    2013-01-01

    We present solution-state NMR structures for two putative venom peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus. These peptides were identified from cDNA libraries created from venom gland mRNA and then recombinantly expressed. They are the first structures from any species of Sicarius spiders, and the first peptide structures for any haplogyne spiders. These peptides are homologous to one another, and while they have at most only 20% sequence identity with known venom peptides their structures follow the inhibitor cystine knot motif that has been found in a broad range of venom peptides. PMID:23342149

  1. Reverse micelles as a platform for dynamic nuclear polarization in solution NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Kathleen G; Mathies, Guinevere; Bédard, Sabrina; Nucci, Nathaniel V; Dodevski, Igor; Stetz, Matthew A; Can, Thach V; Griffin, Robert G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-02-19

    Despite tremendous advances in recent years, solution NMR remains fundamentally restricted due to its inherent insensitivity. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) potentially offers significant improvements in this respect. The basic DNP strategy is to irradiate the EPR transitions of a stable radical and transfer this nonequilibrium polarization to the hydrogen spins of water, which will in turn transfer polarization to the hydrogens of the macromolecule. Unfortunately, these EPR transitions lie in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum where bulk water absorbs strongly, often resulting in catastrophic heating. Furthermore, the residence times of water on the surface of the protein in bulk solution are generally too short for efficient transfer of polarization. Here we take advantage of the properties of solutions of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents to implement DNP in liquids. Such samples are largely transparent to the microwave frequencies required and thereby avoid significant heating. Nitroxide radicals are introduced into the reverse micelle system in three ways: attached to the protein, embedded in the reverse micelle shell, and free in the aqueous core. Significant enhancements of the water resonance ranging up to ∼-93 at 0.35 T were observed. We also find that the hydration properties of encapsulated proteins allow for efficient polarization transfer from water to the protein. These and other observations suggest that merging reverse micelle encapsulation technology with DNP offers a route to a significant increase in the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy of proteins and other biomolecules. PMID:24456213

  2. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  3. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  4. Geochemical kinetics via the Swift-Connick equations and solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Steven J.; Ohlin, C. André; Casey, William H.

    2011-07-01

    Signal analysis in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is among the most powerful methods to quantify reaction rates in aqueous solutions. To this end, the Swift-Connick approximations to the Bloch-McConnell equations have been used extensively to estimate rate parameters for elementary reactions. The method is primarily used for 17O NMR in aqueous solutions, but the list of geochemically relevant nuclei that can be used is long, and includes 29Si, 27Al, 19F, 13C and many others of particular interest to geochemists. Here we review the derivation of both the Swift-Connick and Bloch-McConnell equations and emphasize assumptions and quirks. For example, the equations were derived for CW-NMR, but are used with modern pulse FT-NMR and can be applied to systems that have exchange rates that are shorter than the lifetime of a typical pulse. The method requires a dilute solution where the minor reacting species contributes a negligible amount of total magnetization. We evaluate the sensitivity of results to this dilute-solution requirement and also highlight the need for chemically well-defined systems if reliable data are to be obtained. The limitations in using longitudinal relaxation to estimate reaction rate parameters are discussed. Finally, we provide examples of the application of the method, including ligand exchanges from aqua ions and hydrolysis complexes, that emphasize its flexibility. Once the basic requirements of the Swift-Connick method are met, it allows geochemists to establish rates of elementary reactions. Reactions at this scale lend themselves well to methods of computational simulation and could provide key tests of accuracy.

  5. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results. PMID:26260854

  6. WAXS studies of the structural diversity of hemoglobin in solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Bardhan, J.; Gore, D.; Lal, J.; Mandava, S.; Park, S.; Rodi, D. J.; Ho, N. T.; Ho, C.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Specific ligation states of hemoglobin are, when crystallized, capable of taking on multiple quaternary structures. The relationship between these structures, captured in crystal lattices, and hemoglobin structure in solution remains uncertain. Wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) is a sensitive probe of protein structure in solution that can distinguish among similar structures and has the potential to contribute to these issues. We used WAXS to assess the relationships among the structures of human and bovine hemoglobins in different liganded forms in solution. WAXS data readily distinguished among the various forms of hemoglobins. WAXS patterns confirm some of the relationships among hemoglobin structures that have been defined through crystallography and NMR and extend others. For instance, methemoglobin A in solution is, as expected, nearly indistinguishable from HbCO A. Interestingly, for bovine hemoglobin, the differences between deoxy-Hb, methemoglobin and HbCO are smaller than the corresponding differences in human hemoglobin. WAXS data were also used to assess the spatial extent of structural fluctuations of various hemoglobins in solution. Dynamics has been implicated in allosteric control of hemoglobin, and increased dynamics has been associated with lowered oxygen affinity. Consistent with that notion, WAXS patterns indicate that deoxy-Hb A exhibits substantially larger structural fluctuations than HbCO A. Comparisons between the observed WAXS patterns and those predicted on the basis of atomic coordinate sets suggest that the structures of Hb in different liganded forms exhibit clear differences from known crystal structure.

  7. Simple NMR methods for evaluating higher order structures of monoclonal antibody therapeutics with quinary structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Long, Dianna S; Lute, Scott C; Levy, Michaella J; Brorson, Kurt A; Keire, David A

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs constitute the largest class of protein therapeutics currently on the market. Correctly folded protein higher order structure (HOS), including quinary structure, is crucial for mAb drug quality. The quinary structure is defined as the association of quaternary structures (e.g., oligomerized mAb). Here, several commonly available analytical methods, i.e., size-exclusion-chromatography (SEC) FPLC, multi-angle light scattering (MALS), circular dichroism (CD), NMR and multivariate analysis, were combined and modified to yield a complete profile of HOS and comparable metrics. Rituximab and infliximab were chosen for method evaluation because both IgG1 molecules are known to be homologous in sequence, superimposable in Fab crystal structure and identical in Fc structure. However, herein the two are identified to be significantly different in quinary structure in addition to minor secondary structure differences. All data collectively showed rituximab was mostly monomeric while infliximab was in mono-oligomer equilibrium driven by its Fab fragment. The quinary structure differences were qualitatively inferred from the less used but more reproducible dilution-injection-SEC-FPLC curve method. Quantitative principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on NMR spectra of either the intact or the in-situ enzymatic-digested mAb samples. The cleavage reactions happened directly in NMR tubes without further separation, which greatly enhanced NMR spectra quality and resulted in larger inter- and intra-lot variations based on PCA. The new in-situ enzymatic digestion method holds potential in identifying structural differences on larger therapeutic molecules using NMR. PMID:27344629

  8. High-resolution NMR studies of structure and dynamics of human ERp27 indicate extensive interdomain flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nader T.; Wallis, A. Katrine; Wells, Stephen A.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.; Freedman, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    ERp27 (endoplasmic reticulum protein 27.7 kDa) is a homologue of PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase) localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERp27 is predicted to consist of two thioredoxin-fold domains homologous with the non-catalytic b and b′ domains of PDI. The structure in solution of the N-terminal b-like domain of ERp27 was solved using high-resolution NMR data. The structure confirms that it has the thioredoxin fold and that ERp27 is a member of the PDI family. 15N-NMR relaxation data were obtained and ModelFree analysis highlighted limited exchange contributions and slow internal motions, and indicated that the domain has an average order parameter S2 of 0.79. Comparison of the single-domain structure determined in the present study with the equivalent domain within full-length ERp27, determined independently by X-ray diffraction, indicated very close agreement. The domain interface inferred from NMR data in solution was much more extensive than that observed in the X-ray structure, suggesting that the domains flex independently and that crystallization selects one specific interdomain orientation. This led us to apply a new rapid method to simulate the flexibility of the full-length protein, establishing that the domains show considerable freedom to flex (tilt and twist) about the interdomain linker, consistent with the NMR data. PMID:23234573

  9. Methyl-specific isotopic labeling: a molecular tool box for solution NMR studies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Plevin, Michael J; Sounier, Remy; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a uniquely powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules at atomic resolution. In the past 15 years, the development of new isotopic labeling strategies has opened the possibility of exploiting NMR spectroscopy in the study of supra-molecular complexes with molecular weights of up to 1MDa. At the core of these isotopic labeling developments is the specific introduction of [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl probes into perdeuterated proteins. Here, we describe the evolution of these approaches and discuss their impact on structural and biological studies. The relevant protocols are succinctly reviewed for single and combinatorial isotopic-labeling of methyl-containing residues, and examples of applications on challenging biological systems, including high molecular weight and membrane proteins, are presented. PMID:25881211

  10. Solution conformation of the synthetic bovine proenkephalin-A209-237 by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, B; Dillmann, B; Lefèvre, J F; Goumon, Y; Aunis, D; Metz-Boutigue, M H

    1998-12-11

    Proenkephalin-A has been described to generate enkephalins, opoid peptides, and several derived peptides, which display various biological effects, including antinociception and immunological enhancement. Recently, we have isolated from bovine chromaffin granules a new antibacterial peptide, named enkelytin, which corresponds to the bisphosphorylated form of PEAP209-237 (Goumon, Y., Strub, J. M., Moniatte, M., Nullans, G., Poteur, L., Hubert, P., Van Dorsselaer, A., Aunis, D., and Metz-Boutigue, M. H. (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 235, 516-525). In this paper, the three-dimensional solution structure of synthetic PEAP209-237 was investigated by NMR. These studies indicate that this peptide, which is unstructured in water, folds into an alpha-helical structure in trifluoroethanol/water (1/1). NMR data revealed two possible three-dimensional models of PEAP209-237. In both models, the proline residue Pro-227 induces a 90 degrees hinge between two alpha-helical segments (Ser-215 to Ser-221 and Glu-228 to Arg-232) leading to an overall L-shaped structure for the molecule. The negative charge of PEAP209-237 and the low amphipathy of the two alpha-helical segments imply new mechanisms to explain the antibacterial activity of enkelytin. PMID:9837932

  11. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Cryobiology studies the effect of low temperatures on living systems such as microorganisms and plants. In particular, plants growing in cold or frozen environments can survive such extreme conditions due to the cold hardening process. Hardening is a three step process during which, first, translocation of polysaccharides to the plant roots affects water structure in the cell-soil surface. For this reason, increase of cell-membrane permeability and resistance to temperatures from -5°C to -10°C is achieved. In a second step, chemical alteration of cell membrane arises and resistance to temperatures up to -20°C is obtained. The last hardening step consists in the vitrification of the plant tissues which allow plants to survive at temperatures as low as -50°C. Since polysaccharides play a very important role in the initial part of the cold hardening process, it is of paramount importance to study the effect of such natural biopolymers on water structure. Here, we present preliminary data obtained by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry on the effect of hyaluronan (an anionic, non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan) on water structure at different concentrations of the polysaccharide. Although hyaluronan is a polysaccharide found exceptionally in animal, human or bacterial bodies, in the present work it was used as a model "pilot" compound. In fact, it has an unique ability to hold water and it contains both polysaccharide and protein-like acetamido functionalities. For this reason, hyaluronan promotes the future research on other plant biopolymers such as, for instance, starch and other very specific proteins. Results revealed that different water-structure systems surround the molecule of hyaluronan in diluted and semidiluted systems. Namely, at the lowest hyaluronan concentration, three hydration shells can be recognized. The first hydration shell is made by bound water (BW) which is strongly fixed to the hyaluronan surface mainly through electrostatic interactions. A

  12. Investigations on the Crystal-Chemical Behavior of Transition-Metal-Bearing Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions Using 27Al and 29Si NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palke, A. C.; Geiger, C. A.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The petrological importance of silicate garnet is derived from the presence of three distinct cation sites of varying size and coordination number. This allows for a wide range of trace, minor, and major element substitutions. However, a full and precise crystal-chemical understanding of the nature of transition metals in garnet is not at hand. Possible mechanisms of various charge-balanced substitutions (e.g. octahedral Ti4+ or tetrahedral Al3+) and the structural state of solid solutions (i.e. short- to long-range ordering) need study. We report on ongoing efforts in these directions using 27Al and 29Si Magic-Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. Early work on synthetic and natural Fe- and Mn-bearing pyrope- and grossular-rich garnets focused on the effect these paramagnetic transition metals have in measuring and interpreting NMR spectra. These results have been expanded with NMR measurements on synthetic pyrope-rich garnets containing other paramagnetic transition metals including Cr3+, V3+, Co2+, and Ni2+ as well as diamagnetic Ti4+. NMR peaks are severely broadened in the presence of even small concentrations of Cr3+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ leading to a loss of spectral resolution. On the other hand, the spectra of garnet containing V3+, Fe2+, Co2+, and Ni2+ have better resolution and show separate paramagnetically shifted NMR peaks. In some cases, crystal-chemical information can be obtained because of the large frequency separations between the NMR peaks that can be assigned to various local atomic configurations around Al and Si. Furthermore, the 27Al NMR spectrum of a synthetic pyrope garnet with about 2% diamagnetic Ti4+ on the octahedral site showed the absence of any tetrahedral Al3+, which rules out the substitution mechanism VITi + IVAl = VIAl + IVSi in the solid solution. Our NMR investigations on garnet are now being made at the exploratory level. We think that NMR spectra of diamagnetic garnet can provide information on a

  13. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  14. Comparison of the crystal and solution structures of two RNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Rife, J P; Stallings, S C; Correll, C C; Dallas, A; Steitz, T A; Moore, P B

    1999-01-01

    Until recently, there were no examples of RNAs whose structures had been determined by both NMR and x-ray crystallography, and thus there was no experimental basis for assessing the accuracy of RNA solution structures. A comparison of the solution and the crystal structures of two RNAs is presented, which demonstrates that NMR can produce solution structures that resemble crystal structures and thus validates the application to RNA of a methodology developed initially for the determination of protein conformations. Models for RNA solution structures are appreciably affected by the parameters used for their refinement that describe intramolecular interactions. For the RNAs of interest here, the more realistic those parameters, the greater the similarity between solution structures and crystal structures. PMID:9876123

  15. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html. PMID:23221084

  16. Solution-State One- and Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy of High-Molecular-Weight Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Holding, Ashley J; Mäkelä, Valtteri; Tolonen, Lasse; Sixta, Herbert; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; King, Alistair W T

    2016-04-21

    High-molecular-weight celluloses (which even include bacterial cellulose) can be dissolved fully in methyltrioctylphosphonium acetate/[D6 ]DMSO solutions to allow the measurement of resonance-overlap-free 1 D and 2 D NMR spectra. This is achieved by a simple and non-destructive dissolution method, without solvent suppression, pre-treatment or deuteration of the ionic component. We studied a range of cellulose samples by using various NMR experiments to make an a priori assignment of the cellulose resonances. Chain-end resonances are also visible in the (1) H NMR spectrum. This allows the rough determination of the degree of polymerisation (DP) of a sample for low-DP celluloses by the integration of non-reducing chain ends C1 versus polymeric cellobiose C1. Low-DP celluloses show a good agreement with the gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) values, but high-DP pulps show more deviation. For high-purity pulps (pre-hydrolysis kraft and sulfite), residual xyloses and mannoses can also be identified from the (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra. Resonances are thus assigned for the common polymeric polysaccharides found in chemical pulps. PMID:27010664

  17. High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid and Solution Biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, A.B.; Paëpe, G. De; van der Wel, P.C.A.; Hu, K.-N.; Joo, C.-G.; Bajaj, V.S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Herzfeld, J.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) results in a substantial nuclear polarization enhancement through a transfer of the magnetization from electrons to nuclei. Recent years have seen considerable progress in the development of DNP experiments directed towards enhancing sensitivity in biological nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This review covers the applications, hardware, polarizing agents, and theoretical descriptions that were developed at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for high-field DNP experiments. In frozen dielectrics, the enhanced nuclear polarization developed in the vicinity of the polarizing agent can be efficiently dispersed to the bulk of the sample via 1H spin diffusion. This strategy has been proven effective in polarizing biologically interesting systems, such as nanocrystalline peptides and membrane proteins, without leading to paramagnetic broadening of the NMR signals. Gyrotrons have been used as a source of high-power (5–10 W) microwaves up to 460 GHz as required for the DNP experiments. Other hardware has also been developed allowing in situ microwave irradiation integrated with cryogenic magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR. Advances in the quantum mechanical treatment are successful in describing the mechanism by which new biradical polarizing agents yield larger enhancements at higher magnetic fields. Finally, pulsed methods and solution experiments should play a prominent role in the future of DNP. PMID:19194532

  18. A View into the Blind Spot: Solution NMR Provides New Insights into Signal Transduction Across the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Call, Matthew E.; Chou, James J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in cell biology concerns how cells communicate with their surroundings through surface receptors. The last few decades have seen major advances in understanding the mechanisms of receptor-ligand recognition and the biochemical consequences of such encounters. This review describes the emergence of solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the structural characterization of membrane-associated protein domains involved in transmembrane signaling. We highlight particularly instructive examples from the fields of immunoreceptor biology, growth hormone signaling, and cell adhesion. These signaling complexes comprise multiple subunits each spanning the membrane with a single helical segment that links extracellular ligand-binding domains to the cell interior. The apparent simplicity of this domain organization belies the complexity involved in cooperative assembly of functional structures that translate information across the cellular boundary. PMID:21134635

  19. Accurate and molecular-size-tolerant NMR quantitation of diverse components in solution

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nagata, Takashi; Kigawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Determining the amount of each component of interest in a mixture is a fundamental first step in characterizing the nature of the solution and to develop possible means of utilization of its components. Similarly, determining the composition of units in complex polymers, or polymer mixtures, is crucial. Although NMR is recognized as one of the most powerful methods to achieve this and is widely used in many fields, variation in the molecular sizes or the relative mobilities of components skews quantitation due to the size-dependent decay of magnetization. Here, a method to accurately determine the amount of each component by NMR was developed. This method was validated using a solution that contains biomass-related components in which the molecular sizes greatly differ. The method is also tolerant of other factors that skew quantitation such as variation in the one-bond C–H coupling constant. The developed method is the first and only way to reliably overcome the skewed quantitation caused by several different factors to provide basic information on the correct amount of each component in a solution. PMID:26883279

  20. 1H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G.; Pîrnau, Adrian

    2009-08-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  1. Oxygen-17 NMR Shifts Caused by Cr{Sup ++} in Aqueous Solutions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jackson, J. A.; Lemons, J. F.; Taube, H.

    1962-01-01

    Cr{sup ++} in solution produces a paramagnetic shift in the NMR absorption of O{sup 17} in ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, as well as the expected paramagnetic shift for O{sup 17} in H{sub 2}O. As the concentration of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} increases, the shift in the H{sub 2}O{sup 17} absorption is diminished, and eventually changes sign. The effects are ascribed to preferential replacement by ClO{sub 4}{sup -} of water molecules from the axial positions in the first coordination sphere about Cr{sup ++}.

  2. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  3. The Solid Solution Sr(1-x)Ba(x)Ga2: Substitutional Disorder and Chemical Bonding Visited by NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Pecher, Oliver; Mausolf, Bernhard; Lamberts, Kevin; Oligschläger, Dirk; Niewieszol, Carina; Englert, Ulli; Haarmann, Frank

    2015-09-28

    Complete miscibility of the intermetallic phases (IPs) SrGa2 and BaGa2 forming the solid solution Sr(1-x)Ba(x)Ga2 is shown by means of X-ray diffraction, thermoanalytical and metallographic studies. Regarding the distances of Sr/Ba sites versus substitution degree, a model of isolated substitution centres (ISC) for up to 10% cation substitution is explored to study the influence on the Ga bonding situation. A combined application of NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations proves the electric field gradient (EFG) to be a sensitive measure of different bonding situations. The experimental resolution is boosted by orientation-dependent NMR on magnetically aligned powder samples, revealing in first approximation two different Ga species in the ISC regimes. EFG calculations using superlattice structures within periodic boundary conditions are in fair agreement with the NMR spectroscopy data and are discussed in detail regarding their application on disordered IPs. PMID:26272697

  4. Conformational investigation in solution of a fluorinated anti-inflammatory drug by NMR spectroscopy in weakly ordering media.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis; Celebre, Giorgio; De Luca, Giuseppina

    2014-07-31

    The structural and conformational elucidation of flexible bioactive molecules in solution is currently a crucial goal for the scientific community, but it is rarely achievable by available techniques. The anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal is presented here as a model case for supporting the efficiency of NMR spectroscopy combined with the use of weakly ordering media as a promising methodology for the conformational investigation of small bioactive molecules. Starting from NMR anisotropic data (40 independent dipolar couplings), a quite accurate description of its torsional distribution around the inter-ring C-C bond was found, characterized by a pair of two couples of conformers. According to the relative configuration of the carboxylic group and the fluorine atom in the ortho position to the inter-ring C-C bond, the more stable couple of conformers are defined as "trans" type conformers (F opposite to the carboxylic group) whereas the less stable couple are "cis" type conformers (F and carboxylic group on the same side). In order to study the influence of fluorine nuclei on the structure and conformational distribution, the same analytical strategy has been applied to investigate the phenylsalicylic acid, its nonfluorinated analogue. PMID:24999747

  5. Uncovering Intramolecular π-Type Hydrogen Bonds in Solution by NMR Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mastrorilli, Piero; Gallo, Vito; Todisco, Stefano; Latronico, Mario; Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Reaction between the phosphinito bridged diplatinum species [(PHCy2 )Pt(μ-PCy2 ){κ(2) P,O-μ-P(O)Cy2 }Pt(PHCy2 )](Pt-Pt) (1), and (trimethylsilyl)acetylene at 273 K affords the σ-acetylide complex [(PHCy2 )(η(1) -Me3 SiC≡C)Pt(μ-PCy2 )Pt(PHCy2 ){κP-P(OH)Cy2 }](Pt-Pt) (2) featuring an intramolecular π-type hydrogen bond. Scalar and dipolar couplings involving the POH proton were detected by 2D NMR experiments. Relativistic DFT calculations of the geometry, relative energy, and NMR properties of model systems of 2 confirmed the structural assignment and allowed the energy of the π-type hydrogen bond to be estimated (ca. 22 kJ mol(-1) ). PMID:27097847

  6. Myochrysine Solution Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William B.; Zhao, Zheng; Dorsey, John G.; Tepperman, Katherine

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the framework structure of Myochrysine (disodium gold(I)thiomalate) in the solid state and extremely concentrated aqueous solution, previously. It consists of an open chain polymer with linear gold coordination to two thiolates from the thiomalic acid moieties which bridge between pairs of gold atoms providing an Au-S-Au angle of 95°. The question remained: was this structure relevant to the dilute solutions of drugs administered and the still lower concentrations of gold found in the bodies of patients (typically 1 ppm Au in blood and urine or 5 μM in Au). We have provided an answer to that question using extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). EXAFS studies confirm that the polymeric structure with two sulfur atoms per gold atom persists from molar concentrations down to millimolar concentrations. CZE is able to separate and detect Myochrysine at millimolar levels. More importantly, at micromolar levels Myochrysine solutions exhibit identical CZE behavior to that measured at millimolar levels. Thus, aqueous solutions of the drug remain oligomeric at concentrations commensurate with those found in patient blood and urine. The reactivity of Myochrysine with cyanide, a species especially prevalent in smoking patients, was explored using CZE. Cyanide freely replaces thiomalic acid to form [Au(CN)2]- and thiomalic acid via a mixed ligand intermediate. The overall apparent equilibrium constant (Kapp) for the reaction is 6×10-4M-1. Further reaction of [Au(CN)2]- with a large excess of L, where L is cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, or glutathione, shows that these amino acids readily replace cyanide to form [AuL2]-. These species are thus potential metabolites and could possibly be active forms of gold in vivo. That all of these species are readily separated and quantified using CZE demonstrates that capillary electrophoresis is an accessible and powerful tool to add to those used for the study of gold

  7. The structure of the cytochrome p450cam-putidaredoxin complex determined by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy and crystallography.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Yoshitaka; Hass, Mathias A S; Kikui, Yuki; Liu, Wei-Min; Ölmez, Betül; Skinner, Simon P; Blok, Anneloes; Kloosterman, Alexander; Koteishi, Hiroyasu; Löhr, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald; Nojiri, Masaki; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2013-11-15

    Cytochrome P450cam catalyzes the hydroxylation of camphor in a complex process involving two electron transfers (ETs) from the iron-sulfur protein putidaredoxin. The enzymatic control of the successive steps of catalysis is critical for a highly efficient reaction. The injection of the successive electrons is part of the control system. To understand the molecular interactions between putidaredoxin and cytochrome P450cam, we determined the structure of the complex both in solution and in the crystal state. Paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy using lanthanide tags yielded 446 structural restraints that were used to determine the solution structure. An ensemble of 10 structures with an RMSD of 1.3Å was obtained. The crystal structure of the complex was solved, showing a position of putidaredoxin that is identical with the one in the solution structure. The NMR data further demonstrate the presence of a minor state or set of states of the complex in solution, which is attributed to the presence of an encounter complex. The structure of the major state shows a small binding interface and a metal-to-metal distance of 16Å, with two pathways that provide strong electronic coupling of the redox centers. The interpretation of these results is discussed in the context of ET. The structure indicates that the ET rate can be much faster than the reported value, suggesting that the process may be gated. PMID:23856620

  8. Solution structure of a designed cyclic peptide ligand for nickel and copper ions

    PubMed Central

    Eshelman, Matthew R.; Aldous, Amanda R.; Neupane, Kosh P.; Kritzer, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study a cyclic peptide derived from the amino-terminal copper-and-nickel-binding (ATCUN) motif. The three-dimensional structure of the unliganded peptide in aqueous solution was solved by simulated annealing using distance constraints derived from Nuclear Overhauser Effects. A structural model for the Ni(II)-bound complex was also produced based on NMR evidence and prior spectroscopic data, which are consistent with crystal structures of linear ATCUN complexes. Structural interpolation, or “morphing,” was used to understand the transition of this highly structured cyclic peptide from its unliganded structure to its metal-ion-bound structure. PMID:25414527

  9. Solute diffusion in ionic liquids, NMR measurements and comparisons to conventional solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients of a variety of dilute solutes in the series of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides ([Prn1][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), trihexyltetracedecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [P14,666][Tf2N], and assorted imidazolium ionic liquids are measured using pulsed field gradient (1)H NMR. These data, combined with available literature data, are used to try to uncover the solute and solvent characteristics most important in determining tracer diffusion rates. Discussion is framed in terms of departures from simple hydrodynamic predictions for translational friction using the ratio ζobs/ζSE, where ζobs is the observed friction, determined from the measured diffusion coefficient D via ζobs = kBT/D, and ζSE = 6πηR is the Stokes friction on a sphere of radius R (determined from the solute van der Waals volume) in a solvent with viscosity η. In the case of neutral solutes, the primary determinant of whether hydrodynamic predictions are accurate is the relative size of solute versus solvent molecules. A single correlation, albeit with considerable scatter, is found between ζobs/ζSE and the ratio of solute-to-solvent van der Waals volumes, ζobs/ζSE = {1 + a(VU/VV)(-p)}, with constants a = 1.93 and p = 1.88. In the case of small solutes, the observed friction is over 100-fold smaller than predictions of hydrodynamic models. The dipole moment of the solute has little effect on the friction, whereas solute charge has a marked effect. For monovalent solutes of size comparable to or smaller than the solvent ions, the observed friction is comparable to or even greater than what is predicted by hydrodynamics. These general trends are shown to be quite similar to what is observed for tracer diffusion in conventional solvents. PMID:23968276

  10. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  11. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  12. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR–derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra. PMID:26665178

  13. Advances in Protein NMR Impacting Drug Discovery Provided by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational drug design relies on three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, especially proteins. Structural genomics high-throughput (HTP) structure determination platforms established by the NIH Protein Structure Initiative are uniquely suited to provide these structures. NMR plays a critical role since (i) many important protein targets do not form single crystals required for X-ray diffraction and (ii) NMR can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on proteins and their drug complexes that cannot be obtained with X-ray crystallography. In this article, recent advances of NMR driven by structural genomics projects are reviewed. These advances promise that future pharmaceutical discovery and design of drugs can increasingly rely on protocols for rapid and accurate NMR structure determination. PMID:20443167

  14. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed. PMID:27192825

  15. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  16. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the gamma-carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, D G; Kanagy, C; Sudmeier, J L; Furie, B C; Furie, B; Bachovchin, W W

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a gamma-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational gamma-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing alpha-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues -13 to -3 form an amphipathic alpha-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5 degrees C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the gamma-carboxylation recognition site, four residues (-18, -17, -16, and -15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue (-10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic alpha-helix in the gamma-carboxylation recognition site is discussed. PMID:1911775

  17. Solution NMR studies reveal the location of the second transmembrane domain of the human sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Amin, Nader T.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91–107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation. PMID:25647032

  18. No-D NMR (no-deuterium proton NMR) spectroscopy: a simple yet powerful method for analyzing reaction and reagent solutions.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Thomas R; Eklov, Brian M; Ryba, Troy D; Voloshin, Mikhail; Yao, Letitia J

    2004-03-18

    [reaction: see text] The title technique is a convenient and powerful method for directly monitoring or assaying any reaction mixture or reagent solution. Examples of some common processes (Fischer esterification, lithiation, butyllithium/THF compatibility, olefin metathesis, and a quantification assay), each interrogated in its native solvent, are presented. The spectral data are easy to acquire, and the information content makes a compelling case for routine use of No-D NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15012073

  19. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  20. Experimental Structural Studies of Solutes in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Ingmar

    2007-11-29

    The principles of experimental methods to study the structure and the hydrogen bonding of hydrated solutes in aqueous solution are presented, and whether theoretical simulations can produce comparable information as the experimental ones is discussed. Two structure methods, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS), and one method to study the hydrogen bonding in hydrated species in aqueous solution, double difference infrared spectroscopy of HDO, are presented.

  1. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  2. NMR structure and dynamics of the agonist dynorphin peptide bound to the human kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey; White, Kate L.; Doncescu, Nathalie; Didenko, Tatiana; Roth, Bryan L.; Czaplicki, Georges; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Milon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the dynorphin (1–13) peptide (dynorphin) bound to the human kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been determined by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 15N chemical shift variations indicated that free and bound peptide is in fast exchange in solutions containing 1 mM dynorphin and 0.01 mM KOR. Radioligand binding indicated an intermediate-affinity interaction, with a Kd of ∼200 nM. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of bound dynorphin. The N-terminal opioid signature, YGGF, was observed to be flexibly disordered, the central part of the peptide from L5 to R9 to form a helical turn, and the C-terminal segment from P10 to K13 to be flexibly disordered in this intermediate-affinity bound state. Combining molecular modeling with NMR provided an initial framework for understanding multistep activation of a G protein-coupled receptor by its cognate peptide ligand. PMID:26372966

  3. Chimeric Avidin – NMR Structure and Dynamics of a 56 kDa Homotetrameric Thermostable Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin–bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin–free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl–detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model–free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin–bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding. PMID:24959850

  4. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development. PMID:21268157

  5. Conformational analysis of Ramipril (HOE 498) in a solution by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishii, Tomoko; Oonishi, Isao; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-05-01

    Conformations of Ramipril (Hoe 498, 2-[ N-(S)-1-ethoxycarbonyl-3-phenylpropyl]-L-alanyl-(1S, 3S, 5S)-2-azabicyclo (3,3,0) octane-3-carboxylic acid), a non-sulfhydryl angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in CD 3OD, to account for their specific biological activity and long-lasting effectiveness. The preferred optimum structures of the cis and trans forms are postulated. The identification of the two conformers is based on NMR measurements and classical energy calculations. The cis conformation should be preferred for biological activity.

  6. Solution NMR assignment of the heavy chain complex of the human cardiac myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Rostkova, Elena; Gautel, Mathias; Pfuhl, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The regulatory light chain (RLC) of striated and cardiac muscle myosin plays a complex role in muscle function and regulation. Together with the essential light chain it provides stability to the lever arm, which is essential for force generation. Furthermore, phosphorylation and interaction with myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) suggest an additional role in the regulation of muscle contraction. The former is of particular importance in the heart, where RLC phosphorylation appears to be correlated to the wringing motion of heart contraction. To address these questions and because of a lack of mammalian RLC structures, we initiated an NMR study of the human cardiac regulatory myosin light chain. PMID:24414277

  7. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  8. High-field NMR T 2 relaxation mechanism in D2O solutions of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, A.; Zengin, B.

    2013-07-01

    400 MHz NMR T 2 in D2O solutions of albumin and pure D2O were measured at different temperatures. A relation, based on the chemical exchange between bound HDO and non-exchangeable protein protons, was derived theoretically for the contributions of bound HDO [ P b(1/ T 2b)]. A second relation was also derived theoretically by considering spin-rotation interactions between bound HDO and surrounding protein protons. The P b(1/ T 2b) values in albumin solutions were then determined by replacing experimental data into the first relation. The values of the 1/ T 2 and P b(1/ T 2b) in albumin solutions increase linearly with temperature( T), whereas the 1/ T 2 in D2O decreases with T. In addition, the spin-rotation correlation times were calculated from the second relation. The dipolar correlation time of albumin was then reproduced from the spin-rotation correlation times for confirmative purposes. In conclusion, the 1/ T 2 in albumin solutions with D2O is caused by spin-rotation interactions.

  9. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda; Dybas, Joseph M.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences that do not share recognizable sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. This challenge can be addressed by hybrid algorithms that utilize easily obtainable experimental data and carry a limited amount of indirect structural information. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein super-secondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago, and new folds discovered since then are novel combinations of existing Smotifs. This observation suggests that it should be possible to build any structure, of either a known or yet to be discovered fold, from a combination of existing Smotifs derived from already known structures. In the absence of any sequence similarity signal, limited experimental data can be used to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known experimental structures. Here we present a modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on NMR chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins with unique folds, the algorithm delivered 90 homology model quality models, among them 24 high quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. Detailed analysis of the method’s performance suggests that further improvement can be achieved by improving sampling algorithms and developing more precise tools that predict dihedral angle preferences from chemical shift assignments. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available. PMID:23685209

  10. NMR structure of a fungal virulence factor reveals structural homology with mammalian saposin B

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Moriah R.; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Goldman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The fungal protein CBP (calcium binding protein) is a known virulence factor with an unknown virulence mechanism. The protein was identified based on its ability to bind calcium and its prevalence as Histoplasma capsulatum’s most abundant secreted protein. However, CBP has no sequence homology with other calcium binding proteins and contains no known calcium-binding motifs. Here, the NMR structure of CBP reveals a highly intertwined homodimer and represents the first atomic level NMR model of any fungal virulence factor. Each CBP monomer is comprised of four α-helices that adopt the saposin fold, characteristic of a protein family that binds to membranes and lipids. This structural homology suggests that CBP functions as a lipid-binding protein, potentially interacting with host glycolipids in the phagolysosome of host cells. PMID:19298372

  11. Structure of supersaturated zincate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrenko, V.E.; Balyakina, N.N.; Baulov, V.I.; Kotov, A.V.; Zubov, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    During the discharge of chemical power sources with zinc electrodes, supersaturated zincate solution (SZS) is formed from which zinc oxide or hydroxide precipitates as a function of time. The deposit detracts from the functioning of these power sources. In view of the model suggested for the structure of SZS, it is expected that a stabilizing effect would be exerted on SZS by compounds having proton-donating groups which do not give off the protons in the strongly alkaline medium and are not discharged in this medium. For a check of this, the authors chose to use xylitol and molasses in their experiments. The SZS were produced with a mock-up silver-zinc battery using the procedure previously described.

  12. Investigating the Mechanisms of Amylolysis of Starch Granules by Solution-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a prominent component of the human diet and is hydrolyzed by α-amylase post-ingestion. Probing the mechanism of this process has proven challenging, due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of individual starch granules. By means of solution-state NMR, we demonstrate that flexible polysaccharide chains protruding from the solvent-exposed surfaces of waxy rice starch granules are highly mobile and that during hydrothermal treatment, when the granules swell, the number of flexible residues on the exposed surfaces increases by a factor of 15. Moreover, we show that these flexible chains are the primary substrates for α-amylase, being cleaved in the initial stages of hydrolysis. These findings allow us to conclude that the quantity of flexible α-glucan chains protruding from the granule surface will greatly influence the rate of energy acquisition from digestion of starch. PMID:25815624

  13. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR. PMID:24218049

  14. Studying the Conformation of a Silaffin-Derived Pentalysine Peptide Embedded in Bioinspired Silica using Solution and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Magic-Angle Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Yasmin; Gottlieb, Hugo E; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Goobes, Gil

    2016-05-01

    Smart materials are created in nature at interfaces between biomolecules and solid materials. The ability to probe the structure of functional peptides that engineer biogenic materials at this heterogeneous setting can be facilitated tremendously by use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This sensitive NMR technique allows simple and quick measurements, often without the need for isotope enrichment. Here, it is used to characterize a pentalysine peptide, derived from a diatom's silaffin protein. The peptide accelerates the formation of bioinspired silica and gets embedded inside the material as it is formed. Two-dimensional DNP MAS NMR of the silica-bound peptide and solution NMR of the free peptide are used to derive its secondary structure in the two states and to pinpoint some subtle conformational changes that the peptide undergoes in order to adapt to the silica environment. In addition, interactions between abundant lysine residues and silica surface are identified, and proximity of other side chains to silica and to neighboring peptide molecules is discussed. PMID:26451953

  15. Solution NMR and molecular dynamics reveal a persistent alpha helix within the dynamic region of PsbQ from photosystem II of higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Rathner, Petr; Rathner, Adriana; Horničáková, Michaela; Wohlschlager, Christian; Chandra, Kousik; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extrinsic proteins of photosystem II of higher plants and green algae PsbO, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbR are essential for stable oxygen production in the oxygen evolving center. In the available X‐ray crystallographic structure of higher plant PsbQ residues S14‐Y33 are missing. Building on the backbone NMR assignment of PsbQ, which includes this “missing link”, we report the extended resonance assignment including side chain atoms. Based on nuclear Overhauser effect spectra a high resolution solution structure of PsbQ with a backbone RMSD of 0.81 Å was obtained from torsion angle dynamics. Within the N‐terminal residues 1–45 the solution structure deviates significantly from the X‐ray crystallographic one, while the four‐helix bundle core found previously is confirmed. A short α‐helix is observed in the solution structure at the location where a β‐strand had been proposed in the earlier crystallographic study. NMR relaxation data and unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations corroborate that the N‐terminal region behaves as a flexible tail with a persistent short local helical secondary structure, while no indications of forming a β‐strand are found. Proteins 2015; 83:1677–1686. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26138376

  16. Correction: Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR.

    PubMed

    Piana, Francesca; Case, David H; Ramalhete, Susana M; Pileio, Giuseppe; Facciotti, Marco; Day, Graeme M; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Angulo, Jesús; Brown, Richard C D; Gale, Philip A

    2016-06-28

    Correction for 'Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR' by Francesca Piana et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 4034-4043. PMID:27254024

  17. DNP-Enhanced MAS NMR of Bovine Serum Albumin Sediments and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein sedimentation sans cryoprotection is a new approach to magic angle spinning (MAS) and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of proteins. It increases the sensitivity of the experiments by a factor of ∼4.5 in comparison to the conventional DNP sample preparation and circumvents intense background signals from the cryoprotectant. In this paper, we investigate sedimented samples and concentrated frozen solutions of natural abundance bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the absence of a glycerol-based cryoprotectant. We observe DNP signal enhancements of ε ∼ 66 at 140 GHz in a BSA pellet sedimented from an aqueous solution containing the biradical polarizing agent TOTAPOL and compare this with samples prepared using the conventional protocol (i.e., dissolution of BSA in a glycerol/water cryoprotecting mixture). The dependence of DNP parameters on the radical concentration points to the presence of an interaction between TOTAPOL and BSA, so much so that a frozen solution sans cryoprotectant still gives ε ∼ 50. We have studied the interaction of BSA with another biradical, SPIROPOL, that is more rigid than TOTAPOL and has been reported to give higher enhancements. SPIROPOL was also found to interact with BSA, and to give ε ∼ 26 close to its maximum achievable concentration. Under the same conditions, TOTAPOL gives ε ∼ 31, suggesting a lesser affinity of BSA for SPIROPOL with respect to TOTAPOL. Altogether, these results demonstrate that DNP is feasible in self-cryoprotecting samples. PMID:24460530

  18. Solution structure by site directed tryptophan fluorescence in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    1997-10-01

    The solution structure of the G strand of human tear lipocalin was deduced by site directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF). The fluorescent amino acid, tryptophan, was sequentially substituted for each native amino acid in the sequence of the G strand. The fluorescent properties resolved alternating periodicity as predicted for beta sheet structure, twists in the beta sheet, strand orientation in the lipocalin cavity, and the relative depth of residues in the cavity. A distribution of microstates with various orientations of dipoles in the side chain environments of the G strand revealed mobility on the nanosecond time scale. SDTF is broadly applicable to most proteins and will complement x-ray crystallography, site directed spin labeling by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the determination of solution structure. PMID:9345294

  19. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  20. Conformational studies of poly(9,9-dialkylfluorene)s in solution using NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Justino, Licínia L G; Ramos, M Luísa; Abreu, Paulo E; Carvalho, Rui A; Sobral, Abilio J F N; Scherf, Ullrich; Burrows, Hugh D

    2009-09-01

    Relationships have been obtained between intermonomer torsional angle and NMR chemical shifts ((1)H and (13)C) for isolated chains of two of the most important poly(9,9-dialkylfluorenes), poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)fluorene-2,7-diyl] (PF2/6) and the copolymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl) (F8BT), using DFT calculations. The correlations provide a model for NMR spectral data interpretation and the basis for analysis of conformational changes in poly(9,9-dialkylfluorene-2,7-diyl)s. The correlations obtained for PF2/6 indicate that the (13)C chemical shifts of the aromatic carbons close to the intermonomer connection (C1, C2, and C3) have minimum values at planar conformations (0 degrees and 180 degrees ) and maximum values at 90 degrees conformations. In contrast, the (1)H chemical shifts of the corresponding aromatic ortho protons (Ha and Hb) are greatest for planar conformations, and the minimum values are seen for 90 degrees conformations. For the F8BT copolymer, similar relationships are observed for the (1)H (Ha, Hb, and Hc) aromatic shifts. Considering the aromatic carbons of F8BT, the behavior of C2, C4, C5, and C6 is similar to that found for the PF2/6 carbons. However, C1 and C3 of the fluorene moiety behave differently with varying torsion angle. These are in close proximity to the fluorene-benzothiadiazole linkage and are markedly affected by interactions with the thiadiazole unit such that delta(C1) is a maximum for 180 degrees and a minimum for 0 degrees , whereas delta(C3) is a maximum for 0 degrees and minimum for 180 degrees. We have studied the (1)H and (13)C spectra of the two polymers at temperatures between -50 degrees C and +65 degrees C. The observed changes to higher or lower frequency in the aromatic resonances were analyzed using these theoretical relationships. Fluorescence studies on PF2/6 in chloroform solution suggest there are no significant interchain interactions under these conditions. This is supported

  1. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  2. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  3. High Resolution Field Cycling NMR in Biopolymers in Solution: Current and Potential Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Alfred

    2006-03-01

    I have been exploring the feasibility and utility of performing high resolution relaxation and cross-relaxation (NOE) in an unmodified shared commercial NMR instrument (PNAS 101:17066-17071) in collaboration with Mary Roberts of Boston College and Elan Eisenmesser of Brandeis. We can move a sample from 11.7 T to low (fringe) field 40- 80 cm above the commercial probe, and back, in 0.3 to 0.5 sec. I am making the system move the sample more gently, to avoid protein denaturation, using a stepping-motor timing-belt linear-motor. I willreview our initial papers on a DNA octamer, and phospholipidvesicles using phosphorus NMR. We emphasize phosphorus,in part, because relaxation studies over a wide range can make behavior of this biologically important species more readily interpretable than at high field alone. Then I will discuss a range of biochemical experiments, not yet done, using the full capability of our commercial instrument for multidimensional preparation and detection before and after field-cycling, and utilizing other nuclear species (H, C, and N). These involve especially use of electron-paramagnetic species and/or studies of small molecules in fast binding exchange with larger ones, and/or increased hetero-NOE effects at low field, to get new information on dynamics and structural preferences. Predictably we have found that, once we start to work on a specific biopolymer problem, we think of more things to do than we expected at first.

  4. Solution NMR and molecular dynamics reveal a persistent alpha helix within the dynamic region of PsbQ from photosystem II of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rathner, Petr; Rathner, Adriana; Horničáková, Michaela; Wohlschlager, Christian; Chandra, Kousik; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Wimmer, Reinhard; Müller, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    The extrinsic proteins of photosystem II of higher plants and green algae PsbO, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbR are essential for stable oxygen production in the oxygen evolving center. In the available X-ray crystallographic structure of higher plant PsbQ residues S14-Y33 are missing. Building on the backbone NMR assignment of PsbQ, which includes this "missing link", we report the extended resonance assignment including side chain atoms. Based on nuclear Overhauser effect spectra a high resolution solution structure of PsbQ with a backbone RMSD of 0.81 Å was obtained from torsion angle dynamics. Within the N-terminal residues 1-45 the solution structure deviates significantly from the X-ray crystallographic one, while the four-helix bundle core found previously is confirmed. A short α-helix is observed in the solution structure at the location where a β-strand had been proposed in the earlier crystallographic study. NMR relaxation data and unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations corroborate that the N-terminal region behaves as a flexible tail with a persistent short local helical secondary structure, while no indications of forming a β-strand are found. PMID:26138376

  5. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  6. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  7. NMR investigation of the interaction of vanadate with carbasilatranes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Evgeniou, Evgenios M; Pergantis, Spyros A; Leontidis, Epameinondas; Keramidas, Anastasios D

    2005-10-17

    Reaction of vanadate with carbasilatranes [methoxy{N,N',N' '-2,2',3-[bis(1-methylethanolato)(propyl)]amino}silane (1), methoxy{N,N',N' '-2,2',3-[bis(1-ethanolethanolato)(propyl)]amino}silane (2), and {N,N',N' '-2,2',2-[bis(ethanolato)(glycolpropyl ether)]amino}silane (3)] in aqueous solution results in the formation of vanadosilicates and five-coordinated chelate vanadium(V) complexes as evidenced by 51V, 1H, and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Chiral carbasilatrane S,S-1 was characterized in the solid state by X-ray diffraction, revealing a trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the metal ion, with one unidentate methoxy group and one atrane nitrogen atom at the axial positions and one carbon and two atrane oxygen atoms at the equatorial plane of the bipyramid. Crystal data (Mo Kalpha; 100(2) K) are as follows: orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1); a = 8.8751(6), b = 9.7031(7), c = 14.2263(12) A; Z = 4. The complexation of vanadium either with 1 or 2 is stereoselective yielding approximately 94% of the complex containing ligand in the S,R-configuration. The lower ability of the S,S- and R,R-diastereoisomers of 1 and 2 to ligate vanadate was attributed to stereochemical factors, dictating a square pyramidal geometry for the chelated complexes. A dynamic process between the vanadium chelate complexes and the respective carbasilatranes was evaluated by 2D {1H} EXSY NMR spectroscopy. These spectra show that the vanadate complexes with the open carbasilatranes exchange more slowly with the free ligand compared to the respective alcohol aminate complexes. PMID:16212377

  8. The structure investigations of dehydroacetic acid and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene condensation product by NMR, MS, and X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Morawiak, M.; Kamieński, B.; Schilf, W.

    2016-05-01

    A new unexpected product of condensation reaction of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and carbonyl compound (here: dehydroacetic acid (dha)) was synthesized. Discussion about the molecular structure of possible products of this reaction was done on the base of NMR studies. The structure of the titled product in both DMSO solution and in the solid state was resolved by analysis of its spectral data (X-ray structure analysis, multinuclear NMR in solution and solid state spectra) and MS measurements. The presented studies provided clear evidence that the titled product exists in diluted DMSO solution as the mixture of two kinetic free ionic species whereas in concentrated DMSO solution as well as in the solid state this system forms associated ionic pairs bonded together by hydrogen bonds.

  9. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James M.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining , 13C, and 15N backbone and 13Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2–1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9–1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments. PMID:22665781

  10. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  11. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  12. Solution- and Adsorbed-State Structural Ensembles Predicted for the Statherin-Hydroxyapatite System

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a multiscale structure prediction technique to study solution- and adsorbed-state ensembles of biomineralization proteins. The algorithm employs a Metropolis Monte Carlo-plus-minimization strategy that varies all torsional and rigid-body protein degrees of freedom. We applied the technique to fold statherin, starting from a fully extended peptide chain in solution, in the presence of hydroxyapatite (HAp) (001), (010), and (100) monoclinic crystals. Blind (unbiased) predictions capture experimentally observed macroscopic and high-resolution structural features and show minimal statherin structural change upon adsorption. The dominant structural difference between solution and adsorbed states is an experimentally observed folding event in statherin's helical binding domain. Whereas predicted statherin conformers vary slightly at three different HAp crystal faces, geometric and chemical similarities of the surfaces allow structurally promiscuous binding. Finally, we compare blind predictions with those obtained from simulation biased to satisfy all previously published solid-state NMR (ssNMR) distance and angle measurements (acquired from HAp-adsorbed statherin). Atomic clashes in these structures suggest a plausible, alternative interpretation of some ssNMR measurements as intermolecular rather than intramolecular. This work demonstrates that a combination of ssNMR and structure prediction could effectively determine high-resolution protein structures at biomineral interfaces. PMID:19383454

  13. Solution Accounts for Structural Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    New analytical technique determines dynamic response of damped structures dominated by internal structural damping mechanisms. Though structural damping is often negligible compared with damping due to air friction and friction in joints, structural damping can be of major importance in structures having heavy damping treatments or in outer-space structures. Finite-element model includes nonlinear, nonviscous internal damping.

  14. Furosemide's one little hydrogen atom: NMR crystallography structure verification of powdered molecular organics.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Robson, Harry; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-05-10

    The potential of NMR crystallography to verify molecular crystal structures deposited in structural databases is evaluated, with two structures of the pharmaceutical furosemide serving as examples. While the structures differ in the placement of one H atom, using this approach, we verify one of the structures in the Cambridge Structural Database using quantitative tools, while establishing that the other structure does not meet the verification criteria. PMID:27115483

  15. 31P magic angle spinning NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances.

    PubMed

    Palke, Aaron C; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-11-01

    We present (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La(1-x)Ce(x)PO4 (x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y(1-x)M(x)PO4 (M = V(n+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic V(n+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+) in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensities of these peaks are related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La(3+) or Y(3+) with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce(3+) and Nd(3+). The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the (31)P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii. PMID:24131129

  16. Correlation between local structural dynamics of proteins inferred from NMR ensembles and evolutionary dynamics of homologues of known structure.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Offmann, Bernard; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Conformational changes in proteins are extremely important for their biochemical functions. Correlation between inherent conformational variations in a protein and conformational differences in its homologues of known structure is still unclear. In this study, we have used a structural alphabet called Protein Blocks (PBs). PBs are used to perform abstraction of protein 3-D structures into a 1-D strings of 16 alphabets (a-p) based on dihedral angles of overlapping pentapeptides. We have analyzed the variations in local conformations in terms of PBs represented in the ensembles of 801 protein structures determined using NMR spectroscopy. In the analysis of concatenated data over all the residues in all the NMR ensembles, we observe that the overall nature of inherent local structural variations in NMR ensembles is similar to the nature of local structural differences in homologous proteins with a high correlation coefficient of .94. High correlation at the alignment positions corresponding to helical and β-sheet regions is only expected. However, the correlation coefficient by considering only the loop regions is also quite high (.91). Surprisingly, segregated position-wise analysis shows that this high correlation does not hold true to loop regions at the structurally equivalent positions in NMR ensembles and their homologues of known structure. This suggests that the general nature of local structural changes is unique; however most of the local structural variations in loop regions of NMR ensembles do not correlate to their local structural differences at structurally equivalent positions in homologues. PMID:23730714

  17. Protein structure determination by conformational space annealing using NMR geometric restraints.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Joung, InSuk; Lee, Jinhyuk; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Weontae; Brooks, Bernard; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out numerical experiments to investigate the applicability of the global optimization method of conformational space annealing (CSA) to the enhanced NMR protein structure determination over existing PDB structures. The NMR protein structure determination is driven by the optimization of collective multiple restraints arising from experimental data and the basic stereochemical properties of a protein-like molecule. By rigorous and straightforward application of CSA to the identical NMR experimental data used to generate existing PDB structures, we redetermined 56 recent PDB protein structures starting from fully randomized structures. The quality of CSA-generated structures and existing PDB structures were assessed by multiobjective functions in terms of their consistencies with experimental data and the requirements of protein-like stereochemistry. In 54 out of 56 cases, CSA-generated structures were better than existing PDB structures in the Pareto-dominant manner, while in the remaining two cases, it was a tie with mixed results. As a whole, all structural features tested improved in a statistically meaningful manner. The most improved feature was the Ramachandran favored portion of backbone torsion angles with about 8.6% improvement from 88.9% to 97.5% (P-value <10(-17)). We show that by straightforward application of CSA to the efficient global optimization of an energy function, NMR structures will be of better quality than existing PDB structures. PMID:26454251

  18. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods. PMID:18470882

  19. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  20. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  1. Dynamic and structural aspects of PEGylated liposomes monitored by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leal, Cecília; Rögnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid; Nilssen, Esben A; Topgaard, Daniel

    2008-09-15

    Proton-detected NMR diffusion and (31)P NMR chemical shifts/bandwidths measurements were used to investigate a series of liposomal formulations where size and PEGylation extent need to be controlled for ultrasound mediated drug release. The width of the (31)P line is sensitive to aggregate size and shape and self-diffusion (1)H NMR conveys information about diffusional motion, size, and PEGylation extent. Measurements were performed on the formulations at their original pH, osmolality, and lipid concentration. These contained variable amounts of PEGylated phospholipid (herein referred to as PEG-lipid) and cholesterol. At high levels of PEG-lipid (11.5 and 15 mol%) the self-diffusion (1)H NMR revealed the coexistence of two entities with distinct diffusion coefficients: micelles (1.3 to 3x10(-11) m(2)/s) and liposomes (approximately 5x10(-12) m(2)/s). The (31)P spectra showed a broad liposome signal and two distinct narrow lines that were unaffected by temperature. The narrow lines arise from mixed micelles comprising both PEG-lipids and phospholipids. The echo decay in the diffusion experiments could be described as a sum of exponentials revealing that the exchange of PEG-lipid between liposomes and micellar aggregates is slower than the experimental observation time. For low amounts of PEG-lipid (1 and 4.5 mol%) the (31)P spectra consisted of a broad signal typically obtained for liposomes and the diffusion data were best described by a single exponential decay attributed solely to liposomes. For intermediate amounts of PEG-lipid (8 mol%), micellization started to occur and the diffusion data could no longer be fitted to a single or bi-exponential decay. Instead, the data were best described by a log-normal distribution of diffusion coefficients. The most efficient PEG-lipid incorporation in liposomes (about 8 mol%) was achieved for lower molecular weight PEG (2000 Da vs 5000 Da) and when the PEG-lipid acyl chain length matched the acyl chain length of the

  2. Distinctive features of complexation of anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin with deoxyhexanucleotide d(GCATGC) in aqueous solution: 1D- and 2D-NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahomov, Valery I.; Rogova, Olga V.; Volynkin, Vladimir S.; Veselkov, Kyrill A.; Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Semanin, Alexander V.; Djimant, Leonid N.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2004-07-01

    Complexation of anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin (DAU) with self-complementary deoxyhexanucleotide d(GCATGC) in aqueous solution has been investigated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional homonuclear 'H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY and NOESY) and heteronuclear 'H-31P NMR spectroscopy (HMBC). Quantitative determination of parameters of oligonucleotide self-association and its complexation with DAU was based on the analysis of the dependences of proton chemical shifts on concentration and temperature. Experimental results were analysed in terms of the equilibrium reaction constants, limiting proton chemical shifts and thermodynamical parameters (enthalpies AN, entropies AS) of the formation of hexamer duplex and different drug-DNA complexes. The most favourable structures of the single-stranded form of d(GCATGC) and the intercalated DAU-hexamer complex have been determined using X-PLOR software taking into consideration both intra- and intermolecular NOE contacts.

  3. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  4. Solid-State and Solution NMR Studies of the CAP-Gly Domain of Mammalian Dynactin and Its Interaction with Microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shangjin; Siglin, Amanda; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2009-07-29

    Microtubules (MTs) and microtubule binding proteins (MTBPs) play fundamental physiological roles including vesicle and organelle transport, cell motility, and cell division. Despite the importance of the MT/MTBP assemblies, there remains virtually no structural or dynamic information about their interaction at the atomic level due to the inherent insolubility and lack of long-range order of MTs. In this study, we present a combined magic angle spinning solid-state and solution NMR study of the MTBP CAP-Gly domain of mammalian dynactin and its interaction with paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules. We report resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of the free CAP-Gly in solution and in the solid state by a combination of two- and three-dimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra. In solution, binding of CAP-Gly to microtubules is accompanied by the broadening of the majority of the peaks in HSQC spectra except for the residues at the termini, precluding further structural analysis of the CAP-Gly/microtubule complexes. In the solid state, DARR spectra of free CAP-Gly and its complex with microtubules display well-resolved lines, permitting residue-specific resonance assignments. Interestingly, a number of chemical shifts in the solid-state DARR spectra of the CAP-Gly/microtubule complex are perturbed compared to those of the free CAP-Gly, suggesting that conformational changes occur in the protein upon binding to the microtubules. These results indicate that CAP-Gly/microtubule assemblies are amenable to detailed structural characterization by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and that solid-state NMR is a viable technique to study MT/protein interactions in general.

  5. The Structural Response of Polyelectrolyte Dendrimer toward the Molecular Protonation: The Inconsistence Revealed by SANS and NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin; Liu, Dazhi; Gao, Carrie Y

    2012-01-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and their charged state in deuterium oxide have been investigated with diffusion NMR and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. NMR measurement suggests that, upon increasing the molecular protonation by progressive acidification of solutions, significant variation of hydrodynamic radius, calculated by the Stokes-Einstein relation with given surface condition, is observed upon increasing the molecular protonation. However, comparative SANS experiment indicates little dependence of dendrimer global size, in terms of radius of gyration, on molecular protonation. This observed inconsistence indicates the necessity of incorporating the effect of molecular interface modification by dressed counterion, when dynamical measurements are used for determination the structural characteristics of ionic soft colloids even in a dilute enough suspension.

  6. Effect of steric hindrance on carbon dioxide absorption into new amine solutions: thermodynamic and spectroscopic verification through solubility and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Huen

    2003-04-15

    Acid gas absorption technology is of great importance in these days for the prevention of global warming and the resulting worldwide climate change. More efficient process design and development for the removal of acid gases has become important, together with the development of new absorbents as one of urgent areas of research in addressing global-warming problems. In the present work, aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (AHPD), a sterically hindered amine, has been examined as a potential CO2 absorbent and compared with the most commonly used absorbent, monoethanolamine (MEA) solution, through equilibrium solubility measurements and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. The solubilities of CO2 in aqueous 10 mass % AHPD solutions were higher than those in aqueous 10 mass % MEA solutions above 4 kPa at 298.15 K, but below 4 kPa, the solubility behavior appeared to be the opposite. The solubility difference between these two solutions increased with the CO2 partial pressures above the crossover pressure. Equilibrated CO2-MEA-H2O and CO2-AHPD-H2O solutions at various CO2 partal pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3000 kPa were analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy to provide a more microscopic understanding of the reaction mechanisms in the two solutions. In the CO2-amine-H2O solutions, amine reacted with CO2 to form mainly the protonated amine (AMH+), bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), and carbamate anion (AMCO2-), where the quantitative ratio of bicarbonate ion to carbamate anion strongly influenced the CO2 loading in the amine solutions. A profusion of bicarbonate ions, but a very small amount of carbamate anions, was identified in the CO2-AHPD-H2O solution, whereas a considerable amount of carbamate anions was formed in the CO2-MEA-H2O solution. AHPD contains more hydroxyl groups than nonhindered MEA, and hence, the chemical shifts in its 13C NMR spectra were strongly influenced by the solution pH values. In contrast, MEA appeared to be insensitive to pH. The

  7. Solution structure of p53 core domain: Structural basis for its instability

    PubMed Central

    Cañadillas, José Manuel Pérez; Tidow, Henning; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Ang, Hwee Ching; Fersht, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    The 25-kDa core domain of the tumor suppressor p53 is inherently unstable and melts at just above body temperature, which makes it susceptible to oncogenic mutations that inactivate it by lowering its stability. We determined its structure in solution using state-of-the-art isotopic labeling techniques and NMR spectroscopy to complement its crystal structure. The structure was very similar to that in the crystal but far more mobile than expected. Importantly, we were able to analyze by NMR the structural environment of several buried polar groups, which indicated structural reasons for the instability. NMR spectroscopy, with its ability to detect protons, located buried hydroxyl and sulfhydryl groups that form suboptimal hydrogen-bond networks. We mutated one such buried pair, Tyr-236 and Thr-253 to Phe-236 and Ile-253 (as found in the paralogs p63 and p73), and stabilized p53 by 1.6 kcal/mol. We also detected differences in the conformation of a mobile loop that might reflect the existence of physiologically relevant alternative conformations. The effects of temperature on the dynamics of aromatic residues indicated that the protein also experiences several dynamic processes that might be related to the presence of alternative hydrogen-bond patterns in the protein interior. p53 appears to have evolved to be dynamic and unstable. PMID:16461916

  8. The complexity of protein energy landscapes studied by solution NMR relaxation dispersion experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The millisecond timescale motions in ribonuclease A (RNase A) were studied by solution NMR CPMG and off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion experiments over a wide pH and temperature range. These experiments identify three separate protein regions termed Cluster 1, Cluster 2, and R33 whose motions are governed by distinct thermodynamic parameters. Moreover each of these regions has motions with different pH dependencies. Cluster 1 shows an increase in activation enthalpy and activation entropy as the pH is lowered, whereas Cluster two exhibits the opposite behavior. In contrast the activation enthalpy and entropy of R33 show no pH dependence. Compounding the differences, Δω values for Cluster 2 are characteristic of two-site conformational exchange yet similar analysis for Cluster 1 indicates that this region of the enzyme exhibits conformational fluctuations between a major conformer and a pH-dependent average of protonated and de-protonated minor conformers. PMID:25680027

  9. Deciphering ligands' interaction with Cu and Cu2O nanocrystal surfaces by NMR solution tools.

    PubMed

    Glaria, Arnaud; Cure, Jérémy; Piettre, Kilian; Coppel, Yannick; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Chaudret, Bruno; Fau, Pierre

    2015-01-12

    The hydrogenolysis of [Cu2{(iPrN)2(CCH3)}2] in the presence of hexadecylamine (HDA) or tetradecylphosphonic acid (TDPA) in toluene leads to 6-9 nm copper nanocrystals. Solution NMR spectroscopy has been used to describe the nanoparticle surface chemistry during the dynamic phenomenon of air oxidation. The ligands are organized as multilayered shells around the nanoparticles. The shell of ligands is controlled by both their intermolecular interactions and their bonding strength on the nanocrystals. Under ambient atmosphere, the oxidation rate of colloidal copper nanocrystals closely relies on the chemical nature of the employed ligands (base or acid). Primary amine molecules behave as soft ligands for Cu atoms, but are even more strongly coordinated on surface Cu(I) sites, thus allowing a very efficient corrosion protection of the copper core. On the contrary, the TDPA ligands lead to a rapid oxidation rate of Cu nanoparticles and eventually to the re-dissolution of Cu(II) species at the expense of the nanocrystals. PMID:25394357

  10. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  11. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  12. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  13. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state 77Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information of selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on 77Se L-selenocystine’s chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10–20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of −180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. −90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from −120° to −60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. 77Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272±30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3–9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results

  14. The NMR structure of the II-III-VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-09-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III-IV-V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II-III-VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg(2+)-binding sites within this structure using Mn(2+)-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg(2+) ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge-bulge interaction and Mg(2+) ions are critical for the stable folding of the II-III-VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II-III-VI junction that does not contain the II-VI bulge-bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  15. The NMR structure of the II–III–VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III–IV–V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II–III–VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg2+-binding sites within this structure using Mn2+-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg2+ ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge–bulge interaction and Mg2+ ions are critical for the stable folding of the II–III–VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II–III–VI junction that does not contain the II–VI bulge–bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  16. NMR structure and dynamics of monomeric neutrophil-activating peptide 2.

    PubMed Central

    Young, H; Roongta, V; Daly, T J; Mayo, K H

    1999-01-01

    Neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (NAP-2), which demonstrates a range of proinflammatory activities, is a 72-residue protein belonging to the alpha-chemokine family. Although NAP-2, like other alpha-chemokines, is known to self-associate into dimers and tetramers, it has been shown that the monomeric form is physiologically active. Here we investigate the solution structure of monomeric NAP-2 by multi-dimensional 1H-NMR and 15N-NMR spectroscopy and computational modelling. The NAP-2 monomer consists of an amphipathic, triple-stranded, anti-parallel beta-sheet on which is folded a C-terminal alpha-helix and an aperiodic N-terminal segment. The backbone fold is essentially the same as that found in other alpha-chemokines. 15N T1, T2 and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been measured for backbone NH groups and used in a model free approach to calculate order parameters and conformational exchange terms that map out motions of the backbone. N-terminal residues 1 to 17 and the C-terminus are relatively highly flexible, whereas the beta-sheet domain forms the most motionally restricted part of the fold. Conformational exchange occurring on the millisecond time scale is noted at the top of the C-terminal helix and at proximal residues from beta-strands 1 and 2 and the connecting loop. Dissociation to the monomeric state is apparently responsible for increased internal mobility in NAP-2 compared with dimeric and tetrameric states in other alpha-chemokines. PMID:10051427

  17. Structural investigations of PuIII phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Prieur, Damien; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    PuPO4 was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β- decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state 31P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution.

  18. High-definition NMR structure of PED/PEA-15 death effector domain reveals details of key polar side chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Wei, Yufeng

    2012-07-20

    Death effector domain (DED) proteins constitute a subfamily of the large death domain superfamily that is primarily involved in apoptosis pathways. DED structures have characteristic side chain-side chain interactions among polar residues on the protein surface, forming a network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The polar interaction network is functionally important in promoting protein-protein interactions by maintaining optimal side chain orientations. We have refined the solution DED structure of the PED/PEA-15 protein, a representative member of DED subfamily, using traditional NMR restraints with the addition of residual dipolar coupling (RDC) restraints from two independent alignment media, and employed the explicit solvent refinement protocol. The newly refined DED structure of PED/PEA-15 possesses higher structural quality as indicated by WHAT IF Z-scores, with most significant improvement in the backbone conformation normality quality factor. This higher quality DED structure of PED/PEA-15 leads to the identification of a number of key polar side chain interactions, which are not typically observed in NMR protein structures. The elucidation of polar side chain interactions is a key step towards the understanding of protein-protein interactions involving the death domain superfamily. The NMR structures with extensive details of protein structural features are thereby termed high-definition (HD) NMR structures. PMID:22732408

  19. Phosphorus speciation in agro-industrial byproducts: sequential fractionation, solution (31)P NMR, and P K- and L(2,3)-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Negassa, Wakene; Kruse, Jens; Michalik, Dirk; Appathurai, Narayana; Zuin, Lucia; Leinweber, Peter

    2010-03-15

    Little is known about P species in agro-industrial byproducts from developing countries, which may be either pollutants or valuable soil amendments. The present study speciated P in dry (COD) and wet (COW) coffee, sisal (SIS), barley malt (BEB) and sugar cane processing (FIC) byproducts, and filter cakes of linseed (LIC) and niger seed (NIC)with sequential fractionation, solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and P K- and L(2,3)-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The sequential P fractionation recovered 59% to almost 100% of total P (P(t)), and more than 50% of P(t) was extracted by H(2)O and NaHCO(3) in five out of seven samples. Similarly, the NaOH + EDTA extraction for solution (31)P NMR recovered 48-94% of P(t). The (31)P NMR spectra revealed orthophosphate (6-81%), pyrophosphate (0-10%), and orthophosphate monoesters (6-94%). Orthophosphate predominated in COD, COW, SIS, and FIC, whereas BEB, UC, and NIC were rich in orthophosphate monoesters. The concentrations of P(i), and P(o) determined in the sequential and NaOH + EDTA extractions and (31)P NMR spectra were strongly and positively correlated (r = 0.88-1.00). Furthermore, the P K- and L(2,3)-edge XANES confirmed the H(2)SO(4)--P(i) detected in the sequential fractionation by unequivocal identification of Ca--P phases in a few samples. The results indicate that the combined use of all four analytical methods is crucial for comprehensive P speciation in environmental samples and the application of these byproducts to soil. PMID:20146464

  20. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  1. Solution structure, aggregation behavior, and flexibility of human relaxin-2.

    PubMed

    Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Daly, Norelle L; Bathgate, Ross A D; Rinderknecht, Ernst; Wade, John D; Craik, David J; Rosengren, K Johan

    2015-03-20

    Relaxin is a member of the relaxin/insulin peptide hormone superfamily and is characterized by a two-chain structure constrained by three disulfide bonds. Relaxin is a pleiotropic hormone and involved in a number of physiological and pathogenic processes, including collagen and cardiovascular regulation and tissue remodelling during pregnancy and cancer. Crystallographic and ultracentrifugation experiments have revealed that the human form of relaxin, H2 relaxin, self-associates into dimers, but the significance of this is poorly understood. Here, we present the NMR structure of a monomeric, amidated form of H2 relaxin and compare its features and behavior in solution to those of native H2 relaxin. The overall structure of H2 relaxin is retained in the monomeric form. H2 relaxin amide is fully active at the relaxin receptor RXFP1 and thus dimerization is not required for biological activity. Analysis of NMR chemical shifts and relaxation parameters identified internal motion in H2 relaxin at the pico-nanosecond and milli-microsecond time scales, which is commonly seen in other relaxin and insulin peptides and might be related to function. PMID:25547165

  2. Perfluoroalkyl Grignard Reagents: NMR Study of 1-Heptafluoropropylmagnesium Chloride in Solution.

    PubMed

    Guang, Jie; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G; Fujiu, Motohiro; Negishi, Kazuyuki; Mikami, Koichi

    2016-07-15

    We report on the generation of a perfluoroalkyl Grignard reagent ((F)RMgX) by exchange reaction between a perfluoroalkyl iodide ((F)R-I) and a Grignard reagent (RMgX). (19)F NMR was applied to monitor the generation of n-C3F7MgCl. Additional NMR techniques, including (19)F COSY, NOESY, and pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) diffusion NMR, were invoked to assign peaks observed in (19)F spectrum. Schlenk equilibrium was observed and was significantly influenced by solvent, diethyl ether, or THF. PMID:27295419

  3. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis J C; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2014-03-21

    About 8000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such "omics" approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  4. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  5. Structural investigation of the interaction between LolA and LolB using NMR.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Shingo; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime; Shimada, Ichio

    2009-09-01

    Lipoproteins that play critical roles in various cellular functions of Gram-negative bacteria are localized in the cells inner and outer membranes. Lol proteins (LolA, LolB, LolC, LolD, and LolE) are involved in the transportation of outer membrane-directed lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that transports lipoproteins, and LolB is an outer membrane receptor that accepts lipoproteins. To clarify the structural basis for the lipoprotein transfer from LolA to LolB, we examined the interaction between LolA and mLolB, a soluble mutant of LolB, using solution NMR spectroscopy. We determined the interaction mode between LolA and mLolB with conformational changes of LolA. Based upon the observations, we propose that the LolA.LolB complex forms a tunnel-like structure, where the hydrophobic insides of LolA and LolB are connected, which enables lipoproteins to transfer from LolA to LolB. PMID:19546215

  6. Duplex formation and secondary structure of γ-PNA observed by NMR and CD.

    PubMed

    Viéville, J M P; Barluenga, S; Winssinger, N; Delsuc, M A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are non-natural oligonucleotides mimics, wherein the phosphoribose backbone has been replaced by a peptidic moiety (N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine). This peptidic backbone lends itself to substitution and the γ-position has proven to yield oligomers with enhanced hybridization properties. In this study, we use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) to explore the properties of the supramolecular duplexes formed by these species. We show that standard Watson-Crick base pair as well as non-standard ones are formed in solution. The duplexes thus formed present marked melting transition temperatures substantially higher than their nucleic acid homologs. Moreover, the presence of a chiral group on the γ-peptidic backbone increases further this transition temperature, leading to very stable duplexes. PNA duplexes with a chiral backbone present a marked chiral secondary structure, observed by CD, and showing a common folding pattern for all studied structures. Nevertheless small differences are observed depending on the details of the nucleobase sequence. PMID:26493008

  7. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  8. Slow exchange model of nonrigid rotational motion in RNA for combined solid-state and solution NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Emani, Prashant S; Olsen, Gregory L; Echodu, Dorothy C; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P

    2010-12-01

    Functional RNA molecules are conformationally dynamic and sample a multitude of dynamic modes over a wide range of frequencies. Thus, a comprehensive description of RNA dynamics requires the inclusion of a broad range of motions across multiple dynamic rates which must be derived from multiple spectroscopies. Here we describe a slow conformational exchange theoretical approach to combining the description of local motions in RNA that occur in the nanosecond to microsecond window and are detected by solid-state NMR with nonrigid rotational motion of the HIV-1 transactivation response element (TAR) RNA in solution as observed by solution NMR. This theoretical model unifies the experimental results generated by solution and solid-state NMR and provides a comprehensive view of the dynamics of HIV-1 TAR RNA, a well-known paradigm of an RNA where function requires extensive conformational rearrangements. This methodology provides a quantitative atomic level view of the amplitudes and rates of the local and collective displacements of the TAR RNA molecule and provides directly motional parameters for the conformational capture hypothesis of this classical RNA-ligand interaction. PMID:21067190

  9. Characterization of nanoparticles in diluted clear solutions for Silicalite-1 zeolite synthesis using liquid 29Si NMR, SAXS and DLS.

    PubMed

    Follens, L R A; Aerts, A; Haouas, M; Caremans, T P; Loppinet, B; Goderis, B; Vermant, J; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Kirschhock, C E A

    2008-09-28

    Clear solutions for colloidal Silicalite-1 synthesis were prepared by reacting tetraethylorthosilicate in aqueous tetrapropylammonium hydroxide solution. A dilution series with water resulting in clear solutions with a TEOS ratio TPAOH ratio H2O molar ratio of 25 : 9 : 152 up to 25 : 9 : 15,000 was analysed using liquid 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Particle sizes were derived independently from DLS and from the combination of SAXS and NMR. NMR allowed quantitative characterization of silicon distributed over nanoparticles and dissolved oligomeric silicate polyanions. In all samples studied, the majority of silicon (78-90%) was incorporated in the nanoparticle fraction. In concentrated suspensions, silicate oligomers were mostly double-ring species (D3R, D4R, D5R, D6R). Dilution with water caused their depolymerisation. Contrarily, the internal condensation and size of nanoparticles increased with increasing dilution. SAXS revealed a decrease of effective nanoparticle surface charge upon dilution, reducing the effective particle interactions. With DLS, the reduction of nanoparticle interactions could be confirmed monitoring the collective diffusion mode. The observed evolution of nanoparticle characteristics provides insight in the acceleration of the Silicalite-1 crystallization upon dilution, in view of different crystallization models proposed in the literature. PMID:18956092

  10. Structural Aspects of Several Oxide Glasses as Elucidated by Multinuclear NMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianhui

    1988-03-01

    NMR is sensitive to many interactions that the nucleus experiences with its environment. Included among these interactions are two that were heavily exploited in this thesis. They are the electric quadrupole interaction and the chemical shift interaction. These interactions yield structural information on short-range order and atom coordinations, which are very valuable and important to the understanding of properties and microstructures of glasses. Both the static or MASS NMR at high field and low field CW NMR were utilized to obtain information concerning the coordinations and local environments of several oxide glasses. For some systems, other spectroscopic methods (thermal analysis, X-ray and IR spectroscopies) were also used to assist NMR studies. In Chapter I relevant NMR theory and detection techniques used for this work are introduced. In Chapters 2-4, some structural aspects of alkali borate, borosilicate or alkali boroaluminate glasses are studied. In particular, boron coordinations in these glasses are carefully reinvestigated. The relationship between the change in boron coordinations and the changes in macroscopic characteristics of the glasses (such as electric conductivity and the mixed alkali effects) are studied. In mixed alkali glasses, the postulated alkali -pairing model provides a reasonable explanation for the structural changes. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the ^{71}Ga and ^{69 }Ga NMR studies of alkali gallate glasses. The glassforming range is explored and the gallium atom coordinations are studied. A structural model for the glass systems is suggested based on the distribution of galliums of different coordinations and structural parameters (quadrupole coupling constants, asymmetry parameters, and isotropic chemical shifts, etc.). A study of ^{31} P spectra in lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glasses is presented in Chapter 6. By subjecting the samples to various magnetic field strengths and different temperatures, information on the local

  11. Characterization of D-glucaric acid using NMR, x-ray crystal structure, and MM3 molecular modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-glucaric acid was characterized in solution by comparing NMR spectra from the isotopically unlabeled molecule with those from D-glucaric acid labeled with deuterium or carbon-13 atoms. The NMR studies provided unequivocal assignments for all carbon atoms and non-hydroxyl protons of the molecule. ...

  12. Effects of a type I antifreeze protein (AFP) on the melting of frozen AFP and AFP+solute aqueous solutions studied by NMR microimaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Ba, Yong; Mao, Yougang; Galdino, Luiz; Günsen, Zorigoo

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a type I AFP on the bulk melting of frozen AFP solutions and frozen AFP+solute solutions were studied through an NMR microimaging experiment. The solutes studied include sodium chloride and glucose and the amino acids alanine, threonine, arginine, and aspartic acid. We found that the AFP is able to induce the bulk melting of the frozen AFP solutions at temperatures lower than 0 °C and can also keep the ice melted at higher temperatures in the AFP+solute solutions than those in the corresponding solute solutions. The latter shows that the ice phases were in super-heated states in the frozen AFP+solute solutions. We have tried to understand the first experimental phenomenon via the recent theoretical prediction that type I AFP can induce the local melting of ice upon adsorption to ice surfaces. The latter experimental phenomenon was explained with the hypothesis that the adsorption of AFP to ice surfaces introduces a less hydrophilic water-AFP-ice interfacial region, which repels the ionic/hydrophilic solutes. Thus, this interfacial region formed an intermediate chemical potential layer between the water phase and the ice phase, which prevented the transfer of water from the ice phase to the water phase. We have also attempted to understand the significance of the observed melting phenomena to the survival of organisms that express AFPs over cold winters. PMID:23860838

  13. A relativistic DFT methodology for calculating the structures and NMR chemical shifts of octahedral platinum and iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Patzschke, Michael; Marek, Radek

    2013-05-28

    A methodology for optimizing the geometry and calculating the NMR shielding constants is calibrated for octahedral complexes of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) with modified nucleic acid bases. The performance of seven different functionals (BLYP, B3LYP, BHLYP, BP86, TPSS, PBE, and PBE0) in optimizing the geometry of transition-metal complexes is evaluated using supramolecular clusters derived from X-ray data. The effects of the size of the basis set (ranging from SVP to QZVPP) and the dispersion correction (D3) on the interatomic distances are analyzed. When structural deviations and computational demands are employed as criteria for evaluating the optimizations of these clusters, the PBE0/def2-TZVPP/D3 approach provides excellent results. In the next step, the PBE0/def2-TZVPP approach is used with the continuum-like screening model (COSMO) to optimize the geometry of single molecules for the subsequent calculation of the NMR shielding constants in solution. The two-component zeroth-order regular approximation (SO-ZORA) is used to calculate the NMR shielding constants (PBE0/TZP/COSMO). The amount of exact exchange in the PBE0 functional is validated for the nuclear magnetic shieldings of atoms in the vicinity of heavy transition metals. For the PBE0/TZP/COSMO setup, an exact exchange of 40% is found to accurately reproduce the experimental NMR shielding constants for both types of complexes. Finally, the effect of the amount of exact exchange on the NMR shielding calculations (which is capable of compensating for the structural deficiencies) is analyzed for various molecular geometries (SCS-MP2, BHLYP, and PBE0) and the influence of a trans-substituent on the NMR chemical shift of nitrogen is discussed. The observed dependencies for an iridium complex cannot be rationalized by visualizing the Fermi-contact (FC) induced spin density and probably originate from changes in the d-d transitions that modulate the spin-orbit (SO) part of the SO/FC term. PMID:23598437

  14. Electronic structure and solvatochromism of merocyanines NMR spectroscopic point of view.

    PubMed

    Kulinich, Andrii V; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Groth, Ulrich M

    2007-09-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two series of malononitrile-based merocyanines, which possess positive and negative solvatochromism have been in detail investigated in low polar chloroform and polar dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Careful attribution of signals in spectra has been made with the help of two-dimensional NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMBC, and HMQC). Hence, the dependence of merocyanines electronic structure on their chemical structure and solvent nature has been studied by this powerful method. It has been shown that there exists a good correlation between the calculated charges on carbon atoms of a polymethine chain and their chemical shifts in (13)C NMR spectra. The influence of solvent polarity on bond orders for dyes with positive and negative solvatochromism is also observed. The comparison of (13)C NMR spectra of merocyanines and corresponding parent ionic dyes allows to determine their sign of solvatochromism irrespectively of electronic spectra, and also to find the key atoms of chromophore whose signals in (13)C NMR spectra are most informative. PMID:17188560

  15. Photoisomerization and structural dynamics of two nitrosylruthenium complexes: a joint study by NMR and nonlinear IR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianru; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Pengyun; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-11-21

    In this work, the photoisomerization and structural dynamics of two isomeric nitrosylruthenium(ii) complexes [Ru(OAc)(2cqn)2NO] (H2cqn = 2-chloro-8-quinolinol) in CDCl3 and DMSO are examined using NMR and IR spectroscopic methods. The two N atoms in the 2cqn ligand are in trans position in the synthesized cis-1 isomer, while they are in cis position in the cis-2 isomer. Kinetics monitored by NMR spectroscopy shows that the rate constant of photoisomerization from cis-2 to cis-1 isomer depends on the wavelength of irradiation and solvent polarity; it proceeds faster on irradiating near the absorption peak in the UV-Vis region, and also in more polar solvents (DMSO). Density functional theory computation indicates that the peculiarity of [Ru(ii)-NO(+)] group affects the structure and reactivity of the nitrosylruthenium complexes. Using the nitrosyl stretching (νNO) to be vibrational probe, the structural dynamics and structural distributions of the cis-1 and cis-2 isomers are examined by steady-state linear infrared and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopies. The structural and photochemical aspects of the observed spectroscopic parameters are discussed in terms of solute-solvent interactions for the two nitrosylruthenium complexes. PMID:25285659

  16. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  17. [sup 31]P and [sup 27]Al NMR investigations of highly acidic, aqueous solutions containing aluminum and phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Mortlock, R.F.; Bell, A.T.; Radke, C.J. Univ. of California, Berkeley )

    1993-01-21

    [sup 31]P and [sup 27]Al NMR spectroscopies have been used to characterize acidic, aqueous solutions of orthophosphoric acid, aluminum chloride, and tetramethylammonium (TMA) hydroxide. The final compositions of the solutions range from 0.1 to 1 mol % P, 0.0 to 20 mol % HCl, P/Al = 0.1 to 20, and P/(TMA)[sub 2]O = 2 to 20. Soluble aluminophosphate cations form reactions of hexaaqua Al monomeric cations, [Al(H[sub 2]O)[sub 6

  18. Chemical structures of manure from conventional and phytase transgenic pigs investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Ajakaiye, Ayodele; Lan, Yeqing; Olk, Dan C; Ceballos, Michael; Zhang, Tiequan; Fan, Ming Z; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2008-03-26

    Nonpoint phosphorus (P) pollution from animal manure is becoming a serious global problem. The current solution for the swine industry includes the enzyme phytase as a component in oil meal and cereal grain-based swine diets. A long-term approach is the production of transgenic phytase pigs that express phytase in the salivary glands and secrete it in the saliva. This study provides a detailed comparison of chemical structures of manure from conventional pigs and transgenic pigs that express phytase under growing and finishing phases using new solid-state NMR techniques. Spectral editing techniques and quantitative NMR techniques were used to identify and quantify specific functional groups. Two-dimensional (1)H- (13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR was used to detect their connectivity. Manure from conventional and transgenic pigs had similar peptide, carbohydrate, and fatty acid components, while those from transgenic pigs contained more carbohydrates and fewer nonpolar alkyls. There was no consistent effect from diets with or without supplemental phosphate or growth stages. PMID:17973446

  19. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  20. Sensitivity-enhanced NMR reveals alterations in protein structure by cellular milieus.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Ong, Ta-Chung; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-10-22

    Biological processes occur in complex environments containing a myriad of potential interactors. Unfortunately, limitations on the sensitivity of biophysical techniques normally restrict structural investigations to purified systems, at concentrations that are orders of magnitude above endogenous levels. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enable structural studies in biologically complex environments. Here, we applied DNP NMR to investigate the structure of a protein containing both an environmentally sensitive folding pathway and an intrinsically disordered region, the yeast prion protein Sup35. We added an exogenously prepared isotopically labeled protein to deuterated lysates, rendering the biological environment "invisible" and enabling highly efficient polarization transfer for DNP. In this environment, structural changes occurred in a region known to influence biological activity but intrinsically disordered in purified samples. Thus, DNP makes structural studies of proteins at endogenous levels in biological contexts possible, and such contexts can influence protein structure. PMID:26456111

  1. The Solution Structure of the Regulatory Domain of Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengnan; Huang, Tao; Ilangovan, Udayar; Hinck, Andrew P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrH) catalyzes the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters. The activity of the enzyme is regulated by phosphorylation of serine residues in a regulatory domain and by binding of catecholamines to the active site. Available structures of TyrH lack the regulatory domain, limiting the understanding of the effect of regulation on structure. We report the use of NMR spectroscopy to analyze the solution structure of the isolated regulatory domain of rat TyrH. The protein is composed of a largely unstructured N-terminal region (residues 1-71) and a well-folded C-terminal portion (residues 72-159). The structure of a truncated version of the regulatory domain containing residues 65-159 has been determined and establishes that it is an ACT domain. The isolated domain is a homodimer in solution, with the structure of each monomer very similar to that of the core of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Two TyrH regulatory domain monomers form an ACT domain dimer composed of a sheet of eight strands with four α-helices on one side of the sheet. Backbone dynamic analyses were carried out to characterize the conformational flexibility of TyrH65-159. The results provide molecular details critical for understanding the regulatory mechanism of TyrH. PMID:24361276

  2. Solution (31)P NMR Study of the Acid-Catalyzed Formation of a Highly Charged {U24Pp12} Nanocluster, [(UO2)24(O2)24(P2O7)12](48-), and Its Structural Characterization in the Solid State Using Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, Mateusz; Olds, Travis A; Pellegrini, Kristi L; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping; Hickam, Sarah; He, Junhong; Oliver, Allen G; Burns, Peter C

    2016-07-13

    The first neutron diffraction study of a single crystal containing uranyl peroxide nanoclusters is reported for pyrophosphate-functionalized Na44K6[(UO2)24(O2)24(P2O7)12][IO3]2·140H2O (1). Relative to earlier X-ray studies, neutron diffraction provides superior information concerning the positions of H atoms and lighter counterions. Hydrogen positions have been assigned and reveal an extensive network of H-bonds; notably, most O atoms present in the anionic cluster accept H-bonds from surrounding H2O molecules, and none of the surface-bound O atoms are protonated. The D4h symmetry of the cage is consistent with the presence of six encapsulated K cations, which appear to stabilize the lower symmetry variant of this cluster. (31)P NMR measurements demonstrate retention of this symmetry in solution, while in situ (31)P NMR studies suggest an acid-catalyzed mechanism for the assembly of 1 across a wide range of pH values. PMID:27322657

  3. Structure and Transformation of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate: A Solid-State 43Ca NMR and Computational Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Jared W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Bowers, Geoffrey M.

    2012-05-22

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable precursor to crystalline CaCO{sub 3} phases that precipitates by aggregation of ion pairs and prenucleation clusters. We use {sup 43}Ca solid-state NMR spectroscopy to probe the local structure and transformation of ACC synthesized from seawater-like solutions with and without Mg{sup 2+} and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to provide more detailed molecular-scale understanding of the ACC structure. The {sup 43}Ca NMR spectra of ACC collected immediately after synthesis consist of broad, featureless resonances with Gaussian line shapes (FWHH = 27.6 {+-} 1 ppm) that do not depend on Mg{sup 2+} or H{sub 2}O content. A correlation between {sup 43}Ca isotropic chemical shifts and mean Ca-O bond distances for crystalline hydrous and anhydrous calcium carbonate phases indicates indistinguishable maximum mean Ca-O bond lengths of {approx}2.45 {angstrom} for all our samples. This value is near the upper end of the published Ca-O bond distance range for biogenic and synthetic ACCs obtained by Ca-X-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is slightly smaller than the values from the structural model of Mgfree ACC by Goodwin et al. obtained from reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of X-ray scattering data and our own computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on this model. An MD simulation starting with the atomic positions of the Goodwin et al. RMC model using the force field of Raiteri and Gale shows significant structural reorganization during the simulation and that the interconnected carbonate/water-rich channels in the Goodwin et al. model shrink in size over the 2 ns simulation time. The distribution of polyhedrally averaged Ca-O bond distances from the MD simulation is in good agreement with the {sup 43}Ca NMR peak shape, suggesting that local structural disorder dominates the experimental line width of ACC.

  4. Comparison of the structure of human recombinant short form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Axel, M G; Caldwell, C G; Hagmann, W K; Becker, J W

    1996-01-01

    Stromelysin-1 is a matrix metalloprotease that has been implicated in a number of degenerative diseases. Here we present the refined NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with a small inhibitor and compare it to the X-ray crystal structure of the same complex. The structures are similar in global fold and show an unusual bottomless S1' subsite. There are differences, however, in the least well defined regions, Phe83-Ile89, His224-Phe232 and Pro249- Pro250, reflecting the lack of NOE data and large B-factors. The region His224-Phe232 contains residues of the S1' subsite and, consequently, small differences are observed in this subsite. Hydrogen-bond data show that, in contrast to the crystal structure, the solution structure lacks a hydrogen bond between the amide of Tyr223 and the carbonyl of the P3' residue. Analysis of bound water shows two tightly bound water molecules both in the solution and the crystal structure; neither of these waters are in the inhibitor binding site. PMID:8720828

  5. Combining solid-state and solution-state 31P NMR to study in vivo phosphorus metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cholli, A L; Yamane, T; Jelinski, L W

    1985-01-01

    Otherwise unavailable information concerning the distribution of phosphorylated compounds in biological systems is obtained by a combined solid-state/solution-state NMR approach, illustrated here for oocytes from Rana pipiens. General methodology is developed, and further extensions are proposed. The following conclusions pertain to the specific system under examination. (i) Nucleoside phosphates can be observed by magic-angle sample spinning of the lyophilized material. (ii) The solid-state NMR technique of dipolar decoupling provides no additional resolution of the phospholipid and phosphoprotein components of the yolk. However, cellular death produces sufficient pH changes to cause the phospholipid and protein phosphate peaks to become resolvable. The concentration of nucleoside phosphates also decreases. (iii) The phospholipid and phosphoprotein components are shown by computer simulation to be present in a ratio of 40:60, respectively. (iv) The amounts of inorganic phosphate, nucleoside phosphates, and sugar phosphates are determined by solution-state NMR observation of the perchloric acid extract of the oocytes. PMID:3871524

  6. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  7. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  8. Rubidium-87 NMR studies of rubidium salts and complexes with 18-crown-6 and cryptand-222 in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaeli, Sadegh; Dye, James L.; Popov, Alexander I.

    Rubidium-87 NMR measurements were used to study the behavior of the Rb + ion in water, methanol, and propylene carbonate solutions. In aqueous solutions the 87Rb chemical shift varies linearly with the mean activity of the salt. In methanol and propylene carbonate solutions the relationship is linear only at high salt concentrations. The resonance lines are broad and vary from ˜ 150 Hz (at half height) in water to ˜ 1000 Hz in propylene carbonate. Additions of macrocyclic ligands 18C6 and C222 to Rb + solutions in the three solvents result in further broadening of the resonance line so that variations in the resonance frequency cannot be measured with a reasonable precision.

  9. Development of Solid State NMR Methods for the Structural Characterization of Membrane Proteins: Applications to Understand Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Tran, A T; Ulloa, J; Maxwell, R S

    2003-03-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder of the central nervous system that results in the loss of the myelin sheaths insulating nerve fibers (axons). Strong evidence suggests that MS is an autoimmune disease mediated by T-cell and antibody responses against myelin antigens. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a 26 kD to 28 kD an integral membrane protein of the central nervous system implicated as a target for autoaggressive antibodies in MS. To date, the conformation of MOG in association with the myelin membrane is unknown and the exact nature of the interactions between this protein and disease-inducing immune responses have not been determined. Since membrane associated proteins are typically characterized by decreased correlation times, solution state NMR methodologies are often impracticable. Membrane proteins are also often difficult to crystallize for X-ray diffraction studies, Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new structure characterization tools for this important class of biomolecules. The research described here overviews the initial stages of our effort to develop an integrated, NMR based approach to structural studies of MOG over the many structural domains it is postulated to posses. The structural knowledge gained about this important MS antigen in its native environment will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function in vivo. This project will also aid in the development of therapeutics to inhibit the antigedantibody interaction and thus prevent demyelination in MS patients.

  10. Salt-dependent structure change and ion binding in cytochrome c studied by two-dimensional proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiqing; Englander, S.W. )

    1990-04-10

    To search for salt-dependent structure changes that might help to explain physicochemical differences observed in previous solution studies, two-dimensional proton NMR spectra of reduced and oxidized cytochrome c were recorded at relatively high and low salt concentrations. The results rule out substantial ionic strength dependent structure change in either redox form over the salt concentrations tested. Chemical shift changes were found for several residues within a limited segment of the oxidized protein, most prominently in the sequence Lys-86, Lys-87, Lys-88, Thr-89. A salt-dependent binding of phosphate anion(s) at this site, as observed earlier by others, is indicated. The binding of one or two phosphates at the cytochrome c surface can explain earlier small-angle X-ray scattering observations of an increase in the calculated radius of gyration of the oxidized protein at the same low-salt condition used here. The results obtained support the view that the absence of sizeable redox-dependent structure change observed in X-ray and NMR studies at varying salt conditions is characteristic of the protein at all salt conditions above the low millimolar range. Physicochemical differences between oxidized and reduced cytochrome c apparently represent differences in stability without patent structure change.

  11. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  12. NMR Studies on the Internal Structure of High- T c Superconductors and Other Anorganic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, K.; Kakuyanagi, K.; Saitoh, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Takashima, S.; Nohara, M.; Takagi, H.

    2004-12-01

    Spatially-resolved NMR is used to probe internal structures in highly correlated superconductors of optimally-doped {text{Tl}}2 {text{Ba}}2 {text{CuO}}_{{6 + δ }} ( T c = 85 K) and a heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 ( T c = 2.3 K). The characteristic change of the properties of 205Tl-NMR in the vortex state provides a clear evidence of the antiferromagnetic order in the vortex cores below 20 K in {text{Tl}}2 {text{Ba}}2 {text{CuO}}_{{6 + δ }} . We also obtain anomalous 115In-NMR spectra of CeCoIn5, which provides a microscopic evidence for the occurrence of a spatially-modulated superconducting order parameter expected in a Fulde Ferrel Larkin Ovchinnkov (FFLO) state.

  13. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  14. 1H NMR analysis of complexation of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine with aromatic biologically active molecules in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantushenko, Anastasia O.; Mukhina, Yulia V.; Veselkov, Kyrill A.; Davies, David B.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2004-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the molecular mechanism of solubilization action of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide (NA) and caffeine (CAF). Hetero-association of NA with riboflavine-mononucleotide (FMN) and CAF with low soluble in aqueous solution synthetic analogue of antibiotic actinomycin D, actinocyl-bis-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) amine (Actill), has been investigated by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. Concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts have been analysed in terms of a statistical-thermodynamic model of indefinite self- and heteroassociation of aromatic molecules. The obtained results enable to conclude that NA-FMN and CAF-Actill intermolecular complexes are mainly stabilized by the stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. Hetero-association of the investigated molecules plays an important role in solubilization of aromatic drugs by hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine.

  15. Solution-state 2D NMR of ball-milled plant cell wall gels in DMSO-d6/pyridine-d5†

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, John

    2014-01-01

    NMR fingerprinting of the components of finely divided plant cell walls swelled in DMSO has been recently described. Cell wall gels, produced directly in the NMR tube with perdeutero-dimethylsulfoxide, allowed the acquisition of well resolved/dispersed 2D 13C–1H correlated solution-state NMR spectra of the entire array of wall polymers, without the need for component fractionation. That is, without actual solubilization, and without apparent structural modification beyond that inflicted by the ball milling and ultrasonication steps, satisfactorily interpretable spectra can be acquired that reveal compositional and structural details regarding the polysaccharide and lignin components in the wall. Here, the profiling method has been improved by using a mixture of perdeuterated DMSO and pyridine (4:1, v/v). Adding pyridine provided not only easier sample handling because of the better mobility compared to the DMSO-d6-only system but also considerably elevated intensities and improved resolution of the NMR spectra due to the enhanced swelling of the cell walls. This modification therefore provides a more rapid method for comparative structural evaluation of plant cell walls than is currently available. We examined loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, a gymnosperm), aspen (Populus tremuloides, an angiosperm), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, an herbaceous plant), and corn (Zea mays L., a grass, i.e., from the Poaceae family). In principle, lignin composition (notably, the syringyl : guaiacyl : p-hydroxyphenyl ratio) can be quantified without the need for lignin isolation. Correlations for p-coumarate units in the corn sample are readily seen, and a variety of the ferulate correlations are also well resolved; ferulates are important components responsible for cell wall cross-linking in grasses. Polysaccharide anomeric correlations were tentatively assigned for each plant sample based on standard samples and various literature data. With the new potential for chemometric analysis

  16. Strategies for the uses of lanthanide NMR shift probes in the determination of protein structure in solutio. Application to the EF calcium binding site of carp parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Sykes, B D

    1980-10-01

    The homologous sequences observed for many calcium binding proteins such as parvalbumin, troponin C, the myosin light chains, and calmodulin has lead to the hypothesis that these proteins have homologous structures at the level of their calcium binding sites. This paper discusses the development of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique which will enable us to test this structural hypothesis in solution. The technique involves the substitution of a paramagnetic lanthanide ion for the calcium ion which results in lanthanide induced shifts and broadening in the 1H NMR spectrum of the protein. These shifts are sensitive monitors of the precise geometrical orientation of each proton nucleus relative to the metal. The values of several parameters in the equation relating the NMR shifts to the structure are however known as priori. We have attempted to determine these parameters, the orientation and principal elements of the magnetic susceptibility tensor of the protein bound metal, by studying the lanthanide induced shifts for the protein parvalbumin whose structure has been determined by x-ray crystallographic techniques. The interaction of the lanthanide ytterbium with parvalbumin results in high resolution NMR spectra exhibiting a series of resonances with shifts spread over the range 32 to -19 ppm. The orientation and principal elements of the ytterbium magnetic susceptibility tensor have been determined using three assigned NMR resonances, the His-26 C2 and C4 protons and the amino terminal acetyl protons, and seven methyl groups; all with known geometry relative to the EF calcium binding site. The elucidation of these parameters has allowed us to compare the observed spectrum of the nuclei surrounding the EF calcium binding site of parvalbumin with that calculated from the x-ray structure. A significant number of the calculated shifts are larger than any of the observed shifts. We feel that a refinement of the x-ray based proton coordinates will be possible

  17. Complex structures – smart solutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The siliceous skeletal elements of the sponges, the spicules, represent one of the very few examples from where the molecule toolkit required for the formation of an extracellular mineral-based skeleton, has been elucidated. The distinguished feature of the inorganic matrix, the bio-silica, is its enzymatic synthesis mediated by silicatein. Ortho-silicate undergoes in the presence of silicatein a polycondensation reaction and forms bio-silica under release of reaction water. The protein silicatein aggregates non-covalently to larger filaments, a process that is stabilized by the silicatein-associated protein, silintaphin-1. These structured clusters form the axial filament that is located in the center of the spicules, the axial canal. Surprisingly it has now been found that the initial axial orientation, in which the spicules grow, is guided by cell processes through evagination. The approximately two µm wide cell extensions release silicatein that forms the first organic axial filament, which then synthesizes the inner core of the siliceous spicule rods. In parallel, the radial growth of the spicules is controlled by a telescopic arrangement of organic layers, into which bio-silica and ortho-silicate are deposited. Hence, the formation of a mature siliceous spicule is completed by a centrifugal accretion of bio-silica mediated by the silicatein in the axial filament, and a centripetal bio-silica deposition catalyzed by the extra-spicular silicatein. Finally this contribution highlights that for the ultimate determination of the spicule shapes, their species-specific morphologies, bio-silica hardens during a process which removes reaction water. The data presented can also provide new blueprints for the fabrication of novel biomaterials for biomedical applications.  PMID:22446527

  18. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. PMID:26624522

  19. Solution structures of stromelysin complexed to thiadiazole inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, B. J.; Waldon, D. J.; Gates, J. A.; Scahill, T. A.; Kloosterman, D. A.; Mizsak, S. A.; Jacobsen, E. J.; Belonga, K. L.; Mitchell, M. A.; Mao, B.; Petke, J. D.; Goodman, L.; Powers, E. A.; Ledbetter, S. R.; Kaytes, P. S.; Vogeli, G.; Marshall, V. P.; Petzold, G. L.; Poorman, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Unregulated or overexpressed matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including stromelysin, collagenase, and gelatinase. have been implicated in several pathological conditions including arthritis and cancer. Small-molecule MMP inhibitors may have therapeutic value in the treatment of these diseases. In this regard, the solution structures of two stromelysin/ inhibitor complexes have been investigated using 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Both-inhibitors are members of a novel class of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor that contain a thiadiazole group and that interact with stromelysin in a manner distinct from other classes of inhibitors. The inhibitors coordinate the catalytic zinc atom through their exocyclic sulfur atom, with the remainder of the ligand extending into the S1-S3 side of the active site. The binding of inhibitor containing a protonated or fluorinated aromatic ring was investigated using 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The fluorinated ring was found to have a reduced ring-flip rate compared to the protonated version. A strong, coplanar interaction between the fluorinated ring of the inhibitor and the aromatic ring of Tyr155 is proposed to account for the reduced ring-flip rate and for the increase in binding affinity observed for the fluorinated inhibitor compared to the protonated inhibitor. Binding interactions observed for the thiadiazole class of ligands have implications for the design of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. PMID:9827994

  20. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  1. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  2. Refined solution structure of the oligomerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Clore, G M; Ernst, J; Clubb, R; Omichinski, J G; Kennedy, W M; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M

    1995-04-01

    The NMR solution structure of the oligomerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53 (residues 319-360) has been refined. The structure comprises a dimer of dimers, oriented in an approximately orthogonal manner. The present structure determination is based on 4,472 experimental NMR restraints which represents a three and half fold increase over our previous work in the number of NOE restraints at the tetramerization interface. A comparison with the recently solved 1.7 A resolution X-ray structure shows that the structures are very similar and that the average angular root-mean-square difference in the interhelical angles is about 1 degree. The results of recent extensive mutagenesis data and the possible effects of mutations which have been identified in human cancers are discussed in the light of the present structure. PMID:7796267

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of conventional'' pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  4. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-07-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using {sup 13}C NMR of 99.9% {sup 13}C-enriched U{sup VI}O{sub 2} ({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and Am{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 295} = 56 kJ/M, {Delta}H{sup {double_dagger}} = 38 kJ/M, and {Delta}S{sup {double_dagger}} = {minus}60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress.

  5. Scalable synthesis of quaterrylene: solution-phase 1H NMR spectroscopy of its oxidative dication.

    PubMed

    Thamatam, Rajesh; Skraba, Sarah L; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-10-14

    Quaterrylene is prepared in a single reaction and high yield by Scholl-type coupling of perylene, utilizing trifluoromethanesulfonic acid as catalyst and DDQ or molecular oxygen as oxidant. Dissolution in 1 M triflic acid/dichloroethane with sonication yields the aromatic quaterrylene oxidative dication, which is characterized by its (1)H NMR spectrum. PMID:23999880

  6. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924. PMID:25240460

  7. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  8. Water structure in concentrated lithium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, R. H.; Neilson, G. W.; Soper, A. K.

    1992-06-01

    The radial pair distribution functions gHH(r) and gOH(r) (to a good approximation) of 1 and 10 m solutions of lithium chloride in water have been obtained from neutron diffraction. It turns out that the intermolecular water structure in a solution of 10 m is affected considerably by the presence of ions—the number of hydrogen bonds is about 70% lower than in pure water. The intermolecular water structure in 1 m lithium chloride as well as the intramolecular water structure in both 1 and 10 m lithium chloride is not distinguishable from that of pure water in any measurable extent.

  9. Formations of hydroxyapatite and inositol hexakisphosphate in poultry litter during the composting period: sequential fractionation, P K-edge XANES and solution (31)P NMR investigations.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Takamoto, Akira; Kikkawa, Ren; Murakami, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Noriko

    2014-05-20

    Little is known about how the solubility and chemical speciation of phosphorus (P) in poultry litters are altered during the composting period. This study investigated the quantitative and qualitative changes in organic P (Po) and inorganic P (Pi) compositions in poultry litters during the seven-day composting period using sequential extraction in combination with P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The result of sequential extraction illustrated that the significant decrease of H2O-P by 55% in poultry litters occurred concomitantly with the increase of HCl-Pi and HCl-Po during the composting period (p < 0.05). X-ray diffraction results for poultry litter samples showed three distinct peaks indicative of hydroxyapatite. Phosphorus K-edge XANES confirmed the increase of hydroxyapatite during the composting period, corresponding to the increase of HCl-Pi determined by the sequential extraction. The NaOH-EDTA extraction for solution (31)P NMR revealed that myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP) constituted about 80% of phosphate monoesters and was increased from 16 to 28% in the poultry litter during the composting period. The combined applications of chemical extraction and molecular-spectroscopic techniques determined that water-soluble P in poultry litter was transformed into less soluble phases, primarily hydroxyapatite and IHP, during the composting period. PMID:24735189

  10. Fully automated high-quality NMR structure determination of small 2H-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Schneider, William M.; Shen, Yang; Raman, Srivatsan; Inouye, Masayori; Baker, David; Roth, Monica J.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of high-quality small protein structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods generally requires acquisition and analysis of an extensive set of structural constraints. The process generally demands extensive backbone and sidechain resonance assignments, and weeks or even months of data collection and interpretation. Here we demonstrate rapid and high-quality protein NMR structure generation using CS-Rosetta with a perdeuterated protein sample made at a significantly reduced cost using new bacterial culture condensation methods. Our strategy provides the basis for a high-throughput approach for routine, rapid, high-quality structure determination of small proteins. As an example, we demonstrate the determination of a high-quality 3D structure of a small 8 kDa protein, E. coli cold shock protein A (CspA), using <4 days of data collection and fully automated data analysis methods together with CS-Rosetta. The resulting CspA structure is highly converged and in excellent agreement with the published crystal structure, with a backbone RMSD value of 0.5 Å, an all atom RMSD value of 1.2 Å to the crystal structure for well-defined regions, and RMSD value of 1.1 Å to crystal structure for core, non-solvent exposed sidechain atoms. Cross validation of the structure with 15N- and 13C-edited NOESY data obtained with a perdeuterated 15N, 13C-enriched 13CH3 methyl protonated CspA sample confirms that essentially all of these independently-interpreted NOE-based constraints are already satisfied in each of the 10 CS-Rosetta structures. By these criteria, the CS-Rosetta structure generated by fully automated analysis of data for a perdeuterated sample provides an accurate structure of CspA. This represents a general approach for rapid, automated structure determination of small proteins by NMR. PMID:20734145

  11. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  12. Examination of the structures of several glycerolipids from marine macroalgae by NMR and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Logvinov, Stepan; Gerasimenko, Natalia; Esipov, Andrey; Denisenko, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of glycerolipids were isolated from the total lipids of the algae Saccharina cichorioides, Eualaria fistulosa, Fucus evanescens, Sargassum pallidum, Silvetia babingtonii (Ochrophyta, Phaeophyceae), Tichocarpus crinitus, and Neorhodomela larix (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae). The structures of these lipids were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, including 1D ((1) H and (13) C) and 2D (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) experiments. All of the investigated algae included common galactolipids and sulfonoglycolipids as the major glycolipids. Minor glycolipids isolated from S. cichorioides, T. crinitus, and N. laris were identified as lyso-galactolipids with a polar group consisted of the galactose. Comparison of the (1) H NMR data of minor nonpolar lipids isolated from the extracts of the brown algae S. pallidum and F. evanescens with the (1) H NMR data of other lipids allowed them to be identified as diacylglycerols. The structures of betaine lipids isolated from brown algae were confirmed by NMR for the first time. The fatty acid compositions of the isolated lipids were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26987002

  13. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  14. Preparation of Protein Samples for NMR Structure, Function, and Small Molecule Screening Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Anderson, Stephen; Aramini, James; Buchwald, William A.; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Conover, Ken; Everett, John; Hamilton, Keith; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Janjua, Haleema; Kornhaber, Gregory; Lau, Jessica; Lee, Dong Yup; Liu, Gaohua; Maglaqui, Melissa; Ma, Lichung; Mao, Lei; Patel, Dayaban; Rossi, Paolo; Sahdev, Seema; Shastry, Ritu; Swapna, G.V.T.; Tang, Yeufeng; Tong, Saichiu; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Zhao, Li; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we concentrate on the production of high quality protein samples for NMR studies. In particular, we provide an in-depth description of recent advances in the production of NMR samples and their synergistic use with recent advancements in NMR hardware. We describe the protein production platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, and outline our high-throughput strategies for producing high quality protein samples for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Our strategy is based on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems and isotope enrichment in minimal media. We describe 96-well ligation-independent cloning and analytical expression systems, parallel preparative scale fermentation, and high-throughput purification protocols. The 6X-His affinity tag allows for a similar two-step purification procedure implemented in a parallel high-throughput fashion that routinely results in purity levels sufficient for NMR studies (> 97% homogeneity). Using this platform, the protein open reading frames of over 17,500 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as over 28,000 constructs. Nearly 5,000 of these proteins have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html), resulting in more than 950 new protein structures, including more than 400 NMR structures, deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pipeline has been effective in producing protein samples of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although this paper describes our entire pipeline for producing isotope-enriched protein samples, it focuses on the major updates introduced during the last 5 years (Phase 2 of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative). Our advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening

  15. Application of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy in structural investigations of Vinca indole alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Yagudaev, M.R.

    1986-07-01

    This paper considers the laws connecting the parameters of the H 1 and C 13 NMR spectra with the structure of the substances and the use of these laws for solving structural and stereochemical problems of the Vinca indole alkaloids and other compounds of closely related structure. For each type of alkaloid, characteristic features of the PMR and C 13 NMR spectra are given that permit the structures of similar bases to be established and their stereochemical identification to be performed.

  16. Optimized co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement for the rapid NMR analysis of a highly fibrillogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Risør, Michael W; Lee, Young-Ho; Megens, Rik P; de Jong, Djurre H; Otten, Renee; Scheek, Ruud M; Enghild, Jan J; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Ikegami, Takahisa; Mulder, Frans A A

    2015-06-01

    Co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is an attractive way to speed up data acquisition in NMR spectroscopy by shortening the T 1 relaxation time of the nucleus of interest and thus the necessary recycle delay. Here, we present the rationale to utilize high-spin iron(III) as the optimal transition metal for this purpose and characterize the properties of its neutral chelate form Fe(DO3A) as a suitable PRE agent. Fe(DO3A) effectively reduces the T 1 values across the entire sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein with negligible impact on line width. The agent is better suited than currently used alternatives, shows no specific interaction with the polypeptide chain and, due to its high relaxivity, is effective at low concentrations and in 'proton-less' NMR experiments. By using Fe(DO3A) we were able to complete the backbone resonance assignment of a highly fibrillogenic peptide from α1-antitrypsin by acquiring the necessary suite of multidimensional NMR datasets in 3 h. PMID:25820763

  17. Solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Weontae

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We have determined solution structures of CEH-37 homedomain. •CEH-37 HD has a compact α-helical structure with HTH DNA binding motif. •Solution structure of CEH-37 HD shares its molecular topology with that of the homeodomain proteins. •Residues in the N-terminal region and HTH motif are important in binding to Caenorhabditis elegans telomeric DNA. •CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding. -- Abstract: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans protein CEH-37 belongs to the paired OTD/OTX family of homeobox-containing homeodomain proteins. CEH-37 shares sequence similarity with homeodomain proteins, although it specifically binds to double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA, which is unusual to homeodomain proteins. Here, we report the solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain and molecular interaction with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR structure shows that CEH-37 homeodomain is composed of a flexible N-terminal region and three α-helices with a helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motif. Data from size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that CEH-37 homeodomain interacts strongly with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA. NMR titration experiments identified residues responsible for specific binding to nematode double-stranded telomeric DNA. These results suggest that C. elegans homeodomain protein, CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding.

  18. Multiple Quantum NMR Investigations of Structure- Property Relationships in Synthetic and Aged Silicone Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Gjersing, E; Chinn, S; Herberg, J; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-09-27

    Complex engineering elastomeric materials are often characterized by a complex network structure obtained by crosslinking network chains with multiple chain lengths. Further, these networks are commonly filled with thixotropic reinforcing agents such as SiO{sub 2} or carbon black. Degradation of such materials often occurs via mechanisms that alter the fundamental network structure. In order to understand the effects of modifications of network structure and filler-polymer interaction on component performance, a series of model compounds have been studied by {sup 1}H multiple quantum NMR analysis and traditional mechanical property assessments. The {sup 1}H NMR data provides insight into the distribution of segmental dynamics that reveals insight into the changes in mechanical properties.

  19. The structural identification of a methyl analog of methaqualone via 2-dimensional NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Angelos, S A; Lankin, D C; Meyers, J A; Raney, J K

    1993-03-01

    A submission to the Drug Enforcement Administration North Central Laboratory of a substance believed to be a structural analog of methaqualone hydrochloride precipitated an interest in being able to obtain a rapid and positive identification of such compounds. Both mass spectrometry and proton NMR spectroscopy (1-dimensional) provided evidence to suggest that the structural analog possessed a second methyl group in the molecule, relative to methaqualone, and that the methyl group was attached to the existing methyl-substituted phenyl ring. By application of proton 2-dimensional (2-D) NMR techniques, specifically the homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 2-D NOE (NOESY), the precise location of the methyl group in this unknown methaqualone analog was established and shown to have the structure 2. PMID:8455002

  20. A hydrogen-1, chlorine-35, and yttrium-89 NMR complex formation study of aqueous Y(ClO 4) 3 and Y(NO 3) 3 solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratiello, Anthony; Kubo-Anderson, Vicki; Bolinger, Todd; Cordero, Cristina; Demerit, Barbara; Flores, Thomas; Matejka, Dennis; Perrigan, Richard

    A Y (III) coordination study of Y (ClO 4) 3 and Y (NO 3) 3 solutions in aqueous solvent mixtures has been carried out by hydrogen-1, chlorine-35, and yttrium-89 NMR spectroscopy. An accurate measurement of the Y(III) hydration number by a direct hydrogen-1 NMR method was not possible in Y (ClO 4) 3 solutions, even at -115°C, but these experiments were successful for Y(NO 3) 3 solutions. The hydrogen-1 spectra for the Y(NO 3) 3 solutions revealed two coordinated water signals, appearing at different temperatures, and corresponding to total Y(III) hydration numbers of 2.5 to 3.5. The yttrium-89 NMR spectra showed one signal for Y(ClO 4) 3 solutions for all conditions of concentration and temperature, whereas the Y (NO 3) 3 solution spectra at low temperature consisted of two signals, which varied in intensity with solvent composition. The hydrogen-1 and yttrium-89 NMR results were interpreted in terms of combinations of (H 2O) 4Y (NO 3) 2+ and (H 2O) 2Y ( NO3) {1}/{2}+ in the Y(NO 3) 3 solutions, but similar experiments, along with chlorine-35 NMR data, ruled out inner-shell complex formation in the Y(ClO 4) 3 systems.

  1. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available. PMID:26431312

  2. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  3. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  4. The three-dimensional solution structure of RANTES.

    PubMed

    Chung, C W; Cooke, R M; Proudfoot, A E; Wells, T N

    1995-07-25

    The solution structure of the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) has been determined using NMR spectroscopy. Backbone and side-chain 1H and 15N assignments have been obtained using a combination of two-dimensional homonuclear and three-dimensional heteronuclear spectra. Regular elements of secondary structure have been identified on the basis of a qualitative interpretation of NOE data, J(NH-H alpha) coupling constants, and amide exchange rates. Three-dimensional structures were calculated from a total of 2146 experimental restraints using a combination of distance geometry and simulated annealing protocols. For the 13 best structures the average backbone (N, C alpha, C) atomic rmsd from the mean coordinates for residues 5-65 is 0.64 A (+/- 0.14 A) for the dimer and 0.50 A (+/- 0.08 A) for the individual monomers. Each monomer consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 26-30, 38-43, 48-51) in a Greek key motif with a C-terminal helix (56-65) packed across the sheet, an arrangement similar to the monomeric structure of other members of this chemokine family (IL-8, PF4, MGSA/Gro alpha, and MIP-1 beta). Overall, the RANTES dimer resembles that previously reported for MIP-1 beta. PMID:7542919

  5. Correlations between 11B NMR parameters and structural characters in borate and borosilicate minerals investigated by high-resolution MAS NMR and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Zhaohua; Yao, Yefeng; Pan, Yuanming

    2012-05-01

    Borates consisting of diverse fundamental building blocks (FBB) formed from complex polymerization of planar triangular [Bϕ3] groups and tetrahedral [Bϕ4] groups, where ϕ = O and OH, provide an excellent opportunity for investigation of correlations between the NMR parameters and local structures. However, previous studies suggested that the 11B NMR parameters in borates are insensitive to local structural environments other than the B coordination number, in contrast to those documented for 29Si, 23Na and 27Al in silicates, and no correlation between 11B chemical shifts and the sum of bond valences has been established for borate minerals with hydroxyl groups or molecular water in the structures. In this study, high-resolution NMR spectra have been acquired at the ultra high field of 21 T as well as at 14 T for selected borate and borosilicate minerals, and have been used to extract high-precision NMR parameters by using combined ab initio theoretical calculations and spectral simulations. These new NMR parameters reveal subtle correlations with various structural characters, especially the effects of the 11B chemical shifts from the bridging oxygen atom(s), site symmetry, symmetry of FBB, the sum of bond valences, as well as the next-nearest-neighbor cations and hydrogen bonding. Also, these results provide new insights into the shielding mechanism for 11B in borate and borosilicate minerals. In particular, this study demonstrates that the small variation in 11B chemical shifts can still be used to probe the local structural environments and that the established correlations can be used to investigate the structural details in borates and amorphous materials.

  6. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  7. Investigation of Solute-Fiber Affinity and Orientational Ordering of Norbornadiene Interacting with Two-Polypeptide Chiral Liquid Crystalline Solvents by Natural Abundance Deuterium (NAD) NMR.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Lesot, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    A prochiral bridged compound of C2v symmetry, the norbornadiene (NBD), oriented in a chiral liquid crystal composed of various mixtures of poly-γ-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG) and poly-ε-carboxy-l-lysine (PCBLL), two chiral homopolypeptides, is investigated using natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) spectroscopy. In such chiral oriented solvents, enantiotopic directions are spectrally nonequivalent, and two distinct (2)H quadrupolar doublets associated with enantioisotopomeric pairs of NBD are detected. As the two homopolypeptides have the same absolute configuration but distinct chemical functions in their side chains, the variation of residual quadrupolar couplings (RQC's) allows the determination of the relative solute-fiber affinities toward the two polypeptides in these lyotropic bipolymeric systems. Besides the experimental measurement of RQC's and the determination of their signs at each inequivalent (2)H site, the elements of the second-rank order tensor, Sαβ, are calculated by assuming a modeled structure. The variations of RQC's and diagonalized order parameters, Sα'α', are followed versus the relative proportion of two polypeptides in the chiral oriented mixture. The influence of the solute mass fraction in the two-homopolypeptide oriented samples is also examined as well as the case of homogeneous and uniform achiral mesophases "PBG-PCBL" made of two pairs of mirror-image homopolypeptides (PBLG/PBDG and PCBLL/PCBDL). In the latter, the solute ordering is modulated by the proportion of each type of homopolypeptide (chemical nature and absolute configuration), leading to eliminate the enantiodiscrimination mechanisms on the average. In the frame of a model, new insights on the solute-homopolypeptide fiber interactions are discussed. PMID:27383731

  8. Toward the molecular basis of inherited prion diseases: NMR structure of the human prion protein with V210I mutation.

    PubMed

    Biljan, Ivana; Ilc, Gregor; Giachin, Gabriele; Raspadori, Andrea; Zhukov, Igor; Plavec, Janez; Legname, Giuseppe

    2011-09-30

    The development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a misfolded, pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Spontaneous generation of PrP(Sc) in inherited forms of disease is caused by mutations in gene coding for PrP (PRNP). In this work, we describe the NMR solution-state structure of the truncated recombinant human PrP (HuPrP) carrying the pathological V210I mutation linked to genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The three-dimensional structure of V210I mutant consists of an unstructured N-terminal part (residues 90-124) and a well-defined C-terminal domain (residues 125-228). The C-terminal domain contains three α-helices (residues 144-156, 170-194 and 200-228) and a short antiparallel β-sheet (residues 129-130 and 162-163). Comparison with the structure of the wild-type HuPrP revealed that although two structures share similar global architecture, mutation introduces some local structural differences. The observed variations are mostly clustered in the α(2)-α(3) inter-helical interface and in the β(2)-α(2) loop region. Introduction of bulkier Ile at position 210 induces reorientations of several residues that are part of hydrophobic core, thus influencing α(2)-α(3) inter-helical interactions. Another important structural feature involves the alteration of conformation of the β(2)-α(2) loop region and the subsequent exposure of hydrophobic cluster to solvent, which facilitates intermolecular interactions involved in spontaneous generation of PrP(Sc). The NMR structure of V210I mutant offers new clues about the earliest events of the pathogenic conversion process that could be used for the development of antiprion drugs. PMID:21839748

  9. Structure Elucidation of Poly-Faldaprevir: Polymer Backbone Solved Using Solid-State and Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Nina C; Busacca, Carl A; Zhang, Li; Saha, Anjan; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Guisheng; Davis, Mark; Offerdahl, Thomas; Jones, Paul-James; Herfurth, Lars; Reddig, Tim; Wagner, Klaus; Niemann, Michael; Werthmann, Ulrike; Grupe, Julia; Roos, Helmut; Reckzügel, Gaby; Ding, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    A large-scale synthesis of the hepatitis C virus drug Faldaprevir revealed precipitation of an unknown insoluble solid from methanol solutions of the drug substance. The unknown impurity was determined to be a polymer of Faldaprevir based on analytical methods that included size exclusion chromatography in combination with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight, ultracentrifugation, elemental analysis, and sodium quantitation by atom absorption spectroscopy. Structure elucidation of the polymeric backbone was achieved using solid-state NMR cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS), cross polarization-polarization inversion, and heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) experiments. The polymerization was found to occur at the vinyl cyclopropane via a likely free radical initiation mechanism. Full proton and carbon chemical shift assignments of the polymer were obtained using solution NMR spectroscopy. The polymer structure was corroborated with chemical synthesis of the polymer and solution NMR analysis. PMID:27238486

  10. Solution deuterium NMR quadrupolar relaxation study of heme mobility in myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.; La Mar, G.N.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.; Langry, K.C. )

    1989-01-18

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the quadrupolar relaxation and motional dynamics of {sup 2}H selectively incorporated into skeletal and side chain positions of the heme in sperm whale myoglobin. The hyperfine shifts of the heme resonances in paramagnetic states of myoglobin allow resolution of the signals of interest, and paramagnetic contributions to the observed line widths are shown to be insignificant. The {sup 2}H line widths for the skeletal positions of deuterohemin-reconstituted myoglobin yield a correlation time identical with that of overall protein tumbling (9 ns at 30{degree}C) and hence reflect an immobile heme group. The {sup 2}H NMR line widths of heme methyl groups exhibit motional narrowing indicative of very rapid internal rotation. Hence the methyl rotation is effectively decoupled from the overall protein tumbling, and the residual quadrupolar line width can be used directly to determine the protein tumbling rate. The {sup 2}H NMR lines from heme vinyl groups were found narrower than those from the heme skeleton. However, the range of quadrupolar coupling constants for sp{sup 2} hybridized C-{sup 2}H bonds does not permit an unequivocal interpretation in terms of mobility. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  11. The inclusion complex of rosmarinic acid into beta-cyclodextrin: A thermodynamic and structural analysis by NMR and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aksamija, Amra; Polidori, Ange; Plasson, Raphaël; Dangles, Olivier; Tomao, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of the rosmarinic acid (RA)-β-cyclodextrin (CD) complex in aqueous solution by (1)H NMR (1D- and 2D-ROESY), completed with studies by capillary electrophoresis (CE). From the (1)H NMR data, the stoichiometry of the complex was determined by a Job's plot and the binding constant was estimated from a linear regression (Scott's method). At pH 2.9, the results showed that RA binds CD with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a binding constant Kb of 445 (±53) M(-1) or 465 (±81) M(-1) depending on the CD protons (H-5 or H-3) selected for the evaluation. The Kb value was also calculated from the CD-induced chemical shifts of each RA proton in order to collect information on the structure of the complex. The pH dependence of Kb revealed that the RA carboxylic form displays the highest affinity for CD. An investigation by capillary electrophoresis fully confirmed these results. 2D ROESY analysis provided detailed structural information on the complex and showed a strong correlation between H-3 and H-5 of CD and most RA protons. In conclusion, RA, an efficient phenolic antioxidant from rosemary with a marketing authorization, spontaneously forms a relatively stable inclusion complex with CD in water. PMID:27132848

  12. Enantiotopic discrimination in the deuterium NMR spectrum of solutes with S4 symmetry in chiral liquid crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroulanda, Christie; Zimmermann, Herbert; Luz, Zeev; Lesot, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Enantiotopic discrimination in the NMR spectra of prochiral rigid solutes in chiral liquid crystals (CLC), by the ordering mechanism, is limited to molecules possessing one of the four, so called, "allowed" symmetries, D2d, C2v, Cs, and S4. So far, such spectral discrimination was demonstrated only for solutes possessing one of the first three symmetries. In this work, we present deuterium NMR measurements on a rigid S4 compound dissolved in a chiral nematic solvent and demonstrate, for the first time, enantiotopic discrimination in such symmetry. The measurements were performed on the isotopically normal icosane derivative (1) and on its isotopomer (1-d8), specifically deuterated in its four core methylene groups. As a CLC solvent, a lyotropic mesophase, consisting of a solution of poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) in pyridine, was employed. For comparison with a corresponding achiral liquid crystal (ALC) solvent, a solution of a racemic mixture of poly-γ-benzylglutamate (PBG) of similar composition in the same co-solvent was used. The spectra were recorded at 92.1 MHz using the 2D Q-COSY Fz sequence with proton decoupling. In the CLC solvents they exhibited clear discrimination due to different enantiotopic sites, with components displaced symmetrically, at frequencies below and above those in the corresponding ALC, as expected for discrimination by ordering. Two procedures were employed for correlating the enantiotopic sites in the CLC spectra. For 1-d8 the dipolar cross-peaks in a 2D 2H-2H COSY-90 experiment provided identification of signals belonging to the same methylene (and hence the same enantiotopic) groups. For 1 the correlation was achieved using a least-square-deviation fitting of the experimental quadrupole splittings with respect to those expected from the molecular geometry. These results, with appropriate symmetry considerations were used to determine the symmetric (Szz) and antisymmetric (Sxy and Sxx-Syy) components of the Saupe ordering matrix

  13. Structural Evidence for Inter-Residue Hydrogen Bonding Observed for Cellobiose in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, William B.; Baker, David C.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the disaccharide cellulose subunit cellobiose (4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose) in solution has been determined via neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS), computer modeling and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies. This study shows direct evidence for an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the reducing ring HO3 hydroxyl group and the non-reducing ring oxygen (O5′) that has been previously predicted by computation and NMR analysis. Moreover, this work shows that hydrogen bonding to the non-reducing ring O5′ oxygen is shared between water and the HO3 hydroxyl group with an average of 50% occupancy by each hydrogen-bond donor. The glycosidic torsion angles φH and ψH from the neutron diffraction-based model show a fairly tight distribution of angles around approximately 22° and −40°, respectively, in solution, consistent with the NMR measurements. Similarly, the hydroxymethyl torsional angles for both reducing and non-reducing rings are broadly consistent with the NMR measurements in this study, as well as with those from previous measurements for cellobiose in solution. PMID:23056199

  14. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p < 0.01). Freezing did not significantly change the NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  15. Structural Convergence between CryoEM and NMR Reveals Novel Intersubunit Interactions Critical for HIV-1 Capsid Function

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, In-Ja L.; Meng, Xin; Jung, Jinwon; Zhao, Gongpu; Yang, Ruifeng; Ahn, Jinwoo; Shi, Jiong; Concel, Jason; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mature HIV-1 particles contain conical-shaped capsids that enclose the viral RNA genome and perform essential functions in the virus life cycle. Previous structural analysis of two and three-dimensional arrays provided a molecular model of the capsid protein (CA) hexamer and revealed three interfaces. Here, we present a cryoEM study of a tubular assembly of CA and a high-resolution NMR structure of the CA C-terminal domain (CTD) dimer. In the solution dimer structure, the monomers exhibit different relative orientations compared to previous X-ray structures. The solution structure fits extremely well into the EM density map, suggesting that the dimer interface is retained in the assembled CA. We also identified a novel CTD-CTD interface at the local three-fold axis in the cryoEM map and confirmed its functional importance by mutagenesis. In the tubular assembly, CA intermolecular interfaces vary slightly, accommodating the asymmetry present in tubes. This provides the necessary plasticity to allow for controlled virus capsid dis/assembly. PMID:19914170

  16. A solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jennifer; Huang, Yulin; Natella, Michael; Cai, Yang; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-01-04

    A detailed study of the chemical structure of mesoporous silica catalysts containing rhodium ligands and nanoparticles (RhP-MSN) was carried out by multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques. The degree of functionalization of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex to the surface of the RhP-MSN channels was determined by {sup 29}Si NMR experiments. The structural assignments of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex were unambiguously determined by employing the novel, indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation ({sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H idHETCOR) techniques, which indicated that oxidation of the attached phosphinosilyl groups and detachment of Rh was enhanced upon syngas conversion.

  17. Structural characterization of selenosubtilisin by sup 77 Se-NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    House, K.L.; Dunlap, R.B.; Odom, J.D.; Wu, Z.P.; Hilvert. D. Research Inst. of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA )

    1991-03-15

    Selenosubtilisin is an artificial enzyme containing an active site selenocysteine residue. In this environment the selenium atom is a valuable probe of structure-function relationships and also confers novel redox and hydrolytic properties to the original protease template. The authors have used {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy to characterize different oxidation states of {sup 77}Se isotopically enriched selenosubtilisin. The oxidized form of the enzyme exhibits a {sup 77}Se resonance at 1,189 ppm. This is in good agreement with the {sup 77}Se chemical shifts for model seleninic acids, confirming that the prosthetic group is in the seleninic acid oxidation state. On treatment of the oxidized enzyme with three equivalents of 3-carboxy-4-nitrobenzenethiol at pH 5.0, they observe the enzyme bound selenenyl sulfide at 388.5 ppm. This work demonstrates the utility of {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy for examining structure-function relationships of selenium containing proteins.

  18. Solution Structures of Rat Amylin Peptide: Simulation, Theory, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Allam S.; Wang, Lu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Ling, Yun; Chopra, Manan; Zanni, Martin T.; Skinner, James L.; De Pablo, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Amyloid deposits of amylin in the pancreas are an important characteristic feature found in patients with Type-2 diabetes. The aggregate has been considered important in the disease pathology and has been studied extensively. However, the secondary structures of the individual peptide have not been clearly identified. In this work, we present detailed solution structures of rat amylin using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. A new Monte Carlo method is presented to determine the free energy of distinct biomolecular conformations. Both folded and random-coil conformations of rat amylin are observed in water and their relative stability is examined in detail. The former contains an α-helical segment comprised of residues 7–17. We find that at room temperature the folded structure is more stable, whereas at higher temperatures the random-coil structure predominates. From the configurations and weights we calculate the α-carbon NMR chemical shifts, with results that are in reasonable agreement with experiments of others. We also calculate the infrared spectrum in the amide I stretch regime, and the results are in fair agreement with the experimental line shape presented herein. PMID:20141758

  19. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  20. REdiii: a pipeline for automated structure solution

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput crystallographic approaches require integrated software solutions to minimize the need for manual effort. REdiii is a system that allows fully automated crystallographic structure solution by integrating existing crystallographic software into an adaptive and partly autonomous workflow engine. The program can be initiated after collecting the first frame of diffraction data and is able to perform processing, molecular-replacement phasing, chain tracing, ligand fitting and refinement without further user intervention. Preset values for each software component allow efficient progress with high-quality data and known parameters. The adaptive workflow engine can determine whether some parameters require modifications and choose alternative software strategies in case the preconfigured solution is inadequate. This integrated pipeline is targeted at providing a comprehensive and efficient approach to screening for ligand-bound co-crystal structures while minimizing repetitiveness and allowing a high-throughput scientific discovery process. PMID:25945571

  1. REdiii: a pipeline for automated structure solution.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A

    2015-05-01

    High-throughput crystallographic approaches require integrated software solutions to minimize the need for manual effort. REdiii is a system that allows fully automated crystallographic structure solution by integrating existing crystallographic software into an adaptive and partly autonomous workflow engine. The program can be initiated after collecting the first frame of diffraction data and is able to perform processing, molecular-replacement phasing, chain tracing, ligand fitting and refinement without further user intervention. Preset values for each software component allow efficient progress with high-quality data and known parameters. The adaptive workflow engine can determine whether some parameters require modifications and choose alternative software strategies in case the preconfigured solution is inadequate. This integrated pipeline is targeted at providing a comprehensive and efficient approach to screening for ligand-bound co-crystal structures while minimizing repetitiveness and allowing a high-throughput scientific discovery process. PMID:25945571

  2. Local structural plasticity of the prion protein. Analysis of NMR relaxation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Viles, J H; Donne, D; Kroon, G; Prusiner, S B; Cohen, F E; Dyson, H J; Wright, P E

    2001-03-01

    A template-assisted conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) from a predominantly helical structure to an amyloid-type structure with a higher proportion of beta-sheet is thought to be the causative factor in prion diseases. Since flexibility of the polypeptide is likely to contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational change that leads to the infective state, we have undertaken a comprehensive examination of the dynamics of two recombinant Syrian hamster PrP fragments, PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231), using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. The molecular motions of these PrP fragments have been studied in solution using (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) measurements as well as [(1)H]-(15)N nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE). These data have been analyzed using both reduced spectral density mapping and the Lipari-Szabo model free formalism. The relaxation properties of the common regions of PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231) are very similar; both have a relatively inflexible globular domain (residues 128-227) with a highly flexible and largely unstructured N-terminal domain. Residues 29-89 of PrP(29-231), which include the copper-binding octarepeat sequences, are also highly flexible. Analysis of the spectral densities at each residue indicates that even within the structured core of PrP(C), a markedly diverse range of motions is observed, consistent with the inherent plasticity of the protein. The central portions of helices B and C form a relatively rigid core, which is stabilized by the presence of an interhelix disulfide bond. Of the remainder of the globular domain, the parts that are not in direct contact with the rigid region, including helix A, are more flexible. Most significantly, slow conformational fluctuations on a millisecond to microsecond time scale are observed for the small beta-sheet. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious, scrapie form of the protein Pr

  3. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  4. High-Resolution NMR Determination of the Dynamic Structure of Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Villinger, Saskia; Schmidt, Christian D; Griesinger, Christian; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-08-22

    (15) N spin-relaxation rates are demonstrated to provide critical information about the long-range structure and internal motions of membrane proteins. Combined with an improved calculation method, the relaxation-rate-derived structure of the 283-residue human voltage-dependent anion channel revealed an anisotropically shaped barrel with a rigidly attached N-terminal helix. Our study thus establishes an NMR spectroscopic approach to determine the structure and dynamics of mammalian membrane proteins at high accuracy and resolution. PMID:27461260

  5. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  6. Water in barnacle muscle. III. NMR studies of fresh fibers and membrane-damaged fibers equilibrated with selected solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, E E; Clark, M E; Hinke, J A; Chapman, N R

    1981-01-01

    Water in barnacle muscle has been studied using NMR techniques. Fresh fibers are compared with membrane-damaged fibers treated with solutes that greatly alter fixed charge and total water content. Both water (97%) and solute (3%) protons are visible in continuous wave spectra of oriented fresh fibers. No local field inhomogeneities were detected, nor are cell solutes significantly bound. In pulse experiments, all cell water is visible and exhibits a single exponential decay. In fresh fibers, T2 approximately or equal to 40 ms; faster decaying signals are assigned to immobile and mobile protons on macromolecules. T1 and T1p are frequency dependent. Using equations derived for a two-compartment model with fast exchange, we calculate the following: tau b, the correlation time for anisotropic rotational motion of bound water; Sb, its order parameter; tau ex, the correlation time for exchange between bound and free fractions; f, the fraction of water bound; and Hr, the grams of water bound per gram of macromolecule. Whereas f varies inversely with total water content, the other parameters are virtually constant, with values: tau b approximately or equal to 1.3 X 10(-8) S; tau ex approximately or equal to 8 X 10(-6) s; Sb approximately or equal to 0.06; and Hr approximately or equal to 0.1g H2O/g macromolecule. Thus, the NMR relaxation detectable properties of water bound to macromolecules are unaffected by solutes that greatly alter the macromolecular surface charge. PMID:7272435

  7. Multi-conformer molecules in solutions: an NMR-based DFT/MP2 conformational study of two glucopyranosides of a vitamin E model compound.

    PubMed

    Nazarski, Ryszard B; Wałejko, Piotr; Witkowski, Stanisław

    2016-03-21

    Overall conformations of both anomeric per-O-acetylated glucosyl derivatives of 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol were studied in the context of their high flexibility, on the basis of NMR spectra in CDCl3 solution and related DFT calculation results. A few computational protocols were used, including diverse density functional/basis set combinations with a special emphasis on accounting (at various steps of the study) for the impact of intramolecular London-dispersion (LD) effects on geometries and relative Gibbs free energies (ΔGs) of different conformers coexisting in solution. The solvent effect was simulated by an IEF-PCM approach with the UFF radii; its other variants, including the use of the recently introduced IDSCRF radii, were employed for a few compact B3LYP-GD3BJ optimized structures showing one small imaginary vibrational frequency. The advantage of using IDSCRF radii for such purposes was shown. Of the four tested DFT methods, only the application of the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) approximation afforded ensembles of 7-8 single forms for which population-average values of computed NMR parameters (δH, δC and some (n)JHH data) were in close agreement with those measured experimentally; binuclear (δH,C 1 : 1) correlations, rH,C(2) = 0.9998. The associated individual ΔG values, corrected for LD interactions by applying Grimme's DFT-D3 terms, afforded relative contents of different contributors to the analyzed conformational families in much better agreement with pertinent DFT/NMR-derived populations (i.e., both data sets were found to be practically equal within the limits of estimated errors) than those calculated from dispersion uncorrected ΔGs. All these main findings were confirmed by additional results obtained at the MP2 level of theory. Various other aspects of the study such as the crystal vs. solution structure, gg/gt rotamer ratio, diagnostic (de)shielding effects, dihydrogen C-HH-C contacts, and doubtful applicability of some specialized DFT

  8. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in <0.5 % of the dry weight of the sample. This usually involves a minimum of several chromatographic purification steps. The second issue is the stability of the compound isolated. It must always be assumed when dealing with the isolation of natural products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived

  9. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a huge carbon pool, specifically in boreal ecosystems. Warming-induced release of large amounts of CO2 from the soil carbon pool might become a significant exacerbating feedback to global warming, if decomposition rates of boreal soils were more sensitive to increased temperatures. Despite a large number of studies dedicated to the topic, it has proven difficult to elucidate how the organo-chemical composition of SOM influences its decomposition, or its quality as a substrate for microbial metabolism. A great part of this challenge results from our inability to achieve a detailed characterization of the complex composition of SOM on the level of molecular structural moieties. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and the chemical shift regions distinguished in the 13C NMR spectra often represent many different molecular fragments. For example, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. We applied two-dimensional (2D) NMR to characterize SOM with highly increased resolution. We directly dissolved finely ground litters and forest floors'fibric and humic horizons'of both coniferous and deciduous boreal forests in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a 2D 1H-13C NMR experiment. In the 2D planes of these spectra, signals of CH groups can be resolved based on their 13C and 1H chemical shifts, hence the resolving power and information content of these NMR spectra is hugely increased. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra, so that hundreds of distinct CH groups could be observed and many molecular fragments could be identified. For instance, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could

  10. An NMR and molecular dynamics investigation of the avian prion hexarepeat conformational features in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Raiola, Luca; Muccioli, Luca; Tiberio, Giustiniano; Zannoni, Claudio; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Mendola, Diego La; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    The prion protein is a copper binding glycoprotein that in mammals can misfold into a pathogenic isoform leading to prion diseases, as opposed, surprisingly, to avians. The avian prion N-terminal tandem repeat is richer in prolines than the mammal one, and understanding their effect on conformation is of great biological importance. Here we succeeded in investigating the conformations of a single avian hexarepeat by means of NMR and molecular dynamics techniques. We found a high flexibility and a strong conformational dependence on pH: local turns are present at acidic and neutral pH, while unordered regions dominate at basic conditions.

  11. Probing NMR parameters, structure and dynamics of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Density functional study of prototypical radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Bühl, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The 15N chemical shifts of metronidazole (1), secnidazole (2), nimorazole (3) and tinidazole (4), radiosensitizers based on the 5-nitroimidazole motif, are reported. A detailed computational study of 1 is presented, calling special attention to the performance of various theoretical methods in reproducing the 13C and 15N data observed in solution. The most sophisticated approach involves density functional-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) of 1 in aqueous solution (BP86 level) and averaging chemical shifts over snapshots from the trajectory. In the NMR calculations for these snapshots (performed at the B3LYP level), a small number of discrete water molecules are retained, and the remaining bulk solution effects are included via a polarizable continuum model (PCM). A similarly good accord with experiment is obtained from much less involved, static geometry optimization and NMR computation of pristine 1 employing a PCM approach. Solvent effects on delta(15N), which are of the order of up to 20 ppm, are not due to changes in geometric parameters upon solvation, but arise from the direct response of the electronic wavefunction to the presence of the solvent, which can be represented by discrete molecules and/or the dielectric bulk. PMID:15558660

  12. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  13. Conformational study of two linear hexapeptides by two-dimensional NMR and computer-simulated modeling: implication for peptide cyclization in solution.

    PubMed

    Chiou, A J; Ong, G T; Wang, K T; Chiou, S H; Wu, S H

    1996-02-15

    Two linear peptides, D-leucyl-L-prolyl-L-isoleucyl-L-valyl-L-alanyl-beta-alanine (I) and D-leucyl-L-prolyl-L-isoleucyl-L-valyl-N-methyl-L-alanyl-beta-alanine (II), whose sequences were designed from protodestruxin and desmethyldestruxin B by replacing D-leucic acid with D-leucine, two cyclic hexadepsipeptides with insecticidal and immunodepressant activities, have been found to be cyclized in unusually high yields (>85%). In order to gain insight into the conformation and the relative flexibility of different constituent residues in these linear peptides, we have applied various techniques of 2D-NMR spectroscopy coupled with dynamic simulated annealing by computer modeling to establish the solution conformations of these two linear peptides. Based on the derived structures, it is found that the distances between N- and C-terminal residues of both peptides are short enough to facilitate the cyclization, thus collaborating the observation of favorable cyclization yields for both linear peptides. PMID:8605029

  14. Solution structure of RNase P RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Alexei V.; Rambo, Robert P.; Karimpour, Sina; SantaLucia, John; Tainer, John A.; Pace, Norman R.

    2011-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme ribonuclease P (RNase P) processes tRNAs by cleavage of precursor-tRNAs. RNase P is a ribozyme: The RNA component catalyzes tRNA maturation in vitro without proteins. Remarkable features of RNase P include multiple turnovers in vivo and ability to process diverse substrates. Structures of the bacterial RNase P, including full-length RNAs and a ternary complex with substrate, have been determined by X-ray crystallography. However, crystal structures of free RNA are significantly different from the ternary complex, and the solution structure of the RNA is unknown. Here, we report solution structures of three phylogenetically distinct bacterial RNase P RNAs from Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Bacillus stearothermophilus, determined using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) analysis. A combination of homology modeling, normal mode analysis, and molecular dynamics was used to refine the structural models against the empirical data of these RNAs in solution under the high ionic strength required for catalytic activity. PMID:21531920

  15. Synthesis of a new quaternary phosphonium salt: NMR study of the conformational structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aganova, Oksana V; Galiullina, Leysan F; Aganov, Albert V; Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Pugachev, Mikhail V; Strel'nik, Alexey D; Koshkin, Sergey A; Shtyrlin, Yurii G; Klochkov, Vladimir V

    2016-04-01

    A novel phosphonium salt based on pyridoxine was synthesized. Conformational analysis of the compound in solution was performed using dynamic NMR experiments and calculations. The obtained results revealed some differences in the conformational transitions and the energy parameters of the conformational exchange of the studied compound in comparison to previously reported data for other phosphorus-containing pyridoxine derivatives. It was shown that increasing the substituent at the C-11 carbon leads to greater differences in the populations of stable states and the corresponding equilibrium energies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26661926

  16. Investigation of soil legacy phosphorus transformation in long-term agricultural fields using sequential fractionation, P K-edge XANES and solution P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Hu, Yongfeng; Yang, Jianjun; Abdi, Dalel; Cade-Menun, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding legacy phosphorus (P) build-up and draw-down from long-term fertilization is essential for effective P management. Using replicated plots from Saskatchewan, Canada, with P fertilization from 1967 to 1995 followed by either P fertilization or P cessation (1995-2010), soil P was characterized in surface and subsurface layers using sequential fractionation, P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (P NMR) spectroscopy. Legacy P from a 28-year build-up was sufficient for 15 years of wheat cultivation, resulting in no significant differences in crop yield in 2010. In surface soils, soil test (Olsen) P decreased significantly in unfertilized plots compared with 1995, which was reflected in declining aluminum (hydr)oxide-associated inorganic P by fractionation and XANES. Furthermore, XANES analysis revealed a decrease of calcium-associated P in 2010-unfertilized soils at both depths and an increase of Fe (hydr)oxides-associated P in the 2010-fertilized and -unfertilized surface soils relative to the 1995 soils. Increased total organic P and orthophosphate diesters by P NMR and accumulated inositol hexaphosphate by XANES were observed in surface soils with P fertilization cessation. In subsurface soils, few legacy P transformations were detected. These results provide important information about legacy P to improve agricultural sustainability while mitigating water quality deterioration. PMID:25426546

  17. (1)H NMR spectroscopic elucidation in solution of the kinetics and thermodynamics of spin crossover for an exceptionally robust Fe(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Holm; Djomgoue, Paul; Hörner, Gerald; Speck, J Matthäus; Rüffer, Tobias; Schaarschmidt, Dieter

    2016-09-21

    A series of Fe(2+) spin crossover (SCO) complexes [Fe(5/6)](2+) employing hexadentate ligands (5/6) with cis/trans-1,2-diamino cyclohexanes (4) as central building blocks were synthesised. The ligands were obtained by reductive amination of 4 with 2,2'-bipyridyl-6-carbaldehyde or 1,10-phenanthroline-2-carbaldehyde 3. The chelating effect and the rigid structure of the ligands 5/6 lead to exceptionally robust Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) complexes conserving their structure even in coordinating solvents like dmso at high temperatures. Their solution behavior was investigated using variable temperature (VT) (1)H NMR spectroscopy and VT Vis spectroscopy. SCO behavior was found for all Fe(2+) complexes in this series centred around and far above room temperature. For the first time we have demonstrated that the thermodynamics as well as kinetics for SCO can be deduced by using VT (1)H NMR spectroscopy. An alternative scheme using a linear correction term C(1) to model chemical shifts for Fe(2+) SCO complexes is presented. The rate constant for the SCO of [Fe(rac-trans-5)](2+) obtained by VT (1)H NMR was validated by Laser Flash Photolysis (LFP), with excellent agreement (1/(kHL + kLH) = 33.7/35.8 ns for NMR/LFP). The solvent dependence of the transition temperature T1/2 and the solvatochromism of complex [Fe(rac-trans-5)](2+) were ascribed to hydrogen bond formation of the secondary amine to the solvent. Enantiomerically pure complexes can be prepared starting with R,R- or S,S-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (R,R-trans-4 or S,S-trans-4). The high robustness of the complexes reduces a possible ligand scrambling and allows preparation of quasiracemic crystals of [Zn(R,R-5)][Fe(S,S-5)](ClO4)4·(CH3CN) composed of a 1 : 1 mixture of the Zn and Fe complexes with inverse chirality. PMID:27506162

  18. Quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures in solution by pulsed field-gradient spin echo NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lokeren, Luk; Ben Sassi, Hanen; Van Assche, Guy; Ribot, François

    2013-06-01

    Pulsed Field-Gradient Spin Echo (PGSE) NMR, which associates to a spectral dimension the measure of diffusion coefficients, is a convenient technique for mixture analysis. Unfortunately, because of relaxation, the quantification of mixtures by PGSE NMR is far from straightforward for mixtures with strong spectral overlap. Antalek (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 (2006) 8402-8403) proposed a quantification strategy based on DECRA analysis and extrapolation to zero of the diffusion delay. More recently, Barrère et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 216 (2012) 201-208) presented a new strategy based also on DECRA and on the renormalization of the intensities using estimates of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. Here we report an alternative quantification approach in which the fractions are obtained by analyzing the PGSE attenuation profile with a general Stejskal-Tanner equation that explicitly includes the relaxation effects. The required values of T1 and T2 relaxation times are either independently measured with conventional sequences or determined, along with the fractions and the diffusion coefficients, from the simultaneous analysis of up to 6 PGSE data sets recorded with different diffusion delays. This method yields errors lower than 3% for the fractions, even for complete spectral overlap, as demonstrated on model binary and ternary mixtures of polystyrene in the case of a convection compensating double stimulated echo (DSTE) sequence.

  19. Combined (Super 31)P and (Super 1)H NMR Experiments in the Structural Elucidation of Polynuclear Thiolate Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    A facile synthesis of two gold(I) complexes with 1,2-benzenedithiolate ligand and two different bidentate phosphines are described. A detailed sequence of NMR experiments is suggested to determine the structure of the compounds.

  20. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  1. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  2. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  3. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ~20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  4. Local electronic structure in MgB2 from B12 β -NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indris, Sylvio; Heitjans, Paul; Hattendorf, Jens; Zeitz, Wolf-Dietrich; Bredow, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We performed β -NMR spectroscopic studies on B12 which was implanted into MgB2 to get insight into the local electronic structure of this high-temperature superconducting material. By measuring electric field gradients we probed the electronic charge distribution anisotropy around boron in this solid and thus obtained experimental information about the bonding by p electrons. Besides the absolute value, the sign of the electric field gradient was also experimentally determined. By comparison with quantum chemical calculations, some of which were performed in the present work, and with results from conventional NMR spectroscopy on B11 we were able to identify regular boron lattice sites as well as interstitial sites.

  5. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  6. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags.

  7. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  8. Lanthanide-binding helix-turn-helix peptides: Solution structure of a designed metallonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joel T.; Kearney, William R.; Franklin, Sonya J.

    2003-01-01

    A designed lanthanide-binding chimeric peptide based on the strikingly similar geometries of the EF-hand and helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs was investigated by NMR and CD spectroscopy and found to retain the same overall solution structure of the parental motifs. CD spectroscopy showed that the 33-mer peptide P3W folds on binding lanthanides, with an increase in α-helicity from 20% in the absence of metal to 38% and 35% in the presence of excess Eu(III) and La(III) ions, respectively. The conditional binding affinities of P3W for La(III) (5.9 ± 0.3 μM) and for Eu(III) (6.2 ± 0.3 μM) (pH 7.8, 5 mM Tris) were determined by tryptophan fluorescence titration. The La(III) complex of peptide P3, which differs from P3W by only one Trp-to-His substitution, has much less signal dispersion in the proton NMR spectra than LaP3W, indicating that the Trp residue is a critical hydrophobic anchor for maintaining a well-folded helix-turn-helix structure. A chemical-shift index analysis indicates the metallopeptide has a helix-loop-helix secondary structure. A structure calculated by using nuclear Overhauser effect and other NMR constraints reveals that P3W not only has a tightly folded metal-binding loop but also retains the α−α corner supersecondary structure of the parental motifs. Although the solution structure is undefined at both the N and C termini, the NMR structure confirms the successful incorporation of a metal-binding loop into a HTH sequence. PMID:12644701

  9. 23Na NMR and FT-IR studies of sodium complexes with the ionophore lasalocid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, G.; Gierczyk, B.; Brzezinski, B.; Różalski, B.; Bartl, F.; Zundel, G.; Sośnicki, J.; Grech, E.

    2000-01-01

    Lasalocid forms 1:1 or 2:2 complexes with sodium ions. The process of complexation was studied in different solvents at various temperatures by 23Na NMR. The formation constants and Δ G values were determined. The nature of the complex between lasalocid and Na + ions was also studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a 2:2 complex of lasalocid and Na + ions is formed. A continuous absorption is observed in the far FT-IR spectrum of this complex. It indicates the large Na + polarizability due to fast fluctuations of the Na + ions in multiminima potentials, in the dimeric structure.

  10. NMR Investigations of Structure and Dynamics in Polymers for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Steven

    Materials innovation is needed to realize major progress in energy storage capacity for lithium batteries and capacitors. Polymers hold considerable promise as ion conducting media in batteries and electrochemical capacitors and as dielectrics in thin film capacitors. Structural studies of materials utilized in lithium battery technology are hampered by the lack of long-range order found in well-defined crystalline phases. Powder x-ray diffraction yields structural parameters that have been averaged over hundreds of lattice sites, and is unable to provide structural information about amorphous phases. Our laboratory uses solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to investigate structural and chemical aspects of lithium ion cathodes, anodes, electrolytes, interfaces and interphases. NMR is element- (nuclear-) specific and sensitive to small variations in the immediate environment of the ions being probed, for example Li+, and in most cases is a reliably quantitative spectroscopy in that the integrated intensity of a particular spectral component is directly proportional to the number of nuclei in the corresponding material phase. NMR is also a powerful tool for probing ionic and molecular motion in lithium battery electrolytes with a dynamic range spanning some ten orders of magnitude through spin-lattice relaxation and self-diffusion measurements. Broadband relaxometry based on Fast Field Cycling NMR (FFCNMR) methods can span three to four of these orders of magnitude in a single set of measurements. Results of several recent NMR investigations performed on our lab will be presented. We explore the ion transport mechanism in polyether-based and lithium polymer electrolytes and those based on other base polymers, in particular, the extent to which ionic motion is coupled to polymer segmental motion. Polycarbonates are being considered as a possible replacement for polypropylene in high power thin film capacitors due to their favorable dielectric

  11. In-Cell NMR Characterization of the Secondary Structure Populations of a Disordered Conformation of α-Synuclein within E. coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Camilloni, Carlo; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W. P.; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. We report here the use of in-cell NMR spectroscopy to observe directly the structure and dynamics of this protein within E. coli cells. To improve the accuracy in the measurement of backbone chemical shifts within crowded in-cell NMR spectra, we have developed a deconvolution method to reduce inhomogeneous line broadening within cellular samples. The resulting chemical shift values were then used to evaluate the distribution of secondary structure populations which, in the absence of stable tertiary contacts, are a most effective way to describe the conformational fluctuations of disordered proteins. The results indicate that, at least within the bacterial cytosol, α-synuclein populates a highly dynamic state that, despite the highly crowded environment, has the same characteristics as the disordered monomeric form observed in aqueous solution. PMID:23991082

  12. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  13. Structural modeling of Vpu from HIV-1 based on solid-state NMR observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeonJoo; Lim, GyuTae; Nam, Seungyoon; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is one of the accessory proteins of HIV-1, and is involved in viral particle release. Viral particle release is enhanced by two proposed functions of Vpu: (i) tetherin interaction and (ii) membrane polarization. Two Vpu functions in viral particle release are still controversial. Here, we investigated the proposed functions by extensive structural modeling of Vpu based on solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) observables. We found that Vpu can co-exist in two structural forms: left-handed and right-handed conformation. The co-existence of the two conformations provides a clue to reconcile the controversial issue of its two functions in virus particle release.

  14. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open. PMID:7656014

  15. Solution- and bound-state conformational study of N,N',N"-triacetyl chitotriose and other analogous potential inhibitors of hevamine: application of trNOESY and STD NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Germer, Antje; Mügge, Clemens; Peter, Martin G; Rottmann, Antje; Kleinpeter, Erich

    2003-05-01

    The solution-state conformations of N,N',N"-triacetyl chitotriose (1) and other potential chitinase inhibitors 2-4 were studied using a combination of NMR spectroscopy (NOESY) and molecular mechanics calculations. Determination solely of the global energy minimum conformation was found to be insufficient for an agreement with the NMR results. An appropriate consistency between the NMR experimental data and theoretical calculations was only reached by assessing the structures as population-weighted average conformers based on Boltzmann distributions derived from the calculated relative energies. Analogies, but also particular differences, between the synthetic compounds 2-4 and the natural